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COVID & CONSTRUCTION: WHAT HAS CHANGED AND WHAT’S TO COME?

June 2020 • www.ccr-mag.com

Light and warmth How Solara Hospitality’s award-winning properties are elevating the customer service game

Andy Briggs, Senior Vice President, Managing Partner & Clancy Cipkala, Senior Managing Partner, President & CEO Solara Hospitality

Official magazine of

Also inside:

Exclusive Inside: Casting a new light on prefab + modular The pivotal role of facilities management in securing public spaces See our General Contractor & Lighting Firms reports


CIRCLE NO. 1


Vol. 19, No. 4 | June 2020

72

28

76

FEATURES 28 Light and warmth  How Solara Hospitality’s awardwinning properties are elevating the customer service game 72  COVID & Construction  What has changed and what’s to come?

76  Making inroads...  Casting a new light on prefab + modular 110  Just saying... One guy’s thoughts on how best to battle an economic downturn

Cover and feature photos by: Eric Glenn Photography

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

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Vol. 19, No. 4 | June 2020 INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

38 General Contracting Report 58 Lighting Report

DEPARTMENTS

4 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 112 Women in Construction 114 The Cannabis Chronicles 124 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 126 Ad Index 128 Publisher’s Note

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Commercial Kitchens 81  Construction Strong  Inside the Wolverine Building Group machine

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Federal Construction 92  Shields up  How the US Army Corps of Engineers aided hospitals during the pandemic Multi-Housing 106  A facility manager walks into a condo…  Watertree at DeWitt’s tale of 33 years, three water heaters, and scores of lasting relationships Craft Brand and Marketing 117 The real deal  Black Button Distilling and the chase for craft perfection

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


CIRCLE NO. 3


EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

A gathering like no other

T

hese are different days. I know, “Tell me something I don’t know.” In a world turned upside down by a type of virus that scientists are still trying to wrap their minds around, the rest of us are left social distancing ourselves and Zooming into new world experiences.

From the jump, our worlds have been thrown into utter and unfathomable chaos. How many of you have had friends say, “Well, what’s next, an alien invasion?” Yes, that was a real question from a friend, who, while only joking, admitted to watching reruns of the “X Files” just in case. Whether you can find any sense of sanity in all of this, know this: We are a resilient bunch. Amid the alarm, the confusion and the “why-is-this-happening-to-us” rhetoric, we continue to find ways to cope. We push forward even though we do not know what we are thrusting ourselves in to.

And while we could benefit from a more unified, systematic approach to dealing with this as one voice, it is what it is (forgive me, I am as tired of that saying as you are). My first foray into this uncharted new world was every bit as odd as you would expect. In a vineyard, miles and miles away from any metropolitan area, surrounded by the grace and beauty of the If you are a mountains that blanketed the skyline, I stood on my socially “glass-is-half-full distanced mark and watched kind of person,” you as people tried to make do. know that when this Some wore masks. Some did not. Some sat in appropriately is all said and done allotted table assignments, (and we do have many while others sat as couples. All more miles to travel of them tried to make the most of the situation. till then), you will It was a different kind be better because of of gathering—our reality for what you experienced. the foreseeable future. As I took in the moment, it hit me: We have two cshoices —We do or we don’t. The scores of people I talk to every day are doers. They continue to find new ways to do the things that once seemed so simple. GMs. Subcontractors. Designers. Architects. Facility managers. If you are a “glass-is-half-full kind of person,” you know that when this is all said and done (and there are many more miles to travel till then), you will be better off because of what you have experienced. We live. We win. We fail. We learn. There is not one person I know who does not believe that is the way the game is played. To better days ahead…

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 561-203-2981

ADVERTISING CIRCLE NO. 5

PUBLISHER/EDITOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


CIRCLE NO. 7


EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Design & Construction Belk Inc. STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design MIKE KLEIN, AIA, NCARB

HEALTHCARE CLINTON “BROOKS” HERMAN, PMP Senior Facilities Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

RESTAURANTS

RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation GREGG LOLLIS Sr. Director, Design Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp. DAVID SHOTWELL Construction Manager Atticus Franchise Group ISYOL E. CABRERA Director Design & Construction Carvel & Cinnabon FOCUS Brands DEMETRIA PETERSON Senior Construction Manager Checkers & Rally’s Drive in Restaurants DAVID THOMPSON Director of Construction WHICH WICH® SUPERIOR SANDWICHES

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Principal Executive Vice President at Stormont Hospitality Group LLC

HOSPITALITY RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality SAMUEL D. BUCKINGHAM, RS CMCA AMS President & Co-Founder Evergreen Financial Partners LLC PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction JOHN STALLMAN Marketing Manager Lakeview Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield MEGAN HAGGERTY Founder Legacy Capital Investment

Sr. Manager, Architecture QA/QC Life Time Fitness

JOHN LAPINS VP of Design & Construction Auro Hotels

RON VOLSKE Construction Project Manager Orscheln Farm & Home

GARY RALL Vice President of Design and Development, Holiday Inn Club Vacations

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG

DEDRICK KIRKEM John Varvatos Enterprises Facilities Director

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

STEVE JONES

International Director JLL

CONSULTANT GINA NODA Founder Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President Nelson FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA

President CESO, Inc.

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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CIRCLE NO. 8


INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Okay, who got it right? The night CCR Nation played Trivial Pursuit

Y

ou would be surprised to find how many people actually knew what round Tom Brady was drafted in. Do you? If you guessed Round 6 of the 2000 NFL Draft, give yourself a point. The CCR Virtual Trivia Pursuit game, sponsored by Mats Inc. (www.matsinc.com), featured a friendly game (there were prizes) of off the wall and accurate responses. If you want in on the continued action, keep checking our social media posts on LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram, as well as our weekly e-Digest blasts.

Next up is the Family Feud, scheduled for July 15 at 7 p.m. (EST) We hope to see you there.

AroundtheIndustry Wahlburgers Wahlburgers has set an aggressive plan to grow from 37 units to 300 by 2025. Plans call for exploring a fast-casual concept, which would include both corporate and franchised locations.

NoMad Ritz Carlton Construction of a 40-story Manhattan skyscraper that will include the NoMad Ritz Carlton Hotel has topped off. The hotel is due to be completed in 2021.

Wegmans Wegmans still plans to open three new stores in New York, North Carolina and Virginia this year, but noted that it would take a more cautious approach to getting the locations up and running. The grocer said it will offer a “targeted time frame” for opening each store, dispense with grand opening festivities, and offer online ordering and curbside pickup to help with social distancing.

Amazon Amazon could be interested in buying all or part of the J.C. Penney chain.

Sprouts Farmers Market Sprouts Farmers Market has reevaluated its business model in the wake of the pandemic and will opt for smaller store footprints and a focus on healthy foods to drive future growth.

The Gate Construction is underway on the next phase of The Gate—one of Frisco, Texas’ most successful mixed-use developments. The 49acre, $1 billion project is on the Dallas North Tollway, just north of the Dallas Cowboys’ Star mixed-use project in Frisco. The Gate is a project of Dubai-based Invest Group Overseas.

Foot Locker Foot Locker started focusing less on mall stores and more on larger standalone locations two years ago. The pandemic has spurred the retailer to speed up its plans. The off-mall stores, called “Power Stores,” have about four times the space of mall locations to accommodate community events.

Plaza Hotel After more than a decade of design and restoration, the famed Plaza Hotel in the heart of Downtown El Paso, Texas is set to open. The 19-story hotel features an adjoining Plaza Pioneer Park.

Dream Cleveland Hotel A new hotel called Dream Cleveland will sit adjacent to the city’s historic Masonic Temple, featuring 207 guest rooms, multiple dining and nightlife venues and an on-site parking deck for 400 vehicles.

Georgia Tech University Upgraded amenities and heightened experiences for fans and student-athletes are on deck as JE Dunn Construction begins a $9 million renovation of Russ Chandler Stadium, the home of Georgia Tech baseball. The demolition of an existing one-story building paved the way for construction of a 25,379-square-foot, two-story structure. The new facility will include three indoor batting tunnels, an indoor pitching lab, event hall space, concessions and a roof terrace. Interior renovation of 1,618 square feet will include new suites and a ticket booth.

Earl Enterprises Earl Enterprises, the operator of concepts that include Buca di Beppo and Planet Hollywood, has agreed to acquire 45 Brio and Bravo Italian restaurants from FoodFirst Global Restaurants, which recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

John F. Kennedy International Airport A $3.8 billion expansion of Terminal 4 at John F. Kennedy International Airport will add 500,000 square feet for seating, gates, restrooms and baggage handling. The project is designed for environmental sustainability, with one team each overseeing project management and IT.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Future forward

Report highlights top tech for construction industry by 2025

Q

uick: Name the technological advances that will make the biggest impact on the construction industry. We know, with all of this pandemic stuff happening, it is hard to focus on something like that right now. But is it? Technology is not only what will help us drive past this bump in the road, but will help make things work better and more efficiently moving forward. So, what are these technologies we speak of? For starters, prefabrication, 3D printing and blockchain are among the ones that will see the fastest growth in construction during the next five years, according to a white paper by Ernst & Young. Here’s a look at the others you should keep an eye on: > Smart buildings > 3D printing > Geo-enabled > Blockchain > Robotic Process > Robotics Automation (RPA) > Digital Twins > Artificial Intelligence (AI)

They said it “The occupancy you can have in a store is a lot lower than before. We are lucky because our stores are pretty big, but it’s still a reduced capacity. We’ve been offering co-browsing, where customers can video chat with sales associates before they come in and pick out clothes they want to try, and we can get the clothes prepared so they’re ready when the customer comes in. Our business is high-touch so we’re looking for any ways to make it safer and easier, and to minimize contact. — Suitsupply founder and CEO Fokke de Jong on how fashion retailers are dealing with reopening requirements

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“We started to take a look closely in all the elements that we have in our identity to make sure that it’s aligned with our Louisiana roots, and also with our values and personalities.”

“Prefabrication has a lot of positive impacts: on construction speed, improved quality and construction tolerances, on people and processes.”

— FRapha Abreu VP and global head of design at Popeyes’ parent company, Restaurant Brands International Popeyes, on the brand’s new logo

— Daniel Glaessl, Design Director for Gensler, on why prefab continues to gain ground for speedier construction practices

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

The big bounce back 5 key revitalization signs you should know

W

ith the country’s gradually reopening comes some signs of life. And while the road to what we once considered normal will be a tough one to travel, there are signs that could point to better days ahead. Here are five signs (and their sources) to watch:

1. Americans are starting to drive and walk again, though transit use is lagging

They walk. They drive. They are moving. What once was essential travel only now is moving into trips to retailers, beaches, parks, etc. But as employees continue to work from home and travelers remain fearful of public transportation, the movement will be slow. Source: Apple Data

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2. Diners are returning to restaurants

Takeout. Delivery. Curbside. Consumers had options during the lockdown. And while some are making their way back to restaurants, the move is slow. A slew of new health guidelines such as capacity limitations and table spacing is helping get diners back in the groove. Source: OpenTable

3. Hotel occupancy rates are coming back

From April to May, hotel occupancy rates began to edge up ever so slightly, as more people resumed some travel for business and leisure. With safety at the forefront, major hotel brands have enhanced their cleaning procedures and put a number of new health protocol in place. Source: STR

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

4. Air travel is picking up, but still down significantly

The daily number of travelers dropped nearly 100% year-over-year in March and April. And while it has picked up slightly, it will be a long ride to normalcy. A number of policy booking and in-flight protocols are helping ease customer fears. Source: Transportation Security Administration (TSA)

5. Home purchases are up versus last year

With some coronavirus-related restrictions easing, potential homebuyers are touring open houses and resuming their searches. Though the single-family home mortgage purchase index saw a 30% plus drop, it is inching back. Source: Mortgage Bankers Association


CIRCLE NO. 11


INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Lodging strikes back Survey shows whose leading the hotel construction pipeline

S

o COVID-19 was a factor in everything and anything during the first part of the year. That said, the pandemic did not have a full impact on first quarter 2020 US results reported by Lodging Econometrics (LE). According to the “United States Construction Pipeline Trend Report,” only the last 30 days of the quarter were affected. And while it still is too early to predict the full impact of the outbreak on the lodging industry, here is a look at how the top three brands in Q1 are faring, numbers that comprised 69% of the projects in the total US pipeline.

Marriott International 1,556 projects/204,244 rooms Hilton 1,413 projects/161,743 rooms InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) 954 projects/97,547 rooms

The numbers game

1,768 220,000

The number (a record) of hotel construction projects (totaling 237,362 rooms) that were underway in the US at the end of 2019, according to Lodging Econometrics. The national pipeline boasted 5,748 projects, up 4% from 2018.

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The number of US hotel rooms under construction, a record level, in April, even though the industry suffered its worst downturn on record, according to STR. While the pandemic will reverse the trend eventually, STR says the slowdown will not necessarily be drastic.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

58.7

The percent of consumers who say the plan to dine out as often as they did before the pandemic, according to a survey from VIPinsiders. The report also showed that 62% want to see restaurant employees wearing both masks and gloves when they reopen, while 39% want to see protective gear in use for 30 days.


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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

In COVID’s wake

The pivotal role of facilities management in securing public spaces

T

here is no crisis in living memory that can compare to the scale of disruption and threat, which the COVID-19 pandemic has unleashed on an unsuspecting world. Waste swathes of the globe were in complete lockdown, self-isolation and preventative measures were the only recourse to defend against the contagion, for now. Recent news reports indicate that a third of the world’s population is currently living under official self-quarantine directives. With people staying home and only venturing out briefly for essential supplies and services, the need to ensure that our buildings and public spaces are secured against the spread of the virus is unprecedented. Facility management has taken on a unique role in the defense against the contagion, in this time of global crisis. The responsibility to mitigate the risk of infection within their portfolio of properties

is on the shoulders of these professionals, and the preventative measures they are implementing will be one of the key factors in “flattening the curve,” of the number of infections. The strategies and processes that facilities and property managers can implement, in this context, are manifold, but the following priorities stand out as must-do measures:

Facility management has taken on a unique role in the defense against the contagion, in this time of global crisis.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

By Prabhu Ramachandran

Disseminating credible information

With a vast majority of the world’s population online, a virtual “infodemic” has spread, in lock step with the pandemic itself. As can be expected, misinformation and sensationalism actually outflanks authentic sources, in sheer volume. Facility managers will play a critical role in disseminating credible information from sources such as the WHO and the national medical bodies of their countries, to


CIRCLE NO. 13


INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE educate their onsite staff and building occupants about preventive and precautionary measures.

Setting up effective operational response rooms

As a workforce that is stationed across every corner of the venue being secured, facilities management teams need to be even better coordinated than usual. Setting up well supported and connected operational response rooms—both onsite and remote—is virtually non-negotiable, in being able to deliver the sort of agile and responsive operations that are the need of the hour.

Building redundancies and inventory

Many facility management teams are running the leanest possible operations, in terms of individuals deployed, so that staff are exposed to a minimum number of others, while still being able to deliver the impeccable operations necessary. The possibility of critical staff getting infected cannot be ruled out.

of access to hand sanitizers and repeated disinfection of frequent contact surfaces, such as door knobs, restroom fixtures, handrails, elevator buttons and work surfaces, is essential to securing onsite staff and occupants.

Maintaining optimal humidity and air quality within buildings

Definitive correlations between humidity and the infectivity of influenza viruses—of which the COVID-19 contagion is a particularly virulent and malevolent strain—have been researched for quite some time. General consensus of such these findings is that this family of viruses can be relatively contained at higher relative humidity. This strategy was found to be true for SARS and other preceding coronavirus strains. While the effects on the COVID-19 contagion are still being investigated, building managers can explore raising relative indoor humidity to 40% or above, as a preventive measure.

Monitoring footfall & visitors

Stringent adherence to very thorough cleaning procedures, performed much more frequently than usual, is paramount. FM operations need to cross-skill team members so operations remain disruption free, in the event that uniquely skilled members are compromised. Facilities managers also need to leverage relationships with their vendors and suppliers, to ensure a well-stocked inventory of essentials such as gloves, masks and disinfectants, securing their operations against possible supply-chain disruptions.

Flawless soft services routines

As evident in the slow, but eventual turnaround in China and South Korea, in terms of the number of infected individuals, prevention is the key to overcoming the COVID-19 crisis. The highest possible standards of sanitization and hygiene in buildings cannot be stressed enough, in this context. Stringent adherence to very thorough cleaning procedures, performed much more frequently than usual, is paramount. Ease

It is estimated that a significantly high number of asymptomatic infected individuals are present in most affected populations. Identifying such persons and having the ability to track their movements within a building retrospectively will be crucial to aggressively disinfecting facilities they might have infected and testing people they came in contact with. Highly detailed and error free records of this nature need to be maintained by facilities managers.

Leveraging technology to optimize operations

A unified, detailed and real-time view of operations, and the buildings under management, is critical to the response that this pandemic requires. Networks of sensors and IoT technology can help collate real time data across locations and assets, which can then be subjected to AI and Machine Learning derived actionable insights. Temperature sensors are being used to identify individuals with elevated body temperatures, so they can be quarantined and tested. Cloud-based apps and interfaces are providing much needed data to all stakeholders and helping to coordinate efforts. Targeted deployment of these technologies, and more, will be essential to ensure the highest standards of operational efficiency and due diligence. CCR

Prabhu Ramachandran is the founder and CEO of Facilio Inc., an enterprise-wide platform for facilities O & M (Operations & Maintenance) across real-estate portfolios, headquartered in New York and with operations in the United States, Middle East and India. Prabhu’s career spans over 18 years of product, business and customer experience focused on enterprise-scale software for IoT-based connected services, sustainable building solutions and telecom network management.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

The right stuff 4 ways construction technology can protect you from litigation

A

s the construction industry continues to navigate new working protocols in the wake of COVID-19, the need for new tools and processes to improve documentation has never been clearer. Many projects are recovering from experienced delays and other unforeseen challenges, which means legal disputes are inevitable. Utilizing the right technology can help you protect your business.

1. Streamline communication

With so many moving pieces in construction, poor communication can lead directly to lawsuits. Keeping an open line of communication between the field, office and stakeholders will ensure more visibility and less room for error when it comes to project execution and results. Every step of the way, your team should be empowered to communicate clearly and directly with all the necessary parties. Invest in

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

By Kyle Slager

construction software that will automatically send data from the field to the office. That way, if an incident or delay occurs on the jobsite, you will be informed instantly—effectively eliminating any surprises and enabling your company to quickly create the proper notifications and filings. Communicating actively and in a timely manner goes a long way in building strong working relationships, and digitally documenting every piece of communication will provide protection in case a disagreement does turn into legal action.

2. Require digital daily reports

Now more than ever, the daily report is critical for keeping a clear record of every project. Completing comprehensive daily reports ensures any delays or liabilities will not slip through the cracks and can be taken care of in a timely manner. The more detailed


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CIRCLE NO. 15


INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE your reports are, the faster you can spot any potential issues and address them. How do you make sure your documentation is accurate? Start where the data is created. More often than not, incomplete or missing dailies are a byproduct of an inefficient or complex field process. The last thing your field crew wants to do at the end of the day is to stay late for paperwork and try to remember everything that happened. The easier you make it for them to collect data and complete reports throughout their day, the more likely they are to do it. Implementing a digital tool built for the field means you will have more detailed daily reports to serve as your documentation in the event of any disputes or litigation. By requiring digital daily reports, you will also limit the risk of losing single paper reports. In addition to always having a digital copy, storing your reports in a cloud-based solution allows you to quickly search and find all of your documentation in one central place—which is crucial for preparing for lawsuits and providing evidence to protect your company.

3. Utilize photos and videos

Although working remotely was never in most construction companies’ plans, they have had to pivot to equip themselves with the proper tools to keep project stakeholders in the loop from a distance. Having to limit the number of people on a jobsite has paved the way for using innovative methods like photos and videos for visual updates, but the benefits of these tools extend far beyond the ease of remote work. Photos and videos that are time and date-stamped and embedded directly into your daily reports (and file storage system) give you powerful evidence of any work completed and project delays. Having an organized database of visual proof helps strengthen your business’ case as litigations arise, eliminating any questions or speculation of what happened.

4. Manage safety risks

Safety is the No. 1 priority in construction. With proper risk management and documentation practices, you will better protect both your crews and company. By properly educating crews on how to deal with risks—and how to safely handle situations—you can remain confident your workers are safe on the jobsite while limiting legal threats. Conducting regular safety meetings and sharing toolbox talks is the first step to making sure your crews are up to date on safety practices. Documenting safety meetings and inspections as they are completed is the important second step, and it serves two purposes: holding your company accountable for conducting them regularly and providing legal protection in the case of any personal injury lawsuits. Keeping digital records of who attended talks and which topics were covered keeps you and your workers protected in the unfortunate case of an incident. As our industry continues to recover and rebuild, there is a chance you will find yourself in a legal dispute. But using technology for clear communication, digital documentation and safety education will help you further protect your company in case of litigation. Implementing technology can help you get back to business faster while optimizing your processes for the future—which is a worthy investment for any company’s success. CCR

Implementing a digital tool built for the field means you will have more detailed daily reports to serve as your documentation in the event of any disputes or litigation.

Kyle Slager is CEO and founder with Raken, a mobile-first, field management software for the construction industry, in 2014. Today, Raken serves nearly 4,000 clients and has been utilized on over 350,000 projects. The cloud-based SaaS solution boosts productivity and safety by streamlining workflow processes such as daily reporting, time tracking, and safety management.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


ATTENTION:

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


Light and warmth

How Solara Hospitality’s award-winning properties are elevating the customer service game By MJ Pallerino

F

or Clancy Cipkala and Andy Briggs, the formula is pretty straight forward: Create a hospitality atmosphere of light and warmth and take care of the associates who are on the front lines of delivering your brand’s mission to the people. Cipkala, Senior Managing Partner, President and CEO; and Briggs, CHA, Senior VP and Managing Partner, have established a formula that continues to manage award-winning properties defined by a team known for their expertise, compassion and commitment to excellence.

JUNE 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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LIGHT AND WARMTH By continually setting itself apart by providing delightful and memorable guests experiences, Solara has become a go-to source for hospitality management, overseeing Marriot-branded properties, including Residence Inns, TownePlace Suites and Courtyard hotels in South Carolina. Under the leadership of Cipkala, Solara has developed more than 30 hotels in the Southeast United States, pulling in numerous brand and state awards, including the “2017 South Carolina Hotelier of the Year” and “Hotel of the Year” within the Marriott and Choice brands. The Solara brand is a testament to the management duo. Cipkala began his career with Ryan Homes as a sales manager and then spent the next five years at Ford Motor Company as a Zone Manager and Product Marketing Manager. He was VP of Sales and Marketing for a hotel management company that handled 25 hotels in the Southeast, as well as a full-service, in-house advertising agency. His counterpart, Briggs, started his 26-year career in hospitality as a banquet waiter at the Broyhill Inn and Conference Center

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

in Boone, North Carolina. Certified by American Hotel & Lodging Association as a Certified Hotel Administrator in 2006, 2011 and 2016, he has consistently served on boards as a director or an officer on the local and state level for tourism and lodging. For 15 years, Briggs has served as GM at several award-winning properties within Hampton Inn by Hilton (3 consecutive Lighthouse awards), Courtyard by Marriott (Diamond, Platinum, and Gold) and Residence Inn by Marriott (Platinum) before becoming a General Partner. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with them to get their take on today’s unique hospitality landscape and what the future holds moving forward for the Solara and the industry at large.

Give us a snapshot of Solara Hospitality.

We are small in size but large at heart. We are completely motivated by treating our staff with the utmost respect and sincerity. I feel this separates us; we want them part of our team as much as they want to play for us. We have two riding philosophies:


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CIRCLE NO. 17


LIGHT AND WARMTH “We believe in being the light and warmth of hospitality while taking care of our associates; that sets ourselves apart and gives our guests a delightful experience at our hotels.” “Helping people love and remember their experience.”

What kind of consumers are we targeting?

All of our guests want to be treated with true genuine hospitality. We cater to both the longand short-term business travelers. Our suites offer separate spaces to sleep, work and lounge, and allow our guests to pursue both their personal and professional passions while on the road.

How does the overall design of your place cater to consumers?

They are looking for functionality, which means making it as easy as possible to travel when they are out of town. As for design, it really depends on the market that we are in. For some of our projects, we have built extended stay hotels that have full kitchenettes and more space for the longer-term guests. For some of our projects, we have amenities for someone staying one or two nights like a full bar or a full restaurant. On the upgrade side, we continue to upgrade our high-speed internet to cater to guest needs. All of our hotels are going to keyless entry. And with COVID-19 concerns, our housekeeping and food and beverage standards have changed to accommodate guests.

We are optimistic for 2021 and for corporate travel to start again, and sustain 2019 levels by 2023.

What kind of adjustments have you made to cater to customers? Keep our staffing levels at a point where there is as minimum impact on quality and service, if any.

What kind of conversations are you having with your employees? Just letting them know and reassuring the staff that things will get better, which they will. Stay optimistic. We talk to our associates every day though our daily huddles and daily stand ups.

What is your short-term strategy? Do the best job we can in taking care of our guests. Same with long-term.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


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CIRCLE NO. 18


LIGHT AND WARMTH

What is the best piece of advice you can offer others in regards to what is happening right now?

Take care of your staff and work harder than you ever have in your life. We will get through this.

Is there a location that really shows how the brand interacts with the community and customers?

The Residence Inn in West Columbia, South Carolina, across from Lexington Medical Center because we see to the needs of the people of the hospital.

Walk us through how and why your locations are designed the way they are.

They are designed in order to maximize the size of the land, the size of the room and to be as visible as possible to the guests.

Give us a rundown of your market’s layout. 50% leisure and 50% corporate.

What is the biggest issue today relating to the construction side of the business?

Construction prices continue to go up both in materials and labor. With the situation of COVID-19 and the uncertainty from both banks and the brands on building, those prices could come down.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Talk about your overall construction and design strategy.

With the sites that we pick, we typically go with a prototypical design from the brand that we are going to go with. That being said, we always put added features to enhance the guest experience. A great example of this is putting a larger pool area in North Charleston, South Carolina for guests to enjoy during their stay after they have enjoyed the historic sites of Charleston throughout the day.

Talk about sustainability.

We continuously upgrade our properties, as we are seeing what guests are expecting—things like Wi-Fi and keyless entry. But we also make sure to do complete renovations on our hotels every seven years to stay current and fresh.

What trends are you seeing/expecting?

If you would have asked me this a few months ago, I would have spoken about enhanced Wi-Fi and efforts to “go green” or some enhancement in the room. But after COVID-19, everything is not just focused on cleanliness, but on how our hotels are making sure we have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic appropriately. We also see more hotels closing, but we are confident that the economy will be better soon so they can reopen. As developers, we have to be mindful of potential niche brands coming into the market.


CIRCLE NO. 19


LIGHT AND WARMTH What type of opportunities do you see moving ahead? Being able to offer an experience where people love and remember the experience they had is important. We are continuously looking for land in areas that don’t seem opportunistic. Clancy has an eye for a raw piece of land and sees the potential in what is going to happen in the area and then I research it. So far he has always been right. In the near future, our goal is to keep as many hotels open and operating efficiently as possible.

What type of optimism is out there?

Currently, with how the economy is, we are looking at more regional type of tourism to happen. We are optimistic for 2021 and for corporate travel to start again, and sustain 2019 levels by 2023.

What is the secret to creating a must visit location in today’s competitive environment?

Hotels have not changed much. They have to be value conscious, and demonstrate or show ease of travel with things like internet and Wi-Fi capabilities.

What are today’s guests looking for?

The guest is looking for a memorable experience, whether it is us remembering their birthday, ensuring that their breakfast was to the temperature they liked or that our associates are wearing masks because of COVID-19. They want an experience that leaves them satisfied. We want the experience to be so memorable that they only think of us when their travel plans involve where our hotels are.

Describe a typical day.

As active owners and operators, we are at our properties on a daily basis. I could be at one property going over P&Ls with our GMs, and later that afternoon at the construction site inspecting trusses or going over plumbing fixtures for our property.

What is the biggest item on your to-do list?

Staying open and finding business. Finding travelers. And as we are currently building a hotel, making sure construction continues to go smoothly. For our open and operating properties, it is about continuing to bring in guests. CCR

One-on-one with... Clancy Cipkala & Andy Briggs Solara Hospitality

What was the best advice you every received? Good things happen to people that work the hardest (Clancy). Mine actually came from Clancy. He told me to move to Columbia, and let’s develop a hotel company that takes care of our associates and takes care of our guests. What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? You have the best staff of any hotel I have ever been to. What is the true key to success for any manager? That goes back to our mission statement. We want them, whether it is associates or guests, to love and remember their experience with us.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

What is the most rewarding part of your job? Watching associates grow with our company as we have continued to build hotels and grow our portfolio. These are the same associates that have been with us from when we started many years ago. What are the three traits every leader should have? The ability to listen to other people. You do not know everything. You have to go with your gut; typically it is correct. And trust your partners. That’s why you have them. What do you do for downtime? Watching sports.


CIRCLE NO. 20


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING

Report highlights industry’s leading GC firms

T

he general contractor sits at the heart of every construction project. So, to help you keep tabs on the industry’s leading firms, our annual GC listing shines a light on who’s doing what in the retail, restaurant, hospitality and other sectors. The report features the contact information and contact person at each company. If your firm did not make the list, contact Publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

RESTAURANT

Lendlease.................................................... $1,620,926,338.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $481,000,000.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $353,063,000.00 Wolverine Building Group............................. $130,000,000.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................... $117,000,000.00 S.M. Wilson & Co......................................... $77,900,000.00 First Finish................................................... $10,000,000.00 PTS Contracting........................................... $6,000,000.00 Tri-North Builders, Inc.................................. $6,000,000.00 Fortney & Weygandt, Inc.............................. $3,920,000.00

HEALTHCARE

HOSPITALITY

McCarthy Holdings, Inc................................ $319,232,690.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $248,000,000.00 Lendlease.................................................... $206,404,076.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................... $134,000,000.00 First Finish................................................... $110,000,000.00 Digney York Associates................................ $98,000,000.00 EBCO General Contractor, LTD...................... $72,014,082.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $70,160,000.00 MYCON General Contractors, Inc.................. $66,000,000.00 Harmon Construction, Inc............................. $53,000,000.00

Schimenti Construction Company................ $62,000,000.00 Gray West Construction Inc.......................... $41,000,000.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $28,000,000.00 Prairie Contractors, Inc................................. $21,000,000.00 Beam Team Construction............................. $20,000,000.00 CDO Group................................................... $20,000,000.00 Wolverine Building Group............................. $20,000,000.00 TMG Construction Management, Inc............. $19,400,000.00 Marco Contractors Inc.................................. $19,000,000.00 Fortney & Weygandt, Inc.............................. $14,680,000.00 McCarthy Holdings, Inc................................ $1,401,853,653.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $1,075,000,000.00 Lendlease.................................................... $338,595,298.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................... $233,000,000.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $130,988,000.00 DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc................... $55,200,000.00 Harmon Construction, Inc............................. $23,000,000.00 S.M. Wilson & Co......................................... $21,000,000.00 Gray West Construction Inc.......................... $15,500,000.00 Poettker Construction Company................... $12,804,120.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

RETAIL

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company....... $430,000,000.00 Gray West Construction Inc.......................... $107,000,000.00 Schimenti Construction Company................ $62,000,000.00 Gray West Construction Inc.......................... $41,000,000.00 Hirsch Construction Corp............................. $35,000,000.00 Prairie Contractors, Inc................................. $21,000,000.00 Beam Team Construction............................. $20,000,000.00 Wolverine Building Group............................. $20,000,000.00 TMG Construction Management, Inc............. $19,400,000.00 Marco Contractors Inc.................................. $19,000,000.00

MULTI-HOUSING

Top Ten Totals

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company..... McCarthy Holdings, Inc.............................. Lendlease.................................................. Gray West Construction Inc........................ O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................. Hoar Construction...................................... Powerhouse............................................... Schimenti Construction Company.............. MYCON General Contractors, Inc................ MYCON General Contractors, Inc................

$9,828,000,000.00 $4,654,000,000.00 $3,238,873,595.00 $1,672,751,267.00 $1,060,000,000.00 $946,580,000.00 $400,000,000.00 $302,000,000.00 $272,800,000.00 $270,700,000.00


Beam Team Construction CDO Group Tim Hill, VP 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com • timhill@thebeamteam.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: 600 Retail: $45,000,000.00 Restaurants: $20,000,000.00 Hospitality: $20,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $85,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 8,000 Square Footage: Retail: 120,000 Hospitality: 10,000 Restaurants: 10,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 10,000 Total: 150,000 Specialize In: Groceries, Drug Stores, Hotels, Restaurants

Bogart Construction, Inc. Danny Stone, Dir of Business Development 9980 Irvine Center Dr., #200 Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 453-1400 Fax: (949) 453-1414 www.bogartconstruction.com dstone@bogartconstruction.com Year Established: 1991 No. of Employees: 60 Retail: $52,000,000.00 Restaurants: $3,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $55,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 60 Square Footage: Retail: 425,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 5,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 430,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

BrandPoint Services Dave Knoche, VP of Sales 820 Adams Ave., Suite 130 Trooper, PA 19403 (800) 905-4342 Ext. 2021 Fax: (484) 392-7520 www.brandpointservices.com dknoche@brandpointservices.com Year Established: 2002 No. of Employees: 60 Retail: $48,000,000.00 Restaurants: $2,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $3,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $53,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Vinny Catullo Vice President of Business Development 333 Harrison Street Oak Park, IL 60304 (908) 627-1778 www.cdogroup.com • vinnyc@cdogroup.com Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: 49 Retail: $10,000,000.00 Restaurants: $20,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $15,000,000.00 Total: $45,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Chain Store Maintenance, Inc. John Catanese, VP 91 Union St. Attleboro, MA 02703 (800) 888-1675 www.chainstore.com • john@chainstore.com Year Established: 1991 No. of Employees: 55 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 50,000 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 50,000,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

CKP Construction Todd Barbour, President 1616 S Kentucky, Suite C325 Amarillo, TX 79102 (806) 420-0696 www.ckpconstruction.com • tbarbour@ckpconstruction.com Year Established: 2016 No. of Employees: 18 Retail: $3,200,000.00 Restaurants: $11,500,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $3,050,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $6,500,000.00 Total: $24,250,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 36 Square Footage: Retail: 14,547 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 68,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 28,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 46,000 Total: 156,547 Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Multi-Family, Medical Offices, Athletic Facilities

JUNE 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

39


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Commonwealth Building Inc. Core States Group Chris Fontaine, President 265 Willard Street Quincy, MA 02169 (617) 770-0050, Fax: (617) 472-4734 www.combuild.com • cfontaine@combuild.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 33 Retail: $23,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $5,000,000.00 Total: $28,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 659,129 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 40,328 Total: 696,457 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Special Projects and Maintenance

Natalie Rodriguez, Marketing Manager 201 S Maple Ave., Suite 300 Ambler, PA 19002 (813) 319-8755 www.core-states.com • nrodriguez@core-states.com Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 325 Retail: $3,103,092.00 Restaurants: $742,666.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $13,992,713.00 Total: $17,838,471.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 264 Square Footage: Retail: 38,788 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 5,941 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 174,908 Total: 219,637 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Restaurants, Solar, Battery Storage

De Jager Construction, Inc. Dan De Jager, President

Construction Advantage, Inc. 75 60th Street SW

Michael Rothholtz, President 1112 Hibbard Rd. Wilmette, IL 60091 (847) 853-9300 constructadvantage@sbcglobal.net Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

Construction One, Inc. Cash Matetich, Business Development Manager 101 E Town St., Suite 401 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 398-7236 Fax: (614) 237-6769 www.constructionone.com • cmatetich@constructionone.com Year Established: 1980 No. of Employees: 70 Retail: $50,453,184.00 Restaurants: $2,159,078.00 Hospitality: $1,953,303.00 Healthcare: $1,700,408.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $6,689,664.00 Total: $62,950,637.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 99 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Self-Storage, Fitness, Entertainment, Lifestyle

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Wyoming, MI 49548 (616) 530-0060, Fax: (616) 530-9888 www.dejagerconstruction.com dj1@dejagerci.com Year Established: 1970 No. of Employees: 35 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $25,700,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 68 Square Footage: Retail: 1,211,073 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,211,073 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Desco Professionals Builders, Inc.

Robert Anderson, President 290 Somers Road Ellington, CT 06029 (860) 870-7070 www.descopro.com • builders@descopro.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: $12,000,000.00 Restaurants: $6,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $5,000,000.00 Total: $23,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 48 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education


CIRCLE NO. 21


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING DeWees Construction Inc. DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc.

Allen Galloway, Senior Vice President 35 N Baldwin P.O. Box 691 Bargersville, IN 46106 (317) 709-5135 Fax: (317) 422-5142 www.deweesconstruction.com allen@deweesconstruction.com Year Established: 1994 No. of Employees: 15 Retail: $4,550,000.00 Restaurants: $1,500,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $7,325,000.00 Total: $13,375,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 9 Square Footage: Retail: 13,200 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 5,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 133,000 Total: 151,200 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

Bryan Hodnett, VP of Business Development 3030 E Causeway Approach Mandeville, LA 70448 (800) 626-4431 Fax: (985) 626-3572 www.donahuefavret.com • dfcinfo@donahuefavret.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 49 Retail: $4,300,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $3,900,000.00 Healthcare: $55,200,000.00 Multi-Family: $1,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $19,600,000.00 Total: $84,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 13 Square Footage: Retail: 74,713 Hospitality: 4,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 96,978 Multi-Family: 169,776 Other: 28,921 Total: 374,388 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Office Buildings, Tenant Improvements, Faith-Based

Bill Navas, President 1919 Gallows Rd. Vienna, VA 22182 (703) 790-5281 www.digneyyork.com • bnavas@digneyyork.com Year Established: 1985 No. of Employees: 45 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $98,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $98,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 15 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Casinos, Hotels

Bennett Van Wert, Director, Sales & Development 2 Northway Ln. Latham, NY 12110 (888) 396-9111 www.dwminc.com • bvanwert@dwminc.com Year Established: 1997 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $30,600,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 10,000+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Financial, REITs

DWM Comprehensive Digney York Associates Facility Solutions

DLP Construction Co. Inc. EBCO General Contractor, LTD.

Lynn Kaden, Dir. of Business Development 5935 Shiloh Rd. E. Alpharetta, GA 30005 (770) 887-3573 Fax: (770) 887-2357 www.dlpconstruction.com lkaden@dlpconstruction.com Year Established: 1996 No. of Employees: 43 Retail: $27,957,349.00 Restaurants: $3,523,793.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,353,692.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $33,834,834.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 95 Square Footage: Retail: 2,350,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 25,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 120,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,495,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Erick Magowan, Business Development 804 E 1st St. Cameron, TX 76520 (254) 697-8516 Fax: (254) 697-8656 www.ebcogc.com • erick.magowan@ebcogc.com Year Established: 1997 No. of Employees: 64 Retail: $13,221,449.00 Restaurants: $14,331,508.00 Hospitality: $72,014,082.00 Healthcare: $1,017,702.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $4,083,045.00 Total: $104,667,786.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 32 Square Footage: Retail: 36,893 Hospitality: 491,521 Restaurants: 45,642 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 95,392 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 17,860 Total: 687,308 Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education


CIRCLE NO. 22


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING FCP Services First Finish James Loukusa, CEO 3185 Terminal Dr. Eagan, MN 55121 (651) 789-0790 www.fcpservices.com • jloukusa@fcpservices.com Year Established: 1990 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

Jason Stock, Vice President of Business Development 6240 Old Dobbin Ln., Suite 190 Columbia, MD 21045 (410) 290-6450 Fax: (410) 290-6451 www.firstfinish.com • jstock@firstfinish.net Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 74 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $110,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $10,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $120,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 20 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 3,686,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: 57,000 Other: N/A Total: 3,743,000 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Matthew Frank, Director of

Federal Health Business Development Steve Abrams, Director of Specialty Contracting 2300 State Highway 121 Euless, TX 76039 (817) 685-9075 Fax: (817) 685-9103 www.federalheath.com • sabrams@federalheath.com Year Established: 1901 No. of Employees: 582 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $22,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Petroleum and C-Stores

31269 Bradley Rd. North Olmsted, OH 44070 (440) 716-4000 Fax: (440) 716-4010 www.fortneyweygandt.com mfrank@fortneyweygandt.com Year Established: 1978 No. of Employees: 99 Retail: $31,060,000.00 Restaurants: $14,680,000.00 Hospitality: $17,680,000.00 Healthcare: $7,060,000.00 Multi-Family: $3,920,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $10,300,000.00 Total: $84,700,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 125 Square Footage: Retail: 647,100 Hospitality: 155,700 Restaurants: 160,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 72,000 Multi-Family: 22,500 Other: 54,300 Total: 990,100 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

Gray West Construction Inc.

Fiorilli Construction, Inc. Eric Berg, Chief Operating Officer, Carmen Fiorilli, President/Owner 1247 Medina Rd. Medina, OH 44256 (216) 696-5845 Fax: (216) 696-5844 www.fio-con.com • cf@fio-con.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $28,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 75 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: Millions Specialize In: Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

44

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

West Region 421 E Cerritos Ave. Anaheim, CA 92805 (714) 491-1317 Fax: (714) 333-9700 www.gray.com • eberg@gray.com Year Established: 1960 No. of Employees: 1,105 Retail: $107,000,000.00 Restaurants: $41,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $15,500,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $1,509,251,267.00 Total: $1,672,751,267.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 424 Square Footage: Retail: 2,800,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 200,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 38,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 3,600,000 Total: 6,638,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Entertainment and Theme Park


Harmon Construction, Inc. Hoar Construction Ardell Mitchell, Vice President 621 S State St. North Vernon, IN 47265 (812) 346-2048 Fax: (812) 346-2054 www.harmonconstruction.com ardell.mitchell@harmonconstruction.com Year Established: 1955 No. of Employees: 90 Retail: $500,000.00 Restaurants: $1,000,000.00 Hospitality: $53,000,000.00 Healthcare: $23,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $1,000,000.00 Other: $9,500,000.00 Total: $88,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 124 Square Footage: Retail: 4,000 Hospitality: 200,000 Restaurants: 5,000 Federal: 115,000 Healthcare: 180,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 50,000 Total: 554,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Restaurants

Healy Construction Services, Inc. James T. Healy, Vice President 14000 S Keeler Ave. Crestwood, IL 60418 (708) 396-0440 Fax: (708) 396-0412 www.healyconstrutionservices.com jth@healyconstructionservices.com Year Established: 1988 No. of Employees: 30 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, PEMB Services, Design Build

Hirsch Construction Corp. Adam Hirsch, President 222 Rosewood Dr., 5th Floor Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 762-8744 www.hirschcorp.com ahirsch@hirschcorp.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 43 Retail: $35,000,000.00 Restaurants: $10,000,000.00 Hospitality: $5,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $2,000,000.00 Total: $52,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 72 Square Footage: Retail: 180,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants

Tiffany Fessler, Communications Manager 2 Metroplex Dr., Suite 400 Birmingham, AL 35209 (205) 803-2121 Fax: (205) 423-2323 www.hoar.com • marketing@hoar.com Year Established: 1940 No. of Employees: 508 Retail: $149,915,000.00 Restaurants: $75,000.00 Hospitality: $70,160,000.00 Healthcare: $130,988,000.00 Multi-Family: $353,063,000.00 Federal: $4,987,000.00 Other: N/A Total: $946,580,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 37 Square Footage: Retail: 499,587 Hospitality: 7,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: 457,300 Healthcare: 94,632 Multi-Family: 2,015,061 Other: 1,532,745 Total: 4,606,325 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Multi-family

Hunter Building Corp. Peter Ferri, President 14609 Kimberly Ln. Houston, TX 77079 (281) 377-6550 Fax: (281) 377-8600 www.hunterbuilding.com • pferri@hunterbuilding.com Year Established: 2007 No. of Employees: 11 Retail: $12,000,000.00 Restaurants: $50,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $12,050,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 45 Square Footage: Retail: 790,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 5,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 795,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Commercial Office

Immel Construction Paul Martzke, President 1820 Radisson St. Green Bay, WI 54302 (920) 468-8208 Fax: (920) 468-7160 www.immelconstruction.com • paulma@immelconstruction.com Year Established: 1961 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $78,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $39,000,000.00 Total: $117,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 169 Square Footage: Retail: 1,956,140 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,956,140 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries

JUNE 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

45


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Kingsmen Projects Lendlease Stephen Hekman, EVP 3525 Hyland Ave. Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (619) 719-8950 www.kingsment-int.com • stephen@kingsment-usa.com Year Established: 1973 No. of Employees: 1,900 Retail: $5,000,000.00 Restaurants: $1,200,000.00 Hospitality: $500,000 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $6,700,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 500+ Square Footage: Retail: 70,000, Hospitality: 10,000, Restaurants: 20,000, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 100,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

Lakeview Construction John Stallman, Marketing Manager 10505 Corporate Dr. Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (262) 857-3336 Fax: (262) 857-3424 www.lvconstruction.com • john@lvconstruction.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 105 Retail: $67,000,000.00 Restaurants: $10,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $5,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $3,000,000.00 Total: $85,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 500 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Laser Facility Management Joe Fairley, Director of Business Development 5701 N Pine Island Rd., Suite 255 Tamarac, FL 33321 (561) 235-7444 Fax: (561) 566-5003 www.laserfacility.com • joseph@laserfacility.com Year Established: 2017 No. of Employees: 18 Retail: $4,000,000.00 Restaurants: $1,000,000.00 Hospitality: $3,000,000.00 Healthcare: $500,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $8,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 72 Square Footage: Retail: 2,000,000 Hospitality: 5,000,000 Restaurants: 2,500,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 25,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 9,000,000 Specialize In: Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare ,Specialty Stores, Shoppimg Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

46

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Mike Fratianni, General Manager, Construction 200 Park Ave. New York, NY 10166 (212) 592-6800 • Fax: (212) 592-6988 www.lendlease.com • americas@lendlease.com Year Established: 1917 No. of Employees: 1,500 Retail: $232,781.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $206,404,076.00 Healthcare: $338,595,298.00 Multi-Family: $1,620,926,338.00 Federal: N/A Other: $1,072,715,102.00 Total: $3,238,873,595.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 35 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 455,628 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 611,652 Multi-Family: 4,406,008 Other: 1,969,966 Total: 7,443,254 Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Education, Multi-Family

Lone Star Commercial Services Matt Mercer, COO 123 N Seguin Ave., #202 New Braunfels, TX 78130 (512) 635-5363 www.lonestarcommercialservices.com matt@lscstx.com Year Established: 2001 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: $3,500,000.00 Restaurants: $1,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $4,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 75 Square Footage: Retail: 100,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 35,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 135,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

Marco Contractors Inc. Nicole Ranalli, Associate Director of Business Development 100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15095 (724) 814-9049, Fax: (724) 741-0335 www.marcocontractors.com • nranalli@marcocontractors.com Year Established: 1978 No. of Employees: 215 Retail: $67,000,000.00 Restaurants: $19,000,000.00 Hospitality: $6,000,000.00 Healthcare: $4,200,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $96,200,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 137 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, C-Stores


Retail Restaurant Healthcare Hospitality Convenience Education Financial / Banking Automotive Sports & Entertainment Commercial / REIT Shopping Centers Manufacturing / Logistics

Creating jobs and advancing skilled tradespersons; achieving functional, safe, healthy, enjoyable commercial environments Providing the following services FACILITIES > COVID-19 Response > Emergency Services > On-Demand Repairs • Break-Fix Services > Scheduled • Recurring Services > Preventative Maintenance (PM) Services > HVAC-R Services > Cleaning & Disinfection Services > Water Damage • Mold Remediation Restoration Services

CONSTRUCTION > Restoration • Build Back > Remodels • Refresh > Projects • Rollouts

Delivering exceptional services with transparency, & integrity

laserfacility.com • 561.235.7444 CIRCLE NO. 23


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING McCarthy Holdings, Inc. N-STORE Services

Susan Garritano, National Communications Manager 1341 N Rock Hill Rd. St. Louis, MO 63124 (314) 968-3300 Fax: (314) 968-4780 www.mccarthy.com sgarritano@mccarthy.com Year Established: 1864 No. of Employees: 2,327 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $1,401,853, 653.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $352,261,419.00 Other: $2,540,863,540.00 Total: $4,654,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 82 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare

MC Construction Management

Connie Mollet, Director of Development 38012 N Linda Dr. Cave Creek, AZ 85331 (480) 367-8600 Ext. 107 Fax: (480) 367-8625 www.mcbuilders.net cmollet@mcbuilders.net Year Established: 2001 No. of Employees: 22 Retail: $18,950,000.00 Restaurants: $2,050,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $23,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 310,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 40,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 50,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 400,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Tenant Improvements

MC Group | Icon

Ryan Goldberg, EVP, Sales 8959 Tyler Blvd. Mentor, OH 44060 (440) 209-6200 Fax: (440) 209-6277 www.mcgroup-icon.com • info@mcgroup-icon.com Year Established: 1931 No. of Employees: 707 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

MYCON General Contractors, Inc.

Jenifer Batchelder, Marketing Director 17311 Dallas Pkwy., Suite 300 Dallas, TX 75248 (972) 529-2444 Fax: (972) 232-2868 www.mycon.com • jbatchelder@mycon.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: 127 Retail: $147,700,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $66,000,000.00 Healthcare: $2,600,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $54,400,000.00 Total: $272,800,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 87 Square Footage: Retail: 4,800,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 538,539 Total: 5,300,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels

48

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Kevin Zigrang, Director of Business Development 160 Chesterfield Industrial Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 778-0448 Fax: (636) 778-0449 www.nstoreservices.com • kevin@nstoreservices.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 63 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $38,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 97 Square Footage: Retail: 1,560,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 70,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,630,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

O’Neil Industries, Inc. Dean Arnold, Retired Vice President-Consultant 1245 W Washington Blvd. Chicago, IL 60607 (773) 755-1611 www.weoneil.com • darnold@weoneil.com Year Established: 1925 No. of Employees: 452 Retail: $354,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $134,000,000.00 Healthcare: $233,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $117,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $222,000,000.00 Total: $1,060,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 160 Square Footage: Retail: 599,000 Hospitality: 308,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 735,000 Multi-Family: 1,132,000 Other: 921,000 Total: 3,655,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Office, Manufacturing, Transportation, Power

P&C Construction, Inc. Nic Cornelison, Vice President 1037 W Main St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 (423) 493-0051 Fax: (423) 493-0058 www.pc-const.com • nic@pc-const.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 72 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 210 Square Footage: Retail: 601,562 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 45,360 Federal: 204,500 Healthcare: 14,401 Multi-Family: 376,400 Other: 227,262 Total: 1,469,485 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Industrial, Street Scapes, Parks


Building Value for Clients

PTS Contracting covers all steps from

BUDGETING, SCHEDULING, and CONSTRUCTION.

www.

PTSCONTRACTING.com CIRCLE NO. 24


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Poettker Construction Prime Retail Services Inc. Company Jeff Terry,

Danielle Bergmann, Director of Marketing 400 S Germantown Rd. Breese, IL 62230 (618) 526-7213 Fax: (618) 526-7654 www.poettkerconstruction.com dbergmann@poettkerconstruction.com Year Established: 1980 No. of Employees: 175 Retail: $51,253,130.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $12,840,700.00 Healthcare: $12,804,120.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $48,130,100.00 Other: $52,971,950.00 Total: $178,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 31 Square Footage: Retail: 2,905,540 Hospitality: 17,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: 52,000 Healthcare: 12,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 56,300Total: 3,042,840 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Commercial & Corporate (Office), Industrial/Warehouse/Distribution, Recreational, Power/Energy

Director of Sales and Marketing 3617 Southland Dr. Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511, Fax: (866) 584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com jterry@primeretailservices.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 800 (+) Retail: $45,000,000.00 Restaurants: $2,000,000.00 Hospitality: $1,000,000.00 Healthcare: $500,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $500,000.00 Other: N/A Total: $49,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

Powerhouse PTS Contracting Jodie Susi, VP Business Development 812 S Crowley Rd., Suite A Crowley, TX 76036 (817) 297-8575 www.powerhousenow.com • jsusi@powerhousenow.com Year Established: 2004 No. of Employees: 900 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $400,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 100,000 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Financial Services, CRE

Alan Briskman, Principal 200 Business Park Dr. Armonk, NY 10504 (914) 290-4166 www.ptscontracting.com • alan@ptscontracting.com Year Established: 2013 No. of Employees: 10 Retail: N/A Restaurants: $400,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $8,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $6,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $14,400,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 10 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 40,000 Multi-Family: 33,000 Other: 10,000 Total: 83,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Family

Rockerz Inc. Prairie Contractors, Inc. Robert Smith, Dir. Business/National Accounts Peter Hegarty, President 9318 Gulfstream Rd. Frankfort, IL 60423 (815) 469-1904 Fax: (815) 469-5436 www.prairiecontractors.com • phegarty@prairie-us.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: $3,000,000.00 Restaurants: $21,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $24,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 46 Square Footage: Retail: 30,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 100,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 130,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants

50

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

100 Commonwealth Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 612-6520 www.rockerzinc.com rsmith@rockerzinc.com Year Established: 2004, No. of Employees: 55 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $10,500,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 300+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 4,500,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Other


CIRCLE NO. 25


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Royal Services Scott Contracting, LLC

Kathy David, Director of Client Growth 19175 Metcalf Ave. Overland Park, KS 66085 (913) 387-2840 www.royalsolves.com • kdavid@royalsolves.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 14,000 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Consumer Services, Self-storage, Lifestyle Brands

Johnny Wilkins, Director of Business Development 702 Old Peachtree Road NW, Suite 100 Suwanee, GA 30024 (770) 274-0534 www.scott-contracting.com johnny.wilkins@scott-contracting.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 48 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $12,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $25,000,000.00 Total: $37,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 120+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Family: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Office Interiors

RT Stevens Construction, Inc. Shames Construction

Troy Stevens, President 420 McKinley St., Suite 111-313 Corona, CA 92879 (951) 280-9361 Fax: (951) 549-9360 www.rtstevens.com tstevens@rtstevens.com Year Established: 1988 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 34 Square Footage: Retail: 109,242 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

S.M. Wilson & Co.

Carolyn Shames, President/CEO 5826 Brisa St. Livermore, CA94550 (925) 606-3000 Fax: (925) 606-3003 www.shames.com • cshames@shames.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 55 Retail: $86,723,932.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $86,723,932.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 31 Square Footage: Retail: 3,500,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 3,500,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Amy Berg, President 2185 Hampton Ave. St. Louis, MO 63139 (314) 645-9595 Fax: (314) 645-1700 www.smwilson.com • amy.berg@smwilson.com Year Established: 1921 No. of Employees: 104 Retail: $49,600,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $21,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $77,900,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $148,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 14 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Multi-Family, Office Space, Senior Living, Municipal, Tenant Finish

S.L. Hayden Construction Inc.

Joseph Rotondo, Executive Vice President 650 Danbury Rd. Norwalk, CT 06877 (914) 244-9100 www.schimenti.com • rotondo@schimenti.com Year Established: 1994 No. of Employees: 200 Retail: $240,000,000.00 Restaurants: $62,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $302,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 168 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

201 Rosa Helm Way Franklin, TN 37067 (615) 550-4343 www.sos-retailservices.com • elessing@sos-retailservices.com Year Established: 2009 No. of Employees: 125 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

Steve Hayden, President 3015 S Burleson Blvd. Burleson, TX 76028 (817) 783-7900 Fax: (817) 783-7902 www.hcichicago.com • shayden@hcichicago.com Year Established: 1940, No. of Employees: 40 Retail: $21,000,000.00 Restaurants: $14,270,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $35,270,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 43 Square Footage: Retail: 12,352 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 64,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 76,352 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Facility Maintenance

SOS Retail Services Schimenti Construction Eli Lessing, Director of Company Business Development

52

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


We don’t strive to be bigger. We strive to deliver the best quality and service in the industry. Our specialized project management teams are highly effective in maintaining affordable budgets, meeting tight deadlines, and delivering quality construction turnovers on time, every time. From coast to coast, Alaska to Puerto Rico, Hunter Building Corporation has you completely covered on your next construction project! We offer a multitude of services nationwide ranging from tenant improvements, buildouts, remodels, ground-up construction, and project management. Hunter Building Corporation takes pride in the fact that many of our clients have been repeat customers for many years.

14609 Kimberley Lane • Houston, TX, 77079 281-377-6550 • Fax: 281-752-8600 info@hunterbuilding.com CIRCLE NO. 26

Retail Construction • Restaurants • Hospitality • Office Spaces • Medical


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Taylor Bros. TRICON Construction Construction Co., Inc. Rich Carlucci, Vice President

Jeffrey Chandler, Vice President 4555 Middle Rd. Columbus, IN 47203 (812) 379-9547 Fax: (812) 372-4759 www.tbcci.com • jeff.chandler@tbcci.com Year Established: 1933 No. of Employees: 250 Retail: $50,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $1,000,000.00 Other: $33,000,000.00 Total: $86,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 400 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Casinos, Industrial

TDS

Christi Bock, CEO 4239 63rd St. W Bradenton, FL 34209 (941) 795-6100, Fax: (941) 795-6101 www.tdsconstruction.com • christi.bock@tdsconstruction.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $51,500,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $51,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 49 Square Footage: Retail: 3,254,761 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 3,254,761 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers CBC1260195

Timberwolff Construction, Inc.

Mike Wolff, President 1659 W Arrow Rte. Upland, CA 91786 (909) 949-0380, Fax: (909) 949-8500 www.timberwolff.com mike@timberwolff.com Year Established: 1989 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: $30,000,000.00 Restaurants: $5,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $10,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $5,000,000.00 Total: $50,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 143 Square Footage: Retail: 375,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 10,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 50,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 10,000 Total: 445,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

TMG Construction Management, Inc.

Tammy Goins, Principal 15420 Endeavor Dr. Noblesville, IN 46060 (317) 219-0406 Fax: (317) 282-0653 www.tmgcm.com • tgoins@tmgcm.com Year Established: 2007 No. of Employees: 15 Retail: $13,400,000.00 Restaurants: $19,400,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $32,800,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 45 Square Footage: Retail: 120,284 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 58,750 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 179,034 Specialize In: Restaurants

54

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

3433 Marshall Ln. Bensalem, PA 19020 (267) 223-1060 Fax: (215) 633-8363 www.tricon-construction.com r.carlucci@tricon-construction.com Retail: $7,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $7,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 555,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 555,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Casinos, Specialty Stores

Tri-North Builders, Inc. Thomas Thayer, CEO & President 2625 Research Park Dr. Fitchburg, WI 53711-4908 (608) 271-8717 Fax: (608) 271-3354 www.tri-north.com • tthayer@tri-north.com Retail: $52,000,000.00 Restaurants: $6,700,000.00 Hospitality: $47,000,000.00 Healthcare: $12,600,000.00 Multi-Family: $6,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $18,700,000.00 Total: $143,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 67 Square Footage: Retail: 281,000 Hospitality: 300,000 Restaurants: 24,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 44,500 Multi-Family: 49,000 Other: 109,000 Total: 807,500 Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family

UHC Construction Services Leslie Burton, Director of Business Development 154 E. Aurora Rd., Suite 155 Northfield, OH 44067 (216) 544-7588 www.uhccorp.com • lburton@uhccorp.com Year Established: 2006 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $23,000,000.00 Restaurants: $9,500,000.00 Hospitality: $1,500,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $34,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 398 Square Footage: Retail: 3,850,000 Hospitality: 10,000 Restaurants: 1,989,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 5,849,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Financial/Banking


Warwick Construction, Inc. The Whiting-Turner Walt Watzinger, Vice President Contracting Company 365 FM 1959 Houston, TX 77034 (832) 448-7000 Fax: (832) 448-3000 www.warwickconstruction.com walt@warwickconstruction.com Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $77,391,070.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 135 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Financial, Convenience/Gas, Entertainment

Waypoint Contracting, Inc. Katrina Gonzalez, President 7955 NW 12 St. Doral, FL 33126 (786) 608-1406 www.waypointci.com • kgonzalez@waypointci.com Year Established: 2016 No. of Employees: 21 Retail: $125,000.00 Restaurants: $125,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $500,000.00 Federal: $600,000.00 Other: $3,350,000.00 Total: $4,700,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 15 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Government, Specialty Stores, Multi-Family

Weekes Construction, Inc. Hunter Weekes, Vice President 237 Rhett St. Greenville, SC29601 (864) 233-0061 Fax: (864) 235-9971 www.weekesconstruction.com hweekes@weekesconstruction.com Year Established: 1975, No. of Employees: 32 Retail: $36,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $36,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 1975 Square Footage: Retail: 599,212 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 599,212 Specialize In: N/A

Tony Messina, Vice President 2 Enterprise Dr., Suite 504 Shelton, CT 06484 (203) 789-8700 www.whiting-turner.com anthony.messina@whiting-turner.com Year Established: 1909 No. of Employees: 4,300 Retail: $430,000,000.00 Restaurants: $28,000,000.00 Hospitality: $248,000,000.00 Healthcare: $1,075,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $481,000,000.00 Federal: $346,000,000.00 Other: $7,220,000,000.00 Total: $9,828,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 330+ Square Footage: Retail: 6,765,282 Hospitality: 3,642,047 Restaurants: 167,050 Federal: 2,482,567 Healthcare: 21,531,181 Multi-Family: 31,080,457 Other: N/A Total: 65,658,584 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, E-Commerce, Data Center, Warehouse & Distribution, Theme Parks, Sports Facilities

Wolverine Building Group

Michael Houseman, Director of Sales 4045 Barden Drive SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512 (616) 949-3360 www.wolvgroup.com • info@wolvgroup.com Year Established: 1939 No. of Employees: 148 Retail: $30,000,000.00 Restaurants: $20,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $5,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $130,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $35,000,000.00 Total: $220,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 65 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-family

Zerr Enterprises, Inc. Mike Zerr, President 1545 S. Acoma Street Denver, CO 80223 (303) 758-7776, Fax: (303) 758-7770 www.zerrenterprises.com zerr@zerrenterprises.com Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: 16 Retail: N/A Restaurants: $1,500,000.00 Hospitality: $30,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $31,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: 31 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Hotels

JUNE 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

55


Building legendary brands.

The Beam Team is an integrated construction and installation services company. America’s most trusted brands rely on us for installations, remodels, rollouts and tenant improvements. Call us at 844.232.6832 thebeamteam.com

GROCERY

M AT E R I A L HANDLING

H O S P I TA L I T Y

R E TA I L

TENANT IMPROVEMENT

CIRCLE NO. 27


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING

Check out the industry’s leading lighting firms

I

f you are looking for the industry leading lighting vendors in the retail, restaurant, hospitality and other sectors, our annual report gives you everything you need, including the contact information and contact person at each company. If your firm did not make the list, contact Publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. 90+ Lighting AFC Cable Darcy Johnson, Sales Manager 1094 Cudahy Pl. San Diego, CA 92110 (619) 340-1203 www.90pluslighting.com info@90pluslighting.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Acclaim Lighting, LLC Michael Giardina, Product Manager 6122 S Eastern Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90040 (323) 213-4557 www.acclaimlighting.com info@acclaimlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants,Commercial

ACS Uni-Fab Lindsay Lyons, Marketing Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.acsunifab.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Modular Lighting, Pre-Fabricated Assemblies, Raised Floor Systems, and Underfloor Systems Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Multi-Family, Telecommunications, Office Space, Casinos, and Hotels

58

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Lindsay Lyons, Marketing Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.afcweb.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Armored Cable, Metal Clad Cable, Flexible and Liquidtight Conduit Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

American PERMALIGHT, Inc. Marina Batzke, General Manager 2570 W 237th Street, Suite C Torrance, CA 90505 www.americanpermalight.com info@americanpermalight.com Lighting Product Type: Photoluminescent non-electrical, non-radioactive Egress Path Marking Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Multi-Family

ANP Lighting Ron Foster, Owner 9044 Del Mar Ave. Montclair, CA 91763 (909) 239-3855 www.anplighting.com rpfoster@anplighting.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family


Architectural Lighting BuzziSpace Works (ALW) Victoria Pascoe, Business Development

Chris Balino, Marketing Manager 1035 22nd Ave., Unit 1 Oakland, CA 94606 (510) 489-2530 Fax: (650) 249-0412 www.alwusa.com talktous@alwusa.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

45 W 21st St. New York, NY 10010 (336) 821-3150 www.buzzi.space.com us@buzzi.space.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Jason McCulloch, Director of Sales and Marketing 2742 Loker Ave. W Carlsbad, CA 92010 (877) 942-1179 Fax: (760) 931-2916 www.auroralight.com sales@auroralight.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Catenary Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential, Eco-Focused

VP National Accounts 22785 Savi Ranch Pkwy. Yorba Linda, CA 92887 (951) 551-5611 www.cednationalaccounts.com vanlaeys@cednationalaccounts.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

CED Auroralight, Inc. David Van Laeys,

Barron Lighting Group

Megan Zelko, Marketing Communications Manager 7885 N Glen Harbor Blvd. Glendale, AZ 85307 (800) 533-3948 www.barronltg.com megan.zelko@barronltg.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Horticultural Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Horticulture

ConTech Lighting 725 Landwehr Rd. Northbrook, IL 60062 (847) 559-5500 www.contechlighting.com info@contechlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Bitro Group Cope

Fritz Meyne, Jr., Vice President Sales 300 Lodi St. Hackensack, NY 07601 (201) 641-1004 www.bitrogroup.com fritzm@bitrogroup.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Shelving Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Signage Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Lindsay Lyons, Marketing Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.copecabletray.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Cable Trays and Cable Management Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Education, Commercial

JUNE 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

59


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Cree Lighting Evo-Lite, LLC

Carrie Martinelli, Director, Marketing Communications & Events 4401 Silicon Dr. Durham, NC 27703 (919) 407-5476 www.creelighting.com • cmartinelli@creelighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Airports, Auto Dealerships, Industrial/Warehouse, Petroleum & Convenience Store

D & P Custom Lights & Wiring Systems, Inc. Neil Aportadera, VP Marketing 900 63rd Ave. N Nashville, TN 37209 (615) 350-7800 Fax: (615) 350-8310 www.dandcustomlights.com info@dandpcustomlights.com Lighting Product Type: Shelving Lighting (LED Undershelf Lighting) Checkout/Checklane Lights, LED Signage Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government

EarthTronics, Inc.

Kevin Youngquist, Executive Vice President 800 E Ellis Rd., #574 Norton Shores, MI 49441 (231) 332-1188 Fax: (231) 726-5029 www.earthtronics.com • contact@earthtronics.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Commercial

EOS Light

Kevin Krohner, CEO 350 Crenshaw Blvd., Suite A104 Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 616-5070 Fax: (310) 616-5056 www.eoslight.com • kkrohner@eoslight.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Backlighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, High-End Residential

60

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Michael Samborn, Director of Sales 6240 W 54th Ave. Denver, CO 80002 (720) 465-6707 www.evo-lite.com michael@evo-lite.com Lighting Product Type: Shelving Lighting, Backlighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Foscarini Paola Slongo, Business Development 20 Greene St. New York, NY 10013 (212) 247-2218 www.foscarini.com p.slongo@foscarini.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Fulham Co., Inc. Chris Veira, Director of Sales, North American Distribution 12705 S Van Ness Ave. Hawthorne, CA 90250 (702) 610-5506 www.fulham.com cveira@fulham.com Lighting Product Type: Power Supplies, LED Drivers, Germicidal UV Ballasts, Lighting Components, Emergency EXIT Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Air Purification HVAC

GE Current, a Daintree Company Colin Woodford, Marketing Manager 1975 Noble Rd. Cleveland, OH 44112 (888) 694-3533 www.gecurrent.com colin.woodford@gecurrent.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial


The

of UV Light Pros and Cons of UVA, UVB, UVC + FarUVC Reporting by Lido’s Certified Lighting Professionals

LIDO Lighting Supplies All of the Major Manufacturers of Germ & Virus Killing Lighting. INCLUDING THE HIDDEN “UPPER AIR” METHOD.

Let’s Start a Conversation About the Health and Safety of Our Customers, Employees, and Family. NATIONAL ACCOUNT LIGHTING DISTRIBUTOR

billpierro@lidolighting.com • 631.595.2000

W W W. L I D O L I G H T I N G . C O M CIRCLE NO. 28


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Genesis Lighting Solutions Häfele America Co.

Doug Head, Executive Vice President 700 Parker Square, Suite 205 Flower Mound, TX 75028 (469) 322-1900 Fax: (469) 322-1917 www.making-light.com doug@adart.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Scott Kaminski, Marketing Communications & PR Manager 3901 Cheyenne Drive Archdale, NC 27263 (800) 423-3531 www.hafele.com sales@hafele.us Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Glint Lighting HanleyLED

Andrew Kim, Vice President of Product 1520 Gilbreth Rd. Burlingame, CA 94010 (650) 646-4192 www.glintlighting.com akim@glintphotonics.com Lighting Product Type: Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Downlighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Art Galleries

Michael Kerber, Director of LED Development 11745 Sappington Barracks Rd. St. Louis, MO 63127 (800) 542-9941 www.hanleyledsolutions.com information@hanleyledsolutions.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Greentek Energy Systems Hera Lighting Christine Pappas, Business Development Manager 1000 Laval Blvd. Lawrenceville, GA 30043 (888) 635-4448 Fax: (770) 299-8155 www.greentekes.com christinep@greentekenergysystems.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Solar Landscape and Area Lights Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Solar Lighting

Griplock Systems Beau Pillet, Marketing Manager 1029 Cindy Ln. Carpinteria, CA 93013 (805) 566-0064 www.griplocksystems.com sales@griplocksystems.com Lighting Product Type: Cable Suspension Systems for Architectural Lighting, Industrial Highbays, and Track Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Jad Kiswani, Marketing Manager 3025 Business Park Dr. Norcross, GA 30071 (770) 409-8558 www.heralighting.com jk@heralighting.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Hermitage National Accounts Wyatt Culver, Account Director 3640 Trousdale Nashville, TN 37204 (800) 264-3383 www.gohermitage.com wculver@gohermitage.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Controls: Wired, Wireless, Daylight Harvesting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family


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Š2019 Current Lighting Solutions, LLC. GE is a trademark of the General Electric Company and is used under license.

CIRCLE NO. 29


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING HyLite LED, LLC

Shahill Amin, VP of Marketing and Sales 3705 Centre Cir. Fort Mill, SC 29715 (803) 336-2230 Fax: (803) 336-2231 www.hyliteledlighting.com shahilamin@hylite.us Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Industrial Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Industrial

Jesco Lighting Group Paulin Tham, Vice President, Marketing and Operations 15 Harbor Park Drive Port Washington, NY 11050 (800) 527-7796 Fax: (855) 265-5768 Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

IdentiCom Sign Solutions LaMar Lighting Co., Inc. John DiNunzio, President 24657 Halsted Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (248) 344-9590 Fax: (248) 946-4198 www.identicomsigns.com info@identicomsigns.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Jeff Goldstein, CEO 485 Smith St. Farmingdale, NY 11735 (631) 777-7700 Fax: (631) 777-7705 www.lamarled.com jeffg@lamarlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Other

Innovations in Lighting LEDVANCE Rob Bruck, President 136 N California Ave. City of Industry, CA 91744 (818) 732-9238 Fax: (818) 796-4724 www.innovationsinlighting.com info@innovationsinlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Chandeliers, Floor Lamps, Table Lamps Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Multi-Family

Intelligent Energy Optimizers (IEO) Yariv Sivan President & CEO 450 S Cemetery St. Norcross, GA 30071 (404) 474-2077 www.ieoenergy.com yariv@ieoenergy.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Glen Gracia, Head of Communications, USC 200 Ballardvale St. Wilmington, MA 02189 (978) 753-5185 www.sylvania.com glen.gracia@ledvance.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Legrand

Jackie Haffey, Sr. Marketing Manager 60 Woodlawn W. Hartford, CT 06317 (860) 563-3606 www.legrand.us Jackie.haffey@legrand.us Lighting Product Type: Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family


CIRCLE NO. 30


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING LIDO Lighting MaxLite

Bill Pierro Jr., LC, President 400 Oser Ave., Bldg. 100 Hauppauge, NY 11788 (631) 595-2000 Fax: (631) 595-7010 www.lidolighting.com billpierro@lidolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Amy Silver, Director of Marketing 12 York Ave. West Caldwell, NJ 07006 (800) 555-5629 www.maxlite.com asilver@maxlite.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Steve Dewar, VP Business Development 1150-572 Nicola Pl. Port Coquitlam, BC Canada V3B OK4 (604) 464-5644 Fax: (604) 464-0888 www.lightheadedlighting.com info@lightheadedlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Managing Director 311 W 43rd St., #11-101 New York, NY 10036 (347) 827-9000 www.quattrobi.net info@quattrobi.net Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Custom Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Quattrobi Inc. Lightheaded Lighting Ltd. Marina Bondarenko,

Sentry Electric LLC

Michael Shatzkin, Dir. Of Marketing

Lighting Services Inc. & Bus. Development

Sales 2 Holt Dr. Stony Point, NY 10980 (845) 942-2800 Fax: (845) 942-2177 www.lightingservicesinc.com sales@maillsi.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Museum/Galleries

185 Buffalo Ave. Freeport, NY 11520 (516) 379-4660 Fax: (516) 378-0624 www.sentrylighting.com michael@sentrylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Municipalities

SloanLED Jeremy Baker, Marketing Manager

LUXX Light Technology 5725 Olivas Park Dr.

Andreas Weyer, Managing Partner 4425 S Kansas Ave. St. Francis, WI 53235 (414) 763-3141 www.luxx.com info@luxx.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Light Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 676-3200 www.sloanled.com info@sloanled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Signage Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Petroleum, C-Store, Grocery


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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Solatube International Ultralights Lighting Robert E. Westfall Jr., President 2210 Oak Ridge Way Vista, CA 92081-8341 (888) 765-2882 www.solatube.com beth@mcraeagency.com Lighting Product Type: Commercial Lighting, Natural Lighting through Tubular Daylighting Devices (TDDs) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Chris Bedwell, Director of Sales & Marketing 320 S Plumer Ave. Tucson, AZ 85719 (520) 623-9829 www.ultralightslighting.com chris@ultralightslighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Pendant Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

South Eastern Lighting Solutions Urban Neon Sign Co.

Michael McLaughlin, Project Manager 821 Fentress Ct. Daytona, FL 32117 (770) 265-7490 Fax: (386) 238-1300 www,selightingsolutions.com mike@southeasternlightingsolutions.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Signs/Installation Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Jim Malin, Sales Executive 500 Pine St., Suite 3A Holmes, PA 19043 (610) 804-0437 Fax: (610) 461-5566 www.urbanneon.com jmalin@urbanneon.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Neon

Teresa Carpenter, Director of Marketing P.O. Box 780 Fallston, NC 28042 (704) 538-6522 Ext. 207 Fax: (704) 538-0909 www.specialtylighting.com tcarpenter@specialtylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Retrofit Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Retrofit

Marketing Communications 450 Old Brickyard Rd. Greenwood, SC 29649 (800) 888-3589 www.veluxusa.com Lighting Product Type: Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

VELUX Skylights Specialty Lighting Chan Hoyle, Director of National

T-1 Lighting

Arthur Sahakyan, VP of Sales 9929 Ploneer Blvd. Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670 (626) 234-2328 Fax: (626) 234-2330 www.t1-lighting.com sales@t1-lighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Sensors Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

WLS Lighting Systems Chantelle Prejean, Marketing Coordinator 1919 Windsor Place Fort Worth, TX 76110 (817) 731-0020 www.wlslighting.com wls@wlslighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Specialty Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family


CIRCLE NO. 32


CIRCLE NO. 33


COVID & Construction What has changed and what’s to come? By Tom Harrison

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T

he current pandemic has caused many companies to adjust

to meet the needs of clients and the consumer market. Many industries, if not all, have experienced some level of uncertainty and numerous hiccups, as things continue to change and progress over time.

JUNE 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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COVID & CONSTRUCTION So, how has the commercial construction industry been impacted, and what does it look like post-COVID-19?

What has changed?

First and foremost, as an evolving situation, it is essential for companies to continue to keep a close eye on real-time updates from the nation’s medical officials and local governments. The guidelines and data can be used to adapt policies and procedures to protect the safety of employees, contractors and trade partners, and to achieve compliance with the most current rules and regulations. If a company has jobsites located in different markets and states, local governments may have other guidelines given the impact the area has experienced. As an essential business, construction has not necessarily stopped, but the typical day does not look the same. Processes and routines have changed and will continue to change weekly, if not daily, so companies must stay in the know to continue their education on the situation at hand.

What’s to come?

For most, the current state of affairs has opened many eyes, allowing them to identify processes that need improvement. Given this has shocked the world, companies are beginning to ask themselves, what if this happens again? How can we learn from this and be as prepared as possible? One of the most valuable tools that have helped companies navigate through this pandemic has been education. Specifically, education entails staying updated on the situation, determining the facts, and then relaying the information to staff. The safety of teams and trade partners associated with projects is paramount and the No. 1 priority to companies, regardless of any variable. Therefore, encouraging workers to participate in educational opportunities to help keep themselves and those around them safe will be necessary. Whether management conducts these weekly, monthly, or as new complications or information arises, the expectation is that educational opportunities soon will become mandatory for all employees. For on-site workers, there will be additional safety precautions and guidelines enforced to ensure the safety of everyone who either works or visits each project. A typical job site setting consists of many bodies assisting each other with projects, as well as sharing tools, water bottles, and other items. Sweat is a natural side effect of the hard labor associated with construction jobs. There is a heightened awareness of how workers will interact with each other while avoiding cross-contamination and germs.

Encouraging workers to participate in educational opportunities to help keep themselves and those around them safe will be necessary. Most, if not all, construction companies outsource materials from overseas due to pricing and availability. Still, given the recent turn of events, many contractors have experienced a shortage of materials, ranging from specialty elevators to standard piping and steel. While this did not necessarily delay projects, there might have been significant schedule re-sequencing to ensure the timeline was complimenting the original project completion date. Less than a year ago, a pandemic was nowhere near the front of people’s minds. Hence, language regarding this situation was most likely not included in current contracts. Contractors are in a position to adjust the legal terminology within any agreement to include pandemic-specific information to help protect themselves from current and future repercussions. It is encouraged that contractors move forward by inserting language that stipulates to the client that if a future world pandemic or crisis occurs, and it could not have been forecasted, that they are not accounted for in either the bid or guaranteed maximum price, all depending on how the contract was procured. Given these adjustments have been the most popular and impactful thus far, there are other additional changes companies have experienced that will also impact the future of this line of work.

So, how does a job site stay safe and healthy while preventing disruption or delays on the job? • Individual toolsets: Rather than sharing tools, workers may be required to use one specific set or personal tools to avoid sharing and cross-contaminating with other workers. • Designated workers for specific jobs: For example, larger tools or heavy machinery supplied by vendors. Overall, “project hygiene” will be prioritized to an elevated level of importance and will be coupled by continued awareness and education as professionals enter new fronts on the worldwide view. The current pandemic has opened a lot of eyes and will resonate within the industry for years, if not forever. To ensure companies are better equipped and prepared for team members and trade partner’s health while also maintaining the ability to effectively carry out an essential business, it is encouraged that companies take this time to reflect on what they have learned and strategized on how they can move forward more effectively and efficiently. CCR

Tom Harrison is senior VP and Managing Partner at Johnson Carlier.

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amily I Healthcare -F lti u M I ty li a it nt I Hosp Retail I Restaura

WHAT CAN F&W BUILD FOR YOU ? Engineering e lu a V I t n e m ge na llout Program Ma o R I d il u -B n g si e ng I D General Contracti

#BuildwithFW www.FortneyWeygandt.com 31269 Bradley Road, North Olmsted, OH 44070 I P: 440.716.4000 I F: 440.716.4010 CIRCLE NO. 34


Making

inroads…

Casting a new light on prefab + modular By Paul Nielsen

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


T

he demand for prefab and modular construction is growing exponentially. Once stigmatized as a low-end and mass-produced mode of construction, the quality and subsequent benefits of this method have improved substantially and are making inroads

to changing this perception.

In fact, the use of modular construction is expected to increase by 6% globally by 2022, as an increasing number of companies look to take advantage of its benefits. Much can be gleaned from a high-end hospitality build in the heart of Midtown Atlanta that is employing prefab and modular construction. This dual-branded Marriott Hotel introduces its Element brand to the Atlanta market with four floors featuring 124 rooms, with an additional four floors and 158 rooms under the Courtyard brand. The building also includes a ground-floor restaurant, along with a lounge and bar with a second-floor terrace overlooking the famous Fox Theatre. The main structure of the hotel is approximately 200,000-square-foot post-tension concrete building, which includes a 360 degree, three-story, helical ramp, four levels of parking, and the main lobbies for the Courtyard and Element Hotel. The Element Hotel guest rooms were inspired by the modular design of Westin and are comprised of a four-story, 80,000-square-foot, Cold-Formed Metal Framed (CFMF) load-bearing interior and exterior building that attaches to the enormous transformer slab on the 11th floor.

Marriott’s move toward prefabrication has four main components: Safety, Cost, Schedule and Quality: Safety is the No. 1 priority for Swinerton. Prefabrication is a solution for lowering the fall risk of workers, materials and equipment from the jobsite. This practice helps protect our partners, our community and the overall safety of a construction site.

Costs

Construction costs can be reduced by as much as 20% due to the improved reliability of the construction process as a result of the

By incorporating prefabricated materials into the project in a variety of scopes, it allows for installation durations to be reduced significantly, thus reducing cost.

All precast panels are being cast in Alabama, while the exterior CFMF panels are being made nearby in Suwanee, Georgia, just 35 miles from the project. Prefabricated elements include: > Exterior wall panels complete with a factory finished exterior façade > CFMF curtain wall style wall panels with a lightweight concrete finish assembly > CFMF panels with a factoryinstalled thin brick, masonry finish > CFMF load-bearing exterior panels finished with a lightweight concrete assembly > CFMF interior load-bearing metal panels without any finish > Precast exterior finished panels with a calcium silicate finish > Precast exterior finished panels with a thin brick masonry finish

JUNE 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

77


MAKING INROADS... controlled environment, reduced construction timeline, as well as bulk discounts available from material suppliers.

Schedule

Cost does not directly represent a price per square foot comparison between two different styles of construction, but the overall cost of the project based on total duration. By incorporating prefabricated materials into the project in a variety of scopes, it allows for installation durations to be reduced significantly, thus reducing cost. For example, whereas it takes one year to build the concrete structure, it only takes four months to have a completed, dried-in, exterior façade with pre-fab and/ or modular components.

The use of modular construction is expected to increase by 6% globally by 2022, as an increasing number of companies looking to take advantage of its benefits.

Quality

The finished quality of the product is more reliable. Prefabricated materials are built in a controlled environment, with safer working conditions, without impact by weather, competing trades, debris and material waste from the installation of the product within the community. Machine precision ensures uniformity as well as conformity to specified codes and standards. Additionally, prefabricated construction helps reduce the time and amount of construction activity on-site, minimizing noise, pollution, waste and construction traffic, creating a more efficient, productive work environment with less disturbance for neighbors and the local area. Offsite prefabrication of the materials has enabled Swinerton to significantly reduce disruption in the Midtown Atlanta, where the new Marriott is situated at 640 Peachtree Street—across from the beloved Fox Theater and on one of the busiest streets in the city. As density increases, construction costs remain uncertain, and innovative approaches to building solutions remain top of mind, prefab and modular construction will take a more significant role within the commercial real estate industry. For it to be effective, it will take the ability to look at different 2D and 3D components that make up projects and see how they can be incorporated. When projects have similar elements such as student housing, apartments and hotels, the ability to fabricate more efficiently and control costs increases significantly. Current craft labor shortages continue to be a direct problem with traditional construction and can be a crucial element when manufactured off-site. Overall, the future looks bright for both prefab and modular construction, and with advancements in technology, proper planning, creative thinking, the speed at which projects can be assembled will further help to reduce overall costs. CCR

Paul Nielsen is Operations Manager at Swinerton, where he manages the project’s direction, schedule and personnel. He is also responsible for maintaining the project budget, project cost controls, and weekly reporting. Nielsen has built projects in a variety of market sectors including hospitality, corporate, healthcare, institutional, resort, and housing.

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CIRCLE NO. 35


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MID-SUMMER 2020

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Construction Strong Inside the Wolverine Building Group machine

A special supplement to:

Ann Zimmer, LEED AP, Senior Project Manager, Wolverine Construction


Construction Strong Inside the Wolverine Building Group machine

By MJ Pallerino

I

ndustrial. Multi-unit residential. Healthcare. Office. Retail. Restaurant. You name it and the Wolverine Building Group has a hand in bringing the concept to life. When Brann’s Steakhouse & Grille, a Michigan chain of restaurants was looking to do a little renovation on one of its units on Leonard Street in Grand Rapids, the Wolverine team jumped into action.

Brann’s was looking to add some enhancements to the restaurant, which has long been a historical landmark. The location serves as a tribute to fallen law enforcement and military members. The Wolverine team was looking to open the look and feel of the place. A nationally recognized construction leader, Wolverine is committed to seeking the balance of simultaneously “doing good” in its community, while “doing well” in its business, by delivering high quality product to its clients —a mantra its team takes to heart. Commercial Kitchens sat down with Ann Zimmer, LEED AP, Wolverine’s Senior Project Manager, to get an inside look at the job Wolverine did for Brann’s and what the future holds as the industry moves back toward some normalcy.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


JUNE 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

83


CONSTRUCTION STRONG

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

The Client: Brann’s Steakhouse & Grille With more than 10 locations across Michigan, Brann’s Steakhouse & Grille has been serving up great food since 1960, when John Brann Sr. opened his first location in Grand Rapids. That first sizzling steak became the start of something special. Today, adhering to the same core values it established in that first restaurant, the Brann’s name is synonymous with great food at a great price with great people.

Give us a snapshot of the construction market today? What are you seeing out there?

Retail, restaurant and hospitality companies have placed many projects on hold or cancelled them for 2020 due to COVID-19. The new contracts we have received since the virus hit are typically through developers and/or franchisees, not corporate.

When it comes to restaurant facilities, what are today’s consumers looking for?

Clean, upbeat, outdoor seating areas, open air and advanced technology.

What were some of the special features of the Brann’s project?

We have the opportunity to step up and be a leader in our industry by coming up with better ways of doing things and partnering with supplier and vendors who are on the leading edge of those devices or products.

Open ceilings, two fireplaces—one on the exterior wall and the other two-sided. The restaurant offers an area for meeting/large group reservations. It also has a fireplace and technology for presentations on large screen TVs. The restaurant is a historical building that has been a landmark for many years. Brann’s has several locations throughout Michigan. This particular one on Leonard Street in Grand Rapids’ (Michigan) west side honors and displays memorabilia from fallen

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

law enforcement and military members. They are very instrumental in fundraising and honoring those of the thin blue line and military, and proudly display it through photos, flags and honor boards.

Walk us through the how and why of the project?

The building is very old and has been in business for decades. There have been additions to it in the past and walls/floors were at different elevations. There were four areas to the restaurant and they were all very separate, so if in one area, you never felt like you were experiencing all of the restaurant/bar and entertainment. The design intent was to open the space up so when you walked it you have visibility of the entire restaurant. We created a feeling of being involved and a part of the entire facility, no matter where you are. The new bar is slightly smaller than they would have wanted it to be so the upper seating area, which is just a few steps up, was opened up by the elimination of obstacles in the dividing wall and installing wire racks dividing the space, which the TVs are installed on. This allows everyone seated in the upper seating area to see and hear the activities in the sports bar and act as an overflow area.


CIRCLE NO. 37


CONSTRUCTION STRONG

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Take us through the construction and design strategy.

Construction was accomplished in what was planned to be three different stages to maintain operations while remodeling. The first phase to relocate the bar to the west side, which was completed and turned over on schedule. Phase II was to demolish the previous bar and build new restaurant seating. At approximately 70% completion of that area, COVID-19 hit. Our construction team was still able to work for a week. We decided to demo the rest of the building and re-build it, planning that we could have the demo and rebuild completed before the COVID restrictions were loosened. But a week after we began total demo, the construction industry was also shut down. We were shut down from 3/34/20 through 5/7/20. On 5/8/20, the construction team began to rebuild. We completed the project in perfect timing to the lift of restrictions for restaurants in Michigan on June 8.

How closely did your team work with the Brann’s team?

Very closely. We were working with them on an ongoing basis. Even during the COVID shutdown time frame, the restaurant maintained take-out service operations.

What is the most important part of the relationship between you and your customers?

On 5/8/20, the construction team began to rebuild. We completed the project in perfect timing to the lift of restrictions for restaurants in Michigan on June 8.

Providing a quality project, for the least amount of out of pocket costs, to our customers. I have completed previous projects for the Brann’s family—Kitchen 67 Remodel—and have worked well with them in the past, providing estimating and design/ construction services. The most important thing to me personally is to maintain a good relationship with a great client, while at the same time giving them a beautiful new venue to do business out of. We are very proud of the new Brann’s on Leonard.

What is the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

Trying to accomplish the fast pace schedules we have been accustomed to while maintaining safe work spaces and social distancing.

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CONSTRUCTION STRONG

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Working with a mask on is very difficult while on jobsites, but it can be done. It just means we have to distance ourselves from one another.

Talk about sustainability. What are your clients looking for?

Ways to build green without spending additional funds to accomplish that. A lot of the building products are now standard in low VOC and other sustainability ingredients. We also find that many AHJs require low light level/air pollution in their zoning now, so sustainability has become more of a normal over the past years than when LEED certification was introduced to the industry.

How do you think the construction market will start shaping up heading toward the fall?

I am not so sure we will see construction projects on the rise until we get through our next virus season winter of 2020/2021. I am hoping we see an incline in construction projects for our industry in early quarter of 2021.

What will your customers be looking for from you? Thinking outside of the box so projects are well prepared for, if and when, another possibility of a pandemic occurs. We have maintained our safe work places and can respond quickly to the mandated changes in the community so their projects can continue to move forward in a safe environment. As always, value for their investment and a design that makes people want to be visit.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities?

We have the opportunity to step up and be a leader in our industry by coming up with better ways of doing things and partnering

with suppliers and vendors who are on the leading edge of those devices or products. Everything is about learning our new normal right now and overcoming the obstacles that it presents us without putting a lot of additional costs back on our customers. That will be our approach.

What is your optimism level?

I am personally optimistic that when the flu season is upon us once again, we will have a vaccine that, at the least, minimizes the effect on the majority of people. Even if our scientists are not able to accomplish that great feat by then, I believe we have all learned how we can continue to build in an environment where viruses are spreading. We know how to be safe now, we just need to continue to enforce that. I am sure COVID-19 will not be the last virus or pandemic we have to deal with in our lifetime, but I certainly hope it will be.

What trends are you seeing?

In Michigan, it is how to create the open air atmosphere in a climate that only has five to six months of outdoor comfortable seating. Although we do a large amount of restaurants and retail throughout the United States, that is the one you see all over the US. Everyone loves to be outdoors.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” restaurant environment in today’s competitive landscape?

Taking the time to design the project and not just cookie-cutting it from one location to another. Each location can have its own feel and meaning, and being able to incorporate that into corporate standard restaurants and one-offs is so important. It creates an at home feeling for your clientele.

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CIRCLE NO. 39


CONSTRUCTION STRONG

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

What is the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

To continue to become more efficient at working virtually and accomplishing the most I can with the technology we have, as well as understanding what new technology will bring the best value to our projects. Being able to function in our business over the past three months and continue to progress is an incredible feeling. Many of our projects were able to continue—especially if they were in the pre-construction or just beginning construction phases. I spent the first six weeks doing submittals, finishing up contracts and writing scopes for a new hotel project. Granted the brick and mortar does not go vertical while sitting at home, but the planning stages of projects and bidding/pre-construction was able to progress. It has always amazes me when I look back on the work we would accomplish in a given day or week when I started in project management many years ago. Seems like the dinosaur ages when you really think about it. Computers were just developing, pagers were used or bag phones, and get this, you had to go to a pay phone to respond to a pager while traveling from project to project. Who would have thought we could build our building without printing documents or, as a PM, being on site? I remember once I created a video of me and my team for remodel projects and sent it out to all the store directors. We selected a time and day for our conference call, and had them watch the video while we were on line to address any questions, comments or changes to the planned sequencing of the remodel. Now it is just a virtual meeting. It is that easy.

Describe a typical day.

Addressing emails to start the day so requests and responses can go out to others before I begin meetings or jobsite visits. I am currently working from my home office. We are trying to minimize the amount of time project managers spend on jobsites or, more importantly, limit the amount of on-site meetings we have with large groups of people. I have quickly become accustomed to using virtual meetings and realizing that we can do even more than we ever imagined before thanks technology.

Tell us what makes the Wolverine Group so unique?

Within the first year I came to Wolverine, we had new ownership. I was so pleased to see that they not only say they care, but they truly do. We can feel that. There are many times that the company could have made decisions based solely on its profit or revenue, but it chose to do the right thing. Wolverine is committed to balancing “doing good” in our community, while also “doing well” in our business and delivering a high quality product to our clients. Our goal is to grow the business, but not so quickly that we step over anyone or any of our clients. They appreciate our clientele and employees. To the effect, one of the first questions they look at when considering to be a part of a project is if the superintendent and project manager who are in the field handling the project on a dayto-day basis will have enjoyment from the project or will it reduce their quality of life. They are a company that cares. CCR

One-on-One with... » Ann Zimmer, LEED AP, Senior Project Manager Wolverine Construction

What is the most rewarding part of your job? Completion of a project and a happy client. What was the best advice you ever received? Don’t ever be afraid to ask a question—no question is a dumb question. I have been in PM for more than 30 years and I still learn every day. Our industry is a never-ending change. What is the best thing a client ever said to you? Thank you, at the end of the project. Just plain appreciation is so heartwarming.

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Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why. Multi-tasking, communication, empathy, attention to detail, a take charge attitude. My boss thinks accounting should be one of these things, but I say leave that to the CPAs. What is the first thing you are going to do when we get some normalcy back? Plan a group vacation.


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By JoAnne Castagna

Shields up How the US Army Corps of Engineers aided hospitals during the pandemic

An aerial view of patient care units under construction inside the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City. Credit: USACE.

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T

he novel coronavirus (COVID-19) surprised everyone, especially our nation’s hospital systems. Hospitals throughout the United States, especially in the state of New York, were overwhelmed with patients with coronavirus symptoms and could not provide them beds. During the stretch run of the virus at the beginning of the year, Tara Clampett, a registered nurse in the Intensive Care Unit at Long Island Community Hospital, said the facility was inundated. “A majority of them are going into respiratory distress and are being intubated. Even if they get stable, many aren’t stable enough to leave.” Clampett said that with many coronavirus patients coming to the hospital, there was less space for patients with other health conditions, so less attention could be given to their health issues. The hospital did all it could do to create more patient space, but it was stretched to its limits. To relieve the burden New York area hospitals, the US Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, collaborated with other agencies to convert existing buildings into alternate care facilities to provide hospitals extra space to care for coronavirus and non-coronavirus patients. “What the Army Corps is doing is making me hopeful,” Clampett said. “We are overwhelmed and we can use all the help we can get.” The US Army Corps of Engineers performed the work as part of a national Federal Emergency Management Agency mission. The Army Corps is working in collaboration with FEMA, Department of Defense, and other federal, state and local partners. In New York State, this work is considered especially critical. The state, primarily New York City, was considered the nation’s epicenter. There were more virus cases and deaths in the state than anywhere else in the country. To accommodate all of these cases, it is estimated that New York needed more than 100,000 hospital beds for COVID-19 patients, compared to the state’s current capacity of 53,000 beds. To help state hospitals deal with this, Army Corps’ New York District volunteers worked 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They sought locating existing buildings that could be converted into alternate care facilities, and designed and constructed them. Four key locations served as these alternative care facilities, including the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City; Westchester County Center in White Plains; Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, and the State University of New York in Old Westbury.

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York City

The first alternate care facility to be constructed—and completed in one week—was the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, located in midtown New York City. The center is a well-known location for expos and business events. The center’s 1,800,000-square-feet seemed like an optimum location for an alternate care facility. The Army Corps converted the center’s multiple floors of space into an alternate care facility, providing beds for more than 2,500 coronavirus and non-coronavirus patients.

The facility was designed and constructed to resemble a hospital setting. There were rows of individual patient care units or rooms that included beds, privacy curtains, medical supplies and equipment. In addition, there was overhead lighting, restrooms, showers, nursing stations, food service and a computer station, powered by multiple generators. While touring the center, Chief of Engineers Lt. Gen. Todd T. Semonite said that in order to quickly and efficiently get these centers up and running for a peak in coronavirus cases, a “super simple solution” had to be applied. He said the Javits Center’s design served as the model for other care facilities being constructed throughout the nation. Charles Paray, Lead Architect, New York District, US Army Corps of Engineers, volunteered to work on Jacob Javits and the other alternate care locations because he thought he could help make a difference.

Workers prepare the flooring inside a climate-controlled tent under construction that will serve as an alternate care facility at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York. Credit: Michael Embrich, Public Affairs.

Westchester County Convention Center, White Plains The center is known for its large gatherings for basketball tournaments and live shows. The Army Corps converted 60,0000 squarefeet of the center into an alternate care facility, providing 110 beds for COVID-19 patients. Fifty-four of the beds were located inside the center, while 56 were located in a temporary tent structure located in the center’s parking lot across from the center. Both areas were designed and constructed to resemble a hospital setting. There were rows of individual patient care units or rooms that included beds, privacy walls, medical supplies and equipment. Each of the rooms were equipped to provide oxygen/medical gas for patients.

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In addition, there was overhead lighting, restrooms, showers, nursing stations, food service and a computer station, powered by multiple generators. The facility also was equipped with an isolation exhaust fan with HEPA filtration located outside of the facility, so that contaminated exhaust air within the facility was discharged to outside the facility. “I worked on the Westchester Center because I wanted to help to provide additional hospital space for nurses and doctors to take care of our neighbors who have been diagnosed with the coronavirus,” said Patrick Nejand, Quality Assurance Representative, New York District, US Army Corps of Engineers.

To help New York State hospitals deal with this, Army Corps’ New York District volunteers worked 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Stony Brook University, Stony Brook

The Army Corps converted 255,676-square-feet of the university’s campus to provide care for 1,028 non-coronavirus patients and low acuity coronavirus patients. They built five climate-controlled tents on an open field on the campus grounds. The inside resembled a hospital setting, with rows of individual patient care units or rooms that included beds, privacy walls, medical supplies and equipment. In addition, there was overhead lighting, restrooms, showers, nursing stations, food service and a computer station, powered by multiple generators. “New York is the epicenter of the COVID-19 Pandemic in the nation and that is why we worked diligently and swiftly to complete four alternate care facilities in New York,” said Col. Thomas Asbery, Commander, New York District. “I am honored and humbled to have led this team of experts and professionals who set the standard for the emergency response to this public health crisis,” Asbery said. “What we did in New York is historic and unprecedented and will be carried out Kevin McGann, New many times over nationwide.” York City resident with Nonetheless, there was much work Coronavirus symptoms. to do as they supported FEMA, New York Credit. Kevin McGann. State and its local partners and stakeholders across New York. The US Army Corps of Engineers continue to work tirelessly at all levels to help the American people recover. Anthony Ciorra, Mission Manager, New York District, US Army Corps of Engineers, who worked on the Stony Brook Alternate Care Center, said his brother had contracted the coronavirus in March and became very sick. “He developed pneumonia and was admitted to a hospital for 10 days,” Ciorra said. “This is an unprecedented time in all our lives and I wanted do my small part in making a difference in a monumental effort to fight this virus.”

State University of New York at Old Westbury In front of the Westchester County Center where an alternate care facility is taking shape. Credit: USACE.

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At the university, the Army Corps provided beds for 1,024 coronavirus and non-coronavirus patients. They built four climate-controlled tents in a large expanse of athletic fields and another unit in a gymnasium.


The tents also resembled a hospital setting, including rows of individual patient care units or rooms that included beds, privacy walls, medical supplies and equipment. In addition, there were overhead lighting, restrooms, showers, nursing stations, food service, a computer station, powered by multiple generators and overhead cameras to enable medical staff to monitor patients.

“You do whatever needs to be done to prepare for the possible onslaught of patients.” — New York City resident Kevin McGann, who was hospitalized in an alternative facility after contracting the virus

William Maher, Mission Manager, New York District, US Army Corps of Engineers, who worked on the State University of New York at Old Westbury Alternate Care Center, said they had to work diligently to meet the challenge of building a high-quality, patient care facility in a very short period of time. Army Corps personnel are used to volunteering for national missions. Nejand volunteered for recovery operations for Hurricane Sandy and 9-11. “During missions, I’m always impressed with the Army Corps ability to quickly mobilize personnel with local knowledge with technical experts nationwide to provide comprehensive response with methods to maintain accountability of all costs and scheduled completions.”

One of four climate-controlled temporary hospital units being con-structed on the athletic fields at the State University of New York at Old Westbury, New York. Credit: James D’Ambrosio, Public Affairs.

Tara Clampett, Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Registered Nurse with Long Island Community Hospital. Credit. Tara Clampett.

These volunteers give more than just their time for these missions. “A lot of people are putting not only their lives on the line, but the lives of their love ones at risk to get this mission executed,” Paray said. As the state worked through the glut of cases impacting every healthcare system, the alternate care facilities served as complementary and vital structures, helping lesson some of the burden on their medical staff. “Based on all of the numbers that came out of New York State’s Governor Cuomo's daily briefings, I supported the Army Corps mission 100%,” said Kevin McGann, who had been hospitalized with coronavirus symptoms. The 49-year-old New York City resident said the tents, converted dormitories and hotels were critical. “You do whatever needs to be done to prepare for the possible onslaught of patients. Worst case is we look back and realize we didn't need all of them, but it was better to have them than have to decide who lives and who dies.” FC

Dr. JoAnne Castagna, Ed.D., is a Public Affairs Specialist and writer for the US Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. She can be reached at Joanne.castagna@usace.army.mil.

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: President’s Message........................pg 3 New Advisory Board Member..........pg 6 Next Gen LinkedIn Community.......pg 3 Superintendent Training..................pg 6 Member Directory..........................pg 4-5 Leadership Connection.....................pg 7

SUMMER EDITION • 2020

NEWSLETTER

RCA Scholarships Make a Difference For Tomorrow’s Construction Leaders Through its scholarship program, RCA demonstrates its commitment to the betterment and the future of the industry. Scholarships positively impact the education of future industry leaders and help increase awareness of the career opportunities available in retail construction. For the 2020 scholarship cycle, RCA selected six schools with strong construction management programs and asked each to select three candidates for consideration. The scholarship committee, comprised of Board members and Advisory Board members, reviewed and scored the resumes and personal statements of the applicants. One student, a rising junior or senior, from each school was selected to receive a $3,000 scholarship to be used for the fall 2020 semester. You can get to know our 2020 scholarship recipients through their own words, with excerpts from their personal statements below. Josh De Mattei, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (Junior, Construction Management; Minor, Real Property Development) “My ideal long-term career goal is to run my own commercial construction company. This is something that is valuable to me, because I will be able to create a company culture that makes everyone feel like family. I am also a strong leader who is able to make quick decisions with the goal in mind to benefit the employees and the company. As an owner, I will create volunteer initiatives in order to give back to the community. Additionally, bringing innovation to the industry is important. I would make it a goal for my company to have the latest and the most efficient technology in place. The other aspects I value as the business grows are building relationships with clients and coworkers. I will give back to Cal Poly’s Construction Management department as an initiative to help students start their careers.” Brittany Lacy, Clemson University (Senior, Construction Science & Management; Minor, Nonprofit Leadership) “I have been involved in construction since I can remember. As a toddler, my grandmother would take me onto worksites for houses that she built, where all I enjoyed doing was playing with scrap wood. Throughout my childhood I always had my hands meddling in something. I enjoyed disassembling computers and building indestructible Lego cars. In high school, I spent many summers working in Hampton, SC as a part of Salkehatchie Summer Camp helping repair houses for those in need. We would work a week each summer, in the blazing South Carolina heat working for a family in need. Ultimately my time serving my community through construction missions is what inspired me to go into the field.

When I graduate, I hope to work serving communities around the world by providing safe, warm, and dry homes to those in need. I want my life’s work to be giving it back to those who need it through the construction industry.” Alex Huffman Coast, Kansas State University (Junior, Construction Science & Management; Minor, Business) “When thinking about the career I wish to have after graduation, I see myself working for a company that prides themselves on their hard work and strong morals. I plan to work for a company that cares more about how their project will benefit the owner and the community than their profits. Fresh out of college, I hope to work as a project engineer or assistant superintendent and work my way up to superintendent. I have also considered starting my own construction company. … I am the youngest person in my class by at least a year. I came to be in this situation by working very hard in high school, taking college classes while still playing a sport every season.” Ferhad Kojic, Pratt Institute (Senior, Construction Management; Minor, Architectural Theory & Technology) “I have a passion for construction and have loved it my whole life. This passion led me to my choice of Construction Management as a major, and my choice of Pratt Institute as my school. In high school when I was planning my future and picking my school, I knew that I wanted to be at a school that would push me to achieve my goals, and help me find a job and establish a career; and Pratt has done exactly that. I have grown up surrounded by construction. My grandfather, father, and uncles have all worked construction their whole lives. My father came to the United States in 1995 and began his own construction company after only two years. As I grew up, I visited him on site when safe, and as I got older, I started working alongside him. When I was 14, I began to work every summer with my father, who specialized in masonry. That summer was the time I first learned how to finish cement stucco with a trowel. … I plan to reopen the company and expand it into a GC firm. I understand that this is easily said and not done, but I believe that the motivation that has pushed me to where I am now will continue to push me and help me be successful in achieving this in the future.” Bronson Linicks, Texas A&M (Senior, Construction Science; Minor, Business) “It is imperative that while attending college that one seeks out all opportunities available. There are many great resources to learn and network. I set myself apart from my peers in the facts that: I am involved with many different organizations on and off campus, am a full-time student, am a full-time cadet in the Corps of Cadets and, I have held different internships within the construction industry. Public service and duty to God and Country are imperative to the overall health of our world, our nation and, our industry. It is vital that as contractors we work together for a successful future. (Continued on next page)

RCA’s mission is to promote professionalism and integrity in retail construction through industry leadership in education, information exchange, and jobsite safety.


NEWSLETTER I enjoy being involved in organizations that give back to the community and the environment because they make a difference for the sustainability of the present and the future. I take pride in developing a quality product, which is why I learn different trades and languages. By doing this, I can respect and better understand the building processes needed for construction completion.” Jailinne Mata, University of Houston (Junior, Construction Science) “Construction has always been a part of my life. Although I did not start exploring the field until my high school years, I grew up with my father and uncles being tradesmen. Oddly enough, I wanted to pursue a career in the medical field. Even though I was seeking a medical degree, in high school, I decided to take a woodshop class as well as an engineering design and presentation class. I enjoyed every second being in both classes. My goal is to become a superintendent once I graduate, and for one day to become a senior superintendent. I love building so much that I began to buy my tools and started doing some small DIY projects, and, oh boy, have I enjoyed working on these little projects! I can only imagine the feeling I will get as I orchestrate larger projects and make them sing to me.” Marcus DeLeon, Minnesota State University Mankato (Senior, Construction Management; Minor, Business Administration) Marcus received the Christian Elder Memorial Scholarship, named in memory of Christian Elder, who died in 2007 at the age of 38. Christian was a project manager with Elder-Jones, Inc., a charter member of the RCA. Christian’s father, and RCA past president. “I have set myself apart from my peers in a way that I have experience working in the field before working in the office. I plan to become a project

manager after graduation. I would like to be a project manager for any commercial construction company. I have always enjoyed seeing and being a part of the growth of large buildings from the ground up and could see myself helping in that process for the rest of my life. In a few years, I want to be able to come back to my college and talk to future construction management students about all the possibilities that it has to offer and to tell them to be as open to new opportunities as possible.” RCA’s Intern Scholarship is awarded to a student who completed an internship at an RCA member company. The award criteria are the same as the main scholarship program; the scholarship award is $1,500. This year’s recipient was Hope Stauffer, a junior at Boise State University majoring in Construction Management. Hope was a project intern with Engineered Structures (ESI). In their nomination of Hope, ESI said, “Hope takes advantage of every interaction and opportunity she encounters, always filing things away and learning. She has learned a lot from her firsthand experience on our projects, from framing thru rough-in, all the way thru finishes, interior and exterior. Hope jumps in and solely manages punch lists, and coordinates with subcontractor foremen. She quickly learned the CSI construction divisions, she’s savvy in plans and specs, and very well versed in Plan Grid. Hope has taken it upon herself to shadow a majority of inspection walks for structural, firestop, and MEP trades. If she encounters something she’s not familiar with, she digs in and sorts it out, always bringing really good questions to her mentor team. Hope is quick to professionally introduce herself to new people on site, and gets right to business on matters at hand. She’s great with owners, architects, foremen, building officials, etc. Hope is just the kind of person we would want to have representing the ESI brand and has a very bright future ahead of her.”

RCA Scholarship Program RCA’s scholarship program is made possible with the support of our members. We would like to thank the following RCA members for making a contribution to the Scholarship Fund in FY20 (May 2019-April 2020) $2,000 and above Shames Construction Company, Ltd. Triad Retail Construction Inc. $1,500 Elder-Jones, Inc. Woods Construction, Inc.

$1,000 Bogart Construction, Inc. Eckinger Construction Company Weekes Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors, Inc.

$500 Commonwealth Building, Inc. JA Carpentry Scheiner Commercial Group $300 Woods Construction, Inc. Management Resource Systems, Inc.

When RCA waived the dues for 2020-2021, we asked members to consider a contribution to the scholarship fund. The following companies have made generous contributions (as of June 1): • Bogart Construction, Inc. • Eckinger Construction Company • Elder-Jones, Inc.

• Scheiner Commercial Group, Inc. • Shames Construction Company, Ltd. • Solex Contracting

• Taylor Bros. Construction Company, Inc. • Triad Retail Construction Inc.

To make a contribution to the RCA Scholarship Fund, visit retailcontractors.org or contact the RCA office at info@retailcontractors.org.

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SUMMER EDITION • 2020


ADVISORY BOARD

President’s Message Steve Bachman, President, Retail Construction Services

Isyol Cabrera - Edible Arrangements

Jason Miller - JCPenney Company

Ken Christopher - LBrands

Jeff Montang - JLM Retail

Mike Clancy - FMI

Steven R. Olson, AIA - CESO, Inc.

Jason Kraus - Kohl’s

Charles Ross -

Jeffrey D. Mahler, AIA - L2M, Inc. What could possibly happen next? Since my last letter in February we have undoubtedly seen more change in a faster period of time than any of us can remember (regardless of our age). Many of you have parents or grandparents that were born pre-Great Depression. That group saw great Steve Bachman industrialization, immigration, mobilization, “Wars to End all Wars” and even possibly lived through the 1918 pandemic. Those born later lived through the Cold War, civil unrest, the invention of the computer, fax machine, and cell phone, and putting a man on the moon. When we temporarily closed our offices at RCS and shut down all but one of our job sites in mid-March, I set up an internal out-of-office reply that read: “Hello RCS Family. I understand that we all face much uncertainty, but we can choose to face that challenge knowing that those that have gone before us dealt with many issues that were similar, whether it be pandemics, disease, war, or terrorism. Ultimately we survived, persevered, and even prospered as a people, with much to offer our family, our fellow citizens, and even those around the globe.” What is my point in bringing up these comparisons, these significant events? We as a people have been here before. Let those of us who are business owners see this as an opportunity to lead and bring change to our organizations. Do we seek different business avenues to apply our trade and the skill sets of our people? Do we say that we have what it takes to get that new customer in a totally different construction arena? Do we do what most entrepreneurs do and chase the next good idea? Who would have bet on Tesla, unless it was a historian that knew that the first electric car came in 1832, before the internal combustion engine? So, all you RCA members, let us innovate, diversify, and make some lemonade out of the lemons.

LEGISLATIVE/REGULATORY

SAFETY

MEMBER BENEFITS

SCHOLARSHIP

Andy Bohon legislative@retailcontractors.org

David Martin memberbenefits@retailcontractors.org

MEMBERSHIP

Hunter Weekes membership@retailcontractors.org

RECRUITMENT

Jay Dorsey recruitment@retailcontractors.org

Mike McBride Justin Elder scholarship@retailcontractors.org

SPONSORSHIP

Phil Eckinger sponsorship@retailcontractors.org

TRAINING

Eric Berg Carolyn Shames training@retailcontractors.org

President - Steve Bachman

Secretary/Treasurer - Eric Handley

Vice President - Ray Catlin

Immediate Past President - Rick Winkel

Retail Construction Services, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company

William A. Randolph, Inc.

Winkel Construction, Inc.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2023 Steve Bachman

2022 Eric Handley

2022 Eric Berg

2021 David Martin

2022 Ray Catlin

2021 Mike McBride

Retail Construction Services, Inc.

William A. Randolph, Inc. H.J. Martin & Son, Inc.

Schimenti Construction Company Triad Retail Construction, Inc.

Members of the retail construction industry are invited to be part of RCA’s Next Gen initiative by joining the RCA group on LinkedIn (linkedin.com/groups/786587). The group is being utilized to expand participation through online discussions and to help promote the values of the RCA to a broader group within our industry. Project managers, superintendents, estimators, and others will be asked to offer their perspectives on a variety of topics. Ideas generated in the discussion forums may be used to determine areas where RCA can provide additional information or benefits, develop new programs, and provide resources for members and the industry. This initiative is being led by Michael Sullivan, Sullivan Construction, and committee members Nate Bachman and Zach Bachman, Retail Construction Services, Phil Eckinger and Jeremy Eckinger, Eckinger Construction, Ken Sharkey, Jr., Commercial Contractors, Tyshaun Allen, Taylor Brothers Construction Co., Ray Freeman, Weekes Construction, Matt Brecker, De Jager Construction, and Daniel Stone, Bogart Construction.

Eric Berg safety@retailcontractors.org

OFFICERS

2021 Jay Dorsey

Next Gen LinkedIn Community

Brad Sanders - CBRE | Skye Group

COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Gray

PS - If you have any feedback or ideas for the organization, please contact me at sbachman@retailconstruction.com.

Seritage Growth Properties

2021 Phil Eckinger

Eckinger Construction Co.

2023 Justin Elder

Westwood Contractors

2021 Carolyn Shames

Shames Construction

2021 Hunter Weekes

Weekes Construction, Inc.

2023 Rick Winkel

Winkel Construction, Inc.

Elder-Jones, Inc.

2023 Andy Bohon

2021 Jack Grothe

Westwood Contractors

JG Construction

PAST PRESIDENTS David Weekes 1990-1992 W. L. Winkel 1993 Robert D. Benda 1994 John S. Elder 1995 Ronald M. Martinez 1996 Jack E. Sims 1997 Michael H. Ratner 1998 Barry Shames 1999 Win Johnson 2000 Dean Olivieri 2001

Thomas Eckinger 2002 James Healy 2003 Robert D. Benda 2004-2006 K. Eugene Colley 2006-2008 Matthew Schimenti 2008-2012 Art Rectenwald 2012-2014 Mike Wolff 2014-2016 Robert Moore 2016-2017 Brad Bogart 2017-2018 Rick Winkel 2018-2019

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RCA Membership

RCA members must meet and maintain a series of qualifications and are approved by the Board of Directors for membership. They have been in the retail construction business as general contractors for at least five years; agree to comply with the Association’s Code of Ethics and Bylaws; are properly insured and bonded; are licensed in the states in which they do business; and have submitted letters of recommendation.

COMPANY CONTACT Acme Enterprises, Inc. Jeff Lomber Atlas Building Group Brian Boettler Beam Team Construction, Inc. Tim Hill Bogart Construction, Inc. Brad Bogart Buildrite Construction Corp. Bryan Alexander Comet Construction Bernard Keith Danzansky Commercial Contractors, Inc. Kenneth Sharkey Commonwealth Building, Inc. Frank Trainor Construction One, Inc. Bill Moberger Corstone Contractors LLC Mark Tapert David A. Nice Builders Brian Bacon De Jager Construction, Inc. Dan De Jager Desco Professional Builders, Inc. Bob Anderson Diamond Contractors Lori Perry DLP Construction Dennis Pigg, Jr. E.C. Provini, Co., Inc. Joseph Lembo Eckinger Construction Company Philip Eckinger EDC Christopher Johnson ELAN General Contracting Inc. Adrian Johnson Elder-Jones, Inc. Justin Elder Encore Construction, Inc. Joe McCafferty Engineered Structures, Inc. Mike Magill Fi Companies Kevin Bakalian Fiorilli Construction, Inc. Jeffrey Troxell Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Greg Freeh Fred Olivieri Construction Company Dean Olivieri Frontier Building Corp. Andrew Goggin Fulcrum Construction, LLC Willy Rosner Go Green Construction, Inc. Anthony Winkco Gray Robert Moore H.J. Martin & Son, Inc. David Martin Hanna Design Group Jason Mick Hardesty & Associates Scott Hardesty Harmon Construction, Inc. William Harmon Hays Construction Company, Inc. Roy Hays Healy Construction Services, Inc. James Healy Howard Immel Inc. Pete Smits International Contractors, Inc. Bruce Bronge J. G. Construction Jack Grothe JAG Building Group Matt Allen James Agresta Carpentry Inc. James Agresta KBE Building Corporation Michael Kolakowski Kerricook Construction, Inc. Ann Smith Lakeview Construction, Inc. Kent Moon M. Cary, Inc. Robert Epstein Management Resources Systems, Inc. Doug Marion Marco Contractors, Inc. Martin Smith Market Contractors Kerry Lobbestael National Building Contractors William Corcoran National Contractors, Inc. Michael Dudley Pinnacle Commercial Development, Inc. Dennis Rome Prime Retail Services, Inc. Donald Bloom PWI Construction, Inc. Jeff Price R.E. Crawford Construction LLC Jeffrey T. Smith Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. Art Rectenwald Retail Construction Services, Inc. Stephen Bachman Retail Contractors of Puerto Rico Sean Pfent Rockford Construction Co. Thomas McGovern Russco, Inc. Matthew Pichette Sachse Construction and Development Corp. Jeff Katkowsky Scheiner Commercial Group, Inc. Joe Scheiner

PHONE STATE EMAIL MEMBER SINCE 810-499-7127 MI jlomber@acme-enterprises.com 2009 636-368-5234 MO bboettler@abgbuilds.com 2017 770-442-2534 GA timhill@thebeamteam.com 2019 949-453-1400 CA brad@bogartconstruction.com 2008 770-971-0787 GA bryan@buildriteconstruction.com 2013 561-672-8310 FL barney@danzansky.com 2016 616-842-4540 MI ken.t.sharkey@teamcci.net 1990 617-770-0050 MA frankt@combuild.com 1992 614-235-0057 OH wmoberger@constructionone.com 2015 360-862-8316 WA Mark@corstonellc.com 2019 757-566-3032 VA bbacon@davidnicebuilders.com 2011 616-530-0060 MI dandj@dejagerconstruction.com 1990 860-870-7070 CT banderson@descopro.com 1995 816-650-9200 MO loriperry@diamondcontractors.org 2015 770-887-3573 GA dpigg@dlpconstruction.com 2008 732-739-8884 NJ jlembo@eprovini.com 1992 330-453-2566 OH phil@eckinger.com 1994 804-897-0900 VA cjohnson@edcweb.com 1998 619-284-4174 CA ajohnson@elangc.com 2010 952-345-6069 MN justin@elderjones.com 1990 410-573-5050 MD joe@encoreconstruction.net 2018 208-362-3040 ID mikemagill@esiconstruction.com 2016 732-727-8100 NJ kbakalian@ficompanies.com 2017 216-696-5845 OH jtroxell@fio-con.com 2019 440-716-4000 OH gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com 2013 330-494-1007 OH dean@fredolivieri.com 1992 305-692-9992 FL agoggin@fdllc.com 2018 770-612-8005 GA wrosner@fulcrumconstruction.com 2014 412-367-5870 PA anthony@ggc-pgh.com 2017 714-491-1317 CA ramoore@gray.com 2005 920-494-3461 WI david@hjmartin.com 2016 847-719-0370 IL jmick@hannadesigngroup.com 2016 949-723-2230 CA scott@hardestyassociates.com 2020 812-346-2048 IN bill.harmon@harmonconstruction.com 2017 303-794-5469 CO r.hays@haysco.biz 2002 708-396-0440 IL jhealy@healyconstructionservices.com 1996 920-468-8208 WI psmits@immel-builds.com 2018 630-834-8043 IL bbronge@iciinc.com 1995 909-993-9332 CA JackG@jgconstruction.com 1998 239-540-2700 FL matta@jagbuilding.com 2019 201-498-1477 NJ jim.agresta@jacarpentryinc.com 2013 860-284-7110 CT mkolakowski@kbebuilding.com 1998 440-647-4200 OH ann@kerricook.com 2012 262-857-3336 WI kent@lvconstruction.com 1998 631-501-0024 NY repstein@mcaryinc.com 2014 336-861-1960 NC dmarion@mrs1977.com 1992 724-741-0300 PA marty@marcocontractors.com 1994 503-255-0977 OR kerryl@marketcontractors.com 2019 651-288-1900 MN bill@nbcconstruction.us 2013 952-881-6123 MN mdudley@ncigc.com 2018 732-528-0080 NJ dennis@pinnaclecommercial.us 2012 866-504-3511 GA dbloom@primeretailservices.com 2014 480-461-0777 AZ price@pwiconstruction.com 2003 941-907-0010 FL jeffs@recrawford.com 2011 724-772-8282 PA art@rectenwald.com 1996 651-704-9000 MN sbachman@retailconstruction.com 1998 586-725-4400 MI spfent@rcofusa.com 1996 616-285-6933 MI info@rockfordconstruction.com 2014 508-674-5280 MA mattp@russcoinc.com 1995 248-647-4200 MI jkatkowsky@sachseconstruction.com 2009 719-487-1600 CO joe@scheinercg.com 2012 (Continued on page 5)

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Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Shames Construction Co., Ltd. Singleton Construction, LLC Solex Contracting Southwestern Services Sullivan Construction Company Taylor Brothers Construction Company, Inc. TDS Construction, Inc. Thomas-Grace Construction, Inc. Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Trainor Commercial Construction, Inc. Travisano Construction, LLC Tri-North Builders, Inc. Triad Retail Construction Warwick Construction, Inc. WDS Construction Weekes Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors, Inc. William A. Randolph, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc. Wolverine Building Group Woods Construction, Inc. Vogel Plumbing, Inc.

Matthew Schimenti Carolyn Shames Denise Doczy-Delong Gerald Allen John S. Lee Amanda Sullivan Jeff Chandler Robert Baker Don Harvieux Mike Wolff Aaron Rectenwald John Taylor Peter J. Travisano David Brown Jay Dorsey Walt Watzinger Ben Westra Hunter Weekes Mike McBride Tony Riccardi Rick Winkel Michael Houseman John Bodary Brian Hogan

914-244-9100 925-606-3000 740-756-7331 951-308-1706 817-921-2466 954-484-3200 812-379-9547 941-795-6100 651-342-1298 909-949-0380 724-452-8801 415-259-0200 412-321-1234 608-204-7227 281-485-4700 832-448-7000 920-356-1255 864-233-0061 817-302-2050 847-856-0123 352-860-0500 616-949-3360 586-939-9991 517-528-8990

NY CA OH CA TX FL IN FL MN CA PA CA PA WI TX TX WI SC TX IL FL MI MI IL

mschimenti@schimenti.com 1994 cshames@shames.com 1994 denisedelong@singletoncontruction.net 2012 jerry@solexcontracting.com 2015 JLee@southwesternservices.com 2017 amanda@buildwithsullivan.com 2012 Jeff.Chandler@TBCCI.com 2014 inbox@tdsconstruction.com 1994 don.harvieux@thomas-grace.com 2012 mike@timberwolff.com 2008 arectenwald@trcgc.net 2010 john.taylor@trainorconstruction.com 2012 pj@travisanocontruction.com 2015 dbrown@tri-north.com 2015 j.dorsey@triadrc.com 2013 walt@warwickconstruction.com 2008 bwestra@wdsconstruction.net 2019 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com 1990 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com 1990 tony.riccardi@warandolph.com 2011 rickw@winkel-construction.com 1990 mhouseman@wolvgroup.com 2012 jbodary@woodsconstruction.com 1996 bhogan@vogelplumbing.com 2020

Visit retailcontractors.org to view the profile of each RCA member company. Click on “Find a Contractor” on the home page to search the member list. Please notify the RCA Office (800-847-5085 or info@retailcontractors.org) of any changes to your contact information.

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NEWSLETTER

New Advisory Board Member RCA’s Advisory Board is comprised of representatives from retail markets including specialty, big box, department stores, and restaurant, as well as developers and architects/engineers. Advisory Board members are appointed by the President and serve three-year terms. During that time, they actively assist the RCA Board of Directors in identifying key industry issues and formulating policies and programs designed to positively impact those issues. Meet RCA’s newest Advisory Board member. Jason Kraus Jason Kraus is the Sr. Program Manager, Property Development – Construction for Kohl’s Department Stores. He is

responsible for the construction of new stores, distribution, ecommerce, and corporate office spaces nationwide for Kohl’s. Prior to joining Kohl’s, Jason worked for Best Buy Company, where he led the New Store Architecture & Construction teams. With over 15 years in the retail construction and architecture business, Jason has established himself as an industry leader in the field of retail development. Jason currently serves on the Executive Committee for the Advisory Board of Minnesota State University – Mankato’s Construction Management Program and the Board of Directors for his local neighborhood association. Jason currently resides in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis/St. Paul with his wife and two boys. When not working, Jason enjoys coaching his two boys’ sports teams and spending time at the lake cabin whenever possible.

Superintendent Training Program Workshop

RCA is hosting a Superintendent Training Program workshop in Dallas, Thursday, December 10 and Friday, December 11, 2020, at the Embassy Suites by Hilton DFW Airport South. Space is limited for the session. If you don’t know who you want to send, you can provide the name later, but be sure to secure your spot now! We will need the names of your attendees two weeks prior to the training date. This program is applicable for superintendents, project managers, and other staff, however, the certification is limited to those who meet the requirements. Visit retailcontractors.org for program information and to register for the training.

We want the ‘BEST OF THE BEST’ Commercial Construction & Renovation's

& awards will recognize 12 of the industry’s most important women & men leaders. To do this, we need your help. Please send us why your nomination is representative of this honor. The honorees will be featured in our October 2020 and November 2020 issues, respectively. Featured honorees will receive a profile in the magazine, an interview on our “Commercial Construction Coffee Talk” podcast and participation in a virtual roundtable discussion. Send your nomination to mikep@ccr-mag.com. Deadlines: Aug. 21, 2020, for CCRW nominations. Sept. 18, 2020, for CCRM nominations.

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Leadership Connection

As the country was shutting down and our members were facing difficult decisions, the RCA launched the Leadership Connection series as a resource for business owners and senior leadership. We wanted to bring our members together as a community to share information and advice about how to handle the challenges facing our businesses, our families, and our industry. Leadership Connection sessions have included prepared presentations and guided discussion topics. Initial topics focused on how members were dealing with the initial effects of COVID-19 and the immediate economic impact of the pandemic. RCA members offering insights included RCA past president Bob Moore, Gray, Carolyn Shames, Shames Construction, and Michael Sullivan, Sullivan Construction. Presentations by renowned attorneys included Chris Mosley, Sherman & Howard, discussing COVID-19 and construction insurance, including builders risk, commercial general liability, and workers compensation; Jeff Rosen, Polsinelli, addressing commercial litigation issues; and Jack Sullivan, Dorsey & Whitney, LLP, offering guidance on human resources compliance and workforce decisions.

We’re

All Leadership Connection sessions were recorded and are accessible to members in the Members Only section of the RCA website.

We’re We’re

All Leadership Connection sessions were recorded and are accessible to members in the Members Only section of the RCA website. The series will continue to be offered with relevant and timely topics. Any suggestions for topics or speakers should be sent to RCA president Steve Bachman sbachman@retailconstruction.com or RCA executive director, Carol Montoya (carol@retailcontractors.org).

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to everything Access to everything toon everything siteon atsite any onat hour, site anyat even hour, anyat hour, even 3am. at even 3am. at 3am. Tom McGee, president & CEO of ICSC joined a session to share his insightsAccessAccess on the pandemics effects on the industry and economy. RCA’s Advisory Board members joined forces for an open discussion about what retailers, developers, restaurants, and architects are doing differently now, how they expect to approach business post-COVID, and how GCs can best position themselves going forward. Economist Anirban Basu, chairman & CEO of Sage Policy Group presented a Lord of the Rings-themed update, touching on unemployment, retail sales, manufacturing, consumer debt, and a forecast as the world recovers from the pandemic crisis.

• Booth • #617 Meet Meet usMeet atusSPECS at usSPECS at •SPECS Booth Booth #617 #617

cmi-usa.com • Boo Meet us #617 at800-915-9002 SPECS • Meet us at SPECS Booth 800-915-9002 800-915-9002 Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617 cmi-usa.com cmi-usa.com cmi-usa.com 80 800-915-9002 800-915-9002 cm cmi-usa.com 2020 • SUMMER EDITION

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NEWSLETTER

RCA Sustaining Sponsors PLATINUM

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SPRING EDITION • 2019

2800 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 210, Alexandria, VA 22314 800.847.5085 • www.retailcontractors.org


CIRCLE NO. 43


A facility manager walks into a condo… Watertree at DeWitt’s tale of 33 years, three water heaters, and scores of lasting relationships By Dan Vastyan

Built in 1975, Watertree of DeWitt is a 320 condominium project in Syracuse, NY. Each of the 40 buildings contain eight, 850-square-foot condo units.

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H

ot water and cable TV. That is what facility manager Ken Allen says condo owners absolutely will not go without. Allen has served as manager of Watertree at DeWitt condominiums for 36 years. In that time, he has developed a knack for keeping the neighborhood at peace.

“Residents will tolerate a lot, considering that they own the condos and are largely responsible for their own properties,” Allen says. “But if the water runs cold or the TV doesn’t work, I know I’ll get calls. And truth be told, we almost never hear about hot water.” The 320 condominium project in Syracuse, New York was built in 1975. Each of the 40 buildings contains eight, 850-square-foot condo units. One large, tank-style water heater in the basement of each building supplies domestic hot water (DHW) to all eight condos. It is the same method of delivering DHW that has been used since 1975, though the equipment has evolved rather dramatically. Today, high-efficiency, tank-style commercial water heaters serve the property. But in the 33 years since the building’s original electric water heaters were replaced, all the players remain the same: installers, reps, wholesalers and manufacturers. Watertree of DeWitt could serve as a case study in good business practice.

Gene Topolski, of Dannan Plumbing, changes setpoint temperature.

Long-term relationships

Throughout the mid to late ’70s, when power costed about $.02 per kWh, Watertree of DeWitt was an entirely electric facility. When the condos were built, electric water heaters were installed. The plumbing work was done, in part, by Gene Topolski. It would not be his last project at Watertree. A few years into Allen’s tenure, the price of electric changed substantially. Managers at Watertree responded by switching to a different energy source in 1990. “By then, were paying more than $.12 per kWh,” Allen says. “So we had the gas utility hook us up, and we replaced all of the major appliances.”

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Through Northeast Sales Associates, CO Supply’s Mike Cannavino delivered the 40 new gas-fired units, including the 100-gallon Bradford White water heaters. The models offered a large cost savings over the electric units, and served the facility for 12 or 13 years with no real issues. In 2003, again under Allen’s direction, Watertree of Dewitt started looking for the right equipment to replace the first set of gas-fired water heaters. His first calls were to Northeast Sales and CO Supply, where Cannavino suggested trying a gas-fired, condensing water heater. Allen had one of the power direct vented, 100-gallon units installed.

First high-efficiency units Each EF Series commercial water heater installed at Watertree of DeWitt serves eight condos.

Throughout the mid to late ’70s, when power costed about $.02 per kWh, Watertree of DeWitt was an entirely electric facility.

The new water heaters are the third general units installed since the property switched from electric to natural gas in 1990.

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Allen says the unit was more expensive than the previous models, so he tracked gas consumption and found a 35 percent savings. When he factored in the cost of installation, Allen discovered it provided a three- to fouryear payback. “So we started installing them all across the property as needed, ultimately buying 39 more over the next few years,” he says. “We’ve got more than a dozen years of hard use out of a commercial, tank-style water heater. I think that’s saying something.” Aside from a few standard maintenance requirements over the years, the new tanks delivered hot water and energy savings for longer than expected. About half of the units are still in service today. Around 2010, a sales rep that handled a line of tankless, gas-fired water heaters convinced Allen to swap an old tank for three new wall-hung units. He knew that tankless and recirculation technology had come a long way since then, but that experiment was a flop. The tankless units did not start to fire until shortly after a tap was opened, so the wait for hot water was twice as long as before. Residents began to complain. Having monitored fuel use, Allen found that the three tankless units used more gas than the storage-type units. To add insult to injury, water and sewage costs also up, due to the longer wait times for hot water.


already reached its set-point temperature. I’ve since suggested these units to several other condo complexes that we service.” Everyone involved agrees that using 60-gallon units instead of the 100-gallon units that had always served the facility was a huge advantage. The basement stairs were not nearly as formidable a challenge anymore. “I’d like to say that I’ve been tracking the gas consumption, but I’m content just knowing that we’re doing better than ever,” Allen says. “The oldest unit is about four years old now, and I haven’t had a single problem.” Today, none of the key players have changed in that time. Some good things never change. MH Robert Phillips, managing partner of Northeast Sales Associates (left), and Mike Cannavino at CO Supply (right), helped Watertree’s Ken Allen (center), selecting product before the sweeping water heater retrofit project began.

Dan Vastyan is PR director and writer for Common Ground, a trade communications firm based in Manheim, Pennsylvania. He can be reached at DanV@SeekCG.com.

“The tankless units were in service for about two years before we pulled them out,” Allen says. “And that was really the last time that we changed any DHW equipment until about four years ago. Now 12 years old, none of the high efficiency tanks have leaked, but parts are starting to wear out and we started looking for the next solution.”

Fourth generation—It is a wrap

After the condo management team said it wanted to shop around for other units, Allen put his foot down. “They wanted to price shop. “To me, quality was evident, and beyond that, my familiarity with the product, and the relationships that I’d built was worth far more than $100 or $200 they might have saved by buying something else.” The eF Series commercial, condensing water heaters offer thermal efficiencies up to 99.1 percent, courtesy of its three-pass heat exchanger. A Vitraglas® lining ensures long product life by helping to eliminate corrosion. Before long, Topolski, along with Rick Dannan, who owns Dannan Plumbing, started replacing the existing water heaters. Topolski had since become a journeyman plumber, and Dannan is a master plumber. The two-man crew handles all plumbing needs at Watertree. “We knew that the recovery rate of the units was very good, so, just as a test, we installed a 60-gallon unit with a 150 MBH capacity, along with a tempering valve that allowed us to maintain slightly higher tank temperatures,” Dannan says. “Over the course of a year, we didn’t have any complaints. But when it came time to replace numerous tanks, we settled on the 199 MBH size, which allowed us to get rid of the tempering valve. It’s one less step in the process, and one less thing to maintain.” Dannan says the first time he installed an eF Series unit, he thought it was broken. “We filled it with cold water, fired it, and it shut off in six minutes. It took us a few seconds to realize that it had

CIRCLE NO. 43

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Just saying… One guy’s thoughts on how to best battle an economic downturn By Ron Treister

I

do not claim to be an expert on anything, but I can state while being an owner of two small businesses—the first from 1981 to 1992, the second from 1994 until now—I have learned much. In particular, running a business, whatever the size, is an educational process that

never ends.

Obviously, I have absorbed quite a bit since beginning in Chicago back in the day, primarily because I had to wear so many hats and learn so many disciplines. Nobody said it was going to be easy. Since my first day as an owner, America’s economy has had its ups and downs. During the last 35 years, we have had two recessions—and now this. Clearly, it is time to put on our get smart and get tough fedoras. Time to think strong.

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My following thoughts are being presented in broad strokes. I believe they are applicable to any business going through tough economic times. Hopefully they will help give you some direction.

Stay rational

For the most part, no established business is going to be here today and gone tomorrow. There are always ways to proceed strategically,


which makes sense. Set your focus on finding the game plan that is best suited for your firm.

Stay positive

Just like misery loves company, enthusiasm with a positive tone works, too. Remember that losers tend to hang out with losers; winners tend to hang out with winners. From my experience, winners most always are positive people. Winner or loser, which one are you? Accentuate the positives.

Don’t press existing customers to do more

Remember, your customers most likely are being affected by these tough times, too. Put on your new business hat and beat down as many bushes as you can. Find new business to replace those accounts, which have most likely scaled down or simply gone away. You have done it before; you can do it again. Even now.

Stay healthy

You know that silly old adage, “When times are tough, drink heavily.” That is always fun to say, but not really a wise thing to practice during challenging times. The healthier course is the one to take—the one that will help you endure the intense stress that goes hand in hand with enduring each “pandemic day.” Remember the four items of global wisdom: Exercise, hydrate yourself, eat right and get enough sleep.

Don’t forget your business friends

Reflecting on your career, how many people were there for you during tough times? Maybe over the years, in your own way, you have paid them back. Maybe you haven’t. Nevertheless, one way or the other, stay in touch with them, infuse them with positive input. If you have a chance to lend a hand in any way, do so. Somehow, at some time, your benevolent actions will be paid back—maybe in ways you never even imagined. Thoughtfulness begets thoughtfulness.

Know the score

I have a dear friend who is negatively affected by much of today’s news. He cannot stop complaining about this or that, or react to omnipresent current events. I know it is hard to keep deep opinions to oneself, but think of the other person. Does he or she want to hear your rants? My point: It is good to know what is going on. Everyone has the right to his or her own opinion about each and any event. But before you rant, think about the person listening to your bluster. Sometimes, it is best not to share your thoughts.

Don’t let ego kill your business

As a manager or owner, there is no shame in stating that business has been slow. Sometimes, elevated egos disallow management to cope realistically with problems. No matter how great you say your business is, the truth rests in your bottom line. Do not let your ego

take your eyes off of it. If it is not what you want it to be, well, as a good businessperson, just be honest with yourself. Then, you will know the next step relative to what to do.

Connect with your advisors

Your company most likely has a law firm, an accounting firm, a personal banker and possibly a management consultant. Nobody knows everything; that is why these specialists are there. If they have been helpful in the past, it is time to seek them out for additional help. I have mentioned business advisors here. There also is no reason whatsoever why you should not connect with a religious/spiritual advisor at this point. Good people help good people. And, in so many cases, they do so because they care about you, not just because they want immediate During the last financial payback. Now is the time for mankind to help mankind in all 35 years, we arenas. And, per this article, that is have had two the business arena.

recessions—and now this. Clearly, What happened with other recessions? it is time to put The time period of 1989-1993 were on our get smart tough years economically. Frankly, they were some of the worst days and get tough business-wise I ever experienced. fedoras. Time to In retrospect, perhaps I should have think strong. handled situations differently. But I

also recall that right around the start of 1994 (ironically, when I started this firm), business started to loosen up. Shortly thereafter, it came back big. When the next and bigger downturn started in 2007, even though it was another rough situation, many of us were better prepared to combat it due to weathering the previous storm. In both situations, these recessions did not last forever. They ended and business came back. This awful pandemic of 2020 will end one day. Hopefully, sooner rather than later. And business, although in many new ways, will come back stronger than ever. We all must believe that.

How best to make things turn around faster

Do not just be aware of your personal situations, but those of others, too. If everyone tweaked their attitude a bit, focused more on the glass “half full” rather than “half empty,” we would be psyched for the day to come when this hard to deal with situation changes us for the better. Think about that. Think about how much more satisfying it will be when business returns? Individually, we all have many blessings. Surely, this is the time to start counting them. These are just one guy’s thoughts. CCR

Ron Treister is President/Founder of Communicators International, Inc., a marketing communications firm headquartered in Jupiter, Fla. For three decades, his firm has worked with major accounts focusing on the commercial construction sector. He may be reached at: rlt@communicatorsintl.com

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INDUSTRY

WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION

Woman-owned, woman grown Conversation with Carolyn Shames, President & CEO, Shames Construction

I

t takes vision, commitment and heart to build a successful firm in a traditionally male-dominated industry. And if you ask Carolyn Shames, who has successfully managed this task a few times over, it also takes intelligence and confidence. Anyone who has worked with Shames Construction knows that when you work with Carolyn, you are working with a professional who takes her clients’ interests to heart. For the past 30 years, she has built Carolyn Shames a reputation as a hands-on construction professional. Founded in 1987 by Barry Shames, Shames Construction started building retail store interiors. Within a few years, Carolyn's management and expertise moved the company to building large, ground-up retail developments. She became the majority stockholder, obtaining woman-owned business status in 1991. Today, Shames Construction is a 100% woman-owned and managed company, serving as one of the premier commercial general contractors on the West Coast. We sat down with Carolyn to get her insights on the industry today and where the road ahead is taking us.

Give us a snapshot of the construction market today? This year started with a lot of excitement and positivity. We had plenty of work with some nice, large projects. Since the COVID shutdowns, none of those projects have been awarded to anyone. Heading into summer, I do not see great promise in new projects for the rest of 2020. There still is great uncertainty. Everyone is still busy with projects they had before everything happened, but that is going to dry out soon. We will be busy into the first quarter of 2021, so I feel lucky. I am a positive thinker, so I feel hopeful we will get back to a good growth position. I am just uncertain how long that will take right now.

How did you get started in the industry? What is your story? I graduated in 1978 with an architecture degree. I worked in Denver for a local architect until 1983. I wanted to get into a construction-related job. I went to work for The Southland Corp., as a construction manager building 7 Eleven stores in Arizona, Colorado and Utah. When the penny stock days came upon us, Southland shut down things to reorganize. I was put in charge of maintenance. It was not my chosen career path. I was recruited by Whirlpool as a construction director for a new national rollout they were doing called Whirlpool Kitchens. They ended up pulling the plug in 1989. At that time, the Colorado economy was in the tank and we moved to California. Shames Construction started building retail stores and interiors until around 1992, when we started focusing on larger ground-up projects and developments. We started building Kmarts, OfficeMaxs and Home Depots, and then other big-box retailers. Through most of the 90s, I built up to 40 Home Depots in California. I started building for Walmart in 2000. Since then, I have continued with these two retailers, along with Public Storage, shopping center

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developers, industrial buildings for Shea, Overton Moore Properties, and eventually Dave and Buster’s. I also worked with a few local California wineries and facilities, and some banks in California. We recently added Kroger to our portfolio. I moved to Colorado for family and personal reasons, and now run the business from here. Most of our work is still in California, but I am actively marketing for projects in Colorado, throughout the west and Tennessee. What are some of the biggest changes you have seen over the past few years? Until the COVID-19 shutdowns, the biggest problem was finding qualified subcontractors with enough qualified staff to partner with to estimate and manage the projects. Truthfully, waiting to see what is coming next is on my list of challenges. Name some of the opportunities available for today’s women. I see no limits to what a woman can do versus a man. The only drawback is women seem to have a lack of willingness and commitment as the construction business requires travel, very long hours, and strength of character and confidence. Women need to be willing to put their gender aside and work to develop those qualities more than a man does in this business. They cannot be defensive or insulted by who they are. When they are able to do that, there will be no limits. What is the best piece of advice you have ever received? Learn how to do your bosses job for them, and you will be irreplaceable and have that job if you want it. What advice would you share with women coming up in the industry? Open your mind, learn everything you can, be creative, work hard, and never let gender enter into any actions reactions or decisions. What is the biggest lesson the past few months have taught you? To me flexible and strong, and always be ready to change course as needed. Also, cash is key. Always have enough cash to remain strong during economic cycles. Be ready for national election craziness, as sadly it happens every four years. What is the biggest item on your to-do list? To manage the realignment of job responsibilities during these uncertain times so that we are limber and ready for whatever comes next. What is the first thing you are going to do when everything gets back to normal? Take a vacation, and visit my five grandchildren and their parents. CCR


A W A R D S Recognizing 12 of the industry’s most important women & men leaders. The CCRW honorees will be featured in the CCR October 2020 issue and CCRM honoress in the November 2020 issue. Nomination form:

_Women_-_Deadline_to_submit:_8.21.20______ _Men_-_Deadline_to_submit:_9.18.20

Name:__________________________________________________________ Title:____________________________________________________________ Company:_______________________________________________________ Years_in_Industry:__________________________________________________ Your_Working_Relationship_with_Nominee:

Why_is_the_nominee_deserving_of_The_CCRW_Award?

Submit all forms to Mike Pallerino: mikep@ccr-mag.com CIRCLE NO. 44


INDUSTRY

THE CANNABIS CHRONICLES

The long run Why cannabis is no longer an illicit cottage industry

T

By James E Megerson

he hemp, medical and recreational cannabis industry has created new interest in indoor agriculture. As more states legalize, architects, engineers and contractors will have to learn what is unique about the facilities that support cultivation, manufacturing and dis-

pensing of marijuana products. Marijuana is no longer an illicit cottage industry.

There are many ways to cultivate plants. Here, we will focus on creating the proper environment for indoor cultivation facilities. The wrong environment will reduce plant yield and, possibly lose a crop to mold or mildew. Given the cost per gram of marijuana, it could result in millions of dollars lost in one crop. With typical buildings (e.g., office buildings, retail, schools, etc.), heating, air conditioning and ventilation engineers and contractors, attempt to create an environment in the space that is comfortable for its occupants (people). The majority of the of

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the time is spent trying to keep the outdoor conditions outside of the building. Indoor cultivation facilities are unique. With an indoor grow facility, growers are trying to create the best outdoor day for growing inside the building. In outdoor cultivation, marijuana plants only produce one time in a grow cycle. With indoor growing, it is all about optimizing the plant’s growth to expedite the growing season so that multiple grows can be accomplished in the same year (up to six is possible with the proper care and understanding of the process). The idea is to create the perfect amount of light, temperature and humidity in the space to propagate healthy plants and optimize their yield. This perfect day that the plants need will change as they develop from very small plants to large ones that need more water and nutrients. Remember learning about plants in grade school? We learned about osmosis and photosynthesis, how the plant uses light and carbon dioxide to grow and produce oxygen, etc. As you can imagine, this is a very simplistic definition of what is happening. Learning more about horticulture and how the HVAC systems affects plant health is paramount to success. There is another term called “transpiration” that we need to understand to maintain that perfect indoor environment for the plants. Transpiration is the movement of water from the ground through the plants roots and to where it exits out of the plant through what is called the stomata (think of this like a perspiration pore). The plant needs water to help deliver nutrients throughout its stems and leaves. Water is transpired through the plant based on the difference in the pressure inside the plant versus the surrounding air (vapor pressure deficit or VPD). For the water


to move through the plant, the vapor pressure inside the plant must be higher than the surrounding air. The optimum VPD for the plant changes as it matures. The VPD for cannabis plants that are young (vegetative stage) is 0.08 to 1.0 kpa (kilopascals) and for mature plants (flower stage) is 1.1 to 1.5 kpa. Lower than these ranges causes less water to transpire through the plant. Higher values cause too much water to transpire. This is where the proper indoor HVAC plan comes into play. The HVAC system controls the temperature and humidity in the space to maintain these optimum VPDs, thereby creating the perfect growing space. In simple terms, the amount of water that moves through the plant needs to be removed by the HVAC equipment to control temperature and humidity to maintain the proper VPD. If the HVAC equipment is not capable of maintaining the right VPD, the water will not transpire through the plant and will go down the drain, wasting expensive nutrients and water resources. Or even worse, keeping humidity too high causing microclimates and potential for mold and mildew, ultimately losing crops. The challenge for HVAC engineers is knowing how to calculate the amount of moisture removal in the space while also taking care of the sensible loads (primarily lighting). There also is an evaporative cooling affect that occurs in the space like what human’s experience when we perspire. The air movement across our skin when we sweat tends to cool us down. The same thing happens to plants as moisture leaves through the stomata. As the plant grows bigger, this evaporative cooling affect also increases because there is more surface area for the plant to transpire through. The issue is that, as the plant grows, the moisture removal needs increase, and the effect of the sensible load from the lights is decreased by the evaporative cooling. Thus, the cooling and dehumidification loads in the space change dramatically throughout the growth cycle (approximately six to eight weeks). The load in the space is a moving target.

The role of HVAC

As you can imagine, the number of cultivation HVAC system solutions is unlike that of typical buildings. Some work better, use less energy, last longer, and so on, than others. Typical commercial cooling equipment will not likely be able to handle the moisture removal needs and are not made to operate 24/7. They also may need supplemental dehumidifiers, humidifiers and reheat to condition properly at all the different conditions needed. Typical building controls also can be problematic as the sequence of operations for these spaces is unique. More than likely, an experienced controls contractor will be needed. There is cultivation purpose-built cooling and dehumidification equipment that can handle the diversity of load in the space and are energy efficient. This equipment is made to run 24/7 and most have built in ability to match the variable conditions needed. It is important that engineers know these differences to help their clients make good educated business decisions.

Most indoor grow facilities fall under the IBC group F-1, occupancy moderate-hazard factory industrial. This group includes hemp products as a category. Each state is different on how they handle building codes for these facilities. Some have very specific requirements and may even impose strict energy efficiency and odor control requirements. Others leave it up to local jurisdictions to handle. There also can be significant utility rebates as the lighting densities can be as high as 175-200 watts/square foot and 13 square foot/ton of cooling. Using LED lighting and purpose-built cultivation cooling and dehumidification equipment could significantly reduce the energy use of the building.

Because the cannabis industry in the US is relatively immature, there are few architects, engineers and contractors that have sufficient experience with these facilities, so the learning curve is steep. While marijuana use is not yet federally legal, there are thoughts that it will soon be. There is some belief that when that happens, the government may impose strict regulations on the cultivation, manufacturing and dispensing of marijuana. Because of this, some cultivation businesses are building their facilities to meet good manufacturing processes (GMP) and or Federal Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. Most grow rooms are built for easy cleaning between grow cycles, minimizing hard to reach flat surfaces and may employ space pressurization and filtration to control contaminants (dust, insects, mold and viruses) within the facility, similar to what has been adopted in the pharmaceutical industry. Because the cannabis industry in the US is relatively immature, there are few architects, engineers and contractors that have sufficient experience with these facilities, so the learning curve is steep. It is important to understand enough about horticulture and the needs of the occupant (plant). The knowledge of VPD, transpiration and the energy balance in the space that makes this possible is paramount to being able to calculate the cooling and dehumidification load in the space. The process determines the systems, and both need the building to be developed around them. We can no longer build the systems into the building, but rather the building around the systems. This is an exciting time to be in the HVAC industry as it develops to meet the needs of marijuana cultivation and manufacturing. The scientific and engineering community is performing studies to quantify data needed to optimize systems and plant propagation. There are emerging technologies that are addressing the needs of the industry. As the cannabis industry evolves, so will the knowledge base. We will learn what works best and develop better solutions. CCR

James E Megerson, PE, LEED AP, is VP of Engineering for Design Mechanical Inc., a mechanical construction / service company providing HVAC solutions to the commercial/industrial market.

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TH E

F UTUR E

OF

R E TA I L

Our team can help you navigate the complex environment created by this shifting landscape. Serving as your change agent, we guide you from site selection through grand opening – turning your bold ideas into reality.

cesoinc.com Architecture | Interiors | Survey | Environmental | Engineering | Landscape Architecture

CIRCLE NO. 45


JUNE 2020 • VOL 4 • ISSUE 4

The Voice of Craft Brands Jason Barrett, Master Distiller, founder and president, Black Button Distilling

The real deal Black Button Distilling and the chase for craft perfection


The Voice of Craft Brands

The real deal Black Button Distilling and the chase for craft perfection

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By MJ Pallerino

Jason Barrett’s family started making men’s suit buttons in Rochester four generations ago. Since 1922 these buttons have been sewn on suits worn by presidents, popes, kings and businessmen all over the world. As a youngster, Barrett was privy to a work ethic that takes most people their whole lives to embrace. Work hard, work with your hands and create quality products. And while Jason took a different path, the lessons and their meaning stick with him still. As the founder, president and master distiller for Black Button Distilling—the legacy he forged to create on his own—Jason pays homage to the the world his grandfather knew—one where real mean worked hard and drank the real thing, i.e., real pot distilled whiskey. His path to craft spirit glory started in 2012, where at the age of 24 he opened Black Button’s tasting room and retail store in Rochester, New York. Spirit tastings and craft cocktails. Tours. Public and private events. With Black Button, he delivered a world-class operation distilled from New York area grains, and aged, bottled, labeled and hand-numbered locally. And if you are looking for a little craft spirit irony—Black Button is the first grain-to-glass distillery in Rochester since Prohibition. The journey, which includes myriad awards, honors and accolades, has been the stuff of legend. We sat down with Barrett, and Director of Marketing Carrie Riby, to get an inside look into the magic that is Black Button Distilling.

What are some of the adjustments you made with/to your business model surrounding the recent state of events? From the time COVID-19 hit, we transitioned from liquor to hand sanitizer production in less than 48 hours. This in turn created a domino effect of other changes. For example, our tasting room expanded our product offerings from just spirits, to cocktail kits and virtual cocktail classes/events. We started offering curbside pickup and door-to-door delivery. A good portion of our sales force now focuses on hospitals and critical facilities versus just retailers. In addition, we have expanded our e-commerce sales options, which now allows us to ship product to more than 38 US states.

Be honest and upfront about why certain products are not currently available because you had to focus on making hand sanitizer. They get it.

What is the best piece of advice you can offer to other brands in how to deal with the unthinkable like this? Here are two pieces of advice: No. 1 — Trust your instincts. You know your targets and markets better than anyone else. The numbers suggested in the early days that everyone would be hunkering down with a well-stocked liquor cabinet. We later learned that they did, they were just not venturing into the craft arena. No. 2 — Hire people who care. Our Black Button employees are family and, in the end, they were the reason we were able to bring hand sanitizer to market so quickly. The “can do” spirit is alive and well at Black Button and employees were willing to do whatever had to be done to make the hand sanitizer happen.

What kind of conversations are you having with your customers? We have always been in and part of the community, but with COVID, we have more time than ever to consider the community first. We all live here. How do we keep our friends and family safe? After taking care of the community, we ensure that our employees have a job. It may not be the same job they had in the tasting room, but everyone knows they are working for all the right reasons. The irony is that when customers see you taking care of the community and your employees, they rally around and take care of you.

What role should a brand play in being a leader in a distressed market? Do the right thing. We live in a small viral world, and customers know when you are only thinking about yourself.

Give us a snapshot of today’s craft spirits market from your perspective. According to the Distilled Spirits Council, only 43% of craft distilleries expect to survive at the end of this pandemic. This is scary, but at the same time, it forces us to rethink our current sales model. Things will not be going back to the way it was anytime soon.

CRAFT BRAND AND MARKETING

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Black Button Distilling

What is likely to happen next?

What is your story from a brand perspective?

Consumer behaviors have shifted. In many cases, this will not change even after COVID. We believe e-commerce is going to get more active in the craft category. For example, Drizly alone grew over 400% over the last few months. Once people know they can buy spirts quickly and easily, they may not want to go back to their old habits.

We are proud to say we are the first grain-to-glass craft distillery to open in Rochester, New York since prohibition. Founded in 2012, Black Button Distilling is a New York State-licensed farm distillery. We use over 90% New York State all-natural ingredients to make all our spirits. From a young age, Jason worked alongside his grandfather in his family’s button factory. There, he learned that hard work, dedication and a commitment to quality are the principles of any good producer. These core values would later become the foundation of Black Button Distilling. We work exclusively with farmers who take great pride in what they harvest, and we never cut corners in the pursuit of making exceptional spirits.

Consumer behaviors have shifted. In many cases, this will not change even after COVID. We believe e-commerce is going to get more active in the craft category. Black Button Distilling is a family company and our products are handmade with quality ingredients—just like the hand sanitizer. We have learned from this pandemic that we are about more than just crafting high quality spirits we offer lifesaving hand sanitizer. Jason’s grandfather would be proud.

Walk us through your branding strategy. Our brand is like most: handcrafted, farm to table, quality ingredients offering unique products you cannot get anywhere else. Our spirits are award winning. We have global recognition being the second American to be inducted into the prestigious Gin Guild. (A highly respected, worldwide

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CBAM-MAG.COM


CIRCLE NO. 46


Black Button Distilling

promoter of the gin category, the Gin Guild is supported by the four major gin distilling companies: Bacardi, Diageo, William Grant and Sons and Chivas Brothers.)

What is the biggest issue today related to the marketing/sales side of the business? Our biggest issue is that there are many distilleries out there. How do we break through this clutter and differentiate ourselves? Couple this with a robust e-commerce community that is designed to support major brands and not the craft. Now, top that off with having to make a totally different product, hand sanitizer, for a different audience set. These are complex times for our industry indeed.

What is the secret to creating a branding story that consumers can buy in to? This is no longer about creating a brand story; this is about keeping our consumers safe so that they will be here for us in the future.

What is the one thing every craft beer brand should be doing in the way of marketing?

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Craft distilleries and breweries need to be curious when it comes to marketing. What worked five months ago will most likely not work now. Trial and error are the keys to knowing if something is working. If it does not work, ask why. And then start again. These are uncertain times. There is no science to what we are doing. If you are to make one marketing investment, hire a good public relations consultant. The ability to announce a story quickly makes all the difference in this rapidly evolving marketplace.

E-commerce is growing fast in this category. Companies like Drizly, Instacart, Whiskey Lovers, Spirits 360, Mash and Grape, etc., offer ways to our promote products in seamless online environments.

What is the biggest item on your to-do list right now? How do you balance hand sanitizer demand with our passion for making award-winning bourbon/whiskey, gin and bourbon cream? What does our future look like? Understanding this dynamic is key to our future.

Sitting down with … Jason Barrett, Master Distiller, founder and president, Black Button Distilling What is the most rewarding part of your job?

What was the best advice you ever received?

Seeing a product go from concept to fruition, and then seeing consumers enjoy our creations.

The only real difference in business anymore is the people. Focus on having great people and the rest will take care of itself.

What is the best thing a customer ever said to you?

What is your favorite brand story?

“Can I get a Black Button Old Fashioned?” I was at a bar not in branded gear, and it was the first time someone ordered our product by name without needing to be prompted.

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Ford Mustang. You really do feel a sense of freedom while driving that car. Just like a pony on the plains.

CBAM-MAG.COM


CIRCLE NO. 47


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Barrington, RI

$450,000.00

2,405

New Construction

Q1 2021

AutoZone #5989

Plymouth, MA

$1,500,000.00

7,000

New Construction

Q3 2020

Acura of Stamford

Stamford, CT

$1,200,000.00

16,726

Addition/Renovation

Q3 2020

Family Dollar

Manchester, NH

$350,000.00

9,135

Remodel

Q3 2020

HighSeasons Apartment

Abington, MA

$5,000,000.00

161,206

Remodel/Renovation

Q3 2020

98 Prescott Street Apartments

Boston, MA

$3,000,000.00

7,293

New Construction

Q3 2020

Portland, ME

$12,000,000.00

35,000

New Construction

Q4 2020

Philip G. Coburn Elementary School

West Springfield, MA

$69,000,000.00

119,800

New Construction

Q4 2020

Hopkinton High School Classroom Addition

Hopkinton, MA

$3,000,000.00

8,000

Addition and Renovation

Q3 2020

New West District Headquarters at Black Rock SP

Hartford, CT

$7,100,000.00

16,000

New Construction

Q1 2021

New Maintenance Garage Project

Boothbay, ME

$840,000.00

4,800

New Construction

Q3 2020

Central Maine Medical Center Outpatient Surgery Center

Topsham, ME

$14,000,000.00

20,000

New Construction

Q2 2021

Constitution Surgery Center East Expansion

Waterford, CT

$4,000,000.00

7,025

Addition

Q3 2020

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Starbucks - County Road

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY: The Longfellow Hotel

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

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CIRCLE NO. 48


AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

ADART/Gensis Lighting Solutions

85

Laticrete

11 8

ALW

65 30

Lido

61 28

Mapes

27

15

Mercho Services Inc.

37

20

Metropolitan Ceramics

109

43

Mike Levin

8

5

NAC

35

19

Navien

15 10

Permit.com

87 38

Poma Retail Development, Inc

33

18

Prime Retail Services

17

11

PTS Contracting

49

24

7

4

105

43

8, CVR4

6, 50

Signage Solutions

89

39

SMI Sign Systems Inc.

21

13

Taylor Bros.

79

35

The Blue Book Network

96

41

Visual EFX Group

121

46

Warner Bros

CVR3

49

37

ANP Lighting

70-71

33

Beam Team

57

27

CVR2-1

1

Big Rentz Bitro

71 32

Bogart Construction, Inc.

43

22

Capacity Builders Inc

5

3

CDO

19 12

CED National Accounts

67

Ceso

116 45

Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreat

31

80 36

Commerical Construction & Renovation Women & Men Awards

113

44

Rockerz, Inc

Construct Connect

125

48

S.L. Hayden Construction, Inc.

Construction One

13

9

D/13 Group

31

17

Dynamic Air Quality Solutions

27

16

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc.

75

34

Schimenti

GE Current

63

29

Georgia Printco

123

47

Healy Construction Services, Inc.

41

21

Hirsch Construction Corp.

51

25

Hunter Building Corp

53

26

Window Film Depot

91

40

Lakeview Construction, Inc

9

7

Wolverine Building Group

23

14

Laser Facility Management

47

23

ZipWall

3 2

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020


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PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Stay focused. Stay committed. Repeat. S ince closing down the greatest country on earth in March 2020 to try and curb the coronavirus spread from toppling our hospital systems, most of the news has been filled with doom and gloom. And without sports, I cannot even remember what day it is. With no vaccine in sight, we are all trying to get back to our normal daily routines. Each of us has been employing a “take one day at a time” approach to get through this nightmare. Well, here are a few feel good stories to help shed some positive light during these uncertain times.

No. 2: Adoption rates for animals have been at an all-time high, as people continue to help empty shelter cages across the country. With so many people home due the shutdown, animal shelters used technology to their advantage, helping get people to adopt pets with the help of volunteers spreading the word via social media. The strategy worked, as many shelters report increases in pet adoptions and fostering. No. 3: The same goes for foster children. Since being cooped up at home, many Americans have rethought their values and the importance of leading more fulfilling lives. No. 4: And on the business front, even with so many people being laid off or furloughed, many businesses are learning how to be more productive than ever. That means when things get back up and running again, things will be bigger, better and more efficient than ever before. Reinvention is the true key to success.

With no vaccine in sight, we are all trying to get back to our normal daily routines. Each of us has been employing a “take one day at a time” approach to get through this nightmare.

No. 1: After a 10-year absence in launching rockets into space and hitching rides with the Russian space agency, Tesla, along with a public private partnership, launched the successful flight of Space X to the International Space station with a slick new look for astronauts, space crafts and attitude. The move helps show that America is not down and out, and will make space travel a real possibility for us in the future. I still remember watching the Americans landing on the moon on TV and was ecstatic to see us get back into the space race, not only to be the leaders, but for national security.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JUNE 2020

That old saying has never been truer, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.” Without a vaccine, we must start to face the facts that COVID-19 might be with us for a while. That leaves us with some choices to make. The best course of action is to do your best and get-r-done any way you can. Giving up is not an option. We hope you enjoy the look of our new monthly magazine. We also have been producing monthly virtual networking events and plan to hold our Women’s & Commercial Retreat and January 2021 Summit virtually—coming to your computer screen near you. Details will follow. Until then, stay connected, competitive and positive. And try to have a little fun too while keeping the faith for us all. CCR


CIRCLE NO. 49


From SoHo to Rodeo. We’ve expanded to the West Coast Bringing decades of experience building high profile retail and office environments for the world’s largest brands. We’re ready to build for you. Tom Fenton, Business Development Manager (914) 244-9100 x 322 / tfenton@schimenti.com

NE W YORK

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LOS ANGELE S CIRCLE NO. 50

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR June 2020  

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