__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

GO BEHIND THE SCENES OF OUR CCR SUMMIT IN MIAMI

Joseph Moffa President Riley Hotel Group

Lead by example How the Riley Hotel Group is out to recharge the hospitality market

Exclusive Inside: Our 2015 Roofing & Engineering lists inside Understanding collaborative building methods Why ‘Construction Put In Place’ is rising

Check out our

Kitchens

Magazine and Supplement inside

Official magazine of

March/April 2015 • www.ccr-mag.com


Advertorial

Cicero’s Problem-Solving Renovation Skills Save Boston Parker House Hotel Time and Money

C

icero’s Development Corporation, a leading full-service hotel renovations contractor for more than 45 years, provided an extensive multi-million dollar renovation of the legendary Rooftop Ballroom in the Omni Parker House, a grand luxury hotel that has been symbolic to Boston’s rich history and culture since 1856. Parker House history includes JFK’s proposal to Jacqueline Bouvier at Table 40 in Parker’s Restaurant, and culinary achievements like the Boston Cream Pie and Parker House rolls.

With spectacular panoramic views of Boston as a dramatic backdrop, the Rooftop Ballroom has been the setting for glamorous wedding receptions and celebrity parties. It features a gracefully arched ceiling, crystal chandeliers and offers 3,500 square feet of space. As part of this landmark renovation, Cicero’s sensitively but thoroughly transformed the face of the Rooftop Ballroom with historically accurate wall coverings, paints and carpeting that capture the look and allure of a bygone era. In addition, ceiling lighting were upgraded to dramatically highlight the room’s many architectural features. Utilizing Cicero’s originally developed, $ensible Green® concept, they converted the existing lighting system by merging classic design with modern energy-efficient dimming and LED technology, ushering in the ballroom to the 21st century. With no architectural documents available showing how to create a smooth painted surface and incorporate all of the new lighting, Cicero’s created the solution by utilizing its “Design/Build” expertise, saving the owner considerable time and expense. Life safety systems were also upgraded to building code standards. One major challenge that Cicero’s met head-on was the ballroom’s curved ceiling. The Contract Documents were prepared by an Interior Design Firm, not an Architect/Structural Engineer,

there were no details as to how to create a smooth painted surface and incorporate all of the new lighting, CDC created the solutions. The other bidders excluded this work stating there were no design details related to how to produce the stated scope. Originally cast in plaster, the ceiling had over the years fallen into a state of disrepair. As cracks appeared, maintenance crews had glued on interlocking ceiling tiles, not once but twice. After consulting with a structural engineer, Cicero’s team found a solution to bring the ceiling back to its original appearance without gutting it to the studs, saving considerable time and expense to the building owner. First, one-quarter inch drywall was shaped so that it could be precisely bent to the ceiling’s curve. Next, Cicero’s researched and found a specially designed and hardened steel anchoring system that could hold its new drywall plus go through the two layers of thick tiles and through original plaster and anchor into existing lath and framing. Finally, the new drywall was taped, primed and painted. The result: a spectacular finished ceiling that plays centerpiece to this dramatic setting. Cicero’s problem-solving creativity did not stop there. When confronted with a service elevator that could not carry standard 12 foot lengths of carpeting, it worked directly with the owner’s product manufacturer to specially cut the carpeting into 7 foot lengths that would. The Cicero crew carried the carpeting, along with other supplies, from the 15th floor elevator up to the 19th floor situated ballroom when the second elevator that traveled from the 15th to the 19th when it was put out of service for maintenance. Along with the Rooftop Ballroom, Cicero’s renovated an additional 585 square feet of the nearby pre-function area, the 1,000-square foot Wheatley Terrace meeting room, and connecting corridors. Bathrooms in these areas received new fresh look with sinks hardware and custom millwork partitions that along with new ceilings, walls and flooring which all lent to the new yet classic look.


CIRCLE NO. 1


March/April • 2015 Vol. 14, No.2

24 Cover Photo by: Solaris Photography

FEATURES

24 Lead by example  How the Riley Hotel Group is out to recharge the hospitality market 68  Best of the best  Ultra-posh, big-ticket resort’s buildings clad with limestone plaster 72  Walk the talk  With the demand for collaborative methods should come the financial obligations to match the rhetoric 94  That ‘wow’ factor  Exterior cladding gives university center stunning look and feel 112 They’re baaaaaaack!  Those nasty bed bugs. So, where else are they?

2

72

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

94


CIRCLE NO. 2


March/April • 2015 Vol. 14, No.2 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 20  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Orlando, Fla. 54  2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit – Miami

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

20

54

36  Top shelve Annual engineering firms report showcases industry’s top brands 44  Peak performers Guide highlights industry’s leading roofing companies

SPECIAL SECTION

Commerical Kitchens 78  Operation Activation  Wendy’s remodeling program helping to refresh brand 86 The art of transparency  Using visual exposure to expand your clientele Federal Construction 97  Going all state of the art  Pumps bring university dorms in New Hampshire into next decade

78

108 Mark it down  Understanding government contractor EPAct designer tax benefits

DEPARTMENTS 6

Editor’s Note

12 Industry News 114 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 116 Calendar 116 Product Showcase 119 Ad Index 120 Publisher’s Note

97 4

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


• Construction Manager • General Contractor • Thirty five years of professional and quality construction management services makes us...

“The Customer’s Builder” Specializing in:

Tenant Fit-Outs Remodels

Ground Up Renovation

Retail Hospitality

Big Box Fitness

www.constructionone.com

CIRCLE NO. 3

United States l Canada l Mexico 101 East Town Street - Suite 401 - Columbus, OH 43215 • 614.235.0057


EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Winning at the art of relationships

S

omewhere between the tabletop dinner and that first cast of the reel on the deep sea fishing trip, you could see it happening. There was a buzz surrounding the bond that always takes place when you get people of similar backgrounds and

interests in the same room.

Sure, Miami in a January that will forever be defined by Mother Nature’s excessive winter wrath (as our Northeastern friends will attest) is nice, but there’s more to it than that – way more. As another Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit passes, we can’t help but to be reminded about the relationships that were forged. I think we can take some license hear to remind you just how important creating and building relationships is to what all of us do. In an economic landscape where the competitive fire of the construction industry’s latest renaissance burns, excelling at human relationships should be at the core of your personal and professional brand-building strategy. In the March 15 issue of Fortune magazine, the article, “How to Build the Perfect Workplace,” discusses how human relationships are emerging as the new “it” men and women.

Just how important is relationship building to you and your team? According to global forecasting firm Oxford Economics, more major employers are recognizing the need to have workers who are good at team building, collaboration and cultural sensitivity. And MIT professor Alex In an economic “Sandy” Pentland, a relandscape where nowned data scientist who the competitive fire directs that institution’s of the construction Human Dynamics Laboratory, believes that the industry’s latest most effective teams are renaissance burns, not ones with the highest excelling at human IQ members, but those that have people who are most relationships sensitive to the thoughts should be at and feelings of others. the core of your The companies in the commercial construction personal and industry that are winning in professional brand- today’s ever-evolving marketbuilding strategy. place are not only surviving by adapting to the changes around them, they are thriving by having the right people in place. They are the ones who not only know how to drive revenue to the brands they represent, but build the relationships that can sustain that business. That is why Commercial Construction & Renovation is not only committed to helping you keep in touch with the trends impacting our industry, but also with building the relationships that make each of us better. So, as you read through the pages of this issue, make plans to attend one of our many networking events. From our Commercial Construction & Renovation People parties, to our CCR Summit and CCR Retreats, we’re here to help build the bridges that keep our industry strong. See you on down the road.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

6

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


CIRCLE NO. 4


• Standard • Vented

F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • Fax 678.765.6551

• See-Through • Box Style • Cell Phone Lockers • Modular • Wood

EDITORIAL

• Plastic

EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com

• Storage Solutions

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com SCC MISSION Create FINAL 5.21:Eagle qrt pg FINAL

5/21/13

10:25 AM

CIRCLE NO. 5

Create 3

7/16”

x 4 7/8”

ADVERTISING

PUBLISHER/EDITOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551

SCHIMENTI MISSION

1/4 Page

Page 1

SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551

4/C

CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702 Luxurious design elements of Massimo-Dutti’s first U.S. store and its largest worldwide - include integrated marble floors, highend millwork, custom lighting, fabric wall coverings and even a life-size horse mannequin. These elements all combine to create a luxury retail environment.

LIST RENTAL: Brian Clotworthy • bclotworthy@inforefinery.com 800.529.9020

We’re ready to create when you are. Call Joseph Rotondo, Vice President 914.244.9100, x319 or visit www.schimenti.com.

General Contractor. Construction Management. Remodel Program. New York I New Jersey I New England CIRCLE NO. 6

8

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES 678.765.6550 corpcirc@ccr-mag.com

F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC


EASY CLEAN BEFORE & AFTER CURE UNLIMITED MOISTURE VAPOR PROTECTION SUPERIOR SOUND DAMPENING PERFORMANCE

The Most Specifiable Hardwood Installation System Projects

High-rise and Multi-famly Commercial On- or Below-grade

Benefits of Using Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™

Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™—with an IIC of 70 dB, ΔIIC of 21, and an STC of 67—eliminates material and time installing secondary acoustic membranes No time-consuming concrete moisture tests—Bostik’s AXIOS™ Tri-Linking™ polymer technology used in Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™ provides unlimited moisture vapor protection • Ultra-Set® SingleStep2™ has incredible bond strength and durability • Lifetime bond and moisture vapor protection warranty • Contributes to LEED® EQ 4.1 and MR 4.2 with 0 VOC and 1% post-consumer recycled content • Patent-pending Thickness Control™ Spacer Technology maintains required membrane thickness for moisture vapor protection and sound reduction—no special tools required • Easy to clean before and after cure for faster installation

Discover more about one of the most unique installation systems to add to your arsenal: www.bostik-us.com CIRCLE NO. 7

T2192-02.25.15

All Spec Projects


EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS CLAY ADDISON Director of Construction and Purchasing Belk AARON ANCELLO TD Bank Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes STEPHEN GALLANT Vice President Facilities Development Jos. A. Bank Clothiers BROOKS HERMAN Project Manager of Construction Academy Sports + Outdoors BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target BRYAN NOVAK Sr. Director of Engin eering, Estimating, Quality Assurance Wal-Mart Stores DAVID OSHINSKI Director of Construction Home Depot JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury JANIS WILLIAMS Director of Store Facilities Tuesday Morning STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods

RESTAURANTS MIKE HUDSON Director of Construction CEC Entertainment GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations & Project Management Interserv Hospitality Solutions PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Rave Restaurant Group DAVID SHOTWELL Director of Construction Corporate Facilities Biscuitville RON BIDINOST Senior Director of Franchise Operations & Administration Marie Callenders Restaurant & Bakery LLC

JOHN LAPINS Vice President, Architecture & Construction Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. DENNIS MCCARTY Vice President, Technical Services, Construction InterContinental Hotels Group, the Americas GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership RICHARD SENECHAL Executive Vice President, Facilities Loews Hotels

JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M

MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT

Senior Vice President, DTZ STEVE JONES

Managing Director Jones Lang LaSalle TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS JOHN MIOLOGOS

Executive VP, Architecture & Engineering WD Partners NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

ROBERT RAUCH President R.A. Rauch & Assoc. Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

DON HASULAK

Managing Director Big Red Rooster

10

JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little

JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group GINA NODA Executive Director of Business Development/Marketing Sargenti Architects

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


CIRCLE NO. 8


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail Target Express Target plans to open eight versions of its small-format store, Target Express, which debuted last July in Minneapolis. New store locations include San Francisco and Washington. Mall of America Canadian developer and Mall of America owner Triple Five Group has unveiled plans for American Dream Miami – a $4 billion retail and entertainment project in Miami-Dade County, Fla. L.L. Bean L.L. Bean plans to have at least 100 locations by 2020. The plan is part of an “omnichannel” retail strategy aimed at giving customers various shopping options – online, by catalog and phone, or in-store. Bloomingdale’s Bloomingdale’s will open its first urban Bloomingdale’s Outlet store on New York City’s Upper West Side this fall. The store, which will take

over a three-story, 25,000-square-foot Urban Outfitters space, will boast a mix of clearance items from full-line stores and goods sourced at lower prices. Kmart Kmart is turning at least five of its 11 Super Kmart stores into a smaller concept called K-Fresh, which eliminates the butcher, bakery and deli counters in favor of more packaged food offerings that require less staff. In some locations, which will range from 140,000 to 190,000 square feet, extra space will be devoted to fulfilling online orders and housing new tenants. Uniqlo Uniqlo will open its first Canadian stores this year, with two stores slated for Toronto this fall. The retailer also is looking to open up shop in Vancouver. ALDI Germany-based discount supermarket chain ALDI plans to have about 2,000 U.S. stores by 2018.

Restaurants Blaze Pizza Blaze Pizza, backed by celebrities such as LeBron James and Maria Shriver, is scheduled to open another 60 to 70 stores in 2015. DineEquity The parent of Applebee’s and IHOP expects to open a number of restaurants this year as part of a five-year plan for global expansion. Tokyo Joe’s Fast-casual Asian chain Tokyo Joe’s will expand outside its Colorado home with its first franchisee restaurant in Tucson, Ariz.

Habit Burger Grill Habit Burger Grill plans to open 28 company-owned units and five franchise locations this year, with an eye on doubling in size by 2019 and, eventually, boasting 2,000 restaurants. Bruster’s Bruster’s plans to continue its momentum by creating store models that offer more flexibility for franchisees and lower the costs associated with opening them.

Hospitality Best Western Best Western International is shifting its focus toward growth with its three new brands leading the way – the BW Premier Collection, lifestyle brand Vib and extended-stay Best Western Plus Executive Residency.

Hyatt Centric New lifestyle brand Hyatt Centric plans to open its first two properties in Miami Beach, Fla., and Chicago. The 105-room Hyatt Centric South Beach Miami and the 257-room Hyatt Centric The Loop Chicago are expected to open this spring.

Virgin Hotels Virgin Hotels hopes to have 20 hotels in its portfolio by 2025. Plans for several more U.S. properties will be announced this year, as the company explores opportunities in international markets, including Barcelona, London, Mexico City and Paris.

Oxford Capital Group Oxford Capital Group is planning a 452-room luxury hotel in Chicago to be called the LondonHouse, which is slated to open in spring 2016.

Choice Hotels International Choice Hotels International is halfway through an initiative to refresh its Comfort Suites and Comfort Inn brands, which continues to boost the number of new build projects in its domestic pipeline. Choice’s Cambria and soft brand Ascend are expected to be potential drivers of domestic portfolio growth.

12

Proper Hospitality Proper Hospitality has created Avalon Hotels, which will start with two properties: the Avalon Hotel Beverly Hills and the Viceroy Palm Springs, which is slated to be re-launched as Avalon Hotel Palm Springs. Lightstone Group Lightstone Group will spend $2 billion developing “top-branded” lodging properties in U.S. markets. The company already has partnered with Marriott International Inc. to build five Moxy hotels in New York.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


I think we now have five very strong brands in the lifestyle space, giving us a good stack across the segments. Each of those brands is resonating, not just with customers, but with owners and franchisees.

Don’t look now, but … office construction is starting to take off Just how much is office construction sector starting to explode? According to CBRE, there was 88.7 million square feet of office space under construction at the end of 2014. In addition, a report from Principal Global Investors says that the new construction cycle for the sector is just at the beginning – but not necessarily one that will result in excessive supply. Analysts point to the recovery in rents and pricing as a factor in the increased activity.

Did you

know Asian cuisine is the third most popular menu segment in the United States, boasting 64,000 Asian eateries that gross about $25 billion annually, according to a study from CHD Expert. Interestingly, chains account for only about 6 percent. The study also found that some 84 percent of Asian eateries are sit-down restaurants, with categories ranging from Chinese, Japanese, Indian and Korean.

– Marriott International CEO Arne Sorenson on how the company’s investment in lifestyle brands has led to big benefits for the hotelier

LED Panel Lights

High Efficient Lighting Solution for Fluorescent Troffers Replace traditional commercial / residential troffers with LED Panel lights to eliminate hazardous waste from fluorescent bulbs and achieve unmatched energy savings. Equipped with Even-Glow technology offering smooth, uniform LED lighting and long-lasting illumination. 10%-100% Smooth Linear Dimming with 0-10V Dimmer Cool White, Natural White, Warm White, or RGB Brightness Ranges from 400 to 4600 Lumens Sizes Include: 6in x 6in, 1ft x 1ft, 1ft x 2ft, 2ft x 2ft, and 2ft x 4ft Flush, Surface, and Suspended Mounting Options

Short ROI

65% Less Energy

Maintenance Free

Quickly recoup investment with large utility rebates and incentives

Reduce energy cost with greater efficiency than traditional HIDs

No bulbs or ballasts to replace, reducing maintenance time & cost

One source for interior and exterior LED lighting solutions for office, commercial, and industrial. LED Flood Lights

LED Down Lights

Shoebox Lights

Modular LED High Bays

For commercial pricing call 866-590-3533 or email commercial-sales14@superbrightleds.com

CIRCLE NO. 9

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

13


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS We’ve made a commitment to ourselves to get to a minimum of 50 units in the next five years, and if the stars align correctly, we will do more than that. But we only want to open strong stores. The growth will depend on real estate, making sure we get appropriate, well-vetted real estate, and then people. We can’t outgrow our pipeline of good folks. – Mad Greens’ co-founder Marley Hodgson on the salad concept’s foray into the mainstream

Everything’s

happening downtown More hotel brands, developers and investors are seeking properties in downtown locations. According to data from STR, hotels located in central business districts (CBDs) ended 2014 with higher occupancies (71.8 percent versus 63.7 percent), average daily rates ($157.82 versus $110.83) and revenue per available rooms ($113.35 versus $70.62) than their counterparts throughout the rest of the country.

EON MODEL EL3 TM

NEW! Three Phase Centralized Emergency Lighting Inverter Full Compliance With NFPA 101 Computer-based, self-testing / self-diagnostic emergency lighting system with data-logging. Reliability, Plus Compatibility Provides reliable, regulated voltage during normal and emergency power modes. Compatible with all lighting fixture types, including LED. Easy Installation & Low Cost of Ownership Requires only (1) battery cabinet for 90 minutes runtime, and only batteries with front-access terminals are used. Single-point operation for all monitoring, testing, data-logging, reporting, and maintenance. Compact, Space-Saving Footprint Physically smaller than comparable three-phase emergency lighting inverter products, without compromising performance or serviceability.

33 kW EON shown

10 kW – 33 kW Download a brochure and specifications today!

www.controlledpwr.com/EON_1

EON Model EL3 Ad_Half Page.indd 1

14

UL 924 Listed C-UL Listed to CSA C22.2 No. 141-10

CIRCLE NO. 10

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

EON Competitor A Competitor B

Output Rating

Width (in.)

33 kW 32 kW 33 kW

70 130 140

7/19/13 11:34 AM


Retailers

Have a Choice Give them a reason to choose you

Retailers look to our members for Integrity, Experience, and Stability. The Retail Contractors RCA has a rigorous membership Association is a national process and all qualification organization of high information is reviewed annually. caliber contractors This means retailers can be assured united to provide a solid that working with a RCA contractor foundation of ethics, means working with Quality. quality, and professionalism in the RCA members are listed in a public retail industry. online directory and in each issue of our newsletter.

RCA Members Benefit From: • Safety Program • Home Depot Rebate Program • ExtendedStay America Discount • BlueBook University Discounts • Military Service Initiative • Multiple Employer Retirement Plan • Annual Conference Networking & Professional Development

CIRCLE NO. 11

Visit retailcontractors.org for membership and program information. US: 800-847-5085 | Intl: 703-683-5637 | retailcontractors.org


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Moving on up Survey says Construction ‘Put In Place’ to grow 8% in 2015

The percent of hoteliers who said their businesses would perform with greater success this year, according to a survey by the Hunter Hotel Investment Conference. In addition, 19.6 percent said they expected performance to be flat, while 4.9 percent expected a slower year. Interestingly, 15.7 percent said they “definitely” planned to buy another hotel property in 2015, the study found.

Total Construction Put In Place for 2015 is predicted to grow 8 percent, according to the latest report from FMI. This supports earlier FMI predictions that CPIP will top $1 trillion in 2015, something the market has not seen since 2008. This indicates that the economy is on track for a resilient recovery. Geographically, larger cities are experiencing strong construction growth, due in part to increases in rents and declining inventory for housing and office space. The sectors expected to experience the highest growth rates are: lodging (16 percent CPIP growth); commercial (15 percent); manufacturing (11 percent); office (11 percent); and residential (9 percent). To download a copy of the report, visit www.fminet.com.

CCR RETR EAT TALK : EXECUT IVES BREA K DOWN

Limitless

Patrick String Senior Mana er ger of Global Store Developm ent Under Armo ur

e e InSId veRag eat Co R RetR eat & CC tR Re omen’S 2014 W

May/June 2015 issue

Why Unde r knows no Armour bounds

L to R: Standing President kel, Services Jim Mer , SVP, Owner tion David Lutzs, SVP, Construc Sam Davi L to R: Estate Seated im, VP, Real lopment Jim Schr per, SVP, Deve John Coo

Kitch s Mag Commercialazine and Supplementeninsid Official maga Kit Januar che zine ns: See howe y/F ebrua ry 2015 • bd’s Mong of www.ccr-m olian Gr ill is growin ag.com g its empire

Don’t miss our surveys for general contractors and lighting mfc/suppliers.

Listing form deadline to be included May 15th

Exclusive Inside:

Why you should care about PM See our Fixt & schedu ling ures & Arc hitecture Firms lists CK: What makes Jac k in the Box tick

Check out our

CCR-JanFeb

.15_991-35.in

dd 991

dge i r b k c o R Way Living th The

s, r traveler design fo s Relevant lue for investor va ng ro st

2/6/15 9:12 PM

Howard Clark Director, Retail Construction Development& City Sports

Inside: Exclusive next Sandy

Edward Albert President and ian Chief Executive Office r of City Sports

g for the Preparin osure to ual exp le Using vis your cliente expand Sign and Leadings unveiled firm ty uri Sec

Check out

e bra nd

our

e of magazin Official

Kitchentns inside

.com w.ccr-mag Suppleme Why • ww tru e ath ber 2014 er/Decem the City Sp letes prefer Novemb or and Magazine

-35.indd

ec.14_991

CCR-NovD

12/3/14

11:34 AM

ts way Exclusive Ins ide:

991

Avoiding hos project des pitality ign pitfalls Selecting the underlayme right nt surfacin g Our HVAC & Facility Maintenance lists revealed

Check out our Magazine insid e

CIRCLE NO. 12

Official maga zine of September /October 201 4 • www.ccr-m ag.com

CCR-SeptOct.

14_991-33.indd

991

10/8/14 3:49 AM

16

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

2015


STONETECH

®

Globally Proven Globally Proven Construction Solutions Construction Solutions

©2015 LATICRETE International, Inc. All trademarks shown are the intellectual properties of their respective owners.

CIRCLE NO. 13


PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

New Risk Sentiment Index Construction companies bullish, staffing challenges limiting growth

H

ard numbers often drive business growth. Higher revenues mean a company can invest in new employees, expand its market reach and create new products. But perception can be just as powerful, and a company’s “risk sentiment” – their level of worry about their risk exposure – can strongly affect all of their business decisions.

By Douglas L. Rieder

Based on employment data we have seen when the markets contracted a few years ago, a lot of the labor left the industry permanently.

18

A company wants to make sure it has access to the resources it needs to take on a new project and make it profitable. That includes physical assets and resources, financial resources and staff. The balance between revenue and expenses needs to be right to make it a smart business decision. We sought to identify the top risk issues for today’s construction companies, so we created a survey of Atlanta companies, examining their risk sentiment and various economic indicators. We asked them to identify their top issues of concern, how they manage their risk, whether their pipeline of new business opportunities is improving and, overall, how they feel about their risk exposure now versus a year ago (See “Snapshot on pg19” sidebar). The topline? While the economic numbers are improving in many ways, construction companies still are worried about their exposure. Their profit margins are improving, but they’re saying that access to adequate staffing is the No. 1 risk to their businesses moving into 2015. Today, there are other issues of concern, including the economic slowdown, cash flow issues and increased competition, but staffing is at the top of the list. Many construction companies are in much better shape today than they were a year ago, with higher margins, more contingencies in their project budgets and a neutral risk profile. Also, other cost inputs like steel, copper, aluminum and fuel have been stable or down. These generally are very positive circumstances for contractors and should help to mitigate some of the labor challenges. Based on employment data we have seen when the markets contracted a few years ago, a lot of the labor left the industry permanently. We suspect that some went permanently to the rapidly expanding oil and gas industry in Texas, North

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

Dakota, Colorado and Oklahoma, all of which added many jobs due to the expansion of the oil and gas sector. Also, at least one national construction association has been closely tracking poor demographic trends in the industry. As the average age of a construction worker increases, we see fewer and fewer young people entering the business. For these reasons, we’ve certainly got a much smaller labor pool now. Part of the challenge now is that things are improving faster than the labor numbers can catch up, and that’s going to have some specific impacts: • E ven if you find enough workers, you may be paying a lot more for them. You’ll need to factor that extra cost into your financial and profitability models. You might need to restructure your contracts, add higher budget contingencies or subcontract some of the labor. • You might see your competitors poaching your top talent for higher wages. Some types of builder/developers might be able to pay more, especially in the multi-family market. • When you have to raise wages, other things are affected as well. Things like payroll taxes and insurance premiums are two items that will rise in tandem. So what can construction companies do? • Use new technology to get more productivity from your workers. We’re seeing a lot of new smartphone and tablet apps that are very useful. Those can help you with field reporting, time tracking, and documenting quality and constructability. •M  ake sure you reevaluate your insurance on a regular basis. Changes in interest rates will affect those costs. You might check out other program structures like retrospectively rated programs, larger deductibles and group captives. All might merit a review at higher premium levels. • The industry can and should encourage companies to build internship programs to get more talent in the employment pipeline. Companies should have their own internal training programs and build relationships with local vocational schools and technical colleges. Several national industry associations are working on initiatives like these.


• Explore whether prefabrication works for your company. Often, pieces of a project can be built in a shop and erected at the jobsite. When we looked at how companies were managing their risk, we received some interesting answers. About three-quarters of the companies we surveyed said they have formal strategies in place to manage their risk, but half also said they don’t have those strategies written down. About 70 percent have reviewed their risk plans in the last year, but that means fully one in three companies haven’t. Ideally, we’d like to see less perceived risk in the Index, and it’s important to look at this regularly. We’ll be indexing again later this year to see how the industry responds to the labor challenges. CCR

Snapshot on – top risks from the Sterling Risk Sentiment Index • No. 1 is staffing, having enough employees to handle projects (44 percent) • No. 2 is the economic slowdown (27 percent) • 77 percent say they have formal strategies in place to manage their risk, but half don’t have those strategies clearly written down • 84 percent say their profit margins are better today than a year ago • 92 percent say their pipeline of opportunities is better today than a year ago • 69 percent have reviewed their risk management plans in the last 12 months • 65 percent say they’re able to build adequate contingencies into their project budgets • 55 percent say their company’s exposure for risk is lower than a year ago

Douglas L. Rieder is president and principal of Atlanta-based Sterling Risk Advisors, where he heads the firm’s Construction Services Practice

Makrolon® DX-NR ...Changing the way you think about lighting • Ideal in exterior applications • Long lasting weatherability • Optimize diffusion and light transmission • Non-reflective surface to enhance aesthetics • High optical performance • Superior impact strength Get more information at sheffieldplastics.com or call 800.254.1707

A D VA N TA G E 119 Salisbury Road • Sheffield, MA 01257 3355 BMS 7x4.875.indd 1

CIRCLE NO. 14

3/12/15 4:46 PM

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

19


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

It’s Louie time CCRP party hits one of Orlando’s favorite local hangouts

O

rlando, if you’re going to go to Bar Louie’s, you go for the atmosphere – and the famous handcrafted signature martinis. If you’re part of the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) crew, you go for the networking. The CCRP made one of Orlando’s favorite local hangouts the site of its most recent networking event. It’s never too late to get in on the action. If you want to make CCRP part of your networking plans, connect with Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at Kristen@ccr-people.com today.

Steve Jenkins, Jones Lang LaSalle; Linda Mancilla, Office Depot; Ken Marsak, Eco GC

REGISTERED COMPANIES: ABC Beverage

Composite Corp

Grace Daly Inc

Porcelanosa USA

Ad Art Sign Company

Construction One

Interplan LLC

Shoe Show

A.R. Services

Crossville Inc

Jones Lang LaSalle

Signage Solutions

ArcVision

ECO Global

Jones Sign

Southwest Signs

The Blue Book

Fi Companies

Mats Inc.

Transceramerica

Communicators International

Goodwill Industries of FL

Office Depot

UHC Corp

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR: 20

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

Southwest Signs David Fields - Vice President Business Development 7208 South W. W. White Rd. San Antonio TX 78222 Ph: 210-757-9121 david.fields@southwestsigns.com


In the real world, good architecture happens when art and business unite. ARCHITECTS FOR THE REAL WORLD

In the real world, good architecture happens when art and business unite. www.wbassociates.com

ARCHITECTS FOR THE REAL WORLD In the real world, good architecture happens when art and business unite. ARCHITECTS FOR THE REAL WORLD www.wbassociates.com www.wbassociates.com

Ovation

Franklin, Tennessee

The Forum

Norcross, Georgia

Wade Park

Frisco, Texas

Ovation

Franklin, Tennessee

The Forum

Norcross, Georgia

Wade Park

Frisco, Texas

Ovation

Franklin, Tennessee

The Forum

Norcross, Georgia

Wade Park

Frisco, Texas

Avalon

Alpharetta, Georgia

ATLANTA

n

JACKSONVILLE

n

SHANGHAI

n

PANAMA

Avalon

Alpharetta, Georgia

ATLANTA

n

JACKSONVILLE

n

SHANGHAI

n

PANAMA

Avalon

Alpharetta, Georgia

ATLANTA

n

JACKSONVILLE

n

SHANGHAI

n

PANAMA

CIRCLE NO. 15


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

3.

2.

4. 1. Randy Stertmeyer, Communicators International: Ron Treister, Communicators International; Mark MacDonald, Composite Corp 2. Pamela Alualu, The Blue Book; Eric Heitner, Solid Insurance Providers; Grace Daly, Grace Daly Inc; April Aacor, The Blue Book 3. Tomas Palomar, Porcelanosa USA; Eve DeGroot, Porcelanosa USA; Andy Pennington, Porcelanosa USA 4. Joy Klein, Transceramica; Greg Mooney, ArcVision; David Fields, Southwest Signs; Ed Lawler, Fi Companies 5. Mike Morelli, Signage Solutions; Andy Shodis, Crossville Inc.; Mike Downes, Crossville Inc.; Rachel Hall, Interplan LLC; Kevin Everard, Jones Sign

5.

22

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


CIRCLE NO. 16


by Lead example How the Riley Hotel Group is out to recharge the hospitality market By Michael J. Pallerino

L

eadership is word that is prevalent in the Riley Hotel Group’s branding strategy. Maybe that’s why the company was voted one of the “Top 100 Management Companies” by Hotel News, and one of the “Top Owners & Operators” by Lodging Hospitality, honors that company president Joseph Moffa says are extremely rewarding for the 10-year-old company. It’s even more rewarding when you consider that in the midst of Riley Hotel Group’s 10-year run, the lodging industry was in one of the longest and toughest slides in its history. Being a consistent leader in those areas is what the company is all about. Ask Moffa, and he will emphasize the importance of staying committed to seeking new projects and forming new alliances with equity sources and lenders. This commitment to that approach continues to keep the Riley Hotel Group atop its game, by offering services such as accounting, brokerage, finances, human resources, interior design, planning and design, sales and marketing, and training, among others. Today, the hospitality-marketing consultants boasts a portfolio of successful independent and franchised hotels in Palm Springs, Calif., Georgia, Key West, Fla., Michigan, Ohio, Wyoming and the Dominican Republic.

24

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


The Island City House, Key West, Fla. MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

25


LEAD BY EXAMPLE CCR sat down with Moffa to get an inside look at the marketplace and where the Riley Hotel Group is headed as the hospitality industry continues to trend upward.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list in 2015?

It is finding good projects in good locations – either new construction or acquisitions. To go along with that, we want to find equity partners that we can grow our portfolio with. Also, it’s going to tradeshows and networking events to get the Riley Hotel Group name out there.

Describe a typical day.

A typical day consists of working with my corporate team on revenue management of our properties. We want to make sure they are positioned properly within their competitive set. In addition, we are searching and negotiating with lenders and equity partners so that we can continue to grow our portfolio.

What are some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead? Working with our new equity partners on new projects.

Give us a snapshot of today’s hospitality marketplace.

The industry has gone through a couple cycles over the last 15 years – the last one of which was the longest and toughest in the history of hospitality. We are seeing a more stable industry moving forward, with occupancy growing a few percentage points over the next two years. The ADR has grown over 6 percent each of the last two years. We will continue to see an ADR growth over the next couple of years, but much smaller – maybe 2 to 3 percent.

What trends and challenges are driving the marketplace?

The leisure market continues to grow with people traveling on long weekends and vacations to destination locations such as The Island City House in Key West (Florida) and The Cherry Tree Inn & Suite in Traverse City (Michigan). We have properties in both locations and have seen a very nice growth in both. The corporate market has rebounded

26

The Island City House, Key West, Fla.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


We believe 100 percent in investing dollars back into our properties to keep them fresh.

nicely over the last three years. I believe we will continue to see this segment grow over the next two years.

Are you optimistic about what you see out there today?

Yes, I’m very optimistic. With the economy getting stronger and demand growing, I believe the continued supply growth in good locations will be fine. The lenders are loaning again, which is very encouraging. Lenders are smarter now then they were prior to the last downturn, which is great for the industry. As I said in the past, and will continue to say, our industry is under demolished, not over built.

What are your hotel clients looking for today?

Great service with a clean property is the first two items. Technology is another big item for our guests. Everyone has a couple

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

27


LEAD BY EXAMPLE devices that need to be hooked up to the internet, so we have been focusing on the technology piece over the last 12 months.

What are some of the things you look for in a hotel partnership? We look for partners to add value, listen and to be a part of the group. Everyone has thoughts, comments and good ideas, so it’s our job to ask and listen. We believe in open relationships with our partners. Then it is up to us to apply our strategies.

In what areas are you seeing the most growth these days?

The Random House, Palm Springs, Calif.

It is all about new projects, and forming new partnerships with equity sources and lenders that want to be your partner. We will focus on all of this for years to come.

There are two areas. We have many non-branded boutique properties in destination locations in our portfolio. The growth over the last couple of years has increased due to the economy and disposable income of our guest. My belief is that this will continue as the economy continues to grow. The other area is in our corporate branded hotels. Companies are continuing to see growth in their business and travel needs. Hotels in our comp set in both of these segments will continue to stabilize due to the overall philosophy of rate integrity of hotel properties at large.

Are you looking to expand your partnerships into any other markets?

We have hotels in six different states. While there are parts of the U.S. that we really like, we have the ability to own and manage anywhere in the United States.

What are today’s customers looking for from their hotel experience?

A clean and well maintained property with fantastic guest service and a staff that proactively ensures an over the top experience.

How do you incorporate their needs into your strategy?

Kent State University Hotel and Conference City, Kent, Ohio

28

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

Our branded properties are always asking their travelers to give them their top three needs. In our non-branded properties, we do the same. This will give us the information we need to implement SOPs (standard operating procedures) into our daily strategies. In all of properties, we are


The Big Picture

An NTMA contractor has the training, skill, and experience to understand that their job is a part of the big picture– bringing your job to a successful completion. Call to find one near you.

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association www.NTMA.com 800.323.9736

Photo: Alan Montgomery

CIRCLE NO. 17


LEAD BY EXAMPLE always doing weekly, monthly and annual training to ensure our actionable items are creating a better guest experience.

What trends are you seeing?

Technology at the hotel level is very important to our guest, so we try to stay ahead of the curve. We are also seeing more and more travelers book through third party sites such as Trip Advisor, Expedia, Hotels.com, etc. As a company, we have created two new corporate positions to revenue manage and yield manage our properties, so that our properties continue to stay well positioned in our comp set. This is very important to continue to manage daily to ensure the highest RevPAR that we can achieve.

What do you expect to see shake out in the marketplace?

This is a tough question, because there are so many things that can affect the industry. I know that with the supply growing with new products, we will have to really focus on the condition of our assets, keeping up with our preventative maintenance programs as well as our capital expenditure plans. We believe 100 percent in investing dollars back into our properties to keep them fresh. Of course, service always wins, so we will continue to keep a very high standard when it comes to our guest satisfaction.

What did it mean to be named one of the Top 100 Management Companies last year? It’s very satisfying. We started the company 10 years ago, and have been through the toughest and longest downturn in lodging history while continuing to grow. We have been ranked in the Top 100 for the last four years. Staying on the list is very satisfying.

How are you building on that?

It is all about new projects, and forming new partnerships with equity sources and lenders that want to be your partner. We will focus on all of this for years to come.

Tell us what makes your brand so unique?

At Riley Hotel Group, we orchestrate leadership like no one else. We not only engage a culture of guest satisfaction, but we set the bar for

30

The Island City House, Key West, Fla.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


l a i c r e m Com ral Gene ng i Contract Firm

New Construction & Tenant Build Outs

A company based on moral & ethical principles, delivering a successful, quality job, on time. • Committed to superior quality and results • Quality you deserve and dependability you can count on • Integrity is what we build

www.cc-m1.com 800.376.1389 CIRCLE NO. 18

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

31


LEAD BY EXAMPLE

We are seeing a more stable industry moving forward with occupancy growing a few percentage points over the next two years. financial performance as well. By bringing unique solutions, management approaches and metrics to the complex task of hotel operations, Riley is able to produce outstanding results in key performance measures such as RevPAR, Occupancy and NOI. Consistently recognized and awarded by the brands under which it manages, we constantly perform in the highest percentiles of guest satisfaction and financial performance. Few hotel management companies can make that claim.

What should people expect from the Riley Hotel Group in 2015? Much the same as years past: hard work, paying attention to the details, understanding what our guest are looking for and being proactive in delivering on that. We are committed to our partners in achieving the best financial return they can get in the industry. CCR

Random Haus Palm Springs Calf.

Get to know ... » Joseph C. Moffa What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Being transparent and honest, making sure that my team clearly understands my message, which is the customer and what they want.

What is the true key to success for any manager? You have to work hard every day to be a leader, not by doing, but by setting an example. Make sure that you empower your team to be leaders and let them lead. You must have an open door policy and be a great listener.

What was the best advice you ever received? Stay true to being honest, humble and confident.

What’s your favorite vacation spot and why? Well, since we have properties in Traverse City, Mich., and Key West, Fla., I would have to say that either one of those locations are fantastic.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? You and your team made our stay a memorable one. Thank you. What are the three strongest traits any leader should have? Integrity, passion and vision.

32

President, Riley Hotel Group

How do you like to spend your downtime? I love to make wine, which takes up a lot of my time. One of these days, my retirement will include owning a vineyard with a small 30-seat restaurant. I was a chef in a prior life, so I love to cook as well.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


2231 S. DUPONT DR. ANAHEIM, CA 92806 T. 714-491-0299 / F. 714-491-0439

www.SIGNAGE-SOLUTIONS.com 800-655-9972 CIRCLE NO. 19

TAMPA, FL. T. 727-226-7180


Architecture Interior Design Fire Protection Mechanical Landscape Structural Electrical Civil

Engineering so good it goes unnoticed

CIRCLE NO. 50

hfa-ae.com


Advertorial

Engineering a meaningful place W

e sat down with A/E Firm HFA to ask about the importance of integrating engineering into a good architectural design. Q: What is the role of

engineering when designing a new space?

A: The architect creates the

space with the needs of the client in mind, while it’s the challenge of the engineer to make the space functional, comfortable and safe. One of the engineer’s main goals is to design the most optimal use of the space.

Q: What’s the biggest advantage of HFA being an integrated A/E Firm?

“ Successful design integrates architecture and engineering into a holistic space ”

Q: How does that integration

help in creating meaningful places?

A: Any designer can create a

space, but great spaces happen when architects and engineers are working together to optimize it for the human experience. That’s the A: Communication. The HFA end goal of any project. Good design team all work in the space design is about the way same studio, which maximizes it makes you feel when you communication to stimulate experience it, and we want to creative design solutions. create a meaningful place for Truly integrating an A/E firm is all to enjoy! hfa-ae.com like designing a good space, you have to understand how the disciplines work together to create the holistic experience for the end-user. In this scenario, our clients are the end-user.


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING

Best of the best Annual engineering firms report showcases industry’s top brands

Y

ou want engineering companies; we got engineering companies. Our annual Engineering Firms listing provides the lowdown on the industry’s best brands. Included on the list is the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting

companies. If you want to be included on next year’s list, connect with publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version of this report, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

HENDERSON ENGINEERS, INC..........$48,685,000.00 STANTEC CONSULTING....................$32,473,721.00 HFA..................................................$21,600,000.00 BERGMANN ASSOCIATES.................$14,146,000.00 DLR GROUP.....................................$13,000,000.00 CEI ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES, INC.....$11,220,565.00 CASCO DIVERSIFIED CORPORATION.....$10,000,000.00 KOHRS LONNEMANN HEIL ENGINEERS, PSC..........................$9,790,720.00

RESTAURANT

RETAIL

Top Ten Totals CORE STATES GROUP....................... $8,497,432.00 INTERPLAN LLC................................ $4,108,216.00 HENDERSON ENGINEERS, INC........... $2,710,000.00 CESCO, INC....................................... $1,500,000.00 AEDIFICA CASE ENGINEERING........... $1,150,000.00 KUHLMANN DESIGN GROUP, INC....... $967,000.00 DLR GROUP...................................... $900,000.00 STANTEC CONSULTING..................... $774,497.00 DUNHAM ASSOCIATES, INC............... $750,000.00

WAKEFIELD BEASLEY & ASSOCIATES..............................$9,000,000.00

MICHAEL BRADY, INC........................ $554,970.00

EMG........................................................ $6,529,226.00 BASKERVILL........................................... $4,751,000.00 DLR GROUP............................................ $3,400,000.00 STANTEC CONSULTING.......................... $2,946,508.00 TLC ENGINEERING FOR ARCHITECTURE.................................. $2,093,818.00 CASCO DIVERSIFIED CORPORATION...... $2,000,000.00 KUHLMANN DESIGN GROUP, INC........... $1,438,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

HOSPITALITY

EMG................................................$6,509,012.00

KOHRS LONNEMANN HEIL ENGINEERS, PSC................................ $633,016.00 MICHAEL BRADY, INC............................. $534,120.00 EFI GLOBAL, INC..................................... $526,528.00

36

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

AECOM........................................ $1,000,000,000.00 STANTEC CONSULTING................ $487,277,745.00 DLR GROUP................................. $130,800,000.00 GPD GROUP................................. $85,000,000.00 HENDERSON ENGINEERS, INC...... $82,933,500.00 BERGMANN ASSOCIATES............. $59,725,000.00 EMG............................................ $48,586,426.00 EFI GLOBAL, INC.......................... $45,154,647.00 TLC ENGINEERING FOR ARCHITECTURE........................ $38,178,868.00 MANNIK & SMITH GROUP, INC...... $30,000,000.00


AECOM CASCO Diversified Corporation

Cincinnati, OH Beth Myers Graham, Vice President 513-651-3440 FAX 877-660-7727 www.aecom.com beth.myers-graham@aecom.com Year Established: 1904, No. of Employees: 90,000, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $1,000,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,000+, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Casinos, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

AEdifica Case Engineering St. Louis, MO Darell Case, President 636-349-1600 FAX 636-349-1730 www.aedificacase.com dcase@aedifica.com Year Established: N/A, No. of Employees: N/A, Retail Billings: $1,652,000, Hospitality Billings: $16,000, Restaurant Billings: $1,150,000, Federal: $55,000, Other Billings: $2,138,000, Total Billings: $5,011,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 840, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Casinos, Education, Leading Clients: Wingstop Restaurants, Starbucks, AT&T, Zara, Swarovski, Domino’s, Kaplan University, Five Guys, Waxing the City

Baskerville Richmond, VA Natalie Warner, Marketing Coordinator 804-343-1010 FAX 804-343-0909 www.baskervill.com nwarner@baskervill.com Year Established: 1897, No. of Employees: 96, Retail Billings: $136,000, Hospitality Billings: $4,751,000, Restaurant Billings: $244,000, Federal: $95,000, Other Billings: $8,339,000, Total Billings: $13,565,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 481, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Leading Clients: Wells Fargo, Starwood, Marriott, Kroger, Markel

Bergmann Associates Rochester, NY Vince Press, Communications Manager 585-232-5135 FAX 585-325-8446 www.bergmannpc.com info@bergmannpc.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 395, Retail Billings: $14,146,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Federal: $1,000,000, Other Billings: $44,579,000, Total Billings: $59,725,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,420, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Education, Research & Manuf, Energy, EMS, Leading Clients: TD Bank, Wal-Mart, Army Corps of Engineers, DART Container, Wegmans, CSX

St. Louis, MO Daniel E. Cutter, President 314-821-1100 FAX 314-821-4162 www.cascocorp.com dan_cutter@cascocorp.com Year Established: 1959, No. of Employees: 130, Retail Billings: $10,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $2,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $600,000, Total Billings: $12,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,200, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Office, Leading Clients: Children’s Learning Adventure, Silverleaf Resorts, Bass Pro Shops

CEI Engineering Associates, Inc. Bentonville, AR M. Christopher Rogers, Principal/VP of Business Development 479-273-9472 FAX 479-273-0844 www.ceieng.com crogers@ceieng.com Year Established: 1973, No. of Employees: N/A, Retail Billings: $11,220,565, Hospitality Billings: $51,403, Restaurant Billings: $539,232, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $3,325,578, Total Billings: $15,136,778, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 576, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Bridgestone, Sonic, Kroger, Kum & Go, Corner Store, Hardee’s, 7-Eleven

CESO, Inc. Akron, OH Steven R. Olson, Vice President 330-933-8820 www.cesoinc.com olson@cesoinc.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 128, Retail Billings: $5,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000, Restaurant Billings: $1,500,000, Federal: $N/A, Other Billings: $12,500,000, Total Billings: $20,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 300, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Bloomin Brands, Speedway, Love’s, Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club, Kohl’s, Tim Hortons

Classic Engineering, LLC Grand Rapids, MI Michael Kavanagh, Mechanical Consultant 616-742-2810 FAX 616-742-2814 www.classicengineering.com mkavanagh@classicengineering.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 14, Retail Billings: $N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: White Lodging, Concord Hospitality, Trader Joes, Subway

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

37


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Core States Group Don Penn Consulting Engineer Duluth, GA Kevin Behnke, Director of Business Development 770-242-9550 FAX 770-242-9560 www.core-eng.com info@core-eng.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 218, Retail Billings: $1,453,905, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $8,497,432, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $17,398,681, Total Billings: $27,350,018, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,755, Specialize In: Restaurants, Retail Banks, Energy, Leading Clients: Bloom Energy, McDonald’s, Chase Bank, Wal-Mart, Citigroup, 7-Eleven, Panera Bread

Grapevine, TX Michelle Judkins, Director 817-410-2858 FAX 817-251-8411 www.donpenn.com mjudkins@donpenn.com Year Established: 1991, No. of Employees: 30, Retail Billings: $2,600,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $2,400,000, Total Billings: $5,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,200, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Education, Leading Clients: T-Mobile, Planet Fitness, Disney, Kay Jewelers, Talbots, Ann Taylor, Bassett, Columbia, Sportswear, Aldo, CVS, Brighton, Torrid, The Vitamin Shoppe

Cyntergy AEC Dunham Associates, Inc. Tulsa, OK Jim Turner, Vice President – Retail 918-877-6000 FAX 918-877-4000 www.cyntergy.com jturner@cyntergy.com Year Established: 1997, No. of Employees: 90, Retail Billings: $5,984,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $2,398,000, Other Billings: $3,441,000, Total Billings: $11,823,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 187, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Government, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Dollar General, Armed Forces Exchanges (AFES)

Minneapolis, MN Jay Rohkohl, President & CEO 612-465-7550 FAX 612-465-7551 www.dunhameng.com info@dunhameng.com Year Established: 1960, No. of Employees: 111, Retail Billings: $4,250,000, Hospitality Billings: $250,000, Restaurant Billings: $750,000, Federal: $675,000, Other Billings: $11,075,000, Total Billings: $17,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1400 Retail & 200 Other, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Casinos, Education, Office, Data Centers, Leading Clients: Best Buy, Dollar Tree, McDonalds, Mens Wearhouse, Rue 21

Delta G Consulting EFI Global, Inc. Engineers, Inc. Humble, TX

Ft. Lauderdale, FL George San Juan, President 954-527-1112 FAX 954-524-7505 gsanjuan@deltag.net Year Established: 1992, No. of Employees: 22, Retail Billings: $200,000, Hospitality Billings: $300,000, Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $2,200,000, Total Billings: $2,900,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 200, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Gresham Smith & Partners

Deborah Cummings, Marketing Assistant ® 800-334-0200 FAX 281-358-3956 www.efiglobal.com deborah_cummings@efiglobal.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 342, Retail Billings: $3,159,167, Hospitality Billings: $526,528, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $1,053,056, Other Billings: $40,415,896, Total Billings: $45,154,647, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 18,426, Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

DLR Group EMG Seattle, WA Daniel Munn, Sr. Principal 206-461-6000 www.dlrgroup.com dmunn@dlrgroup.com Year Established: 1966, No. of Employees: 600, Retail Billings: $13,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $3,400,000, Restaurant Billings: $900,000, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $113,500,000, Total Billings: $130,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 106, Specialize In: Shopping Centers, Hotels, Casinos, Education, Justice, Sports, Workplace, Leading Clients: N/A

38

Hunt Valley, MD Aliza D. Stern, Principal 800-733-0660 www.emgcorp.com adstern@emgcorp.com Year Established: 1986, No. of Employees: 450, Retail Billings: $6,509,012, Hospitality Billings: $6,529,226, Restaurant Billings: $ (combined with Retail # above), Federal: $5,331,121, Other Billings: $30,217,067, Total Billings: $48,586,426, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 25,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: GE, Extended Stay, Home Depot, JP Morgan, Ventas

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Engineering Professionals, Inc.

HFA

C

M

Tampa, FL Gary Stenlund, Principal 813-251-6848 FAX 813-251-1468 www.engrpros.com stenlund@engrpros.com Year Established: 1992, No. of Employees: 11, Retail Billings: $157,485.43, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $57,429.57, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $741,640.58 – Church, Medical, School, Residential, Office, Bank, Utilities, Total Billings: $956,555.58, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 533, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: PDQ Restaurants, NCA-National Corporate Accounts

Bentonville, AR Chris Horton, EVP & CFO 479-273-7780 www.hfa-ae.com larry.lott@hfa-ae.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 165, Retail Billings: $21,600,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $21,600,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 370, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: WalMart, Academy Sports, Sam’s Club, Stripes, Love’s

GHT Limited

Cincinnati, OH Bruce Mirrielees, Sr. Vice President & Project Manager 513-241-1230 FAX 513-241-1287 www.hixson-inc.com bmirrielees@hixson-inc.com Year Established: 1948, No. of Employees: 130, Retail Billings: $1,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A, Other Billings: $21,300,000, Total Billings in: $22,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 10, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Leading Clients: Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s

Arlington, VA Evan Thomas, Marketing Specialist 703-243-1200 FAX 703-276-1376 www.ghtltd.com info@ghtltd.com Year Established: 1965, No. of Employees: 73, Retail Billings: $25,000, Hospitality Billings: $65,000, Restaurant Billings: $15,000, Federal: $700,000, Other Billings: $11,488,500, Total Billings: $12,293,500, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 650, Specialize In: Commercial Office, Leading Clients: N/A

GPD Group Akron, OH Michael Morrison, Director of Marketing 330-572-2100 FAX 330-572-2101 www.gpdgroup.com mmorrison@gpdgroup.com Year Established: 1961, No. of Employees: 520+, Retail/Hospitality/ Restaurant Billings: $9,000,000, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $85,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 600+, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: Survey says “See Attached” but there wasn’t an additional sheet with this survey

Henderson Engineers, Inc. Lenexa, KS Melissa Read, Communications Manager 913-742-5000 FAX 913-742-5001 www.hei-eng.com info@hei-eng.com Year Established: 1970, No. of Employees: 550, Retail Billings: $48,685,000, Hospitality Billings: $174,000, Restaurant Billings: $2,710,000, Federal: $1,036,500, Other Billings: $30,328,000, Total Billings: $82,933,500, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 2,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Casinos, Education, Sports, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Sprint, Academy Sports, Nike, Ulta, Sprouts, Verizon, Whole Foods, Office Depot, Dave & busters, Mixed-Use Development, Hi-End Retail

Y

CM

MY

CY

Engin it goe

CMY

K

Hixson Architecture & Engineering Interiors LEFT

Interplan LLC Orlando, FL Patrick Ringlever, Business Development Manager 407-645-5008 FAX 407-629-9124 www.interplanllc.com pringlever@interplanllc.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: 90, Retail Billings: $1,211,568, Hospitality Billings: $254,805, Restaurant Billings: $4,108,216, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $2,532,586, Total Billings: $8,107,176, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 790, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Banks, Leading Clients: N/A

Kohrs, Lonnemann, Heil Engineers, PSC / d.b.a. KLH Engineers Ft. Thomas, KY Cindy Jackson, Marketing Manager 859-442-8050 FAX 859-442-8058 www.klhengrs.com cjackson@klhengrs.com Year Established: 1955, No. of Employees: 150, Retail Billings: $9,790,720, Hospitality Billings: $633,016, Restaurant Billings: (Included in Retail & Hospitality), Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $5,753,528, Total Billings: $16,177,264, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,142, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Civic, Leading Clients: N/A

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

39


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Kuhlmann Design Group, Inc.

Maryland Heights, MO Darrell Abernathy, Vice President 314-434-8898 FAX 314-434-8280 www.kdginc.com dla@kdginc.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 54, Retail Billings: $1,814,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,438,000, Restaurant Billings: $967,000, Federal: $113,597, Other Billings: $2,670,403, Total Billings: $7,003,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 182, Specialize In: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Casinos, Leading Clients: Regency Centers, Seneca, The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf Co., Nekter, Edwards Group, DESCO, Schnucks Market Inc., Isle of Capri Casinos, Hard Rock International, Cold Lake First Nation

Larson Binkley, Inc.

Kansas City, MO Christopher R. Larson, President 816-997-9601 FAX 816-997-9602 www.larsonbinkley.com chris.larson@larsonbinkley.com Year Established: 1988 No. of Employees: 35 Retail Billings: $3,493,275, Hospitality Billings: $475,810, Restaurant Billings: $164,585, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $606,950, Total Billings: $4,740,620, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 451, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Sustainability, Leading Clients: Aritzia, At Home, Associated Bank, Cantina Laredo, Capital Grille, Bonefish Grill, Discount Tire, Bath & Body Works, Alamo Drafthouse, Bass Pro, Kohls, Victoria Secret, Pink

Little

Charlotte, NC Jeff Roman, National Director of Engineering 704-525-6350 FAX 704-561-8700 www.littleonline.com jeff.roman@littleonline.com Year Established: 1964, No. of Employees: 330, Retail Billings: $1,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $100,000, Restaurant Billings: $100,000, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $2,800,000, Total Billings: $4,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 164, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education. Net Zero, High Performance Buildings, Leading Clients: Symantec, Bank of America, BB&T, Concentra, Food Lion, Publix, Wells Fargo, First Citizens Bank

Mannik & Smith Group, Inc.

Columbus, OH Steven C. Hermiller, Vice President P.E. 614-441-4222 FAX 888-488-7340 www.MannikSmithGroup.com SHermiller@MannikSmithGroup.com Year Established: 1955, No. of Employees: 245, Retail Billings: $2,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000, Restaurant Billings: $500,000, Federal: $N/A, Other Billings: $27,000,000, Total Billings: $30,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Transportation, Energy Educational, Public Facilities/Government, Industrial, Urban Revitalization, Waste Management, Leading Clients: WND

40

Merritt Engineering Consultants, P.C.

Bayside, NY Heather Cerone, Marketing Director 718-767-0923 FAX 718-767-4920 www.merrittengineering.com info@merrittengineering.com Year Established: 1986, No. of Employees: 30, Retail Billings: $N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $5,700,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 200, Specialize In: Commercial Offices, Commercial Space, Healthcare, Residential, Educational Institutions, Banking Facilities, Leading Clients: JP Morgan Chase, Verizon, CLK Properties, Cushman & Wakefield

Michael Brady, Inc.

Knoxville, TN Louis Cortina, President 865-584-0999 FAX 865-584-5213 www.michaelbradyinc.com louisc@mbiarch.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 75, Retail Billings: $1,021,725, Hospitality Billings: $534,120, Restaurant Billings: $554,970, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $7,757,690, Total Billings: $9,868,505, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 250, Specialize In: Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Churches, Industrial, Leading Clients: Bojangles, Pilot Travel Centers LLC

Slider Engineering Group, Inc.

West Palm Beach, FL Stephen Mrozinski, Sr. Project Manager 561-684-8813 FAX 561-689-4456 www.sliderengineering.com smrozinski@sliderengineering.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 15, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 7, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Hotels, MultiUse, Leading Clients: The Blackstone Group

Stantec Consulting

Toronto, ON Canada Lui Mancinelli, Vice President 416-542-6057 FAX 416-596-7892 www.stantec.com lui.mancinelli@stantec.com Year Established: 1954, No. of Employees: 15,000, Retail Billings: $32,473,721, Hospitality Billings: $2,946,508, Restaurant Billings: $774,497, Federal: $5,540,118 (Commercial Fed. Only) $256,390,087 (All Business Lines Fed. Includes Oil & Gas, Power, Transportation, Water, Mining), Other Billings: $189,152,814, Total Billings: $487,277,745, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 4,347, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Airports, Attractions, Arts & Entertainment , Automotive, Community/Institutional, Justice, Mixed-Use, Office, Research/ Labs, Transit, Warehouse/Light Industrial, Leading Clients: Ivanhoe Cambridge, Kohl’s, Limited Brands, McDonald’s, Oxford Properties, Safeway, Shape Properties, Wal-Mart, Walgreens, JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Auto Nation, Host Hotels & Resorts

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


CIRCLE NO. 20


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Thorburn Associates, Inc.

Castro Valley, CA Lisa Thorburn, President 510-886-7826 FAX 510-886-7828 www.TA-Inc.com LAT@TA-Inc.com Year Established: 1992, No. of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: N/A, Specialize In: Acoustical, Technology and Lighting Design Consulting, Leading Clients: N/A

TLC Engineering for Architecture, Inc.

Orlando, FL Cheryl Maze, Marketing & Branding Manager 407-841-9050 FAX 407-835-9926 www.tlc-engineers.com cheryl.maze@tlc-eng.com Year Established: 1955, No. of Employees: 300, Retail Billings: $585,587, Hospitality Billings: $2,093,818, Restaurant Billings: (included in totals above), Federal: $1,435,823, Other Billings: $34,063,640, Total Billings: $38,178,868, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 175, Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education, Office, Leading Clients: N/A

Wakefield Beasley & Associates

Alpharetta, GA Michel T. Lentz, Principal Director of Retail/Mixed-Use Studio 770-209-9393 www.wakefieldbeasley.com mlentz@wbassociates.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 141, Retail Billings: $9,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $250,000, Restaurant Billings: $150,000, Federal: $500,000, Other Billings: $4,360,000, Total Billings: $14,260,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 100+, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: N/A

May/June 2015 issue Don’t miss our surveys for general contractors and lighting mfc/suppliers.

Listing form deadline to be included May 15th 42

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Architecture.

Engineering.

Integrated.

Our clients succeed because it’s actually relationships that we build.

www.cyntergy.com

CIRCLE NO. 21


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING

Peak performers Guide highlights industry’s leading roofing companies

I

t all starts at the top. If you want to find some of the industry’s leading roofing companies, roll through our annual Roofing Manufacturing listing. This annual guide showcases the leading companies working in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. Our exclusive listing

provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If you’re not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version of this report, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. Acrymax Technologies, Inc. 221 Brooke St. Media, PA 19063 Scott Bennung, President Phone: 610-566-7470 Fax: 610-891-0834 www.acrymax.com info@acrymax.com Roofing Product Type: Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Active Ventilation Products, Inc.

P.O. Box 1521 Newburgh, NY 12551 Martin Kolt, President Phone:845-565-7770 Fax: 845-562-8963 www.roofvents.com sales@roofvents.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Curbs, Roof Vents, Roof Exhaust Fans, Solar Attic Fans Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Alpine SnowGuards

289 Harrel St. Morrisville, VT 05661 Jolene Ciosek, Marketing Phone: 888-766-4273 Fax: 888-766-9994 www.alpinesnowguards.com info@alpinesnowguards.com Roofing Product Type: Snow Guards Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Residential, Residential

44

American Weatherstar

3100 Lees Lane Mobile, AL 36693 Brian O’Donnell, President Phone: 800-771-6643 Fax: 251-479-3602 www.americanweatherstar.com brian@weatherstar.net Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

ATAS International, Inc.

6612 Snowdriff Rd. Allentown, PA 18106 LeeAnn Slattery, Sales Support Manager Phone: 610-395-8446 Fax: 610-395-9342 www.atas.com lslattery@atas.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Cool Metal Roofing, Solar Ready Metal Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Atlas Roofing

2000 Riveredge Pkwy NW, Ste. #800 Atlanta, GA 30328 Diane Peoples, Marketing Communication Manager Phone: 770-952-1442 Fax: 770-952-3170 www.atlasroofing.com dpeoples@atlasroofing.com Roofing Product Type: Asphalt, Shakes/Shingles (Asphalt) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Other

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


BASF CertainTeed Corporation

11501 Steele Creek Rd. Charlotte, NC 28273 Michael Guibault, Industry Marketing Manager Phone: 704-587-8136 Fax: 704-587-7965 www.basf.us/dpsolutions michael.guibault@basf.com Roofing Product Type: Acrylics for roof coatings, Raw Material Supplier Markets Served: Commercial, Manufacturers

The Bilco Company

P.O. Box 1203 New Haven, CT 06505 Misty Harris, Customer Service Manager Phone: 203-934-6363 Fax: 203-933-8478 www.bilco.com bilco@bilco.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Hatch, Safety Products Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

BITEC, INC.

P.O. Box 497 Morrilton, AR 72110 Myles Adams, Tech/Representative Phone: 800-535-8597 Fax: 501-354-3019 www.bi-tec.com ema@bi-tec.com Roofing Product Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Coatings Markets Served: Distribution

Bostik, Inc.

11320 W. Watertown Plank Rd. Wauwatosa, WI 53226-3413 Tom Mylott, Business Manager Phone: 330-329-6182 Fax: 414-607-1515 www.bostik-us.com tom.mylott@bostik-us.com Roofing Product Type: Polyurethane and MS Sealants, (high velocity hurricane zone approved sealants) We have the first and only Miami Dade approved roofing sealant/adhesive) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential and Multi-Family Dwellings

Butler Manufacturing

1540 Genessee St. Kansas City, MO 64102 Leslie Clark, Director of Marketing Phone: 816-968-3525 www.butlermfg.com laclark@butlermfg.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

750 East Swedesford Rd. Valley Forge, PA 19482 Ralph Galvan, Commercial Marketing Manager Phone: 610-341-6278 Fax: 610-341-7859 www.certainteed.com ralph.galvan@saint-gobain.com Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Asphalt, Shakes/Shingles, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

Chicago Clamp Company 2350 South 27th Ave. Broadview, IL 60155 Kevin Barry, Sales Manager Phone: 708-343-8311 www.ChicagoClampCompany.com kevin.barry@chicagoclampcompany.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Curbs, Equipment Support Frames Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

Coated Metals Group 301 Yard Dr. Verona, WI 53593 Carmen Burnard, Administrative Assistant Phone: 800-784-0356 Fax: 608-826-4264 www.cmgmetals.com cburnard@cmgmetals.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards Markets Served: Any and All Roofing

CP Rankin, Inc. 4359 County Line Rd. Chalfont, PA 18914 Justin Brown, National Account Manager Phone: 866-ROOF-322 www.cprankin.com jbrown@cprankin.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Synthetic, Asphalt, Concrete, Shakes/Shingles, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Tiles, Snow Guards, Coatings, Roof Curbs, Solar Panels, Other Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Storage Facility

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

45


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING Davinci Roofscapes Englert, Inc.

13890 W. 101st Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Wendy Bruch, Marketing Manager Phone: 800-328-4624 x-2116 Fax: 913-599-0065 www.davinciroofscapes.com wbruch@davinciroofscapes.com Roofing Product Type: Synthetic, Polymer Shakes & Slate Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Duro-Last Roofing, Inc.

525 Morley Dr. Saginaw, MI 48601 Jenny Bruzewski, Marketing Communications Manager Phone: 800-248-0280 Fax: 800-432-9331 www.duro-last.com jbruzews@duro-last.com Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

EcoFasten Solar

289 Harrel St. Morrisville, VT 05661 Jolene Ciosek, Marketing Phone: 877-859-3947 Fax: 888-766-9994 www.ecofastensolar.com info@ecofastensolar.com Roofing Product Type: Solar Roof Mounts and Components, Snow Management Solutions for Solar Arrays Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Residential

1200 Amboy Ave. Perth Amboy, NJ 08861 Mitch Gaber, Marketing Director Phone: 732-826-8614 Fax: 732-826-8865 www.englertinc.com m.gaber@englertinc.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards, Roof Curbs, Solar Panels, Gutter Materials Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Large Scale Residential

Fall Protection Distributors, LLC 1324 Seven Springs Rd., #323 Trinity, FL 34655 Howie Scarboro, CEO Phone: 423-999-0107 www.fallpd.com howie@fallpd.com Roofing Product Type: Fall Protection Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Firestone Building Products 250 W. 96th Street Indianapolis, IN 46260 Phone: 800-428-4442 Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Coatings Markets Served: Commercial

Flex Membrane EcoStar, LLC International Corporation

42 Edgewood Dr. Holland, NY 14080 Dan Nesselbush, Marketing Phone: 800-211-7170 Fax: 888-780-9870 www.ecostarllc.com info@ecostarllc.com Roofing Product Type: Synthetic, Shakes/Shingles, Tiles, Slate Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

EDCO Products, Inc.

8700 Excelsior Blvd. Hopkins, MN 55343 Brad Newell, Marketing Manager Phone: 952-945-2680 Fax: 952-938-9244 www.edcoproducts.com bnewell@edcoproducts.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Commercial

46

2670 Leiscz’s Bridge Rd., Ste. #400 Leesport, PA 19533 John Doyle, President Phone: 610-916-9500 Fax: 610-916-9501 www.flexroofingsystems.com jdoyle@flexmembranes.com Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Snow Guards, Coatings, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

GAF 1 Campus Drive Parsippany, NJ 07054 Phone: 973-628-3000 www.gaf.com Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Shakes/Shingles, Coatings Markets Served: Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Georgia-Pacific Gypsum – DensDeck® Roof Boards

133 Peachtree St. Atlanta, GA 30303 Greg Hudson, National Sales Manager Phone: 404-652-4000 www.DensDeck.com techservices@gapac.com Roofing Product Type: Thermal Barrier, Cover Boards Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

Gutterglove, Inc.

4021 Alvis Court, Ste. 5 Rocklin, CA 95677 Robert Lenney, CEO Phone: 916-778-8777 Fax: 916-624-5001 www.gutterglove.com robert@gutterglove.com Roofing Product Type: Gutter Guards Markets Served: Retail, Corporate, Commercial, Federal/Government

Johns Manville

717 17th Street Denver, CO 80202 Christina Martinez, Marketing Specialist www.jm.com/roofing Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Kingspan Insulated Panels

726 Summerhill Dr. DeLand, FL 32724 Adam Spendjian, Marketing Coordinator Phone: 386-626-6789 Fax: 386-626-6883 www.kingspanpanels.us adam.spendjian@kingspan.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

MBCI

14031 W. Hardy Rd. Houston, TX 77060 Amy Crenan, Marketing Coordinator Phone: 877-713-6224 Fax: 281-445-8110 www.mbci.com info@mbci.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Eco-Green Roofing Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Agricultural, Religious, Self-Storage

McElroy Metal 1500 Hamilton Rd. Bossier City, LA 71112 Ken Gieseke, VP Marketing Phone: 800-562-3576 Fax: 318-747-8099 www.mcelroymetal.com info@mcelroymetal.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Snow Guards, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government, Residential

Metal Sales Manufacturing Corporation 545 South 3rd St. Louisville, KY 40202 Pat Lanning, Marketing Manager Phone: 800-406-7387 Fax: 502-855-4200 www.metalsales.us.com info@metalsales.us.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

MFM Building Products P.O. Box 340 Coshocton, OH 43812 Tony Reis, Sales & Marketing Director Phone: 800-882-7663 Fax: 740-622-6161 www.mfmbp.com info@mfmbp.com Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Underlayments Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Mid-South Roof Systems P.O. Box 45717 Atlanta, GA 30320 Jeff Ansel, Business Development Phone: 404-361-5154 www.mid-southroof.com jeffa@mid-southroof.com Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Coatings, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Corporate, Commercial

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

47


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING Mule-Hide Products Co., Inc. 1195 Prince Hall Dr. Beloit, WI 53511-5481 Lynette Collins, Marketing Administrator Phone: 800-786-1492 Fax: 608-365-7852 www.mulehide.com Roofing Product Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Maintenance & Repair Products, Roofing Installation, Fasteners, Edge Metal, Cover/Barrier Boards Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

OpenAire, Inc. 2360B Cornwall Rd. Oakville, ON L6J 7T9, Canada Deborah Baker, VP & CFO Phone: 905-901-8535 Fax: 905-901-9662 www.openaire.com sales@openaire.com Roofing Product Type: Custom Aluminum Retractable Roofs & Skylights Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Water Parks, Aquatic & Community Centers

Petersen Aluminum 1005 Tonne Rd. Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 Rob Heselbarth, Director of Communications Phone: 847-981-4707 Fax: 847-956-7968 www.pac-clad.com rheselbarth@petersenmail.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

Plasteco, Inc. 8535 Market St. Houston, TX 77029 Jonathan Ultis, Sr. Account Manager Phone: 800-231-6117 x-304 Fax: 800-231-6117 www.plasteco.com jonathan@plasteco.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Curbs, Skylights & Skylight Fall Guard® Safety Screens Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal/Government

48

Prism Solar

180 South St. Highland, NY 12528 Phone: 520-333-4274 www.prismsolar.com j.hughes@prismsolar.com Roofing Product Type: Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

Progressive Materials

540 Central Ct. New Albany, IN 47150 Josh McKain, Marketing Director Phone: 812-944-7803 Fax: 812-944-7804 www.pmsilicone.com josh@pmsilicone.com Roofing Product Type: Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Coatings Markets Served: Retail, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Red Built

200 E. Mallard Dr. Boise, ID 83706 Cornelia Sprung, Marketing Phone: 208-364-1300 www.redbuilt.com Roofing Product Type: Open-Web Truss Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Roof Hugger, Inc.

142-B Whitaker Rd. Lutz, FL 33549 Dale Nelson, President Phone: 800-771-1711 Fax: 877-202-2254 www.roofhugger.com dale@roofhugger.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof System This part of the form was cut off after Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Sika Sarnafil

100 Dan Road Canton, MA 02021 Stephen Mochun, Trade Show Coordinator Phone: 781-828-5400 Fax: 781-828-5365 usa.sarnafil.sika.com mochun.stephen@us.sika.com Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


PRACTICAL THAT’S THE POWER OF THE PANEL

Reduce Build Speed and Earn Valuable LEED Credits with KingZip™. The KingZip™ Standing Seam Roof Panel provides three critical factors the industry demands today. It is a single component roof system that delivers faster installation time compared to built-up roofs, provides excellent thermal performance with a high R-value, and can help projects earn valuable LEED credits. Formed with insulated metal panels (IMPs), a KingZip roof provides these benefits in a way that’s not just practical — but far superior to standard built-up roofing systems.

www.KingspanPanels.us CIRCLE NO. 22


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING Snoblox-Snojax 671 Willow St. Lemoyne, PA 17043 Howie Scarboro, National Sales Manager Phone: 800-SNOJAX1 www.snojax.com sales@snojax.com Roofing Product Type: Snow Guards, Roof Clamps Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

Situra, Inc. 60 Industrial Parkway, Ste. 688 Cheektowaga, NY 14227 Chauntelle Farey, Project Specialist Fax: 416-622-0212 www.situra.com situra@situra.com Roofing Product Type: Waterproof Expansion Joints Markets Served: Commercial

Solatube International, Inc. 2210 Oak Ridge Way Vista, CA 92081-8341 Rachel Ochinero, Marketing Coordinator Phone: 888-765-2882 www.solatube.com commsales@solatube.com Roofing Product Type: Tubular Daylighting Devices Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

SOLEC-Solar Energy Corp. 129 Walters Ave. Ewing, NJ 08638 Robert Aresty, President Phone: 609-883-7700 Fax: 609-883-5489 www.solec.org info@solec.org Roofing Product Type: Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

50

SOPREMA

310 Quadral Dr. Wadsworth, OH 44281 Sara Jonas, Marketing Manager Phone: 800-356-3521 Fax: 330-334-4289 www.soprema.us sjonas@soprema.us Roofing Product Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes, Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Eco-Green Roofing Systems, PMA/PMMA Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance 3735 Green Rd. Beachwood, OH 44122 Bob Spreat, Dir. Messaging & Marketing Communications Phone: 216-242-5000 www.tremcoroofing.com bspreat@tremcoinc.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Manufacturing

Triton Incorporated 250 33rd St. Dr. SE Cedar Rapids, IA 52403 Dustin Brooks, Director of Sales Phone: 319-865-5233 www.tritonwp.com info@tritonwp.com Roofing Product Type: Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Repair/ Patch Materials Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal Government

VMZ, Inc. 3600 Glenwood Ave., Ste. 250 Raleigh, NC 27612 Chandra Hester, Marketing & Communications Mgr. Phone: 919-874-7173 Fax: 919-874-7140 www.vmzinc.com chandra.hester@am.umicore.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, ??? Page Cut Off – Can’t Read Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


START YOUR BUILDING SCIENCE DISCUSSION IN THE MIDDLE.

AIR BARRIER WRB INSULATION

Atlas® polyiso products are an important part of the building envelope discussion. In one simple package, you can meet the highest requirements for your commercial and residential projects with Atlas solutions. Let’s start the discussion today. CIRCLE NO. 23

AtlasRoofing.com


For your next exterior cladding project, here’s a product you cannot ignore: Thermocromex™ state-of-the-art limestone plaster highperformance cladding, can be applied to virtually any substrate, including CMU, frame/sheathing, tilt wall, poured-in-place concrete and lightweight blocks/cement. Also available in custom colors, Thermocromex delivers a vibrant and permanent finish requiring no other coloring or topcoat. The alkali- and UV-resistant pigments will not fade over time; the finish is both weatherproof and breathable at a cost comparable to stucco or EIFS. Almost no maintenance is needed to preserve the original appearance, year after year. Thermocromex can also be installed in multiple colors for an incredibly realistic, natural stone look. Additionally, Thermocromex offers a 20-year material performance warranty that ensures keeping out the rain and protecting against delamination.

Corporate Headquarters 10920 Alder Circle Dallas, Texas 75238 Tel: 972.424.8280 Toll Free: 800.780.7731 Web: www.thermocromex.com


Thermocromex signature projects include:

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Dallas, TX

The Linq, Las Vegas, NV

Edgewater House, Rehoboth, DE

General Services Administration, Albuquerque, NM

Residences at Albany, New Providence, Bahamas

Florida International University, Miami, FL

Limestone Plaster Ultra-High-Performance Cladding CIRCLE NO. 51


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

South Beach baby!! Miami – the Magic City, plays host to 2015 CCR Summit

I

t’s January. So, where else are you going to go to escape the snow and ice and cold and, well, you get the picture. How’s Miami sound? That’s where some of the industry’s leading executives landed for the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, held January 26-28, at The Marriott Biscayne Bay in downtown Miami. The evening kicked off with the annual tabletop cocktail party/dinner/scavenger hunt party, where attendees were invited to visit each vendor and get their cards stamped. The scavenger hunt not only allowed for an entertaining meet and greet, but also qualified each person for a special raffle held at night’s end. Winners donated their takes to their favorite charities.

CCR 2015 Charity Winners Dennis Horn, Consultant: Make a Wish Foundation Raul Reyna, H&M: March of Dimes Mathew Boynton, Heartland Restaurant Group: Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh Craig Auberger, Crestpoint Development: American Lung Association David Thompson, Which Wich: MD Anderson Barbara Schenker, Which Wich: MD Anderson Richard Huff, Hospitality Realty Services: Wounded Warriors Dan Wisk, Hertz: JDRF Tobias Collie, Fun-Brands: Austin Speaks David O’Brien, Southern Deli Holdings: Hospice of High Point, NC Colleen Biggs, The Little Gym: Brad & Theresa Biggs, Motorcycle Accident Survivor

54

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Reelin’ ‘em in Fishing tourney leaves attendees baiting their hooks

I

magine this: You spring out of bed and take a bus out to the boat. From there, you load up and head out to sea. That just happened – in January, in Miami, during the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, held January 26-28, at The Marriott Biscayne Bay in downtown Miami. With a little assist from Kelly Fishing Charters, attendees were able to spend the morning enjoying the salty sea air. And when it was all said and done, Craig Weber from Carney Contracting hauled in the biggest catch, making him this year’s CCR fishing champ.

Face off Vendors, end users talk shop during one-on-one meetings

C

ocktail receptions. Networking events (fishing, bay cruises). Casino Night. While each of these events have their snapshots in time during the Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, nothing beats the one-on-one meetings. Here vendors and end-users get to sit down face-to-face for 15 minutes to talk shop. The sessions continue to be one of the most valued networking opportunities the commercial construction industry has to offer.

Lanyard Sponsor:

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

55

INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Ship ahoy Casino Night goes all Miami with dinner/party cruise

C

ome on, does it get any better than a dinner party cruise to celebrate one of the Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit’s most anticipated events – Casino Night? With their gambling hats squarely in tow, attendees cruised around the bay compliments of the sleek, ultra-modern Biscayne Lady luxury yacht. Ask anybody who was there, and they will tell you that there are few things better than watching the sun set on scenic Biscayne Bay on a perfect Miami evening.

Casino Night prize sponsor:

Is that Lebron’s place? Millionaire’s Row cruise showcases the best of Miami’s real estate

Y

es, Lebron (James for those who need the help) has a place on the bay. So does a host of other celebrities, CEOs, millionaires and billionaires? Who are they? To find out, you have to take the “Millionaire’s Row” cruise, which drifts around scenic Biscayne Bay providing a peek into the lifes of the rich and famous. To cap off three days of networking and educational meetings, attendees of the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit received a firsthand look at celebrity life – Miami style aboard the Island Queen. The 90-minute cruise provided a fully narrated peek into Miami’s spectacular coastal sites, including the downtown skyline, Port of Miami, Fisher Island and Miami Beach. Thanks to Chick-fil-A for sponsoring the morning breakfast

56

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Gut check time Former NHL player says taking chances key to success

T

here are moments that define each of us. For Randy Moller, he was 18. That’s when the Quebec Nordiques took him in the first round of the National Hockey

League (NHL) draft. So, at 18, Moller, who grew up in Red Deer, Alta, a suburb of Alberta, Canada, moved to Quebec City, where 98 percent of the population was of French decent.

“You never know what’s behind that newly ‘renovated door. The key is to move forward and build relationships with trust.” That was pretty exciting for a young man who didn’t speak a lick of French. The former defenseman who played 13 seasons in the NHL with Quebec, the Florida Panther, New York Rangers and Buffalo Sabres recorded 45 goals, 180 assists and 1,692 penalty minutes in 815 games. Moller remembers the exact moment he endeared himself to his Nordiques teammates and the Quebec fans. Because he began taking French lessons, Moller felt fairly confident he was ready to do an interview in French. Following his one-on-one with a French broadcaster, he returned to his teammates to find out how he did. Turns out, he ended up ordering Chinese food, he told attendees during the luncheon keynote of the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit in Miami.

“I could no wrong,” says Moller, who today serves as VP of broadcasting for the NHL’s Florida Panthers and the team’s radio play-by-play man. “But even though I never learned enough French, I tried. And that’s what mattered to my teammates.” Moller’s lesson to CCR attendees is that in order to be successful, you have to take chances. “For me, it was sports at an early age,” he says. “Today, it’s living in the world of social media, where even as a broadcaster I’m continually finding new ways to communicate. My position as part of a sports team that is striving for customer development and retention parallels the challenges in all revenue generating businesses. With similar experiences in

customer relations and business-to-business networking, it’s important to understand your business, set realistic goals against your competitors, and seize your opportunities in life and your career.” Moller, who has been with the Panthers since 2002, said that because the window of opportunity closes quickly, you must enjoy your hard work, visualize the success you seek and sometimes take that dare. “You never know what’s behind that newly ‘renovated door. The key is to move forward and build relationships with trust. There has to be human connection. That is the key.”

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

57

INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

The business case for ADA compliance

I

t has been 25 years since the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), bringing with it a number of accessibility assessment and

barrier removal issues for retailers, restaurant owners and hospitality facilities.

By M. Bradley Gaskins

Businesses not adhering to ADA compliances face a number of legal risks. Costly ADA lawsuits include civil penalties, attorneys’ fees and other costs. The best way to avoid being a target of an ADA lawsuit is to conduct a thorough accessibility survey and barrier removal plan – a strategy that can give your bottom line a huge boost. The demographics of individuals with disabilities in the United States are not what you might expect. For example, a “disability” refers too much more than someone who is bound to a wheelchair. Other disabilities include hearing impairments and vision impairments; persons whom have a therapy dog or need assistance getting around due to cancer treatment. To date, there are 35.8 million Americans 15 years of age and older with a mobility disability, 7.6 million with a hearing disability and 8.1 million with a visual disability. Individuals with disabilities

With more than $220 billion in discretionary income, the spending power of individuals with disabilities is powerful. ages 21-64 make up 16.6 percent of that population, and 49.5 percent of Americans over the age of 65 have a disability. With more than $220 billion in discretionary income, the spending power of individuals with disabilities is powerful. Not only can accessible businesses bet on loyalty from these consumers, but they also can take into account the business they will get from friends and family of persons with disabilities. Not only is ADA compliance the law, but it’s also the right thing to do, and, to top it all off, it is good for business. For more information, email me at bgaskins@themcintoshgroup.com. In addition, if you have questions on ADA compliance, please visit www.askbrad.info. CCR Bradley Gaskins is the COO and partner for The McIntosh Group in Tulsa, Okla.

58

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


How to develop your leadership team

W

hen it comes to leadership, there are four key elements that every construction executive should know in order to be more effective, including building the right team, creating an efficient process, providing useful information and focusing on value.

By Steve Jones

5. P  innacle – people follow you because of who you are and what you represent The book made me realize that our leadership team needed to transform from production (Level 3), to people development (Level 4). The third thing was the leadership values and characteristics I witnessed by observing the actions displayed by Tom Nolan, senior director, restaurant development, at Chick-fil-A, and other leaders at the brand. What I saw was the combination of business success, customer satisfaction and employee satisfaction that could only be accomplished through leadership (Level 5).

The most important part of the equation is developing your leadership team. Before anything else can happen, this is the first step to your company’s success. In 2007, Nick Saban took over the reins as head While it appeared to me that the leaders at football coach at the UniverChick-fil-A must have all read the “5 Levels of sity of Alabama, an iconic proLeadership and lived its values every day, I later gram that struggled to a 6-6 discovered that they use the “SERVE” leadership record the year before. So, Steve Jones Tom Nolan guidelines. SERVE provides the following values: how did he turn a mediocre S – See and shape the future football team into a 14-0 National Champion the next year (and two more E  – Engage and develop others since)? How did he build a program that has become the envy of nearly R – Reinvent continuously every other program? What can we learn from him? V – Value results and relationships It all starts at the top – with your leadership team. Saban constructed E – Embody the values a team of coaches and assistants who shared his vision, his values and his work ethic. Next, he built a team of young men who could carry out this vision, While they are different words, the values are the same. When I recruiting four future NFL first-round draft picks in his second year. Overall, he looked at our team, I focused the conversation on what I thought was created an atmosphere that strives for excellence – one that not only forces Saban to push himself to be better every day, but everyone around him as well. one of our most difficult challenges – getting people to go from producThe “ah ha” moment for me came a few years ago, when three tion to people development. In the process, I identified four challenges things happened somewhat simultaneously. First, I was asked to double that were in our way: leaving our comfort zones, not trusting others, the our business – a task that seemed daunting when I realized our current inability to teach what we do and being threatened by others. leadership team did not have the bandwidth to double the business without To overcome our challenges, we had to understand the power of leverdeveloping the other leaders around us. age, hire great people, provide vision and guidance, not rules, and see the bigger picture, which meant creating a non-threatening work environment. Second, I read the book “5 Levels of Leadership” by John Maxwell. According to Maxwell, there are five levels of leadership: In the end, our company’s avenue to success meant we had to follow 1. Position – people follow you because they have to the following five guidelines to build our leadership team: 2. Permission – people follow you because they want to 1. Understand that great leaders are great learners 3. P  roduction – people follow you because of what you have 2. Hire and promote the right people done for the organization 3. Clarify our vision/values 4. P  eople Development – people follow you because of what 4. Understand that people development matters you have done for them 5. Embrace servant leadership Steve Jones is managing director for Jones Lang LaSalle and Tom Nolan is restaurant development with Chick-fil-A. MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

59

INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Defining the successes and failures of building in South Florida

By Steve Bachman and Rick Winkel

M

any contractors/retail tenants typically have engaged the services of a permit expediting company or service. This company helps assist with the plans/

drawings for their new project through the review process within all governmental agencies and departments – building, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and eventually fire. The experiences of some contractors found success when the tenant hired the services of a company that the landlord had worked with.

It is important to be vigilant in following the progress of your project. Today, the GC is responsible for securing all necessary permits required for the project, calling and paying for all of his inspections and the electronic format(s) established by each county. It has not only become necessary to monitor the progress of the initial permit(s), but also all of the subsequent inspections that must be called in/requested, wait for the queue, pay the requisite fee, and obtain, and hopefully pass when the inspector does show up – oftentimes days later.

Assuming the inspection(s) passes, you are on to the next phase of construction, and next series or set of inspections/fees/approvals. This process is something we all become accustomed to when building in southern Florida. Nonetheless, we still get surprised at how long some of these things take. One possible solution is to engage an engineering/expediting firm that has a relationship within the county you are

It is important to be vigilant in following the progress of your project. working. Some of these firms charge a fee, which basically mirrors the fee of the respective building permit. The good news is that they have a certification process arranged with the county to perform the inspections and cut down the process by weeks, if not months. Some of these firms have worked with a few national retail/ fast food chains, which has enabled them to perform the construction/inspection process in a 45-day cycle – construction start to completion. This scenario is worth the effort. CCR

Sponsored by:

60

Steve Bachman is founder and CEO of Retail Construction Services in Lake Elmo, Minn., and Rick Winkel is president of Winkel Construction in Inverness, Fla.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


The convergence of online and in-store retailing

By Jeff Roark

J

ust a few years ago, the “brick-and-mortar” design/ construction groups within a typical retail organization often looked at their own e-commerce sales teams with an “us

against them” mindset. But successful retailers – in direct response to their customer base – are now merging the best of both worlds into a seamless, brand-consistent customer experience. This change is being driven by the generational transition from baby boomers, to Gen-X and Gen-Y (Millennials), and now to Gen-Z (digital generation). The younger – and more tech-savvy – generations are demanding a seamless customer experience between “online” and “in-store,” and retailers have to respond. In the past, retailers were focused on developing extravagant, but purely physical, visual merchandising displays. Currently, they are demonstrating their digital prowess by creating brand experiences that incorporate “in-store” technology components, such as interactive digital walls and holographic-style windows, as well as the integration of social media. In the future, combined multi-sensory technologies will blur the line between the physical and digital worlds, leading to retail experiences that are so tightly intertwined, they will appear as one. One example of integrating technology components and social media is a test concept called “Belle & Ty” that Belk Department Stores recently did via a holiday pop-up store in Pineville, N.C. Belk’s goal for Belle & Ty was to learn more about how to attract and get younger customers into their stores, so they experimented with technology and social media, like providing a photo station where store associates could take photographs of customers in their new outfits, post them on Instagram and to a large display screen in the store. This way, those customers could direct their friends to see

them on Belle & Ty’s Instagram page, which in turn helped promote the brand. Another example of digital integration is the new augmented reality (AR) simulator currently being tested by the home-improvement retailer, Lowe’s. Customers first create a design for say, a new bathroom, using a custom-adapted tablet loaded with a special AR app on which to drag and drop fixtures, designate colors, etc. Next, the customer walks into an empty 400-square-foot room called the “Holoroom,” which is synchronized with the tablet, in which they can explore and modify their design in 3D as they walk around the space with their tablet. An example of an “on-line” retailer adapting their brand to “brick-and-mortar” is Nasty Gal, which recently opened its first retail store on Melrose Avenue in Hollywood, Calif. The 3,500-square-foot store is centered around the try-on experience, through a group of fitting rooms with two-way mirrored doors that allow customers to see out with complete privacy, while trying on clothes. Through eight years of building its brand via an on-line customer base, Nasty Gal is now creating real-life social media and a physical experience via bold personalities, a strong look and a specific sound. CCR

Successful retailers – in direct response to their customer base – are now merging the best of both worlds into a seamless, brandconsistent customer experience.

Jeff Roark is principal and partner at Little Diversified Architectural Consulting in Charlotte, N.C.

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

61

INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Lemons to lemonade Commercial real estate guru discusses lessons we must learn sooner

S

o, your resume has 25 jobs, starting at the age of four with her first lemonade stand. That’s a real red flag, right? Pamela Goodwin doesn’t think so. Her resume features 25 jobs. But

ask her, and she’ll tell you that each one of them gave her the diversified experiences she needed to grow. It was time well spent.

In her book – “One Cent Lemonade to Million Dollar Deals: 25 Jobs & 25 Lessons I Wish I Learned Sooner!” – Goodwin shares the knowledge she has gained from these professional and personal experiences. During the breakfast keynote at the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit in Miami, she discussed her personal journey of finding the motivation and inspiration she needed to jumpstart a better life for herself. “There are no overnight miracles,” she says. “But there are essential tools for finding the inspiration and motivation you need to energize and find a better life. Part of success is staying steady and working where you are until the right changes can be made to spark the beginning of something more.”

“Part of success is staying steady and working where you are until the right changes can be made to spark the beginning of something more.” – Author Pamela Goodwin The key is to build a foundation for success, rather than selling the idea of a “get rich quick” mentality. “I have had my own battles with failure and success, but I was able to turn these obstacles into what I am today,” Goodwin says. “I wasn’t the greatest of students, but I was still able to develop the motivation to succeed I needed.” Today, Goodwin is the founder and CEO of Goodwin Commercial in Dallas. With more than two decades of commercial real estate experience, Goodwin has been featured in publications such as Texas Real Estate Business and the Dallas Business Journal. For more information, you can reach her at pam@goodwincommercial.com or visit www.goodwincommercial.com.

62

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


3M

3M Center Bldg 220-12E-04 Maplewood, MN 55144 (651) 736-0977 Cindy Jenkins / Marketing Manager ccjenkins1@mmm.com • www.mmm.com Graphics / Architectural Finishes / Floor Maintenance

Advance Sign Group

5150 Walcutt Court Columbus, OH 43228 (614) 429-2079 Andy Wasserstrom / New Business Development andyw@advancesigngroup.com • www.advancesigngroup.com Signage

Carney Contracting

536 Cassinghan Road Fairless, PA 19030 (610) 960-0264 Craig Weber / Business Growth Strategist info@carneycontracting.com www.carneycontracting.com Self Performed Renovations

CDO Group

120 N. Green Street, Apt #4-F Chicago, IL 60607 (312) 733-9803 Anthony Amunategui / President anthony@cdogroup.com • www.cdogroup.com Project Management

Ceso, Inc

Columbia Forest Products

7900 Triad Center Drive, Suite 200 Greensboro, NC 27409 (336) 456-8657 Richard Poindexter / Specialty Products Manager rpoindexter@cfpwood.com • www.cfpwood.com Architectural Building Products

Core States Group

4191 Pleasant Hill Road Duluth, GA 30096 (770) 242-9550 Kevin Behnke / Director of Business Development kbehnke@core-eng.com • www.core-eng.com Architecture/Engineering Firm

Cornell Storefronts

140 Maffett Street, Suite 200 Wilkes-Barre, PA 31012 (800) 882-6773 Chris Slocum / President cslocum@cornellstorefronts.com • www.cornellstorefronts.com Security

Crossville Inc.

349 Sweeney Drive Crossville, TN 38555 (773) 988-8118 Heidi Vassalotti / Strategic Accounts hvassalotti@crossvilleinc.com • www.crossvilleinc.com Flooring

Exclusive Retail Interiors

988C Old Country Road, Suite 318 Plainview, NY 11803 (516) 606-1590 Mitch Kahn / VP Business Development mkahn@exclusiveretail.net • www.exclusiveretail.net Fixtures

395 Springside Drive, Suite 202 Akron, OH 44333 (330) 665-0660, ext 1713 Steve Olson / President olson@cesoinc.com • www.cesoinc.com Architecture/Engineering Firm

FH Specialty Contracting

Cicero’s Development Corp

Federated Service Solutions Inc

1020 Pittsburg Drive, Suite A Delaware, OH 43015 (740) 368-4140 Mark McCreary / General Contracting Manager fhspecialtycontracting.com • www.federalheath.com Specialty Contracting/Signage

10038 Clow Creek Drive Plainfield, IL 60585 (866) 904-0141 Sam Cicero Jr. / President secicero@cicerosdev.com • www.cicerosdev.com Renovations

30955 Northwestern Hwy Farmington Hills, MI 48334 (248) 539-9000 Jennifer Ferris / President jferris@federatedservice.com • www.federatedservice.com Cabling/Data

Coast 2 Coast

1945 The Exchange, Suite 400 Atlanta, GA 30339 (678) 872-7337 Faith Hoople / Director of Marketing & Business Development marasin@fulcrumconstruction.com www.fulcrumconstruction.com General Contractor

7704 Basswood Drive Chattanooga, TN 37416 (423) 710-4714 Tim West / Senior Business Development Associate twest@c2csurveys.net • www.c2csurveys.net As-Built Surveys

Fulcrum Construction

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

63

INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS


INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS GPD Group

520 South Main Street, Suite 2531 Akron, OH 44311 (330) 958-0925 Mike Morrison / Director of Marketing mmorrison@gpdgroup.com • www.gpdgroup.com Architecture/Engineering/Project Management Firm HFA_Jan-Feb_CCR Ad.pdf

1

1/21/15

Lakeview Construction

11:14 AM

Hermitage Lighting

3640 Trousdale Drive Nashville, TN 37204 (615) 843-3394 • Mobile: (615) 878-2817 JD Ryan / Account Manager jdr@hlg.com • www.hlg.co Lighting

HFA

Toll Free: 800-264-3383 www.hermitagelighting.com Nashville, Tennessee SPECIALIST IN RESTAURANT AND RETAIL LIGHTING DESIGN

C

1705 South Walton Blvd, Suite 318 Bentonille, AR 72712 (479) 273-7780 Harrison French / President harrison@hfa-ae.com • www.hfa-ae.com Architecture/Engineering Firm M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Identicom Sign Solutions

42705 Grand River Ave., Suite 201 Novi, MI 48375 (248) 344-9590, ext 222 John DiNunzio / President jdinunzio@identicomsigns.com • www.identicomsigns.com Signage

10505 Corporate Drive Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (262) 857-3336 John Stallman / Marketing Manager john@lvconstruction.com • www.lvconstruction.com General Contractor Architecture Interior Design MC Lighting FireBlvd Protection 8959 Tyler Mechanical Mentor, OH 44060 Landscape Structural (440) 209-6200 Electrical Bob Patton / Director of Sales Civil bob.patton@mcsign.com • www.mcsign.com Lighting

MLE Inc

1800 Lunt Ave

Your customer is Elk Grove, IL 60007 our designer (630) 422-1790 Frank Loftus / CEO frankloftus@mleinc.com • www.mleinc.com Installations

Philadelphia Sign

707 West Spring Garden Street Palmyra, NJ 08065 (503) 830-3841 Nate Doney / Business Development ndoney@philadelphiasign.com / www.philadelphiasign.com hfa-ae.com Signage

InstaKey Security Systems

Porcelanosa USA

7456 West 5th Ave Lakewood, CO 80226 (303) 761-9999, ext 125 Cita Doyle / Dir of Sales & Marketing cdoyle@instakey.com • www.instakey.com Security

600 Route 17 North Ramsey, NJ 07446 (201) 995-1310 Andrew Pennington / Sales Director apennington@porcelanosa-usa.com • www.porcelanosa-usa.com Architectural Building Products

Interplan LLC

Prime Retail Services

604 Courtland Street, Suite 100 Orlando, FL 32804 (407) 645-5008 Patrick Ringlever / Business Development pringlever@interplanllc.com • www.interplanllc.com Architecture/Engineering Firm

3617 Southland Drive, Suite A Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (770) 297-0480 Darrel Chaney / Consultant darrelchaney@windstream.net • www.primeretailservices.com GC/Installations/Merchandising

Jones Lang LaSalle

Quality Project Management, LLC

3344 Peachtree Rd NE, Suite 1200 Atlanta, GA 30326 (404) 995-2100 Steve Jones / Managing Director steve.jones@am.jll.com • www.jll.com Project Management

64

1702 East McNair Drive Tempe, AZ 85283 (602) 448-2145 John Ott / Business Development Manager jott@qpmllc.com • www.qpmllc.com Project Management

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Rectenwald Brothers Construction

Storefloors

16 Leonberg Road Cranberry Township, PA 16066-3602 (724) 772-8282 Art Rectenwald / President art@rectenwald.com / www.rectenwald.com General Contractor

6480 Roswell Road Atlanta, GA 30328 (404) 610-4008 Julia Versteegh / National Sales juliav@storefloors.com • www.storefloors.com Flooring

Retail Maintenance Specialists

1 Memorial Drive. Suite 101 Waretown, NJ 08758 (609) 891-9954 Kelli Buhay / Director of Business Development kelli@retailmsc.com • www.retailmsc.com Facility Maintenance

Rockford Construction

Southwest Signs

601 First Street NW Grand Rapids, MI 49504 (616) 432-6599 Ann Zimmer / Project Executive Retail Construction azimmer@rockfordconstruction.com • www.rockfordconstruction.com General Contractor

Rogers Electric

2050 Marconi Drive, Suite 200 Alpharetta, GA 30005 (770) 772-3400 Lori Lucas / National Sales llucas@lrogerselectric.com • www.lrogerselectric.com Electrical

Sargenti Architects

461 From Road Paramus, NJ 07652 (201) 248-1388 Gina Noda / Executive Director of Business Development gnoda@sargarch.com • www.sargenti.com Architecture Firm

Security Resources

1155 Marlkress Road Cherry Hill, NJ 08003 (856) 796-9169 Kristine Vece / Senior Client Relations Manager kvece@securityresources.net • www.securityresources.net Security

Shaw PPC Design

44311 Grand River Ave. Novim MI 48375 (248) 348-7755 John Desmendt / National Sales jdesmedt@ppcretaildesign.com • www.shawppcdesign.com Fixtures

Skudo LLC

2330 Alberta Drive, Suite200 Dallas‎ TX‎ 75229 (770) 714-0607 Tim Mason / Vice President tom@skudousa.com • www.skudousa.com Flooring Protection

7208 South W.W. White Road San Antonio, TX 78222 (210) 757-9121 David Fields / Vice President Business Development david.fields@southwestsigns.com • www.southwestsigns.com Signage

Taylor Bros. Construction

4555 Middle Road Columbus, IN 47203 (812) 379-9547 Jeff Chandler / Vice President jchandler@tbcci.com • www.tbcci.com Millwork

The Blue Book

P.O. Box 500 Jefferson, NY 10535 (800) 431-2584 Kelly Carpentierei / Marketing Manager kcarpentieri@thebluebook.com • www.thebluebook.com Project Management

The McIntosh Group

1850 S. Boulder Ave Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 585-8555 Brad Gaskins / Principal bgaskins@themcintoshgroup.com • www.themcintoshgroup.com ADA/Architecture Firm

The Paint Folks

105 Main Street, 3rd Floor Hackensack, NJ 7601 (201) 968-5407 Brian Foster / National Vice President of Business Development bfoster@paintfolks.com • www.paintfolks.com Painting Contractor

Wolverine Building Group

4045 Barden Grand Rapids, MI 49572 (616) 949- 3360 Mike Houseman / President mhouseman@wolvgoup.com • www.wolvgroup.com General Contractor

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

65

INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS


INDUSTRY EVENTS

REGISTION LIST

3M Marketing Manager 3M Marketing Development Manager Advance Sign Group New Business Development Barnes & Noble Development Manager Biscuitville Dir of Construction Bridgestone/Firestone Development Manager Café Rio Development Manager Carney Contracting Business Growth Strategist Carney Contracting Business Development CBRE/Bank of America Project Manager CDO Group President CDO Group Business Development Ceso, Inc President Ceso, Inc PE Charter One Hotels Director of Renovations Chick-fil-A Snr Construction Manager Chick-fil-A Snr Director Restaurant Development Cicero’s Development Corp President Cicero’s Development Corp Business Development Coast 2 Coast Snr Business Development Associate Columbia Forest Products Specialty Products Manager Conn’s Inc Construction Manager Consultant(Prior Clarks NA) Construction Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurants Snr VP Development Core States Group Dir of Business Development Core States Group Business Development Cornell Storefront Systems Business Development Cornell Storefront Systems President Crestpoint Hotels VP Business Development Crossville Inc. Strategic Accounts Crossville Inc. Business Development Del Taco VP Design/Construction DKN Hotels Project Manager Dollar Financial Group Director of Construction DTZ Snr Vice President Dutch House Restaurants CEO Einstein Noah Restaurant Group Reg Facilities/Construction Manager Empire USA LLC Director of Design Exclusive Retail Interiors VP Business Development Exclusive Retail Interiors Sales Associate Federated Service Solutions Inc Business Development Manager Federated Service Solutions Inc President FH Specialty Contracting General Contracting Manager FH Specialty Contracting National Sales Manager Florida Panthers VP, Broadcasting + Panthers Alumni Fulcrum Construction Director of Marketing Fulcrum Construction President Fun Brands Snr Construction Manager Goodwin Commercial President GPD Group Director of Marketing GPD Group Business Development Grand Hinckley Casino VP of F & B Guess? VP Retail Development H&M Project Manager Heartland Restaurant Group Construction Mgr Hermitage Lighting Account Manager Hermitage Lighting Account Manager Hertz VP Facilities & Construction HFA President HFA Executive VP Hospitality Realty Services President Identicom Sign Solutions President InstaKey Security Systems Dir of Sales & Marketing Interplan LLC Business Development Interplan LLC Business Development Interserve Hospitality Services Vice President Operations It’s Sugar VP Store Development Jones Lang LaSalle Managing Director Lakeview Construction Marketing Manager Lakeview Construction President Level Office Director of Development LinGate Hospitality VP Administration Little Principal Marie Callender’s Snr Director of Ops & Admin Marriott/RLJ Lodging Project Manager MC Lighting Director of National Sales MC Lighting Director of Lighting Solutions MLE Inc CEO

66

MLE Inc Nasty Gal Nothing Bundt Cakes Orscheln Papa Gino’s Philadelphia Sign Pomeroy Lodging Porcelanosa USA PREIT Prime Retail Services Quality Project Management Quality Project Management RB Hotel Development RCA/Retail Construction RCA/Winkel Construction Rectenwald Brothers Construction Retail Maintenance Specialists Riley Hotel Group Riley Hotel Group Rockford Construction Rockford Construction Rogers Electric Rogers Electric Samsonite Sargenti Architects Sargenti Architects Security Resources Security Resources Shaw PPC Design Skudo USA Sleepy’s Southern Deli Holdings Southwest Signs Starboard Group Storefloors Swire Properties Target Target Target Taylor Bros. Construction Taylor Bros. Construction TD Bank TD Bank The Blue Book The Little Gym Inter. The McIntosh Group The McIntosh Group The Paint Folks The Pantry The Shopping Center Group The Shopping Center Group THG Properties TPG Hospitality Under Armour US Cellular US Cellular US Cellular Walgreens Wawa Inc Which Wich Which Wich Wolverine Building Group Wolverine Building Group Wyndham Hotels

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

Director of Business Development Director of Retail Development Dir of Development Store Development Manager Director of Construction Business Development Director of Construction Sales Director Snr Tenant Coordinator Consultant Business Development Manager Managing Member Program Manager President President President Director of Business Development President Project Manager Sales VP of Multi -Unit Housing National Sales Marketing Manager Construction Manager Exec Director of Business Development Business Development Snr Client Relations Manager Director of Sales National Sales Vice President Director of Facilities Mgmt/Purchasing Director of Construction VP Business Development Dir of Facilties & Construction National Sales Project Manager Operations Manager Sr Code Compliance Manager Snr Project Manager Vice President Business Development VP Facilities Manager NE VP Assett ReInvestment Marketing Manager Real Estate & Development Manager Principal Business Development National VP of Business Development Facilities Mgmt Snr Property Manager Director of Property Management CEO VP Construction Management Construction Manager Construction & Design Manager C&D Financial Analyst Construction & Design Manager Snr Director of Construction Construction Team Manager Snr Development & Project Manager Director of Construction President Project Manager VP Resort Renovations


MARK IT ON YOUR CALENDAR TO ATTEND THE

Marriott Riverwalk downtown San Antonio, TX January 20-22, 2016. www.ccr-summit.com

Knibbe Ranch

Riverwalk Tour

SPONSORED BY:

WANT TO ATTEND AS AN END-USER OR SPONSOR...

Contact David Corson 678.765.6550 or e-mail davidc@ccr-mag.com End-Users (retailers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc.) will receive complimentary hotel, airfare, transportation to and from airport, and food and activities, or contact David Corson for an affordable registration rate. CIRCLE NO. 24


Best of the best Ultra-posh, big-ticket resort’s buildings clad with limestone plaster By Ron Treister

T

o say The Albany, a luxury resort located on the island of New Providence in the Bahamas, is “high-end,” would be like saying

Albert Einstein was “a smart guy.” Simply stated, this world-class luxury community offers, without question, the best of the best for those of the most discriminating tastes and pleasures.

68

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

The mind-boggling shared vision of founders Joe Lewis, cited by Forbes as the 308th richest person in the world, the private investment organization Tavistock Group and golfing legends Tiger Woods and Ernie Els, The Albany features incomparable surroundings, world-class architecture, sporting amenities nonpareil and service programs so advanced they almost are unfathomable. Want a yardstick indicating just how upper-tier these residences are? The owners of The Albany’s new apartments and private villas, also part of the resort, can rent the individual dwellings via a specialized hotel system – prices per night range from $3,500 to $30,000.


TO CORE OR NOT TO CORE? By Mac Krauss, Substrate Sleuth #1

We all know that hardened concrete is very permeable and will absorb many liquids and other unwanted chemical contaminants such as oils, fuels, battery acids, and food processing fluids -- just to mention a few. But how do you tell, conclusively, if the substrate is “clean” enough for your coating or flooring system? If the concrete has never been covered or coated, then these types of contaminants may be very visible as staining or discolorations on the surface, especially after floor prep. If there has been a floor covering installed and then removed it may be hard if not impossible to tell if there are further contaminants lurking down in the concrete. Most epoxy, adhesive, and resilient flooring manufacturers have a requirement in their respective installation literature: “The concrete must be clean, absorptive and stain-free prior to installation ...”. The product warranty will also be linked to this requirement. The marina, which continually harbors the type of yachts one expects to see in a James Bond movie, offers unobstructed, breathtaking vistas of the exquisite Bahamian Atlantic. And interestingly, The Albany is named for Albany House, a celebrated pink mansion located on the 600-acre property. The mansion served as the home of arch-villain Alex Dimitrios in the James Bond flick “Casino Royale.” When it comes to projects of this magnitude, there are many choices relative to which building materials are to be specified. “The requirements for an exterior cladding of this high-end project were that it needed to be direct-applied to a concrete substrate, weatherproofing the building while withstanding the harsh elements on this Caribbean Island,” says David Lane Thomas, VP and project manager of Dallas-based HKS Inc. the international architecture firm. “Thermocromex was chosen for its lack of maintenance in never having to be re-colored for the life of the building, even in this salt air environment.” Thomas says the 20-year performance warranty, which includes keeping out the rain from the substrate, was important in making its decision, due to the humid climate zone and

To learn more and finish this article, visit us online at: www.actechperforms.com or

CIRCLE NO. 25

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

69


BEST OF THE BEST the problems with mold/mildew which are a non-issue with this product, due to its very high breathability. In addition, Thermocromex was chosen, because even though it offers all the remarkable properties Thomas referenced, it actually is priced very comparably to stucco and EIFS.

Deck the halls

More than 200,000 square feet of Thermocromex were directly applied to the exterior walls of three separate buildings using the unique Scoria pattern in custom colors. This process further enhanced the natural beauty of the resort’s stunning oceanfront marina. In layman’s terms, ultra high-performance Thermocromex consists of limestone plaster. By now, most people know that limestone has been the choice of cladding for signature building projects throughout history. It’s attractive; it lasts; and it performs. But perhaps the main reason is that lime itself provides so much for any construction undertaking. Douglas Johnston of Edinburgh, Scotland, a founding Trustee of The Scottish Lime Centre Trust, is founder/technical director of

You don’t want those otter devices.

Just like an otter’s coat, our outdoor AV devices and accessories keep the insides nice and dry. System Sensor SpectrAlert® Advance outdoor audible visible notification appliances provide all the time- and laborsaving benefits as the rest of the award-winning SpectrAlert Advance family. And with features designed specifically for outdoor environments, these devices Outdoor Outdoor deliver weatherproof performance. Wall Devices Ceiling Devices Watch the Outdoor AV video at:

go.systemsensor.com/ outdoorAV-CCR ©2015 System Sensor. All Rights Reserved.

Masons Mortar Ltd., a firm specializing in the manufacture, supply and distribution of materials for the repair and conservation of traditional and historic buildings. “Lime is vapor-permeable and therefore, it actually allows buildings to breathe,” Johnston says. This, of course, reduces the risk of there being any trapped moisture that may cause great damage to the structure. For example, lime plasters such as ThermocroInstallation mex can stabilize the internal humidity of a building by absorbing and releasing moisture. This reduces surface condensation that subsequently can promote the growth of highly detrimental mold and mildew. “This isn’t rocket science,” Johnston says. “Buildings around the world initially clad with basic lime materials have been around for hundreds of years with very little appearance change. And lime plaster finishes, which have been used seemingly forever in Europe, are extremely beautiful.” Unlike paint, which ultimately appears “flat” and must be re-applied in regular cycles, one correct application of lime plaster basically will last forever, as will its aesthetic properties. “The lime itself includes calcite crystals offering a double refraction of light that gives off a unique, glowing patina from the buildings’ exterior walls,” Johnston says. “You have to see this firsthand to best appreciate it.” Johnston says lime materials have been used to create hygienic surfaces of buildings for thousands of years as well. “For the most part, falling rain mixed with lime results in a natural cleaning and disinfecting process. Having lime in one form or the other on the exterior of a building makes a great deal of sense. It has throughout history and will continue moving on into the future.” General Contractor Woslee Construction contracted Nu-Tek Stucco Ltd. to “direct-apply” the Thermocromex material to The Albany’s building walls. “While this was a large and very prestigious project, we knew from the start it would be a very successful one,” says James Reed, national sales manager for Thermocromex. “We worked closely with the applicators of Nu-Tek Stucco, who were extremely professional in every phase of the project. Everyone was 100 percent briefed prior to the cladding being applied; every ‘team member’ knew what they had to do. The results speak for themselves.” “We know that HKS made the right choice regarding cladding the buildings’ exterior facades,” Reed says. “Not only will the surface be resistant to the intense tropical sunlight and salt air of the Bahamas, there will be no need for any re-application, no need for re-coloring for the life of the building. Thermocromex has naturally weatherproofed The Albany without the need for any moisture barriers. This saved the developers quite a bit of money, which I am sure they re-channeled into just another of the absolutely top-of-the-line components specified for this outstanding, world-class resort.” CCR Ron Treister is president of Communicators International, a Jensen Beach, Fla.-based marketing firm. He can be reached at rlt@communicatorsintl.com.

CIRCLE NO. 26

70

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Craig Weber, Business Strategist, Carney Contracting Services Inc.

The Carney Way Building relationships that last Relationships: Like fishing they need... • Time • Patience • Commitment Understanding our value, communicating that value to our clients, and then demonstrating how that value works as a partnership. That’s the Carney Contracting Services Inc. Way. We are a self-performing general contractor specializing in commercial remodeling, renovating and national rollout projects. Founded on Biblical principles, we provide tightly knit teams in the field and behind the scenes to effectively serve our partners’needs from start to finish. The Carney Way means going that extra mile to accomplish a task. Our creed is built on long-term relationships, multi-state traveling and self-performing, managing budgets, and impeccable communications skills. After discovering what it takes to provide you what you need, our customer-focused strategy enables us to accomplish goals while consistently exceeding expectations. With a commitment to transparency and unparalleled communication, our goal is to build our reputation one project at a time with patience and commitment.

Contracting Services Inc. has been one of our primary contractors “Carney for over two years. Their commitment to quality work, tight time lines and competitive pricing is an asset to our company. ” – Paul Lubking, facilities manager for Mariner Finance, on its partnership with Carney on Mariner’s $1.5-plus million dollar re-image campaign that includes 31 branch remodels and their 70,000-square-foot corporate headquarters CIRCLE NO. 27

1-866-628-9196 • info@carneycontracting.com

John 14:6 “I am the way, the truth, and the life.”


Walking the

talk

With the demand for collaborative methods should come the financial obligations to match the rhetoric By Oliver Snider

I

f you think of the design and construction process as a long crosscountry race over uneven terrain, the finish line is the completed building. In an actual cross-country race, crossing the finish line is an emphatic statement about success and, in a sense, that’s true of the building process, too. Most people are going to love their new building, no matter how exhausting or painful the journey.

Photos © Gregg Shupe 2014

72

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


CIRCLE NO. 28


WALK THE TALK But increasingly, success in design and construction is being gauged as much by the process as by the outcome. This is a trend being driven by building owners who are turning more to collaborative, streamlined processes such as design-build, which can shave months off a schedule and save countless dollars in building costs. Organizations such as the Design Build Institute of America have noted a gradual shift toward the design-build delivery method for almost two decades. Integrated project delivery, a new-sounding concept that promises the collaborative benefits of design-build, also is on the rise, as is building information modeling (BIM) software. And, it seems, design-bid-build architecture firms are beginning to take note. As traditional firms flock to meet this new market demand, the waters have begun to get muddied, with hybrid methods (such as “architect-led design-build”) threatening to complicate what actually is a very straightforward idea of single-source responsibility. It’s an evolution with which prospective building owners should become familiar, since the delivery method selected will impact project cost and timeline, rule out certain design and/or construction firms, and influence the eventual project scope and aesthetic.

project. Since all contractors are given the same detailed drawings on which to base their bid, the low bid typically wins. Certain advantages continue to accrue to the owner when hiring separate entities to handle design and construction. The primary benefit is that since both the architect and contractor are contracted to the owner, they both are presumed to have the owner’s best interests in mind. In addition, competition is introduced into the selection process of both the architect and the contractor, which theoretically can limit costs and promote efficiency. I say “theoretically”, because there would be no owner interest in collaborative techniques if D/B/B consistently limited costs and promoted efficiency, the hallmarks of all alternatives to D/B/B. However, D/B/B is built on some significant inefficiencies. Primarily, in a D/B/B project, the contractor has no input in the design process, meaning that no lower-cost or more efficient alternatives can be presented until the project is under way. The architect and contractor, both hired by the owner, each estimate the cost of the facility separately, and disagreements between the two often have no obvious solution. It is the absence of collabora-

Building blocks

tion on low-bid projects that can lead to cost overruns, costly change orders and litigation.

Architects and contractors were once a single entity, but a split began to take place as architects gradually were accepted as artists. The split seemingly became permanent in the mid-20th century, when the concept of liability led to specialization and accreditation of different building trades, from structural and civil engineers to heating and electrical engineers. The architect-as-artist is an idea that persists to this day. “Architecture,” as Chicago’s Center for the Study of Art and Architecture now describes it, “is considered a visual, art-like painting and sculpture. Architects design buildings using a creative process by which they manipulate art elements to create a unified and pleasing artistic statement. The difference between a painting and architecture is that a building has a function and must be designed with safety in mind.” Being’s the job’s designated visionary was extremely advantageous to architects. The architect now was, in the eyes of owners, separate from contractors both theoretically (the thinker versus the hammer) and from a contractual standpoint, legally. Design-bid-build (D/B/B), emerging 100 years ago, was in some ways the embodiment of the hardening attitudes of separateness. In D/B/B, a client hires an architect, who designs a building to fit the client’s budget and other specifications, and then asks contractors to bid on the

74

Collaboration & risk

The alternatives to D/B/B have different contractual arrangements and nuances, but they’re all characterized by their more-collaborative nature. In classic design-build, the owner contracts with one entity comprising the architect and contractor – a “single point of responsibility” contract, language that is vital to understanding the benefits and drawbacks of the method. With disputes between architect and contractor removed from the equation, owner risk is eliminated, change orders virtually are nonexistent, and costs and schedule are reduced. The two most-common criticisms of design-build also stem from its single point of responsibility – one, that the owner, lacking an advocate separate from the contractor (the architect), has less oversight into the process; and two, that the architect serves the interest of the contractor, meaning that aesthetics will take a back seat to pragmatism on the job site. With the industry’s shift toward collaborative delivery methods, you’ll find plenty of owners who will attest to their team’s responsiveness and no shortage of imaginatively designed, aesthetically pleasing design-build projects.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


IS NOW QUIETER NEW FEATURES: Lower decibel level with the new Customize the speed of air flow using the new speed controller. Remove bacteria and dust by using

The NEW XLERATOR eco: Consumes only hands in 15 seconds!

while drying

Learn How Our Restroom Experts Will Save You Money, Time and Energy XLERATOR® Hand Dryers Bathroom Stall Partitions

Plumbing Fixtures Fire Protection

NEWTON DISTRIBUTING COMPANY

Toilet Accessories Drinking Fountains

Call now CIRCLE NO. 29

Lockers & Benches And More...

877-837-7745

sales@newtondistributing.com www.newtondistributing.com


WALK THE TALK Design-build teams sometimes are led by architecture firms, a circumstance that has become common enough to have spawned a method that has gained its own acronym: Architect-led design-build (ALDB). In ALDB, the architect serves as the owner’s advocate and the project’s steward, with design and construction otherwise integrated. Exactly how this is achieved in practice within a design-build framework – serving as an advocate to the owner would suggest potentially opposing another key member of your team – is unclear. There’s a lot that’s unclear in most descriptions of integrated project delivery (IPD), another collaborative alternative to D/B/B that owners are increasingly investigating (and requesting). According to the American Institute

With the industry’s shift toward collaborative delivery methods, you’ll find plenty of owners who will attest to their team’s responsiveness and no shortage of imaginatively designed, aesthetically pleasing design-build projects.

In a D/B/B arrangement, a change order resulting from a mistake by either the architect or contractor can end up as a cost overrun – and, as the AIA California Council found in 2010 when compiling case studies of IPD, a “pure” IPD model has “no provision for change orders.” By contrast, a design-build firm like ours, comprising the architect and the contractor, agrees to design and construct a project for a guaranteed fixed price. If one of our subcontractors makes a mistake or overlooks a detail, the subcontractor pays. If we fail to put something on our drawings, and it must later be added, we pay. Ultimately, an IPD team will deliver on the economic and design benefits owners are seeking only if they collaborate well together – but, as with D/B/B, when something goes wrong, it’s the owner who pays for the change order.

Special delivery

Under current definitions, at least, delivery methods such as IPD and ALDB share an unfortunate trait of D/B/B, with the architect standing above and separate, in charge and yet largely shielded from risk. Both IPD and ALDB appear to offer the benefits of construction expertise at the table earlier in the design process, while ceding much of the responsibility for budgetary control. There is something almost oppositional in seeking to take control of what are supposed to be collaborative practices, whether IPD or the Photo courtesy of Stanmar, Inc. “architect-led” abstraction of design-build. We think of ourselves as a team that, together, designs of Architects (AIA), IPD “integrates people, systems, business structures a building, guarantees a price and completes construction at that price. and practices into a process that collaboratively harnesses the talents Forcing owners who seek out collaboration to draw a distinction and insights of all participants to reduce waste and optimize efficiency between the designer and the contractor from the outset suggests a method that, whatever its supporters choose to call it, merely pays lip through all phases of design, fabrication and construction.” service to the current collaborative ideal. Moving from this mission statement to particulars, IPD (says In construction, collaboration doesn’t mean conversations. When the AIA) is marked by “continuous involvement of owner and key deyou choose a project delivery method, you’re choosing a contractual signers and builders from early design through project completion,” arrangement, and knowing what happens when something goes wrong “joint project control by owner and key designers and builders,” and is crucial. “Who pays?” is exactly what people should be asking going “limited liability among owner and key designers and builders.” into their jobs – and even among owners seeking collaborative methTo be sure, collaboration, waste reduction and efficiency are ods, too few do. But the rise of collaborative delivery methods means all worthy goals – and many owners can attest to real, attainable that owners, and architects, are getting the message. results. But when something goes wrong, who pays? IPD’s advocates Bringing a project in on time and on budget are as worthy as say that a contract including all parties means that risk is spread other goals for buildings, but only by understanding the very real difamong all parties, but this ignores a reality that should seem obvious ferences between collaborative methods can owners get the benefits – in the world of design and construction, “risk” and “responsibility” of collaboration in reality, and not just in theory. CCR can be defined as “paying for.” Oliver Snider is director of business development for Stanmar Inc., a Wayland, Mass.-based design-build firm specializing in multipurpose athletic facilities. You can reach him at osnider@stanmar-inc.com.

76

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


SPRING 2015

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Robert McNeill Facilities Director, Starboard Management Group

Operation Image

Activation Wendy’s remodeling program helping to refresh brand Also Inside: A special supplement to:

Using visual exposure to expand your clientele Photography by BM Photographers


Operation Image

Activation Wendy’s remodeling program helping to refresh brand

D

ave Thomas loved the restaurant business. That love helped the founder of Wendy’s to not only be a part of the game, but to be an innovator as well. For starters, when other quick-service restaurants were using frozen beef and mass-producing food, Thomas developed an innovative method to prepare fresh, made-to-order hamburgers. Wendy’s became known for square ground beef hamburgers that hang over the bun, made with the customer’s choice of toppings.

78

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

By Michael J. Pallerino


MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

79


OPERATION ACTIVATION

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Thomas opened the first Wendy’s restaurant in Columbus, Ohio, in 1969. In 1970, he opened the second Wendy’s in Columbus, which featured the modern day Pick-Up Window. The concept included a separate grill, a unique feature in the quick-service restaurant industry. Innovation still is a part of the Wendy’s brand. Take its “Image Activation Program,” which pertains to the modernization of its restaurants. Today, the brand is remodeling its company-owned stores, with the majority of its franchised locations to follow, says Robert McNeill, facilities director of Starboard Management Group, which currently operates Wendy’s quick service restaurants in Philadelphia, Richmond, Va., southern New Jersey, Alabama, Tampa and South Florida markets.

Describe a typical day.

Well, that’s what I love about my job. There is no such thing as a typical day. Some days can be going along pretty uneventful, and then my phone rings with a district manager telling me that a car just drove through the dining room.

Define some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

I’d have to say reducing the construction project time line and costs – not just actual construction, but architectural and engineering services, permitting and procurement.

Are you optimistic about what you see out there?

I am. We have some great relationships with contractors and architects, and I’m looking forward to building new ones as well. As a whole, the economy and the construction industry seems to be doing well and are the way to reaching pre-financial collapse levels. I am also encouraged by our current remodel efforts, in terms of performance. We expect that our Image Activation will improve our sales outlook.

What is your growth plan?

In July 2012, we developed a three-year plan for growth called, “The Painted Picture.” We envisioned what the Starboard Group would look like as a company in July 2015. Part of that is to have 175 restaurants in our portfolio. Over the past two years, we’ve put systems in place such as payroll automation, workforce management software and a cloud-based facilities management system that can successfully and seamlessly handle that amount of growth. Today, we have the bench strength on our operations staff, and we are well on our way to reaching those goals by July 2015. Today, the company is enjoying relatively high average unit volumes, with sales of more than $120 million and average Wendy’s unit volumes of approximately $1.50 million. Wendy’s is the third largest quick-service restaurant company in the country, with more than 6,500 restaurants that post approximately $12 billion in system-wide sales. Commercial Kitchen connected with McNeill to get a feel for what the brand has in store for 2015.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list for 2015?

We are implementing a five-year plan for remodels and refreshes with Wendy’s “Image Activation” platform. The platform incorporates a bold new modern design with features that include digital menu boards, a Wi-Fi bar and intimate seating areas that include a fireplace.

80

What markets are you targeting?

We will pursue the right opportunity from the East Coast and as far as Utah.

What’s driving the growth?

It is being driven by a combination of factors, such as franchisor requirements, capital availability and existing franchisees exiting the system. Wendy’s announced in February that they’ll be selling about 500 of their corporate locations, so there’s that opportunity, as well as other franchisees that have decided to exit the system.

How many restaurants do you plan on adding? Approximately 100

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


LED LIGHTS - THE BRILLIANT CHOICE FOR FOODSERVICE LED lights are the energy-efficient, money-saving choice to replace incandescent and fluorescent lights. Component Hardware offers a wide variety of LEDs – all UL and NSF listed, with low wattage, high lumen output and 50,000 hour life.

• 7W Edison-base LED bulb for reach-in refrigerators • 20W Edison-base LED bulb for canopy hoods • 24” and 48” surface mount LED fixtures for walk-in coolers and freezers • 24” and 48” recess mount LED fixtures for canopy hoods • T4 linkable light bars for display applications

It’s here! 20W Edison-base Passive Infrared MOTION SENSOR bulb for walk-in coolers and freezers. Call or email us for a complete LED Lighting catalog and price list. 800-526-3694 • 732-363-4700 • sales@componenthardware.com.

© Copyright 2015, Component Hardware Group, Inc. 04/2015 CIRCLE NO. 30


OPERATION ACTIVATION

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Tell us about your refresh strategy.

Over the past few months, we performed an extensive market survey for all of our current locations. We visited every site, analyzed our competition, sales demographics, franchise expiration dates, lease expiration dates, etc., and created a detailed five-year plan. That plan indicates what will happen at each site, whether it’s a full remodel, a more economical refresh, or a scrape and rebuild.

How many refreshes are you targeting?

Right now, we are planning on performing eight projects a year for the next five years. That number will likely increase, however, due to the potential acquisitions.

What are some of the adjustments you’re making?

Right now, we’re working on standardizing our interior lighting. It’s kind of a pet peeve of mine to walk into a kitchen and see mismatched bulbs in the fixtures.

What is today’s customer looking for?

I think today’s customer is looking for a complete package, which includes great quality food and atmosphere at a great price.

Give us a rundown of your kitchen operation. How is it organized?

Each site has a P.U.W. (Pick Up Window) line and a front line. The P.U.W. line is utilized throughout the day and the front line is utilized during busier day-parts. We are in the quick-service restaurant business, but Wendy’s service is “A Cut Above,” and the food forward kitchen design allows us to use fresh ingredients and provide average services times around one and half minutes on the drive through.

How do you select the equipment you use?

We typically utilize Wendy’s Q.S.C.C. (Quality Supply Chain Co-Op) for purchasing equipment, which selects pre-approved manufacturers and suppliers.

Right now, we are planning on performing eight projects a year for the next five years. That number will likely increase, however, due to the potential acquisitions.

82

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


NRA

BOOTH 4241

Hold the Cold with Master-Bilt

Walk-In Doors

Sagging walk-in doors allow cold air to escape resulting in higher energy bills and potential food spoilage. Over time and with frequent usage, any door can get out of square but Master-Bilt doors are designed to be easily realigned. Every Master-Bilt walk-in door is equipped with the unique, Fully-Adjustable Hinge Backing

Plate allowing you to square your door without removal of the door or frame. Doors can also be adjusted in any direction, not just horizontally. For more information on the Fully-Adjustable Hinge Backing Plate or our complete line of walk-in coolers and freezers, contact us today.

» FULLY-ADJUSTABLE HINGE BACKING PLATE FOAMED-IN-PLACE INSIDE DOOR » LOOSENING HINGE BOLTS ALLOWS ADJUSTMENT OF PLATE 3/8” IN ANY DIRECTION

master-bilt.com | 800.647.1284 | CIRCLE NO.31


OPERATION ACTIVATION

I think today’s customer is looking for a complete package, which includes great quality food and atmosphere at a great price.

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

and energy efficient equipment. We want to keep the customers we have, and we feel these initiatives are important to our customers – bringing back some old ones and getting a lot of new ones as well.

What trends are you seeing?

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

I would have to say the supply chain. In our system, there only a few authorized suppliers of materials and equipment specific to a Wendy’s. With the high volume of remodels being performed, it may make project scheduling difficult.

Talk about sustainability.

Remodels include environmental initiatives such as LED lighting, renewable materials

I think there’s an increasing demand for bold and spicy flavors, as well as items that support snacking during non-peak day parts.

Tell us what makes Wendy’s so unique?

Well, of the “Big Three” hamburger QSRs, Wendy’s is the only one to use fresh beef, never frozen.

What should customers expect to see from the brand in 2015? I think you’ll continue to see some exciting limited time offerings like the most recent “Bacon and Blue on Brioche.” CCR

Get to know ... » Robert McNeill Facilities Director, Starboard Management Group What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

The people and the relationships I have with them. Whether it’s the people in our home office, my techs in the field, crew members, vendors or other facilities and development professionals, I’m truly fortunate to work in such a great industry.

Lead by example, integrity and have an open mind.

What is the true key to success for any manager? Effective communication with your people.

What was the best advice you ever received?

What’s your favorite vacation spot and why?

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you?

What book are you reading now?

K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid).

When I had my own commercial contracting business a client’s project manager handed me a zero item punch list. That was pretty awesome.

84

What are the three strongest traits any leader should have?

Anywhere with a beach and my family. “John Adams” by David McCullough.

How do you like to spend your down time?

Working on projects with my sons. Lately, we’ve been doing some projects using recycled pallet lumber.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


UN-RUST-ABLE! • Won’t rust, corrode or fade • Dishwasher safe • Never needs painting • Indistinguishable from metal when installed

Metal diffusers rust. Stratus never will. ™

It’s a fact: In high-humidity environments, metal air diffusers will begin to rust. And have to be repainted. And repainted. Rugged Stratus diffusers are made from an engineered polymer, so they’re impervious to humidity and moisture and will never need painting. Highly resistant to smoke, heat and impacts, Stratus diffusers clean up fast and stay looking good for a very, very long time.

See the difference yourself — with a free Stratus polymer diffuser.

To get your free sample, call (800) 772-0355 or visit AmericanLouver.com/sample. CIRCLE NO. 32


The art of transparency

Using Visual Exposure to Expand Your Clientele By Joshua Zinder

86

R

estaurant industry growth has accelerated slightly over the last couple of years, in spite of some dire predictions made back in 2010 and 2011. But increased growth does not automatically translate into increased sales. Certain pre-recession business models create obstacles – literally – for attracting new clients.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


You don’t have to replace the entire door frame anymore Commercial Door Solutions Commercial doors made of aluminum or steel are integral to the security of your business, as well as the appearance you present to the public. Over time, commercial doors can fall prey to corrosion, rust, or impact damage, losing structural integrity. At Door Innovation, we saw that replacing a damaged commercial door was often an excessive expense, and developed products to repair commercial doors at a fraction of the cost of purchasing replacements. Door Innovation's products, the Jamb Anchor and the Jamb Patch, are the cost effective solution to corroded, rusted, and damaged door frames.

Jamb Patch

The Jamb Patch is used to repair steel door frames that have rusted or corroded leaving raw edged openings that allow for rodent infestation, energy loss, contaminant ingression, and even personal injury from the sharp edges. With the Jamb Patch kit, the customer can self-repair the steel frame system, saving money while extending the useful life of the door system.

View our video on how the Jamb Patch is installed: www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tayZ7bMCys

To contact us for more information, please visit our website:

www.doorinnovation.com CIRCLE NO. 33


THE ART OF TRANSPARENCY

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

The additional benefits of incorporating transparency should not be glossed over. Even if a venue is unlikely to benefit from exposure, transparency still may be an overall plus.

Consider high-end full-service dining. For a long time, the design approach for such venues embraced an assumption that high price point diners preferred privacy. Typical designs placed at least one layer of opacity – walls, foyers, even stairs or elevators – between the dining room and the surrounding public space. Obscuring dining areas from view of the public have been thought to add to the appearance of exclusivity in addition to removing noise and distraction from the dining experience. Soon, restaurants with lower price points were following suit, in an attempt to capitalize on the appeal of exclusivity. The economic downturn impacted this approach negatively, except for those venues that actually boast an exclusive and devoted clientele. As patrons have become more circumspect, their willingness to spend top-dollar dining in a place they have not yet even glimpsed has naturally waned. Without a deep reservoir of regular, repeat patronage, restaurants need to offer a peek at what’s on offer, and that means the dining experience as well as the menu.

88

The ROI of transparency

For venues looking to turn passers-by into new patrons, there is a lot of good news. Adapting a space to increase exposure is not only a relatively easy fix, but it has added benefits as well. But to capitalize on the increased exposure in terms of new patronage, the venue must be adjacent to a corridor or artery with significant foot traffic. One excellent example of this strategy is the Moonlight Noodle House, a moderately priced full-service casual located adjacent to the casino floor at the Sands Macau resort in China. Our firm, JZA+D, spearheaded the renovation project geared toward increasing walk-ins and creating a memorable dining experience. To complement the traditional Cantonese fare, we borrowed from the Chinese tradition of “moon gates” – large circular portals that mark thresholds between gardens and homes in both rural and urban settings throughout the country. JZA+D created a moon gate-inspired entrance for the restaurant, and similarly inspired visual penetrations around the venue perimeter.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


CIRCLE NO. 34


THE ART OF TRANSPARENCY

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Within the ceiling height circular gates we installed rectilinear woodwork lattices that create separation while providing a view to the inside for resort guests and gamblers as they pass. With the chic, richly appointed dining room visible, the updated Moonlight enjoys robust sales enhanced by higher walk-in volume and increased repeat business and word-of-mouth, making the return on investment a quick one. The firm employed a similar strategy for a privately owned and operated Italian restaurant much closer to home – in fact, right in downtown Princeton, within walking distance of JZA+D’s offices. The venue, La Mezzaluna, had been serving locals for some time from its storefront location in the quaint-but-upscale Nassau Street shopping district, but the ownership wanted to increase volume. This meant a refresh of the dining room with an eye toward expanding the clientele. The strategy for accomplishing these twin goals focused on creating a visual connection between the dining room and the street.

Multiple benefits

Part of the problem with the original planning for this small venue was the front dining room. Separated from the main dining room by a wall, this small dining area near the entrance was all that pedestrians could see from the street. The renovation included removing the wall and installing a 26foot photorealistic mural of a flower in close-up to create a focal point, which established a visual connection from the sidewalk outside to the

90

main dining room. As an added benefit, the windows now flood the dining area with light during the day, creating an energetic atmosphere that has expanded the lunch crowd as well. The complete renovation plan included new chairs and light-colored finishes that brighten the room and make it feel larger, as well as reupholstering of the banquettes and booths. Not only has the renovation helped boost sales and establish La Mezzaluna as a popular lunch spot (in addition to its long-standing success as a dinner destination for locals), but it also was accomplished on an accelerated construction timeline that closed the restaurant’s doors for less than two weeks. The venue was able to quickly re-establish itself with regulars and begin attracting new patronage, without loss of revenue. The additional benefits of incorporating transparency should not be glossed over. Even if a venue is unlikely to benefit from exposure, transparency still may be an overall plus. At another Princeton eatery, Despaña, transparency creates a unique and vibrant atmosphere. The Spanish eatery operates a retail deli counter in its entrance space – selling imported cheeses, olives, hams, and more – while seating up to 140 for lunch and dinner with tapas-based menus. JZA+D’s design capitalizes on the large windows on the venue’s frontage, filling the vaulted lobby and deli counter space from floor to ceiling with natural daylight. This is not only optimal atmosphere for the retail portion of the venue, but also saves on operating costs associated with lighting. Despaña’s dining area is only separated from the retail counter by height. The second-floor seating overlooks the lobby and entrance

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


– creating a marketplace feel in keeping with the import-heavy eatery’s European roots. While the location does not see as much foot traffic as La Mezzaluna, the transparency strategies represent an important part of the venue’s new appeal. Our experience in hospitality has revealed just how often opportunities like this are missed. Too often, the focus of ownership on creating a particular kind of experience needlessly sacrifices the potential exposure to foot traffic. At the famed Venetian Resort in Las Vegas, we were asked to create a rock-androll dive bar with an ’80s “hair metal” theme, as a tie-in to the jukebox musical “Rock of Ages.” While this request would suggest an enclosed nightclub space, we were able to evoke the same atmosphere while keeping the venue open and visible to the baroque-style casino floor. A spirited atmosphere, neon-like lighting, custom furnishings, leather and steel accents, and multiple flat-screens screening ’80s music videos deliver the flavor, while eye-level openings draw attention to the space.

It also should be noted that high-end venues boasting exclusive, behind-closed-doors experiences also can boost sales volume with transparency. The celebrity-chef driven Waku Ghin, which JZA+D designed for renowned chef Tetsuya Wakuda at the Marina Bay Sands resort and casino in Singapore, offers glimpses of the experience within by making the entrance lounge visible and accessible. Patrons can take a peek through the glass, and enjoy just a hint of the grand experience beyond. CCR Joshua Zinder, AIA, founded Princeton, N.J.-based JZA+D in 2006 to pursue contemporary, sustainably responsible design. Today, Zinder runs the firm with his partner and director of interior design, Marlyn Zucosky. AIA’s New Jersey chapter recently honored the growing firm with the “2014 Architectural Firm of the Year” service award for delivering multidisciplinary services for buildings, interiors and product designs. For more information, visit www.joshuazinder.com.

Marlboro, New Jersey

Howell Commons – Howell, NJ

Linden Shopping Center

1701 W. Edgar Road, Linden, New Jersey Demising of existing 120,000sf Kmart into a multi-tenant space UNDER CONSTRUCTION • ShopRite, Staten Island, NY

uality of Our Work Remains ed and Our Clients’ Satisfaction e Measure of our Success.

BEFORE

Contactus@gerardcnd.com CIRCLE NO. 35

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

91


Advertorial

For both new constructoin and renovations AC•Tech offers innovative toolbox for self-performing contractors

W

e provide state-of-the-art, Performance Coatings for concrete slabs ... and via our “Substrate Sleuths” provide up-to-date technical support ensuring problematic substrates are handled right … the first time. For Renovation, Repurposing, and Building Expansion projects, AC•Tech offers 2

Our products & services include: AC•Tech 2170™ FC. Fast cure time and odor-free/zero VOC emissions permit super-fast turnaround in areas remaining open to customers, employees, students and patients. Makes overnight work and weekend projects feasible without totally interrupting operations! AC•Tech Oil Buster System™ provides advanced technology to renovators when the concrete slab has been contaminated during previous use. No jackhammers are required. Oil, grease, sugar and other organic/chemical compounds are often discovered soaked into the concrete slab once old flooring is removed. Oil Buster both cleans and seals the slab so these contaminants do not become bond breakers for the new flooring system. Substrate Sleuths™ advise Renovation Contractors how best to keep on budget and schedule by avoiding the costly delays and budget overruns that problem concrete slabs create. Our Sleuths provide field experience from their previous careers as top flooring applicators, construction]contractors and technical directors. Tethered to their electronic devices to provide assistance whenever required, you can always reach them from the office, from the road or from the jobsite via Skype, email, text or phone. (For more, see page 69 of this issue).

performance coating systems and 1 substrate technical service for Retrofits, Occupied Building Remodels, Tenant Build-Outs, Ground-up Renovations and Facility Upgrades/Expansions. Every day there is an increased demand for AC•Tech products as retail brands expand their national footprints… as existing structures are repurposed to be condominiums, mixed-use developments, and boutique hotels… and, as healthcare networks update with demanded physical improvements, overall upgrades and expand into satellite care facilities.

92

AC•Tech’s Go-Early Technology™ keeps fast-track projects on schedule… and, on budget by combining concrete curing, slab protection and vapor reduction in a one coat system applied 24-72 hours after initial concrete set. It was awarded the “MOST INNOVATIVE PRODUCT” Experts Choice Award at this year’s World of Concrete Expo! For more information: www.actechperforms.com

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Self-Perform? Add AC•Tech Innovation to your toolbox.

When performance counts!

Start early. Finish early. Open early. Bank it early.

Prepare contaminated concrete slabs for new flooring.

Eliminate the #1 cause of flooring failures on concrete.

Get Truths from the Sleuths. To anyone. Any time. Free. (SEE PAGE 69 OF THIS CC&R ISSUE!)

www.actechperforms.com | team@actechperforms.com | 1-800-607-5523 AC•Tech Go-Early Technology™ 2015 Experts Choice Award for Most Innovative Products, World of Concrete CIRCLE NO. 36


That

‘wow’ factor

Exterior cladding gives university center stunning look and feel

W

inventory and color limitations. Fortunately, UW discovered a manufacith an eye on the future, University of Wyoming (UW) set out tured building stone that mimics natural sandstone in appearance and to build an extraordinary welcome center, which embodied, performance. Since 2003, the manufacturer of that product, Arriscraft, has in every detail, the UW brand. As the first point of contact, planners supplied a custom color blend as the signature sandstone for UW buildings. envisioned a “wow” factor that would awe everyone – from visitors, Stone supplier, BrickStone Inc., and project leader Chet Lockard of students, families, supporters and the community alike. Completed in Project Guide Services collaborated with UW to find not only a sandstone late 2014, the Marian H. Rochelle Gateway Center certainly delivers a match, but also a palette that was a perfect representation of the UW brand. stunning and consistent experience, from the fundamental architectural “Arriscraft was able to dial in the color we needed,” Lockard says. “We wantelements to the finest details woven throughout. ed to create more excitement for the Gateway Center and they have a great The state-of-the art Gateway Center successfully fuses the univerrange of standard colors, which also saved money on the project.” sity’s time-honored brand qualities, with a leading-edge technological Careful to continue a very similar masonry pattern as existing infrastructure. Designed by Pappas & Pappas Architects and DLR Group, buildings, Toby Marlatt, VP of marketing and communications at UW, the center combines the traditional with the contemporary and provides a helped create a 4-inch module pattern using Renaissance Masonry spectacularly visual venue, which incorporates welcome areas, offices, ballUnits in Garnet, Suede and Café colors in a rooms, conference rooms, exhibits, and more. rocked finish. The warm tan, red and brown The building’s exterior needed to provide tones combine to both brand the building the impact UW envisioned – the “wow” factor. and deliver the strong statement that the As the front door of the university, two vital reuniversity was after. quirements challenged the center’s designers: The Renaissance stone was continincorporating the historical sandstone as the ued throughout the interior of the Gateway primary building element and utilizing the UW Center to maintain the rustic feel and provide brand colors in a visual and lasting way. the fundamental color palette for the interior From 1886 through to the early 1970s, the design. In the interior atrium, ARRIS.stack university utilized the same sandstone quarried thin stone covers the stunning three-story locally near Laramie, which became a signature fireplace – a highly durable and impactful look. When the quarry closed, a new natural – Chet Lockard, Project Guide Services choice for this key visual feature. CCR stone supply was difficult to source, given

“We wanted to create more excitement for the Gateway Center and they have a great range of standard colors, which also saved money on the project.”

94

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


CIRCLE NO. 52


It’s the networking that matters

Become part of a program that helps forge strong relationships with high-level decision makers

CIRCLE NO. 37

AUGUST 6-9, 2015 • DENVER, CO

OCTOBER 1-4, 2015 • HOUSTON, TX

Your sponsorship affords you the opportunity to:

• Build personal and professional relationships with key decision makers from some of the industry’ most high profile companies. • Gain insights into key issues and trends that will influence your business in the years ahead. • Put yourself in a category-exclusive, one-on-one experience that’s without equal in our industry.

Be an attendee or sponsor, please contact David Corson at 678.765.6550 or via e-mail at davidc@ccr-mag.com.


SPRING 2015

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

SUPPLEMENT

Going of allstate the art Pumps bring university dorms in New Hampshire into next decade ALSO:

Understanding government contractor EPAct designer tax benefits

A special supplement to:


Mike Hanson, distributed product sales at Emerson Swan, and Adam St. Germain, discusses pump setup with AE Mechanical’s Dan Daley, lead technician.

98

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Pumps bring university dorms in New Hampshire into next decade

Going all By John Dan Vastyan

state of the art S

outhern New Hampshire University (SNHU) in Manchester isn’t a huge school by most standards. But, with a 300-acre wooded campus, more than 100 undergraduate degree programs and state-of-the-art facilities, the school offers as much as many of the larger schools, and more than some. And as for quality of life: They’ve cornered the market.

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

99


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • GOING ALL STATE OF THE ART

The school’s 2006 dormitories were retrofitted with new pumps for more efficient operation.

Complaints of over- or under-heated rooms now are a thing of the past, and zone valve maintenance has decreased dramatically.

Dan Daley, lead technician at AE Mechanical, in the building’s mechanical room.

100

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

Between 2000 and 2010, the United States saw full-time college enrollment rise by 45 percent. SNHU wasn’t an exception. The school added two new dorms in 2006 to accommodate the influx of new knowledge seekers. Each three-story building comfortably houses 130 students. While the school built newer dorms in 2013, the 2006 buildings have been a favorite for years among students and maintenance personnel alike. But there was one item university managers wanted to improve. At the time of construction, the technology allowing commercial hydronic circulators to accurately respond to system changes didn’t exist as it does today. So, eight years later, it was time for a change. Comfort, system longevity and most importantly, operating expenses can be dramatically improved with a simple change in the boiler room.

Quick upgrade

Two, 725 MBH Smith cast iron boilers connected to commercial fin-tube baseboard in dorm rooms, heats each of the 37,000-square-foot dorm buildings and hydronic coils inside air handlers for common areas. Reverse-return piping was used with 2-inch supply lines. Originally, a redundant pair of fixed-speed, in-line pumps was used to distribute heating fluid. Regardless of the call for heat – or lack of it – the “duty” pump ran continuously while the building was in heating mode. “In 2011, we added an energy management system with outdoor reset, so that the pumps would shut off at 65-degree F outdoor ambient, even if the building was in heating mode,” says Adam St. Germain, supervisor of the school’s plumbing and heating department. “This at least kept the pumps from running if nobody actually shut the heating system down.” “It also meant the boilers could go into standby mode, as opposed to heating water circulated through the main,” he says. “There’s less heat loss along the mains when the water isn’t moving.” The change was a step in the right direction. The pumps still ran one speed, whether one zone or all 35 were calling. It was most wasteful of energy when the building was at part-load, such as


under tough conditions.

“Duro-Last,” and the “World’s Best Roof,” are registered marks owned by Duro-Last, Inc. DuPont™ and Elvaloy® are a trademark and registered trademark of the DuPont Company. EV - Under Tough Conditions_SUS_11.3.14_v1

CIRCLE NO. 38


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • GOING ALL STATE OF THE ART

Mike Hanson, distributed product sales at Emerson Swan, retrieves runtime data from one of the circulators.

during the shoulder seasons when the sun’s energy on one side was sufficient to passively heat exposed areas, eliminating the call for heat. Early in 2013, SNHU managers began their search for ways to further improve hydronic efficiency for the 2006 dorms. Armand Turcotte of The Granite Group Wholesalers knew of SNHU’s desire to improve system energy efficiency and suggested that St. Germain take a look at the self-sensing Taco Viridian circulator.

Stepping up their game

After learning about the ECM-driven Viridian line, St. Germain examined the mechanical systems on campus with special attention to system pumps. He was eager to learn if the two dorm buildings finally could have a responsive and more efficient pumping

102

“We expected the pumps to be more complicated and harder to install,” St. Germain says. “But that wasn’t the case.” – Adam St. Germain, Supervisor, Southern New Hampshire University’s Plumbing & Heating Department

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

system without the need for major renovations or addition of pressure sensors. St. Germain enlisted the help of Turcotte and Mike Hanson, distributed product sales, New Hampshire territory, for rep firm Emerson Swan, to review the original engineering diagrams. After comparing numbers with specifications of the new line of pumps, he decided to replace the four existing pumps with Viridian VR20s. The web-enabled Viridian line includes four different models, for pipe sizes from oneand-a-half to 3 inches. The VR20 provides up to 240 GPM with a peak head pressure of 46 feet. While an ECM motor inherently means less energy expended to circulate system fluid, the real advantage to using the Viridians is the pump’s ability to automatically sense and respond to load and pressure changes in the main loop.


Changestore-June 7x10

6/9/05

8:48 AM

Page 1

Your good name. Your reputation. Your redeeming qualities. How will they all look from the road?

At Southwest Signs, the answer is clear. For more than 60 years, we have created and maintained local and national signage programs for some of the most recognized brand names in the country. Headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, we offer state-of-the-art production capabilities and are able to provide cost-effective signage programs that give the most to your corporate identity. Our staff of account managers, designers, and engineers has more than 200 years of combined industry experience and can assist you in every step of the process, from initial consultation to final installation. The secret to our success is no secret. Since 1945, we’ve known the importance of service and customer satisfaction. And our experience and conversion success can give your signage clear visibility, both locally and nationwide.

Experience. Knowledge. Service. Services and Capabilities Conceptual Design • Custom Projects • Professional Project Management Structural Engineering • Nationwide Manufacturing • Nationwide Distribution Nationwide Installation and Maintenance

The clear choice for your commercial signage.

210-648-3221 www.southwestsigns.com 7208 South W. W. White Road, San Antonio, Texas 78222

CIRCLE NO. 39


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • GOING ALL STATE OF THE ART

“Think of controlling the speed of your car with the gas pedal versus using the brake pedal – that is the main difference between a constant speed pump compared to the Viridian.” – Steve Thompson, VP, Residential Product Management, Taco Inc.

The lack of existing pressure sensors throughout the building, or a control system to relay the message, made selecting the self-sensing, or sensor-less Viridian technology, an easy choice, modulating flow rates to precisely accommodate the variation in demand when a zone valve opens or closes. This self-sensing capability lends itself to retrofit applications where running control wires and installing pressure sensors would be invasive and cost prohibitive. It also means that controllability is increased because the pressure at the zone valves is consistent. Complaints of over or under heated rooms now are a thing of the past, and zone valve maintenance has decreased dramatically. “Think of controlling the speed of your car with the gas pedal versus using the brake pedal – that is the main difference

Mike Hanson, distributed product sales at Emerson Swan, and Adam St. Germain, supervisor of the Southern New Hampshire University’s plumbing and heating department, set up the redundant Viridian pumps.

104

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015

between a constant speed pump compared to the Viridian,” says Steve Thompson, VP of residential product management at Taco Inc.

No passing zone

“It was a relatively simple swap-out,” St. Germain says. “It took our staff – with the help of AE Mechanical Inc. – two days to replace all four circulators. It would’ve gone faster if we wouldn’t have added check valves as well.” Because the original, single-speed pumps were entirely manual in their operation, each one was isolated with a pair of ball valves. When maintenance crews wanted to switch the pumps from duty to standby mode, they would physically walk to the mechanical rooms, kill power to both pumps, and change the position of the ball valves before restoring power.


OPEN

CIRCLE NO. 40

DESIGN SPACE MINDS


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • GOING ALL STATE OF THE ART

Because the Viridians can switch from “duty” to “standby” either automatically or by remote web-monitoring, the school’s plumbing and heating staff needed a better way to restrict flow through the standby pump. Without the check valves, water would have simply rushed around the header, instead of moving out into the building. Although it wasn’t their initial function, the ball valves remain in place for service isolation. “We expected the pumps to be more complicated and harder to install,” St. Germain says. “But that wasn’t the case. It was exciting to see the project come together and for the dorms to now have a much-needed solution. Comfort levels are higher and energy use is lower. Our mechanical

staff won’t waste any more time walking downstairs to start, stop and switch pump operation.” During the winter, Hanson visited the site to collect operation data from the four pumps. He found that, based on motor efficiencies and hours of operation, the Viridian pumps had cut the power consumption by more than half. In many cases, Viridian circulators can be adjusted to optimally meet system demand, resulting in an additional 30 percent reduction in electric use. More importantly, and harder to quantify, student comfort, savings through increased heating efficiency, and reduced wear and tear on the pumps themselves all adds up to a smart move for SNHU, financially and environmentally. CCR

The dormitory’s mechanical room features redundant Taco Viridian pumps.

106

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Little is dedicated to delivering stellar service, innovative design solutions and high quality documents to enhance client performance.

all enGineerinG disciPlines Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Fire Protection, Structural and Civil

results beyond architecture Architecture, Interior Architecture Sustainable Design, Planning & Land Development, Brand Communication & Design, CAFM & Occupancy Strategies, Digital Media Communications

JeFF roMan National Director of Engineering Jeff.Roman@littleonline.com

CIRCLE NO. 41


Understanding government contractor EPAct designer tax benefits By Charles Goulding, Jennifer Pariante & Jacob Goldman

O

EPAct Tax Deductions ne of the most intriguing aspects of the Section 179D Pursuant to Energy Policy Act (EPAct) Section Energy Policy Act (EPAct) tax benefit provisions has 179D, building owners or tenants making qualifying energy-reducing investments can been the provision enabling members of the governobtain immediate tax deductions of up to ment building design community to achieve a tax incentive for $1.80 per square foot. building project doesn’t qualify energy efficient design. Heretofore, excluding R & D tax credits and for theIf the maximum $1.80 per square foot immediate tax deduction, there are tax previous foreign sales corporation export tax incentives for export deductions of up to $0.60 per square foot services, it has been rare to find Internal Revenue code tax incen- for each of the three major building subsystems: lighting, HVAC (heating, ventilating, tives that reward professional creativity.

The government building designer incentives has become critically important to many design firms – big and small – in an atmosphere where new commercial construction has come to a standstill and the government sector remains one of the few segments where new construction continues.

108

and air conditioning), and the building envelope. The building envelope is every item on the building’s exterior perimeter that touches the outside world including roof, walls, insulation, doors, windows and foundation. On Dec. 19, 2014, President Obama signed the bill extending the EPAct 179D Tax Credit for the 2014 tax year.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


What is a Government Building? A government building is defined as any: • Building owned and operated by a government authority or agency thereof, or. • Building leased by a government authority or agency thereof. • Eligible government owners include federal, state and local government organizations.

Typical federal buildings would include General Services Administration (GSA) offices, U.S military-owned buildings, Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, federal courthouses and virtually all departments of the federal government. Agencies of the federal government would include the U.S. Postal Service.

Typical state building would include state office buildings, state courthouses, state hospitals, state transportation facilities and state universities. Typical local/municipal government buildings would include city, county, town and village owned buildings, including office buildings, courthouses, public schools, libraries, fire departments and police stations. From a square footage standpoint, K-12 public schools are the biggest category of government-owned buildings and, in many rural areas, may be the largest buildings in the county. Three of the largest and fastest growing government building categories that often involve government authority ownership are airports owned by

The government building designer incentives has become critically important to many design firms – big and small.

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

109


EPAct TAX BENEFITS specially designated government airport authorities, water authorities and sports stadiums. Many parking garages are government owned and include municipal garages, airport garages, hospital garages, sports stadiums and office buildings.

Who qualifies as a designer?

Many creative professionals get involved with the energy design aspects of buildings, including architects, engineers, lighting designers, HVAC system designers, design and build firms, design and assist firms, and ESCOs (Energy Service Companies). New building construction generally requires the services of a licensed architect and engineer, and virtually all of the above listed professionals may be involved in the retrofit of an existing building. Many specialized architects and engineers concentrate on specific categories of government buildings including schools, airports, sports stadium, hospitals, courthouses and libraries.

deduction. Sophisticated design firms use this failure to optimize as a learning experience, and typically improve their future designs, making them more energy efficient and eligible for larger tax incentives.

LEED buildings

LEED buildings have a major impact in the government building designer tax incentives area. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is the fast growing marquee standard for sustainable buildings established by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The reason is that virtually all new federal buildings, many state and local government buildings and, in particular, public schools, must be built to LEED standards. The advantage with LEED buildings is that LEED requires a building energy simulation model and the Section 179D HVAC and building envelope EPAct government building designer tax deductions also require a building energy simulation model. As of 2009, the new LEED system provides for a higher level of energy-related LEED points, making LEED buildings utilizing a greater portion of energy related LEED credits better candidates for higher levels of EPAct tax deductions.

Recognizing the real world team aspects of achieving energy efficient building design, the government designer incentive may be allocated among the design team members based on their design contribution. Many large ESCOs sometimes focus exclusively on government sector retrofits, including federal buildings, K-12 public schools, state universities and sometimes, entire cities. The 16 largest ESCOs are sometimes referred to as the “Tier 1 ESCOs.” Recognizing the real world team aspects of achieving energy efficient building design, the government designer incentive may be allocated among the design team members based on their design contribution.

Experience to date

Our experience to date is that when design community members have their first EPAct project evaluated, their project generally doesn’t qualify for the maximum tax incentive because their designs, although efficient, are not sufficiently energy efficient to qualify for the maximum EPAct tax

Confusion by government owners & agencies

Notice 2008-40, which was issued March of 2008, requires government projects completed after that date to have a representative of the government building owner or agency acknowledge that the designer(s) has notified them that they are planning on claiming the EPAct deduction. Government owners are not used to being involved in tax matters. Many government owners mistakenly interpret the postMarch 2008 required government allocation sign-off as an assignment that they can potentially withhold as a business negotiation ploy. However, one cannot assign an economic right that one doesn’t own. Moreover, the government owner already is getting the lion’s share of the economic benefit, which is the permanent annual energy cost savings. The government designer(s) receive a one-time proportionally lower economic value tax incentive for achieving the required energy efficient design targets. The government building EPAct designer tax incentives represent innovative tax policy aimed at achieving important policy objectives in the service sector of the U.S. economy. This tax incentive is working and resulting in a design community that is much more cognizant of energy efficient design. Equally important, American citizens are going to benefit from a government and public school sector with much lower ongoing energy related operating costs. CCR

Charles R. Goulding, attorney/CPA, is president of R&D Tax Savers, an interdisciplinary tax and engineering firm. Jennifer Pariante is an analyst with R&D Tax Savers, while Jacob Goldman is the senior tax/engineering consultant.

110

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


CIRCLE NO. 42


They’re

baaaaaaack! Those nasty bed bugs. So, where else are they? By Paul Curtis, B.C.E.

I

n recent years, bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) have gone from relative obscurity to center stage in America and some other countries. In a curious mimicry of their individual behavior, the U.S. population of bed bugs once fed upon their human hosts as common household pests, and then all but disappeared for nearly 50 years. Now they are back – ready to feed, and at the forefront of the media, legislation and medical research. As the name indicates, bed bugs often are found in close proximity to beds. Box springs, headboards and bed framing are favorite harborage sites. They provide shelter in close proximity to the host. Furniture and fixtures that are close to the bed may also house bed bugs. But bedrooms are not the only place that bed bugs can be a concern. Bed bugs are looking for human hosts that stay still long enough to provide a meal, and will feed opportunistically even in the daytime. They show up in the places you might expect, but they also are making an appearance in places that are not as obvious. Sitting for two hours in a movie theater while distracted by adventure and popcorn? You could become an extra large drink for a bed bug. Maybe the movie is enjoyed in your favorite recliner in the living room? You could be a target. Have a long cab ride to a meeting? You get the idea here. Any place that humans sit, rest or sleep can be a place that bed bugs are introduced. Bed bugs have been spotted in hospitals, subways and retail shops. They take trips with us on buses or planes. They’re even at the office. Bed bugs travel by crawling, and by hitchhiking, on people and their belongings. They glue their eggs to items and clothing, which can then be transferred to homes, shops and workplaces without the person transporting them even being aware they’re doing so. And while bed bugs are relatively small – they’re often compared to an apple seed when an adult – most people can see them without magnification. They prefer humans as hosts, and primarily feed at night. Body heat, the carbon dioxide from exhaled breath and other biological signatures help focus the bed bugs on unsuspecting hosts. The bed bug feeds, then retreats back to its place of harborage for days or even weeks before coming back out, often making detection of infestations difficult until they are well established.

Inspections key to the fight

Because people primarily transport bed bugs, they can show up in places that are overlooked during inspections. A good example would be the lobby of a hotel. There usually is comfortable furniture, tables, and may

112

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Photo credit: Paul Curtis/Terminix

even have a source of heat and harborage, such as a fireplace. Luggage coming in and out of the hotel parks there, along with their owners. In some cases, the legs of the furniture and tables in hotels can be hollow. This provides an excellent hiding place close to feeding opportunity for bed bugs that is seldom ever checked. The underside of the furniture and area rugs also are popular hiding spots. Voids beside and around sources of heat such as fireplaces and electronics, such as a lobby TV can provide protection and warmth as well. Bed bugs also will hide behind wall paper, in electrical socket and switches, and in window coverings and drapery. You should also check luggage carts, too. Most of these are constructed of hollow tubing and a carpet base on wood or metal. Bed bugs travel throughout the hotel and out to guests’ vehicles. It is not uncommon for hotels to treat room after room for bed bugs, only to find out that the luggage cart was the source of infestation for them all. Crown molding and the void behind baseboards also can provide plenty of space for relocation of bed bugs. Business centers, coffee shops and free Wi-Fi areas also provide shared spaces and distracted hosts that sit for long periods of time. They also will have furniture, electronics, and plenty of cracks and crevices to hide in. Bed bugs have been discovered in heating and air-conditioning units that are commonly used in guest rooms, where the compressor provided a source of heat. Let’s face it – bed bugs don’t need much space. It’s possible to find eight or 10 of them in a single screw hole in furniture or electronics. Many inspectors use a hotel key card or similar plastic card to look for places these pests can hide, because the thickness of a credit card is all the space they need to enter or hide. If it is starting to sound as if bed bugs can be just about anywhere, they can. And their harborage can be exposed when removing and taking things apart during construction or remodeling. Infested construction debris can transfer bed bugs to other areas, and workers can transport bugs or eggs on their clothing and equipment to off-site structures, including their home.

A fight you can win

But all is not lost. The first step in protecting yourself and your clients from unintended bed bug exposure is education. Know what bed bugs and evidence of bed bugs, such as fecal spots and shed skins look like. Most universities and professional pest management companies have great educational resources on bed bug biology, behavior and prevention. If bed bugs or evidence of them are discovered during construction or re-modeling, stop work and call a qualified pest management expert to assist. Bed bugs will move to other areas when they are disturbed, which may cause other areas to be infested or the pest to move to a much more difficult area to inspect or treat.

Where possible, seal as many cracks and crevices during construction and re-modeling as possible, to exclude bed bugs from hiding and harboring behind trim and fixtures. Consider design and construction techniques that minimize voids and areas that bed bugs can hide. You may also want to consider inspection access for electronics, like TVs and computers. Bed bugs will continue to be a concern in many types of structures. Knowing what to look for, where to look, and what to do if you find bed bugs will go a long way toward keeping them from being a problem for you and your clients. Paul Curtis, B.C.E., is manager, technical services, for Terminix International. For more information on these and other common pests, visit TerminixCommercial.com.

Aspirating Smoke Detection

Pipe Network Design

Talk to the

experts.

To have a FAAST Specialist assist with your next design project for free, visit: go.systemsensor.com/design-ccr

©2015 System Sensor. All Rights Reserved.

CIRCLE NO. 43

MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

113


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data for Southwest Texas

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects scheduled in Southwest Texas. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

CONTRACTING METHOD

McDonald's Restaurant

Aransas Pass

$500,000

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

Chipotle Mexican Grill

Edinburg

$300,000

Renovation

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

Chicken Express

Portland

-

New Construction

Q3 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Auntie Anne's Pretzels

Laredo

$50,000

Renovation

2016

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage

Georgetown

-

15,019

New Construction

Q4 2015

Negotiated GC Contract

The Outlet Shoppes at Laredo

Laredo

$30,000,000

345,000

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

Costco Wholesale

Corpus Christi

$500,000

6,500

New Construction

Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

Walmart Supercenter No. 3107-00

San Antonio

-

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE: Griffis La Frontera

Austin

-

512 units

Renovation

Q4 2015 or 2016

GC Bids (BIO)

Complete Energy Systems at Renewable Energy Business Park

Pflugerville

-

100,000

New Construction

Q4 2015 or 2016

GC to Subcontract

TPCO America

Gregory

$1,587,525

20,000

New Construction

Q2 or Q3 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Austin Oaks Redevelopment

Austin

-

950,000

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Bella Vista Apartments Phase II

Brownsville

-

150 units

New Construction

Q4 2015 or 2016

Negotiated GC Contract

East Avenue Apartment Building

Austin

$100,000,000

35 stories

New Construction

Q4 2015

Owner to Subcontract

The Reese Condominiums

Harlingen

-

4 stories

Renovation

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC to Subcontract

Green WTP Office Tower Block 23

Austin

-

500,436

New Construction

Q2 or Q3 2015

GC to Subcontract

Country Place Senior Living Center

Beeville

$1,500,000

19,000

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

Owner to Subcontract

YMCA Phase III

Corpus Christi

-

Addition

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Payne Volkswagen Addition & Renovation

Brownsville

$2,300,000

22,685 GSF

Renovation/Addition

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Homewood Suites

Austin

-

150 rooms

New Construction

Q3 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Gregory-Portland ISD 2015 Bond

Portland

$117,000,000

Renovation

Q4 2015 or Q1 2016

Competitive Public Bids

ACC Highland Campus Phase II

Austin

$82,500,000

Renovation

Q4 2015

GC to Subcontract

Westwood High School Renovation Phase III

Round Rock

$18,400,000

Renovation

Q4 2015

CMAR to Subcontract

General Academic Complex & Phase II Music Building

Corpus Christi

$45,393,000

New Construction

Q4 2015 or 2016

Competitive Public Bids

Dwelling Reconstruction

Laredo

-

1,000

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

Competitive Public Bids

Fire Station No. 4

Leander

-

2-3 bays

New Construction

Q4 2015

Competitive Public Bids

Reservoir Improvements

Austin

$2,000,000

Alteration

Q3 or Q4 2015

Competitive Public Bids

MEP Improvements

San Antonio

$600,000

Alteration

Q3 or Q4 2015

Competitive Public Bids

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION: 415,000

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

114

-

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


CIRCLE NO. 44


CALENDAR

CALENDAR • MARCH - APRIL APRIL 22-24, 2015

RICS 2015 Summit of the Americas Millennium Biltmore Hotel Los Angeles http://la2015.rics.org

SAVE YOUR SPOT TODAY Women’s Retreat 2015: August 6th-9th The Hotel Monaco downtown Denver, CO

MAY 7, 2015

Commercial Construction & Renovation People Minneapolis, MN www.ccr-people.com

Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat 2015: October 1st-4th Hotel Derek in Houston, TX

PRODUCT SHOWCASE

JANUARY 20th-22nd The Marriott Riverwalk San Antonio, TX • www.ccr-summit.com Dakota Systems Manufacturing

Metropolitan Ceramics® Canton, OH

Farmingdale, NY

METRO® PAVERS

Build Your Store In Hours, Not Days!

Metropolitan Ceramics® manufactures METRO® PAVERS for applications requiring tile that is extremely durable. The words that best describe METRO® PAVERS are resistant, lasting, and strong.

Green Perimeter Wall Systems

METRO® PAVERS are 3/4” thick by 6”x9”. They are low absorption making them the right tile to withstand the punishment of industrial applications like breweries and food processing. They can take the punishment of forklift, cart and vehicle traffic. METRO® PAVERS can withstand extreme temperatures, spills, impact/abrasion all while remaining slip resisting.

Drywall, Finished Panels, Mirrors, Cabinets From design to fast, easy installation — Dakota designs and manufactures products that work.

Recessed Standards, custom metal work, post and panel - Fitting room systems, floor fixtures and cash & wrap desks - A sustainable resource manufacturer, our products are green. We Stand Behind Your Products With Ours

Use METRO® PAVERS for demanding commercial applications from heavy industrial to car dealerships. METRO® PAVERS are the one tile that can take the punishment and provide decades of uncompromised service.

877.9.DAKOTA (932.5682)

1-800-325-3945

www.dakotamfg.com

www.metroceramics.com

CIRCLE NO. 45

CIRCLE NO. 46

116

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


THE GLOBAL

LANGUAGE OF LIGHT LIGHTFAIR.COM

NEW YORK, NY USA

Javits Center PRE-CONFERENCE

May 3 – 4, 2015 PHOTO CREDITS (1) WALL ILLUMINATION FANTASY OF PIOLE HIMEJI, HIMEJI-SHI, JAPAN | LIGHTING DESIGN: UCHIHARA CREATIVE LIGHTING DESIGN INC + TAKENAKA CORPORATION | PHOTOGRAPHY © MASAKI KAWAGUCHI (2) BRANZ KOSHIEN, NISHINOMIYA, JAPAN | LIGHTING DESIGN: AKARI+DESIGN ASSOCIATES | PHOTOGRAPHY © HIROYUKI TSUDA

TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE

May 5 – 7, 2015 CIRCLE NO. 47


March/April 2015 • ccr-mag.com YES I wish to receive a FREE subscription to

P.O. Box 3908, Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • 678.765.6551 corpcirc@ccr-mag.com

NO

Commercial Construction & Renovation.

Would you like information on Commercial Construction & Renovation People? Yes No Please check here if you would like to receive the Commercial Construction & Renovation email newsletter. Yes No 1. Please indicate your organization’s primary business: (choose one only)

INQUIRY and SUBSCRIPTION CARD • FAX to 678-765-6551

 (A) Retailer  (N) H  ospitality (Hotel, Motel,

(I) Developer (Q) Management Company

Resort, Cruise Line etc., and Hospitality Management Company)

Signature_____________________________________________________ Date______________ Name (please print)________________________________________________________________

(K) Financial/Purchasing Firm (R) Shopping Center Owner

(C) Restaurant

(S) Healthcare Facility

(O) Architecture Firm

(T) Government

Company_______________________________________________________________________

(G) Design Firm

(L) Manufacturer/Supplier

Address________________________________________________________________________

(P) Engineering Firm

(Z) Other (please specify)

City_____________________________________________ State_________ Zip______________

(H) Contractor/Builder/ Construction

Title___________________________________________________________________________

Phone (

)___________________________ Fax (

)_______________________________

Web site____________________________________ E-mail______________________________

2. Please indicate your primary job function: (choose one only)

 (01) Corporate Management

(Owners, Partners, President, Chairman, Principal, CEO, CFO, COO, etc.)

Please check here if you do not wish to receive third party information on the latest products and services. To receive FREE product information from the individual companies featured in this issue, circle the number below that corresponds to the product number. Valid through September 31, 2015.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75

________________________________

 (02) Senior Management (Executive, Vice President, Director, etc.)

     

(03) Management (04) Facilities (05) Maintenance (06) Construction

       

(09) Design (10) Project Management (11) Estimator (12) Operations (13) Security (14) Purchasing (15) Environmental (16) Real Estate

( 99) Other (please specify):

(07) Architect (08) Engineer

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

All information must be provided. The publisher reserves the right to determine qualification for a free subscription.

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES Call 678.765.6550: Call anytime. If no one answers, leave a detailed message and be sure to include your name, phone number and/or email address so we can contact you if we have any questions. Or write: Commercial Construction & Renovation P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 Moving?: Please let us know eight weeks in advance to make sure you do not have interruption in service. Remember to include both your old and new contact information. Duplicate Issues?: If you are receiving multiple copies of Commercial Construction & Renovation, please let us know. And please include information from both mailing labels. A subscription to Commercial Construction & Renovation is your subscription to better-design, better-built and better-maintained facilities.

Please contact us for all your subscription needs. We’re here to help! How To Reach Us Regarding Your Subscription Visit us online: 24 hours a day at www.ccr-mag.com. All the information you need to take care of your subscription account is right here. Subscription Questions?: Please email corpcirc@ccr-mag.com.

118

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Advertiser Page

Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page

Reader Service No.

AdArt / Genesis Lighting Solutions...............72................... 28

Georgia Printco............................................23................... 16

AC•Tech................................................ 69, 92-93............25, 36

Gerard Construction Corp.............................91................... 35

American Louver Company..........................85................... 32

HFA .......................................................... 34-35................. 50

Atas International, Inc...................................3..................... 2

Interplan......................................................41................... 20

Atlas Roofing...............................................51................... 23

Kingspan Insulated Panels...........................49................... 22

Atlas Sign Industries....................................95................... 52

Lakeview.....................................................11.................... 8

Bayer MaterialScience.................................19................... 14

Laticrete......................................................17................... 13

Bostik...........................................................9..................... 7

Lightfair International..................................117.................. 47

Calpipe Security Bollards............................111.................. 42

Little...........................................................107.................. 41

Carney Contracting Services........................71................... 27

Master-Bilt...................................................83................... 31

Chouinard Construction...............................31................... 18

Metropolitan Ceramics................................116.................. 46

Cicero’s Development Corp....................Cover 2, 1............... 1 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreats.................................96................... 37 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit..................................67................... 24

Newton........................................................75................... 29 National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association.......29................... 17 RedBuilt......................................................105.................. 40 Retail Contractors Association......................15................... 11

Commercial Construction & Renovation Surveys.................................16................... 12

Rockerz, Inc..................................................7..................... 4

Component Hardware..................................81................... 30

Salsbury.......................................................8..................... 5

Construction Data Co. (CDC).......................115.................. 44

Schimenti Construction..........................8, Cover 4.............6, 49

Construction One..........................................5..................... 3

Signage Solutions........................................33................... 19

Controlled Power Company..........................14................... 10

Southwest Signs.........................................103.................. 39

Cyntergy......................................................43................... 21

Superbrightleds.com....................................13.................... 9

Dakota........................................................116.................. 45

System Sensor........................................70, 113.............26, 43

Door Innovation...........................................87................... 33

Thermocromex......................................... 52-53................. 51

Duro-Last...................................................101.................. 38

Wakefield Beasley & Associates...................21................... 15

Exclusive Retail Interiors..............................89................... 34

Warner Bros.............................................Cover 3............... 48 MARCH : APRIL 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

119

AD INDEX

CCR • AD INDEX


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Winning with customer service as big as the State of Texas

L

ike many of you who are growing and renovating your brands, choosing the right firms to help you achieve your goals is crucial to the success of your new or renovation projects. We go through that same process when we choose the sites for our face-to-face, networking events. As you will see in this issue, we have chosen San Antonio to host the 6th Annual 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit. The event will be held January 20th - 22nd downtown on the River Walk. While doing our site visits last month, we looked at five hotels to hold the Summit and its ancillary events around the San Antonio area. For your projects, you have many vendors to choose from in your supplier stable. Each offers similar products and services, which makes it difficult to finally decide which firm will be awarded the job. Most of the time, the supplier who wins that job is the one who went the extra mile to prove that they want the business and they are a leader in that particular service/product category. In San Antonio, each of the hotels we visited offered rooms, food and beverage packages, and event spaces with all the bells and whistles that best fits our meeting plans. Our quest began by contacting the San Antonio Visitors Bureau for their recommendations. After contacting each hotel, we asked that they submit a bid. Next, we traveled to San Antonio to check out each venue in person. In the end, it all came down to customer service. Ultimately, we selected the hospitality brand that went that extra mile to show they really wanted our business. The winning facility was the first one to submit a bid. They gave me a complimentary

In today’s increasingly competitive business climate, you must treat every business deal, big or small, like it’s your last. Every one of them adds up.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

120

room without asking, arranged transportation to and from the airport, made sure my room had a spectacular view of the city and had a hot meal waiting when we arrived after midnight. In addition, they conducted a comprehensive meeting that included multiple vendors to help support the kind of stay our Summit attendees and sponsors are accustomed to. The hotel also arranged transportation to and from the other hotels they would be competing with. They even took us to The Knibbe Ranch, the awesome place we have chosen for our Gala Reception. And when they took me back to the airport, they gave me lunch and a cowboy hat (you read that correctly). One of the best things they did was give me a questionnaire, which sought more personal information about my personal interests, family, etc. It was a nice personal touch. It was true Texas hospitality at its finest and proved to me that they really wanted our event at their hotel. In today’s increasingly competitive business climate, you must treat every business deal, big or small, like it’s your last. Every one of them adds up. Sometimes, it’s the little things that can separate you from your competition. It’s not always about price. We hope you add our 2016 Summit in downtown San Antonio to your travel calendar. We’re extending you an official invitation to be our guest. To see what you’re in store for, check out the coverage on our 2015 Summit in Miami, which starts on page 54. Here’s wishing all of you safe travels, good health and prosperity for the rest of 2015. CCR

Subscription: 1 year, $50 in U.S., Canada and Mexico; single copies, $10. 1 year, $190 International surface; $290 International air mail; International single copies $25. Printed in U.S.A. Known office of publication: 358 Aviemore Lane, Suwanee, GA. 30024. Periodicals postage paid at Suwanee, GA. 30024, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Commercial Construction & Renovation, P.O. Box 3908, Suwanee, GA 30024.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2015


Turning imagination into reality.

Retail. Hospitality. Restaurant. Entertainment. Exhibits. Environments. SIGNS & GRAPHICS • INTERIOR IDENTIFICATION PACKAGES • DIGITAL & FLATBED PRINTING HAND-PAINTED MURALS • FABRICATED SURFACES / ARCHITECTURAL ORNAMENTATION PLASTER & FIBERGLASS FABRICATION • METAL FABRICATION • CUSTOM CABINET & FURNITURE SHOP DRAPERY • UPHOLSTERY • DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SERVICES Vember.Stuart-Lilley@warnerbros.com • 818.954.4430 www.WarnerBrosDesignStudio.com CIRCLE NO. 48


CIRCLE NO. 49

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR March April 2015  

CCR March April 2015