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5 SUCCESSFUL WAYS TO ACHIEVE SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION

Paradise found How Crystal Springs Resort remains Jersey’s favorite place to hang

Chris Mulvihill, CMO, Crystal Springs Resort

Exclusive Inside: How blockchain technology can impact your business When déjà vu strikes with your commercial GC See our annual Lighting & GC lists

May/June 2019 • www.ccr-mag.com

Official magazine of

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Committed to offering premium services while helping our clients meet their supplier diversity initiatives.

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RESTAURANTS UHC Construction Services is proud to announce National Certification by the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC).

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May/June • 2019 Vol. 18, No.3

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FEATURES 26 Paradise found  How Crystal Springs Resort remains Jersey’s favorite place to hang

166  Great Chemistry  R&D lab unites sustainable products and lean construction

78  Light of day  Intelligence in emergency lighting improves building safety

170  Eliminating the middleman  How blockchain technology can impact your business

88  Storytelling in adaptive reuse  Inside KETV-7’s Burlington Station

174  The Green Wave  5 successful ways to achieve sustainable construction

148  Don’t I know you?  When déjà vu strikes with your commercial general contractor

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May/June • 2019 Vol. 18, No.3 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  CCRP – Atlanta, GA 22  CCRP – Minneapolis, MN

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS 36  General Contracint 64  Lighting

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 188 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 190 Ad Index 192 Publisher’s Note

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158 SPECIAL SECTION

Commercial Kitchens 129 Fast. Affordable. Healthy. The Just Salad way continues to be a leader in fresh food options 140 Waterfront Evolution How the House of Que is making New Jersey love Texas-style barbeque Healthcare 152 Gaining a foothold  Flooring renovation reinforces Chicago area VA Hospital’s outreach to its patients

129

Multi-Housing 158 Cold as ice  Minnesota Townhome complex deals blow to winter conditions Federal Construction 162 Wtih honor  Army Corps shares love of preservation for Ulysses Grant’s family Craft Brand and Marketing 180 Keeping bees  Inside the story of the Catskill Provisions brand

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Click on this

D

espite its modest foray into physical stores, online furniture retailer Wayfair still generates nearly all of its $7 billion or so in annual revenue from internet purchases. The Boston-based brand had researched the brick and mortar approach in the past, including a series of pop-up stores in the New England and New Jersey areas during last year’s holiday season. After opening an outlet store in Kentucky recently, it announced plans to open four more pop-up shops later this summer.

So why a retail store in the Natick Mall in Boston? Executives say that the 3,700-squarefoot, “front of the house” store will include service and home-design experts that offer consultations to customers. Shoppers also will be able to buy an assortment of home decor products and place orders for home deliveries. Wayfair is not alone in the pursuit of brick and mortar locations. Online retailers like Allbirds, Amazon, Bonobos, Casper,

In a time when technology is forcing us to think creatively every day, it was just a matter of time before the online brands got physical, so to speak.

Glossier and Warby Parker have all jumped into the fray. For brands that started out in the e-commerce game, brick-and-mortar retail is just to promising to pass up. It is not about putting other retailers out of business, forcing acquisitions or rising visibility as much as it is about having the ability to turn online data into insight, thereby creating a seamless and convenient shopping experience across all channels. And that is a pretty valuable asset to have in your corner these days. Being able to collect and analyze data enables a brand to refine its strategy, including testing new markets with pop-up stores or seeing just what its customers really want in any given area. Perhaps no brand is ready to take advantage of this strategy better than Amazon. With four Amazon Go stores in the United States today, rumor has it that the brand plans to open thousands of new locations over the next few years. The Amazon strategy, which is revolutionizing the retail scene with strategies like its “Just Walk Out” approach, also is making a hard play for the grocery market. Retailers like Walmart and Costco are now having to deal with Amazon’s tech approach to buying groceries. Have mercy. Is any of this fair? With new stores popping up and more concrete strategies being rolled out all of the time, it is great for business. In a time when technology is forcing us to think creatively every day, it was just a matter of time before the online brands got physical, so to speak. Just how good it is for your business is worth watching.. CCR

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 561-203-2981

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PUBLISHER/EDITOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702

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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Design & Construction Belk Inc. STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design MIKE KLEIN, AIA, NCARB

Sr. Manager, Architecture QA/QC Life Time Fitness

HEALTHCARE CLINTON “BROOKS” HERMAN, PMP Senior Facilities Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

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HOSPITALITY

RESTAURANTS RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation GREGG LOLLIS Sr. Director, Design Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp. DAVID SHOTWELL Construction Manager, Flynn Restaurant Group ISYOL E. CABRERA Director Design and Construction Carvel DEMETRIA PETERSON Construction Manager II Checkers & Rally’s Drive in Restaurants DAVID THOMPSON Director of Construction WHICH WICH® SUPERIOR SANDWICHES

HOSPITALITY

SAMUEL D. BUCKINGHAM, RS CMCA AMS President & Co-Founder Evergreen Financial Partners LLC

JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality

TOMMY LINSTROTH

LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality

JOHN LAPINS VP of Design & Construction Auro Hotels

JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

Principal Trident Sustainability Group

International Director JLL

ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

NUNZIO DESANTIS

PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development

GARY RALL Vice President of Design and Development, Holiday Inn Club Vacations

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS

STEVE JONES

JIM SHEUCHENKO

JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President Nelson HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP

President Property Management Advisors LLC

STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG

ADA

CONSULTANT GINA NODA President Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019

President CESO, Inc.

BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Hospitality Taco Bell Taco Bell has unveiled a limited-time hotel in Palm Springs named “The Bell: A Taco Bell Hotel and Resort,” which the brand describes as a “Tacoasis in the desert” that will provide a brand-themed experience for visitors.

Nobu Hotel The Nobu Hotel London Portman Square will open in 2020, replacing the Radisson Blu in London. The Nobu hotel brand arrived in the city two years ago with the Nobu Hotel London Shoreditch.

Sister Hotels Sister projects Moxy Louisville Downtown and Hotel Distil in Kentucky are on track to open in the fall. The Moxy property will have 110 guest rooms, while Hotel Distil will have 205 keys.

Country Inn & Suites Radisson Hotel Group promises “accelerated growth” for the chain’s Country Inn & Suites brand, with special attention paid to California and Texas. The upper-midscale, select-service brand could triple or quadruple its presence in the United States alone.

AC Hotel NYC Marriott’s modular-designed AC Hotel going up in New York City will be the tallest prefabricated hotel in the world.

Dream Hotel Group Dream Hotel Group plans to add 20 properties to its portfolio in the next three years. The company has 19 hotels under four brands.

TWA Hotel The TWA Hotel at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport will launch an infinity pool with runway views. The pool will be open year-round and heated up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit in winter.

Marriott’s Autograph Collection Marriott plans to add a dozen Autograph Collection properties in Europe this year. Schloss Lieser in the Moselle region of Germany, the Shelbourne in Dublin and the Academia of Athens are among the new properties coming in 2019.

Rosewood Hotels Rosewood Hotels has 21 properties in its development pipeline. 21c Museum Hotels/MGallery Paris-based Accor has added 21c Museum Hotels to the MGallery Hotel Collection, simultaneously bringing the MGallery brand into North America. The 21c Museum Hotels/MGallery brand will combine art with boutique hotels and chef-driven restaurants in 26 countries.

Hotel Hendricks Luxury Hotel Hendricks will open on Fifth Avenue and West 38th Street in New York City. The event space will feature dramatic views of the Empire State Building just four blocks to the south. InterContinental InterContinental is planning to create a second design lab in Atlanta.

Restaurants Restaurant Brands International Restaurant Brands International (RBI), the parent of Burger King, Tim Hortons and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, plans to grow to more than 40,000 global locations in the next decade. Sprouts Farmers Market Sprouts Farmers Market is entering new markets this year, with plans to open more than half of its future stores in new territory. The grocer has also introduced prototype stores centered around customer experience improvements in the meat, deli, seafood and bakery departments. Meijer Meijer is expanding its presence in Ohio with three new supercenters. The new additions mark the chain’s first move into Northeast Ohio. Domino’s Pizza Domino’s Pizza aims to add 10,000 new restaurants around the world, bringing its global total to 25,000 units. 7-Eleven 7-Eleven’s new Dallas-area convenience store is the first of six test stores the company plans to open around the United States. Wegmans Wegmans is entering New York City for the first time with a 74,000-squarefoot store in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The supermarket is expected to open in the fall and will be one of three new locations to open this year.

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Whole Foods Whole Foods Market is testing a bodega-style store format in New York City’s Chelsea neighborhood. The small-format store, called Whole Foods Market Daily Shop, emphasizes grab-and-go shopping, with a focus on local favorites such as bagels, breads and a coffee bar. Bloomin’ Brands Bloomin’ Brands will open the first U.S. location of its Aussie Grill by Outback fast-casual sandwich concept in Tampa, Florida. The concept debuted earlier this year outside the United States as part of the Outback Steakhouse parent’s international growth plan. Godiva Chocolate brand Godiva opened the first of 2,000 planned cafes in New York City. Unlike the brand’s 800 existing stores, the cafes will feature a full menu of sandwiches, coffees and treats, including a croissant-waffle hybrid called the croiffle. Lidl Lidl has opened Lidl Express, a small-format store at its Arlington, Virginia. The store, about 1,000 square feet, offers many grab-andgo and fresh items. Taylor Gourmet’s The new owner of Taylor Gourmet plans to reopen at least five of the restaurants that closed abruptly when the Washington, D.C.-area chain filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy last fall.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Restaurants (continued) Cava Group Cava Group has plans to grow both its 80-unit fast-casual Cava Grill concept and Zoe’s Kitchen. Cava Grill also aims to expand distribution of its packaged dips and spreads to Whole Foods Market stores around the United States this year.

Cub Foods Cub Foods is opening its first urban concept store in Minneapolis. The 46,000-square-foot location, the company’s smallest to date, will put a premium on speed with grab-and-go options like a popcorn shop, burrito bar, juice bar and sushi bar.

The Little Beet The Little Beet’s recent opening of a restaurant in Miami marks the chain’s first foray outside its core markets of New York City and Washington, D.C. The chain is studying new markets and tailoring the concept to those consumers as it plans to open 15 more locations by the end of next year.

Capriotti’s Sandwich Shop Capriotti’s Sandwich Shop is in growth mode with plans to grow to 500 franchises by 2025. The chain has been revamping stores as it grows, trimming the footprint and moving refrigerators and ovens to the front to highlight its signature slow-roasted turkey.

Starbucks Starbucks has grown to 30,000 stores worldwide with the opening of its newest Reserve store in Shenzhen, China. The Seattle-based coffee giant opened its first China location 20 years ago and now has 3,700 units in the country.

Rise Biscuits Fast-casual chain Rise Biscuits Donuts has changed its name to Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken. The change signals a shift away from sweet doughnuts to a more savory menu as the 15-unit chain ramps up franchise growth plans.

Retail Bath & Body Works Bath & Body Works will renovate 175 stores, open 46 new ones and shutter 24 locations this year.

IKEA IKEA opened its first U.S. IKEA Planning Studio in New York City, a smaller-format urban concept where shoppers will be able to browse products and place orders for home delivery. The Manhattan location will give shoppers the option of making consultation appointments with designers.

Nordstrom Nordstrom will open two outpost locations in New York City this fall, in addition to its planned seven-story full-line department store. The merchandise-free small-format stores in the West Village and Upper East Side will be pickup and return spots for online purchases, and will offer styling and tailoring services. Crate & Barrel Crate & Barrel will open a CB2 store near a namesake location in the Knox Street shopping district of Dallas. The home goods retailer launched the CB2 format in 1999 as a less-expensive alternative for young city dwellers. Wayfair Online retailer Wayfair plans to open its first full-service store in Natick, Massachusetts this fall. It also plans four pop-up shops this summer. Hy-Vee/HealthMarket Hy-Vee will open its second HealthMarket specialty store in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. The HealthMarket concept includes an abundance of fresh items plus pharmacy, health clinic and fitness studio services. Sneakersnstuff Sneakersnstuff has launched a 3,500-square-foot store in Venice, California, its second location in the United States. Red Wing Red Wing has opened its first Manhattan store, with plans to grow by 1,000 new locations through 2024. The brand, known for its work boots, operates 700 international stores.

Nine West Nine West has emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization after nearly a year with a new name and a plan to firm up partnerships for future growth. The newly named Premier Brands Group Holdings includes brands such as Anne Klein and Gloria Vanderbilt. J. Crew J. Crew Group is expanding its casual sibling brand, Madewell, with four new stores that have already opened this year, including a location at Hudson Yards in New York City. Madewell is scheduled to open six more locations by next February. Barneys Barneys New York will open its only New Jersey location at the 3-million-square-foot American Dream mall under construction at the Meadowlands. The two-story New Jersey flagship will include a Freds at Barneys New York restaurant. Dollar General Dollar General will open 975 new locations and remodel 1,000 existing stores this year, with self-checkouts and improvements to sections, including health and beauty. The 15,300-store retailer also will expand its fresh food and home goods offerings.

Five Below Eclectic low-priced retailer Five Below will open up to 150 new locations and end the year with about 900 U.S. stores.

Walmart Walmart will invest $11 billion in its stores this year, with plans to remodel 500 locations for expanding digital commerce and improving the supply chain. Remodels will include a long list of changes, including adding self-checkout kiosks, re-merchandising grocery and electronics sections and adding consultation rooms in the pharmacy departments.

Toys R Us Tru Kids Brands, the new owner of Toys R Us, will open a few 10,000-square-foot stores in the United States in time for the holidays this year. The retailer expects 70 more international locations to open in 2019.

Sears Sears will debut its first three small-format Sears Home & Life stores in Alaska, Kansas and Louisiana. The retailer will offer appliances, mattresses, tools and home services.

MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

They said it...

Return of the cafeteria

“We believe the main thing we need to do is invest in people— and better people.”

Who doesn't love an old-fashioned diner? If today's consumer continues to have a say, it looks like the cafeteria-style restaurant is making a bit of comeback. According to a report by Datassential, 21 percent of consumers love them, 34 percent like them and 33 percent are indifferent or neutral. And when it comes to walking through the front door, the survey found that 72 percent want cafeteria concepts to have a salad bar, 67 percent want healthy foods, 56 percent want more global flavors and 43 percent want to see plant-focused foods.

— H.E. Butt Grocery President Craig Boyan on why technology should be used to create jobs and improve the lives of both customers and employees

“It is equally important for us that our guests have amazing dining experiences as it is for us to engage with local artists, crafters and brewers, too.” — Joe Jackson, VP of F&B at Marcus Hotels & Resorts, on how the brand is prioritizing the food and beverage experience as part of its overall stay at each of its properties

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


The numbers game

25,312 30 13,573 The number of fast-casual concepts operating in the United States as of last fall, according to NPD Group. According to the National Restaurant Association, quickservice chains still command about three-quarters of total restaurant traffic, and sales at quickservice and fast casuals combined are on track to grow 3.2 percent to $246.7 billion.

The percentage increase of grocery stores in 2018, making it one of the strongest sectors in retail, according to a report by JLL. The data shows that there were twice as many store openings as closings last year, the study found.

The number of projects in various stages of development and construction in the global hotel construction pipeline, according to Lodging Econometrics. The United States accounted for more than twofifths of the global pipeline with 5,530 projects, the study found.

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MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

In Memoriam Arthur “Art/Artie” Jay Benson

Room(s) to grow U.S. hotel construction pipeline numbers up in April

P

owered by the upper upscale segment, hotel rooms in the development phase increased 9.9 percent year-over-year in April (203,890 rooms) in the United States, according to STR. The report showed that a majority of the construction activity continues to be focused in the upper midscale and upscale segments, while upper upscale projects represented the largest percentage increase in activity year-over-year. The areas include: upper midscale, 67,495 rooms (+4.5 percent); upscale, 61,347 rooms (+4.9 percent), and upper upscale, 24,543 rooms (+12.2 percent). Here’s a look at the five markets that reported more than 6,000 rooms under construction:

Born on Sept. 3, 1939 in the Bronx, New York, there was not much that Arthur Jay Benson did not accomplish. “Art” or “Artie,” as his friends knew him, passed away recently in his home in Burnsville, North Carolina at age 79. A Captain in the United States Air Force, Art was stationed all over the world, including stints in Cape Cod, Sweetwater, Texas, Thule, Greenland and Keflavik, Iceland. He was a graduate of Martin Van Buren High School and Adelphi University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree. In 1966, he partnered with his father, and went on to become president and CEO of SureAir Ltd. in Stamford, Connecticut, where he pioneered the industry of National Heating and Air Conditioning Service Management which became the model of today’s national facility management. He retired in 2001 to spend his days with his wife, Sandra. Art lived all over the country, including taking up residence in Queens and Pound Ridge, New York, Port Aransas, Texas, Bonita Springs, Florida, and later in Burnsville. A huge baseball fan (Yankees and Mets) and golfer, Art was a beautiful singer and musician, amazing photographer, crossword puzzle enthusiast, voracious reader and history buff, and writer. In 2011, he published a book chronicling his late wife Sandy’s two year battle with cancer. He is survived by his children, Matthew, Alan (Meredith), Mark (Hallie) and Leah (Matthew), grandchildren Justin, Sophia, Jack, Luke, Ben, Grace and Nicholas, and cousins Audrey (Ken) Michaels and Daryle (Dick) Prager. The Commercial Construction & Renovation family would like to extend his sympathy to Art and his family. He will truly be missed by all of us.

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New York: 13,976 rooms

Las Vegas: 8,435 rooms

Orlando: 7,310 rooms

Dallas: 6,438 rooms

Los Angeles/ Long Beach: 6,113 rooms

11.3%

5.1%

5.7%

7.1%

5.8%

The Green Wave New Buildings Institute releases 2019 count zero energy buildings report 580. It’s an important number to remember. According to the “2019 Getting to Zero Project List” by the New Building Institute (NBI), that’s how many buildings use only as much energy as is produced through clean, renewable resources over the course of a year. If you are keeping score, that is a 10-fold increase since NBI started tracking buildings in 2012. Emerging buildings are those that have a stated goal of achieving zero energy, but do not yet have 12-months of energy use and production data to share or have not yet hit the zero energy performance target. Just how important will be getting to zero be? Data by Grand View Research project $78.8 billion of growth in the global net-zero-energy building market by 2025.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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Bullseye

See you in Minneapolis, CCRP hits the axe range in Atlanta for networking gig

See you in Minneapolis, MN May 9th, 2019

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s that an axe? We know what you’re thinking, but don’t knock the exercise until you give it a try. That was the line of thinking for attendees of the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) networking event at Bury the Hatchet in Atlanta, a bar made for people who like to, you guessed it, throw axes. The backdrop once again was the perfect spot for a night of networking and industry conversation. If you’re looking for different options to expand your list of contacts, reach out to Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

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Thank You to Our CCRP Atlanta, GA Sponsors:

INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Ron Hunter: Vice President Sales 503 South 301 Tampa, FL 33169 (727) 809-1251 rhunter@jonssign.com www.jonessign.com

See you in Minneapolis, MN May 9th, 2019

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


3.

1.

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4.

5.

1. J ulie Starzynski, Floor & Décor; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors; Patricia Parajon, Equipment Management Group 2. Ashleigh Peppers, JLL; John Stallman, Lakeview Construction

4. Brody Corson, Aviation Institute of Maintenance; David Corson, CCR 5. Chris Caldwell, Consultant; Dan Eberhardt, The Beam Team

3. Steve Winston, The Beam Team; Laurie Pysher, QEM

MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

19


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

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1. K evin Fleming, The Beam Team; Lori O’Brien, ICON 2. A ri Covacevich, Coastal Mississippi; Marlo Yarbrough, Boyd Gaming 3. L isa Schwartz, ProCoat Products; Tim West, Coast 2 Coast; Jeff Mahler, L2M 4. John Palmer, Dunham Sports; Chris Heba, Feed Restaurant; Joe Talley, Continental Restaurant 5. Jim Rieckel, Entouch; John Catanese & Laura Riendneau with Chain Store Maintenance; Jace Barrera, The Beam Team 6. ATL Axe Throwing Champions: Chris Caldwell, Consultant; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors

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3.

8.

11. 7. Kevin Kilgore, Jim ‘N Nick’s BBQ; Marilyn Brennan, Interstate Signcrafters; George Farrelley, Mens Wearhouse 8. Brody Corson, Aviation Institute of Maintenance; Larry Schwartz, HTC Flooring 9. Scott Kerman, Jet Towel/Mitsubishi; Frank Rhodes, Elro Signs; Ian Bannister, Window Film Depot 10. Ron Hunter, Jones Sign; , Jimmy Johnson & David Physer with QEM 11. Nick Trimmer, Equipment Management Group; Matt Smith, Federal Heath

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


CIRCLE NO. 12


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

BBQ, football and barbarians W CCRP’s Minneapolis networking event goes all medieval

ho else can combine BBQ, football and a touch of barbarians? Did you say Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP)? The networking event, sponsored by RCA, took a little Nordic turn with a tour of U.S Bank Stadium, home of the Minnesota Vikings, and then some of the Twin Cities’ best BBQ at Erik The Red Nordic BBQ & Barbarian Bar. If you’re going to network, why not go for something different. To add this type of events to your to-do list, reach out to Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

See you in Philadelphia, PA June 13th, 2019

See you in Philadelphia, PA June 13th, 2019

REGISTERED COMPANIES: Bishop Fixtures

ACME Enterprises Inc

Bosco Development

Aluma Spec

CBRE

ANP Lighting

Chain Store Maintenance

ArcVision Thank You to Our Command Center Commercial Contractors Inc Ardex Americas CCRP Minneapolis, MN Davis & Associates Assa Abloy Sponsors:

Diehl & Partners LLC Elder-Jones Inc EMG Corp ESI - Engineered Structures ICON IDQ JLL Jones Sign

L&S Lighting Corp L2M Architects Lakeview Construction Inc. Life Time National Contractors Inc. nParellel Permit.com Retail Construction Services

Thank You to Our CCRP Minneapolis, MN Sponsors:

Thank You to Our CCRP Minneapolis, MN Sponsors: Abra Auto Body & Glass

Thank You to Our CCRP Minneapolis, MN Thank you to our sponsors: Sponsors:

Serigraphics Sterling Systems Target Corp The Beam Team UHC Corp UNFI Store Design Services Verizon Wireless Wallace Engineers

Retail Contractors Association Serigraphics Carol Montoya, CAE, Executive Director Adam Halverson: President carol@retailcontractors.org 2401 Nevada Avenue North See you in Philadelphia, PA June 13th, 2019 2800 Eisenhower Ave, Suite 210 Minneapolis, MN 55427 Alexandria, VA 22314 (763) 270-3311 (703) 683-5637 • Fax: (703) 683-0018 adamh@serigraphicssigns.com www.retailcontractors.org www.serigraphics.com See you in Philadelphia, PA June 13th, 2019

22

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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7. 1. M  ark Palmquist, CBRE; Leslie Burton, UHC Corp 2. Z ach Hanson and Maurissa McNellis with National Contractors Inc 3. J eff Mahler, L2M; Michael Papec, Engineered Structures Inc 4. A nthony Johnson, Davis & Associates; Jerry Fisher, ANP Lighting

5. David Corson, CCR; Jan MacKenzie, ASSA ABLOY; MK Nelson, Bishop Fixtures 6. Dave deNeui, Abra Auto Body & Glass; Tim Hill, The Beam Team; Jay Heid, Abra Auto Body & Glass 7. Bob Schmidt, Bosco Development; Vaun Podlogar, State Permits; John Stallman, Lakeview Construction

MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

23


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

7.

6. 1. Steve Hirtz, Mike Waich & Jon Jasper with Jones Sign

5. Adam Halverson, Serigraphics; Mike Klein, Life Time

2. Joe McMahon, Retail Construction Services; Ross Stecklein, Retail Construction Services; David Fritz, National Contractors; Derrick Diedrick, National Contractors Inc

6. Ken Sharkey, Commercial Contractors Inc; Sharon & Steve Bachman with Retail Construction Services & Sandy Sharkey with Commercial Contractors Inc

3. Justin Parish, Engineered Structures Inc; Kelly O’Brien, Serigraphics; Janine Buettner, ArcVision

7. Seth Wellnitz, Command Center; Brian Perkkio, Elder-Jones, Dwight Enget, Command Center; Justin Elder, Elder-Jones

4. Bill Marcato, Wallace Engineering; Jeff Seba, EMG Corp; Win Rice, Wallace Engineering

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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CIRCLE NO. 13

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Paradise found How Crystal Springs Resort remains Jersey’s favorite place to hang

By Eric Balinski

“T

his is New Jersey?!?!” This is something that Chris Mulvihill never tires of hearing from astonished guests the first time they experience Crys-

tal Springs Resort, a 4,000-acre community and getaway for people of all ages set in Northwestern, New Jersey. Golf. Spas. Dining. Wine. Nature Hikes. Wedding parties. Catering. Meetings. You name it, Crystal Springs has you covered.

Take its world-class golf experience, featuring six championship caliber courses, including the highly acclaimed Ballyowen, all within a five-mile radius. Set amongst the Kittatinny mountain range near the Appalachian Trail, Crystal Springs has recruited the world’s best golf course architects, including von Hagge, Trent Jones and Rulewich. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Chris Mulvihill, CMO at Crystal Springs Resort, to get his take on where New Jersey’s favorite paradise is heading and what places it at the top of so many must-visit lists.

Give us a snapshot of Crystal Springs brand?

Crystal Springs Resort is many things to many people. We were originally known as golf resort and are actually named after one of our six golf courses (incidentally one of the toughest in the country—No. 36 in the United States, according to Golf Digest). With the addition of two hotels, two spas, three pool complexes, a sports club and wellness center, mountaintop lake and nature center, 10 restaurants and world class culinary program, it is now more accurate to refer to Crystal Springs Resort as the Northeast’s largest golf, spa and culinary resort.

MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

27


PARADISE FOUND Tell us what makes the Crystal Springs brand so unique?

Wow, where do I start? We are best in class in so many areas of operation: New Jersey’s No. 1 rated public golf course, one of the state’s only AAA 4 Diamond hotels, NJ’s most highly decorated restaurant, Wine Enthusiast Hall of Fame wine cellar, home to the NJ Wine & Food Festival, and you know what’s better than a luxury spa? Two of them. But this all being said, for my answer, I’ll go with location, location, location. I often tell people, maybe there are 100 spectacular resorts in the world, and one day, if you have time, you should go and see them all. But guess what? There is only one resort in the world that you can drive to within an hour of the George Washington Bridge from New York City, and that’s us. Of course you can fly to some other great places, but in the time it would take you to get through airport security, you could be up at Crystal Springs with a cold drink in your hand by the pool. So for the 20 million or so people who live in the greater New York metro market who I care about, that is what really makes us unique.

What are today’s guests looking for?

Authentic experiences with a connection to nature. With more people opting to live in the city and spending more time tied to their phones

28

and tablets, there is a growing demand for meaningful recreational experiences that allow guests to unplug and reconnect with nature. Just offering nature-themed experiences is not adequate. Today’s consumers are somewhat jaded and wary of marketers with superficial “back-to nature” offerings comparable to producers of so called “free range” eggs produced in poultry houses with 10,000 hens that all share a single door to a postage stamp yard. Fortunately, our resort is surrounded by thousands of acres of woodlands and farms with stunning mountain and valley views. You cannot fake that or make that up. In addition to being only a few miles from the Appalachian Trail, we have our own nature trails on property as well as pristine mountaintop lake and nature center. We also work with several local farms and foragers to source fresh local ingredients for our menus and we work with multiple local partners to arrange farm tours and immersive local agriculture experiences.

What type of guests are you targeting?

We have a very diverse set of offerings and audiences, which help us maximize our occupancy year-round. Roughly half of our business is “Groups,” comprised of wedding parties, corporate offsite meetings, golf outings and family reunions. The other half is “Leisure” business, which is comprised of family vacations, couples retreats, girlfriend getaways, golfer vacations and ski trips. Our targeting varies quite a

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CIRCLE NO. 14


PARADISE FOUND bit depending upon the time of year and what our occupancy looks like in the upcoming months. The great thing about doing my job in 2019 is that digital advertising now allows us to target these audiences on a pinpointed basis and to present ourselves differently to each audience, depending upon which aspects of the resort are the most important to them. For example, instead of running an ad for a “ski and stay” promotion in the newspaper or on the radio, where we will spend money to promote to non-skiers, we can advertise online only to skiers, or for that matter, skiers who have shown a history of taking time off mid-week if that happens to be the area we need to promote. Plus, when those people respond to our ads, we can bring them through a section of the website highlighting our outdoor heated snow pools and après ski drink specials.

What are the demands these customers place on the company?

In my experience, it is critical that marketing and operations work very closely to make sure the picture painted by marketing translates

into the experience that is delivered to the guest. Word spreads fast on social media and via online reviews, so doing right by your guests pays off in referrals and repeat visits. It is not enough to just provide a clean room and timely service. Guests want the experience that was promised, so the amenities and activities delivered need to support that. It’s the little extra things that make all the difference.

How is your geographic location figure into your marketing and operation?

The worst and best thing about our location is that we are in New Jersey. I will not be politically correct here. Nobody from Chicago or California wants to go to New Jersey for vacation. When they hear New Jersey, they picture Tony Soprano, oil refineries and the Jersey Turnpike. As a marketer, I decided a long time ago that I will not die charging up the mountain trying to convince the world that New Jersey (or at least our corner of it) is actually a very beautiful place. The other side of that coin, the shiny side, is that we have the country’s largest and most affluent population center in our backyard, so what do I care what people in California think? This actually gives us a very powerful elevator pitch to millions of people: “Experience (insert X here) at NYC’s Closest Resort.” Whether X is goat yoga or wine cellar tours, the message of proximity and convenience is always the same.

What do you see is the difference between being an independent like Crystal Springs and a company operating under the flag of a major brand? On one hand, we do not have the resources of a Marriott or Hyatt, but we certainly have more scale than most independents. And we can be much more innovative and nimbler than the typical lumbering large operator. Since all of our assets are in one market, we can really cater to the nuances market, whereas the management at a chain hotel may have little latitude in adjusting the chain’s offerings to their local audience. This is really a competitive advantage for us when it comes to offering authentic experiences. We partner with local farms, orchards, vineyards, foragers and other producers to provide on property and off property programming in ways I just cannot see a chain hotel ever delivering.

What trends are you seeing are there today?

Wellness retreats, interactive nature experiences, interactive agricultural experiences and interactive culinary experiences.

30

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


CIRCLE NO. 15


PARADISE FOUND

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” resort in today’s competitive landscape?

I’m going to have to go back to my earlier answer: Location. Today’s consumers crave authentic experiences in a beautiful setting, but they also do not have a lot of time. So our secret is that nobody has an assembly of amenities anywhere close to what we provide in such a bucolic setting. And we’re only one hour from the George Washington Bridge. New Yorkers will still take their week in Nantucket or Sun Valley, but when they want to get away for two days, we are their go-to spot.

How does the upcoming design/renovation project cater to what your guests are looking for?

We are about to renovate the rooms in Grand Cascades Lodge, the larger of our two hotels. The hotel was built 10 years ago and as one of the few AAA 4 Diamond properties in New Jersey. We need to keep the rooms in alignment with the high expectations we are setting for our guests elsewhere throughout the property. A big factor driving visits to Crystal Springs is the beautiful setting in which we reside. Our guests come to escape the city and to reconnect with nature. We want to bring that experience and feeling to them in the rooms. What you will see in the renovation is a fresh and vibrant look with a lot of stone and wood that connects the rooms to the surrounding outdoor mountain and valley views. For this project, we have retained INC Design, which just did a fantastic job for us on the renovation of our flagship restaurant, Restaurant Latour.

What’s the biggest issue(s) today related to the resort business?

One of the biggest challenges that a multi-faceted resort like ours faces is the need to be different things to different people, based on the wide array of programming we are offering at any particular time

32

to fill in gaps to maximize our occupancy. This is not a new issue, but is rather timeless one in the resort business. What is new is the ever increasing ability of digital marketing to address this challenge. In the past, if you ran a print or radio ad, you could target your audiences and segment your advertising based on the publication or radio station that you chose, but everyone in your audience would see or hear the same ad. What if there is no strong local golf publication or radio station dedicated to golfers? Today, not only can we pinpoint our advertising based on whether you are a golfer, skier, wine lover, spa enthusiast, etc., but we can also position messaging and depict families or couples or groups of friends, depending on other demographic information.

Talk about sustainability. What are your doing in this area?

We use paper straws and of course we recycle, but I expect most any responsible resort would do as much. What I am excited to tell you is that we are on track to go online later this year with a solar field that will provide Grand Cascades Lodge and The Crystal Springs Clubhouse the majority of its power needs. We are also involved in a member of other initiatives, including the development of a new habitat for bees, butterflies and birds on Black Bear, one of our six golf courses. We did this in partnership with Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L). We are members of the New Jersey Audubon Corporate Stewardship Council, which emphasizes voluntary environmental stewardship, sustainability, conservation partnerships and public education. And sometimes being good to the environment can be good to your bottom line. We are also in the process of replacing substantially all of our lighting with LED to save consumption and are looking to add additional EV charge stations. Many golfers like the idea of charging their EVs while they play, and we want to accommodate them.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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CIRCLE NO. 16

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PARADISE FOUND What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

As we continue to build awareness in the marketplace and as our occupancy increases, our biggest opportunity is corporate midweek business. While we have always had the advantage of a beautiful setting and proximity to NYC relative to other resorts, we

are going to the next level by offering content and experiences for our corporate groups that they are not able to get elsewhere. Presently, we have over 60 highly unique meeting add-on group experiences in the categories of team building and wellness such as goat yoga, meet the bee keeper, and guided hikes to hunt for edible mushrooms. CCR

One-on-one with... Chris Mulvihill, CMO Crystal Springs Resort

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? I love to see people at the resort having a good time. I will often visit the pools, restaurants or golf course posing as a guest and strike up conversations to find out how our guests heard about us and what it was that they saw or heard that compelled them to visit. That is really fun for me. I also never get tired of hearing out of state guests’ reactions when they arrive for a wedding and are blown away when they see how nice it is here. What was the best advice you ever received? To “starve the mediocre and feed the superstars.” I actually got this advice in another line of business in relation to sales, but it applies to marketing. It is fairly common knowledge that in any field of sales that 20 percent of the sales people typically generate 80 percent of the results. In advertising, the same is true. Some campaigns work very well and can really move the needle, but only if you have the resources to double or triple down on them when you find they are working. The advice is to rob as much time and resources from other things to support your best performing campaigns. What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? I enjoy reading comments from people on Facebook telling their friends that they think their phones must

34

be tapped since Crystal Springs keeps showing up in their news feed after they were just talking about us with a friend. While they are not necessarily addressing this to me, it tells me that my marketing is well targeted. Name the three strongest traits any leader should have. Vision, enthusiasm and humility. What is the true key to success for any manager? Hire good people and treat them well. Beside Crystal Springs what is your favorite vacation spot or resort and why? Chatham, Cape Cod. I’ve been going there for 20 years. If you enjoy the beach/shore, you really can’t beat it. It’s right on the elbow of the Cape and within a half mile radius you be on Nantucket Sound, on the Atlantic, in one of multiple harbors, bays or ponds. How do you like to spend your down time? I have a great wife and four great kids, ranging in age from 11 to 17. I really enjoy my time with them. My wife and me both come from large families and enjoy spending time with our extended families. Probably my most relaxing time is digging littleneck clams and cooking them for friends and family to enjoy.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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Window Protection and Security CIRCLE NO. 17


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING

Report spotlights industry’s leading GC firms

I

f you’re looking for the industry’s leading general contractors (GCs), you are in the right spot. Our annual listing provides all of the information you need to find the right company in the retail, restaurant, hospitality & other commercial sectors. The listings include the contact information and contact person at each company. If your firm didn’t make the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

36

RESTAURANT

Lendlease.................................................... $2,505,211,046.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company....... $398,000,000.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $305,470,000.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................... $120,000,000.00 Pepper Construction Group.......................... $101,700,000.00 Wolverine Building Group............................. $95,000,000.00 Rockford Construction................................. $72,899,000.00 Broadway Construction Group...................... $72,471,355.00 ESI, Engineered Structures........................... $60,680,000.00 DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc................... $22,000,000.00

HEALTHCARE

HOSPITALITY

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company........ $248,000,000.00 Lendlease......................................................... $163,549,159.00 Digney York Associates..................................... $94,000,000.00 EBCO General Contractor, LTD.......................... $86,672,211.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc......................................... $85,000,000.00 Pepper Construction Group............................... $83,900,000.00 MYCON General Contractors, Inc...................... $49,000,000.00 IDC Construction, LLC....................................... $40,000,000.00 Broadway Construction Group.......................... $28,294,089.00 Donnelly Construction....................................... $25,000,000.00

Icon................................................................ Gray............................................................... The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company....... Lendlease....................................................... Marco Contractors, Inc.................................... Fortney & Weygandt, Inc................................. Prairie Contractors, Inc.................................... Beam Team Construction................................ Wolverine Building Group................................ Lakeview Construction....................................

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $1,150,000,000.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................... $313,000,000.00 Lendlease.................................................... $297,555,471.00 Pepper Construction Group.......................... $181,400,000.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $122,068,000.00 S.M. Wilson & Co......................................... $43,587,806.00 EBCO General Contractor, LTD...................... $36,387,376.00 DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc................... $32,000,000.00 Rockford Construction................................. $20,178,000.00 Horizon Retail Construction, Inc.................... $13,100,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

RETAIL

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $435,000,000.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................... $263,000,000.00 Schimenti Construction Company................ $224,000,000.00 ESI, Engineered Structures........................... $197,753,268.00 Horizon Retail Construction, Inc.................... $157,900,000.00 MYCON General Contractors, Inc.................. $141,000,000.00 Rockford Construction................................. $130,189,000.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $127,065,000.00 Gray............................................................ $94,500,000.00 Pepper Construction Group.......................... $81,300,000.00

MULTI-HOUSING

Top Ten Totals

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company..... Lendlease.................................................. Pepper Construction Group........................ O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................. Gray.......................................................... Hoar Construction...................................... Rockford Construction............................... ESI, Engineered Structures......................... Schimenti Construction Company.............. MYCON General Contractors, Inc................

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019

$58,800,000.00 $44,000,000.00 $37,000,000.00 $26,587,229.00 $24,000,000.00 $22,300,000.00 $21,519,800.00 $20,000,000.00 $20,000,000.00 $17,900,000.00

$8,445,000,000.00 $3,907,690,717.00 $1,260,000,000.00 $1,254,000,000.00 $1,095,762,203.00 $869,047,000.00 $402,247,000.00 $401,750,530.00 $275,000,000.00 $240,000,000.00


CIRCLE NO. 18


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Acme Enterprises Inc. Bogart Construction, Inc. Jeff Lomber, President 15751 Martin Road Roseville, MI 48066 (586) 771-4800 www.acme-enterprises.com info@acme-enterprises.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: N/A

Anderson & Rodgers Commercial James Spataro, General Manager 170 Prosperous Pl. Lexington, KY 40509 (859) 309-3021 www.andersonandrodgers.com info@andersonandrodgers.com Year Established: 2013 No. of Employees: 10 Retail: $2,000,000.00 Restaurants: $1,000,000.00 Hospitality: $1,000,000.00 Healthcare: $4,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $1,000,000.00 Federal: $500,000.00 Other: $4,000,000.00 Total: $13,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 22 Square Footage: Retail: 30,000 Hospitality: 15,000 Restaurants: 5,000 Federal: 5,000 Healthcare: 20,000 Multi-Family: 10,000 Other: 301,000 Total: 386,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family

DannyStone, Dir of Business Development 9980 Irvine Center Dr., #200 Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 453-1400 Fax: (949) 453-1414 www.bogartconstruction.com dstone@bogartconstruction.com Year Established: 1991 No. of Employees: 60 Retail: $62,000,000.00 Restaurants: $5,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $5,000,000.00 Total: $72,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 60 Square Footage: Retail: 650 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 30 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 10 Total: 690 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Boss Facility Services, Inc. Keith Keingstein, President 1 Roebling Cart Ronkonkoma, NY 11779 (632) 361-7430 www.bossfacilityservices.com info@bossfacilityservices.com Year Established: 2001 No. of Employees: 65 Retail: $15,600,000.00 Restaurants: $400,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: 300,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $400,000.00 Total:$20,300,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 14,840 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education

Beam Team Construction Broadway Construction Group Tim Hill, VP 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com timhill@thebeamteam.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: 600 Retail: $45,000,000.00 Restaurants: $20,000,000.00 Hospitality: $20,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $85,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 8,000 Square Footage: Retail: 120,000 Hospitality: 10,000 Restaurants: 10,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 10,000 Total: 150,000 Specialize In: Groceries, Drug Stores, Hotels, Restaurants

38

Joseph Aiello, COO 140 Broadway, 41st Floor New York, NY 10005 (212) 834-4688 www.broadwaycg.com jaiello@broadwaycg.com Year Established: 2013 No. of Employees: 51 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $28,294,089.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $72,471,355.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $100,765,444.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 16 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 175,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: 1,472,000 Other: N/A Total: 1,647,000 Specialize In: Hotels, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


CIRCLE NO. 19


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Buildrite Construction Corp. Command Center, Inc. BryanAlexander, President 600 Chastain Rd., Suite 326 Kennesaw, GA 30144 (770) 971-0787 Fax: (770) 973-3373 www.buildriteconstruction.com bryan@buildriteconstruction.com Year Established: 1982 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $26,913,048.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 288 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Retail

DwightEnget, Corp. Business Development 3609 S Wadsworth Blvd. Lakewood, CO80235 (480) 390-8484 www.commandonline.com dwight.enget@commandonline.com Year Established: 2006 No. of Employees: 300 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Temp Labor

Commonwealth Building, Inc.

CDO Group Chris Fontaine, President

Vinny Catullo, Director of Business Development 333 Harrison St. Oak park, IL 60304 (908) 627-1778 www.cdogroup.com vinnyc@cdogroup.com Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: 50-100 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Hospitality, Health and Wellness

CKP Construction Todd Barbour, President 1616 S Kentucky, Suite C325 Amarillo, TX 79102 (806) 420-0696 www.ckpconstruction.com tbarbour@ckpconstruction.com Year Established: 2016 No. of Employees: 18 Retail: $2,500,000.00 Restaurants: $12,700,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $11,000,000.00 Total: $26,200,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 43 Square Footage: Retail: 12,455 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 72,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 68,000, Total: 152,455 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Restaurants, Medical Offices, Athletic Facilities

40

265 Willard St. Quincy, MA 02169 (617) 770-0050 Fax: (617) 472-4734 www.combuild.com cfontaine@combuild.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 35 Retail: $25,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $3,000,000.00 Total: $28,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 43 Square Footage: Retail: 600,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 8,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 50,000 Total: 658,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Special Projects & Maintenance

Construction Advantage Mike Rothholtz, President 1112 Hibbard Rd. Wilmette, IL 60091 (847) 853-9300 constructadvantage@sbcglobal.net Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: Varies Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: Varies Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


• BUILDING CONFIDENCE • DELIVERING RESULTS

NATIONAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR CIRCLE NO. 20


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Construction One DAVACO Don Skorupski, Business Development 101 E Town St.Suite, 401 Columbus, OH43215 (614) 235-0057 Fax: (614) 237-6769 www.constructionone.com dskorupski@constructionone.com Year Established: 1980 No. of Employees: 80 Retail: $40,000,000.00 Restaurants: $5,000,000.00 Hospitality: $10,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $55,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 102 Square Footage: Retail: 630,000 Hospitality: 340,000 Restaurants: 110,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,080,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants

Paul Hamer, EVP 4050 Valley View Ln., Suite 150 Irving, TX 75038 (877) 7DAVACO www.davacoinc.com info@davacoinc.com Year Established: 1990 No. of Employees: 1,600 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

De Jager Construction Inc. Dan De Jager, President

Core States Group 75 60th St. Natalie Rodriguez, Marketing Manager 201 South Maple Ave., Suite 300 Ambler, PA 19002 (813) 391-8755 www.core-states.com nrodriguez@core-states.com Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 350 Retail: $11,198,137.00 Restaurants: $6,248,102.00 Hospitality: $214,527.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $27,310,178.00 Total: $44,970,944.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 587 Square Footage: Retail: 139,308 Hospitality: 2,861 Restaurants: 49,984 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 216,000 Total: 408,153 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants

Wyoming, MI 49548 (616) 530-0060 Fax: (616) 530-8619 www.dejagerconstruction.com dj1@dejagerci.com Year Established: 1970, No. of Employees: 40 Retail: $23,947,260.00 Restaurants: $712,740.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $24,660,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 61 Square Footage: Retail: 564,712 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 5,900 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 570,612 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Desco Professional Builders Inc.

Dalo Construction, Inc. Robert Anderson, President

Belden Bowman, Treasurer 2812 US RT 40 Tipp City, OH 45371 (937) 898-0953 Ext. 106 Fax: (937) 898-0974 belden_bowman@daloinc.com Year Established: 1974 No. of Employees: 33 Retail: $40,000,000.00 Restaurants: $5,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $45,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 47 Square Footage: Retail: 1,085,760 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 40,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,125,760 Specialize In: Groceries, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

42

290 Somers Rd. Ellington, CT 06029 (860) 870-7070 Fax: (860) 870-1074 www.descopro.com banderson@descopro.com Year Established: 1983, No. of Employees: 48 Retail: Yes Restaurants: Yes Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: Yes Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $25,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 56 & Millwork Mfg. Square Footage: Retail: 309,189 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 22,530 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 14,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 190,639 Total: 536,358 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Offices, Millwork Manufacturing for all of the above

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


ily pitality I Multi-Fam os H I nt ra au st Re Retail I

WHAT CAN F&W BUILD FOR YOU ? g t I Value Engineerin en em ag an M m ra og Pr esign-Build I Rollout D I ng cti ra nt Co al Gener

FORTNEY & WEYGANDT, INC.

#BuildwithFW www.FortneyWeygandt.com 31269 Bradley Road, North Olmsted, OH 44070 I P: 440.716.4000 I F: 440.716.4010 CIRCLE NO. 21


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING DeWees Construction Inc. DLP Construction Co. Inc. Allen Galloway, Sr. VP 35 N Baldwin P.O. Box 681 Bargersville, IN 46106 (317) 709-5135 Fax: (317) 422-5142 www.deweesconstruction.com allen@deweesconstruction.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 15 Retail: $1,998,000.00 Restaurants: $2,695,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $710,000.00 Total: $5,403,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 13 Square Footage: Retail: 8,600 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 12,400 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 3,000 Total: 24,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

Lynn Kaden, Dir. of Business Development 5935 Shiloh Rd. E, Suite 100 Alpharetta, GA 30005 (770) 887-3573 Fax: (770) 887-2357 www.dlpconstruction.com lkaden@dlpconstruction.com Year Established: 1996, No. of Employees: 43 Retail: $31,732,382.00 Restaurants: $1,200,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $5,700,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $38,632,382.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 91 Square Footage: Retail: 2,130,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 15,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 95,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,240,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

DonahueFavret Diamond Contractors Contractors, Inc.

Lori Perry, Owner 4224 NE Port Dr. Lees Summit, MO 64064 (816) 650-9200 Fax: (816) 650-9279 www.diamondcontractors.com loriperry@diamondcontractors.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 50 Retail: $16,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $94,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $16,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 354 Square Footage: Retail: 2,490,187 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,490,187 Specialize In: Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Retail Tenant Finish

Digney York Associates Deanne Kuzmic, Dir. of Business Development 1919 Gallows Rd. Vienna, VA 22182 (703) 790-5281 www.digneyyork.com dkuzmic@digneyyork.com Year Established: 1985, No. of Employees: 45 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $94,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $94,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 23 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Hotels

44

Bryan Hodnett, Dir. of Business Development 3030 E Causeway Approach Mandeville, LA 70448 (800) 626-4431 Fax: (985) 626-3572 www.donahuefavret.com dfcinfo@donahuefavret.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 47 Retail: $4,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $1,000,000.00 Healthcare: $32,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $22,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $28,000,000.00 Total: $87,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 16 Square Footage: Retail: 30,000 Hospitality: 11,160 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 160,266 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 299,503 Total: 500,929 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Office Buildings, Tenant Improvements, Faith-Based

Donnelly Construction

Doug Berry, Sr. PM 577 Route 23 S Wayne, NJ 07470 (973) 672-1800 Ext. 100 Fax: (973) 677-1824 dberry@donnellyind.com Year Established: 1977 No. of Employees: 100 Retail: $5,000,000.00 Restaurants: $5,000,000.00 Hospitality: $25,000,000.00 Healthcare: $5,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $40,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 100 Square Footage: Retail: 15,000 Hospitality: 100,000 Restaurants: 15,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 15,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 145,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Country Clubs

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


CIRCLE NO. 22


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING DWM Comprehensive Encore Construction Inc. Facility Solutions Joe McCafferty, President

Bennett Van Wert, National Sales Manager 2 Northway Ln. Latham, NY 12110 (888) 396-9111 www.dwminc.com bvanwert@dwminc.com Year Established: 1997 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $30,200,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 8,867 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education

2014 Renard Ct., Suite J Annapolis, MD 21401 (443) 214-5379 Fax: (410) 573-5070 www.encoreconstruction.net joe@encoreconstruction.net Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 17 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Facade Renovations, LL Turnover

E.C. Provini Co., Inc. ESI, Engineered Structures

Joseph Lembo, President 1 Bethany Rd., Unit 24 Hazlet, NJ 07730 (732) 739-8884 Fax: (732) 739-8886 jlembo@ecprovini.com Year Established: 1986 No. of Employees: 30 Retail: $36,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $36,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 125 Square Footage: Retail: 560,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 560,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers

EBCO General Contractor, LTD. William A. Egger, VP, Corporate Development 804 E 1st St. Cameron, TX 76520 (254) 697-8516 Fax: (254) 697-8656 www.ebcogc.com william.egger@ebcogc.com Year Established: 1986 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: $5,133,431.00 Restaurants: $15,395,162.00 Hospitality: $86,672,211.00 Healthcare: $36,387,376.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $1,465,241.00 Total: $145,053,421.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 37 Square Footage: Retail: 27,750 Hospitality: 541,700 Restaurants: 87,970 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 103,950 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 7,350 Total: 768,720 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants

46

Mike Magill, VP of Business Development & Marketing 3330 E. Louise Dr., Suite 300 Meridian, ID 83642 (208) 362-3040 www.esiconstruction.com brandankirby@esiconstruction.com Year Established: 1973, No. of Employees: 500 Retail: $197,753,268.00 Restaurants: $12,971,739.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $60,680,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $401,750,530.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 48 Square Footage: Retail: 11,808,473 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 67,260 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: 2,124,675 Other: N/A Total: 17,028,277 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Public Works, Industrial/Manufacturing, Commerical Office, Tenant Improvement, Mission Critical

FCP Services

James Loukusa, CEO 3185 Terminal Dr. Eagan, MN 55121 (651) 789-0790 www.fcpservices.com jloukusa@fcpservices.com Year Established: 1990 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


CIRCLE NO. 23


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Federal Heath FRONTIER Building

Steve Abrams, Director of Specialty Contracting 2300 State Hwy. 121 Euless, TX 76039 (262) 636-0040 www.federalheath.com sabrams@federalheath.com Year Established: 1901 No. of Employees: 692 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $22,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Convenience Stores, Petroleum

Jazmine Woods, Business Development 1801 SW 3rd Ave., Suite 500 Miami, FL 33129 (305) 692-9992 Fax: (305) 749-8673 www.frontierbuilding.com jwoods@frontierbuilding.com Year Established: 2002 No. of Employees: 60 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: N/A

Go Green Construction Anthony Wincko, Vice President

Flynn Construction 3471 Babcock Blvd., Suite 205

Jennifer Kilgore, VP, Sales & Marketing 600 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA15221 (412) 342-0555 Fax: (412) 243-7925 www.flynn-construction.com jkilgore@flynn-construction.com Year Established: 1989 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $55,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 70 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family

Pittsburgh, PA 15237 (412) 367-5870 Fax: (412) 367-5871 www.ggc-pgh.com anthony@ggc-pgh.com Year Established: 2009 No. of Employees: 34 Retail: $29,150,229.00 Restaurants: $27,067.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $1,285,399.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $30,462,695.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 97 Square Footage: Retail: 325,727, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: 3,487, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: 7,355, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 336,569 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Gray Mitch Lapin, President 31269 Bradley Rd. North Olmsted, OH 44070 (440) 716-4000 Fax: (440) 716-4010 www.fortneyweygandt.com mlapin@fortneyweygandt.com Year Established: 1978 No. of Employees: 109 Retail: $69,215,000.00 Restaurants: $22,300,000.00 Hospitality: $7,479,100.00 Healthcare: $775,000.00 Multi-Family: $5,540,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $1,095,000.00 Total: $106,404,100.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 432,150 Hospitality: 55,165 Restaurants: 185,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 3,000 Multi-Family: 38,032 Other: 5,000 Total: 718,347 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family, Senior Living, Commercial Office

48

Eric Berg, Chief Operating Officer, West Region 421 E Cerritos Ave. Anaheim, CA 92805 (714) 491-1317 Fax: (714) 333-9700 www.gray.com eberg@gray.com Year Established: 1960 No. of Employees: 922 Retail: $94,500,000.00 Restaurants: $44,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $957,262,203.00 Total: $1,095,762,203.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 478 Square Footage: Retail: 3,600,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 226,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 2,900,000 Total: 6,726,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


R.E. CRAWFORD CONSTRUCTION, LLC IS a recognized leader in the construction industry, setting the mark for others to follow. Our team of professionals takes ownership in everything that we do. We are committed to exceeding your expectations through our company culture of integrity without compromise, professionalism and accountability. General Contractor ¡ Licensed in 43 States

www.recrawford.com

CIRCLE NO. 24


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Hanna Design Group Hirsch Construction Corp Jeffrey Sabaj, Director of Business Development 650 E Algonquin Rd. Schaumburg, IL 60173 (847) 719-0373 www.hannadesigngroup.com jsabaj@hannadesigngroup.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Adam Hirsch, President 222 Rosewood Dr., 5th Floor Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 762-8744 Fax: (978) 762-8455 www.hirschcorp.com ahirsch@hirschcorp.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $30,000,000.00 Restaurants: $10,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $40,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 60 Square Footage: Retail: 180,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 60,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 240,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Airport Work, Spas

Harmon Construction, Inc. Hoar Construction Ardell Mitchell, Vice President 621 S State St. North Vernon, IN 47265 (812) 346-2048 Fax: (812) 346-2054 www.harmonconstruction.com ardell.mitchell@harmonconstruction.com Year Established: 1955 No. of Employees: 85 Retail: $3,000,000.00 Restaurants: $2,500,000.00 Hospitality: $23,000,000.00 Healthcare: $4,500,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $4,000,000.00 Total: $37,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 120 Square Footage: Retail: 22,500 Hospitality: 150,000 Restaurants: 15,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 12,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 28,000 Total: 227,500 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Restaurants

Tiffany Fessler, Communications Manager Two Metroplex Dr., Suite 400 Birmingham, AL 35209 (205) 803-2121 Fax: (205) 423-2323 www.hoar.com info@hoar.com Year Established: 1940, No. of Employees: 684 Retail: $127,065,000.00 Restaurants: $2,569,000.00 Hospitality: $22,693,000.00 Healthcare: $122,068,000.00 Multi-Family: $305,470,000.00 Federal: $1,295,000.00 Other: $287,887,000.00 Total: $869,047,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 40 Square Footage: Retail: 1,940,091 Hospitality: 412,123 Restaurants: 7,000 Federal: 425,300 Healthcare: 1,433,156 Multi-Family: 6,387,936 Other: 2,903,029 Total: 13,508,635 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Multi-Family

Healy Construction Horizon Retail Services, Inc. Construction, Inc.

James T. Healy, Director of Construction 14000 S Keeler Ave. Crestwood, IL 60418 (708) 396-0440 Fax: (708) 396-0412 www.healyconstrutionservices.com jth@healyconstructionservices.com Year Established: 1988 No. of Employees: 30 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

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Horizon RETAIL CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Stefanie Andersen, Marketing Manager 9999 E Exploration Ct. Sturtevant, WI 53177 (262) 638-6000 Fax: (262) 638-6015 www.horizonretail.com sales@horizonretail.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 337 Retail: $157,900,000.00 Restaurants: $15,400,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $13,100,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $25,300,000.00 Total: $211,700,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 1,633 Square Footage: Retail: 3,781,878 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 177,517 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 162,680 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 621,515 Total: 4,743,590 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Financial Institutions, Airport Concessions, Entertainment

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Serving for more than three decades as a PREMIERE GENERAL CONTRACTOR

100% WOMAN-OWNED, Shames Construction BUILDS BEYOND EXPECTATIONS

Shames gives back to the community through these charitable contributions: • ACE Scholarships • Wounded Warriors • St. Anthony’s Hospital - Flight for Life

CALIFORNIA

925.606.3000

COLORADO

303.253.3200

CIRCLE NO. 25

www.shames.com


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Hunter Building Corp. Kingsmen Projects

Peter Ferri, President 14609 Kimberly Ln., Suite A Houston, TX 77079 (281) 377-6550 Fax: (281) 377-8600 www.hunterbuilding.com pferri@hunterbuilding.com Year Established: 2007 No. of Employees: 15 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $13,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 32 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 940,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Commercial-Office

Stephen Hekman, Vice President, US 3525 Hyland Ave. Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (619) 719-8950 www.kingsment-int.com stephen@kingsment-usa.com Year Established: 1973 No. of Employees: 1,900 Retail: $5,000,000.00 Restaurants: $1,200,000.00 Hospitality: $500,000 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $6,700,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 500+ Square Footage: Retail: 70,000, Hospitality: 10,000, Restaurants: 20,000, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 100,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

Icon Knoebel Construction, Inc. Kevin Hughes, EVP Sales & Marketing 1701 Golf Rd., I-900 Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 (877) 740-4266 www.iconid.com khughes@iconid.com Year Established: 1931 No. of Employees: 400 Retail: $10,200,000.00 Restaurants: $58,800,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $1,000,000.00 Total: $70,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 3,975 Square Footage: Retail: 4,500,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 50,000,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 500,000 Total: 55,000,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

IDC Construction, LLC Blake Williams, VP Development 1000 Churchill Ct. Woodstock, GA 30188 (678) 213-1110 Fax: (678) 213-1109 www.idcconstruction.com bwilliams@idcconstruction.com Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $40,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $40,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 10 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 36,000,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 36,000,000 Specialize In: Hotels

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Susan Bowen, Dir. of Business Development 18333 Wings Corporate Dr. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 326-4100 Ext. 240 Fax: (636) 326-4101 www.knoebelconstruction.com sbowen@knoebelcon.com Year Established: 1981 No. of Employees: 68 Retail: $56,642,804.00 Restaurants: $12,333,785.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $3,522,077.00 Federal: N/A Other: $7,658,944.00 Total: $80,157,610.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 66 Square Footage: Retail: 754,170 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 38,200 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: 10,710 Other: 14,220 Total: 817,300 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Multi-Family

Lakeview Construction

John Stallman, Marketing Director 10505 Corp. Dr. Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (262) 857-3336 Ext. 241 www.lvconstruction.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 115 Retail: $76,500,000.00 Restaurants: $17,900,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $3,500,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $97,900,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 2,000,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 500,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 40,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,540,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Retail

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


CIRCLE NO. 26


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING LCS Facility Group MC Construction Management Joe Fairley, Vice President 36 Cottage St. Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 (845) 485-7000 Fax: (845) 485-7052 www.lcsfacilitygroup.com joseph.fairley@lcsfacilitygroup.com Year Established: 2001, No. of Employees: 450 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $12,000,000.00 Healthcare: $10,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $3,000,000.00 Total: $25,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 55 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 1,000,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 2,000,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 1,000,000 Total: 4,000,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Commercial Office, Warehouse, Industrial, Manufacturing

Jim McClymonds, President 38012 N Linda Dr. Cave Creek, AZ 85331 (480) 367-8600 Ext. 107 Fax: (480) 367-8625 www.mcbuilders.net jmcclymonds@mcbuilders.net Year Established: 2001, No. of Employees: 25 Retail: $21,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $23,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 48 Square Footage: Retail: 250,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 25,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 275,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers

MYCON General Contractors, Inc.

Lendlease Dana Walters, Vice President Andrew Council, General Manager, Construction 200 Park Ave. New York, NY 10166 (212) 592-6800 Fax: (212) 592-6988 www.lendlease.com americas@lendlease.com Year Established: 1917, No. of Employees: 1,730 Retail: $6,599,331.00 Restaurants: $26,587,229.00 Hospitality: $163,549,159.00 Healthcare: $297,555,471.00 Multi-Family: $2,505,211,046.00 Federal: N/A Other: $908,188,481.00 Total: $3,907,690,717.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 142 Square Footage: Retail: 117,800 Hospitality: 120,000 Restaurants: 217,500 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 51,000 Multi-Family: 5,386,971 Other: 2,291,495 Total: 8,184,786 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education, Multi-Family

Business Development 17311 Dallas Pkwy., Suite 300 Dallas, TX 75248 (972) 529-2444 www.mycon.com dwalters@mycon.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: 152 Retail: $141,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $49,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $50,000,000.00 Total: $240,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 87 Square Footage: Retail: 1,800,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 3,000,000 Total: 4,800,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels

Marco Contractors, Inc. N-STORE Services Samra R Savioz, National Director of Business Development 100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 814-4547 www.marcocontractors.com ssavioz@marcocontractors.com Year Established: 1941, No. of Employees: 225 Retail: 63,000,000 Restaurants: 24,000,000 Hospitality: 6,000,000 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: 93,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 13,250 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

54

Kevin Zigrang, Director of Business Development 160 Chesterfield Industrial Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 778-0448 www.nstoreservices.com kevin@gnhservices.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 77 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 519 Square Footage: Retail: 1,900,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 1,875,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 1,225,000 Total: 5,000,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Construction Management • General Contractor • Fixture Contractor Self-Perform Services • Special Projects & Rollouts

Contractor of The Year by Top Notch Indiana General Contractor of The Year by Indiana Subcontractors Association Gold Summit Safety Award

National Contractor

MBE - Minority Business Enterprise CIRCLE NO. 27

812.379.9547 | WWW.TBCCI.COM


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING National Contractors, Inc. Pepper Construction Group Michael Dudley, Vice President 2500 Orchard Lane Excelsior, MN 55331 (952) 881-6123 Fax: (952) 881-6321 www.ncigc.com mdudley@ncigc.com Year Established: 1990 No. of Employees: 28 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

O’Neil Industries, Inc.

Dean Arnold, Retired Vice President-Consultant 1245 W Washington Blvd. Chicago, IL 60607 (773) 755-1611 www.weoneil.com darnold@weoneil.com Year Established: 1925, No. of Employees: 474 Retail: $263,000,000.00 Restaurants: $6,000,000.00 Hospitality: $85,000,000.00 Healthcare: $313,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $120,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $467,000,000.00 Total: $1,254,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 178 Square Footage: Retail: 930,000 Hospitality: 94,000 Restaurants: 7,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 250,000 Multi-Family: 57,000 Other: 662,000 Total: 2,000,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Office, Residential, Manufacturing, Transportation, Power

P&C Construction, Inc. Nic Cornelison, Vice President 2500 E 18th St. Chattanooga, TN 37404 (423) 493-0051 Fax: (423) 493-0058 www.pc-const.com nic@pc-const.com Year Established: 1993, No. of Employees: 72 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 294 Square Footage: Retail: 635,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 62,000 Federal: 30,000 Healthcare: 17,000 Multi-Family: 125,000 Other: 230,000 Total: 1,099,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Office

56

J. Scott Pepper, Vice President 643 N. Orleans Street Chicago, IL 60654 (312) 266-4700 www.pepperconstruction.com info@pepperconstruction.com Year Established: 1927, No. of Employees: 1,070 Retail: $81,300,000 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $83,900,000 Healthcare: $181,400,000 Multi-Family: $101,700,000 Federal: N/A Other: $811,700,000 Total: $1,260,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 470 Square Footage: Retail: 871,000 Hospitality: 937,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 771,000 Multi-Family: 1,065,000 Other: 8,500,000 Total: 12,144,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Commercial Office, Data Centers, Industrial / Manufacturing, Institutional, Entertainment

Poettker Construction Company

Danielle Bergmann, Director of Marketing 380 S Germantown Rd. Breese, IL 62230 (618) 526-7213 Fax: (618) 526-7654 www.poettkerconstruction.com dbergmann@poettkerconstruction.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 135 Retail: $30,503,403.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $3,236,392.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $57,412,716.00 Other: $36,290,254.00 Total: $127,442,765.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 28 Square Footage: Retail: 1,494,966 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: 158,720 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 46,525 Total: 1,700,211 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Commercial & Corporate (Office), Industrial/Warehouse/Distribution, Recreational

Prairie Contractors, Inc.

Peter Hegarty, President 9318 Gulfstream Rd., Unit C Frankfort, IL 60423 (815) 469-1904 Fax: (815) 469-5436 www.prairiecontractors.com phegarty@prairie-us.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: $4,847,200.00 Restaurants: $21,519,800.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $26,367,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 69 Square Footage: Retail: 28,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 120,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 148,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


BUILD ON OUR EXPERIENCE

COMMERCIAL CRAFTSMANSHIP PERFECTING OUR CRAFT TO BETTER YOUR BUSINESS CIRCLE NO. 28


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Prime Retail Services, Inc. Retail Construction Services, Inc.

Jeff Terry, Director of Business Development 3617 Southland Dr. Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 Fax: (866) 584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com jterry@primeretailservices.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 600+ Retail: $32,000,000.00 Restaurants: $6,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $1,000,000 Other: N/A Total: $39,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Banking and Financial Facilities

Ross Stecklein, Director of Business Development 11343 39th St. N Lake Elmo, MN 55042 (651) 704-9000 Fax: (651) 704-9100 www.retailconstruction.com rstecklein@retailconstruction.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Other

Rockerz Inc.

RobertSmith, Dir. Business/National Accounts

PTS Contracting 100 Commonwealth Alan Briskman, Principal 75 Virginia Rd. White Plains, NY 10603 (914) 290-4166 www.ptscontracting.com alan@ptscontracting.com Year Established: 2013 No. of Employees: 8 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $11,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $8,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $19,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 14 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 40,000 Multi-Family: 33,000 Other: N/A Total: 73,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Multi-Family

R.E. Crawford Construction, LLC

Susan Courter, Director of Business Development 6650 Professional Pkwy. W, #100 Sarasota, FL 34240 (941) 907-0010 Fax: (941) 907-0030 www.recrawford.com scourter@recrawford.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 44 Retail: $27,100,000.00 Restaurants: $4,800,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $1,150,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $2,700,000.00 Total: $35,750,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 74 Square Footage: Retail: 198,800 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 25,600 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 13,500 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 11,000 Total: 235,400 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

58

Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 612-6520 www.rockerzinc.com rsmith@rockerzinc.com Year Established: 2004, No. of Employees: 55 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $10,500,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 300+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 4,500,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Other

Rockford Construction Jennifer Boezwinkle, Executive Vice President 601 First St. NW Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (616) 285-6933 www.rockfordconstruction.com jboezwinkle@rockfordconstruction.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $130,189,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $20,178,000.00 Multi-Family: $72,899,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $178,981,000.00 Total: $402,247,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 369 Square Footage: Retail: 2,822,550 Hospitality: 185,296 Restaurants: 98,541 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 221,905 Multi-Family: 1,627,912 Other: 2,821,422 Total: 7,777,626 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Industrial and Manufacturing

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Royal Services S.M. Wilson & Co. Jamie Leeper, Director of Business Development 19175 Metcalf Ave. Overland Park, KS 66221 (913) 387-3436 www.royalsolves.com jleeper@royalsolves.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 48 Retail: $20,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $2,000,000.00 Total: $22,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 10,000 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores

RT Stevens Construction, Inc. Troy Stevens, President 420 McKinley St., Suite 111-313 Corona, CA 92879 (951) 280-9361 Fax: (951) 549-9360 www.rtstevens.com tstevens@rtstevens.com Year Established: 1988 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 34 Square Footage: Retail: 109,242 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Coleen Olson, Executive Assistant 2185 Hampton Ave. St. Louis, MO 63139 (314) 645-9595 Fax: (314) 645-1700 www.smwilson.com coleen.olson@smwilson.com Year Established: 1921, No. of Employees: 124 Retail: $46,618,130.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $43,587,806.00 Multi-Family: $20,020,502.00 Federal: $3,341,379.00 Other: $71,240,842.00 Total: $184,808,659.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 23 Square Footage: Retail: 1,815,203 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: 371,000 Healthcare: 884,261 Multi-Family: 310,000 Other: 1,898,468 Total: 5,278,932 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Multi-Family, Industrial

Sachse Construction Miha Pusta, Business Development 1528 Woodward Ave., Suite 600 Detroit, MI 48226 (313) 481-8263 Fax: (313) 481-8250 www.sachseconstruction.com mpusta@sachse.net Year Established: 1991, No. of Employees: 165 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 185 Square Footage: Retail: 16,000 Hospitality: 95,000 Restaurants: 48,600 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 26,000 Multi-Family: 219,000 Other: 178,000 Total: 1,056,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

S.L. Hayden Construction Inc. SAJO Inc. Steve Hayden, President 3015 S Burleson Blvd. Burleson, TX 76028 (817) 783-7900 Fax: (817) 783-7902 www.hcichicago.com shayden@hcichicago.com Year Established: 1940, No. of Employees: 40 Retail: $21,000,000.00 Restaurants: $14,270,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $35,270,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 43 Square Footage: Retail: 12,352 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 64,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 76,352 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Facility Maintenance

Rocco Raco, Director of Marketing & Business Development 1320 Graham Mont-Royal, QC H3P 3C8 Canada (877) 901-7256 Fax: (514) 385-1863 www.sajo.com rocco@sajo.com Year Established: 1977 No. of Employees: 170 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Retail

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SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Schimenti Construction Sharpe Contractors, LLC Company Brian Mulligan, Vice President Joseph Rotondo, Executive Vice President 650 Danbury Rd. Norwalk, CT 06877 (914) 244-9100 Fax: (914) 244-9104 www.schimenti.com marketing@schimenti.com Year Established: 1994 No. of Employees: 205 Retail: $224,000,000.00 Restaurants: $16,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $35,000,000.00 Total: $275,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 160 Square Footage: Retail: 1,040,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 120,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 340,000 Total: 1,500,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

425 Buford Hwy. NW, Suite 204 Suwanee, GA 30024 (678) 765-8680 www.sharpegc.com bmulligan@sharpegc.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: 15 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $17,352,275.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $17,352,275.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 3 Square Footage: Retail: 17,000 Hospitality: 54,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 71,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

Solex Contracting Inc. Jerry Allen, President

Scott Contracting, LLC 42146 Remington Ave.

Johnny Wilkins, Director of Business Development 702 Old Peachtree Road NW, Suite 100 Suwanee, GA 30024 (770) 274-0534 www.scott-contracting.com johnny.wilkins@scott-contracting.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 48 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $12,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $25,000,000.00 Total: $37,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 120+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Office Interiors

CONTRACTING INC.

Temecula, CA 92590 (951) 308-1706 Fax: (951) 308-1856 www.solexcontracting.com jerry@solexcontracting.com Year Established: 2005 No. of Employees: 95 Retail: $30,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $10,000,000.00 Total: $40,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 150 Square Footage: Retail: 450,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 150,000 Total: 600,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Tower Erection/Telecommunications

SOS Retail Services Shames Construction Eli Lessing, Director of

Carolyn Shames, President/CEO 5826 Brisa St. Livermore, CA94550 (925) 606-3000 Fax: (925) 606-3003 www.shames.com cshames@shames.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: 54 Retail: $77,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $77,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 20 Square Footage: Retail: 2,700,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,700,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

60

Business Development 201 Rosa Helm Way Franklin, TN 37067 (615) 550-4343 www.sos-retailservices.com elessing@sos-retailservices.com Year Established: 2009 No. of Employees: 100 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Spiegelglass Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc. Construction Company Jeff Chandler, Vice President Tim Spiegelglass, Owner 18 Worthington Access Dr. Maryland Heights, MO 63043 (314) 569-2300 Fax: (314) 569-0788 www.spiegelglass-gc.com tim@spiegelglass-gc.com Year Established: 1904 No. of Employees: 15 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Tenant Improvement Retail

4555 Middle Rd. Columbus, IN 47203 (812) 379-9547 Fax: (812) 372-4759 www.tbcci.com jeff.chandler@tbcci.com Year Established: 1933 No. of Employees: 250 Retail: $70,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $5,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $1,000,000.00 Other: $11,000,000.00 Total: $87,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 575 Square Footage: Retail: 5,000,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 250,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 500,000 Total: 5,750,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores

Excellence in General Contracng Services

Quality. Service. Value. Safety.

Proudly serving clients naonwide for 35 years. We manage and facilitate the construcon process, so you can focus on driving revenues. Through our commitment to superior quality, service, value, and safety, Westwood Contractors provides excellence in general contracng services. Naonwide experience Full range of pre-construcon services Shell and interior construcon Chain-wide feature rollout programs Refresh and rebranding programs

Established 1983.

951 West 7th Street | Fort Worth, TX 76102 | 817.877.3800 | Addional offices in Phoenix, AZ and Charleston, SC. www.westwoodcontractors.com

CIRCLE NO. 29

MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING CBC1260195

TDS Construction, Inc. TRICON Construction

Christi Bock, VP of Operations 4239 63rd St. W Bradenton, FL 34209 (941) 795-6100 Fax: (941) 795-6101 www.tdsconstruction.com christi.bock@tdsconstruction.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 63 Retail: $52,900,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $52,900,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 49 Square Footage: Retail: 3,464,751 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 3,464,751 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers

Rich Carlucci, Vice President 3433 Marshall Ln. Bensalem, PA 19020 (267) 223-1060 Fax: (215) 633-8363 www.tricon-construction.com r.carlucci@tricon-construction.com Retail: $7,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $7,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 555,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 555,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Casinos, Specialty Stores

UHC Construction Services Leslie Burton, Director of

Timberwolff Business Development Construction, Inc. 154 E Aurora Rd., #155 Mike Wolff, President 1659 Arrow Rte. Upland, CA 91786 (909) 949-0380 Fax: (909) 949-8500 www.timberwolff.com mike@timberwolff.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 160 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Commercial Dental/Medical Offices

Northfield, OH 44067 (216) 544-7588 www.uhccorp.com lburton@uhccorp.com Year Established: 2006 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $25,000,000.00 Restaurants: $11,000,000.00 Hospitality: $1,000,000.00 Healthcare: $1,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $38,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 412 Square Footage: Retail: 4,125,000 Hospitality: 8,000 Restaurants: 2,112,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 14,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 6,259,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Financial/Banking

Triad Construction VENATOR Contracting Group, LLC

Donna Coneley, Vice President of Development 2206 O’Day Rd. Pearland, TX 77581 (281) 485-4700 Fax: (281) 485-7722 www.triadrc.com d.coneley@triadrc.com Year Established: 2008, No. of Employees: 65 Retail: $5,842,710.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $750,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $41,445,761.00 Total: $48,038,471.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 32 Square Footage: Retail: 48,689 Hospitality: 5,769 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 436,271 Total: 490,729 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Environmentally Controlled Storage Facilities

62

Suzette Novak, Director of Business Development 44930 Vic Wertz Dr. Clinton Township, MI 48036 (586) 229-2428 Fax: (586) 229-2428 www.venatorcontracting.com suzette@venatorcontracting.com Year Established: 2010 No. of Employees: 12 Retail: $5,000,000.00 Restaurants: $3,500,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $587,000.00 Total: $9,087,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 23 Square Footage: Retail: 134,900 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 34,500 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 10,000 Total: 179,400 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Salons, Community Centers

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Warwick Construction, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc.

Walt Watzinger, Vice President 365 FM 1959 Houston, TX 77034 (832) 448-7000 Fax: (832) 448-3000 www.warwickconstruction.com CONSTRUCTION walt@warwickconstruction.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 80 Retail: $75,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $75,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 124 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Rick Winkel, C.E.O. 1919 W Main St. Inverness, FL 34452 (352) 860-0500 Fax: (352) 860-0700 www.winkel-construction.com rickw@winkel-construction.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

Wolverine Building Group Weekes Construction, Inc. Mike Houseman,

Hunter Weekes, Vice President 237 Rhett St. Greenville, SC29601 (864) 233-0061 Fax: (864) 235-9971 www.weekesconstruction.com hweekes@weekesconstruction.com Year Established: 1975, No. of Employees: 32 Retail: $36,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $36,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 1975 Square Footage: Retail: 599,212 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 599,212 Specialize In: N/A

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company Bob Minutoli, Jr., Division Vice President 135 W Central Blvd., Suite 840 Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 370-4500 www.whiting-turner.com bob.minutoli@whiting-turner.com Year Established: 1909, No. of Employees: 3,867 Retail: $435,000,000.00 Restaurants: $37,000,000.00 Hospitality: $248,000,000.00 Healthcare: $1,150,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $398,000,000.00 Federal: $321,000,000.00 Other: $5,856,000,000.00 Total: $8,445,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 350+ Square Footage: Retail: 7,098,881 Hospitality: 3,628,337 Restaurants: 193,270 Federal: 1,958,599 Healthcare: 24,553,753 Multi-Family: 22,026,000 Other: N/A Total: 59,458,840 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, E-Commerce, Data Center, Warehouse & Distribution, Theme Parks, Sports Facilities

President/North America 4045 Barden SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512 (616) 299-4381 Fax: (616) 949-6211 www.wolvgroup.com mhouseman@wolvgroup.com Year Established: N/A, No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $20,000,000.00 Restaurants: $20,000,000.00 Hospitality: $15,000,000.00 Healthcare: $5,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $95,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $40,000,000.00 Total: $195,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 700,000 Hospitality: 10,000 Restaurants: 50,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 10,000 Multi-Family: 180,000 Other: N/A Total: 950,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family

Zerr Enterprises, Inc. Mike Zerr, President 1545 S Acoma St. Denver, CO 80223 (303) 758-7776 Fax: (303) 758-7770 www.zerrenterprises.com mike.zerr@zerrenterprises.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 16 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $18,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $18,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: 28 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 880,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 880,000 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING

Lighting manufacturers on display in annual listing

I

t is all about lighting these days. To help you keep up with the industry’s top vendors, our annual listing gives you the contact person and contact information you need to get started. To see how to get listed in the next report, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. Above All Lighting Inc. Acuity Brands Inc. Ying Su, Marketing Manager 1501 Industrial Way N Toms River, NJ 08755 (866) 222-8866 www.abovealllighting.com yingsu@abovealllighting.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Monica Weglicki-Sanchez, Sr. Manager Analyst & Media Relations, Thought Leadership One Lithonia Way Conyers, GA 30012 (470) 413-2340 www.acuitybrands.com monica.sanchez@acuitybrands.com Lighting Product Type: Connected LED Luminaires by Litonia Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Michael Giardina, Product Manager 6122 S Eastern Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90040 (323) 213-4626 www.acclaimlighting.com info@acclaimlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.afcweb.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Armored Cable, Metal Clad Cable, Flexible and Liquidtight Conduit Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

AFC Cable Acclaim Lighting, LLC Lindsay Lyons, Marketing

Altman Lighting

ACS Uni-Fab Julie Smith, General Manager Lindsay Lyons, Marketing Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.acsunifab.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Modular Lighting, Pre-Fabricated Assemblies, Raised Floor Systems, and Underfloor Systems Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Multi-Family, Telecommunications, Office Space, Casinos, and Hotels

64

57 Alexander St. Yonkers, NY 10701 (914) 476-7987 www.altmanlighting.com marketing@altmanlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Entertainment and Theatrical Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Museum, Art Gallery, Performance Arts Venues, Houses of Worship

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


CIRCLE NO. 30


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING American Permalight, Inc. Auroralight Marina Batzke, General Manager 237th St., #101 Torrance, CA 90505 (310) 891-0924 www.americanpermalight.com info@americanpermalight.com Lighting Product Type: Emergency: Egress Path Marking Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Amerlux, LLC Bill Plageman, Vice President of Marketing and Product Development 178 Bauer Rd. Oakland, NJ 07436 (973) 882-5010 www.amerlux.com bplageman@amerlux.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Jason McCulloch, Director of Sales and Marketing 2742 Loker Ave. W Carlsbad, CA 92010 (877) 942-1179 Fax: (760) 931-2916 www.auroralight.com sales@auroralight.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Underwater Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential

Autec Power Systems Billy Bautista, Marketing Director 31328 Via Colinas, Suite 102 Westlake Village, CA 91362 (818) 338-7788 www.autec.com marketing@autec.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Drivers Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Custom, Agri/Horticulture

ANP Lighting Avenue Lighting Ron Foster, Owner 9044 Del Mar Ave. Montclair, CA 91763 (909) 239-3855 www.anplighting.com rpfoster@anplighting.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Chris Titizian, CEO 9000 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth, CA 91331 (800) 798-0409 Fax: (888) 870-0105 www.avenuelighting.com info@avenuelighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Custom Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Aurea Lighting Big Ass Fans Beth Pfefferle, Vice President, Marketing 116 John St. Lowell, MA 01852 (978) 459-4500 www.bambuglobal.com/aurea-lighting/ bpfefferle@bambuglobal.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

66

Alex Risen, Public Relations 2348 Innovation Dr. Lexington, KY 40511 (877) BIG-FANS www.bigassfans.com alex.risen@bigassfans.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Task Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Combine energy efficiency & safety in stairwell lighting

simple sensor solutions

Motion controlled bi-level lighting provides an energy saving solution for applications such as stairwells, offices, libraries, laundry rooms, conference rooms and any other areas where maximum light levels may not be needed 100% of the time Bi-level motion sensor controlled LED luminaires offer increased energy savings with standby power as low as 3 watts without leaving the area dark. Our proven ultra-sonic sensor technology immediately switches the fixture to full light output when occupancy is detected.

For office and retail spaces

Narrow Linear Series

ENERGY SAVING Standby Mode When Unoccupied

100% Brightness For Safety Upon Occupancy

slim | appealing | no led hot spots

Architectural Brilliance The NL line is one of the slimmest LED luminaires LaMar makes: at only 2.25� wide, these fixtures can fit discreetly into almost any architectural application. Comprised of three product groups, the Narrow Linear Wall (NLW), Narrow Linear Surface (NLS) and the Narrow Linear Recessed (NLR), this product line is ideal for retail, office, educational facility or architectural applications with most being suitable for continuous row installations (up & along a wall [90˚ angle] or suspended from ceiling). Cable Hung or Wall Direct/Indirect

Cable/Surface or Wall mount

Cable/Surface

Recessed

optional wall bracket

DE IN THE MA

USA

485 Smith Street, Farmingdale, NY 11735 | tel 631.777.7700 | fax 631.777.7705 www.lamarled.com | www.occusmart.com CIRCLE NO. 31


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Bitro Group ConTech Lighting Fritz Meyne, Jr., Vice President Sales 300 Lodi St. Hackensack, NY 07601 (201) 641-1004 www.bitrogroup.com fritzm@bitrogroup.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Point of Purchase, RGB, Plastics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Marine

725 Landwehr Rd. Northbrook, IL 60062 (847) 559-5500 www.contechlighting.com info@contechlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Blueprint Lighting Controlled Power Kelly Aaron, Chief Luminary/ Company Creative Director 601 W 26th St., Suite M258 New York, NY 10001 (212) 243-6300 www.blueprintlighting.com kelly@blueprintlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Wall Sconces Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial, Multi-Family

+

x

Cope Boost Lighting Lindsay Lyons, Marketing

Christine Pappas, Business Development 3235 Satellite Place, Bldg. 400, Ste. 358 Duluth, GA 30096 (470) 209-3668 www.boostlightinginc.com christine@boostlightinginc.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures (Commercial Industrial and Residential Categories) Markets Served: Healthcare, Education, Commercial, Multi-Family, Commercial, Industrial and Residential LIGHTING

Suzanne Hooley, Marketing Director 1955 Stephenson Hwy. Troy, MI 48083 (800) 521-4792 www.controlledpwr.com shooley@controlledpwr.com Lighting Product Type: Emergency Lighting Inverters, Egress Lighting Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.copecabletray.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Cable Trays and Cable Management Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Education, Commercial

Cree Lighting Commercial lighting Carrie Martinelli, Director,

Farren Halcovich National Account Sales Manager 81161 Indio Blvd. Indio, Ca 92201 800-755-0155 www.commercial-lighting.net farrenhalcovich@yahoo.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

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Marketing Communications & Events 4401 Silicon Dr. Durham, NC 27703 (919) 407-5476 www.creelighting.com cmartinelli@creelighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Airports, Auto Dealerships, Industrial/Warehouse, Petroleum & Convenience Store

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Your PREMIER Lighting Distributor Lido Lighting is an industry-leading lighting distributor of lighting and controls. We design and supply all manufacturers. We’re currently ranked within the top 10 national lighting distributors nationwide.

FAMILY OWNED BUSINESS Founded over 45 years ago

NO VOICEMAIL Lido responds with urgency

TOTAL DISTRIBUTION FOCUS Committed to Latest Technology

RELIABILITY Dedicated inventory for clients

CIRCLE NO. 32

NATIONAL ACCOUNT LIGHTING DISTRIBUTOR www.lidolighting.com • 631.595.2000 • info@lidolighting.com


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING D & P Custom Lights & Enlighted Wiring Systems, Inc. Mark Milligan, Senior Vice

Rita Schenkel, Inside Sales Representative 900 63rd Ave. N Nashville, TN 37209 (615) 350-7800 Fax: (615) 350-8310 www.dandcustomlights.com info@dandpcustomlights.com Lighting Product Type: Checkout Lights Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

President of Marketing 930 Benecia Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (650) 964-1094 www.enlightedinc.com mark.milligan@enlightedinc.com Lighting Product Type: N/A Markets Served: N/A

ET2 Lighting EarthTronics, Inc. Adena Sperling, Marketing Director

Kevin Youngquist, Executive Vice President 380 W Western Ave., Suite 301 Muskegon, MI 49440 (231) 332-1188 Fax: (231) 726-5029 www.earthtronics.com contact@earthtronics.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

253 N Vineland Ave. City of Industry, CA 91746 (626) 956-4200 www.et2online.com adenas@maximlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Smart Home Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial, Multi-Family

Flex Lighting Solutions

Eaton Luis Acena, Sr. Marketing Manager

Kyra Mitchell Lewis 1121 Highway 74 S Peachtree City, GA 30269 770-486-4800 eaton.com/lighting PTCmarcom@eaton.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highway Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Elemental LED Kris Hong, Sr. Marketing Manager 885 Trademark Dr., Suite 200 Reno, NV 89521 (877) 817-6028 www.elementalled.com kris.hong@elementalled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

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7320 W 162nd St. Overland Park, KS 66085 (913) 851-3000 www.flexlightingsolutions.com lighting@flex.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Indoor Sports Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Fulham Andy Firchau, Marketing Manager 12705 S Van Ness Ave. Hawthorne, CA 90250 (323) 779-2980 Fax: (323) 754-1141 www.fulham.com afirchau@fulham.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Wireless Controlled LED Drivers Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


SIZE DOES MATTER Cylinder One® HO produces class-leading output in one of the smallest available profiles.

CYLINDER NE HO CYLINDER NE HO . 6 inch Aperture ONE HO CYLINDER ®

®

®

. 12,000 Lumen . 15º, 22º, 40º, and 70º Reflector Options via Quick Change Reflectors . Best In Class Dimming from 0-100% . Aria Wireless DMX Technology Built-In . 10-Day Quick Ship on Most Models via the Acclaim Modular Systems Platform . Ideal for Theatres, Airports, Convention Centers, Shopping Malls and Other High Ceiling Applications

W I R E L E S S

D M X

CIRCLE NO. 33

SOLID STATE: SOLID PERFORMANCE

+31 (0) 45 - 5468560 EU +44 (0) 1162786177 UK +1 323 213 4626 USA SALES@ACCLAIMLIGHTING.COM

ACCLAIMLIGHTING.COM


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Genesis Lighting Solutions IdentiCom Sign Solutions Doug Head, Executive Vice President 700 Parker Square, Suite 205 Flower Mound, TX 75028 (469) 322-1900 www.making-light.com doug@adart.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Parking Lot Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

John DiNunzio, President 24657 Halsted Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (248) 344-9590 Fax: (248) 946-4198 www.identicomsigns.com info@identicomsigns.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Innovations in Lighting Rob Bruck, President

Griplock Systems 136 N California Ave. Bryan Shamblin, Sales Director 1029 Cindy Ln. Carpinteria, CA 93013 (805) 566-0064 www.griplocksystems.com bryans@griplocksystems.com Lighting Product Type: Cable Suspension Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

City of Industry, CA 91744 (818) 732-9238 Fax: (818) 796-4724 www.innovationsinlighting.com anna@bruckconcepts.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Decorative Markets Served: Hospitality, Commercial

Michael Kerber, Director of LED Development 11745 Sappington Barracks Rd. St. Louis, MO 63127 (800) 542-9941 www.hanleyledsolutions.com information@hanleyledsolutions.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

15 Harbor Park Dr. Port Washington, NY 11050 (800) 527-7796 Fax: (855) 265-5768 www.jescolighting.com info@jescolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

JESCO Lighting Group HanleyLED Richard Kurtz, President & CEO

HyLite LED, LLC Shahill Amin, VP of Marketing and Sales 3705 Centre Cir. Fort Mill, SC 29715 (803) 336-2230 Fax: (803) 336-2231 www.hyliteledlighting.com shahilamin@hylite.us Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Industrial Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Industrial

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Kalwall Corporation Amy Keller, VP International Sales and Marketing 1111 Candia Rd. Manchester, NH 03105 (603) 627-3861 Fax: (603) 627-7905 www.kalwall.com info@kalwall.com Lighting Product Type: Daylighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


LaMar Lighting Co., Inc. LIDO Lighting Nicole Calise, Director of Marketing 485 Smith St. Farmingdale, NY 11735 (631) 777-7700 Fax: (631) 777-7705 www.lamarled.com nicole@lamarlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Other

Bill Pierro Jr., LC, President 966 Grand Blvd. Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 595-2000 Fax: (631) 595-7010 www.lidolighting.com billpierro@lidolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Millwork

LEDVANCE Lightheaded Lighting Ltd.

Glen Gracia, Head of Communications, USC 200 Ballardvale St. Wilmington, MA 02189 (978) 753-5185 www.sylvania.com glen.gracia@ledvance.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Steve Dewar, VP Business Development 1150-572 Nicola Pl. Port Coquitlam, BC Canada V3B OK4 (604) 464-5644 Fax: (604) 464-0888 www.lightheadedlighting.com info@lightheadedlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Lighting Services Inc. Sales

Legrand 2 Holt Dr.

Kelsey London, Account Supervisor 415 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10007 (212) 829-0002, Ext. 125 www.sharpthink.com kelsey.london@sharpthink.com Lighting Product Type: Landscape Lighting, Lighting Controls Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Stony Point, NY 10980 (845) 942-2800 Fax: (845) 942-2177 www.lightingservicesinc.com sales@maillsi.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Museum/Galleries

Legrand, North & Central America LUXX Light Technology (Wattstopper) Andreas Weyer, Managing Partner Jared Morello, Director of Product Management 2234 Rutherford Rd. Carlsbad, CA 92008 (760) 804-9701 www.legrand.us/wattstopper jared.morello@legrand.us Lighting Product Type: Lighting Controls Markets Served: Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Multi-Family

4425 S Kansas Ave. St. Francis, WI 53235 (414) 763-3141 www.luxx.com info@luxx.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Light Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Maxim Lighting OSRAM Adena Sperling, Marketing Director 253 N Vineland Ave. City of Industry, CA 91746 (626) 956-4200 www.maximlighting.com adenas@maximlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Smart Home Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial, Multi-Family

Modular Lighting Instruments

John Yriberri, North America Market Leader One PPG Pl., Floor 31 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (800) 674-9691 www.supermodular.us welcome.us@supermodular.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting, Architectural Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Nora Lighting

Kevin Solano, Marketing Manager 6505 Gayhart St. Commerce, CA 90040 (323) 767-2600 Fax: (500) 500-9955 www.noralighting.com kevin.solano@noralighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Original BTC

Anna Lee, Showroom & Account Manager 56 Greene St. New York, NY 10013 (646) 759-9007 www.us.originalbtc.com anna@originalbtc.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

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Ellen Miller, Head of Media Relations, Americas Region 200 Ballardvale St. Wilmington, MA 01887 (978) 570-3755 www.osram.us/ e.miller@osram.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Management Systems, Horticultural Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Philips Lighting Heather Milcarek, Marketing Director 200 Franklin Square Dr. Somerset, NJ 08873 (732) 563-3468 www.usa.lighting.philips.com heather.milcarek@philips.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government, Grocery, Petrol, Public Spaces

Project Light Inc. Jenni Collier, Director of Projects 4976 Hudson Dr. Stow, OH 44224 (330) 688-9026 Fax: (330) 688-9026 www.projectlightinc.com jenni@projectlightinc.com Lighting Product Type: N/A Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Commercial

Quattrobi Inc. Marina, Managing Director 311 W 43rd St., #11-101 New York, NY 10036 (929) 422-2361 www.quattrobi.net info@quattrobi.net Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Regency Lighting Solar Electric Power Company Mark Heerema, Sr. Director National Accounts 195 Chastain Meadows Ct., Suite 100 Kennesaw, GA 30144 (800) 284-2024 www.regencylighting.com mark.heerema@regencylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Robe Lighting Inc. Lisa Caro, Marketing Coordinator 3410 Davie Rd., #401 Davie, FL 33314 (954) 680-1901 Fax: (954) 680-1910 www.robelighting.com info@robelighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Stephanie Holloran, National Sales Manager 1521 SE Palm Court Stuart, FL 34994 (772) 220-6615 Fax: (772) 220-8616 www.sepco-solarlighting.com info@sepconet.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Sonneman- A Way of Light Matthew Sonneman, Director Sales and Market Development 20 North Ave. Larchmont, NY 10538 (914) 834-3600 www.sonnemanawayoflight.com matts@sonneman.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Specialty Lighting Teresa Carpenter, Marketing

Samsung Semiconductor, Inc. P.O. Box 780

Sunghoon Jung, Sales & Marketing Manager 11800 Amberpark Dr., #225 Alpharetta, GA 30004 www.samsung.com/led sunghoon.j@samsung.com Lighting Product Type: LED Component Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Sentry Electric LLC Michael Shatzkin, Dir. Of Marketing & Bus. Development 185 Buffalo Ave. Freeport, NY 11520 (516) 379-4660 Fax: (516) 378-0624 www.sentrylighting.com michael@sentrylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Municipalities

4203 Fallston Rd. Fallston, NC 28042 (704) 538-6522 Ext. 207 Fax: (704) 538-0909 www.specialtylighting.com tcarpenter@specialtylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Tivoli Stephen Ledesma, Marketing Manager 15602 Mosher Ave. Tustin, CA 92780 (714) 957-6101 Fax: (714) 427-3458 www.tivolilighting.com stephen@tivoliusa.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Theater (Safety Low Light) Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Commercial, Theater

MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Tridonic Inc. USA VELUX America, LLC Paul Montesino, Director of Product Marketing, Tridonic USA 3300 Route 9W Highland, NY 12528 (617) 595-8532 www.tridonic.us paul.montesino@tridonic.com Lighting Product Type: LED Drivers Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Kelsey Webb, Public Relations/ Content Account Manager 104 Ben Casey Dr. Fort Mill, SC 29708 (803) 396-5700 www.veluxusa.com kwebb@wrayward.com Lighting Product Type: Commercial Skylights Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Tuya Smart Vista Professional Kody Betonte, Outdoor Lighting

Marketing Director, North America 75 E Santa Clara St., 6th Floor San Jose, CA 95113 (909) 460-3302 www.tuya.com kody@tuya.com Lighting Product Type: Smart Lighting AI+loT Platform. The Smart Lighting Platform will allow Commercial lighting manufacturers to connect to the broader Tuya AI+loT platform, saving on energy and allowing for programmable outputs, diagnostics and dimming cycles. Markets Served: Commercial

Ultralights Lighting Julia Restin-Morl, Business Development Manager 320 S Plumer Ave. Tucson, AZ 85719 (520) 623-9829 www.ultralightslighting.com julia@ultralightslighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting * Decorative Task, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Ecclesiastical, High End Residential

Urban Neon Sign Co. Jim Malin, Sales Executive 500 Pine St., Suite 3A Holmes, PA 19043 (610) 804-0437 Fax: (610) 461-5566 www.urbanneon.com jmalin@urbanneon.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Neon

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Cruz Perez, Vice President of Sales of Marketing 1625 Surveyor Ave. Simi Valley, CA 93063 (805) 527-0987 or (800) 766-8478 Fax: (888) 670-8478 www.vistapro.com email@vistapro.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Waldmann Lighting Debbie Boton, Marketing Communications Coordinator 9 Century Dr. Wheeling, IL 60090 (800) 634-0007 Fax: (847) 520-1730 www.waldmannlighting.com waldmann@waldmannlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Classic Shapes for Modern Living An impressive mixture of finishes and materials available in different shade sizes – up to 48” diameter – allowing individuality within the design and a harmonious addition to any room. Integrated, dimmable, warm LED sources create the perfect illumination and a pleasant lighting atmosphere. As a family-owned and operated business, we are committed to manufacturing the highest quality, made in the U.S.A. products, and delivering outstanding expertise, service, and value. Shown: Oversized, Madison and M+D Lighting – visit us online or call us to discuss your customized lighting solution.

ANPlighting.com / 1-800-548-3227 CIRCLE NO. 34


LIGHT OF DAY Intelligence in emergency lighting improves building safety By Russ Sharer

78

A

ny commercial building has to conform to safety regulations, including the placement and maintenance of emergency lighting. Once installed, those emergency lights have to be tested regularly to ensure they are operating correctly and have sufficient battery power. But by installing smart emergency luminaires, you not only eliminate the need for manual testing, you lay the foundation for an intelligent emergency system that can increase building safety.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


IT’S NOT JUST WHERE YOU START IT'S ALSO WHERE YOU FINISH INFINA® 120V Strip

120V INFINA® with on-board constant current IC chips make certain that the beginning of each run looks exactly like the end - even at 150ft

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Matching our 120V strip offering with our architectural-grade 24V LED strip, available in a wide range of options, means JESCO can meet any of your design needs.

As the original company to introduce FLEXIBLE AC LED strip, JESCO Lighting is the go-to choice for designers who realize that not all LED strips are the same

• Extra long runs up to 150 feet • Made-to-order in precise 4" increments • A single source powers entire run eliminating multiple drivers • Many CCTs - 2400K, 2700K, 3000K, 3500K, 4000K & 5000K • 3-step MacAdam LEDs offer 555 Lm/Ft with 112 Lm/W • UL & ETL listed for indoor and outdoor applications • Specifically designed for plug-in or hardwire installations • Mounted with channels or clips • Aluminum channel & lens with endcaps for a neat enclosure

800.527.7796 www.jescolighting.com

• Designed, developed and assembled in the U.S.A. • Shipped ready for installation

CIRCLE NO. 35


LIGHT OF DAY Consider the possibilities of having smart emergency luminaires strategically placed throughout any building. Sensors in these luminaires can be used to detect hazards such as smoke or noxious gases to trigger an alarm. And if you connect these luminaires into a single ecosystem, you can consolidate access from a single location, making it easy to monitor and manage building conditions from a central dashboard. To create an intelligent emergency lighting ecosystem, you need two basic elements: onboard luminaire intelligence and connectivity. Since the new generation of emergency luminaires are made with solid-state technology, programmable intelligence is embedded in the LED semiconductors. All you need to do is create a twoway communications system for luminaire monitoring and to issue commands.

A wireless emergency ecosystem

Once you have an intelligent ecosystem in place, you can extend it to support other applications beyond emergency response and building access.

To connect luminaires together you can use either a cabled network systems or a wireless network. With new construction, wiring luminaires into a single intelligent infrastructure is certainly an option. More luminaire vendors are experimenting with Power over Ethernet (PoE, IEEE 802.3) to deliver power and connectivity to luminaires. But PoE has not yet gained widespread acceptance and it won’t work for luminaire retrofits, which is why more luminaire manufacturers are starting to add wireless networking capability to LED drivers. There already are wireless standards for lighting communications. Zigbee (IEEE 802.15.4), for example, is a 20-year-old

low-power radio platform specifically for lighting controls, although it can’t handle other types of data traffic. To create a robust emergency lighting infrastructure, you need a wireless approach that is scalable, and that can handle different types of command and control data. Bluetooth mesh is rapidly becoming the de facto standard for intelligent lighting communications. While Bluetooth has been around as an open, device-to-device communications standard for some time, Bluetooth mesh is relatively new, providing a peer-to-peer communications grid that is readily extensible. Since it is a mesh network, data traffic is broadcast to all the other Bluetooth mesh-enabled devices within range, creating redundant connections; nodes can be added or removed at will. The Bluetooth mesh grid is readily scalable since each node is a repeater, and it can handle two-way data traffic. And since it is a well-defined open standard, devices from different vendors are assured to be compatible. With a mesh network of smart emergency luminaires in place, you have a simpler means of testing emergency lighting and a foundation for smart building controls.

Programmed emergency response

By connecting emergency luminaires into a common ecosystem, you dramatically simplify testing and logging of emergency lighting. Standards such as CSA C22.2 NO. 141 require testing and logging of emergency systems. Rather than manually inspecting each light, you can use a central console to monitor emergency lights for readiness, run remote testing and log the results. You create new management and control possibilities by creating an ecosystem of programmable emergency luminaires, such as: • Testing emergency systems from anywhere, anytime, including function and battery duration tests, failure alerts and automatic logging • Real-time emergency monitoring • Remote maintenance including commissioning and firmware updates • Monitoring for unit failures and end-of-life for components • Intelligent emergency response, such as programmed evacuation procedures • Full integration with other security and emergency access systems • Data gathering to assess building traffic patterns, occupancy, and more Implementing an intelligent emergency lighting ecosystem also creates new possibilities for safer buildings. Sensors in emergency luminaires can be programmed to detect fire, smoke, carbon monoxide,

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LIGHT OF DAY or even the sound of a gunshot. Using preprogrammed responses those sensors can implement a response such as sounding an alarm, activating emergency lights and alerting emergency services. The connected ecosystem can use machine learning to provide proactive as well as reactive responses. For example, emergency luminaire sensors can detect the location of a fire or hazard. Based on incoming data the system can respond by lighting a path toward a safe exit, or detecting room occupancy to ensure the danger zone is clear. They can even trigger other systems such as locking and unlocking fire doors.

Since the ecosystem operates over Bluetooth mesh it can be accessed from any Bluetooth-enabled devices, such as a laptop or smart phone. Data also can be accessed over the internet, which makes it easier to not only alert first responders but help them locate hot spots as well as locate building occupants who may be trapped. The same intelligent ecosystem can be used for other applications. For example, Bluetooth sensors can control building access. Using Bluetooth tagging, individuals can be granted or denied

access to specific areas based on the information on their badges. Visitors can be issued temporary passes with access credentials built in, and Bluetooth tagging can even be used for wayfinding, using Bluetooth beacons and mapping software that can run on your smartphone or tablet to guide you through the building or campus.

A foundation for building automation

Once you have an intelligent ecosystem in place, you can extend it to support other applications beyond emergency response and building access. For example, the same emergency luminaire sensors can be used to monitor building environmental conditions, such as ambient temperature and available light. The ecosystem can be programmed to respond to changing light conditions, either dimming room lighting, automatically lowering or raising blinds or turning off lights in unoccupied rooms. It also can be used to activate HVAC for consistent temperature and humidity. In fact, this type of intelligent lighting system is an ideal skeleton for building automation for the Internet of Things (IoT), especially since Bluetooth mesh can handle any type of data traffic. For example, DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) is a common standard for light dimming controls, but HVAC uses a (building automation system (BAS) protocol such as BACnet. While the wireless infrastructure can handle different types of data traffic, you still need a common protocol, such as IoT, to make disparate systems interoperable. With IoT you have a foundation platform that can support multiple building automation protocols, providing a central access point to all building management systems as well as access via the web. You can expect to see more smart LED drivers with Bluetooth mesh capability coming to market. Installing or retrofitting smart LED emergency luminaires will likely prove the simplest way to connect an entire building into an intelligent building management infrastructure. CCR

Consider the possibilities of having smart emergency luminaires strategically placed throughout any building.

Russ Sharer is VP of Global Marketing and Business Development for Fulham a manufacturer of innovative and energyefficient lighting sub-systems and components for lighting manufacturers worldwide. Russ Sharer is a business leader with over 25 years of experience in B2B marketing and sales, including successful software and network equipment start-ups.

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INNOVATIVE THERMOPLASTIC SOLUTIONS

PLASKOLITE.COM 800-848-9124 CIRCLE NO. 37


Bostik’s Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™ deadens sound traveling from one floor to another in this residential high-rise condominium.

Sound dampening is nothing to keep quiet about And, why it’s more important than ever in today’s construction marketplace.

T

he commercial and multifamily combined building universe (in the United States) consists of office buildings, stores, hotels, warehouses, commercial garages… and, the still very hot multifamily housing sector. Recent statistics indicate there was a 4% increase for commercial and multifamily construction starts is the states during 2018, in particular for multifamily housing, which was up 8% to $95.1 billion, while the commercial building categories listed above, were up 1% to $117.3 billion. Multifamily housing in 2017 had fallen 8% after appearing to have reached a peak in 2016, before posting the 8% rebound in 2018. Builders of multifamily buildings, especially in the last few years, have a new catchphrase, “acoustic privacy,” and they are taking this term very seriously. A tenant’s noise complaints can possibly escalate to a point where they end up in front of a judge. As a result, more and

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By Ron Treister

more general contractors, architects, designers and engineers are putting acoustic privacy under the microscope from a construction project’s concept through its completion. In today’s highly competitive marketplace where buyers are more cautious than ever… and, an educated consumer is still the best customer, absolutely NOBODY wants to be disturbed by their neighbors! Working on lavish multifamily high-rises, savvy designers seldom plan for gathering rooms that could emit loud noises to be positioned next to residential living units. In other words, they’re not going to put a fitness room adjacent to apartments. Clearly, tenants don’t want to hear cacophonous sounds coming from a large, early morning spinning class… or the pounding of feet from a spirited Zumba workout. Overall, the entire building team, from the developer on down, for

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Advertorial the most part knows the vital importance of making sound decisions about sound management for their respective projects. A good indication of what experts consider when planning how best to address sound issues, was discussed by Scott Banda, Bostik’s Director of Marketing & Business Development, who stated, “There are three basic types of noise transmission found in today’s multi-family residences. ‘Airborne,’ such as voices or music; ‘Impact,’ from footsteps or dropped objects… and, ‘Structural Component Movement’ (resulting in squeaking or creaking floors). “Local building codes have standardized on two methods of measuring noise,” Banda continued. “STC (Sound Transmission Coefficient) measures the airborne sound moving through a floor, and IIC (Impact Isolation Class) measures sound from impact on the floor. Both can be measured in a laboratory as well as on-site. The International Building Code (IBC) requires a lab IIC of 50 dB (45 dB field measurements) and a lab STC of 50 dB (45 dB field measurements). In both cases, the higher the number, the better the performance of the sound abatement material. While not all local building codes are the same, the UBC is the most common benchmark in the U.S.” Banda said. Today, most developers, GC’s, their subs and suppliers are on the same page relative to soundproofing in construction, which can be defined as “a combination of many different means to achieve the goal of reducing sound pressure with respect to a specified sound source and receptor.” Or in layman terms, simply “to reduce the sound one hears.” In America, especially in higher-end residences, natural hardwood flooring continues to be in demand. Wood flooring has many advantages over other types of flooring. It adds value, warmth and style to both new and newly renovated homes. Installation generally will cost more than purchasing new carpet. However, premium wood floors can last more than 100 years with regular maintenance and minor repair. The majestic “look” of wood combined with the fact that it is a green, sustainable product of Mother Nature, makes it an even more attractive surfacing decision. And, because it doesn’t harbor allergens or dirt, as do carpets and rugs, natural wood flooring continues to be highly desirable and sought after. If wood flooring does have an ostensible downside or two, these most likely will have to do with sound. In particular, with “impact” such has the reverberations from footsteps or dropped items… and with ‘structural component movement.” (We’ve all walked on a creaky wood floor at one time or another.) “Right now,” added Banda, “adhesive acoustic membranes are emerging as the fastest-growing segment of the sound abatement systems market, especially in specifications for high-rise, residential construction. Other, more established products can be used in conjunction with high-performance adhesive membranes to further increase sound dampening, moving from a solution that simply passes code … to a system that dramatically increases the comfort of the

space and virtually eliminates one of the most common complaints of multi-family living.”

A new way of doing things

To meet or exceed building code requirements… up until now architects and designers generally have specified cork, rubber or composite underlayments to function as sound abatement barriers relative to airborne or impact noise transmission. With these newer acoustic solutions, new developments in adhesives have surfaced. Strategically specified sound solutions can actually have positive effects on the project’s timeline. For example, advanced hardwood flooring adhesives that include sound abatement within their respective formulations can be installed in the same time required to install a gluedown hardwood floor. The installation of cork, rubber or composite membranes often requires the membrane to be glued down first, requiring a full day to cure before crews can come back to finish the hardwood installation. Architects and designers must make sure that if a separate membrane is used for acoustic purposes, the increased height of the floor will not cause any problems. For example, using 1/4-in. cork is effective to achieve building requirements, but this installation increases the height of the floor by 1/4 of an inch… and, requires two layers of adhesive. Built-in cabinets, base molding and other items may need to be modified, sometimes by another tradesperson (such as a carpenter), to accommodate the increased height, increasing the cost of the project. Proper adhesive systems can typically eliminate the 1/4-in. thickness of the underlayment, and generally only result in the thickness of two credit cards. Regarding floating floors, architects and designers should consider the acoustics within the room and extra expansion or contraction requirements. Floating floors can result in meeting IIC Scott Banda, Bostik and STC values, but do not significantly reduce the sound of footsteps within the room. When there is an impact on a floating hardwood floor, the boards vibrate and thus, downward motion is absorbed. However, the upward rebound is not absorbed, resulting in a hollow sound in the flooring. Proper adhesives can reduce the vibration of these boards in both directions, resulting in a quieter floor. Expansion and contraction of floating floors is also a concern. Bostik’s adhesives have elastomeric characteristics that create an anti-fracture membrane. That membrane bridges cracks up to 1/8 inch thick, that can occur in the substrate prior to… or after, installation. Elastomeric properties also allow the adhesive to move with the wood as it expands or contracts due to changes in humidity and temperature… throughout the entire life of the floor.

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Advertorial There is a belief that typical adhesive solutions are dependent on the skill of the contractor to establish and maintain the correct membrane thickness; that they are more susceptible to performance impact from inconsistencies in the substrate or flooring materials. To address this, Bostik’s Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™ was formulated with recycled rubber crumb spacers within the adhesive itself, to increase sound abatement performance and ensure the specified membrane thickness is consistent in size throughout the entire installation. Using the right system of sound abatement solutions can increase the overall comfort of residents… and, virtually eliminate complaints about noisy neighbors (the bane of multifamily living!) For architects and designers, these advanced adhesive membranes play a vital role in developing the best sound abatement systems for owners and developers Adam Abell, Bostik of high-rise residential buildings.

“We want to hear exclamations of specifiers, building owners and endusers acknowledging that adhesive systems for both horizontal and vertical surfaces… now have the wherewithal to offer world-class sound dampening performance!” – Scott Banda, Director of Marketing & Business Development, Bostik

Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™ provides Bostik’s highest level of acoustic performance. The adhesive contains Bostik’s patented AXIOS™ Tri-Linking™ Polymer Technology, offering polymer molecules that interweave themselves into a tight mesh, subsequently absorbing both impact and airborne sound waves. Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™ also contains 1 percent recycled rubber material; emits zero VOCs (as calculated per SCAQMD Rule 1168), and no water. And of course, with this product, there is no need for a separate acoustic membrane to be installed. “All-in-one adhesives like Bostik’s Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™,” concluded Banda, “are amazing, time-saving installation systems that in addition to their acoustic control properties, also offer a lifetime warranty for unlimited moisture vapor protection with no concrete moisture testing required. We believe that if end-users are investing in beautiful natural wood flooring, it should be installed

using the optimal adhesive system. One that actually helps keep neighbors neighborly.”

Noise out

Let’s now talk about sound dampening regarding WALLS in a commercial project. Keeping noise blocked from one side of the building to another can be a challenging task, and again, may call for the expert input of an acoustical engineer. Imagine a large furniture retailer that sells products out of a beautiful showroom. And, all or most of the products are inventoried within the attached, huge warehouse, right behind it. These SKU’s are methodically stocked in a gargantuan shelving grid from floor to ceiling. In that warehouse, there are loudspeakers, forklifts, trucks coming into the loading docks and other sources of discordant “sounds” that needn’t be heard in any showroom. Because of today’s technologically-advanced porcelain products specifically crafted to optimize wall coverings in commercial settings… there are also new adhesive systems that not only have been created for perfect, time-saving and long-lasting installations. These systems also offer high-performance sound dampening properties. Meet Bosti-Set™, Bostik’s latest advancement in adhesive technology. According to Adam Abell, Bostik’s Market Manager, “Bosti-Set™ has been created to offer peak performance for thin gauged porcelain panels. One component Bosti-Set™ is an adhesive that revolutionizes how the design-build community works with thin gauged porcelain tile panels. It provides instant grab and holding power in a single coat application. Installers don’t need to back-butter both the panel and also the wall. Just one coat on one surface is all that is needed.” “Bosti-Set™ provides non-sag, instant grab of thin gauged porcelain tile panels in sizes as large as 1/4” x 5’ x 10’. Because installers need only to trowel on the back of the panel, installation time is reduced by as much as 50%. There is also no need for mixing, water, and electricity to install the panels,” Abell continued. “Increased time-savings!” Bosti-Set™ provides the ability to position panels up to 30 minutes while still preventing sagging. “But there is so much more,” exclaimed Abell. “Not only does Bosti-Set™ weigh up to 80% less than traditional mortar installations. It also guarantees exceptional acoustic performance for the long-term durability of the wall system. “Why should salespeople working hard to make their commissions within their showroom environment have their efforts constantly interrupted by dissonant noise emitted from the warehouse?” Abell asked. Scott Banda summed it all up by stating, “We want to hear exclamations of specifiers, building owners and end-users acknowledging that adhesive systems for both horizontal and vertical surfaces… now have the wherewithal to offer world-class sound dampening performance!” CCR

Ron Treister is President/Founder of Communicators International, Inc., a marketing communications firm headquartered in Jupiter, Fla. For three decades, his firm has worked with major accounts focusing on the commercial construction sector. He may be reached at: rlt@communicatorsintl.com

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www.PhoenixDronePros.com CIRCLE NO. 38


Storytelling in adaptive reuse Inside KETV-7’s Burlington Station By Kristi Nohavec

A

fter 40 years of vacancy and deterioration, Omaha’s historic Burlington train station has been repurposed

as a state-of-the-art broadcast headquarters for Hearst’s ABC-TV affiliate KETV-7. Converting the dilapidated train station into a TV studio required architecture and engineering firm LEO A DALY and general contractor Lund-Ross to uncover hidden structural conditions, perform major surgery on load-bearing elements, and thoughtfully preserve a layered history while creating a modern workplace. 88

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019

Before renovation


Throughout its 120-year history, Omaha’s Burlington Station played an important part in Omaha’s development as a city. Designed by famed architect Thomas Rogers Kimball, and opened in 1898, the station was built to “wow” travelers visiting the city during the Trans-Mississippi Exposition. Visitors from all over the world passed through its doors, hailing it as “the handsomest railway station ever seen.” A 1930 renovation altered the station’s original Greek Revival design into a Classical Revival style. The pitched roof was flattened, its columns removed, and the Grand Hall’s spiral staircase removed and infilled. As automobiles replaced

Before renovation

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STORYTELLING IN ADAPTIVE REUSE trains as the primary mode of transportation in the United States, the Burlington’s business suffered. In 1974, the building was shuttered and remained vacant until late 2015, when it reopened as KETV’s 7 Burlington Station. Through its ups and downs, the building has changed dramatically, collecting layers of history that embed the history of Omaha and its people. LEO A DALY’s design returned the near-condemned building to viability while preserving that layered history and adapting the building to a new use.

Saving the structure

It was a rehabilitation that many in the community thought was impossible. During its shuttered period, the building sustained extensive water damage and vandalism. For years, four deteriorated interior downspouts poured rainwater into each corner of the Great Hall and the rooms below. The masonry walls had cracked and were bleeding mortar.

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STORYTELLING IN ADAPTIVE REUSE

Below, on the track level, freeze-thaw had caused portions of the 1898 concrete tile floor to heave and collapse into pipe tunnels. While the main level steel structure was in sound condition, the structure at the track level was, in some areas, rusted through to a see-through metallic lace. Plaster finishes had disintegrated or been removed in all but one room, the east lobby. The exterior was also in an extremely deteriorated condition. The rehabilitation began with the removal of the passenger concourse and the 1955-era parking deck. Exterior wood doors and windows were restored where feasible or replaced with reproductions. The exterior granite, limestone, and brick were repointed and patched. A small supply of matching, salvaged brick was located and used for patching areas of missing brick. Inside, an unplanned structural intervention became necessary when crews discovered an existing masonry wall at track level was not properly supported. Instead of

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Throughout its history, Burlington Station connected Omaha to the rest of the world, welcoming visitors from abroad during the Trans-Mississippi Exposition, processing mail, and sending generations off to war.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019

the typical continuous pyramidal-brick footings on stone slabs seen elsewhere in the structure, the wall sat on a severely-rusted, below-grade steel beam supported by intermittent masonry pyramids in direct contact with the earth. To save the structure, helical piers were installed as part of the permanent new structure. Steel shoring beams supported the wall temporarily while a new concrete beam foundation was poured to replace the old steel beam.

Adapting to news use

To create a track-level news studio, six cast-iron columns had to be removed from the old baggage handling room. This required the installation of eight new steel columns supported by concrete micropiles extending 80 feet down to bedrock. The new columns support four primary steel transfer beams to collect the loads from the floor above. The loads include a 60-foot high, two-foot thick masonry wall, which weighed hundreds of thousands of pounds.


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STORYTELLING IN ADAPTIVE REUSE This masonry wall supports the only remaining ornamental plaster wall and ceiling finishes on the main level, so maintaining strict deflection limits during erection and final installation was vital to ensure the wall and its finishes would remain undamaged. The transfer beams were manually leveraged and shimmed against the weight of the building above to achieve the design dead load deflection prior to receiving their load. In a building located less than 50 feet from an active rail line, vibration was a challenge to the studio’s sensitive acoustics. LEO A DALY worked closely with the owner’s representative, Broadcast Building Company (BBC), to design a box-within-a-box solution that provided vibration isolation from the existing structure at a reasonable cost. The resulting studio space is silent even with a train passing right outside the thick historic masonry walls.

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Preserving layers of history

From its period of vacancy, most of the building’s historic 1930 interior finishes were lost, revealing vestiges of its original Greek Revival design. In the Great Hall, one can see evidence of each chapter in the building’s history. The white glazed brick and mosaic tile floor remains from the 1898 design. Fluted marble trim and clay tile infill illustrate the extent of the 1930- and 1955-era renovations. The absence of plaster finishes and the preservation of graffiti acknowledge the period of abandonment. The interior design preserves and showcases these vestiges, along with what remains of the building's historic materials and patina. Stone, brick, steel, and decorative plaster finishes have been repointed, patched, and protected. New elements consist of simple materials and forms which create a calming background for the chaos of the news. A soothing color palette of white, gray, and buff is invigorated with punches of russet and blue. An oculus was cut in the floor where the original 1898 stair opening had been filled in 1930. The few historic features that remained, including mosaic stone floors, were repaired or restored. The

1930’s era marble clock surround was found in pieces on the floor of an adjacent room. Three missing pieces were reconstructed of cast-stone material using molds cast from original pieces. The surround was reassembled and hung in its original place on the east wall with a new clock face installed almost identical to the original. The east lobby is the only room in the building that was treated as a restoration rather than a rehabilitation. With its ornamental plaster rosette ceiling and mosaic stone floor still intact, it is the building’s strongest representation of its 1898 origins.

Station to Station

Throughout its history, Burlington Station connected Omaha to the rest of the world, welcoming visitors from abroad during the Trans-Mississippi Exposition, processing mail and sending generations off to war. Today, through thoughtful adaptive reuse, 7 Burlington Station now connects Omaha in a new way. By retaining its layered history, the design acts as a physical expression of journalistic integrity, allowing the building to tell its remarkable story just as KETV’s reporters tell the story of Omaha each day. CCR

CIRCLE NO. 42

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Amanda Hope Rainbow Angels Crusading the fight against childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases

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Lorraine Tallman Founder & CEO

IN O GA E T S P NC TI FIDE N O C

CONNECT. INFLUENCE. LEAD. leadupforwomen.com


Contents May • June 2019

Owned & Operated by Women’s Association, LLC Mailing Address: PO 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 Editorial Editor: Dalana Morse dalanam@leadupforwomen.com 817-405-4058

Amanda Hope Rainbow Angels

Contributing Writer: Kate Pittman K8pittman@gmail.com 214.558.0295 PR and Social Media: Ashlyn Biggs Leyba Digital Marketing social@leadupforwomen.com 480.848.0927

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Art Director: BOC design, Inc. brent@bocdesigninc.com 404-402-0125 Circulation/Subscriptions: subscriptions@leadupforwomen.com

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LUFW Management: Colleen Biggs: Chief People Officer colleenb@leadupforwomen.com 480-241-3708 David Corson: Operations Manager davidc@leadupforwomen.com 404-931-6569 Lead Up for Women General Inquiry: 602.730.5121 membership@leadupforwomen.com

5 6

Founder’s Corner You are STRONGER than you think, BRAVER than you believe and MORE than you ever imagined Advisory Board Editor’s Note Steps to building the right characteristics of a successful entrepreneur

LEADERSHIP

18 A farm-to-food solutions’ leader who dreams bigger and advocates healthier.

leadupforwomen.com

14

Lead Up for Women travels to Arizona where the weather is hot and the women are on Fire!

16 26 30

Atlanta women brought the passion, courage and humor Beating the odds one day at a time 10 Tips to gain confidence

BUSINESS

LIFESTYLE

22 Putting the ‘human’ in human resources

28 Becoming more present in life

Lead Up for Women

3


Founders Corner

You are STRONGER than you think, BRAVER than you believe and MORE than you ever imagined We are traveling the nation educating women of all diversity, race, and culture about Lead Up for Women and how our community of strong survivors and powerhouse leaders are purposefully supporting each other for what you need and what you can offer. We are hard at work every day spreading the word about what Lead Up means with everyone we meet. Monthly luncheons have proven to be a success as we enter our fourth month of gatherings. We are humbled and grateful for so many women who have aligned themselves to be part of our panels and share their stories. Our radio show—Lead Up for Women: Speak Up to Lead Up—launched March 27th and is already VoiceAmerica’s fastest growing new radio show, leading the way for their Women Series on the Empowerment Channel. Each week we interview the bold survivors, influential women leaders and those who can teach us how to laugh and love ourselves for exactly who we are. We invite you to be inspired to lead without permission through the 4

Lead Up for Women

inspiration of our guests’ stories of survival, overcoming adversity and their celebrations in business, in their community and in their personal lives. If you missed a live show, no worries, we stream live on our Lead Up for Women Facebook page. Every show becomes “On Demand,” because as women, we are busy, so listening on our terms is a must. We are passionate and focused on what we can do to Connect, Influence, and Lead every woman, and know we all long to belong and to have a community that accepts and celebrates our identities. We have worked diligently to create an organization for you and all women looking to lead without permission, be the badass leader that you know you are, and gain the courage through the strong support of our group of women so you can live your best life. You just need to tap into your greatest power, YOU! You are the only you that has ever been and the only you that will ever be. Be you and be strong, because you are brilliant and the world needs you. We align with this so much, but it means nothing if you don’t hold yourself accountable on a daily basis through concrete daily actions. Those choices make or break us. All of the members of Lead Up for Women are here to offer you support and sisterhood to leading your best life and the journey starts today. What are you waiting for? Join us.

Colleen Biggs May-June 2019


Advisory Board

Marilyn Brennan

Sawrie Becker

Dr. Tammy Bialek

Associate Director of Business Development American/Interstate Signcrafters

Founder SBB Life Coaching

Isyol Cabrera

Aly Chally

Dee Daniels

Director of Design and Construction FOCUS BRANDS

Manager, Store Planning and Design Aaron’s, Inc.

Executive Vice President VoiceAmerica™

Rebecca Easton

Jennifer Grieser

Gina Noda

Founder Easton Law, PLLC

Consultant

Founder & Principal Consultant Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC

Founder Bialek Chiropractic

Shannon Polvino PR and Account Manager Insight International LLC

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Lead Up for Women

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Editor’s Letter

Steps to building the right characteristics of a successful entrepreneur

TThe cost of generating a start-up business varies, but cost isn’t all that matters. What really makes a difference is the range of entrepreneurial characteristics that a small business owner has. While successful entrepreneurs don’t belong to any other planet, they do have some unique qualities that set them apart from the rest of us. Do you know what those qualities are? Here are some important characteristics that are needed to become a successful entrepreneur.

1. Pursue Something You Enjoy When you want to launch your start-up or small business, you’ll need to invest plenty of time and energy. You may need to work for hours on end, so it’s extremely important to choose an area of business that you are truly passionate about. If you don’t enjoy what you do, chances are your entrepreneurial venture won’t meet with success.

2. Practice Self-Discipline

Dalana Morse is the editor of Lead Up For Women magazine. You can reach her at (817) 405-4058 or by email at dalanam@leadupforwomen.com. 6

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The best part about becoming an entrepreneur is that you work without a boss. The worst is that not having a boss can easily lead to procrastination, which you need to avoid at any cost. One of the most important characteristics of an entrepreneur is practicing self-discipline. You are your own boss, so be a good one.

3. Always Plan in Advance Successful entrepreneurs never forget to plan things. In fact, planning is like a habit to them. No matter what part of the business it is, they always abide by strategic planning. This quality is highly essential, as it provides you with an opportunity to study and analyze things before they are implemented. If you want to become successful as an entrepreneur, develop the trait of planning each and every area of your small business.

4. Know How to Self-Promote Self-promotion is one of the most needed characteristics for obtaining entrepreneurial success. Your success is in your own hands. As a budding entrepreneur, you need to work day in and day out to reach your audience. People are waiting to know May-June 2019


who you are, what business you are in, and what products or services you have to offer.

5. Have a Strong Belief in Whatever You Do No matter what entrepreneurs do in business, they do it with plenty of confidence. They have unstoppable faith in their ideas and are quite sure it will work. If you watch a successful entrepreneur, you’ll notice a good amount of confidence in whatever they do. People with entrepreneurial traits have a firm belief in their ability to achieve the desired goals.

6. Find Opportunities to Learn One of the key qualities that sets entrepreneurs apart is that they are always in the learning stage. They learn from other successful people and from their competition. In fact, they don’t miss an opportunity where they think they can learn something new that can be utilized to boost the growth of their small business. Don’t be unhappy or jealous of the success of your competitors. Instead, learn from their success and use them to grow.

7. Know Your Customers Really Well Successful entrepreneurs focus on their customers. They are eager to know what their customers like or dislike. They want to know what truly catches their customers’ interest. They try to find out the day-to-day issues that their customers are facing and work out ways to provide effective solutions. No wonder, they provide personal attention to their customers to keep them coming back for more.

Successful entrepreneurs focus on their customers. They are eager to know what their customers like or dislike. They want to know what truly catches their customers’ interest. They try to find out the day-to-day issues that their customers are facing and work out ways to provide effective solutions.

9. Negotiate Effectively Successful entrepreneurs are excellent negotiators. If you want to become an entrepreneur and obtain success with your start-up or small business, you must perfect the art of negotiation. You’ll need to negotiate a wide range of deals while establishing your business. By being an excellent negotiator, you’ll be able to create a win-win situation almost anywhere.

8. Sell an Experience

10. Continue to Expand Your Network

Entrepreneurs don’t become successful by selling a product or service, they sell an experience. By offering a product or a service to your customers, the main goal of a true entrepreneur is to provide an experience that can’t be easily forgotten.

One of the defining characteristics of entrepreneurs is that they are always trying to expand their business network. They use various ways to achieve this purpose. They regularly participate in community events. They attend industry-related exhibitions

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and conferences. They join professional associations and clubs.

11. Persist Until You Succeed The journey of an entrepreneur is full of adventures. While making an effort to establish their small business, they pass through ups and downs. They suffer from different types of setbacks. They fail and then start over. It’s qualities like these that make up an entrepreneur. No matter what happens, you should persist until success kisses your feet. Which of these qualities do you possess and which do you need to learn to achieve success as an entrepreneur? Don’t be worried if you lack some characteristics. All of these characteristics can be learned or developed with practice. Lead Up for Women

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hits the radio waves every week Whoever makes the statement that endless opportunity doesn’t exist, needs to stop limiting themselves by the beliefs that exist between their ears. Our goal with Lead Up for Women is to empower as many women as we possibly can to be the best version of themselves. Having a radio station allows us to do just that. VoiceAmerica™ is the single largest producer of original internet talk radio Are you ready programming in the world, with unparalleled scope and reach, to lead without which is why we teamed up with them. On March 27, 2019, we launched “Speak Up to Lead Up” with permission and host Colleen Biggs and co-host Dee Daniels, executive producer of take the steps VoiceAmerica. Are you ready to lead without permission and take needed to live the steps needed to live your best life? Whether you want to start the business of your dreams, learn the steps you need to take so your best life? you can LOVE what you do, or celebrate your present and future accomplishments, our radio show will dive into deeper subjects as we interview weekly guests that have already walked in your shoes. Let the experts guide you for a clearer path to your most successful future. Our show will be the perfect platform for all of our members to advertise their businesses, network and hear about upcoming events, as well as a recap of live interviews that were recorded at all of our monthly luncheons around the nation. With millions of listeners, we have the opportunity to pioneer change for women today, as well as in the future.


We invite you to tune in to “Lead Up for Women: Speak Up to Lead Up,” as we celebrate the influence of women in business and beyond. Colleen and Dee speak with guests who have stories to share, have faced adversity and have become success stories in business, in their communities and in personal accomplishments. Join the strong and the brilliant ones and understand that the world is ready for you to be at your best. Listen to “Lead Up for Women” live every Wednesday at 1 p.m. (EST) or 10 a.m. (PST), on Voice America Empowerment.

Visit our website www.leadupforwomen.com/lead-up-for-women-speak-up-to-lead-up/ or visit www.voiceamerica.com/show/3872/lead-up-for-women-speak-up-to-lead-up to bookmark our show and listen in live each week.

Sponsorship Rates Full

Do you have someone in mind you feel would be a great interview on the show? Do you have a mentor, coach, sponsor or have been inspired by an amazing leader, entrepreneur, employer or friend? If so, we want to hear from you. Please submit their name(s), contact information and why you feel they would be the perfect guest for the show to info@leadupforwomen.com.

» 13-week sponsorship of show series » 30-second spot (production included) played 6 times (3 during live broadcast and 3 during rebroadcast) » 30-60 second video spot (content must be provided) » Banner ad on weekly eCard » Opening & closing billboards on show » One live mention by host » Banner ad on host page » Banner ad on host personal/business website » Possible guest appearance by key person within company (subject to host approval)

Half » 13-week sponsorship of show series » 30-second spot (production not included) played 4 times (2 during live broadcast and 2 during rebroadcast) » One live mention by host » Banner ad on host page » Banner ad on host personal/business website » Possible guest appearance by key person within company (subject to host approval)

Quarter » 13-week sponsorship of show series » 30-second spot (production not included) played 2 times (1 during live broadcast and 1 during rebroadcast) » One live mention by host » Banner ad on host page » Banner ad on host personal/business website » Possible guest appearance by key person within company (subject to host approval) As the world’s largest producer of internet talk radio programming, VoiceAmerica™ can put your brand in front of millions of active listeners. If you are interested in getting our name out to millions of listeners, contact info@leadupforwomen.com for sponsorship package pricing.

Optional Advertising for Half and Quarter Sponsors » 13-week sponsorship of show series » Audio commercial production » 30-60 second video (content must be provided) » eCard banner ad


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Amanda Hope Rainbow Angels Crusading the fight against childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases

Amanda Hope Rainbow Angels is a nonprofit, support and educational organization designated by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) tax-deductible, tax-exempt organization, founded in 2012 in celebration of Amanda Hope’s life. During Amanda’s three-year fight with Leukemia and nine-month battle with a brain tumor, she dreamed she would one day design a fun clothing line for kids, just like her, that would provide comfort and dignity during chemo treatments. Amanda’s life ended far too soon, but her dream lives on through Comfycozy’s for Chemo apparel. Her legacy continues with the expansion of programs and services. The nonprofit brings Amanda’s sunshine to some of the most difficult days through a program called Major Distractions. They host spa days, craft days, sports camps, meals of hope, teen nights, and many other events. Their little warriors love knowing there is always something fun in store. Their in-house Comfort and Care team of licensed therapists provides free counseling, play therapy and supportive services to families who have a child battling cancer, a blood disorder, or any other life-threatening illness. Services are provided to pedileadupforwomen.com

atric patients, their siblings and their parents/caregivers. Individual, couples and family counseling appointments are available, as well as support communities and educational sessions. At this time Comfort and Care services are only offered to families in the Maricopa County area and/or for pediatric patients being treated at Banner Thunderbird, Cardon Children’s and Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Founder and CEO, Lorraine Tallman, and other members of the Amanda Hope team are focused on delivering compassionate and responsible advocacy, education and empowerment for families. Amanda Hope was a special little girl, the type of child who lit up the room with her smile. At the age of nine, she started experiencing severe headaches and flu-like symptoms. After several tests, it was confirmed that Amanda had Leukemia. The phone call confirming the diagnosis would forever change the lives of Amanda and her family. Lead Up for Women

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It took three long years of chemotherapy to finally go into remission. Celebrations were had, a huge “No More Chemo Party” attended by family, friends, nurses and doctors. She went back to school and started to enjoy life again. Then one afternoon, three months later, Amanda mentioned she wasn’t feeling well. A battery of tests discovered she had a mass in her brain. Another painful journey of chemo and radiation began. Throughout her treatment, Amanda’s spirits never waned. She kept smiling and expressing her concern and caring for the other children in the hospital.

On March 30, 2012, at 11:29 a.m., Amanda lost her battle to Leukemia. In her honor, the nonprofit carries out her vision of giving dignity back to our children with something as simple as a shirt designed for them.

Comfycozy’s for Chemo with all children fighting life threatening diseases will continue to grow knowledge and correct data for children fighting cancer so we can get better research funded for our warriors.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

What do you feel is the best way to connect with other women in business?

To bring Amanda’s mission world-wide and have dignity in healthcare. Parents deserve and need a voice for choice. This will be done by teaching doctors and families how to communicate with each other in a respectful caring manner. Sharing the Amanda Needle and

Networking with organizations that offer mentoring and educational opportunities, and growing from each other’s life experience has worked well for me.

Who are the most important areas of your business that inspire you to thrive? I have three: my life, my families I serve, my board and operations, non-profit and business development.

What is Amanda Hopes growth plan? To touch the lives of families suffering from a diagnosis they never thought they would hear. I continue to create relationships with hospitals to be the “go-to” person to help any family in need.

What is the most rewarding part of changing lives?

Amanda Hope and Lorraine Tallman.

Empowering families to have a voice for choice and dignity for their treatment plan. They learn the necessary coping skills to keep fighting the journey before them.

What is the biggest item currently on your to do list?

Amanda’s Needle

Educate all hospitals about the new incredible tool to access ports with one poke, the “Amanda Port Stabilizer.” Inspired by Amanda, a young, brave cancer warrior, the Port Stabilizer is designed to aid in access when inserting the infusion needle.

What is your secret to making a non-profit a success? Our success is based on follow through. Don’t make commitments you cannot keep. We always make sure we understand the needs of our families. 12

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One-on-One with... Lorraine Tallman Founder & CEO

Tell us about your family and how you manage priorities/balance? My family, husband, Marty, and three daughters, Leah, Rachael and Amanda, are gifts from Heaven. There wasn’t balance for a long time while Amanda fought cancer twice. Our whole world was centered around her chemo, radiation and hospital stays. Our date nights were late night picnics on the hospital floor and special getaways, one-on-one movies with our girls. Marty was the Rams coach, so he was at every game, school play and swim meet. He loved it all.

How are you mentoring/sponsoring others? I love to mentor young non-profits. It does take a village.

What are your strongest traits as a leader? What traits of other leaders inspire you? I never give up on what is right, and I’m mindful of my team and what they need to reach our goals. My favorite word is “Next.” Leaders who inspire me are women like Rosa Parks and Mother Teresa—women who are dedicated to standing up against all odds and doing whatever it takes to be the change.

How has fighting for the lives of your family What book are you reading now? members changed you for the better? First, “Sandra Day O’Connor” by Evan Thomas, and “An The life lessons I have learned is that every day is a gift. Love, forgive and laugh whenever possible. My career is about making a difference daily. You never know, the smile you create today could save a life in the future. My motivation every day is my daughters last words, “Not everyone has a mama like you, promise me you’ll help every child fighting cancer. Promise.”

Echo in the Darkness” by Francine Rivers

How do you tap into the power of YOU that makes you unique and how has that pushed you forward?

What does your typical day look like?

My faith keeps me going every day, knowing that even though they have passed on, Amanda and Marty are with me every day.

Who inspires you and why?

What are your favorite hobbies? Hiking and riding my bike in the neighborhood.

How do you like to spend your down time? Traveling Receiving notice from a hospital about a new patient diagnosed with cancer, then reaching out to let the families know we are here for them and sending them a Comfycozy’s or Chemo care pack, visiting a hospital for one of our Major Distraction events and providing free counseling or financial assistants. But mostly giving a lot of hugs.

My little warriors. They never give up, no matter how much pain they endure.

What was the best advice you ever received?

What’s a fond memory of a family sharing their gratitude?

What does “Lead up” mean to you?

They stated, “You changed my life forever. Thank you for being by my side and helping our family.”

Stay mission focused. Women empowering women. Sharing personal growth experiences because you never know who you could be encouraging.

To donate in any way, learn more information, or volunteer, contact them through email: hello@amandahope.org. or online through their website www.amandahope.org or on Facebook www.facebook.com/ahrangels. leadupforwomen.com

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LUNCHEON • AZ

Lead Up for Women travels to Arizona where the weather is hot and the women are on fire! We had a strong panelist of women at the Arizona Luncheon. Lead Up for Women welcomed Janice Jackson, President of Plexus; Vanessa Siren, Yogi and model for the Ford Company; Audrey Monell, President of Forrest Anderson Plumbing/HVAC Company; Deborah Bateman, Vice Chairman for First National Bank of Arizona; and Ashley Austin, Marketing Manager for the Phoenix Suns. Janice Jackson reminded us to expect the unexpected, as she did when she was offered a deal to come to Plexus as the president of sales and marketing, while on the verge of

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retiring. She is a true steward of Servant Leadership and leads the only way she knows how, to be her true self. Vanessa shared that finding her balance and “center� through Yoga and setting her priorities straight was how she found true happiness. From Brazil, she currently lives with her family of five children and devoted husband, Troy. She even took the attendees and panelists through breathing exercises that can be used in our everyday lives to relax and reset. Audrey shared that stepping into a position of power that is a predominantly male-driven industry was the

Deborah was a light of many colors as she shared her journey from a teller to her current role as vice chair, and how women are the greatest force if we just believe in ourselves and our abilities.

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hardest trial of her life. She enlightened us with the wisdom that if you truly stick to who you are and talk straight, challenging those to respect and stand steadfast through the trials, you can endure the hardships. Deborah was a light of many colors as she shared her journey from a teller to her current role as vice chair, and how women are the greatest force if we just believe in ourselves and our abilities. She also shared her wisdom with the group of making sure you are always the example for those that follow. The awesome panelists encouraged all of us by sharing experiences that compliment all of our current leadership styles to set our careers on the right path. Remember to always believe in yourself, lean into who you are, and STOP making yourself small. Stop apologizing, talk straight and be proud, proud to be YOU and start leading without permission. You can find the full video for the luncheons, including photos for all of our members at https:// leadupforwomen.com/gallery/ luncheon-scottsdale-az-april-25th-2019/ To become a Member of Lead UP for Women, visit our website www.leadupforwomen.com/ membership and start your journey to living your best life. Lead Up for Women

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LUNCHEON • ATL

Atlanta women brought the passion, courage and humor Lead Up for women traveled to Atlanta in May where the attendees and panelists were mighty. We welcomed panelists Afsaneh Abree, Integral Coach, June Cline, best-selling author and humorist, and last minute special guest speaker Ambassador Dr. Chanita Foster, mother, best-selling author, TV personality, coach, entrepreneur, activist and philanthropist. He shared their experiences in business and showed how success is possible for all women, if you tap into your greatest power, YOU!! The panelists were awesome and encouraged everyone in the room, sharing experiences that reminded us how important it is to surround yourself with the right community of support, LIVE for your PURPOSE and remember humor as you enjoy the journey to be “Mo’ Better”! Afsaneh challenged attendees with the question, “Who is going to be there for you when you lean into your best self?” She said you need a strong community to support you through your journey. She also shared some personal secrets about her life growing up in a hut, and how her hardships as child living through the revolutionary war that was full of violence didn’t stop her from being “Afsaneh.” Even though she was practicing her Muslim faith, and was required to wear cloth to fully cover her head and body, she would sneak out and climb up a ladder to the roof of the hut and lay out under the hot sun in her bikini. She said she even had an amazing suntan that year. June humored us with her story on how she found her purpose through working for a gut wrenching job as the director of financial aid in a small college. Using the applications as humor, she would locate “bloopers” from the 16 Lead Up for Women

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“We must find our purpose first, then we will have peace, and last the money will follow.” – Ambassador Dr. Chanita Foster

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applications and gather them up to use when she spoke, which led to her becoming a paid speaker. She finds the sun in every dark place, and it shows. Dr. Chanita Foster showed real grit and determination as she shared her personal struggles with depression and finding her purpose. She reminded us that depression is real and needs to be dealt with. She also uplifted the room when she preached on how we must find our purpose first, then we will have peace, and last money will follow. She said chasing money will only bring you discouragement and disappointment times 10. You can find the full video for the luncheons, including photos for all of our members at https://leadupforwomen. com/gallery/lufw-atlanta-ga-luncheonmay-22-2019 To become a Member of Lead UP for Women, visit our website www.leadupforwomen.com/ membership and start your journey to living your best life.

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LEADERSHIP

A farm-to-food solutions’ leader who dreams bigger and advocates healthier. Lucinda Perry Jones, Director of Strategic Initiatives at Operation Food Search

By Rochelle Brandvein

Imagine growing up in northeast Missouri on a 900-acre farm—never ending chores to be completed, animals to be cared for and fed. This type of 24/7 working lifestyle was a family affair for Lucinda Perry’s household. From a very young age, she wholeheartedly embraced this world—one that would eventually meld effortlessly with her adult life.

In Her Shoes Lucinda’s parents taught her every aspect of farm and livestock management, so much so that she reveals “ensuring people have access to nutritious food is in my DNA.” Her family farm consisted of raising hogs and cattle, along with 18 Lead Up for Women

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has defined her work ethic and sharpened her leadership skills. This type of upbringing inspired her to strive for a standard of excellence that, for most, was out of reach but, for her, required stretching just a little bit further.

Bold change surrounds Lucinda both personally and professionally. She is currently pursuing her Doctor of Education at Brandman University in Organizational Leadership after earning a Master in Public Administration.

A Fearless Dreamer When 9/11 happened, everything changed. Lucinda was living in New York City at the time, and the devastating ordeal made her carefully examine her life. This introspection led to leaving her job for an eight-week immersion program in Mexico. The unusual hiatus gave her the courage to follow her heart and take a risk she never would have ordinarily. What ended up as a temporary pivot became a nearly two year journey of teaching in an environment where

they needed her—and she learned even more from them. Her career was subsequently filled with integral philanthropic positions in both private and public sectors. Ranging from the ACLU and academia, to public health and grocery retail, Lucinda gravitated more toward opportunities that embraced community transformation and strategic collaboration. Throughout her life, Lucinda has had an uncanny ability to foresee—and answer—the needs of those who cannot imagine a solution. She is, in fact, the catalyst in creating types of favorable consequences that enable others to live more independently. Lucinda is a flawless fit for her current position as Director of Strategic Initiatives at Operation Food Search (OFS), a non-profit hunger relief organization based in

producing corn and soybean crops, a very laborious, although enlightening existence, particularly for a youth whose curiosity about the world grew as she did. Lucinda’s time was spent caring for farm animals and tending the harvest at a level of responsibility fit for someone much older. Yet she says this path gave her a stronger base that leadupforwomen.com

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LEADERSHIP

St. Louis. Her decision-making abilities are apparent in each and every program she touches—and her input is both powerful and essential.

A Hunger-Free Missouri She aptly describes her present role as “chief architect for OFS’s compelling new vision which involves motivation to end the food pantry line, not merely feed the line.” Her agency is shifting the reliance on emergency food distribution to more “upstream, preventative measures that address root causes and call for innovative integrated program models.” In her quest to end hunger, Lucinda acknowledges what is necessary to succeed in the simplest terms: “intensive community partnership collaborations, a trained and knowledgeable staff and board, involved philanthropists and food donors, and an informed citizenry.”

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Lucinda spearheaded efforts to compile a coalition of Fresh Rx game-changers that included widespread financial support and a local partnership with a hospital’s fullservice prenatal care facility.

Bold change surrounds Lucinda both personally and professionally. She is currently pursuing her Doctor of Education at Brandman University in Organizational Leadership after earning a Master in Public Administration. The program, which is bolstering her ability to be a transformational leader, is enabling Lucinda to better guide her team in assembling an even more impressive strategic plan.

Just What The Doctor Ordered She recently helped launch OFS’s newest program called Fresh Rx: Nourishing Healthy Starts. This food-as-medicine initiative is the only fresh food prescription program in existence that addresses food insecurity during pregnancy. The need to provide low-income women the experience of healthier pregnancies

May-June 2019


and healthy babies was glaringly apparent. Lucinda and her team took the reins to create and activate this monumental plan. Fresh Rx has a variety of components—a weekly share of protein, fruits and vegetables from local farm partners; one-on-one nutrition consultations with OFS’s Fresh Rx registered dietitian; cooking classes delivered by OFS’s community chef; at home and online nutrition and cooking tutorials; and supportive services and links to community resources by OFS’s licensed clinical social worker. Lucinda spearheaded efforts to compile a coalition of Fresh Rx game-changers that included widespread financial support and a local partnership with a hospital’s full-service prenatal care facility. The initial impact is astounding and, as the program grows, so will its ripple effect upon the community.

Empowering Our Future While eliminating overall hunger is OFS’s goal, Lucinda states “it’s the kids who suffer the worst consequences in this equation.” How can 18.6 percent of children in Missouri—nearly one in five—live in households that struggle with hunger? And how can these children achieve academic success when their stomachs are empty from missing meals?

• L eading OFS’s “Sunny Day Endowment Campaign,” a $5 million dollar fundraising effort to ensure sustainability and innovation for years to come. •P  roviding nutritious food to children 18 years of age and younger through a year-round approach. The services— including summer meals, afterschool meals, and a weekend meal program for elementary children—impact thousands of children throughout the St. Louis bi-state region. •O  ffering on-site cooking demonstrations (to food pantry volunteers, staff and clients) in

addition to nutrition education services that reach kids and their families (shows how to plan, shop, and prepare healthy and affordable meals through Cooking Matters®.)

Reaching Her Summit Lucinda believes she still has many miles to go to achieve maximum impact in the hunger relief field. For inspiration, she remembers a favorite quote from Nelson Mandela who said, “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” Lucinda is determined to make transformational change by leading from the heart, and inspiring others to dream and achieve the impossible.

The task to turn the curve toward food security is daunting, but Lucinda and her team have enacted new programs and enhanced existing services to include: • Establishing an advocacy program that engages elected officials and systems – such as hospitals and school districts—to assess and implement policies that will support nutrition-forward environments. • “Launching Healing Hunger,” a hunger-informed training program to aid frontline professionals in understanding how to screen and help clients obtain food and nutrition services. leadupforwomen.com

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BUSINESS

Putting the ‘human’ in human resources

By Zoe Hawkins

How Sharon Lontoc brings humanity to corporate culture 22

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Like most people in the working world, Sharon Lontoc once had a job with an unpleasant work environment. Rather than complain or fear, it was a sign of an unfulfilling career ahead. She took on the challenge and became an expert on fixing the problems people face in the workplace. Working in leadership at a variety of top companies before landing her dream job at Title Alliance, Sharon has shown that innovative and creative Human Resources strategies can make even unexpected companies become inspiring places to work. May-June 2019


toward her bachelor’s degree while working full time. There were some underlying issues in her place of employment at the time, and when she discussed them with a favorite professor, he advised her to take a course on Human Resources the next semester. Not only did that course highlight exactly the issue that Sharon was experiencing at work, but it also sparked a passion for Human Resources, which became the focus of her bachelor’s degree. Following completion of that course, Sharon returned to the professor to discuss the situation again. Pivotally, he asked her, “Now that you know what’s going on, what are you going to do about it?” This is the question that has resonated throughout Sharon’s career. It has led her to make changes in each of the organizations she’s worked based on predictive analytics resulting

in improved personnel retention and cutting department overhead.

A Varied Path to the C-Suite Before becoming Chief Human Resources Officer at Title Alliance, Sharon held a range of Human Resources positions at a variety of organizations. Whether working at Lockheed Martin or Southwestern Bell, a law firm or a financial institution, Sharon has brought her uniquely strategic and innovative approach to each job. Sharon always strives to not just work hard, but truly make a difference. From job to job, she helped to save companies money, boost morale and drive HR strategies that align with business goals. This includes attracting top tier talent while building a culture of engagement, agility and innovation. She says this is an important factor in how she’s continually worked up through the ranks of various companies.

Deciding to go into Human Resources While Sharon has quite a proficient career in Human Resources, she didn’t know that was where her career would eventually take her. Early on, Sharon was studying leadupforwomen.com

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BUSINESS

“It’s all about how people remember you,” Sharon says. “I’ve earned amazing positions at top companies, all through networking and connections. It’s only when you forge truly meaningful relationships that people will remember you when they need leadership at their organizations.”

Leading the Company Forward While Title Alliance is a title and escrow company, it prides itself on being a relationship company first and foremost. Title agents might deal with hundreds or thousands of closings, but the people buying homes might only experience the process a couple of times in their lives. At Title Alliance, the goal is to make every interaction filled with superior customer service, bringing the spirit of celebration back to the closing table. Sharon refers to her role at Title Alliance as her “dream job.” This is largely due to the opportunity to play a more strategic role in the company, creating Human Resources strategies that exceed client expectations, engage people, enable exceptional performance and support an inclusive corporate culture. Not only is she a part of enhancing Title Alliance’s reputation in the title insurance industry, but also generally as an employer of choice. “It’s thrilling to be a part of such a collaborative company,” Sharon says. “I am trusted to fulfill my role as a leader in the organization and given the room to implement strategic initiatives that help us move forward. It’s particularly exciting to be a part of a company with a majority female C-Suite, highlighting the leadership opportunities here for women of all backgrounds.” As Title Alliance continues to grow into new regions, Sharon says her role keeps expanding. “There’s so much growth now, it feels like there’s something new and exciting every day. Of course, it means that 24 Lead Up for Women

Teaching the necessary skills to balance passions and projects, work and home is a key part of Sharon’s life. That’s why she has volunteered as a Girl Scout Troop leader for nine years. She’s particularly enthusiastic about breaking down walls and gender stereotypes.

May-June 2019


we need to think strategically to stay ahead of any growing pains and ensure a smooth process as we reach out to new regions and bring on more partners.”

Empowering Women and Girls Sharon is distinctly aware of the struggles that women face in the work world. The mom of three is married to a reservist who has been deployed, leaving her to feel like a single mom in some ways as she needs to balance work and childcare. With this experience, Sharon is able to relate to other women and give them advice on how they can achieve their professional goals. “I get asked all the time about how I’ve been able to achieve the success I’ve seen in my career,”

Sharon says. “If there’s one thing I want to share with women in the working world, it’s to focus on networking and build as many strong, positive relationships as possible, with men and women alike. You

never know what opportunities might be out there until you really connect with people and have them remember who you are and what you can bring to the table.” Teaching the necessary skills to balance passions and projects, work and home is a key part of Sharon’s life. That’s why she has volunteered as a Girl Scout Troop leader for nine years. She’s particularly enthusiastic about breaking down walls and gender stereotypes. “It’s amazing to see the growth in the girls who join Girl Scouts,” Sharon says. “The girls I lead are interested in robotics, take part in Girls Who Code, and defy all the gender norms you might imagine. I’m humbled at the chance to help them along, because they inspire me even more than I lead them.”

EXPLORE • DISCOVER • GROW

Deborah Bateman An Experienced, Award-Winning, Results-Oriented Leadership and Personal Brand Coach. Supporting you to realize and embrace your Purpose, Potential, and Passion. Coaching customized to your needs and goals. Contact Deborah at Deborah@DeborahBateman.com

Find out more at:

www.DeborahBateman.com • www.Riskblossoming.com


LIFESTYLE

Beating the odds one day at a time By Jeanie R. Davis

My journey has been nothing like I imagined it would be. In college, I studied Public Relations, then later Interior Design. I even taught math, as I partnered with my husband in owning and running two Math tutoring centers. As it turned out, none of these would become my passion. Illness and disability made certain of that. After the last of my four daughters was born, I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. It began more as an irritation, but before long what had started as a relapsing/remitting disease became progressive. In fact, in 2003, my neurologist, a leading MS specialist at Barrow Neurology at the time, held up my latest MRI and informed me that my brain was filling with fluid and I would soon become brain-dead. Nothing could stop the rapid downward spiral of my disease. There was only one thing for me to do—prove him wrong. My husband, Rick, is fond of traveling, and even though his job took him to many foreign and exotic countries around the globe, he wanted me to experience them as well. I will never forget my first trip 26 Lead Up for Women

to Europe. It was then my disease worsened, making it difficult for me to walk or even stay awake for long periods of time. Never having experienced the full impact of losing control of my faculties until this time, I was a mess. My young daughters were an ocean away and at the rate my health was declining, I wondered if I would see them again. Sickness can distort your thinking. I told Rick I could never travel again, at least without our girls. This began some of our family’s greatest adventures. Though my disability made it difficult for me to travel, we were able to take the necessary measures to see the world with our daughters. We visited Fiji, Costa Rica, Ireland, Europe (a couple of times), Mexico and Africa. And I managed to stay alive.

It was on one of these adventures that I learned a valuable lesson; I can do ANYTHING if I take it one step at a time. While were visiting the Alps in Switzerland, one of the activities was to climb 900 steps on a steep mountainside up to a glacier. This activity is not very conducive to people with physical disabilities. I assured my family that I would be up to the task. They were skeptical. But they’d sacrificed so many activities on my behalf, I didn’t want this to be another, so I convinced them that I really did want to climb those steps, and that with their help, I could do it. I didn’t know how wrong I was. To get to the base of the mountain, a hike in and of itself, exhausted me before I had even taken one step of the 900, but I was determined. (Determination can be good, but sometimes, as in my case, misguided). So up we went. The stairs were constructed of narrow, wooden slats and the mountain was steep—900 steps up, 900 steps down— suddenly that was a lot of steps. May-June 2019


I made it up the first 200 before my legs buckled and I knew I absolutely couldn’t go any further. My husband and youngest daughter wanted to stay with me and help me down, but I insisted I would be fine on my own. After many assurances and a lot of convincing on my part, Rick and my daughters reluctantly went up the stairs while I went down. It had been cold and drizzly all morning, but shortly after parting ways with my family, it began to pour in earnest, making the steps slippery. Some of the symptoms of MS are dizziness, imbalance, numb limbs, weakness and visual impairment, just to name a few. I was experiencing most of these. The stairs had a railing, which I clung to for dear life, but every time someone would come up the steps, I’d have to let go of one side to let them pass, causing me to lose my balance. Looking down from where I stood overwhelmed me. The stairs went on and on. My legs were so tired that each step I took down became a major accomplishment. I finally reached the point where I felt completely exhausted, hopeless and utterly alone. I had gone as far as I could possibly go on my own. When I looked down and saw how far I still had left to reach the bottom, I was sure I couldn’t make it. My options were limited. I could sit down, cling to the railing and wait for my family to return (and probably freeze to death in the pouring rain), or I could pray and ask God to get me off that mountain. I chose the latter. As I was pleading with God for help, there was a distinct voice in my head telling me to quit looking down to the bottom of the mountain as that perspective gave me no hope. Instead, I should just take one more step. Well, I could do that. Just one more step wouldn’t kill me, but the whole staircase would. I was sure of that. So I took one step. When I did, I heard the voice again asking, “Can you take one more step?” The pattern continued. If I ever took my eyes off the steps and looked down to the bottom, I’d get discouraged and lose hope all over again, so I quickly leadupforwomen.com

learned not to do that. Instead, I just took one shaky step at a time until I miraculously found myself at the bottom of the mountain, completely drenched from the pouring rain, but alive. I learned two valuable lessons from this: With God, all things are possible, and never give up or give in to that voice of failure. Instead, focus on taking it one step at a time, or one day at a time.

at how many readers enjoyed it who weren’t related to me. This spurred me to write more. In the meantime, I had tapped into a world I hadn’t known existed, the wonderful writing community of which I am now a part. As I learned, I wrote, edited, revised and rewrote my next novel, “Time Twist,” a romantic suspense story with some time travel. This book was picked up by a New York

Through the years of rearing my daughters, when my illness had disabled me, I turned to writing poetry. Gradually, I took to the piano and began writing music. I found great comfort in composing songs and was rewarded when I was asked to write music for conferences, weddings and other events. Music gave me purpose. I felt blessed and fortunate to have developed this gift. But how long until I lost it? Even worse, how long until I didn’t recognize my husband and daughters—my truest passion? One of my daughters suggested that I write a book. I laughed, but the idea worked in me until I decided to try it. I began writing and found it so fulfilling, I didn’t stop at one book, but kept going. The first book I published, “As Ever Yours,” is a historical fiction based on the true story of my grandparents’ amazing lives. I wasn’t too worried about my lack of training in the writing field, as this book would be read by mostly family. However, I was astonished

publishing house. Since then, I have written a sequel, “Time Trap,” which will be released later this year, along with a Christmas novella, “Chrissy’s Catch,” part four of the Christmas Frost series, written with my critique partners. Writing has been a godsend for me; it has given me purpose. But it isn’t always easy or fun. Ask me how I felt about it when the first few rejection letters rolled in. Plus, though I’m gratefully not brain-dead, focus, muscle cramps and spasms, along with many other MS related symptoms make it a challenge. I work through those one day at a time. Perseverance and commitment are essential to success, but writing books doesn’t make my story one of success. There are thousands of successful authors in the world. Beating the odds and proving my doctor wrong has made this a success story. As I learned long ago when I was stranded on the side of the steep Swiss Alps, I can do anything when I turn to God for help. Lead Up for Women

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LIFESTYLE

Photography by Lauren Hensgens at www.saltphotography.co

Becoming more present in life By Kate Pittman

Is anyone else out there (I know who you are) running on fumes because you are pushing full steam ahead with a “no-rest-for-the-weary” mindset to provide a great life for yourself and your family while also striving for that day you will hit the pinnacle of a successful career and arrive at a life abundantly filled with joy? Hand raised—yep, that was me. Everyone on this planet is on a journey to find fulfillment, joy, love and connect with the greater being that surrounds us—the one who embodies all of these gifts and more. This task is probably the most elusive and greatest sought-after treasure that our life’s journey holds. I recognize that there are plenty of working and stay-at-home parents or individuals (including my past self) who play out their lives either too busy or too focused on other things to give the pursuit of joy a chance. A year ago, I was at the height of chaos and felt as though I was far from experiencing joy. I was extremely blessed with a great job, beautiful family and financial security, but something seemed off. I loved my life, but something was missing. After everything that I had accomplished, I was still wondering if I was fulfilled and I was constantly asking myself, “Am I content?” If not, what exactly does contentment look like? 28

Lead Up for Women

I was a Business Development Director for a great architecture, engineering and general construction company and our team was making big progress by bringing in exciting accounts that would provide great work for the 350-plus employees who worked there, hopefully years to come. I was a jet-setter, but I was constantly mitigating the travel that was probably necessary to do my job to the maximum level. I was shaving here and there on travel, doing what I believed necessary for my professional job, to still enable me to do my even more important job of being a mother to my two small children and a supportive wife to my loving husband, who had an equally taxing stressful full-time job. I had just flown home from yet another conference, I do not even recall which, but it didn’t really matter. At this point, they all seemed to run together.

I was always careful to arrange my travel to bring me home—if the stars aligned and there were no delays, around 3:45 p.m., to have time to pick up my loves as their day ended a little early at 4:30 p.m., or so. There was something about those smiling faces that lit up the moment you opened the door to their daycare that suddenly made it all seem worth it. After two years of being on the road, managing relationships—both in and out of the office—with my clients, an explosion of stress was mounting that I could not control anymore. The dam had sprung a leak—additional pressure built as work was booming, behavior problems arose with my oldest in school (minor things, but major to a parent in the moment) and I was feeling more distant from my husband because we were only passing in the wind and shouting instructions at each other to keep the machine oiled and running. Although I was good at connecting with people for my job, I was doing worse than subpar with the one who mattered most as my partner in this life—my husband. I was exhausted, WE were exhausted. May-June 2019


I had been gone for three days and two nights, but I knew my travel was beginning to have an effect on the kids, especially my son. I had received calls two of the three days from separate teachers from his school informing me of issues that had arisen during the time I was away. Unfortunately, this had become a repeat ploy he had enacted on multiple occasions before. Each time, he was put on the phone and I was able to speak with him. His voice was somber, ashamed and I could hear the depression echo the same feeling that plagued my heart. Talking him off the ledge (and myself at that point), I did as best I could to give a pep talk to our wilting five-yearold. I informed him I would pick him up and that we would do something special. I gave him the task of picking what that something may entail and he was on his way with a glee that had been missing a few moments beforehand. There I was, fatigued from entertaining potential clients the night before and the night previous. I had been on the phone since landing and walking to my car, loading my luggage and driving to the daycare with another director at the company—relaying messages about what needed to be done, for who and when. I hung up as I rolled into the parking lot and I turned up the radio as soon as I heard the song that I knew by heart play. In this moment, the song, Breathe, by Jonny Diaz (see song on his 2015 Everything is Changing Album on his website https://jonnydiaz.com/ music/) spoke so clearly about what I was going through. I felt in that moment that the Universe understood and was sympathizing with me. I love a good song, and if you pass me driving on the street, most likely, you will see me singing wildly out loud to myself (or my kids) in my car. So there I was, sitting in the parking lot for the entire song as it played its course, singing out loud and praying. My eyes filled with tears, and I sang the lyrics and rested in the chorus. As the music peaked and began to trail off, I wiped my tears, leadupforwomen.com

took a deep breath and cleared my head. Somehow, everything felt better after that. My emotional outburst had taken place so quietly that the rest of the world did not even notice, but that time of recognition from the Universe (that is God to me) gave me just what I needed to clear my head, re-adjust and even give me a spark of an idea about where I may be headed. God was, in that moment, answering my prayers. What I had realized was that my life had become

they are well-trained (I hoped that would be soon). And how my husband and others would view me as superwoman if I could make his and everyone else’s lives easier (although I was constantly needing accolades this for momentum). I realized that all of those things I was focusing all of my energy on were items that my exterior self, this persona that I had created for myself, about myself—my ego—needed to keep form. In the end, none of these things were providing me with joy or happiness because it was not what my spirit, or my internal self-needed or wanted to reach its fullest potential. All of these desires were completely centered selfishly around how I wanted to be and to be perceived by others, and how I would be affected—not how I could affect others in a positive way. At this point, I was not even sure WHAT my spirit cried out to do. But, I took the hint from what was being sent my way through God, through the Universe and from that moment on, I vowed to myself that I would make the first step: to focus my energy much more

I had been gone for three days and two nights, but I knew my travel was beginning to have an effect on the kids, especially my son. I had received calls two of the three days from separate teachers from his school informing me of issues that had arisen during the time I was away. so busy, so cluttered with this, that, what had been and what was next to come that I had completely forgotten how to “just be” in each present moment as it passes. You see, there was so much joy in my life that I was missing because I was concentrating so much on the end result that was to become. The house that we would be able to afford by putting 20 percent down and having a two high-income household (completely necessary in Southern California where we live). How my children should behave when

on being present in order to take full advantage of seeing the beauty that this world provides us in every second, which we are most of the time too busy to even recognize. My hope is to be able to recognize translate the many interactions with others, beautiful occurrences and pleasant happenstances (that to me are all part of God’s plan) that are ever-presently playing out in the world surrounding me daily so that my purpose will unfold. Amen Sista! Lead Up for Women 29


Lead Up Tips

10

IN A G TO TIPS IDENCE F CO N

1.

Link up with other women: Take a look around your industry’s community, your personal community and social channels. Join a community group that keeps you connected and provides ongoing support, understanding and opportunities. You’ll make new friends, too.

2.

Support and share with other women:

3.

Make your voice heard:

By supporting and empowering each other, we’re all building personal success stories in our industries. Share your stories with others to inspire them.

Don’t assume your boss will notice what a great job you do and make that next important project a part of your road to success. You must speak up if you want to be heard.

4.

Meet challenges with solid support:

5.

Take the leap:

6.

Toot your own horn:

7.

Speak your mind:

8. 9. 10.

When you connect with individuals who serve as inspiration, they help you develop the confidence it takes to push you to the next level.

Look at all the women today with important roles in high finance, politics, entrepreneurship and manufacturing. We often hear we are too emotional for the BIG jobs, but it is our ability to empathize that makes us effective leaders. We get the big picture and understand the details. Believe in yourself and get your ideas out there. Don’t be afraid to do things your way.

It’s okay to let people know when you get a win, at least in small doses. You can build your own confidence by pointing out that you were the one who accomplished something for the company or organized a social gathering that serves the community.

A lack of confidence is often a bottleneck that keeps you from saying what you really think. Uncork that confidence blocker. By stating your view in a meeting, you are building confidence because you can see the reactions to your viewpoint and adjust as needed. Speak up to lead up.

Increase your knowledge:

Training helps build confidence because it goes right to the source of the problem. Read more books, attend more seminars and watch online talks. Confidence grows when you act on what you know.

Smile:

People with confidence tend to smile more, but it’s a learned skill. If you walk around the office and greet others, smile first and ask about their day. The change in attitude about what is going on around the office builds your own confidence because you realize you need to have a better outlook—and that’s highly contagious.

Feel your best being YOU:

Nothing feels better to a woman than looking and feeling your best. Spend time to get your nails done, style your hair, get a spray tan or spend work out several days a week. Find what makes you feel just as beautiful on the outside as you are on the inside and OWN it!

We suggest joining Lead Up for Women as your confidence building resource.

30 Lead Up for Women

May-June 2019


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SUMMER 2019

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Fast. Affordable. Healthy.

Theodore Dubin, director of design & construction, Just Salad

The Just Salad way continues to be a leader in fresh food options

Also Inside: A special supplement to:

Waterfront Evolution Cover story photography by Cyrille Dubreuil Photography


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Fast. Affordable. Healthy. The Just Salad way continues to be a leader in fresh food options By Michael J. Pallerino

T

he trading floor can be brutal. The fast and furious, always-on-the-move atmosphere does not always afford itself the most nutritional of lunchtime options. Nick Kenner and Rob Crespi had seen enough. They wanted to give New York City lunchtime crowd something that was fast, affordable healthy.

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In 2006, Just Salad was launched with a focus on selling quality salads. At first, the New York media glowed over the concept (and crowd). One publication went as far as to write, “Cute guys plus carb-free dressing? I’m so in.” But the initial concept needed refining, so the Just Salad team worked with a culinary agency to develop new menu items, eventually broadening the restaurant's appeal and consumer base. With a growing store count, the Just Salad brand continues to blossom. Commercial Kitchens sat down with Theodore Dubin, director of design and construction, to get his thoughts on where the brand is heading.

Give us a snapshot of Just Salad brand?

Just Salad is a QSR focused on delivering healthy, delicious and sustainable food. Our speed of service and value proposition set us apart from the competition.

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From a Just Salad brand perspective, we see a tremendous opportunity in suburban markets. We are making a huge push in suburban areas in new geographic regions.

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What type of consumer are you targeting?

We primarily target the lunch crowd in dense office districts and at large universities. Our target customers come from a diverse set of demographics and backgrounds, but they are all looking for a healthy meal at a reasonable price.

How does the design of Just Salad units cater to what today's consumers are looking for?

Our store design and ambiance are major drivers of sales. The design is clean, cutting edge and visually interesting. It’s just an inviting place to spend time and eat a meal. The effort and care we put into our store design is mirrored by the food we serve, and I think our customers make that connection.

Is there a location that is one of your favorites (and why)?

That’s a tie between our 750 Third Avenue store in New York and our 10 S. Riverside


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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS store in Chicago. Both locations have huge windows that make the architectural elements and finish materials in the stores pop. I particularly love the lighting design at 750 Third Avenue. It gives the space a sort of sparkling glow that naturally draws you in.

Walk us through how and why it was designed the way?

I think lighting is one of the most important elements of a store’s environment. You need to strike a balance between volume and quality of light. The goal of the lighting design here was to create a warm and inviting space, while throwing enough light on our food and signage to properly direct the customer’s attention.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

You need to build beautiful stores. The spaces need to be warm and inviting, but also clean and sleek.

One of our brand’s advantages is the low cost and simplicity of construction. When we overhauled design, we knew we needed to set a new segment standard for store design, while continuing our track record of spending a fraction of what the competition spends on build outs. We achieved that goal by painstakingly designing every piece to be modular and plug and play. Our millwork, lighting, wall coverings and soffit designs can easily be applied in any space we look at. We have learned how to make everything simple and straightforward for our GCs on site through years of trial and error.

Give us a rundown of the market's layout.

The well established trade areas are more competitive and expensive than ever. It’s a challenge to attract foot traffic when new competition is constantly opening around you. Players in today’s market win by providing the best experience to delivery and pickup customers. That is something we have done a great job capitalizing on. The leaders at Just Salad have done an unbelievable job evolving the business model in a way that grows our advantage in the marketplace.

What's the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

The biggest issue is how busy contractors continue to be. Demand for construction

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has been so strong for so long that the best subs are stretched thin. They can afford to demand higher prices so it’s a continuous challenge to keep budgets in line.

markets. We are making a huge push in suburban areas in new geographic regions. From a construction standpoint, I am excited about the number of units we are building. Our pipeline has more stores than ever before, and I am looking forward to taking advantage of bulk pricing for future FF&E orders.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

Refrigeration and HVAC are the electricity consumption beasts in stores. We continue to look for the highest efficiency units within our budget and intelligently layout our back of house refrigeration.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

From a Just Salad brand perspective, we see a tremendous opportunity in suburban

One of our brand’s advantages is the low cost and simplicity of construction.

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace?

Yes, definitely. The market for affordable, healthy fast casual food continues to grow. Landlords want our brand because it attracts young, affluent traffic to their properties. There is so much opportunity outside of our traditional markets that once we establish a foothold we are in a position to really blow up.

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

We just opened in Gainesville, Florida, and we our opening our first store in the Miami area this month. We will continue to target large urban areas outside of our core New York market because there is a surprising lack of competition and an obvious pent up demand for our product. We are entering the most aggressive unit growth period in the company’s history.

What trends are you seeing?

Delivery and off-site sales are disrupting the QSR market. There are a lot of new ideas and business models competing for supremacy. I think it remains to be seen what exactly the future looks like here, but it is safe to say the commercial spaces we look at and construction we do is going to change.

What is the secret to creating a "must visit" environment in today's competitive landscape? You need to build beautiful stores. The spaces need to be warm and inviting, but also clean and sleek. You need to create a great in-store experience, which for us means efficiently moving the customer through the queue. We spend a lot of time making sure we optimize customer flow within the space.

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What is today's consumer looking for?

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Describe a typical day.

Tell us what makes you so unique?

Today’s consumer demands healthy, fresh and sustainably sourced food. People are extremely conscious about what they put in their bodies and they think about how food affects their personal well being, environment and local economy. I have close to a dozen projects in different stages of construction and pre-construction. I spend my days reviewing site reports with contractors, coordinating Just Salad’s vendors, reviewing new store plans, and following up with expediters and architects on permitting and construction documents.

My biggest challenge is learning the ins and outs of new regions on the fly. We are doing an incredible amount of work in new markets, and it is on me to get to know the contractors, architects, supply chain and permitting processes.

I handle the entire construction process from the time the lease is signed to the day we hand over to ops. I am responsible for the store design, construction documents, permitting and construction management. My biggest challenge is coordinating and negotiating with the dozens of contractors it takes to open a store, while staying on budget and hitting our schedule. CCR

One-on-One with... » Theodore Dubin

director of design & construction, Just Salad

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? When I see customers and employees in the store for the first time. It is the culmination of all the hard work and late nights it takes to build a new restaurant. It’s a very satisfying feeling. What was the best advice you ever received? Stay on top of your subs. My Mom told me that. Your contractors and vendors need to know that you are holding them accountable at all times. What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? The best conversations are when we are reviewing new store sales and the numbers are beating expectations right out of the gate. I like to think execution in the design and construction phase help move the needle and turns an average store into a cash cow. Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why The ability to listen, adapt and hold people accountable. When people feel like you value their opinion and heed their advice, they take ownership in what they are doing. A good leader makes everyone feel personally invested in the process of whatever they are doing.

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Every project has its own unique set of challenges and roadblocks. If you can’t adapt and find solutions in real time, you can’t successfully lead a complex project. A good leader not only has the ability to hold other people accountable for their work, but also has the humility to take responsibility for himself. If you want to take credit for success you also need to take responsibility for failure. You need to be able to admit when something goes wrong and recognize that, even if its not necessarily your fault, you are ultimately responsible for the project. The key is the ability to learn from bad situations. What book are you reading now? I’m reading a book called “High Rise.” It’s about the construction of an office building in midtown Manhattan. It’s fascinating to see the same challenges I face on a day-to-day basis play out on a $500 million project. How do you like to spend your down time? I like to spend as much time as possible outside. I take every opportunity I can to play basketball, golf, run and go fishing. When fall comes around, I’ll be going back and forth to Ann Arbor as much as possible for Michigan football games.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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Waterfront

The NYC skyline as seen from Weehawken, New Jersey.

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Evolution

By Dan Vastyan

How the House of Que is making New Jersey love Texas-style barbeque

I

t has been a decade since Captain Chesley Sullenberger glided US Airways Flight 1549 to a soggy emergency landing on the Hudson River. The plane touched down gently, not far from the Port Imperial Ferry Terminal, in Weehawken, New Jersey. All 155 passengers and crew members survived. Without being instructed to do so, ferries left their docks and hurried to pull people from the frigid January waters.

Known for its smoked meat dishes, House of Cue is located across from the Weehawken Ferry Terminal.

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“Everyone called it the 'The Miracle on the Hudson,’” says Keith McGowan, commercial sales associate at Johnstone Supply. “It was 19 degrees F that afternoon, and everyone was fortunate that the ferries were able to get there quickly. The ferries weren’t as busy then as they are now, and the Weehawken shoreline looked much different than it does today.” When McGowan was a service tech, in the late ’90s, the ferry terminal was the only thing on the west shore of the river. Today, construction occurs at a blistering pace. "The Port Imperial Ferry Terminal has become a main aorta for commuters headed into the Big Apple,” he says. “It connects many of New Jersey’s bedroom communities with high-paying jobs in the city. But it wasn’t until more recently that development hit full stride. This past year was the first I’d put my expertise to the test in the construction. I was involved with a unique Fujitsu Airstage VRF installation right beside the ferry terminal.”

New condos, daycare facilities and parking garages now fill the streets leading to the ferry terminal, relying completely on the conduit to Manhattan that Port Imperial provides. Construction took place so rapidly that it seems like developers never considered where commuters might stop to grab a bite to eat. “There are almost no restaurants here,” McGowan says. “When a unique space opened up on the ground floor of a new parking garage directly across from the terminal, a Texas-style barbeque, called House of Que, jumped to make it their own.” Founded in 2013, House of Que has one existing location in Hoboken, which also overlooks NYC from the far side of the Hudson. The restaurant’s owner knows Dave Ashenfelter, president of Dash Mechanical, and brought him in early on the HVAC system design to address the particular challenges the space presented.

The House of Que is at ground level, and almost the entire front of the venue has folding glass doors that open to the street, and to the view of the city across the river.

This project was the first VRF system that Dash mechanical installed.

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“This is a plan/spec job where we collaborated with the engineer,” says Ashenfelter, whose company focuses on commercial and industrial plumbing and HVAC throughout New Jersey. “Limited space, and the fact that the restaurant sits below a parking garage, made for a lot of unique considerations.” While the House of Que dining experience—complete with live stage, open-air atmosphere and a menu to die for—will be the same in Weehawken as it is in Hoboken, the mechanical system takes a page from a different playbook. In Hoboken, the eatery is heated and cooled by a large central system operated by the Port Authority. In Weehawken, owners and managers at the House of Que wanted to keep the mechanical systems in-house, with comfort and efficiency prioritized.


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CIRCLE NO. 48


WATERFRONT EVOLUTION

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Dave Ashenfelter, president of Dash Mechanical, worked with the mechanical engineer to change the spec to two, smaller VRF condensers instead of on, which the original design called for.

Large, high static air handlers are used to heat and cool the seating area through exposed spiral duct.

Conditioning unique space

Ashenfelter says that in the original design, a single VRF condenser was going to serve the entire space. He worked with the engineer to change the spec to two, smaller Fujitsu Airstage VRF systems. The restaurant owner preferred two condensers instead of one. If a condenser fails, the restaurant can at least maintain half its heating or cooling capacity. The House of Que is at ground level, and almost the entire front of the venue has folding glass doors that open to the street, and to the view of the city across the river. For roughly nine months of the year, the doors are open. To extend the open-air season and limit the entry of insects and dirt, Johnstone supplied 60 feet of Mars air curtain. “The use of the air curtains causes a wash of air over the entrances to prevent outdoor air from rushing indoors, and helps keep insects from entering,” says McGowan, who has worked on the project with Ashenfelter

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While the House of Que dining experience— complete with live stage, open-air atmosphere and a menu to die for— will be the same in Weehawken as it is in Hoboken, the mechanical system takes a page from a different playbook.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019

since the beginning. “Without air curtains, the heating or cooling load would be much higher.” Table seating is provided at ground level, and the bar area was excavated several feet below grade. A stage and a pair of massive TV screens above the bar are also at street level, providing pedestrians a view of the entertainment inside. Two, eight-ton high-static Fujitsu Airstage air handlers are used to heat and cool the seating area through exposed spiral duct. An office and locker room space behind the bar is conditioned by a three-ton air handler. The Fujitsu Airstage condensers—one eight-ton and one 10-ton—are mounted in the parking garage on the second floor, separated from cars by a set of bollards. Even though the parking garage is open to the outside, the ceilings are low enough that the design called for condenser hoods. These are used to discharge air horizontally, out of the parking garage.


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A first of many

A 40-year veteran, Ashenfelter founded Dash Mechanical about five years ago. This was his first VRF project, so he was grateful for the Fujitsu factory training, on-site support from Johnstone Supply, and design input from Umair Surani, Mid-Atlantic Sales Engineer at Fujitsu. "That support made the install easier than I expected, despite the fact that everything inside the restaurant is custom made, and the building is all steel and concrete," Ashenfelter says.

As soon as Dash was contacted about providing a solution for the restaurant last year, Ashenfelter asked McGowan where to get solid VRF training. Several Dash employees then attended Fujitsu’s VRF training courses over the winter. “Keith has been in this industry a long time, and like everyone at Johnstone, he’s always been a great resource,” Ashenfelter says. “He comes out to jobs anytime I need him, and he’s certified for VRF start-up as well. Johnstone supplies a level of service and expertise that isn’t common among wholesalers.” Dash stayed one step ahead of construction progress and maintained attention to detail. The use of sound attenuators and purging refrigerant lines with nitrogen before brazing will go a long way to elevate the customer dining experience and ensure long system lifecycle. With the success of the project, Ashenfelter is confident that House of Que will duplicate the system if they open new locations. The restaurant’s grand opening took place in late November, and if the customer response since then is any indication, expansion may be a serious consideration. In the meanwhile, Dash Mechanical has more VRF projects on the calendar. CK

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Extensive use of air curtains helps to keep dirt out and conditioned air in when the large doors are open.

Keith McGowan (R), with Johnstone Supply, visited the construction site frequently during mechanical system installation.

Dan Vastyan is a regular contributor to Commercial Construction & Renovation magazine. Common Ground is a marketing communications brokerage that covers the commercial construction market.

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A commercial contractor’s expertise is beneficial when a facility maintenance project is more complex than originally thought. For example, at this senior community, Englewood Construction’s work on what was initially a simple water infiltration maintenance project turned into a full-on repair of the property’s entire exterior façade and window systems.

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Don't I know you? When déjà vu strikes with your commercial general contractor

W

hen commercial property owners and tenants start looking for the right provider to handle facility management and maintenance needs, they

shouldn’t be surprised if they have a déjà vu moment. Why? Because the best partner might be a firm they already have a good working relationship—the commercial general contractor they originally tapped to build or remodel their space. Several years ago, a handful of our clients at Englewood Construction started making requests for maintenance-level services outside of our original scope of work. Turns out, these client were on to something. Years later, we have a stand-alone Facilities Management Group that provides planned, preventative and emergency facility maintenance. Today, we not only have many clients who first tap us for a construction project later engage us for their facility management needs, but we also have a number of clients who initially hire us for facility management and then eventually bring us on board for a construction or remodel project.

Issues that come up in facility management often initially look like a small maintenance project, but what they actually need is a construction approach.

By Chuck Taylor

In both cases, this has been due to clients realizing the advantages and efficiencies of having the same partner for both functions. Here are just a few benefits of this setup:

Insider knowledge

The contractor that built or remodeled a facility is already intimately familiar with the building, which pays dividends when that same firm also manages its maintenance. The GC typically has easy access to recent drawings associated with the space, as well as information about the subcontractors and manufacturers for different building systems. This is all helpful not only in troubleshooting issues, but also in planning for building maintenance based on the age and condition of mechanical systems and unique building features that require special upkeep. Additionally, a construction firm that handles the maintenance of a building will have a unique perspective when planning for a commercial renovation or remodel. That includes not only having a good understanding of which mechanicals need to be updated or replaced—or, that are in good condition and can be repurposed— but also knowing if the property has problem areas that may need to be addressed in a renovation.

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DON’T I KNOW YOU? Problem-solving know-how

Issues that come up in facility management often initially look like a small maintenance project, but what they actually need is a construction approach. It may be that a maintenance job is more complex than originally thought, or could benefit from a contractor’s ability to analyze a problem and figure out the solution. For example, if a facility maintenance client has a recurring issue with flooring tiles popping, a GC will investigate why the tiles are failing—whether due to a bad install or a problem below the flooring—and address the cause, rather than simply continuing to replace them, which may not solve the real issue.

Perhaps the biggest benefit of choosing the same firm for construction and maintenance services is that it is an extension of an already proven and successful partnership. Similarly, as mechanical equipment or systems near their life expectancy, such as an aging HVAC roof unit that is increasingly requiring service calls, a GC can provide market-based construction costs to replace the unit and compare that to what the client is spending on frequent servicing to help decide whether to continue repairing or instead replace the unit.

Budget & planning efficiencies

As existing mechanical equipment or building systems near their life expectancy, a GC that also provides facility maintenance can provide market-based construction costs for replacement and compare that to what the client is spending on frequent servicing to help decide whether to continue repairing or opt for replacement.

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Commercial property owners, managers and tenants can often benefit from considering the big picture as they assess their needs for both future facility maintenance work as well as upcoming capital improvement projects. A GC can help plan and estimate costs for not only maintenance line items but also renovation work, allowing clients to better prioritize these projects and make the most out of their facility budget.


Likewise, a GC that also manages facility maintenance can advise on maintenance and construction projects that it makes sense to do at the same time for the sake of efficiency and cost, and manage them both.

is a failed HVAC system, a burst pipe, or facade damage from a major storm, the client doesn’t have to waste valuable time figuring out whether their commercial contractor or their maintenance provider is better suited to deal with it; there’s just one firm to call.

The ease of one phone call

Comfort with existing relationships

No one wants to make more phone calls than they have to, so having one trusted partner as a single point of contact for all construction and facility services can streamline work and provide peace of mind. Often, when a firm turns to Englewood Construction for both commercial construction services and facility management, it is because they want to minimize the number of partners and vendors on their roster, and have one resource for their team to go to with any construction or facility-related need. Having that single point of contact can prove particularly beneficial when it comes to emergency maintenance. Whether the situation

Perhaps the biggest benefit of choosing the same firm for construction and maintenance services is that it is an extension of an already proven and successful partnership. Clients that turn to Englewood for both construction and facility management do so because they are confident in the quality of our firm’s work, know we can deliver on brand standards and are comfortable with our team. That level of trust and respect is an important basis for any client relationship, and helps ensure facility work—whether maintenance-based or a full-scale construction project—will be completed smoothly and successfully. CCR

Chuck Taylor is director of operations for Lemont, Illinois-based Englewood Construction, a national commercial construction firm specializing in retail, restaurant, hospitality/entertainment, industrial, office, entertainment and senior living construction as well as facilities management.

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By John T. McGrath Jr.

Gaining a foothold Flooring renovation reinforces Chicago area VA Hospital's outreach to its patients

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T

he Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital, located west of Chicago, is a 147-acre campus that provides a safe and supportive environment for America’s veterans. It is home to a variety of facilities for our servicemen and women, including America’s first Blind Rehabili-

tation Center (BRC). Today, the Hines BRC is a 34-bed, in-patient facility that receives applicants from more than 50 VA hospitals in 14 Midwest states.

When the facility was built in 2005, it included LVT in high-traffic areas along with other floorcovering materials throughout additional spaces. Unfortunately, environmental challenges during installation combined with age and condition changes led to loose and buckled tiles in corridors and public spaces. The problem first appeared in 2010 and became a hazard for blind and vision impaired patients, visitors and staff, eventually leading to the need to mitigate and replace the flooring. In-house measures were used to temporarily secure the tiles to minimize any tripping hazards for patients and other occupants. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) directive regarding blind centers requires them to provide training to veterans within 60 days of application. In order to meet this requirement, the Hines BRC was required to maintain 100 percent operational during any potential renovation work. In order to minimize bed closure and facilitate a rotation of patients, installing the new floor would prove to be a challenging, multi-phase process. With that in mind, administrators and the hospital’s in-house interior designer set out on an ambitious plan to transform the space while limiting closures to no more than six beds at a time. This included hiring INSTALL Contractor NuVeterans Construction Services, Inc. to complete the installation process. A Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB), the contractor played an important role in keeping patients safe and rectifying the combination of moisture, material and installation problems that led to the initial flooring challenges.

“We were dealing with a facility that not only looked bad, but was unsafe,” says Denise Van Koevering, chief of the Hines BRC. “This came to a head in 2017 when our team was dealing with tile after tile that was either coming loose, buckling or delaminating. It was a frustrating situation for a floor that was installed a decade prior.” Mary Tucker, an in-house interior designer from Hines Engineering Services, became involved as the COR and project manager. Together, Tucker and Van Koevering conducted market research on potential solutions.

“Since we could only shut down a maximum of six rooms at a time, we wanted to do our due diligence in finding the best solution for transforming the space,” Tucker says. “We also needed to create something special in our design and elevate the facility to a new level of sophistication by creating wayfinding that our patients could feel with their long canes.”

The design process

Due to overarching VA standards, the design and specification process was somewhat limited. The replacement flooring could not

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include a shiny surface and needed to be a no-wax product due to glare, reflection and slip resistance. They also couldn’t specify linoleum or ceramic tile, which narrowed them down to luxury vinyl tile. Even with LVT the specified product had to be a specific thickness to be able to seamlessly transition from LVT to existing VCT that was found in patient rooms (they were not able to use transition strips at the threshold of patient room doors as they are a trip hazard). The final product also needed light color options along with a very dark textured option that had enough texture to feel with a long stick but not too much to become a trip hazard. When considering the other daily demands of the space, including service dogs that could scratch or stain the floor, heavy rolling loads from medical carts and equipment, and heavy foot traffic, they were further limited to a handful of manufacturers.

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“One of our biggest challenges with the project was the phased installation approach in a fully operational healthcare facility for vision impaired veterans.” — Nick Anos, INSTALL Contractor NuVeterans Construction Services

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019

“All of the physical demands dictated the material selection process,” Tucker says. “However, there were specific design needs as well. It needed to contrast for vision impaired patients but not be too contrasting that it looked gaudy or disjointed.” The team also needed materials that would pass the tap and sweep test of a long cane and help with wayfinding. Patients needed to be able to feel a difference between the flooring material without it being too obvious. For example, a long strip of textured flooring perpendicular to a door or opening signifies a patient room. A textured square is a sign for non-patient rooms. A long strip or band that runs parallel to a door signifies an elevator or exit. These designs do double duty, as they help the fire department look for patient rooms in smoky or hazardous conditions where only the floor is visible.


CIRCLE NO. 52


The installation process

With a design in place for 13,000 square-feet of new flooring in corridors and public spaces throughout the facility, the job went out to bid through the VA GLAC. Since May 2015, the VA has adopted INSTALL certification standards or equal into its Section 09 68 00 Carpeting, Section 09 65 19 Resilient Tile Flooring and Section 09 68 21 Athletic Carpeting, for contacting purposes. “One of our biggest challenges with the project was the phased installation approach in a fully operational healthcare facility for vision impaired veterans,” says president and owner Nick Anos. “Not only were infection control barriers and other safety systems a major concern, we needed to get to the bottom of the flooring failure from the installation in 2005.” Throughout each phase, Anos and his team needed to address moisture barrier and mitigation issues to improve conditions. After removing each tile, the installation ground and shot-blasted the

concrete to remove any contaminants. They then used a moisture mitigation system to prepare the surface for primer and texturizing. Another challenge was creating an infection barrier that could be seen by vision-impaired patients who were not fully blind. The infection barrier needed to keep dust, allergens and other debris out of occupied spaces. “A black plastic barrier was implemented, as it provided enough contrast for many of the patients in the facility to see,” Anos says. With roughly 13,000 square-feet of flooring and 21 phases, the Hines installation was challenging, but thanks to certified training from INSTALL, Anos and his team were able to quickly and efficiently complete the project with minimal disruption to patients, staff and visitors. Specific education in moisture mitigation and substrate preparation helped them provide the facility with a floor that will last for decades. More importantly, the patients who now call the Hines VA BRC home know they have a floor that’s specifically designed for them. HC

John T. McGrath Jr. is the executive director of INSTALL—the International Standards and Training Alliance, which is the construction industry’s best endorsed floor covering installation training and certification program. A three-decade flooring installation professional and accomplished speaker, McGrath conducts seminars regularly for architects, interior designers, building owners and facility managers to increase their knowledge of flooring installation issues. He can be contacted at: john. mcgrath@carpenters.org.

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Cold as ice Minnesota Townhome complex deals blow to winter conditions

By Rachel Ruhl

Mike Jackson, Associated Mechanical pipefitter foreman, left, and Nick Kruse, Michel Sales field support and technical trainer, perform final boiler commissioning in one of the mechanical room locations.

M

innesota is home to Bob Dylan, Betty Crocker, Post-It Notes, Bisquick and the Jolly Green Giant. And it is becoming green, quite literally. All across

the Midwestern state, federal dollars have been hard at work setting new energy standards.

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As the capital city, it only makes sense that Saint Paul has taken a leading role in the movement toward greater energy efficiency. Managers of Hanover Townhomes, a Section 8 housing complex in the heart of Saint Paul, have fully embraced the efficiency shift and signed off on a $10 million energy retrofit, completely transforming the mechanical systems ±and comfort—of the townhomes.


It’s rare to hear “affordable housing” and “comfort” in the same sentence. Too often, comfort is the compromise that gives way to price and ease of installation. Why is it that experiencing true comfort is so often thought to be reserved for people of greater means? It’s a question that troubled the property manager for BDC Management Company, the group that owns Hanover Townhomes. “Fortunately, I know now it’s just a myth, and we’ve done our best to bust it,” said the property manager. Many of the occupants at Hanover Townhomes are refugees. Some are from the Vietnam era while some are younger, with families and children.

Busting BTUs at the source

Nick Kruse, foreground, Michel Sales field support and technical training, completes a combustion analysis on one of the Laars Mascot boilers. Working with him are Larry Sundberg, left, Michel Sales field support and technical trainer and Mike Jackson, Associated Mechanical pipefitter foreman.

Minnesota isn’t known for mild winters. Residents learn to expect—and get—the worst of winter conditions all too often. Temperatures can drop to -30 degrees F as lake effect conditions engulf the state, leaving annual snowfalls of up to 170 inches. Knowing this, when the 13-building, 128-unit apartment complex was built in 1968, a central heating plant delivered plenty of heat in time of need. Colossal cast iron boilers, with a combined 50 million BTUs of output, supplied hot water to each building. But of course, the bigger they are, the harder they fall. Ultimately, no-heat calls came in frequently. Almost without fail, most of them came in the middle of a midwinter night. When facility maintenance pros dug into the source of problems—and deeper Mike Jackson, Associated Mechanical into the ground, in fact—they discovered pipefitter foreman, prepares to activate one that leaking pipes were the chief culprit. of the Laars Mascot FTfiretube boilers. BTUs were shared abundantly with the soil around the pipes, and stubborn air locks simply caused hydronic fluids to stop circulating. After years of challenge with the aging central system, including plant, the cast iron boilers eventually became a maintenance chalenormous heat loss and plentiful leakage, managers smartly chose lenge and had an insatiable thirst for fuel. to decentralize the old heating systems. Each apartment building then got its own cast iron boiler. The central plant was turned into a Déjà vu roomy storage facility. For some of the long-time maintenance guys—those who could For a decade or so, all space and water heating needs were recall long nights while tending to the needs of the big old central provided this way. While still an upgrade from the central heating plant—it was a déjà vu experience.

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Nick Kruse, Michel Sales field support and technical trainer, left, Larry Sundberg, technical training and field support at Michel Sales, middle and Mike Jackson, Associated Mechanical pipefitter foreman, right, discussing one of the nowcomplete hydronics systems at Prairie Meadows

Minnesota isn’t known for mild winters. Residents learn to expect— and get—the worst of winter conditions all too often.

Nick Kruse, Michel Sales field support and technical trainer, sets up a heat curve for one of the Laars boilers.

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For facility managers, they knew it was again time to switch to a more reliable and more efficient heating system, hopefully with an approach that would serve needs there more reliably, and for a much longer period of time. “This time, we scrutinized every detail to proposals that we received —from the type of equipment that was recommended, to approaches taken to meet—or preferably exceed—tenant expectations for comfortable space heating, as well as heat for domestic water,” explained the property manager Shakopee, Minnesota-based Associated Mechanical was chosen to complete the system overhaul at Hanover Townhomes. “The project broke ground on April first,” says Mike Jackson, Associated Mechanical jobsite superintendent. “The demolition of the existing mechanical systems was a pretty laborious job.” Nick Kruse, inside sales at St. Paulbased Michel Sales Agency explained that access to mechanical rooms is through a storm door, outside—and the steps that led to the basement, below, are old and steep. “Because of the difficult access, walk-behind cranes were used to hoist out the old equipment through the storm doors,” Kruse says. “It was no easy task.” Laars Mascot FT firetube boilers were selected by Associated. With an efficiency of 95 percent AFUE, input of 199 MBH, with 10:1 turndown, and the capability of cascading up to twenty boilers for larger structures— the new boilers give managers and residents new peace of mind during preparations for the inevitability of the Minnesota winters. “The Mascots were chosen for this job because they’ve got standard features that aren’t even options with other brands—like integral circulating pumps,” Jackson says. This meant that Associated’s pros didn’t have to supply one for each system— at an additional cost to them—or the added work entailed in installation, and dialing them in.


Boiler operation is now controlled by outdoor reset, built into each boiler’s circuitry. “This alone brought a whole new level of comfort for residents of the apartment complex,” says Larry Sundberg, technical training and field support at Michel Sales. “Before, residents had one- or two-zone systems that simply operated by an ‘on’ or ‘off’ function. At last, residents now enjoy the luxury of heat that’s measured out in doses, according to ambient conditions—good or bad.”

Aside from new mechanical systems, all Hanover Townhomes buildings were equipped with new windows, doors, sidewalks, steps and handrails, appliances and insulation.

Mike Jackson, Associated Mechanical pipefitter foreman, left, and Nick Kruse, Michel Sales field support and technical trainer, perform final boiler commissioning in one of the mechanical room locations.

Comfort & efficiency: The sum of its parts

Aside from new mechanical systems, all Hanover Townhomes buildings were equipped Laars Mascot FT firetube boilers in one of with new windows, doors, sidewalks, steps the mechanical rooms at Prairie Meadows. and handrails, appliances and insulation. Electrical improvements were also made. “It’s been a complete and noticeable improvement for everyone, and we’ve had several comments from living spaces so much more comfortable. The final proof of tenant tenant confirming that the changes are appreciated,” the property happiness and comfort comes when our maintenance phones remain manager says. “The updates and improvements here have made the silent all winter long.” MH Rachel Ruhl is a writer and account manager for Common Ground, a Manheim, Pennsylvania-based trade communications firm focused on the plumbing and mechanical, HVAC, geothermal and radiant heat industries. She can be reached at rachelr@seekcg.com.

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By JoAnne Castagna

Exterior of Grant Barracks at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. Credit: Dan Desmet, Public Affairs.

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With honor

Army Corps shares love of preservation for Ulysses Grant's family

N

ew Jersey resident, Ulysses Grant Dietz is named after his great great grandfather, Army General Ulysses S. Grant, the nation’s 18th president and commander

in chief. Dietz realized at a young age that bearing his name would be significant in his life.

"In 1968, at my grandfather's memorial service at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., I met his older sister who was born in the White House in 1876 and who married a Russian prince in 1899," Dietz says. "I suddenly became aware of my ignorance. I realized that my family was not like other families, and that somehow I had to do something about that. I was only 13, but I think a switch was flipped that day." Since then, he has set out to preserve and share his family's history. He has done this by being on the board of the Ulysses S. Grant Association and speaking annually at the General Grant National Memorial or “Grant's Tomb” on the General’s birthday. He’s also made preservation his career and was the Chief Curator of the Newark Museum for many years. So when he heard that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, is renovating and preserving Grant Barracks at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, he was pleased. “Buildings like this are often not treated with historical sensitivity,

which seems too bad. So the idea that the historic aspect of the building—even though it was built in 1931—is being considered is a good thing,” Dietz says.

Renovation of Grant Barracks at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. Credit: Dan Desmet, Public Affairs.

The Army Corps is performing this work as part of the West Point Cadet Barracks Update Program. This purpose of the program is to provide additional modern living space for the Cadets: •G  rant Barracks—formerly named “Old South Barracks”—was constructed in 1931 and is the oldest Cadet barracks in use. • It was re-named after General Grant who commanded the victorious Union Army during the American Civil War. •G  rant graduated from the academy in 1843 and both his son and grandson would following in his footsteps. Today, the barracks is being modernized to meet the needs of the modern Cadet. “The renovation includes a complete gut and remodel of the existing structure

Army General Ulysses S. Grant. Credit: Wikipedia.

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and the floor plans will be optimized to utilize space in a more practical way,” says Christopher Reinhardt, former Chief of New York District’s Military Programs Branch. The renovation is being accomplished by Army Corps contractors, while STV Inc. of New York City is performing the design, and J. Kokolakis Contracting Inc. of Bohemia, New York is doing the construction. When completed, the multi-story barracks will have 162 modernized rooms. To assist the Cadets with their academics, each Cadet company will have Collaboration Rooms that will allow them to meet in large numbers to work on group projects or participate in team building activities.

Ulysses Grant Dietz, the great great grandson of Army General Ulysses S. Grant. Credit: Ulysses Grant Dietz.

To help with this, it will be equipped with Wi-Fi and work stations will be equipped with cable connectors and power supply between computers and devices—Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports. In addition, the barracks will be outfitted with completely new mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems. The barracks will also get something that it didn’t have before—air conditioning. Many of these new and upgraded features will be energy-efficient making the barracks Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certifiable.

Exterior of Grant Barracks at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. Credit: Dan Desmet, Public Affairs.

The Army Corps is performing preservation work inside and outside the building, including restoring the decorative wood work along the walls and ceilings of the dining hall, like these historic unit crests. To preserve these crests, plaster and terrazzo work will be performed. Credit: Dan Desmet, Public Affairs.

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Preservation a birthright

Besides the renovations, preservation work is also underway. Dietz says that preserving old buildings is in his family’s blood and so is the Army Corps. “My grandfather, Ulysses S. Grant III was a 1903 West Point Graduate, who worked for the Army Corps and was also a founding trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation," Dietz says. “In the 1920s, his job in Washington, D.C. was to oversee all of the public buildings and parks, including the White House, which he altered for the Coolidge’s.” Dietz was also bitten by the preservation bug. “I’ve always loved old houses and the variety of things that went inside them. While I was Chief Curator of the Newark Museum, I was the keeper of a great 1885 beer baron’s mansion that is part of the museum’s complex. Interestingly, next door to this was the house of Marcus L. Ward, torn down to build the museum in 1922. It was a house that Ulysses S. Grant and his wife, Julia, visited, because Ward was a huge supporter of Grant, as both governor of New Jersey and a Republican congressman during and after the Civil War. The Army Corps will be doing its own preservation work on Grant Barrack’s both inside and outside the building. Some of this preservation will take place in the Grant Hall that is connected to the east side of the barracks. The hall was built in 1852 and was the former Cadet mess hall, used to feed Cadets until 1923. Today, Grant Hall is a kitchen and dining area separate from the mess hall. It is also a great gathering place to meet up with friends socially or discuss projects with professors in a more relaxed atmosphere.


“Within the woodwork on the walls and ceiling of the dining hall there is a rich history of unit crests decorating the interior," Reinhardt says. "To preserve these crests plaster and terrazzo work will be performed.”

A gothic revival

Grant Barrack’s exterior military gothic revival architecture is also being restored in order to blend in with the rest of the historic 200-year old campus. This involves delicate repointing work, pressure washing and re-grouting of the exterior granite stones. Repointing is when the joints of brick or stonework are repaired by filling in with grout or mortar. The primary purpose of this is to prevent water from infiltrating into the building.

Besides the granite work, exterior historic items will be restored, including decorative metal railings, stone masonry, and decorative metal and wood doors. The barracks is expected to be available to the Cadets in the summer of 2020. This spring, Dietz will have an opportunity to see the Grant Barrack’s renovation work. He’ll be at the academy with the Ulysses S. Grant Association to view a new Grant statue. After this, he’ll be traveling with the academy’s honor guard to Grant’s Tomb in New York City for an annual commemoration ceremony. There he’ll give a speech—like he’s done for 30 years—educating the public about Ulysses S. Grant and continuing to preserve and share his family’s history. FC

A regular contributor to Commercial Construction & Renovation, Dr. JoAnne Castagna is a Public Affairs Specialist and writer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. She can be reached at joanne.castagna@usace.army.mil

SPECIAL REPOR T

DON’T MISS OUT ON YOUR CHANCE TO BE INCLUDED Inc. Crossville, PR Representative Specialties Irene Williams, Dr. Product Construction r 349 Sweeney Brown, Senior Wade

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REPORT SPECIAL

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2018

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Specialties

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Get your company’s profile in our Flooring and Project Management Software listings, which will be published in our July/August 2019 issue. Our annual listings provide a snapshot of the leading companies in the respective sectors.

Go online at www.crr-mag.com on Advertising Page to download form.

Deadline: July19 CIRCLE NO. 54

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GREAT CHEMISTRY R&D lab unites sustainable products and lean construction

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by Jerry Brandmueller, IMC Construction


The company’s new Discovery Hub will consolidate the labs of 330 scientists into one building on the University of Delaware’s Science, Technology & Advanced Research (STAR) campus, connecting the industry leader with one of the foremost bio-engineering schools in the country. The $195 million, 340,000-square-foot facility is expected to be complete in 2020. A fortuitous pairing of construction ingenuity and chemical innovation is proving to save time, reduce costs, enhance safety and protect the environment in the building of this major facility.

Best and the Brightest

To Chemours, whose 2017 Corporate Responsibility Commitment dedicates $50 million to STEM education programs, UD’s STAR campus is the ideal location for its new building. “We’re thrilled to begin research and development work in the creative environment of a public university, alongside professors and students, not far from our global headquarters in downtown Wilmington,” said Mark Vergnano, Chemours’ CEO. “In this building, we’re going to bring together some of the brightest minds in academia alongside our R&D scientists to innovate new solutions for our customers and hopefully introduce some University of Delaware students to potential careers in chemistry and science.” The building will include more than 100 labs, fifty specialty rooms, cafes, conference rooms and twenty “huddle” rooms for small group meetings. It will span 15 acres within a campus of 272 acres.

Rising Star

D

elaware has been the home of DuPont for more than two centuries, but a four-year-old DuPont spinoff is staking its claim in Newark with a brilliant new research facility.

Chemours, with headquarters in Wilmington’s historic DuPont Building, is a Fortune 500 chemical company with 7,000 employees in the Americas, Asia, Africa, Europe and the Middle East. It is the world’s largest producer of titanium dioxide products for coatings, plastics and paper; and fluoroproducts including Teflon, lubricants and refrigerants.

The STAR campus is rising rapidly. Within the next few years, several additional stateof-the-art, collaborative workplaces will be complete, establishing the campus as a 21st century nexus of innovation, learning and research. The Discovery Hub is going up in the southeast corner of the campus along a streetscape of retail, housing and green spaces. Adjacent to the Newark train station, STAR will be more like a dynamic urban environment than a suburban office park.

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GREAT CHEMISTRY

“We’re building a community here,” said UD President Dennis Assanis at groundbreaking ceremonies in December 2017, “one of researchers, students, innovators, entrepreneurs and leading-edge thinkers and doers.”

Hub Cap

The location may be ideal, but not without challenges for the building team led by IMC Construction. Formerly occupied by the Chrysler Assembly Plant, the campus contains areas of contamination (AOCs) as identified by environmental engineers. Since acquisition in 2009, the University’s due diligence in testing and remediation of the brownfields site has been meticulous. Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control regulations stipulate that soil from AOCs can be contained and stored elsewhere temporarily, but ultimately it must be returned to the original site. IMC’s solution was to excavate 140,000 cubic yards of the contaminated

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The company’s new Discovery Hub will consolidate the labs of 330 scientists into one building on the University of Delaware’s Science, Technology & Advanced Research (STAR) campus.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019

soil in segments, raise the building pad to accommodate the soil that had to go back, and create a vented vapor barrier underneath the floorplate. The vapor barrier is a proven, effective method. While remediation has significantly reduced off-gases, the vapor barrier will remove any trace of off-gassing from the AOC and vent it above the building. The solution allows brownfield sites to be renewed and reused by the next generation of makers, and it puts this project one step closer to its Green Globes goal.

Sustainability

In addition to building on a brownfields site, the project has several sustainable features that may earn it three Green Globes out of four when the project is complete. It is a profound advantage to work with a client who is also committed to energy conservation. Said Vergnano, “This building represents our company’s commitment to


Delaware and to our community – made all the more special by the cutting-edge construction technology that incorporates some of our company’s own products.” Chemours’ new product Opteon will be used in the building’s chiller plants. A ground-breaking environmentally-friendly refrigerant with Low Global Warming Potential, Opteon is being adopted around the world, particularly in regions that are vigorously fighting climate change. Several other products will be the subject of study as well as used in the building of the Discovery Hub. Chemours’ Ti-Pure titanium dioxide – a nearly ubiquitous white pigment covering walls, floors, automobiles etc. – will be used for architectural coatings in the Discovery Hub. IT wiring will be coated with Chemours’ fluoropolymers, and a fire-resistant foam insulation made of Chemours’ fluorochemicals will be applied to the walls. The building will have an energy recovery ventilation system that uses 100% outside air. In laboratories that may use 17 exotic gases, recirculating interior air is impossible. Ducts as large as 92” will draw clean air in from outside and circulate it throughout the building. Other sustainable features include energy-efficient options for appliances, occupancy sensors and LED lighting, reflective roof coating and a native plant landscaping plan.

Prefabrication

Project Team Chemours Discovery Hub, Newark, DE Owner Chemours Company, Wilmington, DE General Contractor IMC Construction, Malvern, PA Owner’s Representative Trammell Crow, Philadelphia, PA Architect L2 Partridge, LLC, Philadelphia, PA Site/Civil Engineer Tetra Tech, Philadelphia, PA Structural Engineer O’Donnell & Naccarato, Philadelphia, PA MEP Engineer NV5 (formerly RDK Engineers), Philadelphia, PA

As designed by L2 Partridge Architects, the building has north, east and west wings. The north is three stories; east and west are two stories. The canopy plaza at the north door is an engaging public space in addition to a dramatic entryway to the double-height lobby. The exterior skin is precast concrete curtainwall with punched windows. “It’s a refined, subtle façade,” explains architect Joel Ziegler of L2 Partridge, who is also renovating the Hotel DuPont for Chemours headquarters. “The surface modulation causes interesting shadows, and there are areas of glass curtainwall and metal panels to help break down that precast façade and signify the main entrance.”

The building is a steel structure with poured slabs on deck – the type of structure that IMC has built many times. For this project, however, the builder had portions of the interior infrastructure prefabricated instead of building in place. Segments were constructed elsewhere and then brought in to be assembled on site. IMC did the same for the central utility plant that produces chilled water, steam and temperate water, and for the five, 65 x 50foot rooftop units. The plants were segmented, built in a fabrication yard and shipped to the site. The large, central plant arrived in 16 segments and was assembled on the roof. This procedure had labor, safety and schedule advantages: • The local labor market in the region is tight, with the boom in construction showing no abatement. Installing prefabbed segments takes fewer workers than building onsite. • Installation poses fewer safety hazards in the field. • Steel fabrication could begin concurrent with the approvals process, rapidly accelerating the construction schedule.

3-D Modeling

When they arrived onsite, did all the pieces fit? Like a glove, thanks to IMC’s Virtual Design Department. The department created a complete 3-D model of the building, including the interior laboratories. An added advantage was being able to effectively walk the owner through the finished space using virtual reality goggles. The model also identified the pipes, ductwork and electrical systems throughout the laboratories, aiding the engineers and subconsultants who could prefabricate from IMC’s model. The investment in software is significant, but ultimately cost-effective and labor saving because the team knows exactly where everything must be. For IMC, the Discovery Hub resembles other major construction contracts the company has won over the years. But innovation in products and process has greatly improved the time, economy and quality of the construction, bringing Chemours that much closer to its nexus of collective entrepreneurship. CCR

Jerry Brandmueller (jbrandmueller@imcconstruction.com) is the R&D project executive for IMC Construction. Based in Malvern, Pennsylvania with an office in Philadelphia, IMC has completed similar projects for the University of Pennsylvania, Endo Pharmaceuticals, Siemens Medical and other leaders in scientific inquiry.

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Eliminating the middleman How blockchain technology can impact your business

By Kris Lindahl

B

lockchain technology has found its way into mainstream news cycles, but many stories still only associate blockchain with cryptocurrency transactions. While

this is an application in which blockchain is being used heavily due to its incredible capabilities to track and securely log transactions of all kinds, a number of businesses and industries are discovering how blockchain might change the way they work. In short, blockchain technology permits the secure distribution of transparent and incorruptible data across a peer-to-peer cloud-based network through an online digital ledger or database, removing the need for potentially flawed or time-consuming paper copies and e-files. In the commercial construction industry, many are paying attention to blockchain technology's ability to decentralize building design data, reduce fraud and improve management amid the supply chain.

Replace the BIM Platform System

Most architects, builders and inspectors currently rely on some type of Building Information Modeling (BIM) platform to centralize

information concerning communications and building design plans. Blockchain technology can potentially eliminate this "middleman." This is done by allowing the parties involved in the structure's planning, design and implementation processes to enter relevant data into a distributed ledger. For example, a builder on-site realizes that certain design details must be changed due to unforeseen circumstances. By decentralizing building design and construction data, these necessary changes to the plans can be easily and confidentially communicated to all parties involved, including any stakeholders. Workflow variations can be costly to maintain, whereas a distributed blockchain

Using blockchain technology and enabling the use of smart contracts can virtually eliminate issues with fraud and quality control.

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ELIMINATING THE MIDDLEMAN ledger allows anyone with permission to access the data for decades—an invaluable resource to investors and commercial structure owners.

Greater quality control

Even with the strongest bonds between companies, it can only take one weak link in the chain of command to cause a project to go awry. Paper or e-contracts leave room for error and can allow certain parties to attempt to make fraudulent claims concerning what has and has not been performed during the construction and design process. Using blockchain technology and enabling the use of smart contracts can virtually eliminate issues with fraud and

A number of commercial industries have already taken advantage of the blockchain to improve supply chain management.

quality control. There is no more reliance on conventional contracts and building inspectors to ensure that everything is constructed as promised when switching to blockchain technology. Contractors are not typically paid until contract specifics are confirmed and fulfilled and all conditions are met according to the smart contract in place. Another example of how this may benefit commercial construction professionals is by its further implementation in effort to integrate with Internet-of things technology (IoT). These smart devices are currently used to connect with sensors amid structural

piping, which can already be regulated and monitored using IoT technology. This innovation helps inspectors confirm their location, material types, and whether or not they are installed according to coding requirements. In short, all of this will be logged amid the blockchain, which could be connected to the sensors to confirm their compliance and integrity for decades.

Improve supply chain management

A number of commercial industries have already taken advantage of the blockchain to improve supply chain management. Experienced professionals amid the construction industry are very aware that issues can occur throughout various project phases. Material deliveries can be delayed, or the wrong products can be sent to construction sites. Another benefit of the blockchain is that, by distributing these issues to the ledger, it allows other individuals, companies and investors involved to become aware of these situations, and change their timelines and schedules for their crew or awaiting tenants accordingly. Essentially, this can save a great deal of time considering that there are likely other projects that can be tackled while waiting for corrections to be made and keep the construction moving forward. This technology also streamlines project management. This is done by allowing parties to see projects become digitally “signed off” on as they are completed, rather than waiting for paperwork or e-documents to confirm the integrity and completion of each and every transaction. While blockchain is only beginning to become recognized as a tool within construction companies and other industries, organizations like the Construction Blockchain Consortium are helping to drive innovation amid the industry. The way in which businesses adopt this technology will reveal itself over time, and it is possible that any one of these solutions could evolve into something beyond what many have predicted. But when things play out, staying abreast of new developments can help existing companies move naturally into the future. CCR

Kris Lindahl is a nationally recognized innovator in real estate, marketing, leadership and community involvement. In 2014, he was Minnesota's No. 1 real estate agent as ranked by Real Trends. In 2017, the Kris Lindahl Team rose to become one of America's top real estate teams. In May 2018, he fully embraced his own real estate model to form Kris Lindahl Real Estate, Minnesota's premier independent real estate agency.

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CIRCLE NO. 56


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The Green Wave 5 successful ways to achieve sustainable construction By Kevin Hill

T

he construction industry never slows down. And it goes

without saying that it is a massive industry. A lot of materials flow in and out of any construction site, and unfortunately, a lot of waste is generated as well. This makes it imperative to keep the waste to a minimum and aim to make the processes as sustainable as possible.

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THE GREEN WAVE The objective of sustainable construction is to create and operate processes that prioritize resource efficiency and ecological design. It focuses on seven core principles across the building's life cycle: protecting nature, reducing the consumption of resources, reusing resources, using recyclable resources, eliminating toxins, applying life-cycle costing and emphasizing on quality. Sustainable construction includes three critical elements— environmental impact, social responsibility and economic efficiency. These elements help in governing the building design, quality of architecture, technologies and processes, working conditions and serve as the basis for sustainable construction.

more natural light, install smart windows that block ultraviolet rays and install solar panels on the rooftop for running HVAC units and water heaters.

3. Minimize Construction Waste

Waste is a byproduct of any construction site. A huge amount of wasted roofing, cardboard, glass, drywall, metal, insulation, etc., isn’t uncommon. Identify the materials that can be repurposed or reused. Waste is also observed when materials go unused due to the presence of large quantities. Implement truck scales to weigh the raw materials accurately so that you don't order more than you require to avoid wastage.

The main environmental benefits of practicing sustainability in the construction industry include reduced carbon emissions, alleviated noise pollution, increased cost savings, faster turnaround times and reduced scrap.

1. Utilize Low Impact Construction Material

2. Choose Renewable Energy Sources

One of the smartest and simplest ways to achieve sustainable construction is by using alternative energy sources. Incorporating solar, wind and hydro energy will tremendously reduce your fuel footprint and optimize your energy savings. You can incorporate renewable energy into the building design by constructing structures that are well-ventilated. Aim to bring in

Actively implement sustainable practices in your organization and seek LEED certification. Encourage recycling programs and train your staff on different sustainable practices they can adopt within the facility. Partner with other companies who practice sustainability to maximize your efforts.

5. Focus on Space Efficiency

Some ways to attain design sustainability through maximizing space efficiency include: • Having open spaces to maximize the use of daylight in the interiors • Incorporating industrial weighing scales in numerous equipment to reduce movement • Minimizing surface areas by excluding spaces like the patio, porches, etc. • Bringing in folding beds, moving walls and space saving furniture to maximize the usable area and minimize the size of the structure. • Incorporating raised floor solutions to make space for under floor systems, reduce overhead space and improve HVAC efficiency

In order to incorporate sustainable practices in construction processes, implement the following five practices: Manufacturing construction materials from scratch requires a lot of energy. In order to reduce the energy expended on various manufacturing processes, use low-impact materials that are recycled or repurposed. Use materials which are sourced from other building sites or materials that come from naturally occurring elements containing recycled waste and content such as blown paper insulation. Opt for modular designs for buildings to minimize wasted materials and decrease the construction time. Moreover, they are durable and can be reused and recycled continually.

4. Practice Inter-Company Sustainability

The main environmental benefits of practicing sustainability in the construction industry include reduced carbon emissions, alleviated noise pollution, increased cost savings, faster turnaround times and reduced scrap. But the shift to sustainability cannot happen overnight and requires a considerable amount of research, innovation and creativity, apart from a positive attitude and support from the stakeholders. Sustainability is the future and the construction industry must set an example by embracing this trend. CCR

Kevin Hill heads the marketing efforts at Quality Scales Unlimited in Byron, California.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


dedicated to

the art of engineering.

Wallace Engineering Structural and Civil Consultants Atlanta | Denver | Kansas City | Oklahoma City | Tulsa wallacesc.com

CIRCLE NO. 57


SAVE THE DATE JANUARY 21-23, 2020 LEXINGTON HOTEL • JACKSONVILLE, FL

WANT TO ATTEND AS AN END-USER OR SPONSOR... Tuesday Jan 21st, 2020:

• * Afternoon check-in. • 5:30-7:30 PM: Welcome Reception • 7:30-9:30 PM: Table Top Exhibit, Dinner and Scavenger Hunt

Sponsored by:

Wednesday, Jan 22nd, 2020: Thursday, Jan 23rd, 2020: • 7:45 - 8:45 AM: Breakfast buffet with Round Tables discussions & Speaker. • 9:00 - 10:15 AM: AIA Seminars. • 10:15 - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break. • 10:45 - Noon: AIA Seminars. • 12:15 - 1:45 PM: Plated Lunch with Speaker. • 2:00 - 5:30 PM: One-On-One Appts. • 7:00 - 10:00 PM: Gala Reception

• 8:00- 9:00 AM: End User Breakfast Only. • 9:00- 11:00 AM: Group Activity • Early Afternoon Flight Home

Contact David Corson 678.765.6550 or e-mail davidc@ccr-mag.com End-Users (retailers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc.) will receive complimentary hotel, airfare, transportation

www.ccr-summit.com

CIRCLE NO. 58


The Voice of Craft Brands

Claire Marin, founder and CEO of Catskill Provisions

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CRAFT BRAND AND MARKETING

MAY/JUNE 2019

CBAM-MAG.COM


Keeping bees By Eric Balinski

Inside the story of the Catskill Provisions brand

The honey bee has been admired and wondered about as far back as ancient times for the hexagonal honeycomb it makes. According to Greek mythology, Daedalus, a craftsman and father of Icarus, produced the first man-made honeycomb by forming gold in lost wax casting more than 3,000 years ago.

Greek mathematicians Euclid and Zenodorus found that honeycombs maximize the use of space with the least amount of building material. In more modern times, honeycomb structures have been described as “an architectural masterpiece� for their resilience and space efficiency. While honeycomb structures were not the original fascination of Claire Marin, founder and CEO of Catskill Provisions, bees and beekeeping were. Starting as a hobbyist beekeeper, Marin discovered the wonders of bees and what they produce. This became the backbone of her company and its wide array of craft products all based on bee honey.

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Catskill Provisions

One of the key reasons Catskills Provisions has been successful with restaurant chefs is that it recognizes Marin’s knack for blending flavors and finding the right balance between acids, sugars or bitterness. Like themselves, it is her deep attention to flavor they love to explore with her. Chefs can find Catskill Provisions’ products at artisanal food distributors Baldor and Gargiulo. CBAM sat down with Marin to get her thoughts on all things Catskill Provisions.

flavor profiles. They appreciate artisanal, small batch and hand-packed products with sustainable practices. Today, consumers can find Catskill Provisions products at specialty retailers in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut or on-line at iGourmet.com.

What is today’s consumer looking for? I think authenticity. Today’s consumer is more educated and aware of where their food comes from, and they respond to companies with a genuine point of difference and a conscience.

What do your consumers (and competitors) find so appealing about your brand? Honestly, the flavor. Whether the artisanal foods or the whiskey, we use our honey subtly, more as a balancing agent than a sweetener, allowing the

Give us a snapshot of Catskills Provisions? Catskill Provisions is an artisanal food and craft spirits company with honey at our core. Our 100-percent raw wildflower honey from the Catskill Mountains is the key ingredient in our finely crafted products, from our handrolled honey chocolate truffles, honey-infused ketchup and apple cider vinegar to our highly acclaimed New York Honey Rye Whiskey.

What type of consumer are you targeting? Our best customers seek only the finest, locally harvested ingredients with unique

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CRAFT BRAND AND MARKETING

MAY/JUNE 2019

CBAM-MAG.COM


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info@visualefxgroup.com | +1 202.207.6000 | visualefxgroup.com CIRCLE NO. 59


Catskill Provisions

true flavor of the ingredients to come through. We find that our whiskey in particular appeals to the novice drinker, since the honey softens the spiciness of the rye, but the typical whiskey drinker is always surprised and impressed at how smooth and balanced the spirit is, and often become some of our biggest fans. People also always respond to our beautiful packaging, which perfectly captures the brand.

How do you tie in everything you do with the brand?

Smaller craft brands are emerging every day so it’s an interesting time, and women are definitely stepping up to have a seat at the table.

That’s easy. We are built on a few key brand pillars—honey at our core, small batch, handpacked and made in the state of New York. We are also female-owned, which is unique, especially within the spirits industry. Also, a percent of all sales are devoted to pollinator-saving causes.

Walk us through your branding strategy. Everything we do consistently supports our brand pillars and reinforces our key values. Brand consistency is key, so even though we have two product lines—artisanal foods and craft spirits, our unique points of difference and brand DNA remain consistent in both packaging and message. We reinforce our brand through promotional alliances, events and collaborations with similar values. We look for opportunities that highlight the wonderful resources of the Catskills, celebrate local farmers, support pollinators and empower women.

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CIRCLE NO. 60


Catskill Provisions

What is the secret to creating a branding story that consumers can buy in to?

What do your consumers think when they think of your brand?

Finding a unique point of difference and being authentic. Consumers have been so over-promoted to, they can smell a gimmick a mile away. My company is truly my story, unembellished and real and people have responded to it.

They think of a brand that’s true to its mission and always delivering quality products with exceptional flavor by using traceable products. Hopefully they also think of the bees and the Catskills.

What’s the biggest issue(s) today related to the marketing/sales side of your brand today?

What trends are defining the space?

The biggest issue is prioritizing how to devote my time and resources. As a small company, we all wear many hats, and it can be difficult to compete withMay_June-2019.pdf the big brands with large staffs and budgets. 1 5/16/19 1:25 PM

Smaller craft brands are emerging every day so it’s an interesting time, and women are definitely stepping up to have a seat at the table.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead? It’s such an exciting time for us, as we just opened our own distillery in The Catskills, with a tasting room following this summer. We are adding one more to the less than one percent of female-owned and operated distilleries in the United States. I am distilling on the grain, using non-GMO corn and our wildflower honey, and will soon introduce a Pollinator Vodka, Pollinator Gin and Wanderer Gin. Each celebrates and supports pollinators like the bees and the endangered Monarch Butterflies.

C

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

M

Y

I just finished my first mash, so I’d have to say getting my first batch distilled on our property out into the marketplace.

CM

MY

CY

Describe a typical day.

CMY

K

METROCERAMICS.COM/SERVICES

Wow, there is no typical day, which is one of the things that I love about owning my own business. I wake up early, spend the early hours catching up on emails and paperwork, then I hit the ground running. If I am upstate, I am in the barn distilling, working with a local farmer down the road planting botanicals and rye, and of course, tending to my bees. I am often in New York City, visiting chefs and bartenders, sitting on panels, networking.

CIRCLE NO. 61

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Why is being female owned and operated your secret weapon? Women approach things differently, so we bring a fresh approach to the spirits industry. We are used to multi-tasking and tend to be more collaborative, so I think women are bringing innovative improvements to some longtime practices.

Why is important to have (and to market) locally harvested resources? It is so difficult to be a farmer, and stay true to good practices, not cut corners and still make a living. We must support these local communities,

and it is also so much healthier to eat local food the way nature intended. And you can definitely taste the difference.

Tell us what makes you so unique? Our culinary roots. I started as a beekeeper, selling my local honey to chefs in and around New York City, and slowly expanded to include other honey-infused artisanal foods. To then cross over into distilling is somewhat crazy and pretty unique. To me, talking to chefs or mixologists are not that different; both are passionate about artistic expression through unusual pairings and creations.

Sitting down with... Claire Marin, founder and CEO of Catskill Provisions What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Giving people the joy of tasting something delicious. This creates such human connection through the food with people, ultimately creating happiness. Likewise, meeting with chefs and making personal connection and exploring flavors. Chefs are the “rock-stars of the food world and there is so much to learn from them. What was the best advice you ever received? Always have your lawyer near you. In today’s world, one has to be careful, as people will lead you down the wrong path whether intentionally or not. I believe it is critical that both parties agree on a written document, which is signed by both parties, and that any fine print is talked about before signing the arrangement. What’s the best thing a customer ever said to you? It always a delight when someone unexpectedly tells you they tried your product and how wonderful it is. Maybe the most surprising time was when our distributor entered our NY Honey Rye Whiskey into a blind taste test with a panel of experts. I received a call from one of the judges who told me we were selected and now would be the official

“Honey Whisky” of Madison Square Garden. How very cool is that, and it’s such a massive audience. Everyone goes to the Garden, and the owners and buyers there know their customers appreciate good local brands. We are mainstream now, not just for a few. When you are not at the Garden, the whiskey is also available at www. forwhiskeylovers.com and bar and restaurants can get it through the distributor, Winebow. What is your favorite brand story? I love two brand stories in particular, Haagen-Dazs and Southwest Airlines. Haagen-Dazs is so interesting because they use great ingredients, have beautiful packaging in a variety of sizes and this premium products is accessible in places that are as diverse as grab-and-go like 7-11, to high end retailers, such as Whole Foods, while maintain their premium brand identity across these different channels. Southwest—one just has to be impressed with how happy their staff is. Everything is positive, how they show-up to work to how they make customers happy. Southwest has shown me that happy bees make better honey. So we go to great lengths to take care of our bees. And in turn, the bees teach us to be good, kind and happy as well.

Eric Balinski is the owner of Synection, LLC, which is a strategy and growth consultancy firm. For more information, visit: synection.com.

CIRCLE NO. 64

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PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Southington, CT

$1,500,000.00

5,465

New Construction

Q4 2019

Dunkin Donuts

Holyoke, MA

$600,000.00

2,000

New Construction

Q4 2019

KFC

Somersworth, NH

$500,000.00

1,406

Renovation

Q3 2019

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Longhorn Steakhouse #5606

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS: O'Reilly Auto Parts

Halifax, MA

$2,000,000.00

7,225

New Construction

Q3 2019

Circle K

Dover, NH

$1,400,000.00

5,328

New Construction

Q3 2019

Walmart Supercenter #1866-218

Farmington, ME

$700,000.00

157,377

Renovation

Q3 2019

Dollar Tree

Woonsocket, RI

$350,000.00

8,895

Remodel

Q3 2019

Carter's & Oshkosh #1304

Nashua, NH

$300,000.00

3,641

Remodel

Q3 2019

40 Trinity Place

Boston, MA

$225,000,000.00

429,000

New Construction

Q4 2019

Mill Plaza Redevelopment

Durham, NH

$70,000,000.00

254,000

New Construction/Addition

Q4 2019

Seabury Cooperative Housing

New Haven, CT

$19,800,000.00

72,306

Renovation

Q3 2019

Chicopee Mill Renovation

Chicopee, MA

$6,000,000.00

65,000

Renovation

Q3 2019

Tru by Hilton

Manchester, NH

$23,500,000.00

63,157

New Construction

Q3 2019

Alexandra Hotel Redevelopment

Boston, MA

$10,000,000.00

60,000

Renovation

Q4 2019

Ana Grace Academy of the Arts Phase II

Bloomfield, CT

$50,000,000.00

160,000

New Construction

Q3 2019

Chapin Street Elementary School

Ludlow, MA

$40,000,000.00

106,000

New Construction

Q3 2019

Manchester Community College (MCC) Lab Renovations

Manchester, NH

$300,000.00

8,220

Renovation

Q3 2019

New Tewksbury Fire Headquarters

Tewksbury, MA

$13,200,000.00

22,300

New Construction

Q3 2019

New DPW Facility

Montague, MA

$8,500,000.00

28,844

New Construction

Q3 2019

Neuroscience Center - Yale-New Haven Hospital Saint Raphael Campus

New Haven, CT

$838,000,000.00

505,000

New Construction

Q1 2020

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

188

Biddeford Saco Dental Associates

Saco, ME

$4,900,000.00

15,800

New Construction

Q3 2019

ConvenientMD

Belmont, NH

$3,000,000.00

5,000

New Construction

Q3 2019

Lahey Behavioral Health at Solomon Center

Lowell, MA

$1,000,000.00

5,000

Remodel

Q3 2019

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Acclaim Lighting......................................................... 71.........................33

Lido Lighting......................................................... 69.......................32

Ad Art/Genesis Light Solutions.............................. 15, 94.................10, 41

Metropolitan Ceramics......................................... 186......................61

ANP Lighting......................................................... 77.......................34

Mike Levin............................................................. 8.........................5

Beam Team Construction...................................... 31.......................15

Mountain Resort Properties, Inc............................ 95.......................42

Bitro Group, Inc..................................................... 65.......................30

NAC Products.........................................................147...................50

Capacity Builders................................................... 5.........................3

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association................ 33.......................16

CDO Group............................................................ 37.......................18

Navien................................................................. 139......................47

Commerical Construction & Renovation .............. 165......................55

P&C Construction.................................................. 57.......................28

Commerical Construction & Renovation People................................................ 96.......................43

Permit.com........................................................... 93.......................40

Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreat............................................... 91.......................39 Commerical Construction & Renovation Summit..........................................178-179..................58 Construction Data Co. (CDC)................................ 189......................62

Phoenix Drone Pros.............................................. 87.......................38 Plaskolite.............................................................. 83.......................37 Poma Retail Development, Inc.............................. 135......................45 Prime Retail Services............................................ 47.......................23

CONSTRUCT-ED................................................... 173......................56

R.E. Crawford Construction................................... 49.......................24

Construction One.................................................. 11........................8

Rockerz, Inc........................................................... 7.........................4

Controlled Power.................................................. 14........................9

S.L. Hayden Construction, Inc............................... 53.......................26

Davaco.................................................................. 9.........................7

Shames Construction............................................ 51.......................25

Dynamic Air Quality Solutions............................... 17.......................11

Schimenti......................................................... 8, CVR4.................6, 64

Experis Engineering............................................. 143......................48

Serigraphics........................................................ 137......................46

Flynn Construction................................................ 41.......................20

ShopTalk 360....................................................... 165......................54

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc....................................... 43.......................21

Signage Solutions................................................. 21.......................12

Georgia Printco.................................................... 185......................60

South Shore Sign Company................................. 145......................49

Global Security Exchange..................................... 157......................53

Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc.......................... 55.......................27

Harding & Companies........................................... 81.......................36

UHC Construction Services............................... COV2-1....................1

Harmon Construction, Inc...................................... 45.......................22

Visual EFX Group................................................. 183......................59

Hunter Building Corp............................................ 151......................51

Wallace Engineering............................................ 177......................57

Jesco Lighting Group............................................ 79.......................35

Warner Bros........................................................ CVR3.....................63

Jones Sign........................................................... 155......................52

Westwood Contractors, Inc................................... 61.......................29

Lakeview Construction, Inc................................... 39.......................19

Window Film Depot............................................... 35.......................17

Lamar LED............................................................ 67.......................31

Wolverine Building Group..................................... 133......................44

Laticrete............................................................ 25, 29.................13, 14

ZipWall.................................................................. 3.........................2

190

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


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MAY : JUNE 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

191


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

A time to celebrate W

inning a professional sports championship is not easy no games. By end of season and playoffs, they were one of the best matter how long a team and its fans have been around. teams in the NHL, hitting on all cylinders. Some teams have it easier than others to get to the pinnacle of To win the Stanley Cup a team must win 16 games, via three championship achievement, while others get close, but don’t get to seven-game series and the Stanley Cup finals. That’s after playing reign in a championship. an 82-game season and all of the bumps This year, after 52 long years in the and bruises that come along the way. National Hockey League (NHL), the Saint Playing the same players, the new Louis Blues won its first NHL Championship coach just tweaked a few things to turn the to hoist Lord Stanley’s Cup. hockey franchise around and shock many of The Blues were one of the original six the pundits who gave them no chance. teams in the NHL. Since then, it has expandIt is amazing when a team or people ed to 31 teams—24 in the United States in general have hit rock bottom. Something and seven in Canada. sparks them to get up and get things done The NHL is considered by many to for the positive of all involved and not choke be the premier professional ice hockey when it’s all on the line. league in the world, and one of the major Winning a sports championship is professional sports leagues in the United just like business. Some teams win every States and Canada. The Stanley Cup, year, some are on the perpetual pendulum the oldest professional sports trophy in of winning and losing, and some just can’t North America, is awarded annually to catch a break. But they all keep coming the league playoff champion at the end of back to practice to try and get better each each season. day, while learning how to win and lose, Each member of the championship and pick up the pieces after every game to NHL team gets his name etched on the Cup look forward to being named Champion. for a lifetime and becomes a member of an Business is the same. You must have an elite group of hockey players that can call obtainable goal in mind, stay focused on the themselves NHL Champions. job at hand, work smart and hard, and never, The St Louis Blues have made the ever say die. If things change, don’t play the playoffs 42 times and have played in three Cup “what if” game. Make a decision so you will finals, each time getting swept, only to have know. Not everything works out the way you the Summer to think the losses before it starts want it, but in the long run, usually things will all over again in early October. With their 4th pay off with high dividends. For the St Louis appearance this year, history was made. Blues, in June 2019, they did it with guts, grit It is amazing when a team and pure desire. Hats off to them. Halfway through this season, the Blues were in last place and its fans were starting So, as we enter the second half of 2019, or people in general have to give up hope. Ownership replaced the we hope to see many of you at our remaining hit rock bottom. Something head coach with Craig Berube, a retired CCRP receptions, Fall Retreats and 10th sparks them to get up and Anniversary Summit in January 2020, when hard-nosed NHL player with a new outlook of playing hard, playing smart and never we travel to Jacksonville, Florida. get things done for the giving up. It is not what you don’t have, but To all, here’s to good health, safe travpositive of all involved what you do with what you have. els and the feeling of championship victory. and not choke when Little by little, as the season progressed And always, just like Blues fans, Keep to the finish line, the Blues began to win the Faith. CCR it’s all on the line.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2019


Turning imagination into reality.

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CIRCLE NO. 63


From Midtown to Manhattan Beach. We’ve expanded to the West Coast Bringing decades of experience building high profile retail and office environments for the world’s largest brands. We’re ready to build for you. Tom Fenton, Business Development Manager (914) 244-9100 x 322 / tfenton@schimenti.com

NE W YORK

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LOS ANGELE S CIRCLE NO. 64


INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

President’s Message....................pg 3 Member Directory......................pg 4-5 In Memoriam: Past President James Healy................................pg 6

Consensus Docs Updates..............pg 6 The Current State of Construction Safety ...................pg 7

SPRING EDITION • 2019

NEWSLETTER

RCA Hosts Successful 29th Annual Conference RCA’s 29th Annual Conference was held March 1-3, at the Gaylord Texan in Grapevine, Texas. The conference featured a welcome reception on Friday and a day of professional development on Saturday. Two events were hosted at the nearby Cowboys Golf Club: a dinner/ casino night on Saturday, and a spontaneous indoor golf event on Sunday. Attendees included members, retailers, architects, and sponsor representatives. A welcome addition was a group of superintendents who had attended our Superintendent Training Program workshop that was held two days prior to the conference. Speaker Gene Marks discussed technology trends and their impact on customer service and how we do business. Economist Anirban Basu presented a James Bondthemed (“To All the Economists I’ve Loved Before”) economic update, with data on both domestic and international markets. Sarah Wicker Kimes discussed the evolving retail and shopping center experience and how companies are adapting to meet changes and (Continued on page 2 )

Ray Catlin, Randy Danielson & Kristen Roodvoets

Eric Handley & Jay Dorsey

Anirban Basu

RCA’s mission is to promote professionalism and integrity in retail construction through industry leadership in education, information exchange, and jobsite safety.


NEWSLETTER (Continued from page 1 ) address customer needs. Ray Catlin, Schimenti Construction Company, moderated a discussion about engaging the workforce and creating a corporate culture where compensation isn’t the most important factor in an employee’s decision to work for or stay with a company. Panelists Randy Danielson, Tri-North Builders, and Kristen Roodvoets, SmileDirectClub, offered their personal experiences and examples of what is resonating in the retail construction industry today. RCA scholarship recipient Ryan Pullin, a University of Houston graduate now working for Triad Retail Construction, talked about the impact of the RCA’s support as he was beginning his career in the industry.

Sarah Wicker Kimes

During the business meeting portion of the conference, RCA’s new officers and Board members were introduced: President: Steve Bachman, Retail Construction Services, Inc. Vice President: Ray Catlin, Schimenti Construction Company Secretary/Treasurer: Eric Handley, William A. Randolph, Inc. Immediate Past President: Rick Winkel, Winkel Construction, Inc.

Dan De Jager & Alison Strauss

New Board members are Eric Berg, Gray, Randy Danielson, Tri-North Builders, and Carolyn Shames, Shames Construction; Ray Catlin and Eric Handley began their second terms.

SAVE THE DATE FOR OUR 30TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE, TO BE HELD PRIOR TO SPECS, MARCH 13-15, 2020, BACK AT THE GAYLORD TEXAN.

We’re We’re

Lion Tamers Lion Tamers

Commitment to adjust to the demands of jobs. Commitment toyour adjust to Not the other way around. the demands of your jobs.

Proactive support, consistency, trademark Proactiveand support, transparency. consistency, and trademark

Not the other way around. transparency. Access to everything on site at any hour, even at 3am. Access to everything on site at any hour, even at 3am.

Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617 Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617

800-915-9002 800-915-9002 cmi-usa.com cmi-usa.com

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SPRING EDITION • 2019

Art Rectenwald & Kent Moon Many thanks to our conference underwriters.

Platinum Commercial Contractors, Inc.

Gold Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Retail Construction Services Bogart Construction, Inc. Management Resource Systems, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Gray

Silver Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Commonwealth Building, Inc.


ADVISORY BOARD

President’s Message What has your RCA Board been doing for you? This past October, the Executive Committee of the Board and some former Presidents met in Washington, DC to re-visit the Purpose, Mission, and Vision of the organization. As part of this work there was an effort to review and validate the relevance of the organization for the membership, recognizing that our businesses must evolve to be successful in the ever-changing retail landscape. With this Steve Bachman market evolution the Board subsequently decided to re-shuffle the committee structure to better adjust to the needs of our membership. We have created the following committees: Membership Experience, which includes Member Benefits, Sponsorship, Membership, and Events; People, which includes Recruitment and Scholarship; Training, which includes Superintendent Training and Safety, and Legislative/Regulatory. A highlight of this rework is the creation of the Advisory Board Committee, which is comprised of all of the current (and potentially future) RCA Advisory Board members. These committees are chaired by your Board Members who have a passion to serve in their specific areas of interest and are supported by other Board members or RCA members at-large who share this interest as well. We believe that these new groups will provide a better roadmap to help us navigate the challenges ahead and help the organization grow its collective knowledge base. The listing of committee chairs can be found to the right of this column. As you know, the media hype of store closings often overshadows the reality of the net gain in retail store openings each year. While some of the legacy brands and namesakes may disappear, there are just as many up-andcomers to take their place; witness the click-to-bricks evolution. Don’t forget, over the last 30 years, the RCA has grown its membership with exciting companies that are often as diverse in their business models and methodology as they are in their customer base. So we know that retail is changing, but hasn’t it always? Next, we will take a deep-dive into the re-purposing of the regional shopping center: stay tuned!

We know that retail is changing, but hasn’t it always?

Steve If you have any feedback or ideas for the organization, please contact me. We are always looking for ways to continue strengthening the organization: president@retailcontractors.org.

Ken Christopher - LBrands

Jeffrey D. Mahler - L2M, Inc.

Mike Clancy - FMI

Jason Miller - JCPenney Company

Craig Hale, AIA -

Steven R. Olson, AIA - CESO, Inc.

HFA - Harrison French Associates

Brad Sanders - CBRE | Skye Group

COMMITTEE CHAIRS LEGISLATIVE/REGULATORY

SAFETY

MEMBER BENEFITS

SCHOLARSHIP

MEMBER EVENTS

SPONSORSHIP

MEMBERSHIP

TRAINING

Mike McBride legislative@retailcontractors.org

Brad Bogart Rick Winkel memberbenefits@retailcontractors.org Jeff Mahler memberevents@retailcontractors.org Hunter Weekes membership@retailcontractors.org

RECRUITMENT

Eric Berg safety@retailcontractors.org Mike McBride Justin Elder scholarship@retailcontractors.org Phil Eckinger sponsorship@retailcontractors.org Randy Danielson Carolyn Shames training@retailcontractors.org

Jay Dorsey recruitment@retailcontractors.org

OFFICERS President - Steve Bachman

Secretary/Treasurer - Eric Handley

Vice President - Ray Catlin

Immediate Past President - Rick Winkel

Retail Construction Services, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company

William A. Randolph, Inc.

Winkel Construction, Inc.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2020 Steve Bachman

2021 Jack Grothe

2020 Eric Berg

2022 Eric Handley

2020 Brad Bogart

2021 David Martin

2022 Ray Catlin

2021 Mike McBride

2021 Randy Danielson

2021 Carolyn Shames

2021 Jay Dorsey

2021 Hunter Weekes

2021 Phil Eckinger

2020 Rick Winkel

Retail Construction Services, Inc. Gray

JG Construction William A. Randolph, Inc.

Bogart Construction, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company Tri-North Builders

Triad Retail Construction, Inc. Eckinger Construction Co.

H.J. Martin & Son, Inc. Westwood Contractors Shames Construction Weekes Construction, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc.

2020 Justin Elder

Elder-Jones, Inc.

PAST PRESIDENTS David Weekes 1990-1992 W. L. Winkel 1993 Robert D. Benda 1994 John S. Elder 1995 Ronald M. Martinez 1996 Jack E. Sims 1997 Michael H. Ratner 1998 Barry Shames 1999 Win Johnson 2000 Dean Olivieri 2001

Thomas Eckinger 2002 James Healy 2003 Robert D. Benda 2004-2006 K. Eugene Colley 2006-2008 Matthew Schimenti 2008-2012 Art Rectenwald 2012-2014 Mike Wolff 2014-2016 Robert Moore 2016-2017 Brad Bogart 2017-2018 Rick Winkel 2018-2019

2019 • SPRING EDITION

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NEWSLETTER

RCA Membership COMPANY Acme Enterprises, Inc. All-Rite Construction Co., Inc. Atlas Building Group BALI Construction Bogart Construction, Inc. Buildrite Construction Corp. Burdg, Dunham and Associates Comet Construction Commercial Contractors, Inc. Commonwealth Building, Inc. Construction One, Inc. Corstone Contractors LLC David A. Nice Builders De Jager Construction, Inc. Desco Professional Builders, Inc. Diamond Contractors DLP Construction E.C. Provini, Co., Inc. Eckinger Construction Company EDC ELAN General Contracting Inc. Elder-Jones, Inc. Encore Construction, Inc. Engineered Structures, Inc. Fi Companies Fiorilli Construction, Inc. Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Fred Olivieri Construction Company Frontier Building Corp. Fulcrum Construction, LLC Go Green Construction, Inc. Gray H.J. Martin & Sons, Inc. Hanna Design Group Harmon Construction, Inc. Hays Construction Company, Inc. Healy Construction Services, Inc. Herman/Stewart Construction Howard Immel Inc. International Contractors, Inc. J. G. Construction JAG Building Group James Agresta Carpentry Inc. KBE Building Corporation Kerricook Construction, Inc. Lakeview Construction, Inc. M. Cary, Inc. Management Resources Systems, Inc. Marco Contractors, Inc. Metropolitan Contracting Co., Ltd. Montgomery Development Carolina Corp. National Building Contractors National Contractors, Inc. Pinnacle Commercial Development, Inc. Prime Retail Services, Inc. PWI Construction, Inc. R.E. Crawford Construction LLC Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. Retail Construction Services, Inc. Retail Contractors of Puerto Rico Rockford Construction Co. Russco, Inc.

RCA members must meet and maintain a series of qualifications and are approved by the Board of Directors for membership. They have been in the retail construction business as general contractors for at least five years; agree to comply with the Association’s Code of Ethics and Bylaws; are properly insured and bonded; are licensed in the states in which they do business; and have submitted letters of recommendation.

CONTACT Robert Russell Warren Zysman Brian Boettler Kevin Balestrieri Brad Bogart Bryan Alexander Harry Burdg Bernard Keith Danzansky Kenneth Sharkey Frank Trainor Bill Moberger Mark Tapert Brian Bacon Dan De Jager Bob Anderson Lori Perry Dennis Pigg, Jr. Joseph Lembo Philip Eckinger Christopher Johnson Adrian Johnson Justin Elder Joe McCafferty Mike Magill Kevin Bakalian Jeffrey Troxell Greg Freeh Dean Olivieri Andrew Goggin Willy Rosner Anthony Winkco Robert Moore David Martin Jason Mick William Harmon Roy Hays James Healy Terry Varner Pete Smits Bruce Bronge Jack Grothe Matt Allen James Agresta Michael Kolakowski Ann Smith Kent Moon Robert Epstein Doug Marion Martin Smith Jane Feigenbaum John Fugo William Corcoran Michael Dudley Dennis Rome Donald Bloom Jeff Price Jeffrey T. Smith Art Rectenwald Stephen Bachman Sean Pfent Thomas McGovern Matthew Pichette

PHONE STATE EMAIL MEMBER SINCE 586-771-4800 MI rrussell@acme-enterprises.com 2009 973-340-3100 NJ warren@all-riteconstruction.com 1993 636-368-5234 MO bboettler@abgbuilds.com 2017 925-478-8182 CA kevin@bali-construction.com 2017 949-453-1400 CA brad@bogartconstruction.com 2008 770-971-0787 GA bryan@buildriteconstruction.com 2013 816-583-2123 MO harry@burdg-dunham.com 2016 561-672-8310 FL barney@danzansky.com 2016 616-842-4540 MI ken.t.sharkey@teamcci.net 1990 617-770-0050 MA frankt@combuild.com 1992 614-235-0057 OH wmoberger@constructionone.com 2015 360-862-8316 WA Mark@corstonellc.com 2019 757-566-3032 VA bbacon@davidnicebuilders.com 2011 616-530-0060 MI dandj@dejagerconstruction.com 1990 860-870-7070 CT banderson@descopro.com 1995 816-650-9200 MO loriperry@diamondcontractors.org 2015 770-887-3573 GA dpigg@dlpconstruction.com 2008 732-739-8884 NJ jlembo@eprovini.com 1992 330-453-2566 OH phil@eckinger.com 1994 804-897-0900 VA cjohnson@edcweb.com 1998 619-284-4174 CA ajohnson@elangc.com 2010 952-345-6069 MN justin@elderjones.com 1990 410-573-5050 MD joe@encoreconstruction.net 2018 208-362-3040 ID mikemagill@esiconstruction.com 2016 732-727-8100 NJ kbakalian@ficompanies.com 2017 216-696-5845 OH jtroxell@fio-con.com 2019 440-716-4000 OH gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com 2013 330-494-1007 OH dean@fredolivieri.com 1992 305-692-9992 FL agoggin@fdllc.com 2018 770-612-8005 GA wrosner@fulcrumconstruction.com 2014 412-367-5870 PA anthony@ggc-pgh.com 2017 714-491-1317 CA ramoore@gray.com 2005 920-494-3461 WI david@hjmartin.com 2016 847-719-0370 IL jmick@hannadesigngroup.com 2016 812-346-2048 IN bill.harmon@harmonconstruction.com 2017 303-794-5469 CO r.hays@haysco.biz 2002 708-396-0440 IL jhealy@healyconstructionservices.com 1996 301-731-5555 MD tvarner@herman-stewart.com 1995 920-468-8208 WI psmits@immel-builds.com 2018 630-834-8043 IL bbronge@iciinc.com 1995 909-993-9332 CA JackG@jgconstruction.com 1998 239-540-2700 FL matta@jagbuilding.com 2019 201-498-1477 NJ jim.agresta@jacarpentryinc.com 2013 860-284-7110 CT mkolakowski@kbebuilding.com 1998 440-647-4200 OH ann@kerricook.com 2012 262-857-3336 WI kent@lvconstruction.com 1998 631-501-0024 NY repstein@mcaryinc.com 2014 336-861-1960 NC dmarion@mrs1977.com 1992 724-741-0300 PA marty@marcocontractors.com 1994 210-829-5542 TX jfeigenbaum@metcontracting.com 1995 919-969-7301 NC jfugo@montgomerydevelopment.com 1999 651-288-1900 MN bill@nbcconstruction.us 2013 952-881-6123 MN mdudley@ncigc.com 2018 732-528-0080 NJ dennis@pinnaclecommercial.us 2012 866-504-3511 GA dbloom@primeretailservices.com 2014 480-461-0777 AZ price@pwiconstruction.com 2003 941-907-0010 FL jeffs@recrawford.com 2011 724-772-8282 PA art@rectenwald.com 1996 651-704-9000 MN sbachman@retailconstruction.com 1998 586-725-4400 MI spfent@rcofusa.com 1996 616-285-6933 MI info@rockfordconstruction.com 2014 508-674-5280 MA mattp@russcoinc.com 1995 (Continued on page 5)

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SPRING EDITION • 2019


Sachse Construction and Development Corp. Jeff Katkowsky Scheiner Commercial Group, Inc. Joe Scheiner Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Matthew Schimenti Shames Construction Co., Ltd. Carolyn Shames Singleton Construction, LLC Denise Doczy-Delong Solex Contracting Gerald Allen Southwestern Services John S. Lee, Sullivan Construction Company Amanda Sullivan Taylor Brothers Construction Company, Inc. Jeff Chandler TDS Construction, Inc. Robert Baker Thomas-Grace Construction, Inc. Don Harvieux Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Mike Wolff TJU Construction, Inc. Tim Uhler Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Aaron Rectenwald Trainor Commercial Construction, Inc. John Taylor Travisano Construction, LLC Peter J. Travisano Tri-North Builders, Inc. Randy Danielson Triad Retail Construction Jay Dorsey Warwick Construction, Inc. Walt Watzinger WDS Construction Ben Westra Weekes Construction, Inc. Hunter Weekes Westwood Contractors, Inc. Mike McBride William A. Randolph, Inc. Tony Riccardi Winkel Construction, Inc. Rick Winkel Wolverine Building Group Michael Houseman Woods Construction, Inc. John Bodary

248-647-4200 719-487-1600 914-244-9100 925-606-3000 740-756-7331 951-308-1706 817-921-2466 954-484-3200 812-379-9547 941-795-6100 651-342-1298 909-949-0380 530-823-7200 724-452-8801 415-259-0200 412-321-1234 608-271-8717 281-485-4700 832-448-7000 920-356-1255 864-233-0061 817-302-2050 847-856-0123 352-860-0500 616-949-3360 586-939-9991

MI CO NY CA OH CA TX FL IN FL MN CA CA PA CA PA WI TX TX WI SC TX IL FL MI MI

jkatkowsky@sachseconstruction.com 2009 joe@scheinercg.com 2012 mschimenti@schimenti.com 1994 cshames@shames.com 1994 denisedelong@singletoncontruction.net 2012 jerry@solexcontracting.com 2015 JLee@southwesternservices.com 2017 amanda@buildwithsullivan.com 2012 Jeff.Chandler@TBCCI.com 2014 inbox@tdsconstruction.com 1994 don.harvieux@thomas-grace.com 2012 mike@timberwolff.com 2008 tim@tjuconstruction.com 2016 arectenwald@trcgc.net 2010 john.taylor@trainorconstruction.com 2012 pj@travisanocontruction.com 2015 rdanielson@tri-north.com 2015 j.dorsey@triadrc.com 2013 walt@warwickconstruction.com 2008 bwestra@wdsconstruction.net 2019 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com 1990 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com 1990 tony.riccardi@warandolph.com 2011 rickw@winkel-construction.com 1990 mhouseman@wolvgroup.com 2012 jbodary@woodsconstruction.com 1996

Visit retailcontractors.org to view the profile of each RCA member company. Click on “Find a Contractor” on the home page to search the member list. Please notify the RCA Office (800-847-5085 or info@retailcontractors.org) of any changes to your contact information.

3M WINDOW FILM NATIONAL INSTALLERS FREE Estimates

866-933-3456

2019 • SPRING EDITION

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NEWSLETTER

In Memoriam: Past President James Healy It is with deep regret that we share news regarding the passing of RCA Past President James (Jim) Healy. He passed away on April 18 after a four-year battle with esophageal cancer. After his diagnosis, Jim spent quality time with his family, including wife Kathy, president of Healy Construction, with whom James Healy he traveled to many places and wintered in Florida. Jim continued to manage the construction side of Healy Construction along with his son James. Jim was able to see both of his children get married and enjoyed time with his grandchildren. Jim was RCA president in 2002-2003. Gifts can be made in memory of James D. Healy to Northwestern University to support esophageal cancer research under the direction of Dr. Victoria Villaflor. Checks payable to Northwestern University may be mailed to: Terri Dillon, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Development and Alumni Relations, 420 E. Superior Street, Rubloff Bldg., 9th Flr., Chicago, IL 60611.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

P E O P L E

Don’t miss our CCRP events July 15th (Monday) Boston, MA July 25th (Thursday) Columbus, OH August 20th (Tuesday) Nashville, TN

If you would like to sponsor a CCRP event, please contact David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com 6

SPRING EDITION • 2019

Consensus Docs Updates ConsensusDocs and AIA Comparison The Defense Research Institute’s (DRI) Construction Law Committee has provided a comprehensive comparison of the ConsensusDocs 200 and AIA A201 General Conditions. As the two most used construction standard contract documents, DRI thought that a summary and brief analysis would help readers determine the advantages and disadvantages in the AIA A201 and ConsensusDocs approaches on important issues. The comparison (available at consensusdocs.org/new-consensusdocs-and-aia-comparisonreleased-by-dri) shows interesting differences, as well as similarities, on a range of issues from contract, structure, consequential damages, financial information, indemnification, and much more.

New Design-Assist Guidebook The ConsensusDocs Coalition just released a new Guidebook for the ConsensusDocs 541 Standard Design-Assist Addendum. The Guidebook provides tools and commentary on how to modify the contract to best meet specific project needs. As the first industry standard contract for design-assist, the commentary is important new resource. “Design-assist services are not a monolith, but rather a range of services that facilitates design development that improve the constructability and overall quality of design documents by getting input from key trade contractors and Constructors earlier.” says Brian Perlberg, Executive Director of ConsensusDocs. More information is available at consensusdocs.org/ new-design-assist-guidebook-for-consensusdocs-541-design-assist-addendum.

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The Current State of Construction Safety By Raken

This article is excerpted with permission and originally appeared on Raken’s blog on May 31, 2019. It's no secret that those working on construction sites face certain risks that would not pertain to 9-5 office jobs. In fact, year after year, construction has consistently ranked as the industry with the most workplace associated fatalities in the United States - not exactly the type of list anyone wants to top. Heavy machinery, complex tools, and dangerous heights are just a few hazards that construction workers have to deal with on a dayto-day basis, and it's up to project authorities to make sure that the jobsite is as safe as possible. The good news is that recent innovations in tools and gear have helped make construction sites much safer, and there are far fewer workplace fatalities than ever before. This is also due in part to significant increases in safety regulations, and the creation of new roles that focus entirely on workplace safety. Although there is still a long way to go before reaching the goal of zero jobsite deaths per year, there is certainly a driving force to make construction a safer industry. It wasn't even until recent times that proper construction safety gear was present on all American jobsites. Even the ubiquitous hard hat has only been around for 100 years! However, in this age in which every person and their dog owns more than one smart gadget, all of the safety gear we're now used to seeing on jobsites are getting

modern makeovers. In the grand scheme of things, personal protective equipment (PPE) is a relatively new invention, and despite the construction industry's lack of urgency in adopting new technology, safety equipment such as harnesses and respiratory devices are frequently updated with improvements. These can range from simply producing gear in more sizes to fit different body types to adding sensors that wirelessly submit information to jobsite authorities, all of which yield life-saving results. Continue reading the full article at rakenapp.com/blog/the-currentstate-of-construction-safety

2019 • SPRING EDITION

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NEWSLETTER

RCA Sustaining Sponsors PLATINUM

GOLD

SILVER

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WINTER EDITION • 2019

2800 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 210, Alexandria, VA 22314 800.847.5085 • www.retailcontractors.org

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR JUNE 19