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A SAN ANTONIO STORY: AN INSIDE LOOK AT OUR 2016 CCR SUMMIT

Bob Cocchi Design, Developement & Construction V.P./Consultant

Guest

friendly Key hospitality partnerships drive success of Travel Traders

Exclusive Inside: Challenging industry’s typical building standards Stacking technology for energy efficiency See our Leading Engineering Firms & Roofing Manufacturing listings

Check out our

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March/April 2016 • www.ccr-mag.com

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March/April • 2016 Vol. 15, No.2

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26 FEATURES

26 Guest friendly  Key hospitality partnerships drive Travel Traders

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94  One for the ages  North Carolina jeweler has gem of a renovation project

96  The Wright Way 72  Pushing the envelope  One-on-one with The Frank Lloyd  How a Portland developer challenged the Wright Foundation’s Stuart I. Graff industry’s typical building standards 90  All eyes ahead  A closer look at the 2016 insurance market forecast

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March/April • 2016 Vol. 15, No.2 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Atlanta, GA 22  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Dallas, TX 56  2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit – San Antonio

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56

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

38  Leading Engineers Annual survey highlights today’s top firms 46  Roofing Manufacturers See who made our annual listing

SPECIAL SECTION

Commerical Kitchens 75  Gone country  How the Old Crow Smokehouse is changing the BBQ game 84 Turn it on  Better light for a better business

75

Federal Construction 101  Lights on in Tupelo  Efficiency upgrades drive sports tourism in Mississippi city 108 Taking flight  The R&D Tax Credit aspects of renovating U.S. airports to global standards

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 112 Perspective 114 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 118 Ad Index 116 Product Spotlight 116 Calendar 120 Publisher’s Note

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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

All about adapting

H

ere are some numbers you should know. A recent

For example, instead of table areas designed to give private spaces to small parties, seating arrangements feature “hangout spaces” Forbes article showed that Millennials hold more on either side of the restaurant that offer cafe-style couch and armchair areas for conversathan $200 billion in buying power. In fact, they will tion and coffee-drinking, not just eating. constitute up to 75 percent of the workforce by 2025. And the new layout offers extended hours – opening four hours earlier at 7 a.m. and closing one hour later at 2 a.m. The plan is to have patrons come in early to work at reservable tables, and to hang out after hours to listen to music, play trivia or take part in open-mic nights. What TGI Friday’s and the scores of other brands are doing is creating a community-centric vibe for today’s community-oriented generation. An interesting study conducted by shopping center developer Westfield Group provided a brief glimpse into what the future of retail might look like, including vintage clothing clubs, discounts for recycling old clothes and shoes and renting apparel via virtual-reality devices. The report, which intended to In the conversations identify transformational consumer trends that will shape future sucin and around our cess for retailers, shows that toCCR Retreats and day’s consumers – both Millennials Summit, the need to and older consumers – want stores to offer learning experiences, such continually change as cooking classes or fitness classes, in our changing or clubs and activities. world is always In the conversations in and around our CCR Retreats and Summit, front and center. the need to continually change in our changing world is always front and center. There is no way around it – With a steadfast reliance on technology, convenience and a companies in our line of work have to be ready to adapt and adapt quickly. desire to connect with a brand on a more personal level, they’re Have we reached the “adapt or die” part of the equation? That really helping shape everything and anything we do these days. Whether depends on your plan of attack and whether or not your brand is designed you’re in the restaurant, retail or hospitality sector, it is imperative for what your customers, and your customers’ customers want and need. that you become Millennial friendly. This much we know – with more than $200 billion in buying Take what TGI Fridays’ did with its experimental store redesign power in tow, your construction strategies had better have some in Corpus Christi, Texas. The 10,000-square-foot WiFi-centric pilot play for the future at hand. location is a whole new cultural experience.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 772.232.6614 SCC MISSION Create FINAL 5.21:Eagle qrt pg FINAL

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678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com

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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes BROOKS HERMAN Project Manager of Construction Academy Sports + Outdoors STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company BRYAN NOVAK Sr. Director of Engin eering, Estimating, Quality Assurance Wal-Mart Stores DAVID OSHINSKI Director of Construction Home Depot JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury JANIS WILLIAMS Director of Store Facilities Tuesday Morning ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design

RESTAURANTS MIKE HUDSON Director of Construction CEC Entertainment GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Rave Restaurant Group DAVID SHOTWELL Director of Construction Bojangles’ Famous Chicken ‘n Biscuits RON BIDINOST Senior Director of Franchise Operations & Administration Marie Callenders Restaurant & Bakery LLC

HOSPITALITY

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT

Senior Vice President, DTZ STEVE JONES

International Director JLL

JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development JOHN LAPINS Vice President, Architecture & Construction Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. DENNIS MCCARTY Vice President, Technical Services, Construction InterContinental Hotels Group, the Americas GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership ROBERT RAUCH President R.A. Rauch & Assoc. Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

SCOTT OFFERMANN Managing Director Global Occupier Services Cushman & Wakefield LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations & Project Management Interserv Hospitality Solutions JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels

DON HASULAK

Managing Director Big Red Rooster

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group GINA NODA Noda Retail Consultancy

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail

IKEA

IKEA will expand by 12 stores in Canada over the next 10 years, starting with the construction of a new 328,000-square-foot location in Halifax, Nova Scotia, this summer. The store is a full-line location that will include a playroom and a restaurant.

Nordstrom

Nordstrom has signed a lease for a three-floor stand-alone men’s store at 3 Columbus Circle in New York City, near the site at 57th Street where the luxury retailer is building its first Manhattan flagship. The seven-floor, 400,000-square-foot flagship is set to open in 2018.

Circuit City

The partners that acquired the Circuit City brand last fall are getting ready to relaunch the consumer electronics retailer in multiple channels, including up to 100 company-owned stores and 100 to 200 franchise locations. The new Circuit City, designed to attract Millennials, will offer a range of gadgets and gaming products arranged in product zones.

Meijer

Meijer will spend $400 million to build nine new stores in five states and remodel 32 existing locations in markets, including Detroit and Indianapolis.

Fabletics

Workout wear retailer Fabletics plans to open up to 100 stores over the next three to five years. While the retailer still does the majority of its sales online, it hopes to create store experiences that mimic its online experience.

YogaSmoga

Workout wear brand YogaSmoga plans to open 25 to 30 new stores this year, including a 3,400-square-foot New York City flagship slated to debut in May.

Wynn Plaza

Wynn Las Vegas plans to develop a luxury retail center called Wynn Plaza, with 75,518 square feet of retail space, influenced by Avenue Matignon in Paris. The project will include a two-story building with atria and a skylight rotunda.

Restaurants Tim Hortons

Tim Hortons, which operates about 650 U.S. locations, plans to open locations in cities such as Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Columbus, Ohio.

Cracker Barrel/Holler & Dash

Panda Express Restaurant Group

In a push to grow and diversify, Panda Express parent Panda Restaurant Group recently has invested in small chains Pieology Pizzeria and Just Salad.

Cracker Barrel will roll out a new fast-casual concept called Holler & Dash this spring, with the first unit set to open in Homewood, Ala. The new concept will maintain the company’s signature Southern cuisine style, while taking it to new urban audiences.

Mrs. Green’s

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen

Stir-fry chain bd’s Mongolian Grill has acquired eight-unit, Illinois-based fast-casual concept Flat Top Grill, which will continue to operate as a separate concept.

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen latest strategic plan calls for the chain to grow to 4,000 U.S. restaurants over the next seven to 10 years.

Natural and organic food market Mrs. Green’s plans to open six stores in the Chicago market.

bd’s Mongolian Grill

Hospitality Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide

Langham Hotels and Resorts

Pacific Hospitality

Kimpton

Davidson Hotels & Resorts

Hoxton

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide became the first U.S. hotel company to sign a deal with Cuba since the 1959 revolution. Starwood will manage and market two properties in Havana and signed a letter of intent to operate a third. Pacific Hospitality Group will seek more properties that fit into its Meritage Collection, following the acquisition of Koa Kea Hotel & Resort in Hawaii, the company’s first buy outside of California. Davidson Hotels & Resorts’ new Pivot lifestyle division was launched with properties in San Francisco; Coral Gables, Fla., and Eugene, Ore.

12

Hong Kong-based Langham Hotels and Resorts plans to open three new hotels in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, San Francisco and Santa Fe, N.M., raising its continental U.S. presence to seven. The Langham, Bishop’s Lodge Santa Fe, will be the firm’s first resort in that state. InterContinental Hotels’ Kimpton brand will debut an Amsterdam property in 2017, the brand’s first foray into the European market. Kimpton plans to convert the current Crowne Plaza Amsterdam City Center. Hoxton is planning to rehabilitate a $30 million Los Angeles building to create a boutique hotel. The property would be the second for Hoxton in the United States.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


The quest for experiences Report shines new light on the future of retailing

V

intage clothing clubs. Discounts for recycling old clothes and shoes. Rented party dresses selected via virtual-reality devices. Welcome to retail’s future. According to recent survey from shopping center developer Westfield Group, “rental retail” models and the quest for experiences are trends likely to drive changes at stores and shopping centers in the coming years. The study was intended to “identify transformational consumer trends that will shape future success for retailers.” The report shows that Millennials – consumers born between 1982 and 2004 – are called the “Generation Rent,” and that about one-third surveyed said they would like to have the option to rent from their favorite stores – twice the percentage of the general population. Millennials and older consumers also want stores to offer learning experiences, such as cooking classes or fitness classes, or clubs and activities, the study showed. The report was based on online surveys completed by more than 13,000 consumers in the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as in-person interviews with shoppers in stores, and interviews with retail and design experts.

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MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

6

The amount, in billions, that Georgia’s HartsfieldJackson Atlanta International Airport will spend on a 20-year-long expansion and renovation project, which begins with concourse renovation, and moves into new runway and hotel; work begins this year.

Which way is up O

The once-growing boutique hotel companies faces growing pains nce among the better-performing hotel sectors in the years following the recession, the boutique and lifestyle sectors are facing flattening demands. Through October 2015, U.S. boutique hotels’ RevPAR rose 3.7 percent from a year earlier, according to STR. By comparison, RevPAR within the upper-upscale sector, whose chains often compete with the boutique/lifestyle hoteliers, rose 5.5 percent. Some industry observers say the challenges are due in part to chain hoteliers’ efforts to expand their soft brands. Boutique hotels still get a 30 percent price premium over upper-upscale hotels, while the sector’s 77 percent occupancy rate is 11 percentage points ahead of the industry’s. And the sector’s hoteliers continue to add U.S. properties, as bankers get more comfortable backing independent properties.

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It is a slightly literal example of the ‘living like a local’ trend — where an apartment is often just a place to sleep, and the public spaces are where one spends the majority of their time. – Gray Shealy, executive director of the Master’s of Hospitality Management Program at Georgetown University, on the rise of micro-hotel trend

100

The number of U.S. stores that beauty retailer ULTA plans to open this year, as part of an aggressive growth plan that continues to outspace smaller rivals such as Sephora and Blue Mercury

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MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Bernie Reiss retires after 22 years with Macy’s O

ur March 2006 cover story executive, Bernie Reiss, the former senior VP of construction with Macy’s, retired on March 31 after 22 years with the company. Reiss led the construction program for Macy’s across the United States, from Hawaii to Puerto Rico. His portfolio includes countless new stores and remodels. Recently, Reiss was charged with his most ambitious challenge of all, overseeing the historic remodel of Macy’s world class flagship store at Herald Square in Manhattan. The four year remodel resulted in a state of the art renovation of the sales floors and building exterior, as well as an overhaul of the infrastructure and non-selling spaces. While Reiss said that he couldn’t be more proud of his accomplishments, what stands out the most is his extraordinary team, which enabled much of his success. In the short term, Reiss plans on taking a “breather” by spending more time with his ever-growing family. He also plans to work in a little travel. Ultimately, he is looking forward to landing a new opportunity that will allow him to stay involved in the industry he loves. We congratulate Bernie on his retirement and wish him well in his future endeavors.

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

ATL style CCRP networking crowd rolls into Atlanta

T

hat neighborhood feel. That open kitchen. Those flat screen plasma TVs. With its down-home friendly atmosphere, which enables its guests to consume every bit of action on the scene, Marlow’s Tavern in Dunwoody, Ga., was the ideal setting for the most recent Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) networking reception. One of the annual stops on the CCRP tour, Atlanta always plays host to a strong crowd of commercial construction executives. If you want in on the networking action in 2016, call Kristen Corson today at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

REGISTERED COMPANIES: Aaaron’s Rents Ameritech Facility Services Arby’s Benise Dowling Painting and Powder Coating Celestial Meetings

Church’s Chicken Continental Restaurant David’s Bridal Davidson Hotels Elkins Partnership Elro Signs

Equipment Management Group FedEx Fi Companies Havertys Furniture Hooters Inside Edge

JLL Little Mats Inc. Popeyes ProCoat Products Southwest Signs

Storefloors The Home Depot The McIntosh Group UHC Corp. United Sign Systems

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: JLL Ken Demske, Senior VP Project & Development Services Ken.demske@am.jll.com 3344 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 1100 Atlanta, GA 30326 Ph: (404) 995-6537 Ken.demske@am.jll.com

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016

Storefloors Julia Versteegh, Director of Marketing & Business Development 6480 Roswell Road Atlanta, GA 30328 Ph: (404) 610-4008 juliav@storefloors.com


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INDUSTRY EVENTS 1.

3.

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4.

6.

7. 1: David Fields, Southwest Signs; Dean Jones, (Formerly Verizon Wireless); David Oshinski, The Home Depot

4: Leslie Burton, UHC Corp; Karen MacCannell, The McIntosh Group

2: Merrill Johnson, Arby’s; Steve Jones, JLL; Ken Demske, JLL; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors

6: Mike DiPaola, United Sign Systems; Ron Hunter, United Sign Systems; Jeff Roark, Little; Eric Johnson, United Sign Systems

3: Lisa Ploss, ProCoat Products; Richard Flores, Whole Foods; Phyllis Chambers, Celestial Meetings; Mike Coghlan, Benise Dowling Painting & Powder Coating

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5.

5: Larry Schwartz, Inside Edge; Todd O’Rourke, David’s Bridal

7: Bret Hanks, Ameritech Facility Services; Tim Theroux, Mats Inc; Ben Hill, Ameritech Facility Services; Chris Kempa, Equipment Management Group

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Networking – Cowboy style CCRP converges on the Great State of Texas

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verything is bigger in Texas. We know that, right? Just ask the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) crew, which converged on the Aspen Creek Grill in the Dallas suburb of Irving for a little down home networking reception. The full service, casual dining restaurant and bar, defined by its mountain lodge theme, offered the ideal place for networking refuge. If you’re looking to add networking to your 2016 to-do list, call Kristen Corson today at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com. Jeremy Cuellar, Ameritech Facility Services; Bryan Walker, The Container Store; Krystal Vasquez, Chain Store Maintenance; John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance

REGISTERED COMPANIES: 7-Eleven

Chain Store Maintenance

Henderson Engineers

Ameritech Facility Services

Cicero’s Development

Hunter Building Corp.

ASSA ABLOY

Einstein Noah Restaurant Group

Identity Management

Benise Dowling

FastSigns

JLL

Bostik

Federal Heath

Le Duff America

Cenco Realty

Goodwin Commercial

Lowen Hospitality Management

Porcelanosa USA Rogers Electric

The McIntosh Group The Townson Company

Samsung Southwest Signs The Container Store

Triad Retail Construction United Sign Systems

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: Bostik, Inc. Scott J. Banda, Director of Marketing Consumer & Construction Business Unit scott.banda@bostik-us.com 11320 W. Watertown Plank Road Wauwatosa, WI 53226 USA Ph: (414) 607-1241 www.bostik-us.com

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016

The Townson Company Roni Townson, CEO roni@townsoncompany.com 7157 Colleyville Boulevard Suite 101 Colleyville, TX 76034 Ph: 817-421-1177 x4 www.townsoncompany.com


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3.

2.

4.

5.

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7. 1: Anne-Marie Thomas, United Sign Systems; Mike Gordon, Einstein Noah Restaurant Group; Dee Wallace, Federal Heath Sign Company 2: Kevin Murphy, Triad Retail Construction; Roni Townson, The Townson Company; Mike DiPaola, United Sign Systems 3: Mike Marnell, Ameritech Facility Services; Kirk Stateson, Identity Management

5: Brad Gaskins, The McIntosh Group; Peter Ferri, Hunter Building Corp 6: Kristin Pagano, The McIntosh Group; Karen MacCannell, The McIntosh Group; Jason Westbrook, Porcelanosa USA 7: Sanjay Naik, Lowen Hospitality Management, LLC; Jill Ventura, Le Duff America; Kevin Townson, The Townson Company; Ajay Desai, Lowen Hospitality Management, LLC

4: Mike Coghlan, Benise Dowling Painting & Power Coating; John Campbell, Jr., Cicero’s Development

MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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CIRCLE NO. 18

Partner with Bostik on your next project: 1-800-726-7845 I www.bostik-us.com T2650_02.05.16


Guest

friendly Key hospitality partnerships drive success of Travel Traders

T

hey are seemingly everywhere your favorite hotel is located. Fairmont. Hilton. Hyatt. Intercontinental Hotels. LXR. Omni. Starwood. Marriott. Wyndham. The principle independent retailer known as Travel Traders is a staple of many major hotel corporations, as well as a number of smaller operators. Founded in 2003, the Travel Traders brand provides retail stores in business/convention centers, airport hotels, luxury hotels and resorts and boutiques in markets such as Chicago, New York, Newport Beach, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Washington. It also has retail locations in Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Not your typical retailer, Travel Traders locations are designed to be a natural extension of a hospitality brand through its grab and go retail concept (food, apparel, accessories, etc.). To get an inside look at Travel Traders’ unique hospitality partnerships, and where the brand is heading, we sat down with Bob Cocchi, VP of Design Development and Construction, and consultant.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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GUEST FRIENDLY Define today’s business landscape in the spaces you operate. How is the market?

We are unique in that we flourish as the hospitality industry flourishes. We are not typical retail. Our brands are typically immersed into the hotel’s lifestyles, and we design around same. The intent is to make a seamless transition for the guests of the hotel when they enter a gift shop – grab and go or apparel store. We want the guests’ experience to be the same as they are when they are in the hotel’s restaurants, or spas. We also accomplish this by allowing all guests to charge anything to their room.

Give us a snapshot of the Travel Traders brand.

We have approximately 250 stores located throughout the United States mainland, as well as Hawaii and Puerto Rico. The majority of them are in full service hotels, Resort Hotels, convention hotels and a few in Airports in Hawaii. We partner up very closely with hotel brands and ownership. This is extremely important to run a seamless operation on property.

We are expanding this year with new stores in the Denver, Houston, Hawaii, California and Chicago markets.

Describe some of the services you offer.

Our mainstay is a typical gift shop that provides hotel guests with all the basics, for example, HBC chips, candy and drinks, and local and national branded gifts and basics. We also have combined this with grab and go coffee shops, which include Proudly Brew Starbucks, grab and go food where we can re-heat as requested by the customer. We also have a number of licensed stores like Swaroski and Johnson Murphy.

Define your partnership with the brands you work with.

Each partnership is unique in that we always have a one-on-one relationship with management at that property. It is important to provide the necessary design (to ownership and management), product and service to the owner, hotel management and, the most important customer, the hotel guests.

How does the design cater to the needs of today’s consumer?

We design around easy access for all customers.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


Making the

Complex Simple

Since 1939

4045 Barden Drive SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512 (616) 949-3360 www.wolvgroup.com CIRCLE NO. 19


GUEST FRIENDLY Walk us through the design process.

Our design process has just a few steps. We confirm our location in the property, which allows us to work within the finishes of that area. We then work with their design teams to create an acceptable palette. (Our design manager and owner work closely). Once approved internally, it is presented to property ownership and hotel management for final approval.

How do you design them into the look and feel of each partner? This process has a few different processes. We work, as indicated, to create a seamless transition between the hotel and gift shop. That said, we either continue the floor directly into the space from a lobby or common area in the hotel or, in some cases, compliment same. We work within

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We are in a unique market, in that we are a hotel and an airport retailer. We are seeing a nice growth in new hotel plan, as well as a fresh batch of hotels refreshening and remodeling.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016

the material pallets of the lobby or common area to continue the same material finishes, i.e., woods/solid surfaces/wall cover/paints. This is all in order to keep a warm and inviting space, which allows guests of the hotel to feel comfortable shopping.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business today?

A good portion of our projects are VB in one form or another, so that provides for an extremely clean turnover. Our biggest challenge is working with older buildings, or as is spaces with very little documentation where hidden obstacles create some challenges. We mitigate this with as often as we can (Destructive Surveys). Some investigation allows us to create a extremely tight set of plans to mitigate as many COs as possible.


Looking, Planning a project in Puerto Rico

Construction Administration • Project Management • Inspection

CIRCLE NO. 20

Manuel Ray, P.E. PO BOX 9023772 • San Juan, PR 00902-3772 787.723.4442 / 375.5770 Fax: 787.723.4447 mray@3mg-pr.com


GUEST FRIENDLY Talk about sustainability.

As we build new and remodel our older stores, we have committed to change out all our lighting to LEDs. As we all know, they have longer life spans and are less expensive to operate. Prices have actually come down from their initial exposure to the retail world.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We are a relatively young company. We were part of the very wide spread hands of WH Smith until 2003, when the current owner took us private. We see lots of growth in the U.S. mainland, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. We grow as fast as the industry expands and remodels.

Having a great team is key to a successful project. We partner with our key vendors, which allows us to work on best ways and means to make a project successful. Are you optimistic about what you see in the market today?

Yes, very much so. We are in a unique market, in that we are a hotel and an airport retailer. We are seeing a nice growth in new hotel planing, as well as a fresh batch of hotels refreshening and remodeling.

What is your growth plan?

We average approximately 20 new properties and 20 remodel stores a year. This changes as the availability of space and the growth of the industry adjusts. We target both new and existing markets.

What areas are you targeting?

We are expanding this year with new stores in the Denver, Houston, Hawaii, California and Chicago markets. We also are expanding and/or remodeling stores in New York, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and San Francisco.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Like most retailers, we are always looking for the best quality and value for our stores. That said, I am constantly working with

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


HOW DO YOU DECIDE? Choosing an outsourced Project Management firm is an important decision. You need to choose a company with confident, in-depth knowledge of project development, from site selection through store opening. You need a partner that is dedicated to the success of your program and has the experience to anticipate and resolve issues before they arise. You need a company that understands the process and produces results every time.

You need The Townson Company! We’ve been providing expert project management services to national retail and restaurant chains since 1999. Our success record is evidenced by our client retention and expansion. • New construction • In-line • Retail

KNOWLEDGE

EXPERIENCE

• Remodels • Ground up • Restaurants

RESULTS

CIRCLE NO. 21

Headquarters: 7157 Colleyville Boulevard, Suite 101 Colleyville, TX 76092 817.421.1177 • www.townsoncompany.com Offices: Dallas • Austin • Atlanta • Los Angeles (coming soon)


GUEST FRIENDLY our current vendors to find ways to keep our cost under control and still keep the quality of their work at a very high level.

Describe a typical day.

Most of my days are spent on the road. My time in my office is extremely limited, weather I am on a site visit for one of the many phases of our build or an existing vendor, new vendor or at the corporate office for monthly meetings. Therefore, you need to be able to manage and work on many fronts at the same time. I attended a great seminar recently called Manage Multiple Projects (MMP). I highly recommend it. It’s important to have detailed reports with bi-weekly status updates as well as having a great team. Maria Flores, Design and Construction Manager and Emily Jimenez,

Each partnership is unique in that we always have a one-on-one relationship with management at that property.

Fixture Coordinator, are key to this process. Having a great team is key to any successful project. We partner with our key vendors, which allows us to work on best ways and means to make a project successful.

Tell us what makes you so unique?

Travel Traders has a national presence with amazing human resources in all aspects, from merchandise buyers to upper management. This allows direct access to everybody, so decisions can be made quickly. We have a small business feel with mid-size staff. This enables us to be out quick and nimble, and to adjust as required for every market’s ups and downs. CCR

One-on-one with... Bob Cocchi VP Design Development and Construction Consultant to Travel Traders LLC What’s the most rewarding part of your job? I enjoy all the new partners we create (the people) around the country, from vendors to hotel operators. This is so rewarding, since you work so closely for months designing, developing and building very functional gift, grab and go, and apparel stores. It goes without saying that it also rewarding to see the end product, which is the cherry on the cake. What was the best advice you ever received? Listen to everyone on your team. Every voice counts. Listening is key to understanding your team and how you all can work together. You must improve all the time and constantly work to keep communications at a high level. What are three strongest traits any leader should have? Listen to your team vendors consultants. Learn from your mistakes. If you do not try, and look for better ways

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and means, you never will. Let your team grow and provide them with all the resources they need to expand their own horizons. What’s your favorite vacation spot and why? Maui and Kona (Big Island) in Hawaii and Puerto Rico. I love them simply because the climates seem to always be the same and each day you can do nothing, sit on the beach, or go and explore these amazing islands looking for adventures. What book are you reading now? Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.” How do you like to spend your down time? I enjoy spending time with family and friends, golfing and relaxing. And when I have lots of free time, I like to tackle some DIY projects.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


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Advertorial

RE-INTRODUCING MOSAIC ARTWORK TO THE CONSTRUCTION SECTOR Bostik and Artaic’s Global Design Competition Includes Winning Mosaic Mural to be Permanently Installed at MGM Grand, Las Vegas!

B

ostik, Inc. (www.bostik-us.com), a world leader in specialty adhesives and installation systems for building construction materials, and Artaic Innovative Mosaic, (www.artaic. com) creator of architecturally compelling mosaics using its patented American robotic production, have announced more exciting news about their upcoming “Design ‘N Gather (DNG)” Mosaic Mural Design Competition, for which top architectural designers have submitted one-of-a-kind mosaic mural designs.

Artaic’s Ted Acworth at Bostik’s Dallas Facility Grand Opening, December 7th, 2015.

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According to Scott Banda, Director of Marketing of Bostik’s Consumer and Construction Business Unit, “The winning mosaic masterpiece will be produced and then, permanently installed as a 20’ x 8’ backlit wall at Wet Republic, MGM Grand Las Vegas’ wildly popular poolside bar and patio area. If that’s not exciting enough, it will first be unveiled May 5th during HD Expo at Bostik’s Hospitality Pavilion at the “Party by the Pool, the exposition’s legendary poolside celebration. Banda continued. “Already, some of the world’s top designers have submitted designs to portray our requested theme, which must depict the energy, life and essence of Las Vegas. In addition to the Grand Prize, which will be a free trip for two to Paris, the ten top finalists will receive many terrific prizes, as well. “ Designs from the top ten finalists will be on display at the “Bostik Gallery Lounge” at HD Expo ‘16, the premier hospitality design tradeshow held at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, May 4-6 of this year. Each of the mosaics from these top ten finalists will also be on display at the Bostik VIP Hospitality Pavilion at The Party By The Pool. As the sun sets on this party, these backlit mosaic masterpieces will come to life! From there, the gallery of finalists will then move to AIA Convention 2016 in Philadelphia, May 19-21, the global architectural trade event which features more than 170,000 square feet of booths, galleries and highly attended architectural continuing education credits (CEU) presentations/ tours. “The winner’s mosaic design work, as well as the other nine finalists, will be seen both inside the show at Bostik’s Gallery Lounge, and at The Party At The Market. Bostik is the marquee sponsor – Scott Banda of this exciting event that is set

“Already, some of the world’s top designers have submitted designs to portray our requested theme, which must depict the energy, life and essence of Las Vegas.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


to dominate Reading Terminal, a local landmark in the city of Philadelphia. All of our activities at these event will be highly publicized globally, “ Banda stated. Ted Acworth, Founder & CEO of Artaic added, “All entrants have submitted their designs as a 20’ x 8’ backlit feature wall. The Grand Prize winner will be fully constructed and on display at the Bostik Hospitality Pavilion at HD Expo. All submissions have been designed using Artaic’s Tessera™ design software and fabricated using the firm’s robotic manufacturing technology. Bostik’s Dimension™ Pre-Mixed, Glass-Filled Grout (which is available in 15 designer colors) must be used as the final design element of the mosaic. We’re excited to unveil the winning mosaic mural in Las Vegas at HD Expo on May 5th… and then to have it permanently installed at the MGM Grand’s Wet Republic. This underscores our overall mission, which is to re-introduce Mosaic Design to the commercial construction sector on a global scale.” “Today’s top hospitality designers are referring to Dimension™ RapidCure™ as ‘another great design element,’” concluded Scott Banda. “We know creative mosaic tile designs for hospitality installations are increasing in popularity. That’s why designers are insisting upon Dimension™ RapidCure™ Grout! Using this as the last step of the mosaic installation process ensures that outstanding, robotic productions by Artaic will not only be stunning… they will also last for decade after decade. We sought out the best, most innovative, ultra-creative designs for our competition. We cannot wait to unveil the Grand Prize winner and also, display the ten finalists. We are proud to be partnering with Artaic in bringing back Bostik’s Scott Banda teaching elementary school students installation techniques. Mosaic Mural Design.”

“We know creative mosaic tile designs for hospitality installations are increasing in popularity. That’s why designers are insisting upon Dimension™ RapidCure™ Grout! Using this as the last step of the mosaic installation process ensures that outstanding, robotic productions by Artaic will not only be stunning… they will also last for decade after decade.

MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING

Annual survey highlights today’s leading engineering firms

I

n today’s growing commercial construction landscape, finding the right engineering firm is critical. That’s why our annual “Leading Engineering Firms” report offers the leading firms in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. The report provides you with the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting firms. If you want to be a part of next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

HENDERSON ENGINEERS, INC.......... $50,623,664.00 STANTEC CONSULTING.................... $37,707,326.00 HFA.................................................. $25,700,000.00 MANNIK & SMITH GROUP, INC.......... $21,546,000.00 AECOM............................................ $15,400,000.00 BERGMANN ASSOCIATES................. $13,783,329.00 WAKEFIELD BEASLEY & ASSOCIATES.............................. $11,000,000.00

RESTAURANT

RETAIL

Top Ten Totals

CEI ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES, INC...... $10,467,000.00

TLC ENGINEERING FOR ARCHITECTURE....................... $2,102,712.00 STANTEC CONSULTING....................... $1,890,845.00 HARRIS CIVIL ENGINEERS................... $1,400,000.00 KUHLMANN DESIGN GROUP, INC.......... $1,264,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

HOSPITALITY 38

MANNIK & SMITH GROUP, INC............. $3,078,000.00

GPD GROUP...................................... $5,000,000.00 HENDERSON ENGINEERS, INC........... $4,056,942.00 MANNIK & SMITH GROUP, INC........... $3,078,000.00 AECOM............................................. $1,900,000.00 AEDIFICA CASE ENGINEERING........... $1,610,000.00 STANTEC CONSULTING..................... $1,575,981.00 DUNHAM ASSOCIATES, INC............... $1,250,000.00

KOHRS LONNEMANN HEIL ENGINEERS, PSC.......................... $7,875,587.00

3MG................................................. $3,500,000.00

INTERPLAN LLC................................ $6,480,843.36

CESCO, INC....................................... $1,500,000.00

WALLACE ENGINEERING................... $8,200,000.00

AECOM............................................. $44,000,000.00

CORE STATES GROUP....................... $6,611,773.30

JACOBS.................................... $12,100,000,000.00 STANTEC CONSULTING............. $308,872,471.00 AECOM..................................... $246,770,000.00 DLR GROUP.............................. $158,399,800.00 HENDERSON ENGINEERS, INC... $105,915,000.00 GPD GROUP.............................. $88,560,000.00 FISHBECK, THOMPSON, CARR & HUBER...................... $62,890,000.00

HENDERSON ENGINEERS, INC............. $1,207,307.00

BERGMANN ASSOCIATES.......... $62,400,000.00

WALLACE ENGINEERING..................... $1,200,000.00

EFI GLOBAL, INC....................... $57,550,290.00

EFI GLOBAL, INC................................ $597,065.00

TLC ENGINEERING FOR ARCHITECTURE.............. $47,855,690.00

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


3mg CEI Engineering Associates, Inc.

San Juan, PR Manual Ray/Owner 787-375-5770 www.3mg-pr.com mray@3mg-pr.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: varies, Retail Billings: $500,000, Hospitality Billings: $3,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $200,000, Total Billings: $4,200,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 2 Hotel Renovations Specialize In: Hotels, Leading Clients: Luxury Resorts/Hilton, CPG Ritz Carlton

AECOM

Cincinnati, OH Beth Myers Graham/Vice President 513-608-7989 • FAX 877-660-7727 www.aecom.com beth.myers-graham@aecom.com Year Established: 1901, No. of Employees: 85,000 Retail Billings: $15,400,000, Hospitality Billings: $44,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,900,000, Federal: $128,770,000 Other Billings: $56,700,000, Total Billings: $246,770,000 (US only) Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,000+ Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Casinos, Education Leading Clients: Brookfield, Related, Mayo Clinic, Mercy, McDonald’s

AEdifica Case Engineering

St. Louis, MO Darrell Case/President 636-349-1600 • FAX 636-349-1730 www.aedificacase.com dcase@aedificacase.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 60 Retail Billings: $1,260,000, Hospitality Billings: $50,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,610,000, Federal: $40,000 Other Billings: $3,270,000, Total Billings: $6,200,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 960 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Casinos Leading Clients: Starbucks, ???, Cole Haan, Dominos, Five Guys, Hollywood Casino, Union Bank, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Hudson Bay, Core Power Yoga, AMC Theatres, Torrid, Potbelly, Swarovski, Zara

Bergmann Associates Rochester, NY Vince Press/Communications Manager 585-232-5135 • FAX 585-325-8493 www.bergmannpc.com vpress@bergmannpc.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 408 Retail Billings: $13,783,329, Hospitality Billings: $101,583 Restaurant Billings: $173,477, Federal: $385,784 Other Billings: $47,955,827, Total Billings: $62,400,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 437 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: TD Bank, Wal-Mart, DART Container, Wegmans

Bentonville, AR M. Christopher Rogers/PrincipalVP of Business Development 479-212-7941 • FAX 479-273-0844 www.ceieng.com crogers@ceieng.com / info@ceieng.com Year Established: 1973, No. of Employees: 99 Retail Billings: $10,467,000, Hospitality Billings: $30,000 Restaurant Billings: $919,700, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $3,027,000, Total Billings: $14,443,700 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 200 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Survey for Energy Sector, Industrial Leading Clients: Bridgestone, CST, Wal-Mart, Sonic, Hardee’s

Ceso, Inc.

Akron, OH Steven R. Olson/Vice President 330-933-8820 www.cesoinc.com olson@cesoinc.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 128 Retail Billings: $5,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,500,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $12,500,000, Total Billings: $20,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 300 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Bloomin Brands, Speedway, Love’s, Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club, Kohl’s, Tim Hortons

Classic Engineering, LLC

Grand Rapids, MI Michael Kavanagh/Mechanical Consultant 616-742-2810 • FAX 616-742-2814 www.classicengineering.com mkavanagh@classicengineering.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 14 Retail Billings: $N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: White Lodging, Concord Hospitality, Subway, Culvers

Construction Management Inspection, LLC

Honolulu, HI Lance Luke/Principal Construction 808-422-2132 www.hawaiibuildingexpert.com lanceluke1@gmail.com Year Established: 36, No. of Employees: 5 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $ N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: Specialize In: Grocery, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Office Buildings, Condominium Projects Leading Clients: Concrete Spalling & Painting

MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

39


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Core States Group Don Penn Consulting Engineer

Duluth, GA Kevin Behnke/Dir. of Business Development 813-319-8755 www.core-eng.com nrodriguez@core-eng.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 262 Retail Billings: $2,291,414.21, Hospitality Billings: $307,769.40 Restaurant Billings: $6,611,773.30, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $16,910,745.18, Total Billings: $25,121,702.09 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 2,628 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurant Leading Clients: Radisson, CVS, Wal-Mart, McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Panera Bread, 7-Eleven, Bloom Energy, Greenskies, TD Bank, Chase Bank, Citibank, Intel

Grapevine, TX Michelle Judkins/Director 817-410-2858 • FAX 817-251-8411 www.donpenn.com mjudkins@donpenn.com Year Established: 1991, No. of Employees: 30 Retail Billings: $2,800,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $3,200,000, Total Billings: $6,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,013 Retail / 81 Other Specialize In: Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Education Leading Clients: T-Mobile, Planet Fitness, CVS, Kay Jewelers, Disney, L’Occitane, Aldo, AT&T, Brighton, Kate Spade, Hugo Boss, David Yurman

Dunham Associates, Inc. Delta G Consulting Engineers, Inc. Minneapolis, MN

Ft. Lauderdale, FL George San Juan/President 954-527-1112 • FAX 954-524-7505 www.deltag.net gsanjuan@deltag.net Year Established: 1992, No. of Employees: 23 Retail Billings: $112,000, Hospitality Billings: $202,000 Restaurant Billings: $180,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $3,178,000, Total Billings: $3,672,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 212 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Corgan, Host, Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts

DEVITA Greenville, SC Steven Grzybowski/Project Development 864-232-6647 • FAX 864-242-4878 www.devitainc.com sgrzybowski@devitainc.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 55 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $3,950,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 400 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurant, Education, Mixed-Use, Industrial, Civic, Corporate, Multi-Family, Leading Clients: N/A

Jay Rohkohl/President & CEO 612-465-7550 • FAX 612-465-7551 www.dunhameng.com info@dunhameng.com Year Established: 1960, No. of Employees: 118 Retail Billings: $4,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $250,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,250,000, Federal: $675,000 Other Billings: $13,325,000, Total Billings: $20,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,500 Retail / 250 Other Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Casinos, Education, Office, Data Centers Leading Clients: Best Buy, Dollar Tree, McDonalds, Mens Wearhouse, Rue 21

EFI Global, Inc.

Humble, TX Deborah Jackson/Marketing Assistant 281-312-3161 • FAX 281-358-3956 www.efiglobal.com deborah_jackson@efiglobal.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 402 Retail Billings: $3,582,393, Hospitality Billings: $597,065 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $1,194,131 Other Billings: $52,176,701, Total Billings: $57,550,290 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 19,885 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education Leading Clients: N/A

DLR Group Ericksen Ellison & Associates

Daniel Munn/Sr. Principal 206-461-6000 www.dlrgroup.com dmunn@dlrgroup.com Year Established: 1966, No. of Employees: 750+ Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $158,399,800 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Specialize In: Energy+Engineering, Higher-Ed, Hospitality, Internatioinal, K-12, Retail, Justice+Civic, Sports, Workplace Leading Clients: N/A

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New Brighton, MN Connie Jo Richtmyre/Project Manager, Associate 651-632-2300 • FAX 651-632-2397 www.eeaengineers.com crichtmyre@eeaengineers.com Year Established: 1954, No. of Employees: 19 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $ N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 175 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurant, Education, Correctional, Data Centers, Renovations, Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


Designing experiences Architecture | Branding | Interior Design | Engineering Retail | Restaurant | Hospitality | Office | Residential stantec.com/commercial

Design with community in mind CIRCLE NO. 23


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber

Grand Rapids, MI Jenny Waugh/Marketing Operations Director 616-575-3824 www.ftch.com info@ftch.com Year Established: 1956, No. of Employees: 360 Retail Billings: $3,600,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $500,000 Other Billings: $58,000,000, Total Billings: $62,890,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 35 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: AMC, Hertz, Meijer

GPD Group

Akron, OH Michael Morrison/ Director Business Development 330-572-2158 www.gpdgroup.com mmorrison@gpdgroup.com Year Established: 1961, No. of Employees: 560 Retail Billings: $7,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $200,000 Restaurant Billings: $5,000,000, Federal: $1,500,000 Other Billings: $74,860,000, Total Billings: $88,560,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 950+ Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: CVS, Racetrac, Meijer, Taco Bell, Dollar General, Travel Centers of America

Harris Civil Engineers

Orlando, FL Debra Teply/Marketing Manager 407-629-4777 • FAX 407-629-7888 www.harriscivilengineers.com debrat@harriscivilengineers.com Year Established: 1986, No. of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $1,200,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,400,000 Restaurant Billings: $900,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $1,500,000 (Theme Parks), Total Billings: $5,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 75 Specialize In: Hotels, Theme Parks Leading Clients: Universal, Sea World, Marriott, Starwood

Henderson Engineers

Melissa Read/Communications Manager 913-742-5000 • FAX 913-742-5001 www.hei-eng.com info@hei-eng.com Year Established: 1970, No. of Employees: 620 Retail Billings: $50,623,664, Hospitality Billings: $1,207,307 Restaurant Billings: $4,056,942, Federal: $3,633,962 Other Billings: $46,393,125, Total Billings: $105,915,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,975 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Sports Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Sprint, Academy Sports, Nike, Ulta, Sprouts, Verizon, Whole Foods, Office Depot, Dave & Busters, High-End Retail

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HFA

Bentonville, AR Chris Horton/EVP & CFO 479-273-7780 www.hfa-ae.com info@hfa-ae.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 190 Retail Billings: $25,700,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $25,900,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 450 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Academy Sports, Stripes, Loves Country Stores, Fresh Thyme Market, Circle K

Hixson Architecture & Engineering Interiors

Cincinnati, OH Bruce Mirrielees/Sr. Vice President & Project Manager 513-241-1230 • FAX 513-241-1287 www.hixson-inc.com bmirrielees@hixson-inc.com Year Established: 1948, No. of Employees: 135 Retail Billings: $2,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A Other Billings: $21,300,000, Total Billings in: $23,300,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 10 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: Macy’s, Bloomingdale’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, General Growth Properties

Interface Engineering

Washington, DC Joy Phifer/Marketing Coordinator 202-370-9555 www.interfaceengineering.com joyp@interfaceeng.com Year Established: 1969, No. of Employees: 185 Retail Billings: $1,255,910, Hospitality Billings: $579,720 Restaurant Billings: $ (included in Hospitality), Federal: $2,131,425 Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $34,242,040 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Gensler, WRNS Studio, Perkins Eastman, Leo A Daly

Interplan LLC Orlando, FL Patrick Ringlever/Business Development Manager 407-645-5008 • FAX 407-629-9124 www.interplanllc.com pringlever@interplanllc.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: 130 Retail Billings: $3,197,321.51, Hospitality Billings: $55,445.62 Restaurant Billings: $6,480,843.36, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $3,265,886.13, Total Billings: $12,999,496.62 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 623 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, C-Store, Banks Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


J. Guider & Associates, P.C.

Parsippany, NJ James Guider/Owner 973-428-1101 • FAX 973-428-1308 www.jguider.com jga@jguider.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 3 Retail Billings: $30,000, Hospitality Billings: $20,000 Restaurant Billings: $80,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $370,000, Total Billings: $500,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 6 Specialize In: Commercial, Residential Leading Clients: Belfor, Paul Davis, Travelers Insurance, USAA

Jacobs

Pasadena, CA H. Thomas McDuffie/Group Vice President 571-218-1309 • FAX 571-218-1560 www.jacobs.com thomas.mcduffie@jacobs.com Year Established: 1947, No. of Employees: 63,000 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $12,100,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 556 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education Leading Clients: N/A

The JDI Group, Inc.

Maumee, OH Bryan Autullo/Director of Operations -Facilities Group 419-725-7161 • FAX 419-725-7160 www.thejdigroup.com bautullo@thejdigroup.com Year Established: 2002, No. of Employees: 72 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $285,000, Federal: $570,000 Other Billings: $8,695,000, Total Billings: $9,550,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 33 Specialize In: Education, Industrial, Manufacturing, Refining, Food, Glass, Automotive, Chemical, Government Leading Clients: Bowling Green State University, The University of Toledo, BP-Husky Refinery, Marathon Inc., General Mills, Potash Corp.

Kohrs, Lonnemann, Heil Engineers, PSC / d.b.a. - KLH Engineers

Ft. Thomas, KY Cindy Jackson/Marketing Services Manager 859-442-8050 • FAX 859-442-8058 www.klhengrs.com cjackson@klhengrs.com Year Established: 1955, No. of Employees: 160 Retail Billings: $7,875,587, Hospitality Billings: $61,594 Restaurant Billings: $455,175, Federal: $348,396, Other Billings: $9,097,274, Total Billings: $17,838,026 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,900 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Hospitality, Civic, Technology, Energy Solutions Leading Clients: Home Depot, Nike, PUMA, Kroger, BJ’s Wholesale Club

Kuhlmann Design Group, Inc.

St. Louis, MO Darrell Abernathy/VP-Director of Business Development 314-434-8898 • FAX 314-434-8280 www.kdginc.com dla@kdginc.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 50 Retail Billings: $1,074,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,264,000 Restaurant Billings: $902,000, Federal: $290,035 Other Billings: $2,127,965, Total Billings: $5,658,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 145 Specialize In: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Casinos, Education, Federal Government, Municipal Leading Clients: Seneca, The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf Co., Pieology, DESCO, Isle of Capri Casinos, Nekter, Edwards Group, Hard Rock International, Schnuck Markets Inc.

Little

Charlotte, NC Jeff Roman/National Director of Engineering 704-525-6350 • FAX 704-561-8700 www.littleonline.com jeff.roman@littleonline.com Year Established: 1964, No. of Employees: 360 Retail Billings: $1,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $200,000 Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $4,200,000, Total Billings: $6,100,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 269 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, High Performance/Sustainable Buildings Leading Clients: Sonic Automotive, Bank of America, BB&T, Wells Fargo, United Health Group, Publix, Food Lion, First Citizens Bank

Mannik & Smith Group, Inc.

Columbus, OH Steven C. Hermiller/Principal, Vice President 614-441-4222 • FAX 888-488-7340 www.MannikSmithGroup.com shermiller@MannikSmithGroup.com Year Established: 1955, No. of Employees: 260 Retail Billings: $21,546,000, Hospitality Billings: $3,078,000 Restaurant Billings: $3,078,000, Federal: $1,539,000 Other Billings: $1,539,000, Total Billings: $30,780,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 150 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Transportation, Energy Leading Clients: Ford, Marathon, ODOT, ProMedica, MarkWest, MIDOT, Toledo-Lucas Airport, Monroe County Road Commission, City of Toledo, City of Detroit, Tetra Tech

Merritt Engineering Consultants, P.C.

Bayside, NY Heather Cerone/Marketing Director 718-767-0923 • FAX 718-767-4920 www.merrittengineering.com info@merrittengineering.com Year Established: 1986, No. of Employees: 32 Retail Billings: $N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $6,500,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 225 Specialize In: Building Envelope Restoration and Structural Design for Commercial Offices/Commercial Space, Healthcare, Residential, Education Institutions and Banking Facilities Leading Clients: JP Morgan Chase, Cushman & Wakefield, Valley National Bank, Jones Lang LaSalle

MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

43


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Michael Brady, Inc.

Knoxville, TN Louis Cortina/President 865-584-0999 • FAX 865-584-5213 www.michaelbradyinc.com louisc@mbiarch.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 85 Retail Billings: $1,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $500,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $9,000,000, Total Billings: $10,500,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 25 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Specialty Structural Engineering Leading Clients: Bojangles, Pilot Travel Centers, Publix

The McIntosh Group

Tulsa, OK Karen MacCannell/Sr. Associate 918-585-8555 • FAX 918-583-7282 www.mcintoshtransforms.com karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $ N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,763 Specialize In: Retail, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Wendy’s, Pizza Hut, Kit & Ace, Kwik Trip, Regions Bank, JC Penney, Kohl’s, etc.

P2S Engineering, Inc.

Long Beach, CA Stephan Freia Kruse 562-384-5096 www.p2seng.com stephan.freiakruse@p2seng.com Year Established: 1991, No. of Employees: 140 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Federal: $N/A Other Billings: $23,022,000 Total Billings: $23,022,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 35 Specialize In: Healthcare, Education, MEPT Full Service Design Leading Clients: University of California Multiple Campuses, CSU Multiple Campuses, Port of Long Beach, The Boing Company

R.A. Smith National, Inc.

Brookfield, WI Steve Miazga/Business Development Manager 262-781-1000 • FAX 262-781-8466 www.rasmithnational.com info@rasmithnational.com Year Established: 1978, No. of Employees: 188 Retail Billings: $3,748,500, Hospitality Billings: $80,000 Restaurant Billings: $142,700, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $25,013,760.60 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 123 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: Simon, Westfield, GGP, Cabela’s, Discount Tire

44

Stantec Consulting

Chicago, IL Mary Jepsen/Marketing & BD Lead, Commercial 920-278-3217 www.stantec.com mary.jepsen@stantec.com Year Established: 1954, No. of Employees: 15,000+ Retail Billings: $37,707,326, Hospitality Billings: $1,890,845 Restaurant Billings: $1,575,981, Federal/Commercial: $8,355,905 Other Billings: $259,342,413, Total Billings: $308,872,471 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 5,198 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Airports, Attractions, Arts & Entertainment, Automotive, Civic, Justice, Mixed-Use, Office/Workplace, Research/Labs, Transit, Warehouse/Light Industrial Leading Clients: WAM Development Group, Wal-Mart Canada Corp, Ivanhoe Cambridge, 7-Eleven, IKEA Properties Limited, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC), Primaris management Inc., JP Morgan Chase & Co., The Irvine Company, Boston Properties Inc., Exxon Mobil Corporation, McDonald’s

TLC Engineering for Architecture, Inc.

Orlando, FL Cheryl Maze/Corporate Marketing & BD Manager 407-841-9050 • FAX 407-835-9926 www.tlc-engineers.com cheryl.maze@tlc-eng.com Year Established: 1955, No. of Employees: 350 Retail Billings: $1,182,138, Hospitality Billings: $2,102,712 Restaurant Billings: $ (included in retail), Federal: $1,253,152 Other Billings: $43,317,688, Total Billings: $47,855,690 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 515 Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Education, Commercial Office Leading Clients: Architects: HKS, Hunton Brady, SOM, HOK, Stantec, etc; Contractors: DPR, Skanska, Turner, Brasfield & Gorrie, etc.

Wakefield Beasley & Associates

Alpharetta, GA Michel T. Lentz/Principal Director of Retail/Mixed-Use Studio 770-851-5402 www.wbassociates.com mlentz@wbassociates.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 180 Retail Billings: $11,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $250,000 Restaurant Billings: $150,000, Federal: $1,500,000 Other Billings: $7,500,000, Total Billings: $20,400,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 100 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: N/A

Wallace Engineering

Tulsa, OK Brad Thurman/Principal & CMO 800-364-5858 • FAX 918-584-8689 www.wallacesc.com bthurman@wallacesc.com Year Established: 1981, No. of Employees: 150 Retail Billings: $8,200,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,200,000 Restaurant Billings: $600,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $11,200,000, Total Billings: $21,200,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 750 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Autozone, Love’s Country Stores

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


We’re Expanding our Architectural and Engineering Expertise. Now Located in: Bentonville, AR Boston, MA Fort Worth, TX CIRCLE NO. 24


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING

See who made our annual Roofing Manufacturing Listing

T

o help keep you in step with the industry’s leading roofing manufacturers, our annual “Roofing Manufacturing Listing” give you the information you need to make the right decisions. Our exclusive listings provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If your company was not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. 3M 3M Center, 220-3E-11 St. Paul, MN 55144-1000 Carrie Niezgocki/Marketing Supervisor Phone: 651-737-7147 www.3m.com/roofinggranules ccniezgocki@mmm.com Roofing Type: Asphalt, Coatings, Roofing Granules Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Alpine SnowGuards 289 Harrel St. Morrisville, VT 05661 Jolene Ciosek/Marketing Phone: 888-766-4273 Fax: 888-766-9994 www.alpinesnowguards.com info@alpinesnowguards.com Roofing Type: Snow Guards Markets Served: Commercial

American Weatherstar 3100 Lees Lane Mobile, AL 36693 Scott Gayle/National Sales Manager Phone: 800-771-6643 Fax: 251-479-3602 www.americanweatherstar.com sgayle@weatherstar.net Roofing Type: Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

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ATAS International, Inc. 6612 Snowdriff Rd. Allentown, PA 18106 Phone: 610-395-8446 Fax: 610-395-9342 www.atas.com info@atas.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Insulated Metal Panels, Cool Metal Roofing, Solar Ready Metal Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Atlas Roofing 2000 Riveredge Pkwy NW, Ste. #800 Atlanta, GA 30328 Diane Peoples/Marketing Communication Manager Phone: 770-952-1442 Fax: 770-952-3170 www.atlasroofing.com dpeoples@atlasroofing.com Roofing Type: Asphalt, Shakes/Shingles (Asphalt) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Other

Bade Roofing Company 3806 Lemay Ferry Rd. St. Louis, MO 63125 Dave Bade/Owner Phone: 314-892-1331 Fax: 314-894-3267 www.baderoofing.com dave@baderoofing.com Roofing Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO EPDM), Synthetic, Asphalt, Shakes/Shingles, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Snow Guards, Coatings, Roof Curbs, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


The Bilco Company Davinci Roofscapes P.O. Box 1203 New Haven, CT 06505 Steve Weyel/Marketing Manager Phone: 203-934-6363 Fax: 203-933-8478 www.bilco.com bilco@bilco.com Roofing Type: Roof Hatches, Automatic Smoke Vents, Bil-Guard 2.0 Hatch Railing System, Ladder Up Safety, Fall Protection Grating Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

CertainTeed Corporation 20 Moores Rd. Malvern, PA 19355 BethAnn Jordan-Kruljac/Marketing Communications Mgr. Phone: 800-233-8990 Fax: 855-639-6629 www.certainteed.com bethann.jordan-kruljac@saint-gobain.com Roofing Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Asphalt, Shakes/Shingles, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Chicago Clamp Company 2350 South 27th Ave. Broadview, IL 60155 Kevin Barry/Sales Manager Phone: 708-343-8311 www.ChicagoClampCompany.com kevin.barry@chicagoclampcompany.com Roofing Type: Roof Curbs, Equipment Support Frames Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Coated Metals Group 301 Yard Dr. Verona, WI 53593 Carmen Burnard/Administrative Assistant Phone: 608-826-0356 Fax: 608-826-4264 www.cmgmetals.com info@cmgmetals.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards, Steel Coil & Flat Stock Markets Served: Any and All Roofing

13890 W. 101st Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Wendy Bruch/Marketing Manager Phone: 800-328-4624 x-2116 Fax: 913-599-0065 www.davinciroofscapes.com wbruch@davinciroofscapes.com Roofing Type: Synthetic, Polymer Shakes & Slate Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Duro-Last Roofing, Inc. 525 Morley Dr. Saginaw, MI 48601 Jenny Bruzewski/Marketing Communications Manager Phone: 800-248-0280 www.duro-last.com jbruzews@duro-last.com Roofing Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Eco-Green Roofing Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

EcoFasten Solar 289 Harrel St. Morrisville, VT 05661 Jolene Ciosek/Marketing Phone: 877-859-3947 Fax: 888-766-9994 www.ecofastensolar.com info@ecofastensolar.com Roofing Type: Solar Roof Mounts and Components, Snow Management Solutions for Solar Arrays Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/ Government, Residential

EcoStar, LLC 42 Edgewood Dr. Holland, NY 14080 Edwin Staroba/Managing Director Phone: 716-537-3153 www.ecostarllc.com estaroba@ecostarllc.com Roofing Type: Synthetic, Shakes/Shingles Markets Served: Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

47


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING Englert, Inc. The Garland Company, Inc. 1200 Amboy Ave. Perth Amboy, NJ 08861 Mitch Gaber/Director of Marketing Phone: 800-ENGLERT www.englertinc.com m.gaber@englertinc.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards, Coatings, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

3800 E 91 Street Cleveland, OH 44105 Phone: 800-321-9336 Fax: 216-641-0633 www.garlandco.com info@garlandind.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Asphalt, Snow Guards, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

GSSI Sealants, Inc. EverRoof 1420 N Post Oak Rd.

8550 West Desert Inn Rd., Ste. 102-520 Las Vegas, NV 89117 David Luna/Sales Manager Phone: 702-966-9961 www.EverRoof.com dluna@EverRoof.com Roofing Type: Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Any structure with flat roof

Flex Membrane International Corporation 2670 Leiscz’s Bridge Rd., Ste. 400 Leesport, PA 19533 John Doyle/President Phone: 610-916-9500 Fax: 610-916-9501 www.FlexRoofingSystems.com jdoyle@flexmembranes.com Roofing Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Eco-Green Roofing Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

GAF 1 Campus Dr. Parsippany, NJ 07054 Arlene Marks, Marketing/PR Phone: 973-317-5851 www.gaf.com amarks@gaf.com Roofing Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Concrete, Shakes/Shingles, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings Markets Served: Commercial

48

Houston, TX 77055 Miguel Pena/Sales Phone: 832-778-6400 Fax: 832-778-6401 www.gssisealants.com info@gssisealants.com Roofing Type: Butyl Sealants Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Gutterglove, Inc.

P.O. Box 3307 Rocklin, CA 95677 Robert Lenney/CEO Phone: 916-778-8777 Fax: 916-624-5001 www.gutterglove.com robert@gutterglove.com Roofing Type: Stainless Steel Micro-Mesh Gutter Guards Markets Served: Retail, Corporate, Commercial, Federal/Government, Costco Wholesale

Huber Engineered Woods

10925 David Taylor Dr., Ste. 300 Charlotte, NC 28262 Mike Oates/Product Manager, Zip System Phone: 800-933-9220 www.zipsystem.com Roofing Type: Structural Sheathing with built in WRB Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Multi-Family, Low Rise, Light Commercial

IKO Manufacturing

235 West South Tec Dr. Kankakee, IL 60901 Jeff Williams/Brand Director, NA Phone: 866-315-3105 Fax: 815-936-9696 www.iko.com jeff.williams@IKO.com Roofing Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Asphalt, Shakes/ Shingles, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Snow Guards, Coatings, PolyIsocyanurate Insulation (PIR) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


CIRCLE NO. 25


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING IMETCO 4648 S. Old Peachtree Rd. Norcross, GA 30071 Josh Younger/Marketing Specialist Phone: 770-908-1030 Fax: 770-908-2264 www.imetco.com info@imetco.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards, Underlayments Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

InterWrap 1818-1177 West Hastings Vancouver, BC V3C 5S5 Canada Drew Gagnier/Sr. Marketing Manager Phone: 778-945-2884 Fax: 604-696-5518 www.interwrap.com info@interwrap.com Roofing Type: Roofing Underlayment Markets Served: Residential Roofing Market

Johns Manville 717 17th Street Denver, CO 80202 Christina Martinez/Marketing Specialist www.jm.com/roofing Roofing Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Karnak Corporation 330 Central Ave. Clark, NJ 07066 Chris Salazar/Chief Operating Officer Phone: 732-388-0300 Fax: 732-388-9422 www.karnakcorp.com csalazar@karnakcorp.com Roofing Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO EPDM), Asphalt, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Commercial

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LM Curbs 827 Fisher Rd. Longview, TX 75604 Clint Funderburk/VP Marketing Phone: 903-297-2148 Fax: 903-759-3598 www.lmcurbs.com clint@lmcurbs.com Roofing Type: Snow Guards, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Major Industries, Inc. 7120 Stewart Ave. Wausau, WI 54401 Mark Mitchell/Marketing Director Phone: 888-759-2678 www.majorskylights.com info@majorskylights.com Roofing Type: Skylights Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

MBCI 14031 W. Hardy Rd. Houston, TX 77060 Heather Hillis/Brand Manager Phone: 877-713-6224 Fax: 281-445-8110 www.mbci.com info@mbci.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Eco-Green Roofing Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Agricultural, Religious, Self-Storage

McElroy Metal 1500 Hamilton Rd. Bossier City, LA 71112 Ken Gieseke/VP Marketing Phone: 318-747-8071 Fax: 318-747-8059 www.mcelroymetal.com info@mcelroymetal.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Shakes/Shingles, EcoGreen Roofing Systems, Metal Tiles, Snow Guards, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Residential

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


MetLoop 100 Pamela Ann Dr. Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 Ben Greet/VP Sales Phone: 850-200-4386 x-101 www.metloop.com bengreet@metloop.com Roofing Type: Address specific severe weather alerts that are issued before the event Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Transportation, Utilities, Banking, Finance

Metl-Span 1720 Lakepoint #101 Lewisville, TX 75057 Amanda Storer/Marketing Brand Manager Phone: 972-221-6656 www.metlspan.com info@metlspan.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

MFM Building Products P.O. Box 340 Coshocton, OH 43812 David Delcoma/Product Marketing Manager Phone: 800-882-7663 Fax: 740-622-6161 www.mfmbp.com info@mfmbp.com Roofing Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Underlayments Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Mid-South Roof Systems 5020 Old Dixie Rd. Forest Park, GA 30297 Jeff Ansel/Business Development Phone: 404-361-5154 Fax: 404-361-5213 www.mid-southroof.com estimating@mid-southroof.com Roofing Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM) Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial

Morin, a Kingspan Company 685 Middle Street Bristol, CT 06010 Lori Reynolds-Morrow/Marketing Director Phone: 860-713-4706 Fax: 860-582-7503 www.morincorp.com lorirm@morincorp.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Mule-Hide Products Co., Inc. 1195 Prince Hall Dr. Beloit, WI 53511-5481 Lynette Collins/Marketing Administrator Phone: 800-786-1492 Fax: 608-365-7852 www.mulehide.com Roofing Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Roof Drains, Maintenance & Repair Products, Fasteners, Edge Metal, Cover/Barrier Boards Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

OpenAire, Inc. 2360B Cornwall Rd. Oakville, ON L6J 7T9, Canada Deborah Baker/VP & CFO Phone: 905-901-8535 Fax: 905-901-9662 www.openaire.com sales@openaire.com Roofing Type: Custom Aluminum Retractable Roofs & Skylights Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Water Parks, Aquatic & Community Centers

Petersen Aluminum 1005 Tonne Rd. Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 Rob Heselbarth/Director of Communications Phone: 847-981-4707 Fax: 847-956-7968 www.pac-clad.com rheselbarth@petersenmail.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

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SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING Plasteco, Inc. 8535 Market St. Houston, TX 77029 Jonathan Ultis/Sr. Account Manager Phone: 800-231-6117 x-304 Fax: 800-231-6117 www.plasteco.com jonathan@plasteco.com Roofing Type: Roof Curbs, Skylights & Skylight Fall Guard® Safety Screens Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal/Government

Progressive Materials 540 Central Ct. New Albany, IN 47150 Josh McKain/Marketing Director Phone: 812-944-7803 Fax: 812-944-7804 www.pmsilicone.com josh@pmsilicone.com Roofing Type: Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

RM Lucas 12400 S Laramie Ave. Alsip, IL 60803 Dennis Kelley/Market Manager Phone: 773-523-4300 Fax: 773-523-3290 www.rmlucas.com dkelley@rmlucas.com Roofing Type: Coatings, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Roof Hugger, Inc. 142 Whitaker Rd. #B Lutz, FL 33549 Dale Nelson/President Phone: 800-771-1711 Fax: 877-202-2254 www.roofhugger.com sales@roofhugger.com Roofing Type: Metal Roof Sub-Purlins Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

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ROXUL, Inc.

8024 Esquesing Line Milton, ON L9T 6W3 Canada Andrew Lindley/Segment Manager, Roofing Phone: 800-265-6878 Fax: 800-991-0110 www.roxul.com andrew.lindley@roxul.com Roofing Type: Insulation, Mineral Wool Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Sika Sarnafil 100 Dan Road Canton, MA 02021 Jay Thomas/VP Marketing Phone: 781-828-5400 usa.sarnafil.sika.com thomas.jay@us.sika.com Roofing Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Situra, Inc. 60 Industrial Parkway, Ste. 688 Cheektowaga, NY 14227 Chauntelle Facey/Project Specialist Phone:888-474-8872 Fax: 416-622-0212 www.situra.com situra@situra.com Roofing Type: Waterproof Expansion Joints Markets Served: Commercial

Iceblox, Inc. DBASnoBlox-Snojax

671 Willow St. Lemoyne, PA 17043 Howie Scarboro/National Sales Manager Phone: 800-766-5291 www.snojax.com howie@snojax.com Roofing Type: Snow Guards Markets Served: Retail, Commercial, Federal/Government

SOF Surfaces, Inc.

4393 Discovery Line Petrolia, ON N0N 1R0 Vic Scarpelli/Sales & Support Phone: 800-263-2363 x-230 Fax: 519-882-2697 www.sofsurfaces.com v.scarpelli@softsurfaces.com Roofing Type: Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Tiles Markets Served: (Flat) Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


Metafor Silversmith

Seven at Broadway LEED Certified Cincinnati, OH Architects: John Senhauser Architects Cincinnati, OH Distributor: Corken Steel Products Covington, KY Contractor: Al Neyer Cincinnati, OH Photograph: Kyle Spears Photography

Left: Metafor™ in Silversmith Over 30 standard colors & 65 designer colors KYNAR 500® PVDF or HYLAR 5000® PVDF finish

CIRCLE NO. 26


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING SOLEC 129 Walters Ave. Ewing, NJ 08638 Robert Aresty/Manager Phone: 609-883-7700 Fax: 609-883-5489 www.solec.org info@solec.org Roofing Type: Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

SOPREMA 310 Quadral Dr. Wadsworth, OH 44281 Sara Jonas/Marketing Manager Phone: 330-334-0066 Fax: 330-334-4289 www.soprema.us info@soprema.us Roofing Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes, Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Standing Seam Roof Anchor 7436 Evesborough Ln. New Port Richey, FL 34655 Howie Scarboro/CEO Phone: 863-703-4522 www.fallpd.com sales@fallpd.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Thybar Corporation 913 S. Kay Ave. Addison, IL 60101 Tim Warner/Executive VP Phone: 630-543-5300 Fax: 630-543-5309 www.thybar.com twarner@thybar.com Roofing Type: Snow Guards, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

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Tremco Roofing & Building Maintenance

3735 Green Rd. Beachwood, OH 44122 Bob Spreat/Dir. Messaging & Marketing Communications Phone: 800-562-6013 www.tremcoroofing.com bspreat@tremcoinc.com Roofing Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, State Government, Manufacturing

Triton Incorporated

250 33rd St. Dr. SE Cedar Rapids, IA 52403 Dustin Brooks/Director of Sales Phone: 319-865-5233 www.tritonwp.com info@tritonwp.com Roofing Type: Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Repair/Patch Materials Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Uniflex-Sherwin Williams

101 W Prospect Ave., Floor #525 Republic Cleveland, OH 44115 Nolan Day/Product Manager Phone: 216-515-7580 www.uniflexroof.com nolan.day@sherwin.com Roofing Type: Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

United States Gypsum Co.

550 W Adams St. Chicago, IL 60661 Derrick Hutchinson/Product Manager Phone: 312-436-6678 www.usg.com dhutchinson@usg.com Roofing Type: Roof Cover Board Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Unity Surfacing Systems

A division of Unity Creations, Ltd.

3997 Rt. 9 W (PO Box 9) Saugerties, NY 12477 Erick B. Prinz/Sales & Marketing Phone: 877-418-6489 Fax: 845-246-1700 www.surfacingsystems.com sales@surfacingsystems.com Roofing Type: Tiles, Rubber Pavers Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 27

Suspension Clamp System


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Meet me in San Antonio Historic Texas city serves as backdrop for 2016 CCR Summit

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ith tours slated for The Alamo, The River Walk and other notable points in between, some of the industry's leading commercial construction executives converged on the historic city of San Antonio for three days of networking, AIA accredited seminars, educational insights and business. The 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, held Jan. 20-22, at The Marriott Riverwalk Hotel, had a little bit of everything – and then some. The event kicked off with the annual tabletop cocktail party/dinner/scavenger hunt (winners got to donate money to their favorite charities), and moved through a tour of The Alamo (featuring a stop at Teddy Roosevelt's favorite bar), a trip to Knibbe Ranch (think Urban Cowboy and mechanical bulls) and a waterway tour in and around The River Walk. And that was just the networking. Attendees also participated in several industry-related, accredited seminars, as well as the always

anticipated one-on-one sessions, which gave vendors and end-users invaluable face time to talk shop. On the following pages is a snapshot of what makes the Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit a "must attend" event.

To the Alamo ... T

he story is one of the most endearing Texas legends. Holed up and surrounded for 13 days by General Antonio López de Santa Anna and his Mexican army, a small band of Texans made a stand unlike any other in the chapters of American history. Led by James Bowie, Davey Crockett and William B. Travis, their battle, and subsequent deaths in the early morning hours of March 6, 1836 at the Alamo, came to symbolize the relentless courage and sacrifice for the cause of liberty. The tour of the historic battle site, located on Alamo Plaza in downtown San Antonio, was one of the many networking events held during the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, Jan. 20-22, at The Marriott Riverwalk Hotel.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


Table top night

CCR 2016 charity winners

David Shotwell from Bojangles’ winner of the Big Battery Back-Up

Charity Winners from left to right back row: Ed Horner, 3H Group Hotels - St Jude’s Children’s Hospital Aaron Ancello, TD Bank - United Way Greg Parsons, MOD Pizza - Seattle Humane Society Sean Coakley, Ann Inc - Honors Bob Witken, Uncle Julio’s - Red Cross Ron Bidinost, Marie Callender’s - Give Kids the World Alvin Hood, Firebirds Wood Fired Grill - Alex’s Lemonade Front Row: Mike Gordon, Einstein Noah Restaurant Group - Boy Scouts Troop #332 Carrie Evans, Nothing Bundt Cakes - JDRF Rebekah Cianfrocco, Level Office - The Anti-Cruelty Society

Luke Hanson from RaceTrac, received bottle service from local night club.

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Life redefined Industry veteran Grace Daly inspires attendees with impassioned insights

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hen Grace Daly was asked to share her insights as the keynote speaker for the Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit in San Antonio, she admittedly wasn’t sure what she was going to address. Growing up in the industry with so many of her colleagues in attendance, what could she possible share that they didn't already know, she thought to herself. And then it dawned on her – why not share her experiences of learning and growth? Share the thought and personal insights that drive her every day. Her insights came from her personal and career transformations she experienced over the past six years, including

Whatever it is that you wish to accomplish – your decision in that endeavor will bring about a whole set of people, places and things to support it – the key is you need to have your eyes wide open to see and catch these miracles. Also, conversely, if you choose to not take any action or proceed with doubt and uncertainty, there will be inactivity or activity to match that energy. We’ve all heard that expression: Like Attracts Like – this is the universal expression of it.

Create Healthy Relationships

“Go where the love is. Where there is love you will flourish. Where you flourish your miracles will manifest.” Now this is the last and most important key. I’ve coached hundreds of people, both inside and outside of our Industry – and the No. 1 challenge I see are that many people continue to remain in an unhealthy relationship or environment after exhausting all measures in attempt to improve the situation. They have been in this negativity for so long that they have learned to identify themselves strongly with this and have accepted it as their life’s path,

Whatever it is that you wish to accomplish – your decision in that endeavor will bring about a whole set of people, places and things to support it.

three key principles that have inspired her during her journey, as presented in her words:

Always Trust Your Intuition

“Intuition is the soul’s knowing, your soul’s feeling. There is no need to justify this to anyone, just trust and follow your intuition’s path.” This is worth repeating: Always, always, always trust your intuition. The times I have gotten in trouble were when I have not listened to this little voice that gently tugged at me. One thing I’ve experienced about intuition is that it is clearly heard when one is calm and still; when there is no mind chatter or outside distractions. Be aware of the day to day noise, other people’s drama or even your own – so that you may gently release it to be in touch with your innermost selves – your intuition.

Be Bold, Providence Follows

“Feelings create thoughts, thoughts create decisions, decisions create actions. The universe simply follows to support your direction.”

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as a norm. To move on, away from negativity is not only a sign of strength – but it is a true sign of self-love. When we free ourselves to a flourishing environment or loving relationships, we grow in all ways to our truest and highest self. However it is that you define your life, make it a great one because you deserve fulfillment, peace and love. CCR For more insights, you can reach out to Daly at Grace@GraceDaly.com

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


The value of design Presentation by: Dawn Hollingsworth, LC, FIALD, ZUZINK

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esign is a key component of financial success. In a design-led experiential economy, brands that depend on brick and mortar for their primary customer interface maximize design efforts to create important elements of their customer experience. This may encompass the flow of how customers enter or navigate the store and how goods are displayed. More importantly, the materials, colors, composition and organization say everything about the quality and persona of the brand. In other words, design is the physical expression of your brand DNA. The long struggle of design has been to justify its value. Design has been lacking a kind of science that supports its value and impact on business performance. Design is strategy fused

once executed. Most creations are intangible or have considerable intangible elements, making it difficult to see the value until the result is realized. It has been shown that: • Every $1 invested in design returns $2.25 • Where design is integral to the business, less than half compete mainly on price • Shares in design-led businesses outperform stock indices by 200 percent • On average “design alert” businesses increased their market share by 6.3 percent through design efforts

Businesses say they want creativity and innovation. Design delivers both, yet is regarded more like art than science. with a problem solving methodology that helps companies know why, how and what to make in order to help people feel how they want to feel. Why are some business activities mandatory when others are discretionary? What is the ROI of accounting? How does HR contribute to shareholder value? Why is investment in design discretionary when HR and accounting are not? Businesses say they want creativity and innovation. Design delivers both, yet is regarded more like art than science. The design process is mysterious to most business executives. How could those drawings cost so much when they are just lines and dimensions on paper. The drawing is in a computer, so it must be easy to change it, right? Simply put, the design process is a sequence of ideas that develop and flow to create a tangible a solution

What is a “design-alert” business? Designers are positioned in key managerial roles. The companies often use external design consultants and likely have design training for employees. These companies use design, because they see their ability to develop higher quality products and services will provide added value to their customers. Beyond anecdotal evidence, how does a brand know if the dollars spent on design efforts are returned? Metrics targeted to analyze design investment have slowly developed over the last decade and should align with the corporate goals established at the beginning of the project. CCR

Dawn Hollingsworth, LC, FIALD, is a certified Lighting Professional by the National Council on Qualifications for the Lighting Professions (NCQLP) and a Fellow of the International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD). She has more than 35 years experience with a diversified background in theatrical and architectural lighting design and consulting, marketing, business management, product management and development, manufacturing, scenic design and event production.

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

If your brand isn’t broken, should you break it? Roundtable Discussion with: Moderator: Steve Pollard, Managing Director, JLL Project Development and Services Panelists: Bruce Allendorfer, Regional Director of Construction, Wendy’s Paul Archambault, Director of Facilities & Distribution, At Home Group Elaine Kleinschmidt, Vice President, Big Red Rooster, a JLL Company

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ince branding is consistently a hot topic within the industry, Commercial Construction & Renovation asked Steve Pollard, managing director, Multi-Site Project and Development Services at JLL, to lead a panel discussion on Brand Transformation. Joining Pollard, were Bruce Allendorfer, regional director of construction for Wendy’s; Paul Archambault, director of facilities & distribution for At Home Group; and Elaine Kleinschmidt, Vice President for Big Red Rooster, a JLL Company. Below is a high level summary of what the group talked about during the lively panel discussion:.

What is branding?

commitment to quality and customer service by re-energizing every touch point with its customers. “Being relevant and delivering the latest and greatest amenities – that’s what our customers expect,” Allendorfer said. “Our image activation program has had a positive increase on sales, customer counts and customer satisfaction. Sales are important, of course, but positive customer count increase is even more important because we want our customers to keep coming back.” The At Home brand, formerly known as Garden Ridge, was born with the objective of better connecting and being more relevant with a broader audience. As part of the transformation, all of the Garden Ridge stores were renovated with the new branding. Panelist and At Home’s director of facilities Paul Archambault said it is important to have At Home’s CEO directly to ensure alignment with his vision, which included having a name that better reflected the product we sell.

Branding is visual. It includes signage, but it’s a whole lot more. It’s really a collection of all the attributes that make up our perceptions about products, companies, and even people. It’s the intangible sum of all of the perceptions and expectations held by consumers.

Why is all of this important?

The brand is a special intangible that in many businesses is the most valuable asset. People decide what products to buy, who they want to work for, and even where to invest their money – all based on branding.

When and why should a brand change?

If it isn’t broken, should you break it? In order to sustain growth, companies are transforming their brand to achieve a better market position, an enhanced customer experience, new shopper engagement and real estate optimization.

Brand transformation can take many forms

Just like every brand is unique, every brand transformation is unique as well. The individuals on the panel were carefully selected to provide their own unique experiences and viewpoints around branding. An updated logo and store design for Wendy’s has greatly evolved the way people perceive the Wendy’s brand, reinforcing its

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Big Red Rooster, a JLL company, has helped some of the world’s most recognized brands with their transformation efforts. Kleinschmidt said the brand experience firm looks at brands through its OmniExperience lens – viewing the totality of a company’s brand experience through the eyes of the shopper. So, how do you get from here to there? When it comes to branding, you must get it done right – and program management is a great way to do that. “The team members I worked with at JLL, they’ve got ketchup in their veins,” Allendorfer said. “They helped us avoid unnecessary costs by anticipating issues that could lead to delays in reopening a restaurant. A one day delay equals one day of sales lost, which is critical to any restaurant in the QSR industry.” CCR

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


Future Forecast: How drones, sensors and integrated apps are rewriting all the rules Presentation by: James Benham, CEO, JBKnowledge Inc.

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verywhere you look, there’s a new mobile, drone or wearable device. How are these technologies evolving construction projects? How are top contractors running research and development on emerging technologies? It is time commercial construction executives start thinking of ways to get ahead of the learning curve and learning what up and coming technology solutions their peers in the industry already are utilizing. The latest trends, solutions and devices – things such as drones, sensors and integrated apps – in building technologies are rewriting the rules for construction projects. In addition to a brief history of virtual reality, Benham reviewed augmented reality and wearable devices, and other types of technology to be used on future construction jobsites, such as 3D printers, drones and smart helmets.

The latest trends, solutions and devices – things such as drones, sensors and integrated apps – in building technologies are rewriting the rules for construction projects. For some on-hand data, check out the annual Construction Technology Report, a survey of over two thousand construction professionals on how they are employing and integrating technology on building projects. You can download the report at no cost at http://jbknowledge.com/report. There are a number of examples of real companies that are researching and implementing the latest technologies, giving real

time data on how these technologies are impacting their construction projects. For example, drones are introducing builders to data mobility, visualization, access and efficiency on projects. In addition, cutting edge mobile applications, sensors and web-based solutions are being integrated for use in the office and on the job site. “It was a very engaging look at the near future,” said Steve Killius, VP of Contractor Industry Affairs at Legrand.” CCR

James Benham, CEO of JBKnowledge Inc., speaks across the world on innovative technology solutions for construction and insurance. With more than 15 years of experience, he has led JBKnowledge to become a premier provider of technology solutions for building contractors, with clients across North America, the Caribbean and the Middle East. James also serves as a College Station Councilman and an Adjunct Professor of Construction Science at Texas A&M University. For information, visit jamesbenham.com.

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Mall anchor re-purposing Presentation by: James L. Harkin, AIA, LEED AP, Senior VP, Principal, FRCH Design Worldwide

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he American mall, first developed and designed in the early 1950s, was to be used as a focused, indoor gathering place for consumers to have access to hundreds of retailers all at once. Department stores, as anchors to these malls, were the stars of the developments, projecting the main draw for consumers and controlling the majority of retail sales in the United States. Today, there are less than a thousand malls in the United States, with most in a state of repositioning. The department store category continues to decline and condense, now with only 22 major brands between the five categories of department stores. These brands include the sectors of upscale, middle market, regional, suburban and discount. Paced by acquisitions and consolidation, there are around 17 owners of these 22 brands. As many of these department store chains are declining and consolidating, there are many anchor department stores going dark. Mall owners are searching for a variety of ways to repurpose them. There

entries on the mall exterior side. This goes against the basic intrinsic principal of getting the consumer inside the mall first, which provides the opportunity to view most of the other retailers. Having an entry/ exit to a tenant without needing to go into the mall proper eventually will reduce traffic for other retailers to parlay. Additional challenges in converting these former anchors include the following: • Obtaining Anchor approval • Signage approval by anchors and zoning • Possible new parking/grading requirements • Building code issues – (anchor versus non-anchor) • Upgrading of existing utilities • Restroom upgrades • New loading dock requirements • New exterior public space requirements

As many of these department store chains are declining and consolidating, there are many anchor department stores going dark. Mall owners are searching for a variety of ways to repurpose them.

usually are three options: demolish the building and redevelop the land, convert the box to a new single tenant or divide the box into a multi tenant building. While some anchor stores are single story, most are twoto three-story buildings, which add to the challenge of repurposing. There are advantages and disadvantages with each of the three options, but the biggest challenge for mall owners is that the new retailer, or multiple retailers, is demanding brand expression and

There will be several hundred vacant anchor store buildings at malls in the next two years, with many more to be added. Developers and department store must be creative and entrepreneurial in their approaches to re-purposing these spaces. With change, comes great opportunity for new niche retailers and new architectural designs, which if done properly, can enhance an existing mall for many years to come. CCR

James L. Harkin, AIA, LEED AP, is a senior vice president and principal for FRCH Design Worldwide.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


Ride ‘em cowboy Reliving the life and times of bull riding icon John Mack

O

h, the stories John Mack can tell. After 10 years competing at the highest level on bull riding circuits across the country, he spent another 30 as an analyst, commentating on the ins and outs of one of the most extreme sports we know. To be sure, there are parallels between the high risk life of a rodeo cowboy and the challenges in the workplace, namely finding the balance between winning and losing, and how to turn failure into success. Mack’s love affair with the “bucking chute,” as the pros call it, began in 1973, and then transitioned into the commentator world. Over the last 35 years, Mack has called more than 3,000 events, including the Open Professional Rodeos exclusively for the Lester Meier Rodeo Company, headquartered in Fredericksburg, Texas. "Rodeo has a fascinating heritage in that, as a sport, it grew from a dangerous and romantic working lifestyle of the American Cowboy," Mack says. "The action is authentic, fresh and exciting." Mack says the adrenaline of both riding bulls and announcing the rodeos is intense, although he admits it is, at time, more terror than adrenaline when you're on the bull. "The rodeo rough stock – bulls and broncs – are huge, powerful, athletic, entertaining and dangerous. Few animals have the genetic makeup to have the interest in, heart for, and athletic ability to buck. Because the are rare, they are valuable which makes them valued, appreciated and protected."

“Rodeo contestants are a unique and independent lot, typically God fearing and patriotic with a fierce attachment to their families and to the land.” – John Mack

As for the type of person who can stare down an amped up bull (or bronc) with the money, the crowd and entertainment value on the line? “Rodeo contestants are a unique and independent lot, typically God fearing and patriotic with a fierce attachment to their families and to the land,” Mack says. “They have uncommon skill sets and athletic abilities and are the ultimate risk takers. As for the bulls? Says Mack, “They are an ultimate thrill to ride and a unique pleasure to watch and to care for.” CCR

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Networking nirvana Vendors, end-users get down to business in one-on-one meetings

Y

ou have your cocktail receptions. Your dinners. Your networking events in and around historic San Antonio. Some people even had the opportunity to face down a mechanical bull. But when it came to one of the best parts of the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, the one-on-one meetings stole the show. The heavily anticipated meetings give vendors and end users 15 minutes of face time to talk shop. The meetings were part of the Summit, held Jan. 20-22, at The Marriott Riverwalk Hotel in San Antonio.

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Ride 'em cowboy – and cowgirls!! I

f you're going to go to Texas, especially as part of a Commercial Construction & Renovation event, you're going to get a Texas-size networking event. Enter the Knibbe Ranch, one of the state's premiere working cattle ranches, complete with a thriving cow-calf operation. Founded in 1852, the family owned business served as the perfect backdrop for some Texas-size fun. Along with some good old-fashioned barbeque, attendees were able to live out all those "Urban Cowboy" fantasies on the mechanical bull. Yes, there are stories. But, what happened on the bull, stayed on the bull (or the floor – that much we can share). The night of cowboy and cowgirl fun was part of the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, held Jan. 20-22, at The Marriott Riverwalk Hotel in San Antonio.

Take me to the water... F

ew cities can match the historic beauty that surrounds the downtown San Antonio area, especially in and around one of its biggest attractions – The River Walk. The Cathedral of San Fernando. The Majestic Theatre. The Fairmount Hotel, which, built in 1906, is San Antonio's second oldest hotel and a place holder in the Guinness World Records as one of the heaviest buildings ever moved intact. So, what better way to see the all the sights than jump on a water boat and hear an insider's take on all those amazing structures. The Rio San Antonio Cruises River Tour was one of the key networking events during the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, held Jan. 20-22, at The Marriott Riverwalk Hotel in San Antonio.

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS 3M

Container Management Inc

3M Center Bldg 220-12E-04 Maplewood, MN 55144 (651) 736-0977 Cindy Jenkins / Marketing Manager ccjenkins1@mmm.com www.mmm.com Graphics / Architectural Finishes / Floor Maintenance

9811 S IH-35, Bldg. 5, Ste. 110 Austin, TX 78744 (512) 280-5151 Dorothy Hammel / CEO/Owner dorothy@cmi-usa.com www.cmi-usa.com Containers – Fireworks sponsors

Core States Group

110 Sargent Drive, New Haven, CT 06511 (512) 585-5205 Jan McKenzie / National Accounts jan.mckenzie@assaabloy.com Security

3039 Premiere Pkway Suite 700 Duluth, GA 30097 (678) 314-5189 Kevin Behnke / Director of Business Development kbehnke@core-eng.com www.core-eng.com Project Management Services

Carney Contracting Services

Cosentino NA

ASSA ABLOY

536 Cassingham Rd Fairless Hills ,PA 19030 (610) 950-0264 Craig Weber / Business Growth Strategist craig@carneycontracting.com www.carneycontracting.com General Contractor/ Project Management

2245 Texas Drive Suite 600 Sugar Land, TX 77479 (281) 202-3110 Steve DeBerardino / Director, Corporate Accounts steved@cosentino.com www.cosentino.com Surfacing Materials

CDO Group

Dryvit Systems

333 Harrison St. Oak Park, IL. 60304 (708)-383-0586 Anthony Amunategui / President anthony@cdogroup.com www.cdogroup.com Project Management Services

One Energy Way West Warwick, RI 02893 (630) 432-9697 Chuck Bundrick / National Renovation Mgr chuck.bundrick@dryvit.com www.dryvit.com Arch Building Products

Columbia Forest Products

DWM Construction & Renovation

7900 Triad Center Drive Suite 200 Greensboro, NC 27409 (336) 456-8657 Richard Poindexter / Specialty Products Manager rpoindexter@cfpwood.com www.cfpwood.com Architectural Building Products

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2 Northway Lane Latham, NY 12110 (888) 396-9111 Joe Fairley Director Client Services jfairley@dwminc.com www.dwminc.com Architectural Building Products

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


Egan Sign

Hermitage Lighting

522 Willow Street Reading, PA 19602 (610) 816-7605 Doug Stine / Marketing Manager doug.stine@egansign.com www.egansign.com Signage

3640 Trousdale Drive Nashville, TN 37204 (615) 843-3394 JD Ryan / Account Manager jdr@hlg.co www.hlg.co Lighting

Exclusive Retail Interiors

ICON

998C Old Country Rd Suite 318 Plainview, NY 11803 (516) 513-1255 Joe Demeri President / jdemeri@exclusiveretail.net www.exclusiveretail.net Fixtures

1418 Elmhurst Road Elk Grove, IL 60007 (847) 631-3295 Lori O’Brien / VP National Accounts lobrien@iconid.com www.iconid.com Construction/Signage/Signage & Lighting Maintenance

Federated Service Solutions Inc

Identicom Sign Solutions

30955 Northwestern Hwy Farmington Hills, MI 48334 (248) 539-9000 Jennifer Ferris / President jferris@federatedservice.com www.federatedservice.com Cabling/Data

24657 Halsted Road Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (248) 344-9590, ext 222 John DiNunzio / President jdinunzio@identicomsigns.com www.identicomsigns.com Branding/Signage

GPD Group

Identity Management

520 South Main Street Suite 2531 Akron, OH 44311 (330) 572-2158 Mike Morrison / Director of Marketing mmorrison@gpdgroup.com www.gpdgroup.com Architects/Engineers/Contractors

1702 Minters Chapel Road Suite 114 Grapevine, TX 76051 (817) 912-0039, ext 103 Kirk Stateson National Account Business Development kstateson@identitybusiness.com www.identitybusiness.com Signage

Granger Contracting & N-Store Services

Innovative Dehumidifier Systems

600 Trade Center Blvd Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 778-2630 Kevin Zigrang / Director of Business Development kevin@gnhservices.com www.gnhservices.com General Contracting/Remodels/Installation

6260 Ocean Hwy West Ocean Isle Beach, NC 28469 (910) 579-3348 Ron Revia / National Sales Manager ron@innovativedehu.com www.innovativedehu.com HVAC/Dehumidifiers

Toll Free: 800-264-3383 www.hermitagelighting.com Nashville, Tennessee SPECIALIST IN RESTAURANT AND RETAIL LIGHTING DESIGN

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS


INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS JLL

Porcelanosa USA

200 East Randolph Drive Chicago, IL 60601 (312) 228-2556 Steve Pollard / Managing Director steve.pollard@am.jll.com www.jll.com Project Management Services

600 Route 17 North Ramsey, NJ 07446 (201) 995-1310 Andrew Pennington / Sales Director apennington@porcelanosa-usa.com www.porcelanosa-usa.com Architectural Building Products

Lakeview Construction

Prime Retail Services

10505 Corporate Drive Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (262) 857-3336 John Stallman / Marketing Manager john@lvconstruction.com www.lvconstruction.com General Contracting

3617 Southland Drive Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 Michael Edmundson / Vice President medmundson@primeretailservices.com www.primeretailservices.com General Contracting Services/Installations

Nationwide Cleaners

Regency Lighting

105 Main Street Suite 3 Hackensack, NJ 07601 (877) 933-8356 Michael Rose, Jr. / President mrose@nationwidecleaners.com www.nationwidecleaners.com Painting Contractor/Facility Maintenance

9261 Jordan Ave Chatsworth, CA 91311 (800) 284-2024 Mark Heerema / Snr Dir of National Accounts mark.heerema@regencylighting.com www.regencylighting.com Lighting

Retail Maintenance Specialists North American Signs 3601 W. Lathrop South Bend, IN 46628 (574) 276-7921 Randy Davis / New Business Development/National Sales rld@northamericansigns.com www.northamericansigns.com Signage – Fireworks sponsors

1995 Swarthmore Ave Suite 2 Lakewood, NJ 08701 (609) 891-9954 Kelli Buhay / Director of Business Development kelli@retailmsc.com www.retailmsc.com Facility Maintenance

Philadelphia Sign

Rockerz Inc

707 West Spring Garden Street Palmyra, NJ 08065 (503) 830-3841 Nate Doney / National Sales Executive ndoney@philadelphiasign.com www.philadelphiasign.com Signage

100 Commonwealth Drive Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 814-2894 Robert Smith / Dir of Business Development rsmith@rockerzinc.com www.rockerzinc.com Polished Concrete Services

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Rogers Electric 2050 Marconi Drive Suite 200 Alpharetta, GA 30005 (949) 381-0700 John Irwin / President West Coast jirwin@lrogerselectric.com www.lrogerselectric.com Electrical/Lighting/Construction

S. Moraitis & Associates 120 N. Green Street Apt #4-F Chicago, IL 60607 (312) 342-5730 Sophia Moraitis / Business Development smoraitis@sma-law.com www.sma-law.com Construction Legal Services

Sargenti Architects 461 From Road Paramus, NJ 07652 (973) 253-9393 Rob Sargenti / Owner rsargenti@sargarch.com www.sargarch.com Architecture Firm

Shaw PPC Design

Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc. Certified MBE 4555 Middle Road Columbus, IN 47203 (812) 379-9547 Jeff Chandler / Vice President jchandler@tbcci.com www.tbcci.com GC/Millwork/Fixture Installations/Certified MBE

The Blue Book P.O. Box 500 Jefferson, NY 10535 (800) 431-2584 Kelly Carpentierei / Marketing Manager kcarpentieri@thebluebook.com www.thebluebook.com Labor/Sub Contractors/Project Management – Lanyard Sponsor

The McIntosh Group 1850 S. Boulder Ave Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 585-8555 x20 Karen MacCannell / Snr Associate, Business Development karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com www.themcintoshgroup.com ADA Services/Architectural Firm

The Paint Folks

44311 Grand River Ave Novi, MI 48375 (248) 348-7755, ext 352 Don Schroeder / National Sales dschroeder@shawandslavsky.com www.shawppcdesign.com Fixtures

105 Main Street 3rd Floor Hackensack, NJ 7601 (201) 968-5407 Brian Foster / VP bfoster@paintfolks.com www.paintfolks.com Painting Contractor/Facility Maintenance

Storefloors

United Sign Systems

6480 Roswell Road Atlanta, GA 30328 (404) 610-4008 Julia Versteegh / Dir of Marketing & Business Development juliav@storefloors.com www.storefloors.com Flooring

206 Tower Drive Oldsmar, FL 34667 (813) 855-3300 Eric Johnson / Business Development Mgr dej@usigns.com wwwusigns.com Signage

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS


INDUSTRY EVENTS

REGISTRATION LIST

3H Group Hotels Director of Construction 3M Brand Owner 3M Marketing Development Manager Allied Development Services President Ann Taylor Director Store Facilities Apple Global Sourcing Mgr Assa Abloy National Accounts At Home Facilities-New Stores Barnes & Noble Development Mgr BCBG VP Arch & Construction Big Red Rooster/JLL VP Digital Experience Bojangles’ Dir of Construction Carney Contracting Business Growth Strategist Carney Contracting Business Development CBG Commercial Real Estate CFO CDO Group President Celestial Meetings Owner Columbia Forest Products Specialty Products Manager Container Management Inc Marketing/Development Continental Restaurants Owner Core States Group Director of Business Development Core States Group Texas Director of Business Development Cosentino NA Director, Corporate Accounts Crestpoint Companies VP Business Development Crestpoint Companies Architect Cushman Wakefield Managing Director David’s Bridal Construction Manager Dryvit Systems National Renovation Mgr DWM Construction & Renovation Director Client Services DWM Construction & Renovation Director of Projects Egan Sign Director of National Accounts Egan Sign Marketing Manager Einstein Noah Facilities Manager South Region Enterprise Holdings Inc Dir of Corp Ops/Facilities Exclusive Retail Interiors President Exclusive Retail Interiors Sales Associate Federated Service Solutions Inc Director of Sales Federated Service Solutions Inc President Fiesta Restaurant Group Inc VP Construction Firebirds Wood Fired Grill Director of Construction Follett Director of Construction Follett Director of In-Store Experience Francesca’s Sr. Director of Construction Francesca’s Construction Manager FRCH Design Worldwide VP GPD Group Director of Marketing GPD Group Business Development Granger Contracting & N-Store Services National Account Executive Granger Contracting & N-Store Services Business Development Associate H&M Regional Construction Mgr Hermitage Lighting Account Manager Hermitage Lighting Account Manager Hospitality Realty Services President ICON VP National Accounts ICON VP National Accounts Identicom Sign Solutions President Identity Management National Account Business Development Innovative Dehumidifier Systems Project Manager Innovative Dehumidifier Systems VP Sales Interserve Hospitality Services VP Ops JBKnowledge CEO JCP Dir of Ops & Construction Svcs JLL Managing Director JLL Managing Director JLL/B of A Project Mgr John Mack Cowboys Inc President John Varvatos Enterprises Facilities Mgr Lakeview Construction Marketing Manager Lakeview Construction President Level Office Dir of Development Level Office Corporate Design Coor. Life Time Fitness VP Arch & Eng Marie Callender’s Snr Dir of Ops & Admin Mitsubishi US Securities Analyst/Facilities MOD Pizza Dir of Construction Nationwide Cleaners Construction Manager North American Signs National Accounts Nothing Budnt Cakes Dir of Development

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Orscheln Store Development Mgr Party City Construction Philadelphia Sign National Sales Executive PJW Restaurant Group Construction Pomeroy Lodging Dir of Construction Porcelanosa USA Sales Director Porcelanosa USA Business Development Primanti Bros Construction Prime Retail Services Consultant RaceTrac Petroleum Senior Project Manager - New Store Construction Ralph Lauren Facilities Management & Energy Engineering RB Hotel Development Program Mgr RCA Board Member Ready & Inspired Inc Author Red Robin Gourmet Burgers & Brews Dir of Construction Regency Lighting Director of National Accounts Regency Lighting Snr Dir of National Accounts Retail Maintenance Specialists Director of Business Development Rockerz Inc Dir of Business Development Rockerz Inc Dir of Operations Rogers Electric President West Coast Rogers Electric VP Lighting Solutions Rue21 Western Reg Dir of Construction S. Moraitis & Associates Business Development Sally Beauty Real Estate Coor Sargenti Architects Owner Sargenti Architects Business Development Save-A-lot Store Design & Planning Shaw PPC Design National Sales Sleepy’s Dir of Facilities Mgt/Purchasing Southern Deli Holdings Dir of Construction Speedway LLC Dir of Construction & Engineering Starboard Group Dir of Facilities & Construction Steak N Shake Director of Construction Steak N Shake Sr. Director of Construction Steak N Shake US Eastern Region Steak N Shake Director of Design Storefloors Dir of Marketing & Business Development Subway of Eastern PA Development Mgr Target Snr Construction Project Mgr Taylor Bros. Construction Vice President Taylor Bros. Construction Subcontract Administrator TD Bank VP Facilities NE TD Bank VP Asset Reinvestment The Blue Book Marketing Manager The Fresh Market Director of Construction The Joint Dir of Construction & Facilities The Little Gym Inter. Real Estate & Dev Mgr The McIntosh Group Principal The McIntosh Group Snr Associate, Business Development The Paint Folks VP The Shopping Center Group Snr Property Mgr The Shopping Center Group Dir of Property Mgmt The Vitamin Shoppe Construction & Facilities The Wendy’s Company Dir of Construction/South Region Uncle Julio’s Director of Construction Under Armour Snr Mgr Global Store Development United Sign Systems Business Development Mgr United Sign Systems National Accounts Mgr Univ. of TX/ San Antonio TXDOT Program Mgr US Cellular Vendor Mgr US Cellular C&D/Mgr Finance & Ops Wawa Inc Director of Construction Which Wich Snr Development & Project Coor Which Wich Dir of Construction Whole Foods South Region PM-Store Development Team Zuzink Designer

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


SAV

E TH

ED ATE

Orlando, FL January 2017

WANT TO ATTEND AS AN END-USER OR SPONSOR... Contact David Corson 678.765.6550 or e-mail davidc@ccr-mag.com End-Users (retailers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc.) will receive complimentary hotel, airfare, transportation Exact dates and location to be announced in CCR May/June 2016 issue

www.ccr-summit.com

CIRCLE NO. 28

Sponsored by:


Pushing the

envelope How a Portland developer challenged the industry’s typical building standards By Adam Petersen

T

he future of construction is more than just a building. It’s an opportunity to consider environmental impacts at each milestone, to give back to the community and to push the envelope on what it means to create a replicable sustainability model for commercial buildings. Brought to life in the heart of one of the nation’s top green building cities, One North is a multi-use, commercial development in Portland, Ore., that incorporates unique design attributes, high standards of energy efficiency, and the use of environmentally sustainable and ethically sourced materials. Coupled with a strong commitment to community values and collaboration, the development represents an entirely different approach to the commercial development process. Beyond an empty plot of land, One North’s developer saw an opportunity to invest in an area that commercial buildings are scarce and focused on creating what would be the center of a 20-minute neighborhood (residents can easily walk or bicycle to meet all basic daily, non-work needs). The result includes creative office and retail space spread across two buildings, the East and West, which overlook a dedicated and landscaped 14,000 square-foot public courtyard that’s shared with the neighboring Radiator building.

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Open to tenants and the community alike, the outdoor space is meant to encourage education, collaboration and engagement with the larger neighborhood through organized programs and events. The importance of collaboration among tenants and neighbors is placed so high in fact that commitment to acting on these core values was written into lease agreements. For the emerging North Portland neighborhood, the project will breathe economic life into the area and offer a place for the community to come together, and continue to evolve.

A unique vision

One North, the product of a multi-year collaborative process, is the brainchild of Karuna Properties II owner Eric Lemelson, who has been a leader in Oregon’s sustainability movement for several decades. Lemelson envisioned a different kind of project in One North, and his passion for sustainability coupled with a rich history in innovation positioned him with the necessary knowledge to make it a reality. R&H Construction – alongside Holst Architecture, Froelich Engineers and McKinstry – helped realize the developer’s goals and vision through innovative solutions, and brought many of the more challenging elements of the project to life. The goal was to employ ethical, sustainable and efficiency standards far above industry standards, while simultaneously using systems and approaches that could serve as a model and inspiration for future projects – and were able to be replicated. Certain sustainable processes actually can be barriers to success, and defining and implementing the most appropriate options for One North required different thinking and a creative approach to commercial building.

Implementing the right tools

One North is meant to serve as an example of the approach to commercial buildings in the future, and the use of prefabricated materials and other features helped improve efficiencies and cut costs. The buildings feature unique curves and apertures that provide eye-catching curb appeal and also enhance natural shading and daylighting of the interior spaces. Initially, the apertures were to be constructed of red

iron steel cages, but that posed difficulties with constructability and schedule, and necessitated materials with huge amounts of embodied energy that conflicted with the sustainable building goals of the project. Drawing from previous experiences with curvilinear structures, R&H elected to bring on Radius Track Corporation of Minneapolis to help facilitate the design and engineering of the aperture structural components. Prefabricated cold-formed decks and trusses replaced the red iron cages and were shipped cross country and installed on the One North Site, decreasing the overall weight by nearly 60 percent and cutting weeks out of the installation schedule. The team used building information modeling (BIM) and Revit software to coordinate details with Radius Track, create exact 3D digital models of the aperture components, sequence the installation, and schedule just-in-time deliveries. This ensured precise construction of the structural elements to within an impressive 1/8-inch of the design, and resulted in an overall reduction in the construction timeline of more than 10 percent due to the efficiency of these critical components.

Pioneering new standards

Fueled by a vision to create the best development possible without sacrificing quality and ethical standards, the project team ensured that goal was met in every aspect of the project. The unique curves of the East and West buildings are complemented by their equally striking cedar siding – a feature that’s also reflective of the project team’s commitment to exceeding industry standards.

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CIRCLE NO. 29

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PUSHING THE ENVELOPE It was important to the developer to know precisely where the siding material was coming from, reaching beyond FSC and SFI certification. Additionally, second growth wood was intentionally chosen because of the negative environmental impacts of using old growth cedar, a rare species in the Pacific Northwest. The trees for the second growth western red cedar siding initially were sourced through Wetset Enterprises, a member of a co-op of private landowners in Western Washington, Northwest Resource Group. This unique group of landowners manages their forestlands sustainably, and was willing to work with the project team on a custom specification for the buildings’ cedar siding. R&H was able to hand-source domestically harvested non-old growth cedar, meet the individuals logging and milling the material, and run a custom 5/4-inch profile

for increased durability. As one of the most sustainable features in the building, it also proved to be one of the most challenging.

Maximizing return

savings. When evaluating double-glazed versus triple glazed units for windows however, the performance increase was almost negligible – but the cost differentiation was astronomical. Therefore, the team deemed triple glazed units unnecessary for the project, and opted to use double glazed instead. To maximize the energy efficiency of the shell, the buildings feature a double paned thermally broken curtainwall system on all floors, 8-feet of dense pack cellulose insulation in the wall cavities and 4-inch mineral wool exterior insulation as part of the rain screen. The thermal separation is carried down into the subgrade as well with two inches of rigid insulation underneath and fully encompassing every exposed footing, slab, and stem wall that would traditionally come into contact with the earth. A custom 2-inch thick as-cast architectural concrete panel was poured in front of the insulated stem walls to achieve the desired aesthetic and maintain the thermal separation, for significantly less cost than a more typical pre-cast concrete solution. Rather than seeking third party recognition of sustainability efforts for the project, Lemelson had his own interpretation of the level of excellence the project would achieve. Heightened standards for energy performance, ethical practices and a commitment to building with the greater North Portland community in mind each contributed to this sustainable, lasting development.

One North is meant to serve as an example of the approach to commercial buildings in the future, and the use of prefabricated materials and other features helped improve efficiencies and cut costs.

Every design aspect of One North was intentional, and each feature and product was carefully weighed against a single overarching goal: to use systems and approaches that could serve as a model for future projects. This required taking a critical eye toward sustainable practices in order to find the balance between green initiatives and not diminishing return by adopting excessive sustainability standards. With the developer and Holst Architecture, R&H carefully weighed the options to see which products would achieve the project goals without unnecessary spending. One example that demonstrates these efforts presented itself when considering a curtainwall versus storefront system for the windows. The first was more appropriate for air and energy performance, and the higher expense was warranted for the long-term energy

The future of commercial building

While tracking the momentum and innovation surrounding green building trends, the leaps and bounds of progress made is inarguable. Yet it also begs the question – where are we going next? The definition of sustainable construction ultimately is at a tipping pointing, and the values that drive that mission will continue to evolve as we look at the bigger picture of what impact truly means – in the community, on the environment and

relating to sustainability. By focusing on how all of these components fit together and taking a more critical eye toward the design and construction process, we truly can begin to redefine what it means to build to a higher standard. CCR

Adam Petersen is a senior project manager for R&H Construction, an Oregon-based general contracting firm that has been building successful commercial construction projects throughout the Pacific Northwest since 1979. For more information, visit www.rhconst.com

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SPRING 2016

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Sam Sanchez Samco

Gone

country How the Old Crow Smokehouse is changing the BBQ game

Also Inside: A special supplement to:

Providing better light for a better business Photography by Melissa Diep


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Gone

country How the Old Crow Smokehouse is changing the BBQ game By Michael J. Pallerino

Y

ou want country – Old Crow Smokehouse has country. Take a walk inside the 7,000-square-foot space, and you

will find signature grey and red barn wood, and corrugated steel cladding throughout. The custom elevated booths, covered in denim and saddle brown leather, sit below a soaring wall adorned with back lit LED whisky barrels brandished with the Old Crow logo and a row of LED TVs. Stroll a little further inside, and you will see rustic communal tables and custom industrial bar stools along the dining room and bar. If you follow the neon sign downstairs, you’ll find even more cowboy imagery – a collage of authentic vintage road signs. Eclectic ads framed against the grey barn wood. There’s a custom hand-painted mural of a vintage pin-up cowgirl against a corrugated metal wall that grabs your attention on the way to the coat check or restroom. The Old Crow Smokehouse – lit by its crimson red barn light pendants throughout, and a custom designed chandelier made of reclaimed railroad ties with an artful tangle of vintage exposed Edison bulbs – brings the country every night. And Sam Sanchez, who along with his business partner at Samco, Mike Gonzales, wouldn’t have it any other way. Sanchez’s goal is to take his live country music and barbecue restaurant concept (there are two in the Chicagoland area and one in Huntinton, Ca.) national. There already are plans to target the Florida markets, as well as other Midwest areas. Sanchez views the Old Crow Smokehouse as the kind of trendy concept that has mass appeal for today’s consumer, especially Millennials.

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GONE COUNTRY

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Commercial Kitchens caught up with Sanchez to get his thoughts on where the brand is heading.

Give us a snapshot of Old Crow Smokehouse.

It’s an American country theme with BBQ food and live music.

Why did you pick the locations you did for your restaurants?

River North has a high density of people within our demographic. I didn’t want to be a destination location; I wanted to be in the entertainment district.

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

We are targeting California, Florida and the Midwest markets. Having locations on three coasts was our goal.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

It’s marketing and kicking off the new franchise to help grow the brand.

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UN-RUST-ABLE! • Won’t rust, corrode or fade • Dishwasher safe • Never needs painting • Indistinguishable from metal when installed

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To get your free sample, call (800) 772-0355 or visit AmericanLouver.com/sample. CIRCLE NO. 30


GONE COUNTRY

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Describe a typical day.

I typically put in 16 to 18 hours, which includes phone calls and emails, and multitasking between various restaurants. I’m cc’d on every email so there’s a lot to look over.

How does the design of the restaurant cater to today’s consumers’ taste?

It’s that warm and cozy feeling you can feel in your stomach. You can feel just how close you are to the American Dream. People want to belong to something in this day and age. You may not be a fan of country music, but being a part of what our country stands for and the camaraderie we have is special.

Walk us through how and why it is designed the way it is? The 15-foot ceilings resemble a barn, as well as the barn wood throughout. We brought “country” to Chicago.

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The most rewarding part of this business are the people you meet everyday, and the commitment you make to society to participate in an industry that helps others and creates sustainable jobs.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016

Walk us through your construction and design strategy.

I always choose buildings no one else wants to touch, because they think the construction is impossible and will get too pricey. But building in landmark locations is my pride. I enjoy tackling projects like these. A building that is vacant for a long period of time has a better cost per square foot, which in turn brings the price down dramatically.

Give us a rundown of your kitchen operation.

We brought on Master Chef Tony Scrubs – the celebrity chef from Fox Network’s “MasterChef.” He developed his own rub, which he calls the Scrub Rub. Before Chef Scrubs, I thought that BBQ food was only good if you smothered it in sauces, but now I see it’s the exact opposite. Our kitchen doesn’t even have a grill. We slow smoke our briskets for 16 hours. Our stove is only used for side dishes. What most people don’t understand


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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS about true dry rubbed BBQ is that it’s not reusable in the sense that if we don’t sell it all tonight, we can’t sell it tomorrow. Once we run out, we’re out. So it becomes a “get it while you can” thing.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business today?

Chicago is a friendly city, and it’s easy to build here. Having built out of state now, the requirements and regulations change drastically. It makes it very difficult to get projects approved. Also, getting the general contractor and designer on the same page is another issue. It’s like reinventing the wheel every time.

Talk about sustainability.

We are revamping our decorations, menu and music to keep things fresh.

Are you optimistic about what you see in the restaurant sector?

Absolutely. A lot has changed and there are many new rules to consider, but this doesn’t stop anyone.

Today’s consumer wants a fun place to have dinner and continue the experience through the night without having to go to a nightclub. What trends are you seeing?

Country baby, country. There also is a lot of oil art in restaurants by recognized artists that are becoming part of the building. For instance, painting a design on the wall. When this happens, people know that you have invested a lot into them.

What is today’s consumer looking for?

Today’s consumer wants a fun place to have dinner and continue the experience through the night without having to go to a nightclub.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” restaurant in today’s competitive landscape? That’s the thing – it’s a secret.

Tell us what makes you so unique?

A lot of people love this business, but I live it. Day to day, this is all I do. The most rewarding part of this business are the people you meet everyday, and the commitment you make to society to participate in an industry that helps others and creates sustainable jobs. CK

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 32


Turn it on Better light for a better business By John Casadonte

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I

t’s well known that lighting in the front of an establishment, such as

a restaurant, is an essential part of its brand – setting the tone for a patron’s experience. But, for a commercial kitchen’s back of house

operations, lighting equally is as important for an effective workspace, since a typical restaurant’s lights run 16 to 20 hours a day.

Better, energy-efficient light can help deliver a more profitable experience for any high-volume commercial foodservice establishment. That’s why the Welch family, owners of A&W Restaurant in Franksville, Wis., chose Cree LED lighting when rebuilding their store in a new location. For 60 years, the Welch family operated the A&W Restaurant in Franksville, but when construction on a major highway where the restaurant was located limited accessibility for customers, Brittany Welch, site and marketing manager, set out to rebuild the restaurant in a new location. “We were lucky that there was land available on the other side of the interstate highway, so we started to rebuild,” she says.

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TURN IT ON

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

In a fast paced environment, knowing and seeing problems can prevent accidents, and the proper lighting experience does not distract or fatigue employees.

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When reviewing the lighting plan for the new restaurant, Welch sought all LED technology, choosing 14 Cree Edge High Output luminaires for the parking lot, instead of the metal halide lights used in their previous lot, and 82 CR6 downlights and 22 CR24 troffers in the kitchen and dining areas. “We didn’t go back once we started on the road with Cree,” Welch says. “They had ideas about how the restaurant could be lit and how we could save energy. Everybody was very nice, easy to communicate with and very professional.” A&W recognized improved visibility while cooking, and with high color rendering index (CRI), Cree LED lighting helped A&W manage quality control in the kitchen while demonstrating true color quality. Additionally, staff can move safely around the restaurant and kitchen machinery with the improved lighting. In a fast-paced environment, knowing and seeing problems can prevent accidents, and the proper lighting experience does not distract or fatigue employees. “Previously, we had T12 lights in the kitchen – now with the Cree lights, we can see while cooking, the kitchen looks clean and the whole atmosphere is happier and crisp,” Welch says.

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TURN IT ON

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS Sustainable brand experience

“My efforts in building this store are two-fold – to be economically sound with energy-efficient methods and, at the same time, to provide a modern space for the enjoyment of customers.” – Ric Richards, McDonald’s franchise owner and operator, Cary, N.C.

Promising economics

Consuming five to seven times more energy per square foot than other commercial buildings, restaurants are energy-intensive businesses, with lighting accounting for 13 percent of total energy expenses. In addition to offering better light quality, LED technology can cut energy consumption in half compared to traditional lighting. And, because Cree LED lighting is covered under a 10-year limited warranty and doesn’t need to be re-lamped like other solutions, commercial kitchens can save on their maintenance expenses as well. Gone are the days of frequently having to call in electrical service companies to change lights. Additionally, LED technology is inherently smarter than conventional light sources, offering increased opportunities for control integration to manage usage. With integrated occupancy sensors, A&W attributes Cree LED lighting to an estimated 56 percent energy savings, helping generate $800 cost savings per month on the electric bill.

Many commercial restaurants also look to LED lighting as a way to build their commitment to sustainability. On track to be the first LEED (Leadership in Energy Environmental Design) certified McDonald’s Restaurant in North Carolina, a new, more energy-efficient McDonald’s in Cary, N.C., is using LED lighting from Cree to meet both business and customer needs. Featuring 97 percent LED lighting, the McDonald’s uses a fully automated, intelligent light system that combines high-efficiency Cree LED lighting and daylighting from Solatube skylights with a photo sensor to maintain the proper light levels on work surfaces. When compared to the standard lighting packages, this store consumes 78 percent less electricity for lighting. “My efforts in building this store are two-fold – to be economically sound with energy-efficient methods and, at the same time, to provide a modern space for the enjoyment of customers,” says Ric Richards, franchise owner and operator. “Cree’s LED lighting products are an important element in our ability to reach our energy efficiency targets.”

Why wait?

Leading manufacturers continue to improve LED technology and design, allowing managers to purchase LED lighting solutions with attractive economics and 10-year warranties, providing ease of mind when making the decision and having confidence in the products they are installing. In fact, today, the upfront investment to switch to LED lighting is lower than one might expect and payback can be achieved in as little as one year. Many incentives and rebates also are available through utilities and government programs, accelerating payback and savings. A&W, for example, leveraged its statewide energy efficiency program, Focus on Energy, to secure rebates for their Cree LED lighting. Whether for better working environments, or the savings, LED lighting has proven to be the best choice for new and existing spaces. The economics of LED lighting solutions have reached the point where waiting for existing technology to burn out actually decreases the potential lifetime savings. Why wait? CK

John Casadonte is a vertical marketing manager at Cree, an industry leader in LED lighting for interior and exterior applications. He currently supports Cree’s Education initiative to help sustainability efforts and achieve LEED qualification for the many institutions nationwide.

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CIRCLE NO. 35


All eyes ahead A closer look at the 2016 insurance market forecast By Jeff Cavignac, James P. Schabarum II & Patrick Casinelli

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ike many businesses, the insurance industry is cyclical. It is affected by a number of factors, including interest rates and investment returns, underwriting results and the general business cycle. The reason the insurance cycle is important to a business owner is because it directly impacts insurance premiums.

The industry had been fairly profitable and surplus was strong (see Table 1), so rates started to come down. From 2004 to 2011, rates actually dropped about 40 percent. When prices went down, combined ratios and profits began to deteriorate. Rates started to increase and, since 2011, average rates have gone up about 15 percent. Still, they remain 30 percent below what was charged in 2004 and the rate increases have begun to taper off.

Allied Lines

Allied lines refers to general lines of insurance that most companies need to purchase. This includes General Liability, Property, Inland Marine, Auto, Workers’ Compensation and Umbrella coverages. If you’re an average risk in a decent class, your rates should be flat.

Executive Risk

Executive Risk refers to Directors and Officers Liability, Employment Practices Liability and Fiduciary coverage. This also can include

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Crime, Kidnap & Ransom and Cyber. Executive Risk is more volatile than the Allied Lines. In addition, current pricing is affected by the last economic down turn. The poor results experienced by many businesses and the layoffs and RIFs (Reduction in Force) have increased loss ratios. Insurance companies tend to be reactive in their pricing and these poor results now are manifesting themselves in higher premiums. While it’s difficult to provide an average rate increase (10 percent to 25 percent is not uncommon), it also is misleading. Every account is different and individually underwritten. The key – start early on these renewals and go in to detail on why your firm is a good risk and should be credited accordingly.

Professional Liability

In general, Professional Liability lines are flat like the industry at large, but again, this varies by profession, specialty and account. For example, architects and engineers currently have more options than they have ever had. Every one of these policies is different and coverage varies greatly. In addition, the claims handling and risk control services offered also vary. Some insurers offer a policy (not a good one) with a subbed out (Third Party Administrator) claims department. This underscores the importance of dealing with a broker that specializes

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ALL EYES AHEAD

in your industry and knows the differences in coverage, and the pros and cons of each insurance company.

Workers’ Compensation

Comp is trending positively after six years of rate increases (see Table 2). Rates peaked in 2003 at 6.29. The reason for the higher rates is attributable to the lousy underwriting results from 1999 to 2002. As rates went up, results improved and from 2003 to 2009, rates fell off 67 percent to an average of $2.10. While this was good news for insurance buyers, it was bad for the insurance industry, and rates started to climb to combat the poor combined ratios. Since then, rates have increased more than 40 percent, but it’s important to remember they’re still less than half of what they were in 2003. While rates continued to increase modestly through 2014 and 2015, it’s anticipated they’ll be flat in 2016. Note that this is an average. Every classification (there are more than 250) is affected by the experience of that class. Some will go down fairly substantially, but others (Class Code 5606, Contractors Executive Supervisors is a good example) could go up.

technology applications are ever improving and there is a painfully growing worker shortage. Going forward, successful firms cautiously will continue to grow their operations with an eye on “doing more with less.”

Health Insurance

Due to the changes in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), medical insurance costs in 2015 increased 20 percent to 40 percent. The early renewal strategy in 2013 helped employers delay the effects of the law and grandmothering helped in 2014. The 2015 medical renewals for companies with two to 50 employees realized all the impacts of the law. Rates currently are determined by the employee and their dependent’s individual ages, plan design and location of the company. A family of five will pay for each family member based on each individual’s age and the plan they select. Some younger employees or families with one child may realize lower premiums. All of the small group plans have changed to conform with the law and most have higher deductibles and co-pays; therefore, employees must pay more when they use the services. In 2016, insurance carriers will try to figure out how to survive after implementing all of the ACA requirements. Rates will continue to increase, as the plan’s taxes and fees continue to rise. Employers should budget a 10 percent to 15 percent increase, and depending on plan change options, rates could settle in at +5-10 percent. It is a pretty good time to be an insurance buyer (with the exception of health insurance). The industry has abundant surplus and decent results. Most businesses will be able to negotiate flat rates, while some may see rate reductions. But insurance premiums must be kept in perspective. They’re only one component in the cost of risk. Time spent managing risk, training employees to be safe, dealing with claims, funding uncovered claims and a number of other costs all factor in as well. CCR

Going forward, successful firms cautiously will continue to grow their operations with an eye on “doing more with less.”

Surety Outlook 2016: Do more with less

There has been a slow and steady improvement in the surety industry in recent years that has been mirrored in the U.S. economy and other related financial markets. In the not-so-distant aftermath of the 2008 economic meltdown, and the stock market’s 2015 poor performance, the surety outlook for 2016 remains positive, but will be significantly challenged by factors that influence the construction and commercial business markets. Astute contractors have not abandoned the lessons learned in the recent post-recession recovery. Today’s construction firms are leaner and meaner, with a focus on bottom-line results. An overall acceptable profit margin for efforts expended is mandatory. But owners’ expectations still are in a buyers’ market mode, interest rates are artificially low, fuel and material prices are cheap,

Jeff Cavignac, CPCU, RPLU, ARM, James P. Schabarum II, CPCU, AFSB, and Patrick Casinelli, RHU, REBC, CHRS, are principals of Cavignac & Associates, a leading risk management and commercial insurance brokerage firm. For more information, visit www.cavignac.com.

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CIRCLE NO. 37


One for the ages North Carolina jeweler has gem of a renovation project

S

erving eastern North Carolina since 1948, Bailey's Fine Jewelry is a family owned and operated jewelry store with locations in Greenville, Rocky Mount, Fayetteville and Raleigh. Known throughout the state for its commitment to quality, superior customer service, long tradition of excellence and product innovation, over the years, the jeweler has sought to strategically upgrade its various business environments on a regular basis. For example, a major renovation recently was completed in Raleigh. After months of renovation, Bailey’s 11,000 square foot Cameron Village flagship became the largest jewelry store in the state. The company has a well-known slogan, “Every Woman Wants a Bailey Box.” Yet prior to the massive renovation, the exterior of the Cameron Village store looked more like a big box retail structure than the sleek, upgraded and inviting building it truly needed – and now inhabits. The shopping center plaza was built in the late ’70s with a focus “to be unlike cookie-cutter malls.” The initial design included tree-lined walkways, one-of-a-kind shops and restaurants/cafes that welcomed people to a unique shopping experience. Ultimately, time took its toll.

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By Ron Treister

The exterior “look” became tired. It was facelift time, especially for a retailer that offered highly stylish, up-to-date “investments in fashion.” “Bailey’s has always catered to an upscale ‘family clientele,’” says Michael Beal, architectural sales manager for Arriscraft, manufacturer of beautiful, high-performance, naturally made products that emulate quarried stone for both commercial and residential applications. “This store in particular always had a high-end appearance, both inside and out, which made a strong statement to the demographic it focused upon,” he says. “But after time, the Cameron Village location’s exterior clearly seemed to look outdated and frankly, more than just a bit run down. The stucco finish flanked by decorative columns did not seem to be inviting any more. Without question, it was time to rejuvenate.” Beal says that a design team was brought in for ideas, some of which were highly effective. A quick choice was made to partner with Barnhill Contracting Company of Rocky Mount, a highly respected, third-generation builder recently named the No. 1 contractor in the state by the national trade publication, Energy News Record. From

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


“We knew Renaissance in the color “limestone” was the right product for Bailey’s exterior,” Beal says. “It was obvious our customer needed the right masonry contractor, one familiar with our materials, to correctly adhere it to the building’s external surface.” As it turned out, selecting that “right” masonry contractor was about as elementary as choosing Renaissance for the material to be used. Custom Brick and Supply Company, a Raleigh “construction institution” for years, got the nod with Ben Aiken, the firm’s cast stone manager, taking the lead. “This job took roughly four months,” Aiken says. “It was truly a unique project consisting of just under 1,500 square feet of highly detailed work. Right from the start, it was evident this was a highly professional undertaking, as all involved were 100 percent invested in partnering together to achieve an outcome with optimal results.” The building’s new exterior included arches, corniches and bullnose stone applications. “We knew we had the best product with the Arriscraft material,” Aiken says. “But the constant con– Clyde Bailey, Owner & President, Bailey’s Fine Jewelry tributions and on-site input from the dependable people of that company helped make this job flow even more smoothly.” The grand re-opening of the Bailey’s Fine Jewelry Cameron Village flagship location took place late in 2014 with an official ribbon-cutting ceremony. The celebration continued when the public was given the opportunity to view the new space, shop and socialize with drinks, appetizers and a chance to win prizes. In addition, Bailey’s hosted its largest diamond show in its company’s history. “We’re so excited (about) our grand re-opening," says Clyde Bailey, owner and president. "We've been growing rapidly, and the renovations really allow us to show all of our expanded collections as well as introduce some new designers. We know our patrons are going to love it." The renovation resulted in positive customer traffic, most likely increased sales, and more. But above else, the Bailey's flagship location is clad with a naturally made stone façade system that will keep the exterior appearance of the store looking like new for decades. The important and expensive materials housed within the interior of Bailey’s Fine Jewelry of Raleigh now are protected by one of the most dependable, high-performance thin-clad products offered on today’s market. CCR

“We’ve been growing rapidly, and the renovations really allow us to show all of our expanded collections as well as introduce some new designers.”

there, the owner, the GC and the masonry contractor became the drivers of this highly successful facelift. After several decisions were made, one of the first construction exercises was to tear off the old stucco façade, and then frame the building’s exterior. This would get it ready for an updated building envelope system that included an air and water cavity to protect the structure from extreme weather conditions. Once framed and ready to go, the process to clad the building’s exterior with Arriscraft ¾-inch Renaissance Thin-Clad masonry units began. Specification of this product line was plain and simple. Renaissance ARRIS.tile units are manufactured to tight dimensional tolerances and mirror natural stone for high strength, high density, extremely low water absorption and overall outstanding durability. They offer natural colors and their through-body color ensures that uneven fading and bleaching will not occur over time. The stone breathes and ages naturally. And, they can be cut, chiseled, dressed or worked on site.

Ron Treister is president of Communicators International, a Jensen Beach, Fla.-based marketing firm. He can be reached at rlt@communicatorsintl.com.

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The Wright Way One-on-one with Stuart I. Graff, CEO of The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

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F

rank Lloyd Wright was an American architect, interior designer, writer and educator who believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment. He coined this unique philosophy as “organic architecture.” For more than 70 years, Wright unveiled original and innovative examples of many building types, including offices, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels and museums. He also designed many of the interior elements of his buildings, such as the furniture, window treatments and stained glass. In 1991, the American Institute of Architects hailed him as “the greatest American architect of all time.” The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation is dedicated to preserving Wright’s homes/architecture laboratories (Taliesin and Taliesin West) for future generations, and inspiring society through an understanding and experience of Wright’s ideas, architecture and design. This past January, Stuart I. Graff took over as president and CEO of The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. One of the first initiatives he focused upon was developing a line of special products for the architectural and design comStuart I. Graff munity via the new Frank Lloyd Wright brand-licensing program. Commercial Construction & Renovation recently sat down with Graff to discuss the new offering.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


WE ARE EXPERTS AT “THINGS YOU CANNOT SEE” Ædifica Case Engineering’s services are focused on creating high performance environments. mechanical electrical plumbing fire protection structural

aedificacase.com CIRCLE NO. 38


THE WRIGHT WAY In broad strokes, how would you describe this program?

The Frank Lloyd Wright brand-licensing program is about embracing highly sophisticated design styles that are dynamic, accessible and transformative. The program has two primary goals: to provide building and design elements to enhance the lives of individuals and to educate the public about Frank Lloyd Wright as an innovative designer of environments, furnishings and decorative objects.

Why did The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation decide to embark on a program incorporating building products to be marketed/sold using the FLW brand? Keeping the FLW brand vital and relevant is one of the most important responsibilities of the foundation. To an architect, buildings and their unique designs will be core structures for Frank Lloyd Wright’s brand. Utilization of these licensed products will further enhance his relevance to the building and construction field; this has been confirmed through strategic review. Wright’s pioneering work in sustainability, appreciation of the environment, love of nature and affordability has proven to be extremely relevant today to builders, building owners, developers and others.

When putting together architectural products for the FLW Brand Licensing Program, we acknowledge the robust importance of the commercial construction sector.

Can you describe some kind of commonality all of the current products and products to be included will have?

Wright stood for continuous innovation throughout his career, and his brand continues to represent innovation in the form of adaptable design, high craftsmanship, use of technology – all at the forefront of building design today. All of the FLW Licensed products will embody these disciplines.

Is there a timetable for the program’s "launch"?

Some products are entering the market now, but we expect to have a broad assortment across many categories of the building products sector available in 2017. Plans are for a number of products to launch in January 2017.

Which companies have already signed on as licensees?

So far we have signed on Creative Edge Master Shop for waterjet-fabricated floor designs, Andersen Windows, Compotite for linear drains, Bradbury & Bradbury for wall paper, PPG Paints for paints and stains, Cassina for furniture, American Pacific (USA) and Yamagiwa (outside the U.S.) for lamps, and Japan Organic House for structures with designs based on Wright’s organic architectural approach. We are in discussions with a number of other potential licensees within the building products arena, and are always exploring new partnerships we believe will uphold the FLW architecture and design philosophy, and continue to expose people to his work.

How will the FLW Foundation promote these products to the A&D community? We plan to showcase these products as we exhibit and educate through trade expositions and other industry channels. The FLW Foundation’s access into the

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THE WRIGHT WAY

major architectural and interior design firms globally allows us to carry on Wright’s core beliefs by giving full presentations of the whole FLW initiative of building and design.

What is the connection of this program with the soon-to-be 150th anniversary of FLW’s birth?

Some products are entering the market now, but we expect to have a broad assortment across many categories of the building products sector available in 2017.

The events, exhibitions and promotions that will be occurring in 2017 to celebrate this milestone will be raising awareness and giving us opportunities to showcase this new program even further. It creates a larger opportunity to recognize the FLW legacy of organic/sustainable architecture and design. Furthermore, the program will enhance Frank Lloyd Wright’s impact and influence that still continues in today’s modern designs. This also brings up the importance of the preservation and conservation of current Frank Lloyd Wright sites as detailed in the recent report on the Preservation Master Plan of Taliesin West. Our preservation approach maintains the historic structures that Wright and his apprentices built, while allowing us to showcase new building product technologies such as our solar field, the use of

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color-matched LED lighting and state-ofthe-art lighting controls, etc., that espouse Wright’s principles concerning innovation, experimentation (for which Taliesin West was built) and sustainability.

Are there specific product categories to be included in the upcoming FLW Collection?

We are currently in discussion or identifying appropriate partners for wood flooring, ceramic and porcelain tiles, metal hardware, case goods, architectural millwork, lighting fixtures, exterior cladding, interior fabrics, masonry and the materials that are used in installation of these products. In 1957, Frank Lloyd Wright stated, “The mission of an architect is to help people understand how to make life more beautiful, the world a better one for living in, and to give reason, rhyme and meaning to life.” When putting together architectural products for the FLW Brand Licensing Program, we acknowledge the robust importance of the commercial construction sector. These will be premium materials that look good, perform at optimal levels and reflect the genius of America’s most iconic architect. CCR

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


SPRING 2016

SUPPLEMENT

Lights on in

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

Tupelo

Efficiency upgrades drive sports tourism in Mississippi city

ALSO: A special supplement to:

Renovating U.S. airports to global standards


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Lights on in

Tupelo Efficiency upgrades drive sports tourism in Mississippi city By Tammy Fulop & Don Lewis

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or the City of Tupelo, located in Lee County, Miss., sports tourism

is a major economic driver in

the region. The city has held numerous state, regional and national championships over the years, and even hosted the Croatian Olympic team training camp prior to the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games. With an extensive array of sporting facilities, including a 10,000-seat football stadium and a 43,665-square-foot aquatic center featuring an Olympic-sized pool, Tupelo is a major draw for external entities looking to host tournaments and events. For Tupelo, sports tourism is an essential revenue source, but its facilities were becoming outdated and equipment was aging in these critical community and recreational areas.

MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • LIGHTS ON IN TUPELO

Tupelo leadership knew the city had to upgrade its arenas in order to maintain its leadership position in the region, so they decided to embark on a comprehensive facilities improvement project.

Securing funding through energy savings

In addition to growing revenue from sports tourism, the mayoral office was looking to reduce expenses through energy efficiency savings. The city faced high-energy costs, stemming from inefficient controls and lighting systems in its sports facilities and community buildings. But Tupelo did not have the capital available to embark on major renovations that would make impactful improvements in its many community facilities. What’s more, the sporting complexes quickly were becoming obsolete and needed upgrades in order to stay competitive and attract new patrons. The ideal solution would improve energy efficiency in community buildings and update sporting facilities, without requiring significant upfront costs. While it had never been done before in the State of Mississippi, the city decided to pursue an energy savings

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performance contract (ESPC) to assist in funding the project for the City of Tupelo. Tupelo was a good candidate for an ESPC because significant energy savings would be attained from renovations to the sporting fields and community buildings. ESPCs permit education and local, state and federal government institutions to pay for efficiency projects over extended payout periods, which allows a school, city or organization to accrue funds from energy savings over time. Under an ESPC, organizations secure third-party financing from an energy-service company (ESCO) and invest little to no initial capital from their own budgets. The ESCO not only assists in securing upfront funding for energy efficiency improvements, but also guarantees that energy savings will cover the cost of a project. Tupelo had a great opportunity with this renovation project to reinvest utility savings into valuable community improvements.

Understanding existing infrastructure

While Tupelo officials had the progressive idea to obtain an ESPC, this project was the largest and first of its kind in the State of Mississippi – so outside help was needed to ensure the project ran smoothly. The city looked to Schneider Electric, an expert in energy management and automation, to oversee the project. Schneider Electric’s initial step was to perform an energy savings audit of Tupelo’s community buildings. The Schneider Electric team worked closely with local government officials to understand the needs of the community, one of which was a significant improvement to the interior and exterior lighting of sporting facilities. The existing lighting systems were not only outdated, but also had been significantly damaged by a tornado in April 2014. The lighting in place produced inconsistent light levels, leaving portions of field space obscured during evening events. In addition, the parks and recreation department could not manage lights remotely. Oftentimes, on tennis courts and baseball fields, users would turn the lights on and forget to turn them back off, draining the city’s energy resources. In addition, Tupelo had many older buildings that needed to be modernized, weatherproofed and upgraded. Even the newest building, City Hall, had an inefficient and water-wasting HVAC system in place. The government’s IT department also was looking to expand network capabilities throughout the city, and Schneider Electric wanted to leverage that change to further reach Tupelo’s efficiency goals.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • LIGHTS ON IN TUPELO

Lastly, Tupelo was growing very quickly, and officials wanted a solution that could be extended as it grew. After performing the energy audit, Schneider Electric developed a comprehensive plan to address these infrastructure challenges, all under the scope of the ESPC. The turnkey energy efficiency solution would impact 23 buildings and 27 sports fields throughout the city. Overall, the $5 million ESPC project would reduce Tupelo’s utility budget by 18 percent and save more than $140,000 in annual energy costs. Over the 20-year life of the

Overall, the $5 million ESPC project would reduce Tupelo’s utility budget by 18 percent and save more than $140,000 in annual energy costs.

unit in the City Hall building, resulting in more than $10,000 in water savings. At the visitor center, the construction team will renovate the air distribution system to improve occupant comfort and energy efficiency. Plans also are in place to weatherproof many of the city’s buildings, weather stripping nearly 90 doors and using more than 2,000 feet of sealant. The project also will connect community buildings using the expanded network capabilities through a building automation system (BAS). The BAS will allow Tupelo’s operations team to monitor and manage HVAC equipment throughout community buildings and easily can be expanded to new buildings as the city grows.

Benefits to the community

project, the city is expected to realize $2.8 million in energy savings. By leveraging the ESPC funding mechanism, Tupelo was able to implement construction of the entire project over the course of one year. Without the ESPC, the city would not have had the capital available to invest in a project this large or experience its benefits.

Constructing improvements

Construction for the project kicked off in November 2015. State-ofthe-art outdoor lighting technology will improve lighting consistency at the city’s sports fields, all while reducing the number of fixtures from 799 to 460. Officials also will have the ability to control lights remotely, reducing unnecessary energy use. In addition, the project will upgrade interior and exterior lighting at various parks and community buildings using compact fluorescents and LED technology for improved energy efficiency. The team also will install new wooden poles to replace those affected by the tornado, improving safety in the city’s parks. Tupelo’s community buildings also will undergo renovations and improvements. First and foremost, the project will replace a condenser

All of these upgrades will lead to significant energy cost savings as well as the added environmental benefit of reducing carbon emissions by 12,400 tons, which is equivalent to planting 10,160 acres of trees or powering 1,129 homes. Some of the field lighting projects already are complete and feature state-of-theart systems creating evenly distributed and bright light. The lighting levels are guaranteed to be competitive for 25 years, allowing Tupelo to continue to attract sporting events and drive sports tourism revenue. In addition, upkeep of the lights is covered by the project for 25 years, resulting in $41,000 of annual savings in maintenance costs. Upgrades to the parks and community buildings will benefit all of 34,000 Tupelo residents. In any given night, more than 1,000 people are out using community fields and facilities. Improvements to indoor and outdoor lighting systems at community buildings will improve safety and visibility for residents exploring parks and recreation facilities throughout the city. The project is expected to be fully complete by November 2016, with Schneider Electric overseeing the construction process. In addition, under the parameters of the ESPC, Schneider Electric will monitor and manage energy savings from the project for the next 20 years, providing the city with monthly operating and energy savings reports. The City of Tupelo is a notable example of the progressive application and extensive capabilities of ESPCs, which are changing the way a government combats aging infrastructure, and are allowing cities and towns to create energy efficient solutions that will dramatically impact their communities. FC

Tammy Fulop is VP of Energy and Sustainability Services at Schneider Electric. With almost 18 years in the industry, Fulup has led her team to successfully implement more than 550 ESPC projects nationwide with a total economic impact of more than $1.9 billion over the life of contracts. As COO of the City of Tupelo, Don Lewis oversees the dayto-day operations of the city, bringing together 13 different departments.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


CIRCLE NO. 41


Taking flight The R&D Tax Credit aspects of renovating U.S. airports to global standards By Charles R. Goulding & J. David Roberson

A

irport design in numerous airports throughout the United States is outdated and lacking in modern technology. Recent remarks by Vice President Joe Biden that described U.S. airports as “third world” have galvanized many airports to pursue massive improvements and “first-world” modernization projects throughout the country. As a result, airports across the United States are working on major construction and infrastructure projects to improve and upgrade their facilities, including new and upgraded terminals, runways and taxiways, lighting and passenger amenities. U.S. airports provide service to more than 800 million passengers annually and is projected to reach the billion mark annually by 2027 or sooner. Compared with their counterparts abroad, U.S. airports receive lower marks for customer service, feature more delays and congestion, and have older infrastructure. Nations in Asia and the Middle East are developing new, efficient and technology-enhanced airports that resemble high-end shopping malls full of leisure amenities, but American airports are falling behind in core infrastructure areas as well as in amenities. New developments and innovations to improve airport design can utilize research and development tax credits.

108

The R&D Tax Credit

Enacted in 1981, the Federal Research and Development (R&D) Tax Credit allows a credit of up to 13 percent of eligible spending for new and improved products and processes. Qualified research must meet the following four criteria: New or improved products, processes, or software Technological in nature Elimination of uncertainty Process of experimentation Eligible costs include employee wages, cost of supplies, cost of testing, contract research expenses, and costs associated with developing a patent. On Dec. 18, 2015, President Obama signed the bill making the R&D Tax Credit permanent. Beginning in 2016, the R&D credit can be used to offset Alternative Minimum tax and startup businesses can utilize the credit against payroll taxes.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


MAJOR AIRPORT RENOVATION PROJECTS & COSTS

Estimated project costs

Tampa (TPA)

Terminal Expansion $1,000

Orlando (MCO)

Terminal Modernization

$1,100

New South Terminal

$1,800

Each airport expansion and renovation project involves massive amounts of construction, whether to renovate high-traffic areas. These include lobby areas, ticketing and baggage handling mechanisms, and intra-airport transportation, such as “people-movers” and rental car hubs, or expanding existing structures and systems to provide for unique airport needs while seamlessly integrating into the former airport layout. The common need for all of these airport projects is that they all involve major airports that have to be renovated and expanded to handle substantially more passengers. Other common technology driven projects impacting two or more of the airports are new ticketing technology, new baggage handling and baggage claim technology, and new central building operating systems, including lighting heating and cooling.

$17,600

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)

AIRPORT NAME

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

ESTIMATED COST (IN MILLIONS)

Los Angeles Terminal International (LAX) Modernization

$8,500

LaGuardia Unified (LGR)

$4,200

Terminal Modernization

New Orleans (MSY) Terminal Expansion $1,000

TOTALS

At LAX, construction and renovation projects have encompassed more than 20 individual projects, including the remodeling of the Tom Bradley International Terminal, new and improved TSA screening areas, the arrivals and departures dining and retail locations, and demolitions of the original TBIT concourses, both north and south terminals. In addition, LAX also is in the process of replacing its central utility plant in conjunction with electrical and accessibility renovations to all airline terminals. Terminal 2, the second largest in the airport, will be upgrading the ticket lobby, baggage screening, baggage claim and concourse areas, as well as construction of all new concession and upgrades of all electrical, mechanical, and telecom systems that serve the terminal. At the Southwest Airlines terminal, improvements include new passenger security screening, a new inline Checked Baggage Inspection and sorting system, upgraded hold rooms and infrastructure, refurbished baggage claim areas, replacement of passenger boarding bridges, renovated airline support office space, replacement of aircraft paving sections and fuel hydrant pits. Passenger services, including convenience retail, specialty retail, food and beverage, public seating, common areas, and restroom facilities are also experiencing dramatic renovation efforts. The LAX improvements are slated for a January 2020 completion date.

LaGuardia International Airport (LGA)

Arguably one of the busiest international airports in the country, LaGuardia Airport is undergoing a massive, and much-needed, makeover of the Central Terminal Building, originally opened for operation in 1964. Once completed, the Central Terminal will be replaced in its entirety and augmenting it with a grand entry way. Additionally, the current disconnected assortment of terminals will be replaced with an aesthetically pleasing, unified airport, which will be physically shifted south, closer to the parkway, allowing for nearly 2 miles of new taxiways to alleviate LaGuardia’s chronic delay issues. The plan also encompasses a

MARCH : APRIL 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

109


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • THE CLEAN UP

rail link between the airport and Willets Point in Queens, as well as reestablishment of ferry service. Further improvements include the elimination of parking garages and surface lots that consume acreage between the highway and the terminal entrance, to be replaced by two modern parking garages elsewhere on the grounds and clearing space to build the new terminals while the old terminals remain in use.

New Orleans International Airport (MSY)

In New Orleans, the city broke ground on a new $807 million North Terminal complex on Jan. 14, 2016. The new 760,500 square-foot terminal will have two concourses with 30 gates, a 2,000 car parking garage, a

Further improvements include expanding Customs & Border protection facilities (an ever-present concern in South Florida heightened by reopened international relations with Cuba), international gates to accommodate larger aircraft, restroom renovations, and replacement of Automated People Mover (APM) trains. The South Airport Complex is increasing multimodal transportation access to accommodate up to four rail systems. The entirety of these renovations is projected for completion by summer 2017. central utility plant and a ground transportation staging area. In addition, the MSY renovation includes a $72 million power plant project, an $87 million highway addition to improve airport access, and a $17 million onsite hotel project. The entire project should be done by October 2018.

Orlando International Airport (MCO)

In Orlando, the $1.1 billion renovation and expansion project is the largest effort in the airport’s history, and includes construction on the South Airport APM Complex and Intermodal Transportation Facility (ITF), along with enhancements at the North Terminal Facility. Current projects include: ticket lobby expansion in Terminals A&B, baggage system improvements for increased efficiency and security, renovation of curbside canopies, a new central energy plant, and a new cell phone lot north of the airport, which includes restroom facilities.

110

Tampa International Airport (TPA)

In Tampa, officials have green-lit a $971 million plan to update its facility, including a consolidated rental car facility, an automated people mover, new concessions, upgraded roadways, and taxiways. Phase One specifically addresses decongestion goals by building a 2.6 million square foot care rental center, a 1.4 mile automated people mover, and major main terminal expansion. By late 2017, passengers will be able to enjoy dozens of new restaurants and stores, including many local brands. As the airport industry continues to grow, new innovations are put into place to fix current infrastructure problems, become more environmentally friendly and turn airports into a place where travelers actually want to spend time. Federal and state R&D tax credits are available to support these innovative efforts in the airport design industry. FC

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


A division of

CIRCLE NO. 42


PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

Finding your priority Why commissioning is more important than signing the contract

I

n today’s world we believe in instant gratification. We want what we want and we want it now. This attitude is everywhere, and in every business. In many cases, instant delivery is achievable and businesses are built around this expectation. Fast food. Same-day delivery. In by 10, and out by 5. But construction should never be in this category. Unfortunately, many of our customers do not share this view. Oftentimes, the customers will demand accelerated scheduled to meet their deadlines, and objectives with no regard for the issues and problems created. They repeatedly ask for compressed work schedules, shortcuts to reduce construction time, occupation before construction is completed and the elimination of commissioning. Unfortunately, in almost all of these situations, the final product is deficient in some manner. In more and more instances, the deficiencies are being addressed through litigation, costing contractors more than profits. Whether it’s requested at the same cost or if the customer provides financial incentive, contractors should never sacrifice the final product in order to achieve unrealistic delivery timelines of the customers. When planning a project, identifying the tasks and the order for each project is the first step. Identifying, defining and allowing the required time and resource to complete each step also is part of the fundamental requirements. Soil compaction, the curing of concrete, necessary inspections, and the setting and drying of finishes require a specific amount of time. Depending on the products and location, there also can be manpower constraints, weather impacts and the necessary commission of equipment. Compressing time frame to a point work does not occur places the project in danger of having significant failure issues in the future, leading to occupant health and safety issues. Ultimately, these avoidable issues can cost contractors and sub-contractors significant time and money, as well as damaging reputations. Today, more and more of these issues end in litigation, with the bulk of the burden falling on the contractor. In most instances, the item that’s the most critical to the continuing operation of any facility is deleted or at best abbreviated. This is the full commissioning the project. Whether constructing a complex mission critical space or a simple tenant improvement, the testing of the systems prior to required use is essential. During the commission process, items identified typically are simple to repair and address. After the building is occupied, these same simple issues become a major task. The interruption of busi-

By Scott Offermann

ness operation because air conditioning systems must be turned off for several hours, power disruptions, breaker testing or something as simple as flushing the building with fresh air becomes a major crisis for the new occupants. It also places stress and inconveniences on the sub-contractors and contractors extended staff. It is during these times of high stress and occupant complaints that contractor are placed in a defensive position. Without the proper documentation and preparations, the customer takes little or no responsibility for the situation that they were pivotal in creating. The process of commissioning is something that must be a requirement rather than a suggestion. It is only with the complete commission that the contractor definitively can state that the building is complete and operating as designed. It is during the commissioning period design that equipment and operational issues are identified. This allows the ability to address these issues in a proactive manner as opposed to reactive. Many times, building management systems have programming errors that create heating or cooling issues, and operational deficiencies that are identified and are not the result of construction. After the building becomes occupied, all issues become contractor problems rather than the responsibility of the engineering and design team who created the deficiencies to begin with. In many instances, these design teams divest themselves from the issue shifting the blame to the installation or operations team leaving the contractor left to take responsibility for addressing these issues. When customers request the acceleration and omission of specific work, contractors must take a firm stand, and what can and cannot be accomplished. There is a point that, as professionals, delivery requests cannot be met. It is imperative that when customers attempt to force the acceleration of projects and the deletion of the commissioning process, contractor’s document the risk associated with these decisions and have customers accept the liability of these actions. This is not simply a conversation during a meeting, but written communication with not only the customer, but also the design teams. This will assist in protecting the contractor and sub-contractors from unreasonable expectations and shift the liability to either the customers or the design team. This can include the limitations of equipment warranties as well as the setting of support guidelines. Being prepared to take a firm stance on these necessary steps will protect contractors against damaged reputation and financial loss. CCR

The process of commissioning is something that must be a requirement rather than a suggestion.

Scott Offermann is a manager director for Cushman & Wakefield. You can reach him at Scott.Offermann@cushwake.com or on LinkedIn athttps://www.linkedin.com/in/soffermann.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


ONE POINT OF CONTACT for NATIONWIDE SERVICE

MainSource Roof Management services over 2,200 various locations across the United States, representing over 228,000,000 square feet of roofing.

Roof Leak Repairs Inspections Maintenance Thermal Imaging Capital Budgeting Manufacturer Interface Phone 404.965.9370 Fax 404.965.9369

www.mainsourcemgt.com CIRCLE NO. 43


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Brewingz Sports Bar and Grill

San Antonio

$1,000,000.00

6,000

New Construction

Q3 2016

McAlister's Deli

Yuma

$900,000.00

3,907

New Construction

Q3 2016

Chick-fil-A #00783

Allen

$650,000.00

4,000

Renovation

early Q3 2016

Raising Cane's Restaurant #258

Katy

$600,000.00

3,000

New Construction

early Q3 2016

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS: Murphy Oil # 846

La Grange

$2,000,000.00

1,200

New Construction

Q3 2016

Dollar General #9459

Fabens

$1,500,000.00

8,724

New Construction

Q3 2016

Nike - The Outlet Shoppes at Laredo

Laredo

$600,000.00

13,068

Renovation

early Q3 2016

O'Reilly Auto Parts

Catalina

$600,000.00

6,500

New Construction

late Q3 2016

The Dylan

Fort Worth

$400,000,000.00

1,300,000

New Construction/Addition

Q3 2016

Stage Center Redevelopment North OG&E Energy Plaza

Oklahoma City

$250,000,000.00

900,000

New Construction

Q3 2016

Jefferson Landmark

Dallas

$135,000,000.00

500,000

New Construction

Q4 2016

La Corsha Hospitality Hotel

Austin

$14,000,000.00

80,081

New Construction

early Q3 2016

Sheraton Grand Phoenix Renovation

Phoenix

$10,000,000.00

500,000

Renovation

early Q3 2016

Marriott Residence Inn

Oklahoma City

$5,000,000.00

55,000

New Construction

Q3 2016

Deming Public School District New Intermediate School

Deming

$22,800,000.00

61,813

New Construction

Q3 2016

Performing Arts Center Oklahoma State University

Stillwater

$17,500,000.00

70,000

New Construction

early Q3 2016

Texas Center for Wine and Culinary Arts

Fredericksburg

$10,000,000.00

30,000

New Construction/Addition

Q3 2016

Peoria Campus Branch - Huntington University

Peoria

$6,000,000.00

15,000

Renovation

Q3 2016

New Courthouse - Hidalgo County

Edinburg

$149,000,000.00

460,000

New Construction

Q3 2016

Solid Waste Transfer Facility Renovation

Albuquerque

$38,000,000.00

115,000

Renovation

Q4 2016

Pima Animal Care Center

Tucson

$15,000,000.00

63,000

New Construction/Renovation

late Q4 2016

Mainstreed Medical Facility

Tucson

$45,000,000.00

76,300

New Construction

Q3 2016

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

114

Holy Cross Hospital Renovations

Taos

$7,000,000.00

89,000

Renovation

late Q3 2016

My Emergency Room

Fort Worth

$2,750,000.00

7,225

New Construction

early Q4 2016

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


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PRODUCT SHOWCASE

CALENDAR

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CIRCLE NO. 45

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


It’s the networking that matters

Become part of a program that helps forge strong relationships with high-level decision makers

Your sponsorship affords you the opportunity to: • Build personal and professional relationships with key decision makers from some of the industry’ most high profile companies. • Gain insights into key issues and trends that will influence your business in the years ahead. • Put yourself in a category-exclusive, one-on-one experience that’s without equal in our industry.

CIRCLE NO. 46

AUG. 4-7, 2016 • CHARLESTON, SC

SEPT. 29 - OCT. 2, 2016 • DAYTONA BEACH, FL.


AD INDEX

CCR • AD INDEX Advertiser Page Reader Service No. 3mg...............................................................31.................... 20

Advertiser Page Reader Service No. Laticrete........................................................11..................... 8

AC•Tech....................................................CVR2, 1................. 1

Major Skylights..............................................19.................... 16

Ad Art/Genesis Light Solutions.......................85.................... 33

McElroy Metals..............................................49.................... 25

Aedifica Case Engineering.............................97.................... 38

Metropolitan Ceramics..................................116................... 45

American Louver............................................79.................... 30

Mid-South Roofing........................................113................... 43

Atas...............................................................53.................... 26

Morin/Kingspan............................................104................... 40

Bostik......................................................... 24-25.................. 18

Nedlaw..........................................................21.................... 17

Calpipe Security Bollards..............................111................... 42

Newton Distributing Company.........................3...................... 2

Carney Contracting Services..........................17.................... 15

Retail Contractors Association.......................119................... 47

Commerical Construction & Renovation Summit 2017..............................69.................... 28

Rockerz Inc.....................................................7...................... 4

Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreat 2016..............................117................... 46

Schimenti..................................................8, CVR4.............. 6, 49

Salsbury.........................................................8...................... 5

Construction Data Co. (CDC).........................115................... 44

ShopTalk 360.................................................15.................... 12

Chicago Clamp..............................................55.................... 27

Southwest Signs............................................81.................... 31

Construction One............................................5...................... 3

Stantec..........................................................41.................... 23

Controlled Power...........................................16.................... 14

SuperBright LEDS..........................................73.................... 29

Fall Protection Distributors, LLC.....................93.................... 37

The Garland Co..............................................13..................... 9

FTCH.............................................................89.................... 35

The Townson Co............................................33.................... 21

Georgia Printco.............................................107................... 41

Wagner Meters...........................................13, 15.............. 10, 13

Henderson Engineers.....................................91.................... 36

Wakefield Beasley..........................................83.................... 32

HFA................................................................45.................... 24

Warner Bros.................................................CVR4.................. 48

Imagilux.........................................................35.................... 22

Wolverine Building Group...............................29.................... 19

Interplan LLC.................................................87.................... 34

WoodWorks...................................................99.................... 39

Lakeview Construction, Inc.............................9...................... 7

Zipwall...........................................................14.................... 11

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES Call 678.765.6550: Call anytime. If no one answers, leave a detailed message and be sure to include your name, phone number and/or email address so we can contact you if we have any questions. Or write: C  ommercial Construction & Renovation P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 Moving?: Please let us know eight weeks in advance to make sure you do not have interruption in service. Remember to include both your old and new contact information. Duplicate Issues?: If you are receiving multiple copies of Commercial Construction & Renovation, please let us know. And please include information from both mailing labels. A subscription to Commercial Construction & Renovation is your subscription to better-design, better-built and better-maintained facilities. Please contact us for all your subscription needs. We’re here to help! How To Reach Us Regarding Your Subscription Visit us online: 24 hours a day at www.ccr-mag.com. All the information you need to take care of your subscription account is right here. Subscription Questions?: Please email corpcirc@ccr-mag.com.

118

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


Retailers look to our members for Integrity, Experience, and Stability.

RCA has a rigorous membership process and all retailers can be assured that working with a RCA contractor means working with Quality.

The Retail Contractors Association is a national We promote our members in a public online directory, in each organization of high issue of our newsletter, and in targeted outreach to retailers. caliber contractors united to provide a soli id solid RCA Members Benefit From: foundation of ethics s, ethics, quality, and d • Safety Program • BlueBook University Discounts professionalism in thee • Home Depot Rebate Program • Military Service Initiative retail industry.. • ExtendedStay America Discount • Annual Conference Networking & • La Quinta Inn & Suites Discount Professional Development

Visit retailcontractors.org for membership and program information. US: 800-847-5085 | Intl: 703-683-5637 | retailcontractors.org CIRCLE NO. 47


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Prep school proud

I

graduated from the Peddie School in Hightstown, N.J. in 1981. That means my 35 year class reunion is coming up in early June. We only had 500 students at our school, and 100 senior classmates that graduated with me on that hot and muggy day in May.

I’ve stayed in touch with a decent amount of my fellow classmates but many, just like myself, have fallen off the radar. But with the birth of Facebook, LinkedIn, etc, some have resurfaced to say hello and let me know what has happened over the last 35 years. Sadly, some have passed away, which is heartbreaking. And others are not doing well health wise, but we are keeping the faith for them. It’s one day at a time. It seems like only yesterday that I was walking to class, trying my best to get good grades, keep myself out of trouble (to keep make my parents happy) and do well on the athletic field (to keep my recruiting hopes up for both ice hockey and lacrosse in college). As a four year boarding student, my name is etched in many of the dormitories I lived in as well on the athletic fields. A seven-time varsity letterman and captain of the ice hockey team my senior year, my name is on the wall in the athletic center as a leader with many others who did their best to show that Peddie School pride. The last time I was at my prep school was just after 9/11, when I was driving back to Atlanta from NYC with a sales rep a few days after that devastating day. We stopped off Exit 8 on the New Jersey Turnpike and drove thru campus. Everything looked the same. It was as if time had stood still since graduation.

You only live once, so if you have the chance to go back to your class reunion, do it. It will remind you what was and give you a glimpse into the future.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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I showed her where I lived, went to class, ate meals, played sports and what a first-class educational opportunity my parents gave me, which I am indebted to them forever. Prior to that, I had not been back since my 10-year reunion. While the school has some new buildings and teachers, it has maintained its identity as one of the top prep schools in the country. Over the years, my classmates have reached out to me to attend reunions, but for one reason or another, something always hindered my presence. This year, there will be no exceptions, as I have booked my hotel room and will be going up with my lacrosse buddy who lives in the ATL. We plan to show our faces and hold our heads high. And we plan on bringing our best in the alumni lacrosse game. Early morning practices, being on time for class, sit down, coat and tie dinners, two hours of study halls during week nights and Saturday morning classes filled with Latin, Calculus, Physics, English and History. Yes, being a boarding student at Peddie molded me into who I am today. As I look back, I have to say I’m proud that I am a Peddie School Falcon Alumni. Those were some of the best days and memories of my life. You only live once, so if you have the chance to go back to your class reunion, do it. It will remind you what was and give you a glimpse into the future. While writing this column, I took a look at my senior yearbook picture. My quote was so appropriate: “It takes a long time to find out who you are, but the wait is worth it”. To all, enjoy the Spring and Summer ahead, and best of success the rest of 2016. CCR

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2016


CIRCLE NO. 48


CIRCLE NO. 49

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR March April 2016  

CCR March April 2016