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CCR MEMPHIS: ATTENDEES DISCUSS THEIR INDUSTRY BEGINNINGS

The need for speed How Andretti Indoor Karting and Games is challenging every consumer’s fun quota Mark Klinger, Director of Architecture and Ed Kennedy, Managing Member, Andretti Indoor Karting & Games

Check out also inside:

Official magazine of

Exclusive Inside: Making construction appeal to a new generation VR meets the construction industry Architectural firms & fixture manufacturers spotlighted

January/February 2020 • www.ccr-mag.com


THE FUTURE OF COMMERCIAL RESTROOMS The D|13 Group has created an integrated sink system that is not only considered the most advanced on the market, it is referred to in the industry as “the future of commercial restrooms.� The D|13 Sink System is currently being used in top stadiums, universities, restaurants and other facilities throughout the United States.


THE D|13 SINK SYSTEM, FEATURING THE NEW XLERATORsync® HAND DRYER

FORM AN D FUNCTIO N The D|13 Sink System, featuring the new XLERATORsync Hand Dryer by Excel Dryer, is the future of commercial restrooms and the most hygienic, sustainable and cost-effective way to wash and dry hands. A masterpiece of form and function, the system seamlessly fuses no-touch, high-efficiency fixtures on the sink deck, creating the ultimate user experience by allowing you to wash and dry hands all in one place. The customizable sink design options allow architects and designers to completely transform the aesthetic of any restroom. In addition to the sleek design and intuitive user experience, what really sets the D|13 Sink System apart is the XLERATORsync Hand Dryer. Designed by Excel Dryer in collaboration with a world-renowned design firm, the dryer’s “reverse airflow” feature blows air/water flow away from the user, promoting hygiene and further enhancing user experience.

A DESI G N -AS S IST PARTNER More than just a supplier, the D|13 Group has positioned themselves as a design-assist partner. They work directly with architects, designers and clients to fabricate each sink system to their specifications, offering unparalleled customization and providing the ultimate product solution. The system is adaptable to any size, shape or material, including solid surface, granite, quartz and other stone, and is compatible with several soap dispenser and faucet models.

THINK OF U S A S YO U R D E S I G N -A S S I ST PA RT N ER FO R H I G H - EN D CO M M ER CI A L R EST R O O M S . CO N TACT U S TO DAY TO D ES I G N YO U R CU STO M S I N K SYST EM . 245 West Central Street / Natick, MA 01760 CIRCLE NO. 1

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January/February • 2020 Vol. 19, No.1

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22

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FEATURES 22 The need for speed  How Andretti Indoor Karting and Games is challenging every consumer’s fun quota

84  Now hiring  Making construction appeal to a new generation 88  Doing Business IRL  Adapting convention centers for the Digital Era

32  Living legacies  Attendees discuss their industry beginnings 80  Game changer  Innovative ways VR is being used in the construction industry

94  Getting Serious About Silica At The Job Site

Cover and feature photos by: Martina Hempel

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

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CIRCLE NO. 2


January/February • 2020 Vol. 19, No.1 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  CCRP – Scottsdale, AZ

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS 54  Architect/Design Firms 72 Fixtures

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 166 The Cannabis Chronicles 180 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 182 Ad Index 184 Publisher’s Note

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173 SPECIAL SECTION

Commercial Kitchens 129 Family affair  How Heidi’s Brooklyn Deli is putting the love in fast casual 140 Move over appliances  Why stainless steel drainage is critical to your kitchen operation Federal Construction 150  Green shelter  Hazardous land used during Atomic Age has sustainable future

129

Multi-Housing 154  Open for luxury  Inside Charleston, South Carolina’s Caroline Luxury Apartments Healthcare 160  Under the hood  How data helped the Georgetown University Science Building save energy Craft Brand and Marketing 173 ‘Beer For the Greater Good’  How Community Beer Co. is taking its brand to the people (everywhere)

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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

New year. New decade. New trends. Hold on tight… W hen I say Atari, what is the first thing that pops into your mind? Hotels, right. Wait, what? I think you meant to say those incredibly intoxicating video games from the 1970s. PacMan. Mario Bros. Space Invaders. Centipede. And my favorite (from the, “Why is he dating himself like that club?”), Pong.

spent more than $152.1 billion (US) on games. Hence the brand’s strategy to connect further with consumers seeking all things gaming (use your imagination there). Additional hotels are planned for Las Vegas, Denver, Chicago, Austin, Seattle, San Francisco and San Jose.

This year— this decade— is just getting started. From the looks of the last few years, we are in for a real “anything goes” experience. So let’s try that again. Atari. You did it again. You said hotels. I know. The trailblazing gaming industry brand is jumping into the hotel business with a slew of branded hotels featuring spaces for virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), studios for streaming games and venues to host esports events. In case you are still reflecting on those hypnotically cool Pong games from yesteryear, the first Atari hotel is slated to start construction this fall in Phoenix and should be finished in about two years. Joining forces with leading innovation and strategy agency GSD Group, Atari is looking to appeal to a segment that is growing in force. In 2019, more than 2.5 billion gamers across the world

The Big Doughnut

When you think of New York City (I know, not this again, but I am on a roll), what is the first thing you think of? Doughnuts. You can thank the gang at Krispy Kreme for that. This summer, the brand is opening seven locations in the Big Apple, including a flagship store in Times Square. And if you are thinking doughnuts and New York City and Times Square, then you could imagine something like the world’s largest Hot Light. Makes sense, right? The 24-hour, 4,500-square-foot retail space at the corner of Broadway and 48th Street is what they are calling a real "doughnut theater experience." Would you expect anything else in NYC? If you really want the inside story on the whole doughnut making process, the Times Square location has it, including an end-to-end peek, from the mixing of ingredients to running the tasty treats through a glaze "waterfall." We did not forget the glaze waterfall. The new store, which Krispy Kreme says will serve more guests annually than any other of its locations in the world, also includes a grab-and-go counter inside with pre-packed dozens of Original Glazed Doughnuts, select assortments and merchandise. You did not think you were getting away without a, “My-ParentsWent-to-the-Big-Apple-and-all-I-got-was-a-Krispy-Kreme T-shirt” comment, did you? So hold on folks. This year—this decade—is just getting started. From the looks of the last few years, we are in for a real “anything goes” experience. Now back to my Pong game. CCR

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


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EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 561-203-2981

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PUBLISHER/EDITOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702

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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Design & Construction Belk Inc. STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods

RESTAURANTS RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation GREGG LOLLIS Sr. Director, Design Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp. DAVID SHOTWELL President DHHK Partners

BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target

ISYOL E. CABRERA Director Design & Construction Carvel & Cinnabon FOCUS Brands

JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company

DEMETRIA PETERSON Senior Construction Manager Checkers & Rally’s Drive in Restaurants

JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury

DAVID THOMPSON Director of Construction WHICH WICH® SUPERIOR SANDWICHES

LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design MIKE KLEIN, AIA, NCARB

Sr. Manager, Architecture QA/QC Life Time Fitness RON VOLSKE Construction Project Manager Orscheln Farm & Home

HEALTHCARE CLINTON “BROOKS” HERMAN, PMP Senior Facilities Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

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HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Principal Executive Vice President at Stormont Hospitality Group LLC JOHN LAPINS VP of Design & Construction Auro Hotels GARY RALL Vice President of Design and Development, Holiday Inn Club Vacations ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality

HOSPITALITY SAMUEL D. BUCKINGHAM, RS CMCA AMS President & Co-Founder Evergreen Financial Partners LLC PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction JOHN STALLMAN Marketing Manager Lakeview Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield MEGAN HAGGERTY Founder Legacy Capital Investment STEVE JONES

International Director JLL MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

CONSULTANT GINA NODA President Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President Nelson FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA

President CESO, Inc.

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Hospitality Waldorf Astoria New York

Virgin Hotels

Hyatt Hotels

Warner Bros.

The Waldorf Astoria New York’s long-delayed rebirth as a luxury hotel/high-end condo property is scheduled to take place this year. The official landmark sold for a historic $1.95 billion in 2014 to China’s Anbang Insurance Group. Hyatt Hotels will expand its luxury offerings worldwide, adding more than 20 properties by the end of next year. The company plans seven Grand Hyatts, five Park Hyatts, two Unbound Collection properties, six Andazes, three Alilas and one Miraval. In addition, Hyatt has opened its first property on Hengqin Island, continuing the pursuit of China expansion ambitions that it shares with other major hotel chains.

Marriott International

Marriott International plans to open 54 new hotels in India by 2025, adding to the 120 properties it now manages in the country.

Virgin Hotels opened its third location, a 268-room property in Dallas’ Design district. Three Virgin Hotels have opened since Richard Branson launched the brand in 2010, and three more are expected to open in 2020. Warner Bros. plans to open its first themed hotel in 2021, bolstering its array of tourist attractions and dialing up competition with fellow entertainment titans Disney and Universal. The eight-story property alongside the Warner Bros. World theme park in Abu Dhabi will feature DC Comics, Looney Tunes and Hanna-Barbera cartoon motifs.

Montage Hotels & Resorts

Montage Hotels & Resorts plans to open nine new hotels in the next two years, with an eye to widening its international presence. Expansion is in store for both the Montage and Pendry brands, which now total eight operating properties.

Restaurants Chipotle Mexican Grill

Chipotle Mexican Grill will test new restaurant prototypes in five US markets as part of its focus on growing its digital business. Formats include a storefront for urban areas and standalone units with a drive-thru. All will feature walk-up windows and dedicated spaces for order pickup.

Famous Dave’s

Famous Dave’s parent company, BBQ Holdings, has introduced a new concept called Clark Crew BBQ with a prototype in Oklahoma City. The concept, created in partnership with competitive barbecue champion Travis Clark, is the first of several new projects BBQ Holdings plans to unveil before the new year.

HNT Chicken

Brazilian boneless chicken concept, HNT Chicken, plans to open as many as 50 units in the Philadelphia area by the end of next year, and then continue expansion throughout the Northeast. Philadelphia-based Pandya Restaurant Growth Brands recently bought the concept, which launched in 2014 and has dozens of locations in Brazil.

Saladworks

Building on successful pilots, Saladworks aims to open additional restaurants in ShopRite and The Fresh Grocer supermarkets in the Philadelphia area as well as in three more states.

12

Applebee’s

An Applebee’s franchisee has opened a fast-casual prototype called Applebee’s Express in Mobile, Alabama. The 2,500-square-foot unit will focus on delivery, takeout and counter service with a streamlined menu, including sandwiches, salads and burgers.

Tacocraft Taqueria and Tequila Bar

Tacocraft Taqueria and Tequila Bar will open its fourth location in the tri-county region in downtown Fort Lauderdale, Florida, later this year.

True Food Kitchen

True Food Kitchen will open its first Orlando, Florida location in a mall space formerly occupied by Panera Bread and Johnny Rockets. The brand plans to open four more units there.

Stoner’s Pizza Joint

Stoner’s Pizza Joint, which claims to have the “best pizza in America,” will open its first Atlanta location downtown at 120 Piedmont Ave. NE.

Chuck E. Cheese

A Chuck E. Cheese restaurant in Indianapolis was one of the first in the country to unveil the chain’s new look, a rebranding that includes a new menu and an interactive dance floor. The location has also eliminated animatronic robots in favor of live shows and performances by a person playing the brand’s namesake character.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


Restaurants (continued) Hooters/Hoots

After acquiring Hooters of America, Nord Bay Capital and TriArtisan Capital Advisors expect to expand Hoots, the fast-casual concept launched by the company two years ago.

Huey Magoo’s

Huey Magoo’s has opened a location in Ocoee, Florida, featuring the chain’s first drive-thru. The 2,000-square-foot restaurant, which includes indoor and outdoor seating, is operated by Huey Magoo’s

co-founders and franchisees Matt Armstrong and Thad Hudgens, along with territory manager Bill Weld and GM Josh Hutchens.

Pizzeria Locale

Pizzeria Locale is making a comeback with a new location in its home state of Colorado, its first new store since 2014. The fast-casual pizza chain closed all five of its out-of-state locations, but is looking to the future with a new focus on pick-up and delivery orders.

Retail Target Stores

Target will open a 33,000-square-foot store in Times Square in 2022. Small-format stores have helped the retailer grow in urban areas, and the Times Square location will be its 10th small-format store in or around Manhattan.

Toys R Us

Toys R Us opened the first of two planned stores at the Westfield Garden State Plaza mall in Paramus, New Jersey. New owner Tru Kids Brands, which acquired the iconic toy brand’s assets last year, also is slated to open a location in Houston.

J.C. Penney

J.C. Penney is testing new concepts in two stores in Texas, including a revamped dressing room staffed with a stylist and in-store classes on home and beauty techniques.

Boot Barn

Western lifestyle retailer Boot Barn plans to double its store count from 250 to 500 and expand toward the East Coast.

Primark

Primark will expand in Eastern Europe with its first store in Slovakia, in addition to earlier announced locations in Prague and Warsaw, Poland. The fashion retailer also plans to roll out four more stores in US locations, including Chicago, Philadelphia, Florida and New Jersey.

Lands’ End

Lands’ End, which split off from Sears this year, has been looking to its catalog roots as it focuses on building digital sales and opening new stores.

Dollar General

Dollar General plans to open 1,000 more locations in 2020 in both new and existing markets.

Burberry

Luxury fashion brand Burberry has ramped up its focus on sustainability in recent years, committing to goals of carbon neutrality by 2022 and zero emissions by 2050. The brand is working to cut waste and make its production and operations more sustainable, including material sourcing.

Harrods

Harrods will open a standalone store in China in 2020, its first outside of the UK. The location will feature a bar, a tea room and events hosted by upscale brands.

Viva Walmart D on’t look now, but with 134 new Walmart locations opened in Mexico last year, the market became the retailer's biggest outside the US, with 3,407 total stores. Most of the new locations were in the Bodega Aurrera division, a collection of small-format, low-priced centers that include the Bodega Express banner.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

10 restaurant brands to watch in 2020

N

ew year, new tastes, especially when it comes to food. To get a feel for what restaurant brands will be moving to the top of trendy list, Fishbowl Analytics went ahead and did the work for you. The firm's sixth annual list of emerging restaurant brands was culled from the insights of nominations, media mentions and social media buzz. To be considered, chains must have five to 75 locations. Here's who made the list:

1. Cava Grill

Known as the "Chipotle of Mediterranean" food, customers personalize grain bowls, salads and pitas with options like lamb meatballs, falafel and roasted red pepper hummus.

2. Bartaco

Bartaco specializes in street food favorites found in Southern California, Mexico and South America.

3. True Food Kitchen

4. Dig Inn

The fast-casual eatery takes pride in its locally sourced ingredients from its farm in the foothills of the Catskill Mountains.

5. Mendocino Farms

The California-based sandwich shop features friendly customer service, and varied line-up of salads and sandwiches.

6. Urban Plates

This restaurant features grass-fed steak and sustainable produce served cafeteria-style.

meat dishes and sandwiches cafeteria-style, complete with trays.

8. The Little Beet

The Little Beet’s menu includes a much wider variety of veggies sourced locally sourced and a number of vegan friendly choices.

9. Bibibop Asian Grill

Bibibop Asian Grill, inspired from the Korean rice dish bibimbap, allows you to customize your entree from start to finish.

10. Punch Bowl Social

True Food Kitchen is known for its health-focused menu with vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options.

7. Lemonade

» Correction

November/December 2019 Signage Survey

2019 Sign firms listings update The Persona company listing was omitted from our 2019 Signs Firms Listing Report in the November/ December issue of Commercial Construction & Renovation. Here is the listing that also impacts the “Top 10 Rankings” that is on page 76 of the issue. For an updated version, please see our digital version by visiting us online at: www.ccr-mag.com/ccr-currentand-past-issues/

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Lemonade offers a variety of both lemonade flavors and entrees. Diners move through the restaurant selecting their salads, braised

Punch Bowl Social mixes dining and entertainment, where customers can find corn hole, arcade games, pingpong tables and bowling lanes in its locations.

Persona, Inc. Mike Peterson, President 700 21st St. SW Watertown, SD 57201 (605) 882-2244; (800) 843-9888 Fax: (605) 882-3521; (800) 843-9890 www.personasigns.com mpeterson@personasigns.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 345 Signage Clients as of 11/2019: 200 Retail Billings: $12,200,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $35,400,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $29,800,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Family Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,900,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Total Billings: $82,800,000.00, Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Other, Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

They said it “I realized very quickly the accommodations on many campuses were less than adequate for anyone who expected a comfortable experience. It was about creating a place that fed off the campus. We’re not kitschy in any way. We’re not trying to go in and overload the spaces with school memorabilia.”

“You follow your passion, you stay true to your values and your core, but you allow those opportunities to unfold.”

“We have to change the dynamics here. You have to change the dynamics. You have, as retailers, the most valuable asset: commercial-intended consumer behavior data. The question is, how can you, through your marketing efforts, convert that into effectively new online advertising channels that could benefit every brand, every supplier.”

— Paul McGowan, president and founder of Hospitality 3 and Study Hotels, on the concept behind his brand

— Kohl’s CEO Michelle Gass on forging new partnerships and driving an ambitious plan for growth

— Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on the future of retail and how technology can help the industry transform

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CIRCLE NO. 10

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


The numbers game 230 28 The number, in millions, of travelers who are expected to generate $300 billion in revenue by 2026 from Halal tourism, among the fastest-growing segments in the tourism industry, according to a Mastercard study. As the trend rises, hoteliers are gearing up to meet the multiple needs of Muslim guests traveling in accordance with religious laws.

The number of coastal restoration projects that will be solicited for bids in 2020 by the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority. The projects will help restore coastline and prevent flooding. The nearly $2 billion effort entails dredging more than 74 million cubic yards of sediment to create or preserve more than 11,000 acres.

10.2

The amount, in billions, that third-party delivery services, including UberEats and Grubhub generated in sales in 2019, according to Technomic. As new technology and growing demand for convenience continues to drive the trend, restaurants are taking different approaches to cut overhead to fill delivery orders.

CIRCLE NO. 11

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Down in the Boondocks Thank You to Our CCRP Nashville, TN Sponsors:

CCRP visits Old Scottsdale haunt for networking bash

O

n the streets of Old Scottsdale, Boondocks Patio & Grill is the place where locals go to surrender to the pressures of the day. It was the perfect spot for the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) crew to spend their final networking event of 2019. If you are looking to networking as one of your top priorities for 2020, call David Corson today at 404-931-6569 or via email at davidc@ccr-mag.com.

to Thank You to Our Nashville, TN Midtown to CCRPSponsors: ach. hattan Beach. REGISTERED COMPANIES:

Cummings Resources DMA/Plaskolite Dynamic Trades Easton Law EBI Consulting EMG Corp Emser Tile Engineered Structures Inc Entouch F.C. Dadson Fitch Fortney & Weygandt Fulcrum Construction Globeatelie Harmon Group of Companies Hire Quest HTC Flooring Hunter Building Corp

Thank You to Our CCRP Minneapolis, MN Sponsors:

T

Schimenti Construction Joe Rotondo, Vice President 650 Danbury Road LOS ANGELES Ridgefield, CT 06877 HQ / CONNECTICUT (914) 244-1900, ext 319 jrotondo@schimenti.com www.schimenti.com

Thank You to Our CCRP Minneapolis, MN Sponsors:

WE S T /

Retail Contractors Association Carol Montoya, CAE, Executive Director 2800 Eisenhower Ave, Suite 210 VA 22314PA June 13th, 2019 ee you inAlexandria, Philadelphia, (703) 683-5637 • Fax: (703) 683-0018 carol@retailcontractors.org www.retailcontractors.org

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Ideation Design Group Identiti IndieSignage KCS West Construction KennethPark Kinsley Construction Kolikoff L2M Lakeview Construction Lbrands Leslie’s Poolmart Life Time M2C Services McRae Agency Mitsubishi MPC N-Store Services North American Signs

OEI Design Onyx Creative Pantera Global Technology Partner Engineering & Science Inc PC Associates LLC Phoenix Drone Pros Poettker Construction Poma Retail Development Powerhouse Retail Services ProCoat Products RE Crawford Rectenwald Brothers Construction Retail Construction Services Rise High Now Society Rockerz Inc Rogue Architects

RSP Architects Sargenti Schimenti Construction Serigraphics SGA Design Group Shape Shift Company SMA Law Taylor Bros Construction Co Tecta America- AZ Threecore TJX Travelers Haven Tricarico UHC Corp USGN Warwick Construction Weekes Construction

Thank You to Ou Phoenix See you in New York CityCCRP September 12th, 2019 Thank you to our sponsors: Sponsors: u to to OurOur You ville, TNTN shville, ors: nsors:

See you in Philadelphia, PA June 13th, 20

evelopment Manager tfenton@schimenti.com

ank You to Our CRP Phoenix September 12th, 2019 City September 12th, 2019 Sponsors:

10 to1 PR ADG ArcVision ASSA ABLOY Big Red Rooster B.J. Jones Company Bogart Construction Brixmor Capacity Builders CDO Group CED Ceso Inc West CoastChain Store Maintenance Coast 2 Coast rience building high profile retail Construction One for the world’s largest Specialties brands. Construction Connect Source Consulting Group you.

Thank You Thank Yo CCRP Nashv CCRP Nas Sponso Spon

Pantera Global Technology DeWayne Adamson, President 10411 Corporate Dr. #208 Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (877) 219-9777 dewayne.adamson@panteratools.com www.panteratools.com

Construction One, Inc. Don Skorupski, Business Development 101 E Town St, Suite 401 Columbus, OH 43215 (480) 528-1145 dskorupski@constructionone.com www.constructionone.com

Hunter Building Corp. Peter Ferri, President 14609 Kimberley Lane, Suite A Houston, TX 77079 (832) 259-0978 pferri@hunterbuilding.com www.hunterbuilding.com

Serigraphics Adam Halverson, President 2401 Nevada Avenue North Minneapolis, MN 55427 See See you you in New YorkYork CityCit S in New (763) 270-3311 adamh@serigraphicssign.com www.serigraphicssign.com

See you in Miami, FL Februa

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


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1. D  eWayne Adamson, Pantera Global Technology; Tony Poma, Poma Retail Development; Kent Moon, Lakeview Construction 2. Larry Schwartz, ProCoat Products; John Jones, B.J. Jones Company; Peter Ferri, Hunter Building Corp; Lisa Schwartz, ProCoat Building Products 3. Stacy Peterson, Schimenti Construction; Jen Davis, Construction Specialties; Jennifer Sussman, Tricarico; Gina Noda, Connect Source Consulting Group. 4. Mitch Lapin & Matt Frank; Fortney & Weygandt 5. Rick & Marina Winkel, Winkel Construction, Inc. 6. Steve Olson, Ceso Inc; Brad Bogart, Bogart Construction 7. Kelly Burnette, Emser Tile; John Stallman, Lakeview Construction

9. Fred Margulies, Onyx Creative; Jan McKenzie, ASSA ABLOY; John Cox, TJX Corp 10. Kevin Poettker, Poettker Construction; Angelina Talamantes, Rogue Architects; Janine Buettner, ArcVision Inc; Scott Burket, N-Store Services; Mike Taylor, N-Store Services 11. Joshua Smith, Architectural Design Guild; Susan Courter, R.E. Crawford; Sam Estes, Architectural Design Guild 12. Mike Gehrt, F.C. Dadson; Jeremy Williams, Rogue Architects; Katrine Hansen, Partners Engineering & Science; Jeff Sabaj, Dynamic Trades 13. Anthony & Sophia Amunategui, CDO Group; Kevin Rourke, Davis Marketing Associates; Tim West, Coast 2 Coast

8. Sean Taft, Globeatelie; Bobbie Jo Staley, Identiti; Adam Halverson, Serigraphics; David Bailey, Globeatelie JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

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1. Leslie Burton, UHC Corp; Cash Matetich & Don Skorupski, Construction One

8. Kevin Zigrang, N-Store Services; Donny Rorschach, Rogue Architects; Greg Money, Rogue Architects

2. Lorenzo Hickey, SHAPESHIFT World; Anniece Acker, Rise High Now

9. Lachelle Reta, Rogue Architects; Bjorn Bowman, Serigraphics; Bob Smith, Rockerz Inc

3. Aric Platt, Threecore; Rod Lynch, Mitsubishi & reception guest 4. Steve & Sharon Bachman, Ross Stecklein, Retail Construction Services 5. Ray Freeman, Weekes Construction; Kent Moon, Lakeview Construction; Chandler Weekes, Weekes Construction 6. Stephanie Moore, N-Store Services; Lisa Schwartz, ProCoat Products; Milissa Garrity, Chain Store Maintenance 7. Dan Sporrer, Tim & Kaycee Aubel, Rectenwald Brothers Construction

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10. Jeff Mahler, L2M; Doug Copp & Jerry Myers, Kinsley Construction 11. Darina Sokanthong & Joe Deiuliis, KCS West, Inc., a Kajima USA Group Company 12. Becky Easton, Easton Law; John Jones, B.J. Jones Company; Melissa Mulligan, M2C Services 13. Kirk Van Blaircom, Serigraphics; Robert Biggs, Phoenix Drone Pros

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


The need for speed How Andretti Indoor Karting and Games is challenging every consumer’s fun quota By Michael J. Pallerino

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he sounds. The sights. The adrenaline rush. The fact that no matter which direction you turn, there is something to see and do. Kart racing. Zip lining. Laser tag. Duck pin bowling. A rope obstacle course. The Hyperdeck, extreme virtual reality attraction. Yes, you are going to have to check that out. Step into the world of Andretti Indoor Karting and Games and you are entering a place for which fun is the No. 1 priority. Did we mention there are food and drinks for everyone, too.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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THE NEED FOR SPEED Making memories is the theme behind every Andretti Indoor Karting and Games experience. Founded by John Andretti in Melbourne, Florida, in 1999, and named after the legendary racing family, the Andrettis, the all-out-fun facilities offer something for everyone, and more. Take its new location in The Colony, Texas, a sprawling fun park set across 100,000 square feet. And if racing around a track trying to outdo your family or friends is not enough, try the virtual reality (VR) experiences, which include 360 degrees of strong wind machines, elevated projected heat mechanisms and a full-motion platform that lifts and lowers the players to correspond with the action of the story. Or how about Hologate Blitz, a new high flying motion simulator where you pilot a futuristic hover vehicles in a fast paced multiplayer race to the finish line! Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Mark Klinger, Director of Architecture, to get his take on why Andretti is

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Each project is a vision of the Andretti owners and operations to design not only for the concept, but also for the community that we establish a connection.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

the place to be and how the brand is gearing up for a fast-paced 2020.

Give us a snapshot of Andretti Indoor Karting and Games brand? Based in Orlando, Florida, Andretti Indoor Karting and Games (www.andrettikarting. com) was established in 1999. It currently has four state-of-the-art entertainment and event destinations in Florida, Georgia and Texas. Two additional locations will be opening in 2020 in The Colony and Katy, Texas. Andretti has undergone exponential expansion over the last four years and will be debuting several more of their legendary entertainment centers across the United States in the near future. The locations feature varying entertainment options all under one roof, including high-speed super-karts, multi-level tracks, a state-of-the-art arcade, cutting edge virtual reality attractions, challenging ropes obstacle courses, unique two-level


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THE NEED FOR SPEED laser tag arenas, boutique bowling and custom high-tech mini-golf. Each location also offers a fresh, hand-crafted menu, a full bar and inhouse gourmet catering to over 10,000plus square feet of event and meeting space. Our locations are frequently recognized as “No. 1 Birthday Party Venue,” “Best Family Entertainment Center” and “Top Event Destination.”

What type of consumer are you targeting?

Soccer moms, families and 18-34 millennials with an interest in entertainment, technology and cutting-edge trends.

How does the design of your facilities cater to how consumers want to have fun today?

The design of our facilities is based on what is in the market today, and areas of the market that tend to generate the most excitement for clients and, therefore generates the most revenue.

Is there a location that really shows how the brand interacts with the community and customers? One of your favorites?

Our new location in Dallas will be the newest and grandest of our brands and certainly one of my favorite projects to date.

We find new developments are a target for us, as it allows us the opportunity to get into a market with optimistic entertainment requirements.

Walk us through how and why the facilities are designed the way they are?

The Andretti footprint is large due to the complexity of the multilevel karting track design. Half of our building footprint is comprised of our track layout. The Andretti track is designed and installed by 360 Karting out of Europe and considered one of the largest tracks in the world. The remaining half of our footprint consists of multiple bars, restaurant, kitchen, bowling, a new concept of mini-golf, laser tag and arcade of multiple VR interactive attractions. The facility design is complex due to the array of entertainment choices for our customers. The wayfinding and flow of all concepts is critical to our vision and facility design. From plan layout to finishes and signage; the Andretti buildings and design are key to our success.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


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THE NEED FOR SPEED

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

The Andretti construction and design department work with multiple architects, contractors and consultants. Each project is a vision of the Andretti owners and operations to design not only for the concept, but also for the community that we establish a connection within the demographics of the new sites. Each site has its own needs and characteristics that will determine the design, contractor and consultant team that is needed to complete a project.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

The largest issue in construction with the Andretti brand is the complexity of our building model. To be able to design and build a multi-use building takes thought, preparation, and a complete examination of the project design and costing. The difficulty in bringing the design and construction costs together in a way that the project is feasible requires much coordination with the contractors. The issues of specifications and construction standards must be coordinated on a site per site basis to keep building costs at a minimum and stay within the Andretti brand and quality.

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Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

Sustainability is a constant conversation within Andretti and our consultants, not only with building specification and construction, but also within operations. We are constantly looking ahead to sustainable products and building type alternatives. Currently, Andretti is evaluating energy, and all our disposable products used in kitchen, dining and bars for the most up-to-date sustainable products.

Today’s consumer is looking for new and exciting. They are looking for an entertainment destination for all members of their family.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We are looking at many sites within the US. I see opportunities throughout the United States as well as the Americas.

Are you optimistic about what you see in the market today?

Andretti is very optimistic about the market today as family entertainment will always sustain a need on all communities. It is the Andretti directive to modify our venue to meet the always changing game and attraction choices.


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THE NEED FOR SPEED Why did you pick the locations you did for your sites?

What is today’s consumer looking for?

We choose our locations or course based on demographics. Demographics must be able to sustain the complex family entertainment facilities we are building. We select from locations that Andretti feels will benefit the most from the Andretti concept. Site size is another determinant which is a constant consideration in site locations. We find new developments are a target for us, as it allows us the opportunity to get into a market with optimistic entertainment requirements.

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

Our growth is scheduled, beginning in 2020 to open three to four locations per year.

What trends are you seeing?

Trends in the family entertainment industry is certainly to stay on top of gaming types such as virtual reality (VR) trends. This includes changing games on a consistent basis.

Today’s consumer is looking for new and exciting. They are looking for an entertainment destination for all members of their family. It is important for Andretti to cater to all family types and age groups.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

The largest item on my to-do-list today is getting two new facilities open at the same time. Construction, vendor installation and employee training are the challenge of today.

Describe a typical day.

Eighty-percent of my time these weeks consists of traveling to multiple sites under construction. I also have multiple sites under early development and a couple sites in design.

Tell us what makes the Andretti brand so unique? We are unique due to the diversity of unique attractions and diverse choices of gaming, food and drink within the facilities. CCR

One-on-one with... Mark Klinger

Director of Architecture, Andretti Indoor Karting & Games

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? It is being a part of a company that is growing and has the intent on creating the most rewarding atmosphere for our clients. The change to design and construct projects that are above and beyond the guys next door is an opportunity that most would want in their careers. What was the best advice you ever received? “The show starts on the sidewalk.” What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? “Your projects have a quality that bring ‘life’ to a brand.”

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Name the three strongest traits any leader should have. Honesty, as it is the integrity of the basis of trust and building relationships. Accountability, as it is the basis of holding my standards to the upmost respected. And being a good communicator is the glue that keeps everyone working together from project to project, beginning to end. How do you like to spend your down time? I spend my personal time with my family and travel. I depend on travel to develop my ideas for projects, both design and client interaction.

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Living legacies Attendees discuss their industry beginnings

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hey are skilled. Motivated. Passionate. Driven. In an industry where deadlines, budgets and building partnerships are critical, commercial construction professionals are a different and special breed. So, how did they get here? What paths did they take to be the caretakers of what happens in our industry? During our roundtable discussions at our 2019 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat, attendees shared their stories on how they entered the industry.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

The three-day event, sponsored by Commercial Construction & Renovation magazine, was held Sept. 26-29 at The Hu Hotel in the heart of downtown Memphis. The retreat featured a series of networking events and roundtable discussions designed to bring together thought leaders from the retail, restaurant, hospitality and other commercial sectors. On the following pages is the final installment of our roundtable discussion. You can also read the story online at www.ccr-mag.com.


Vinny Catullo

Darrel Chaney

Kevin Fleming

Director of Marketing & Sales

Business Development

VP of Business Development

Megan Haggerty

Stephen Hekman

Tim Hill

Founder

VP Retail Services

Executive VP, Business Development

Brandon Ingram

Dedrick Kirkem

Eric Korth

Real Estate Associate

Facilities Manager

Retail Facilities Manager

Abram Lueders

Skip Mason

Nate McNeil

Planning & Development Analyst

Director of Sales, National Accounts

Director of Retail Operations

Michael Morelli

Randy Pannell

Elizabeth Parker

Director of Business Development

Managing Executive

Facility Designer

Converge Consultants

Christine Smith

Russell Williams

Nicole Young

Construction Coordinator

Manager of Design & Production

Business Development

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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LIVING LEGACIES CCR: Tell us your story. How did you get into the industry?

Abram Lueders, Downtown Memphis Commission: I moved from Hawaii to the far suburbs of Omaha, Nebraska with my brother when I was 17. I didn’t have my driver’s license, so I spent a lot of time walking along those highways in a completely suburban area. It made me think a lot about the built environment and city use. Why were there no sidewalks, and things like that. I read a lot about cities, downtown areas and historic development patterns, things like that. I read the book, “The Death and Life of Great American Cities” by Jane Jacobs. The idea of where we live and how we create these places really appealed to me.

I ended up getting a four-year degree in broadcasting and worked for a couple of years in public broadcasting. Then I went to Georgia Tech to get my master’s in city and regional planning, where I ended up getting interested in real estate development and finance. I took some courses in that. I read about pro formas. When I finished grad school, I was hired by the Downtown Memphis Commission doing the things I wanted to do. I get to work in the public sector for the public good. I get to work with developers, with numbers and data. It has been a really fun journey. Stephen Hekman, Kingsmen Projects: Initially, I didn’t want to get into construction or fixtures. I was going to get into advertising and work in branding, but it just seemed like those jobs didn’t pay very well. I ended up

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landing a job working for CPI (Corporate Property Investors) right out of college. I worked the Burlington Mall when they raised the second level, and I was thrown into this project where they brought in 65 retailers all at the same time. It just so happened that I knew some people and got the job. That was my developer exposure. And then the market started to turn in 1990. I went back to California and helped open about 400 stores for a blind retailer called “Three-Day Blinds,” all the way to Texas and Arkansas. We didn’t have cellphones back then, just SkyPagers and fax machines. The market turned again in 1996, and I went to work for a fixture fabricator in New Mexico. That’s where I started getting into the fixture business—with a British-owned company. The first contract was with Rubio’s restaurants. Next was Bugle Boy, followed by Hot Topic, where we did 600 stores. Sketchers was another brand along those lines I worked with. I owe a lot to them. It was the first brand I worked overseas with, doing stores in Europe. Kingsman ended up getting my name, so that is where that relationship started. So while I am not really doing advertising, I am working with and learning about brands. That’s the fun part of the business—the part I am passionate about. The brand is the story. It is about telling that story.

Skip Mason, FloorMax USA: I got started in the flooring industry in 1995. I didn’t have any flooring experience and I was asked to run a retail outlet. I learned a lot by trial and error.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

Meghan Haggerty, Legacy Capital Investment: I’ve always been extremely interested in problem solving, statistics and stability. After I lost my stepfather when I was in high school, I sat down and thought, “In the end, where do I want to be? What do I want to be able to say that I accomplished?” I always knew that I wanted to build a legacy. From then on, I began looking for opportunities to grow. I went to college a year early and studied mechanical engineering. I quickly realized in college that the problem solving mindset I developed while studying engineering could be applicable in many other areas aside from engineering. Every time I went to New York City and saw the way the buildings were built, I found it fascinating. I always loved the idea of physical assets that produced real valueboth for the investors and the end users. I ended up leaving college to pursue real estate. I read every book I could get my hands on—listened to every audio book—took every class. The more I learned, the more I realized it is who you know and not what you know. So I began networking.


CIRCLE NO. 17


LIVING LEGACIES I truly believe that people will elevate you to places you want to be. I spent a lot of time and effort networking. I was fortunate enough to meet some executives and senior members from top real estate firms. They invested with me early on, not just monetarily. They took me under their wings and showed me what it looked like to build a company, and buy and run deals. I have been working with them and a lot of other amazing people to purchase real estate. There is something I have been really passionately following, something I believe is as recession-resilient as possible—affordable housing. It is the part of commercial real estate that doesn’t really get talked about much. That being said, this is a journey of continuing to develop and expand, putting myself around people who are brilliant. Expansion is the name of the game—surrounding myself with people who have a solid track record. It’s a rinse and repeat until I am the best.

Vinny Catullo, CDO Group: I started out of college with Legends Hospitality. It was a newly formed partnership between the New York Yankees and Dallas Cowboys and I was part of their operations team. I helped open the new Yankee Stadium and I worked at Cowboys Stadium when it first opened as well. After that, I relocated to North Carolina and I opened up another baseball stadium in Winston-Salem. I was kind of like the firefighter who would go wherever there was an issue at a stadium on the operations side of food and beverage and work toward fixing it. It usually was with our special events, suite or high-end services. It got to a point where I wanted to take a step toward career growth, which led me to enter the growing healthcare industry as a consultant. That was very different but allowed to focus on training, developing, and growing a team which ultimately led me to CDO Group.

Tim Hill, The Beam Team: I started less than 47 years ago as a merchandizer doing resets with fixtures and merchandise three or four decades ago. I have worked my way up. Over the years, I have lived in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Cleveland, Boston, and now Chicago. At CDO, I am able to be hands-on with our culture, growth, and establishing our processes to better serve our partners. It has allowed me to utilize everything I have learned throughout my career which was what I really wanted. Russell Williams, Skechers: I was going back to school to get my master’s in healthcare and working part-time at Belk. I did not know this at the time, but the store had never made its numbers (in the Tommy Hilfiger department) before I went to work there. I worked in the department for maybe like six months. Somebody at the Tommy

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


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LIVING LEGACIES

Kevin Fleming, Quality Equipment Management: I have spent most of my career calling on the large home improvement retailers, either selling a product as a manufacturer or as a manufacturer’s rep. I was the conduit between the manufacturer and the home center.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

Hilfiger corporate office asked at a meeting what was going on with the store. It ended up doubling its sales goal during the first six months I worked there. There was not a huge volume, but this store had never made its numbers before. Somebody at Tommy Hilfiger called the store and asked how we did it. They told them there was this new kid working in the department at night. A month later someone from Tommy Hilfiger flew down to see me. A few weeks later, they invited me to New York to interview for a job. They interviewed me on Friday, and I moved two weeks later. After Tommy Hilfiger, I went to GUESS?, which moved me to move to LA. I said no. After a brutal New York winter, I told them I’d be there in a month. After my dad got sick, I started teaching at a fashion school so I could have a more flexible schedule. When my dad passed away, I joined Skechers and have been here for three years. Kevin Fleming, Quality Equipment Management: I recently took on a new challenge with Quality Equipment Management (QEM). The company specializes in providing construction project equipment, e.g., open top dumpsters, temporary storage containers, lift equipment, portable restroom facilities and office trailers. I had spent the past three years working on the GC side of the business, selling construction and installations services. Now I’m focused on the equipment side. Prior to that, I came out of the flooring industry, where I worked for seven years promoting a leading national brand of carpet with a major home improvement retailer. I have spent most of my career calling on the large home improvement retailers, either selling a product as a manufacturer or as a manufacturer’s rep. I was the conduit between the manufacturer and the home center. I gained critical experience by working in the stores performing a lot of hands-on merchandising of product, moving things around on the shelves to ensure that the vendors we were representing were well represented inside the store. I’ve been in an account management/ business development role throughout my career, working with four or five companies


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LIVING LEGACIES over the years. I love what I’m doing now and find fulfillment in hunting new opportunity to apply our company’s vision and creating value for our clients. Randy Pannell, Converge Consultants: I’ve been either in the architectural or construction business my entire working career, which spans 47 years. I started when I was 17. I started as a draftsman when I was 17, back when they used pencils and paper, protractors and stuff like that. I worked at a handful of different companies, including Red Lobster, where I was a design manager there. When I moved to the construction side, I went to work for McCrory Stores, the Melville Company out of Rye, New York, and Saks, where I stayed for 21 years. The retail stuff is hard to get out of your system—it’s definitely a passion. And it will be for at least a few more years, servicing the retail, especially on the luxury retail side of the business. Mike Morelli, Signage Solutions: I have been in the sign business since 1986, so it has been a bit of a journey. I got into the sign business because of my love for art and had to start at the bottom basically sweeping floors, coating out boards and pouncing patterns. I moved up from there until I was able to start swinging a brush and hand-painting signs working under some exceptional talent. This was before computers and vinyl, when your ability was based on your talent and creativity. We never had routers or anything like that. We’d make a paper pattern by hand, put it on the aluminum, cut it out with a jigsaw, and welded the returns holding them together with magnets. It was a cumbersome process but at the time no one knew any different. I have seen the entire industry morph into something incredible. Production time, due to modern fabrication techniques, has increased client expectations. Today, everything’s pre-coated. Neon is becoming a thing of the past and illuminated signage is all LED. Everything is lightweight, so it’s a snap to get it done. I morphed into the sales vertical and really fell in love with that part of it. This is what I really enjoy,

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Elizabeth Parker, Quest Workspaces and Interior Designed Spaces: I actually wanted to be a fashion designer when I was younger. My mother caught me cutting up her shammy for the car.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


CIRCLE NO. 20


LIVING LEGACIES building relationships—that feeling of accomplishment when a project is completed on time and within budget. Having the knowledge and experience helps me become more of a partner for sign programs. Everyone wants the same outcome and the only way to do that successfully is to work as a cohesive team with your clients. I have to exceed expectations every day. Christine Smith, Cedar Realty Trust: I was a buyer for Anne Klein Factory Stores very early in my career, shortly after college. I transitioned over to store development with that firm, and found my niche. From there, I went to work for a couple of general contractors who did retail work nationwide, in project management. I was then fortunate enough to work for two different retailers (A.C. Moore and Spencer Gifts) in project management and store development. Today, I am in project management and development for a REIT. So I have virtually seen all sides of this industry; working as the

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Meghan Haggerty, Legacy Capital Investment: This is a journey of continuing to develop and expand, putting myself around people who are brilliant. Expansion is the name of the game— surrounding myself with people who have a solid track record. It’s a rinse and repeat until I am the best.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

general contractor, the retailer or tenant, and now the landlord/developer. Eric Korth, Cole Haan: I started off with a really bad skiing problem. That’s all I wanted to do, so when I decided college wasn’t for me, and I could ski, I said to my now wife, “Hey, why don’t we go out to Colorado or Wyoming? I’m good enough to get someone’s attention, and I’m dumb enough try anything. I could probably get sponsored if we moved out West.” She wanted nothing to do with moving out west. So I stayed local and went to work for my family business. At the time, my wife was still in school, and I was mad as hell that we were still paying rent. Due to the nature of our business, I was working every weekend and I had Tuesdays and Wednesdays off. I made a pact with myself to work seven days a week for one full year. I worked for a real estate company on Tuesdays and Wednesdays so I could save enough money to buy a home. After a year, the real estate company


CIRCLE NO. 21


LIVING LEGACIES

Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services: Think Prime Retail Services is one of the greatest stories to tell in our industry. I’m proud to say I helped start the company and still have the opportunity to represent them.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

approached me with the idea to work for them full time. So I did. My tenure with the RE company coincided with the recession of 2008. It was a real tough time to work for a real estate company. They were handing out pink slips a lot at the end of each quarter. I wasn’t sure what I was going to do. I applied for the job at Starbucks as a facility service manager for the Boston market. At the time, it was the No. 5 market in the US. My then boss didn’t think I had what it took to be successful with such a level of visibility, and she passed on me. At the same time, my boss got a construction PM job at Starbucks and told me he would come from me. Six months later, the person that was hired over me failed, so she came back to me. Out of tragedy came something that was wonderful. Three months into my tenure with Starbucks, the Marathon Bombing took place. The second of two bombs was place within feet of my Boylston Street Starbucks. As luck would have it, or not, all of our operations partners were in New York City for this big event that they couldn’t get away from. That left me, the new kid to pick up the pieces. I was able work directly with the FBI and Boston PD since they were utilizing my store as the staging point to gather evidence. I’m proud to say that my store was the first business to reopen on Boylston Street. The US leadership team in Seattle started to asked, “Who is this kid in Boston?” It was at that moment my boss realized she made the right decision in putting me in Boston. That experience really catapulted my career. When I was offered the opportunity to go to Cole Haan, I thought the experience would really help boost my skill set and industry knowledge. In my mind, I had done worked in commercial real estate offices and restaurants but never retail. This was a chance to work for a high-end retailer. A chance I couldn’t justify passing on. Our headquarters happened to be two miles from my house, which dramatically benefited my work-life balance. At Cole Haan, we’re a department of two. My direct supervisor is very seasoned, and has a plethora of knowledge he’s willing to share with me. With his guidance and


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LIVING LEGACIES tutoring, I’ve been able to make serious strides in improving our department’s productivity and cost savings strategies. Tim Hill, The Beam Team: I started less than 47 years ago as a merchandizer doing resets with fixtures and merchandise three or four decades ago. I used to get up on Monday morning, travel all week long, get back Friday night, week after week after week. I ended up getting a really good job with Stanley Works, the tool folks. I did that same kind of job with Stanley. I remember buying my first cellphone with my own money. It cost me $800.00. Why? Because I used to have to roll quarters and carry a bunch of rolls around with me to use the pay phone. I can still remember having to make those calls in the rain at a gas station pay phone. You’d talk on the phone for as long as you could until some other salesman behind you who was impatient beeped the horn.

I’ve been in a similar type of industry my whole career. I have worked my way up. Over the years, I have lived in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Cleveland, Boston, and now Chicago. Deidrick Kirkem, John Varvatos Enterprises: I have been in facilities now for the last 20 years. I got into it via an insurance company. I’ve worked in five different industries in facilities: insurance, health care, a trading company and finance. I met John while I was working for the finance company Creditex, which ironically is in our building. We hooked up on LinkedIn. There have been a lot of ups and downs, but for the most part, I love what I do.

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Nate McNeil, Asa Carlton: After graduating high school, I immediately entered into the trades. I worked in the general construction industry as a field manager for a while, but then decided to leave my hometown of Athens, Georgia in hopes of getting a better opportunity in a new field. I took a job as a manager of a landscape company, where I worked for about a year. This job opened the doors to new connections and I was given the opportunity to work for a well-known up-and-coming blinds company. This company allowed me to meet many Nationwide Residential Building Contractors, and through these connections sprouted many opportunities. I ended up working for one of the most prominent residential home building companies, which bought more than 1,000 tract homes in the Atlanta market. I became a front- and back-end builder with this company, where I worked for a year or so. This job pushed me to move to the Gwinnett County area, where I met the vice president of business development for Asa Carlton Inc. He gave me the opportunity to get involved with the company because of my previous experience and connections with multiple commercial retail clients. I have been able substantially grow from there, and I now manage a team of 10 project managers who work for me. I also have about 200 people across the country who are employed under my specific division in the field. It has been a quick, fast and maturing experience, but I’ve enjoyed all of it. There is a challenge every day, and I think that’s my favorite part of truly mastering the commercial construction industry.

Stephen Hekman, Kingsmen Projects: Initially, I didn’t want to get into construction or fixtures. I was going to get into advertising and work in branding, but it just seemed like those jobs didn’t pay very well.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

Elizabeth Parker, Quest Workspaces and Interior Designed Spaces: I actually wanted to be a fashion designer when I was younger. My mother caught me cutting up her shammy for the car. I got into big trouble and had to use an old sock or something to finish designing my Barbie dress. I wanted to be a fashion designer through high school. I went to college and received my general education degree, and then years later actually went back to school and graduated with my two year fashion design degree. I felt that I had a lot of things under my belt. Fast forward to the job I got after my divorce. I was a merchandising manager for a company that had seven stores. While doing that, I was recruited to be a merchandising manager for a sporting goods store, which I knew nothing about, nor had any interest in (sports that is ). But I was a buyer, and a merchandising manager, and I liked that.


CIRCLE NO. 23


LIVING LEGACIES Eventually, I had the opportunity to design the new store they were opening. It was the most fun I had ever had in my career-time flew by. I designed it like an urban playground. I found chain link fence merchandising fixtures and turned it into a super cool sporting goods store. Along the way, I fell in love with interior design. That is what I wanted to do. So at 30 years old, I went back to school—Florida State University—and got my interior design degree. I graduated in one year because I already had all the credits from the two other degrees. I moved to South Florida, worked for a couple of companies, then was eligible to sit for the exam and took my licensing exam. I passed. I left the firm I was working with in 2006 to start my own business, which is where I am today. Nicole Young, FaciltyRx Services: I knew I was an overachiever early on. I started with Merry-Go-Round and succeeded there. They always had a plateau. You had to hit $100,000 to be the top salesperson. I accomplished that because they told me I couldn’t do it. Then I went on to my next career, which was at Olive Garden and hit $100,000 in sales there. They told me I couldn’t do that. Next was Red Lobster and Crack Barrel. I did at both places, too. There were all of these little pieces. Got married. Started a construction company. Got divorced. When the market went down, I lost my construction company. I said to myself, “What does a girl do with all of those things on her background?” I really didn’t know what I was going to do. So I went into the insurance industry for mobile homes. Didn’t like that. A headhunter reached out to me with a great opportunity in the facility industry. They brought me on. I don’t even know what he hired me for. I really don’t even know what I was doing there, but I figured it out. And then I got fired. They walked into my office and fired me, after everything I did. I had no idea what I was going to do. But I found my way.

Eric Korth, Cole Haan: My direct supervisor is very seasoned, and has a plethora of knowledge he’s willing to share with me. With his guidance and tutoring, I’ve been able to make serious strides in improving our department’s productivity and cost savings strategies.

Skip Mason, FloorMax USA: I got started in the flooring industry in 1995. I didn’t have any flooring experience and I was asked to run a retail outlet. So I cut my teeth in the

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


CIRCLE NO. 24


LIVING LEGACIES

Randy Pannell, Converge Consultants: I’ve been either in the architectural or construction business my entire working career, which spans 47 years. I started when I was 17.

industry. I was thrown to the wolves. But I was very successful with the store. I had no management experience, but I was hiring people. I did everything. I learned a lot by trial and error. Then came the opportunity to work with Shaw Industries. They opened up a territory in the Harrisonburg, Pennsylvania market. I was a territory manager for them for just about 15 years. I kept getting asked do you want to move up? Do you want to get promoted? But every time I was going to have to move. We wanted to stay and raise our family, so I passed on the opportunities. Five years ago, a person retired from our company and I saw an opportunity. I thought if I am going to do something, now is the time. So I moved into corporate accounts for Shaw Industries, taking over the Sherwin Williams account. I ran corporate accounts for five years. And through that period I was able to grow their business. I was going to retire when a customer from my retail days came to me and asked if I wanted to go to work for his company. I had been at Shaw for almost 20 years. I did a lot of soul-searching and thought, “I better do something now.” So I took the leap back and went to work for FloorMax USA. Going from a manufacturer to the service side has been a real learning experience for me. Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services: After 16 years in professional baseball and not making very much money back in my day, I had to go to work. I was brought up to work hard, play hard and pray

50

hard. That’s what Ernie Banks, my baseball idol, told me at my Little League Banquet in 1960. My dad had always told me that, too, but it really hit home with me when one of the greatest baseball players of all time told me. So, I had no problem looking for a job and going to work in the “real world.” After 30 years in the real estate industry working in the corporate relocation world, my company was sold and I was out of a job again. I met Donald Bloom, who is now the president and CEO of Prime Retail Services. Back then, Donald was the CFO of a competitor and decided to start his own company. He asked me to come on board and handle marketing and sales. Marketing wasn’t my strong suit but, sales was. We founded Prime Retail Services in 2003. About seven years ago, I sold me interest in the company to concentrate on my public speaking and book, “Welcome to the Big Leagues — Every Man’s Journey to Significance, The Darrel Chaney Story.” The author is Dan Hettinger, a pastor. It has impacted many lives. About a year and a half later, I got a call from Donald asking me to come back and help with some sales consulting, as the company was on an aggressive growth plan. I accepted and have been doing that ever since. Donald is one of the finest men I have ever known, and I’ve been around a while. I think Prime Retail Services has one of the greatest stories to tell in our industry. I really do. I’m proud to say I helped start the company and still have the opportunity to represent them, if even in a small way. CCR

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


CIRCLE NO. 25


STAY TUNED!

Brought to you by:

We will be hosting a brand new CCR live global talk show starting in March 2020. If you would like to participate as a guest or show sponsor, contact us at davidc@ccr-mag.com as we are developing show lineups for the inaugural launch on the web. More show details to follow with your upcoming host, David Corson. CIRCLE NO. 26


CIRCLE NO. 27


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Meet some of the industry’s leading architectural firms

I

f If you are looking for some of the commercial construction industry’s leading architectural firms, we have you covered. Our annual listing provides a snapshot of each firm, including contact information and contact person. If your firm did not make this year’s list, contact publisher

American Hotel Register Co..........................$80,000,000.00 Premier Project Management.......................$25,000,000.00 Rebel Design+Group....................................$17,300,000.00 Stantec Architecture Inc...............................$15,839,110.00 NELSON Worldwide......................................$12,415,480.00 Leo A Daly...................................................$12,035,000.00 Smallwood..................................................$11,302,157.00

MULTI-HOUSING

NELSON Worldwide......................................$4,510,660.00 Rebel Design+Group....................................$2,700,000.00 MBH Architects............................................$2,515,000.00 LGA Partners, LP..........................................$1,400,000.00 Ware Malcomb............................................$1,358,115.00 GPD Group...................................................$1,200,000.00 Leo A Daly...................................................$1,167,000.00

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RESTAURANT

Interplan LLC...............................................$10,000,000.00 GPD Group...................................................$9,000,000.00 Rebel Design+Group....................................$5,300,000.00 stevens Architects........................................$5,000,000.00

CESO, Inc.....................................................$2,800,000.00 Stantec Architecture Inc...............................$131,448,140.00 Leo A Daly...................................................$39,082,000.00 Little Diversified Architectural Consulting Inc..........................................$10,752,000.00 WD Partners................................................$9,000,000.00 NELSON Worldwide......................................$6,899,969.00 GPD Group...................................................$6,700,000.00 Ware Malcomb............................................$6,597,699.00 Fishbeck......................................................$4,500,000.00 Hobbs + Black Architects.............................$4,000,000.00 Architecture, Incorporated............................$3,820,000.00 Stantec Architecture Inc...............................$643,564,482.00 NELSON Worldwide......................................$223,299,998.00 Ware Malcomb............................................$130,511,319.00 GPD Group...................................................$126,100,000.00 Leo A Daly...................................................$110,000,000.00 New Ground.................................................$88,700,000.00 American Hotel Register Co..........................$80,000,000.00 Little Diversified Architectural Consulting Inc..........................................$78,113,000.00 Core States Group........................................$58,769,210.00 Stevens Architects.......................................$56,000,000.00

GSB, Inc.......................................................$7,450,000.00

Smallwood..................................................$4,914,523.00

Core States Group........................................$12,726,135.00

FHA Architects ............................................$2,900,000.00

Alternate Resources.....................................$7,900,000.00

stevens Architects........................................$20,000,000.00

WD Partners................................................$13,500,000.00

MBH Architects............................................$2,965,000.00

JN+A...........................................................$9,800,000.00

Stantec Architecture Inc...............................$21,647,770.00

Chipman Design Architecture.......................$17,000,000.00

HEALTHCARE

NELSON Worldwide......................................$67,324,950.00 Core States Group........................................$32,431,156.00 Sargenti.......................................................$28,000,000.00 Stantec Architecture Inc...............................$26,649,181.00 MBH Architects............................................$24,444,000.00 Little Diversified Architectural Consulting Inc..........................................$24,310,000.00 SGA Design Group.......................................$24,200,000.00 WD Partners................................................$23,200,000.00 GPD Group...................................................$18,900,000.00 CESO, Inc.....................................................$18,500,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

HOSPITALITY

RETAIL

David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


Architecture | Prototype Development | Sustainability

CELEBRATING

25 years of opening doors!

877.584.8600 | SGADesignGroup.com © 2020 SGA Design Group. All rights reserved.

CIRCLE NO. 28

CCR-25 | 02/20


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS //3877 Architectural Design Guild

David Shove-Brown, Principal & Partner 3333 K St. NW, Suite 60 Washington, DC 20007 (202) 350-4244 www.3877.design • info@studio3877.com Year Established: 2011, No. of Employees: 22 Retail Billings: $42,975.00, Hospitality Billings: $3,013,017.81 Restaurant Billings: $593,830.25, Healthcare Billings: $78,715.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $174,201.93, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,902,739.99 Completed Projects in 2019: 53 Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Health & Wellness, Bar Design, Residential Projects Leading Clients: IHG, Marriott, OTO Development, AppleREIT, KNEAD Hospitality + Design

Sam Estes, Vice President 2710 Sutton Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63143 (314) 644-1234 www.adg-stl.com • sestes@asg-stl.com Year Established: 1981, No. of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $3,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $250,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $4,250,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 125 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Floor & Décor, CVS, Office Depot, PetSmart, Shoe Carnival, Hertz

4TWELVE Architecture Architecture, Incorporated

Damon Drennan, Principal 931 N Edgefield Ave. Dallas, TX 75208 (888) 707-0104, Fax: (214) 948-5530 www.412arch.com • info@412arch.com Year Established: 2018, No. of Employees: 3 Retail Billings: $50,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $600,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $500,000.00, Total Billings: $1,150,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 37 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Custom Residential Leading Clients: TGI Fridays, RA Sushi, Benihana

William Drury, AIA, President 1902 Campus Commons Dr., Suite 101 Reston, VA 20191 (703) 476-3900 www.archinc.com • marketing@archinc.com Year Established: 1986, No. of Employees: 65 Retail Billings: $415,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,497,150.00 Restaurant Billings: $766,850.00, Healthcare Billings: $3,820,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $155,000.00, Federal Billings: $1,080,000.00 Other Billings: $8,368,000.00, Total Billings: $16,102,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 85 Specialize In: Grocery, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal Leading Clients: Lidl, Artis Senior Living, ClubCorp

Kristine Welker, Principal 250 E. Hartsdale Ave., Suite 30 Hartsdale, NY 10530 (914) 713-1001 www.alternateresources.com • kristine@alternateresources.com Year Established: 1991, No. of Employees: 3 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $7,900,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $7,900,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 15 Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: Hilton, Marriott, Best Western

Dir. Of Business Development 1950 Craig Rd. #, 300 St. Louis, MO 63146 (800) 489-2233 • Fax: (314) 415-2300 www.arcv.com • jbuettner@arcv.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: 950 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, All Retail, Office Leading Clients: Five Below, Lovisa, Panera, Taco Bell, Boot Barn, Arby’s

ArcVision Inc. Alternate Resources Janine Buettner,

American Hotel Register Co. CASCO Diversified Corporation

Deidre Schwartz, Director of Design 100 S Milwaukee Ave. Vernon Hills, IL 60061 (800) 323-5686 www.americanhotel.com/interior-design dschwartz@americanhotel.com Year Established: 1865, No. of Employees: 1,050 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $80,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $80,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 85 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels Leading Clients: Wyndham Hotels & Resorts, Intercontinental Hotel Group, Marriott, Hilton, Red Roof, Radisson

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Daniel E Cutter, P.E. 12 Sunnen Dr., Suite 100 St. Louis, MO 63143 (314) 821-1100 • Fax: (314) 821-4162 www.cascocorp.com • info@cascocorp.com Year Established: 1959, No. of Employees: 125 Retail Billings: $13,400,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $221,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $100,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $805,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $4,150,000.00, Total Billings: $18,676,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 1,837 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Industrial, Municipal/State, Assisted Living, Health & Fitness, Auto Service Leading Clients: Burlington, Dollar General, Dollar Tree, O’Reilly Parts, Primrose Schools, Rooms to Go, Ross, The Home Depot

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


GSB, INC. ARCHITECTS & PLANNERS Turning Visions Into Reality Since 1979.

HOSPITALITY | COMMERCIAL | ENTERTAINMENT CIVIC | RESIDENTIAL | EDUCATIONAL | COMMUNITY CIRCLE NO. 29

inc

Architects Planners ®

www.gsb-inc.com


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS CESO, Inc. Corwil Architects

Steven R Olson, AIA, President 175 Montrose W Ave., # 400 Akron, OH 44321 (330) 933-8820 www.cesoinc.com • olson@cesoinc.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 212 Retail Billings: $18,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $250,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,800,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $200,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $250,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $15,000,000.00, Total Billings: $37,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 1800 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Industrial/Warehouse Leading Clients: Bloomin Brands, Speedway, Love’s, Valvoline, Kohl’s, Burlington

Don Sackman, AIA, Architect 4210 Laguna St. Coral Gables, FL 33146 (305) 448-7383 www.corwilarchitects.com dsackman@corwilarchitects.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 30 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: N/A

CREATE Architecture Planning & Design Frankie Campione, Principal

Chipman Design Architecture 45 W. 34th St. Penthouse

Kate Kerin, Principal/HR & Corp. Affairs 1350 E Touhy Ave., 1st Floor East Des Plaines, IL 60018 (847) 298-6900 • Fax: (847) 298-6966 www.chipman-design.com • info@chipman-design.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 135 Retail Billings: $7,300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $17,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $25,300,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 537 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Sustainable Design, 3D Photo-Accurate Renderings, Virtual Reality and Immersive Project Walk Throughs Leading Clients: N/A

Coast2Coast Survey Corporation

Tim West, Director, Multi-Site 7704 Basswood Dr. Chattanooga, TN 37416 (423) 710-4714 www.coast2coast.net • twest@coast2coast.net Year Established: 2000, No. of Employees: 90+ Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: 1000+ Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Ware Malcomb, Ace Hardware, JLL, Gresham Smith

Core States Group

Natalie Rodriguez, Marketing Manager 3039 Premiere Pkwy., Suite 700 Duluth, GA 30097 (813) 319-8755 www.core-states.com • nrodriguez@core-states.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 283 Retail Billings: $32,431,156.00, Hospitality Billings: $262,662.00 Restaurant Billings: $12,726,135.00, Healthcare Billings: $874,580.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $12,474,677.00, Total Billings: $58,769,210.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 2,682 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Primark, Fossil, JP Morgan Chase, Verizon, Darden, McDonald’s, Panera Bread, Hardee’s, Pilot Flying J, 7-Eleven, Buc-ee’s, TD Bank, Citizens Bank, At Home, Rite Aid, Best Buy, Simon Property Group, Chipotle, Chick-fil-A, Jack-in-the-Box, In-N-Out Burger, Pollo Tropical, Taco Bell, Red Robin, The Melt, Cava Grill, Circle K

58

New York, NY 10001 (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com • info@createapd.com Year Established: 1996, No. of Employees: 15, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: 48, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Leading Clients: Serramonte Center

Darkhorse Lightworks, LLC

Dawn Hollingsworth, Principal 14352 Killion St. Sherman Oaks, CA 91401 (818) 514-2272 www.darkhorselightworks.com • dawnh@darkhorselightworks.com Year Established: 2016, No. of Employees: 1, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $30,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $120,000.00, Total Billings: $150,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 2 Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Office, Leading Clients: N/A

ESa

Sandy Dickerson, Director of Marketing 1033 Demonbreun St., Suite 800 Nashville, TN 37203 (615) 329-9445 • Fax: (615) 329-0046 www.esarch.com • sandyd@esarch.com Year Established: 1961, No. of Employees: 190 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: N/A, Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education, Corporate Office, Leading Clients: N/A

FHA Architects

Harlan Faust, President 14344 Y St., Suite 204 Omaha, NE 68137 (402) 895-08788 www.fhaarchitects.com fhainfo@fhaarchitects.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 16 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: $2,900,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $2,900,000.00, Completed Projects in 2019: 75 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Chipotle, Sweetgreen, Tacodeli, Blue Stone Lane, Pratz, Peets, Snooze AM Eatery

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


CIRCLE NO. 30


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Fishbeck Group 7 Design, Inc.

Jennifer Waugh, Director of Marketing 1515 Arboretum Dr. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49546 (615) 575-3824 www.fishbeck.com • info@fishbeck.com Year Established: 1956, No. of Employees: 460 Retail Billings: $8,200,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,100,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $4,500,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $2,600,000.00, Total Billings: $17,900,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 161 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: AMC, Hertz, Meijer Inc., Wyndham, Wendy’s

Fisher Architecture, LLC

Keith P. Fisher, Principal/Architect 542 Riverside Dr. Salisbury, MD 21801 (410) 742-0238 • Fax: (888) 879-7149 www.fisherarchitecture.com kfisher@fisherarchitecture.com Year Established: 2009, No. of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: $300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $700,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $250,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $350,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $275,000.00, Federal Billings: $175,000.00 Other Billings: $200,000.00, Total Billings: $2,250,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 165 Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Federal, Residential Leading Clients: Hyatt, Marriott, Cambria, Hampton Inn, Holiday Inn, Hilton, Comfort Inn, La Quinta, Jimmy Johns, Starbucks, Dairy Queen, Harley Davidson, Long & Foster, Toyota, Chevrolet, Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Ford, Chrysler, Saladworks

Luanne Perry, VP Design and Operations 83 Cedar St., Suite 100 Milford, MA 01757 (508) 458-4545 • Fax: (508) 458-4546 www.group7design.net • 1perry@group7design.net Year Established: 2008, No. of Employees: 6 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: 38 Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: The Talbots, Seven Hills Foundation

GSB, Inc.

Ronald G Smith, AIA, NCARB, President 3555 NW 58th St., Suite 700W Oklahoma City , OK 73112 inc (405) 848-9549 • Fax: (405) 848-9783 www.gsb-inc.com • gsb@gsb-inc.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 38 Architects Planners ® Retail Billings: $603,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $7,450,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $927,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $97,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $748,000.00, Total Billings: $9,825,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 37 Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Entertainment, Leading Clients: Disney, Marriott, Love’s

Hixson Architecture, Flick Mars Engineering, Interiors

James Flick, Partner 10440 N Central Expy Dallas, TX 75231 (214) 653-1900 www.flickmars.com • jhonelle@flickmars.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $3,257,320.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,257,320.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 6 Specialize In: Casinos, Hotels, Restaurants, Luxury Multi-Family, Leading Clients: N/A

Scott Schroeder, Vice President and Manager, Client Development 659 Van Meter Street Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 241-1230 • Fax: (513) 241-1287 www.hixson-inc.com • info@hixson-inc.com Year Established: 1948, No. of Employees: 120 Retail Billings: $2,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $18,000,000.00, Total Billings: $20,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 12 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s, Brookfield Properties, CVS Health

GPD Group Hobbs + Black Architects

Steve Turner, Director 1801 Watermark Dr., Suite 210 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 588-8081 • Fax: (330) 572-2101 www.gpdgroup.com steve.turner@gpdgroup.com Year Established: 1961, No. of Employees: 700+ Retail Billings: $18,900,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $9,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $6,700,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $1,200,000.00, Federal Billings: $1,100,000.00 Other Billings: $88,200,000.00, Total Billings: $126,100,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 2,500+ Specialize In: Big Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Other Leading Clients: RaceTrac, CVS, Starbucks, YUMI Brands, PNC Bank, Meijer, 7-Eleven, The Home Depot, JOANN Stores

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Amanda Ciliberti, Marketing Manager 100 N State St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (734) 663-4189 www.hobbs-black.com • aciliberti@hobbs-black.com Year Established: 1965, No. of Employees: 69 Retail Billings: $6,400,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $155,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $4,000,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $620,000.00, Federal Billings: $1,400,000.00 Other Billings: $3,500,000.00, Total Billings: $16,075,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Education, Senior Living, Office, Worship, Leading Clients: The Taubman Co, State of Michigan, Restoration Hardware, Macomb Community College, Henry Ford Health System, Valleywise Health

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


CIRCLE NO. 31


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Hospitality Design Group Jencen Architecture

Robert L Herbage, AIA , Principal/Architect 4035 Naco Perrin Blvd., Suite 200D San Antonio, TX 78217 (210) 831-3580 • Fax: (210) 399-9063 www.hospitalitydesigngroup.com rherbage@hospitalitydesigngroup.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 4 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $160,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $123,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $283,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 48 Specialize In: Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

Hospitality Design Guild

Katherine Cortese, Executive Creative Director 95 S Federal Hwy., #100 Boca Raton, FL 33432 (561) 416-1429 www.hdesignguild.com katherine@hdesignguild.com Year Established: 2017, No. of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $1,500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 0 Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Spa/Wellness, Branding for Hospitality, Leading Clients: Hilton, Marriott, Hyatt

HVS Design

Warren Feldman, Principal 7361 Calhoun Place, Suite 310 Rockville, MD 20855 (240) 683-7123 • Fax: (301) 670-9643 www.hvsdesign.com • wfeldman@hvs.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 20 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $2,700,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $2,700,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 35 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

Interplan LLC

Rachel Reife, Senior Business Development 604 Courtland St., Suite 100 Orlando, FL 32804 (407) 645-5008 • Fax: (407) 629-9124 www.interplanllc.com • rreife@interplanllc.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: 170 Retail Billings: $7,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $550,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $10,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $50,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $4,300,000.00, Total Billings: $22,400,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 1,800 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Banks, Swim Schools, Co-Working Office Space, Wellness, Cryotherapy, Storage Units, Car Wash, Warehouse, Gaming Leading Clients: N/A

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Juleen Russell, Principal 2850 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH 44115 (216) 781-0131 • Fax: (216) 781-0132 www.jencen.com • jrussell@jencen.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 20 Retail Billings: $1,210,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $550,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,760,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 102 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Branded Environments Leading Clients: Alex and Ani, Kay Jewelers, Zale’s, Jared, Piercing Pagoda, Refresh Dental, Precision Orthodontics, Seritage Growth Properties, Johnston & Murphy, Journeys, Cora Physical Therapy

JN+A

Scott P. Rosenberg, President 7361 Calhoun Place, Suite 310 Rockville, MD 20855 (301) 670-1635 • Fax: (301) 670-9643 www.nehmer.com • srosenberg@nehmer.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 30 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $9,800,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $9,800,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 55 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurant Leading Clients: N/A

JW Displays, Incorporated

Joel Warnick, President 822 A1A North, Suite 310 Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (888) 412-4009 www.jwdisplays.com • sales@jwdisplays.com Year Established: 2016, No. of Employees: 7-10 Retail Billings: $150,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $20,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $30,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $50,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $250,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 100+ Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: N/A

L2M Architects

Jeff Mahler, Vice President 811 Cromweil Rd. #113 Glen Burnie, MD 21061 (410) 863-1302 www.l2m.com • jmahler@l2m.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 24 Retail Billings: $4,100,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $200,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $400,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $500,000.00, Total Billings: $5,200,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 200 Specialize In: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: KIMCO, Hannaford, PM Pediatrics, Panera, Enterprise

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


We’ve always been all in one.

Now we’re Since our company began in 1956, we have adapted to your changing needs. At our core, we are trusted as engineers, architects, scientists, and constructors solving problems while making the world a better place. While the name is new, our approach is still the same: all-in-one service with an emphasis on integrity, innovation, and excellence.

800.456.3824 fishbeck.com

CIRCLE NO. 32


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS LEO A DALY

John McGauvran, Director of Marketing 8600 Indian Hills Dr. Omaha, NE 68114 (402) 390-4433 • Fax: (402) 391-8564 www.leoadaly.com • jtmcgauvran@leoadaly.com Year Established: 1915, No. of Employees: 446 Retail Billings: $2,200,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $12,035,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $39,082,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $1,167,000.00, Federal Billings: $22,036,000.00 Other Billings: $33,480,000.00, Total Billings: $110,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 235 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal Leading Clients: Capital One Services, Hilton, Marriott, Publix, Dollar General, Blackstone, United Airlines, Delta Airlines, Arthrex, American Savings Bank

LGA Partners, LP

Paulette Burns, Partner 1425 Forbes Ave., Suite 400 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 243-3430 • Fax: (412) 224-4747 www.lga-partners.com • pauletteb@lga-partners.com Year Established: 1993, No. of Employees: 62 Retail Billings: $3,700,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $460,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $500,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $500,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $1,400,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,700,000.00, Total Billings: $8,260,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 407 Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Airport Retail & Restaurant Leading Clients: Aeropostale, Rue21, Bluemercury, Brahmin, Claire’s, DTLR, FRAPORT USA, J Jill, TUMI, American Eagle, Kendra Scott, PPG

MatchLine Design Group

Lesley H Wyman, Principal/Partner 10300 N Central Expy., Suite 335 Dallas, TX 75231 (972) 707-0568 www.matchlinedesign.com • lesley@matchlinedesign.com Year Established: 2009, No. of Employees: 8 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $905,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $30,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $935,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 32 Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Newcrest Image, Magnolia Hospitality, O’Reilly Hospitality Mgmt., AWH Partners

Mayse & Associates, Inc.

David Goldston, Partner/VP-Marketing 14881 Quorum Dr., Suite 800 Dallas, TX 75254 (972) 386-0338 • Fax: (972) 386-0578 www.mayseassociates.com dgoldston@mayseassociates.com Year Established: 1983, No. of Employees: 27 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: 54 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Chick-fil-A, Inc., H-Mart Companies, Insignia, Hospitality Group, Landry’s Restaurants, Zoë’s Kitchen

Architects Little Diversified MBH Gina Kuhlmann, Architectural Consulting Inc. Communications Designer

James Franell, CID, FRDI, IIDA, MCSD, NCIDQ, Partner & Retail Practice Leader 615 S College St., Suite 1600 Charlotte, NC 28202 (704) 561-6350 • Fax: (704) 561-8700 www.littleonline.com • james.farnell@littleonline.com Year Established: 1964, No. of Employees: 417 Retail Billings: $24,310,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $10,752,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $43,051,000.00, Total Billings: $78,113,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 712 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Hospitality, Mixed-Use, Adaptive Re-Use, Banking, Financial Centers Leading Clients: CVS Health, Truist Financial Corp. (Formerly BB&T/ SunTrust) Marriott International, United Healthcare Group, First Citizens Bank, Public Storage, Concentra Inc., Wells Fargo, Trader Joes

960 Atlantic Ave. Alameda, CA 94501 (510) 865-8663 • Fax: (510) 865-1611 www.mbharch.com • communications@mbharch.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 221 Retail Billings: $24,444,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $41,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,965,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $153,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $2,515,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $13,829,000.00, Total Billings: $43,947,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 1,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Office, Workspace, Laboratories Leading Clients: CorePower Yoga, Lululemon, Peet’s Coffee, WeWork, Yard House, Levi’s

MBI Companies, Inc. Louis Cortina, CFO

LSArchitecture, PLLC 299 N Weisgarber Rd.

Terri Lewis Stevens, CEO/Architect P.O. Box 1287 Mandeville, LA 70470 (409) 299-0162 www.lsarchitecture.com lsainfo@lsarchitecture.com Year Established: 2004, No. of Employees: 4 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: 15 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Religious Facilities Leading Clients: N/A

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Knoxville, TN 37919 (865) 584-0999 • Fax: (865) 584-5213 www.mbicompanies.com louisc@mbicompanies.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 92 Retail Billings: $1,414,091.00, Hospitality Billings: $364,915.00 Restaurant Billings: $192,428.00, Healthcare Billings: $839,603.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $845,510.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $11,519,319.00, Total Billings: $15,175,866.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 275 Specialize In: Grocery, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Industrial, Local and State Government, Sign Engineering, Leading Clients: Pilot, Weigel’s, Fresenius North America, Honda, Nissan North America

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


513 MAIN STREET SUITE 300 FORT WORTH, TX 76102

WWW.ROGUEARCHITECTS.COM

CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS MCX Interior Nvironment

R. Shane McNamara, Co-Founder and Managing Principal 11 Broadway, Suite 615 New York, NY 10004 (310) 928-3988 • Fax: (202) 215-8288 www.mcxinterior.com • contact@mcxinterior.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 50-100 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $13,000,000.00, Total Billings: $13,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 25 Specialize In: Corporate Interiors and Luxury Showrooms Leading Clients: N/A

Christopher P Collins, AIA, NCARB, Principal 27 E Russell St., Suite 300 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 725-4644 www.nvironmentdesign.com christopher@nvironmentdesign.com Year Established: 2008, No. of Employees: 10 Retail Billings: $300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,600,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,900,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 42 Specialize In: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

1201 S Marquette Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 (612) 822-1211 www.nelsonworldwide.com • info@nelsonww.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 1100 Retail Billings: $67,324,950.00, Hospitality Billings: $12,415,480.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,233,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $6,899,969.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $4,510,660.00, Federal Billings: $7,145,600.00 Other Billings: $122,770,339.00, Total Billings: $223,299,998.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 4000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Workplace/Office Leading Clients: Simon Premium Outlets, North American Properties, Macy’s, Dicks Sporting Goods, Hilton, Saks Fifth Avenue, Yum! Brands

25001 Emery Rd., # 400 Cleveland, OH 44128 (216) 223-3200 • Fax: (216) 223-3210 www.onyxcreative.com mailbox@onyxcreative.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: $8,737,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $265,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $2,000,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $715,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $3,135,000.00, Total Billings: $14,852,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 634 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: Dick’s Sporting Goods, Fabletics, Pet People, Biolife, Abercrombie & Fitch, Bed Bath, Lifestance, Northern Tool, Roadhouse, Taco Bell, Hanger

Onyx Creative NELSON Worldwide Carole Sanderson, CFO

New Ground

Amanda Jasper, Director of Corporate Communications 15450 S Outer Forty Dr., Suite 300 St. Louis, MO 63017 (636) 898-8100 • Fax: (636) 898-8111 www.newground.com • ajasper@newground.com Year Established: 1913, No. of Employees: 150 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $88,700,000.00, Total Billings: $88,700,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 25 Specialize In: Financial Institutions and Corporate Spaces Leading Clients: Chartway Federal Credit Union, TTCU The Federal Credit Union, City & County Credit Union

PFI Displays, Inc.

Anthony R Tricomi, CEO 40 Industrial St. Rittman, OH 44270 (330) 925-9015 • Fax: (330) 925-8520 www.pfidisplays.com • artricomi@pfidisplays.com Year Established: 1970, No. of Employees: 20 Retail Billings: $3,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $100,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $100,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,800,000.00, Total Billings: $5,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 30 Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: Macy’s, Bosch, Vector

Premier Project Management Nudell Architects Jeremy Robinson, SVP of Sales & Marketing

Howard Nudell, President 31690 W 12 Mile Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48334 (248) 324-8800 www.nudellarchitects.com jhnudell@jhn.com Year Established: 1976, No. of Employees: 20 Retail Billings: $2,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $4,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 107 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: DNC, Brixmor, Site Centers, Taubman

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14185 Dallas Pkwy., Suite 1400 Dallas, TX 75254 (972) 778-9549 www.premierpm.com • jeremyrobinson@premierpm.com Year Established: N/A, No. of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $25,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $25,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 60, Specialize In: N/A Leading Clients: Hyatt, Hilton, IHG, Marriott, Autograph, Bardessono, Lakeway Resort & Spa, Le Meridien Minneapolis, Le Pavillon New Orleans, One Ocean Jacksonville, Pier House Key West, The Ashton Hotel, The Churchill, The Melrose Georgetown Hotel Washington D.C., The Silversmith Hotel Downtown Chicago

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


CIRCLE NO. 34


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Raymond and Associates P.A. Sargenti

Alex P Raymond, Architect 2279 Ranchette W Dunedin, FL 34698 (727) 786-1937 Ext. 22 • Fax: (727) 787-5205 www.rayarch.com • alex@rayarch.com Year Established: 1985, No. of Employees: 3 Retail Billings: $28,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $35,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $63,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 2 Specialize In: Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Single Family Homes, Leading Clients: Sarku Japan

Rebel Design+Group

Douglas DeBoer, Founder/Owner/CEO 2554 Lincoln Blvd. Marina Del Rey, CA 90292 (800) 92-REBEL www.rebeldesign.com douglas@rebeldesign.com Year Established: 1985, No. of Employees: 127 Retail Billings: $1,400,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $17,300,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $5,300,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $2,700,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $26,700,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 19 Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Cruise Ships, Aircraft, Mixed-Use Leading Clients: Waldorf Astoria, Ovolo Hotels, Ruby Hotels, Main Event Entertainment, Festival Malls

Agata Torbus, Marketing Manager 461 From Rd. Paramus, NJ 07652 (201) 701-5539 www.sargarch.com • atorbus@sargarch.com Year Established: 1997, No. of Employees: 150 Retail Billings: $28,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $31,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 1800 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Planet Fitness, H&M, Sephora, Burlington Coat Factory, GAP, L. Brand, Target

SGA Design Group

Daryl Bray, COO 1437 S Boulder, Suite 550 Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 587-8600 • Fax: (918) 587-8601 www.sgadesigngroup.com • darylb@sgadesigngroup.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: $24,200,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $48,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $331,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $644,000.00, Total Billings: $25,223,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 788 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Walmart, Target, Hobby Lobby, Burlington, BSRO, Aldi, Casey’s, Hanger Clinic, Walgreens

Smallwood

Rogue Architects Gil Garrison, AIA, CEO

Brooke Kelley, Business Development Coordinator 513 Main Street, Suite 200 Ft. Worth, TX 76102 (817) 820-0433 • Fax: (682) 224-8917 www.roguearchitects.com brooke@roguearchitects.com Year Established: 9, No. of Employees: 40 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: N/A Specialize In: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: N/A

3495 Piedmont Rd. NE, Building 10, Suite 700 Atlanta, GA 30305 (404) 233-5453 • Fax: (404) 264-0929 www.smallwood-us.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 137 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $11,302,157.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $4,914,523.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $8,206,966.00, Total Billings: $24,423,646.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 10 Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Education, Mixed-Use, Office, Retail, Government, Industrial, Parking Decks, Performing Arts, Worship Leading Clients: N/A

RRMM Architects Stantec Architecture Inc.

Chris Crouch, Director of Business Development & Marketing 1317 Executive Blvd., Suite 200 Chesapeake, VA 23320 (757) 213-6358 www.rrmm.com • ccrouch@rrmm.com ARCHITECTS Year Established: 1988, No. of Employees: 120 Retail Billings: $1,800,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,500,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $100,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $300,000.00, Federal Billings: $1,400,000.00 Other Billings: $31,300,000.00, Total Billings: $36,400,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 1,485 Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Convenience Stores Leading Clients: Dollar Tree, Family Dollar, McDonalds, Arby’s, Taco Bell, Ferguson, 7-Eleven, DTLR

RRMM

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Darren Burns, Vice President 1100-111 Dunsmuir Street Vancouver, BC V6B 6A3 (604) 696-8009 www.stantec.com • darren.burns@stantec.com Year Established: 1954, No. of Employees: 22,000 Retail Billings: $26,649,181.00, Hospitality Billings: $15,839,110.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,688,943.00, Healthcare Billings: $131,448,140.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $21,647,770.00, Federal Billings: $21,853,514.00 Other Billings: $423,437,824.00, Total Billings: $643,564,482.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 5,848 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Airport, Industrial Buildings, Justice and Civic, Entertainment Leading Clients: CIBC, Hines, Ivanhoe Cambridge, Comcast, JPMorgan Chase, Marriott, McDonald’s, Walmart, Walgreens

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


636.898.8100 888.613.0001

Delivering the Next Generation of Design

We have deep expertise in creating the branches of the future and agship headquarters that deliver on the promise of leading nancial and corporate brands.

CIRCLE NO. 35


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Stevens Architects Valerio Architects, Inc.

Leroy Stevens, Architect 209 Huron Ave Port Huron, MI 48060 (810) 987-3755 www.stevensarchitects.com • ljstevens@stevensarchitects.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 5 Retail Billings: $1,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $5,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $20,000,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $30,000,000.00, Total Billings: $56,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 30 Specialize In: Grocery, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: N/A

Alicia Zaayer, Project Manager 5858 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 954-8996 Ext. 122 www.valerioinc.com • azaayer@valerioinc.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 45 Retail Billings: $3,101,252.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $2,117,785.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $648,710.00, Total Billings: $5,867,747.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 220 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Retail, Med Spa, Fitness, Office Leading Clients: Bottega Veneta, Gucci, Fendi, Blink Fitness, Nespresso, Starbucks

The McIntosh Group Ware Malcomb

Karen MacCannell, Sr. Associate 1850 S Boulder Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 585-5555 Ext. 320 www.mcintoshtransforms.com • karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 17 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,300,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: N/A, Specialize In: N/A Leading Clients: N/A

Tricarico Architecture & Design

Jenn Sussman, Marketing & Business Development 502 Valley Rd. Wayne, NJ 07470 (973) 692-0222 • Fax: (973) 629-0223 www.tricarico.com • jennifers@tricarico.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: $9,360,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $615,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $525,000.00, Total Billings: $10,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: Tapestry, Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, C-2 Education, Warby Parker

Urban Architectural Group

John Urban, AIA, Principal 1242 Mann Dr., Suite 200 Matthews, NC 28105 (704) 841-1899 www.urbanaia.com johnurban@urbanaia.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 7 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2019: 101 Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: N/A

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Maria Rodgers, Public Relations Manager 10 Edelman Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 660-9128 • Fax: (949) 863-1581 www.waremalcomb.com • mrodgers@waremalcomb.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: 594 Retail Billings: $8,854,510.00, Hospitality Billings: $470,586.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,581,277.00, Healthcare Billings: $6,597,699.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $642,641.00, Federal Billings: $80,786.00 Other Billings: $112,283,820.00, Total Billings: $130,511,319.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 4,329 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Advance Manufacturing, Auto, Branding, Signage, Build to Suit, Building Measurement, Civil Engineering, Industrial, Office, Planning, Renovation, Science & Technology, Workplace Leading Clients: Charter, Verizon, Honeywell, Prologis, L’Oreal, Cubic Corporation.

WD Partners

Mark Bateman, VP, Business Development 7007 Discovery Blvd. Dublin, OH 43017 (614) 634-7000 • Fax: (614) 634-7777 www.wdpartners.com talktous@wdpartners.com Year Established: 1968, No. of Employees: 468 Retail Billings: $23,200,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $13,500,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $9,000,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $4,000,000.00, Total Billings: $49,700,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 2,126 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: The Home Depot, CVS, Walmart

Weber Architects & Planners

Neil Weber, President P.O. Box 930 Wayzata, MN 55391 (952) 476-4434 www.weberarchitects.com • nw@weberarchitects.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 9 Retail Billings: $126,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $100,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $80,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $300,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $3,000,000.00, Total Billings: $606,000.00 Completed Projects in 2019: 10 Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


amily I Healthcare -F lti u M I ty li a it nt I Hosp Retail I Restaura

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SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES

Fixture manufacturers take spotlight in annual listing

F

ixtures, fixtures, who needs fixtures? If you are looking to check this critical item off your project’s to-do list, check out our comprehensive manufacturers’ listing. Our annual report gives you the contact person and contact information you need to get started. To see how to get listed in the next report, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. 555 International Artitalia Group Inc.

James Geier, President 4501 S Western Blvd. Chicago, IL 60609 (773) 869-0555 Fax: (773) 376-0555 www.555.com info@555.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Garment Racks, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Wire, Wood, Lighting MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Pro Sports Retail and Concessions

Automated Cutting Technologies

Rodney Worley, President 1300 John C Watts Dr. Nicholasville, KY 40356 (859) 881-1228 Fax: (859) 881-0671 www.actky.com info@actky.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Federal, Multi-Housing

Allegheny Store Fixtures Darcy DiFazio, CEO 57 Holley Ave. Bradford, PA 16701 (814) 362-6805 Fax: (814) 362-6806 www.allstorefix.com info@allstorefix.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/ Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Casinos

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Enzo Vardaro, SVP-Chief Commercial Officer 11755 Rodolphe Forget Montreal, Canada H1E 718 (514) 643-0114 www.artitalia.com enzo@artitalia.con FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wire, Wood, Custom Design and Manufacturing MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Material Handling and Postal

B Free Hanger Design & Display Ltd. Bert Spitz, Owner 1410 Broadway, 24 Fl. New York City, NY 10018 (855) 714-2428 www.bfreehangers.com bert@bfreehangers.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Custom Garment Hangers, Garment Racks, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Corporate, Commercial & Residential Interior Design

Beam Team, Inc.

Tim Hill, Executive VP, Business Development 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com timhill@thebeamteam.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


Bernhard Woodwork Ltd. Combination Mark Bernhard Door Company 3670 Woodhead Dr. Northbrook, IL 60062 (847) 291-1040 Fax: (847) 291-1184 www.bernhardwoodwork.com sales@bernhardwoodwork.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Perimeter, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Dan Schmidt, President/CEO 1000 Morris St. Fond du Lac, WI 54976 (920) 922-2050 Fax: (920) 922-2917 www.combinationdoor.com doors@combinationdoor.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Architectural Millwork, Wood, Fitting Room & Commercial Doors MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

Ceiling Outfitters D/13 Group, Inc. Thomas Stanley, President

Lance La Fave, Principal

2445 Midway Rd., Suite 103

245 West Central Street

Carrollton, TX 75006 (972) 588-1555 Fax: (866) 525-0687 www.ceilingoutfitters.com tstanley@ceilingoutfitters.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: POP, Sign Hanging Solutions MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Manufacturing

Natick, MA 01760 (617) 307-1150 Fax: (617) 307-1149 www.d13group.com design@d13group.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Architectural Millwork, Integrated Sink Systems MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Columbia Forest Products Dakota Systems MFG Todd Vogelsinger, Marketing Director 7900 McCloud Dr., #200 Greensboro, NC 27409 (800) 637-1609

Edward Owsinski, President 1885 New Hwy. Farmingdale, NY 11735 (631) 249-5811

Fax: (336) 605-6969

Fax: (631) 249-5819

www.cfpwood.com

www.dakotamfg.com

tvogelsinger@cfpwood.com

info@dakotamfg.com

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Architectural Millwork, Veneers, Wood, Decorative Hardwood Panels MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Econoco Corporation idX Corporation Barry Rosenberg, CEO 300 Karin Ln. Hicksville, NY 11801 (800) 645-7032 Ext. 310

Jessica Burgett, Marketing Communications Manager One Rider Trail Plaza Dr., Suite 400 Earth City, MO 63045 (314) 739-4120

Fax: (516) 935-7697

Fax: (314) 739-4129

www.econoco.com

www.idxcorporation.com

sales@econoco.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Shopping Malls

contactidx@idxcorporation.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants,

Formica Corporation Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Housing, Auto, Convenience, Owen Serey, PR Manager 10155 Reading Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45241 ®

Flexible Workspaces

ILM Light Boxes Jennifer Foster, GM

(800) FORMICA

10831 Canal St.

www.formica.com

Largo, FL 33777

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings, Laminate, Solid Surfacing MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

(727) 549-1808 www.ilmusa.com jfoster@ilmusa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Light Box MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants,

Gondola Train Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls Brad Walsh, Vice President 135 Tennyson St. Potosi, WI 53820 (608) 763-4216

Paula Schmidt, Director of Marketing 1224 Mill St.

Fax: (608) 763-4255

Jasper, IN 47546

www.gondolatrain.com

(800) 422-5727

gondola@gondolatrain.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Kiosks, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Warehouse

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Indiana Furniture

Fax: (812) 482-9035 www.indianafurniture.com paula.schmidt@indianafurniture.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Federal

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


JGX Group KRG Enterprises Inc. Scott Watson, President 2267 Vantage

Director Sales and Procurement

Dallas, TX 75207

9901 Bluegrass Rd.

(214) 308-2727

Philadelphia, PA 19114

Fax: (214) 308-2721 FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Kiosks, POP, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Housing

JW Displays, Incorporated Joel Warnick, President Trade Show Displays | Office Branding | Printing | Promotional Products

Ken Sysyn,

822 A1A North, Suite 310 Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (888) 412-4009

(215) 708-2811 Ext. 215 www.krgenterprises.com ksysyn@krgenterprises.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants

Lozier Corp. Tracy Keith, Director of Marketing

www.jwdisplays.com

6336 Pershing Dr.

sales@jwdisplays.com

Omaha, NE 68110

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cable & Rod System, Cashwraps/

(402) 457-7986

Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Islands/Back Islands,

www.lozier.com

Kiosks, POP, Wallcoverings

info@lozier.com

MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Pallets &

Kingsmen Projects US Pallet Racking, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood Stephen Hekman, Executive Vice President 3525 Hyland Ave., Suite 225 Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (619) 719-8950 www.kingsmenprojects-us.com stephen@kingsmen-usa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, POP, Shelving, Slatwall MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, E-Entertainment

MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Shopping Malls

Madix, Inc. John Clontz, Director of Marketing 500 Airport Rd. Terrell, TX 75160 (214) 515-5400 www.madixinc.com jclontz@madixinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Wire, Wood, Refrigeration Shelves MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Shopping Malls

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

75


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Masonways Prime Retail Services Inc. Indestructible Plastics Jeff Terry, Director of Sales & Marketing Judd E Hinger, President 580 Village Blvd., #330 West Palm Beach, FL 33409 (800) 837-2881 Fax: (561) 478-8775 www.masonways.com

3617 Southland Dr. Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 Fax: (866) 584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com jterry@primeretailservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/

judd.ettinger@masonways.com

Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas,

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Display Cases, End Caps,

Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter,

Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Pallets & Pallet Racking, POP, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants

POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

N-STORE Services Rich Ltd. Kevin Zigrang, Director of Business Development 160 Chesterfield Industrial Boulevard Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 778-0448 Fax: (636) 728-0449 www.nstoreservices.com

Kelly Burt, V.P. Sales 3809 Ocean Ranch Blvd., Suite 110 Oceanside, CA 92056 (760) 722-2300 Fax: (760) 722-2301 www.richltd.com kburt@richltd.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout

kevin@nstoreservices.com

Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Rid Racks/Grid

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Store Fixture Installation

Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork,

MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

Porcelanosa David Carmona, National Sales Director 600 Route 17 N Ramsey, NJ 07446 (201) 995-1310 www.porcelanosa-usa.com info@porcelanosa-usa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings, Floor Coverings, Solid Surface Material, Plumbing Fixtures MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

76

SAJO Inc. Rocco Raco, Director, Marketing & Business Development 1320 Graham Mont-Royal, QC Canada H3P 3C8 (877) 901-7256 Fax: (516) 385-1843 www.sajo.com rocco@sajo.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood, Glass MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


Spacewall West Trial Design Inc. Sue Waller,

John French, Director

Sales/Marketing Mgr.

570 boul. des Erables

350 E Crowther Ave.

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, QC Canada J6T 6G4

Placentia, CA 92870

(450) 370-1377 Ext. 231

(714) 961-1300

www.trial-design.com

Fax: (714) 961-0976 www.spacewallwest.com

jfrench@trial-design.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout

swaller@spacewallwest.com

Counters, Display Cases, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter,

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Slatwall

Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood

MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Corporate

Sparks Retail Angel Carra, SVP Retail 2828 Charter Rd. Philadelphia, PA 19154 (215) 671-8827 www.retail.wearesparks.com acarra@wearesparks.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Furniture/Upholstery, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail

TC Millwork, Inc. Leo Couchara, VP Sales 3433 Marshall Lane Bensalem, PA 19020 (215) 245-4210 Fax: (215) 245-4723 www.tcmillwork.com l.couchara@tcmillwork.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout

MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls

Viridian Wood Kristen Gilchrist, Director of Sales 9111 SE McBrod Ave. Portland, OR 97222 (503) 468-3539 www.viridianwood.com kristen@viridianwood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Furniture/Upholstery Tables, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Housing

Warner Bros. Design Studio Craig McNabb, VP Design Studio 4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, CA 91522 818-954-1815 Fax: 818-954-2806 www.warnerbrosdesignstudio.com craig.mcnabb@warnerbros.com

Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas,

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Innovative ways VR is being used in the construction industry By Ashley Halsey

S

ci-Fi books, movies and series are always trying to theorize how technology can impact the world we live in. In fact,

a lot of technology’s latest ideas have been inspired by Sci-Fi writers and films, including the concept of virtual reality. What is fascinating is looking at the ways in which technology like virtual reality (VR) will impact each industry. It would be reductive to keep virtual reality for the gaming sector—virtual reality can actually be applied across all industries. In the construction industry, virtual reality is set to have a huge impact, drastically changing standard, traditional practices. While much technology is several years away from being available for commercial use, tests and case studies are available that show the change VR will make. In the future, it will be a significant tool in construction’s toolbox. Since construction is an industry frequently suffering from setbacks and budget extensions due to problems with the blueprint as it becomes a reality, or unforeseen problems when the building begins, VR can predict these problems and hugely limit the problems faced. “Just imagine: Rather than taking weeks, months or years to complete a project and then discover the cracks in the foundations, you could go into the house with VR and check every angle—before any physical changes or building ever take place,” says Ronnie Wong, a tech writer at Writinity and LastMinuteWriting.

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GAME CHANGER Here are some of the most innovative ways VR will change the construction industry:

1. 3D modeling using laser scanning & BIM adaption A more immersive, interactive and detailed virtual representation of a project is just a click away with 3D modeling and BIM adaption. It is the next level of 3D modeling—as traditionally, after the blueprints are drawn up, 3D models of house or buildings are made to help with construction, so VR will be used to create a model before building. Like 3D models, they will be detailed, virtual models of the final structure. Unlike 3D models, the user can actually walk around inside the environment, experiencing all aspects of the structure—from the important things like the foundations, to the little things like where the best lighting is. You can walk into a building, literally, before it is built. This is important for several reasons: It is much more cost-efficient, as anyone using the VR software can see potential problems or changes that need to be made before building. This is also useful for clients—there is no more it does not look like what I imagined phrases coming from customers mouths, as they have seen the design and approved it before it is built. They can check if there is room for everything they want. No more miscommunications when building. VR models are built using two things called laser scanning and BIM adaption. Laser scanning is actually a lot cheaper and more accurate than traditional practices of landscape topography, and can be combined with drones to provide a really clear image of the reality of the landscape. You then "build" the virtual reality with BIM (Building Information Modelling) on programs like Autodesk’s Revit Live.

using VR to help stakeholders understand exactly what is going to be built and what they need during the planning period, and so that remote team members can see changes and updates. Since this nonprofit work all over the world in challenging environments, it is crucial that they can communicate with their team and supporters, and keep their supporters safe from challenging environments.

3. Improve customer relations

Rather than simply having to trust a construction company was doing a good job during the building process, VR can now allow customers and stakeholders to see what a construction company is going to do. Instead of paper drawings and plans, clients can, as noted, literally walk into a building and check what it looks like. This empowers clients to make better decisions and improves the company’s ability to meet their expectations. VR can also be used for customers to see if the project is unfolding the way they wanted, and progressing as planned. In traditional building processes, there are often problems with the timeline, due to alterations being done and problems being faced. Since there will be fewer alterations, it is much easier for companies to stick to timelines, keeping their customers happy. Managers can also use VR to monitor the building process— stopping workers slacking off. What is more, VR allows commercial property owners to put their space on the market long before its even constructed. A VR program allows potential tenants or buyers to see what their prospective home will look like—no more waiting for building to be done to market a property.

VR gives teams the ability to collaborate, in a virtual environment, and point out details and problems they see with the project.

2. Greater collaboration

Never before has it been easier for teams to "see" a project without actually going to it. VR gives teams the ability to collaborate, in a virtual environment, and point out details and problems they see with the project. This real-time communication and feedback reduces rework, and vastly improves accurate building. Traditionally, when building across difficult or remote sites, teams might be communicating across huge distances. Site conditions could also make visits to the site difficult. With VR, all of these problems are eliminated. One awesome example of VR making a real difference is the NGO Build Change, which construct projects all over the developing world, particularly in disaster-prone areas. They have lately been

4. Safer training of workers

The last exciting benefit of VR to note is the training of heavy-equipment workers, i.e. crane operators, in virtual reality settings. Many engineers and construction workers might gain a degree or diploma from an institution without much practical experience. This is where VR comes in—with VR, engineers, architects and all other construction workers can gain more experience hands-on. This is also at no risk to themselves as they can operate dangerous equipment without any harm coming to them. It is also much cheaper than physically training people in the real world. “There are some cool companies opening up specifically with training people virtually in mind," says Otis Day, an IT expert at Draftbeyond and Researchpapersuk. "CertifyMe.net is one such company that specializes in forklifts with a VR program. It is used to eliminate injuries, equipment damage and other dangerous effects of using forklifts without experience.” CCR

Ashley Halsey is a professional writer at Luckyassignments.com and Gumessays.com.

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ES T

2010

CIRCLE NO. 38


Now hiring Making construction appeal to a new generation By Kyle Slager

A

s the construction industry continues to face a skilled labor shortage, despite offering high starting salaries and promising career paths, it begs the question: What is keeping new talent from seeking out jobs in construction?

One theory is that construction has historically been viewed as a technology-resistant field and that young adults want to seek out more tech-savvy jobs. If construction firms embrace new technology and workplace ideologies, they could have greater success at attracting and retaining new talent.

Tech is just better—period

Many seasoned members of the construction industry reflect back upon a time in which software solutions for project management were clunky, difficult-to-use and generally not useful. In fact, these sorts of platforms turned most contractors off of the idea of utilizing

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digital tools in general, and for years, have continued using traditional pen and paper management solutions. But just as any other software has evolved, software for the construction sector has had quite a few transformations over the years. Aside from talent retention, it is critical for contractors to adopt modern technology on their job sites both to stay afloat and get ahead. As the industry advances into the digital era, the firms that do not adapt will struggle as the competition completes more projects on time and on budget. Technology helps streamline every aspect of a construction project, from planning, to reporting, to accident prevention, production tracking, close-out, and more.

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NOW HIRING Embracing new technology and implementing software and other digital tools into daily workflows is the first step a construction firm can take to acquire and retain talent. If you want to find the best possible talent for your firm, you need to advertise that you are tech-savvy and open to new innovations. And you need to make sure you are selecting tech tools that were built for the end user. If it is a field app, it needs to be designed as a mobile-first, field-first solution. Whether you are listing jobs online, or recruiting from colleges/trade schools, showing off your tech tools can help bring in the sharpest, most ambitious young professionals.

More than just technology

In addition to simply implementing new technology, construction companies can take a page out of the tech industry’s book, and start embracing modern methods of attracting and retaining talent, such as strengthening company culture. Over the last decade or so, great company culture has become one of the most important perks people look for in a job, and for good reason: Companies that treat their employees well are more successful and have less turnover. Millennials are often partial to choosing jobs outside of the construction industry simply because other fields have started prioritizing company culture and employee happiness. Although fun perks are always a great way to keep your staff happy, company culture means more than just hosting happy hours or offering flexible PTO. By promoting a healthy culture, you improve morale and help employees feel a sense of belonging at your firm. In this day and age, culture is just as crucial for worker retention as adopting new tech or offering high salaries.

Over the last decade or so, great company culture has become one of the most important perks people look for in a job. In terms of attracting and retaining young talent, technologically advanced construction firms will have a leg-up, by providing millennial-aged employees the tools they not only want, but expect to see at work.

Breaking down assumptions

While the construction industry has slowly evolved to adopt new technology over the last decade or so, many young people still view the field as an “older” workforce. With little-to-no buzz around technology in construction, millennials see old-school workflows as inefficient uses of time. Even though high-tech processes have made their way into construction, most people outside of the industry are unaware. As we all know, millennials love their technology. But why wouldn’t not they? Tech has helped make their lives easier in every way, and they want their jobs to follow suit. In the eyes of older generations, this seems like a dependency, or even an entitlement, but the reality is, millennials see the innovative potential that technology brings to any workforce.

Times are changing

At this point, adopting new technology is almost a mandatory factor to keeping a construction firm in business. Not only can tech improve project efficiency and quality of results, but by showing that your company is tech-savvy and open to modern organizational practices, you can attract the brightest young talent in the construction industry. Making sure employees are given the digital tools they need to excel is the most important step in improving the state of the construction industry and ending the labor shortage. CCR

Kyle Slager is CEO and founder of Raken.

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Doing Business IRL

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Adapting convention centers for the Digital Era By Julian Anderson

C

hat with any colleagues who have recently returned from an industry gathering or conference, and, in addition to the business debriefing, you will likely hear

anecdotes, restaurant recommendations, and of course the latest insider gossip. In my experience, there is no substitute for this kind of personal interaction. Faceto-face networking, in such a concentrated way with people who have common interests, remains an incredibly effective, efficient way of communication. Judging by a report in Trade Show Executive, an increasing number of people share this view. Year-over-year, trade show attendance was up. Especially in the age of digital meeting technologies, this positive trend is encouraging. As people are communicating more electronically—video-conferencing s required in large organizations, with approximately 450,000 systems installed in the US, and Skype alone logs eight billion hours of calls each year. It is obvious that quality, in-person time is viewed as valuable and that the convention industry, especially host cities and facility owners, should appreciate this by keeping their properties in top condition. A convention center can generate a significant amount of revenue for a municipality. The income is not attributable to just the facility rentals, but also the expense-account dollars spent by visitors for dining, entertainment and shopping. Several years ago, the San Diego Convention Center welcomed 824,000 attendees, who directly spent $658 million in the city; the regional fiscal impact totaled $1.1 billion. Chicago’s 2.6 millionsquare-foot McCormick Place generates $1.7 billion each year. The Orange County

Convention Center has delivered $2.28-plus billion to the Orlando community, while drawing more than one million visitors to town.

Disrupt or be disrupted

In light of these facts, it is clear that the meetings industry must make some significant changes if it is to continue to remain relevant. At the big-picture level, a new perspective on the economic relationship between the community and the convention business is emerging. Cities are promoting not just their facilities and cultural attractions to conference organizers, but also their resources for innovation, often in the tech, research and education sectors. This far-sighted, inclusive strategy stresses long-term growth for cities and regions, rather than short-term returns. Austin’s South by Southwest (SXSW) is a notable example of this approach. With minimal expense, the city leveraged its homegrown media and music industries to attract attendees as well as outside sponsors to the conference. Attendance at SXSW has increased eightfold since its establishment in 2011. Redefining the destination-city in this way greatly enhances the draw to convention visitors. If they have made the financial and scheduling commitment to traveling, conference attendees want to go somewhere interesting. To remain competitive, it is incumbent upon cities to deliver a holistic experience to visitors.

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DOING BUSINESS IRL

Drilling down on building up

To keep up with these changes, the physical nature of convention centers has also evolved. In the 20th Century, convention centers were all about scale. Except in cases where a facility regularly hosts heavy-equipment trade shows, the demand for cavernous exhibition spaces is waning. Replacing the bigger-is-better mandate is a focus on customizable meeting spaces that can be tailored to diverse specifications. Many communities are faced with a choice between constructing a new convention center, or renovating existing facilities. Typically, building a new hall is easier than rehabbing an old one. However, finding a suitable site—one that is sufficiently large,

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Intelligently planned and executed, investments in convention centers will yield not only great financial returns, but ensure a returning customer, as well.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

centrally located, and within walking distance of urban attractions—is not always feasible. Opting to build from the ground up also eliminates the need to interrupt scheduled conventions, as they can be held in the outdated facility while the new one is being constructed. For convention centers located on a landlocked, built-out site, there’s typically one way to go when adding meeting space to the hall—up. The old model for facilities situated everything at ground level for easy access; now, with land at a premium, most buildings are stacking spaces vertically. This presents its own set of challenges, including incorporating parking into the structure and planning the ground-level


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DOING BUSINESS IRL programming and content—but it provides an opportunity to make a design statement. When modernizing the envelope of an existing building, owners are seeking design solutions that go beyond merely dressing up a box. They are aware that an attractive exterior can help to compensate for the decline in performance that occurs once the building starts showing its age, between five and 10 years after completion. Also, convention centers that have an architecturally iconic identity reflect positively on their home city and, by extension, on the attendees and the conference.

Interior amenities

Inside the convention center, user expectations are a combination of the pragmatic and the aesthetic. Conference organizers are attracted to environments that make a good first impression. Great-looking public areas and meeting spaces with a high level of quality detailing and finishes (think wood veneer, clear-span design, and glass partitions instead of drywall, concrete columns, and popcorn ceilings).

Architecture that capitalizes on its setting, with a lobby or ballroom oriented towards a view of a river or park, is another enticement that appeals to meeting planners. To maximize resources (both in area and revenue), it’s possible to simultaneously increase meeting capacity and reduce exhibit space through creating a physically flexible design. Moscone West in San Francisco is an example of this tactic. The building features more than a mile of movable interior walls that permits a high degree of freedom to reconfigure the 200,000 square feet of function space on the second and third floors. Anaheim’s new expansion also adopts this approach. Of course, the technological features that are intrinsic to the impetus for upgrading a convention facility must be stateof-the-art. Digital resources, seamless connectivity, and security programs are central to every successful meeting. Intelligently planned and executed, investments in convention centers will yield not only great financial returns, but also ensure a returning customer. CCR

To remain competitive, it is incumbent upon cities to deliver a holistic experience to visitors.

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CIRCLE NO. 42


Getting Serious About Silica At The Job Site By Terri Sparks

E

very day, thousands of individuals wake up and prepare for work “at the shop” or on the job site. They are heading out to a shopping mall to tear out and install a beautiful new tiled store front or perhaps they are making their way into the city to finish off that 2,000 square foot luxury hotel lobby. Whatever their day may have in store for them, aside from the mixing, matching and mortaring, tile contractors need to take time to get serious about their respiratory safety.

Respirable crystalline silica is a dangerous hazard that millions of workers are unknowingly exposed to every year. Of these estimated 2 million workers, 840,000 of them are exposed to an amount of silica that exceeds the permissible exposure limit or the amount of exposure deemed safe. Ninety percent of the individuals exposed to this material are employed in the construction industry.

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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have identified exposure to silica as a health hazard to workers involved in finishing and installing natural and manufactured stone products, both in fabrication shops and during on-site finishing/installation. This hazard can be

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

mitigated with simple and effective dust controls in most operations¹. Professionals serious about OSHA compliance, site contamination, and employee safety know how important it is to enforce strict standards relative to airborne hazards like silica or other harmful airborne materials like asbestos. The safest of jobsites are those where every employee is looking out for each other by reporting accidents, maintaining equipment, and following regulations. With the OSHA Silica Standard now in effect, silica education and awareness should be paramount to everyone’s safety plan.

Know the hazard

Crystalline silica is an extremely common mineral found in granite, sandstone, quartzite, various other rocks and sand that becomes dangerous when it is disturbed. Finished natural and manufactured stone products, porcelain and ceramic tile products, do not pose a health hazard themselves. It is the


fabrication and processing of these products that will generate dust that can expose you to crystalline silica (quartz). Cutting, sawing, grinding, breaking, crushing, drilling or sanding of these materials generates a fine silica dust that, unless contained, will seriously contaminate the air. Tiles are not always the only culprit on the jobsite to pose exposure. Mixing mortar and grout can create a “dusty” hazard too. These products, generally produced using cement or sand aggregate, are comprised of silica as well. Inhalation of respirable crystalline silica can lead to respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or silicosis. Silicosis causes inflammatory damage in areas affected by silica, causing scar tissue to form over critical lung components. Type of Material

Average Percent of Silica

Engineered Stone

≥ 93

Quartzite

95

Quartzitic Sandstone

90

Sandstone

60

Granite

10-45

Slate

Varies

Soapstone

Varies

Sources: Silica Hazards from Engineered Stone Countertops, NIOSH Science Blog, March 2014; ASTM C616, Standard Specification for Quartz-based Dimension Stone: American Geological Institute, Dictionary of Geological Terms

Know the standard

The 2016 OSHA Silica Standard limits silica exposure to a Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 50 micrograms of respirable crystalline silica per cubic meter of air or 50 µg SiO2/m³ over an eight-hour time weighted average (TWA). Table 1 identifies occupational exposures to silica along with work practices and specified engineering control methods to limit exposure. Employers who follow the requirements of Table 1 are not required to measure silica exposure through air monitoring and are not subject to the PEL. OSHA recognizes using tools equipped with a water delivery system that

supplies a continuous stream or spray of water at the point of impact or using tools equipped with a commercially available shroud and dust collection system as the work practice control methods that safely limit silica exposure. There are alternative exposure control methods available to give contractors more flexibility in their choice of work practices and tools. These methods do require some additional control measures to be in compliance with the OSHA Silica Standard. For alternative control methods, the following applies as explained in the OSHA Silica Standard: > Permissible Exposure Limit: The employer shall ensure that no employee is exposed to an airborne concentration of respirable crystalline silica in excess of 50μg/m3 calculated as an 8-hour TWA.

> Exposure Assessment: The employer shall assess the exposure of each employee who is or may reasonably be expected to be exposed to respirable crystalline silica at or above the action level in

accordance with either the performance option in paragraph (d)(2)(ii) or the scheduled monitoring option in paragraph (d)(2)(iii) of Table 1.

> Performance Option: The employer shall assess the 8-hour TWA exposure for each employee on the basis of any combination of air monitoring data or objective data sufficient to accurately characterize employee exposures to respirable crystalline silica.

Know your exposure

One way to determine silica exposure is through air monitoring. To many, this may seem like a complicated, expensive process. The fact is, it’s really fairly easy once one understands what is involved. Air monitoring equipment will measure the air quality in a worker’s breathing area to determine silica exposure during a specific work practice. Air monitoring uses a battery-operated vacuum attached to an operator’s shirt collar, collecting air samples right where the operator breathes.

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GETTING SERIOUS ABOUT SILICA AT THE JOB SITE Another way to determine silica exposure is by using objective data provided by tool manufacturers. OSHA defines Objective Data as “information, such as air monitoring data from industry-wide surveys or calculations based on the composition of a substance, demonstrating employee exposure to respirable crystalline silica associated with a particular product or material or a specific process, task, or activity.

The data must reflect

a reminder to check exactly what you’re cutting into. Stone and quartz materials contain high amounts of the natural mineral silica. Exposure varies by stone type. Silica exposure can vary depending on the silica content of a porcelain or ceramic material being used. Controlled tests of cutting tile show that airborne emissions of crystalline silica and metals are strongly related to their concentrations in tile.2. If you’re not sure if a product contains crystalline silica, check the manufacturers Safety Data Sheet (SDS).

Workplace conditions closely resembling or with a higher exposure potential than the processes, types of material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions in the employer’s current operations.” When a manufacturer tests its equipment, if the work practice and materials used match the job site conditions, OSHA will allow this data to be used as objective data as part of a written silica exposure control plan. Once you learn about exposure levels, you can decide what options are best-suited to control silica exposure on your job sites or in your shop.

Know your Material

“Check Twice, Cut Once.” The old saying doesn’t just prevent mismeasurement; it’s also

Terri Sparks, Vice President of Communicators International, Inc.

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The iQ426HEPA Cyclonic Dust Extractor with HEPA Filtration

1 2

Know your Options

Wet cutting and dry cutting without a vacuum have been the main applications for cutting tile materials and fabricating surfaces for decades. But that is changing. The team at iQ Power Tools, manufacturer of power tools with integrated dust collection systems has studied silica for almost 20 years. They know dust. Seeing the need to reduce silica exposure on job sites led to the development of an innovative line of power tools with integrated dust collection systems. These tools have been objectively tested to capture up to 99.5% of the harmful silica dust generated from cutting stone and tile. iQ Power Tools recently unveiled the iQ426HEPA, a patent-pending, cyclonic filtration system designed to allow less than 1% of incoming dust to ever reach the filter; keeping the filter virtually dust-free and the vacuum airflow strong. No matter what tool you’re using, saw, grinder or a high-speed polisher, it’s essential to wear personal protective equipment (PPE) such as protective eyewear and ear attenuators. You should also know exactly what you’re cutting into so you can implement proper control methods when exposing hazardous materials. Whether you’re sizing a piece of tile or cutting blind into a wall, you should be cautious to generate airborne contamination that could contain silica dust or even asbestos particles. Whether you’re using hand or power tools, it’s important to follow the necessary precautions to protect against any unknown airborne contamination. Remember, awareness and education ensures prevention and safety, so if you need a refresher course, take one- your lungs will thank you! The Marble Institute of America (MIA) technical module, “Silicosis – An Industry Guide to Awareness and Prevention,” offers tips on controlling silica exposures in stone cutting operations. It is available to workers and employers on the MIA web site: www. marble-institute.com/silica/Silicosis_ Industry_Guide_ Tech_Module_2008.pdf. Other resources from MIA can be found at: www.marble-institute.com/silica. CCR

DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2015-106, OSHA - HA-3768-2015 E xposures To Crystalline Silica and Metals in Ceramic and Glass Tile” Report prepared By: Environmental Health & Engineering, Inc. November 2017

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JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

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Contents January • February 2020

Owned & Operated by Women’s Association, LLC Mailing Address PO 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 Editorial Contributing Writer Rochelle Brandvein rochelle@brandveinpr.com 636.530.7225 Website & technical Support Shapeshift World Lorenzo@shapeshiftcompany.com 480.886.8005 PR social@leadupforwomen.com 602-730-5121 Social Media Amplified Social Marketing ashlyn@amplifiedsocialmarketing.com 480-848-0927 Membership Information membership@leadupforwomen.com 602-730-5121

Extraordinary Leadership takes clarity, commitment, and courage

8

LEADERSHIP

4 Founder’s Corner Gaining clarity in 2020

BUSINESS

General Inquiry info@leadupforwomen.com 602-730-5121

5 Ambassadors 18 Finding Your Way Helpful hints for your leadership career path

Art Director BOC design, Inc. brent@bocdesigninc.com 404-402-0125 Circulation/Subscriptions subscriptions@leadupforwomen.com

14 What are you waiting for?

20 All for one

LUFW Management: Colleen Biggs: Chief People Officer colleenb@leadupforwomen.com 480-241-3708

LIFESTYLE

PHILANTHROPY

David Corson: Operations Manager davidc@leadupforwomen.com 404-931-6569 Lead Up for Women General Inquiry 602.730.5121 membership@leadupforwomen.com

26 A Pivotal Space Do good. Be better. Lead best. 30 10 Tips to make your life feel easier

24 The Secret to a Passionate, Purposeful Life

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12 Embracing your ‘enoughness’ 5 ways burlesque can positively impact every area of your life

28 The most important resolution you’ll ever make

Lead Up for Women

3


Founders Corner

Gaining clarity in 2020 Happy New Year! As we move into another decade, I want to reflect on past accomplishments and what I want to accomplish over the next 10 years. To do this, we must first understand what it is we are reaching for. In order to have the vision, we must have the clarity to create that vision. This year, we will focus conversations around gaining clarity to be, to have and to do more. The first step is to show up. I would like to challenge each of you to show up in your life for those who matter, those who need you and those who are waiting to hear your message. Think big this decade. Take action on your vision. Be unapologetic for the success and joy it brings to you and so many who surround you. We exist to empower you to “Show Up” as “You” every day, but we know that is not as easy as it sounds. This is why we are compelled to build several platforms to give you what you need to thrive in life, not just survive anymore. There is no need to feel as if you are stuck behind closed doors anymore. We provide the support, the community of experts, and the tools to remove the masks, leave the cloaks in the closet, and be you, in all your beauty, every day, everywhere, all the time. Because you are worth it. We are passionate and focused on what we can do to Connect, Influence and Lead every woman, and know we all long to belong and to have a community that accepts and celebrates our identities. We have worked diligently to create an organization for all women looking to lead without permission, be the badass leader you know you are, and gain the courage and confidence through the strong support of our group of women so you can live your best life. We are here to show you how to tap into your greatest power, “You.” You are the only you that has ever been and the only you that will ever be. Be you and be strong, because you are brilliant and the world needs you. All of the members of Lead Up for Women are here to offer you support and sisterhood to leading your best life and the journey starts today. What are you waiting for? Join us. With Gratitude,

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Lead Up for Women

January-February 2020


Your Guide to

Successful Franchise Matching

Find Your Perfect Franchise Careyann Golliver is known as America’s Franchise Matchmaker™. Her greatest passion is people to take the leap into franchising. Her passion began from helping grow her local family handyman business to the top-rated national franchise in the industry. The franchise family business became so successful that in 2019 it was acquired by the largest retailer-owned hardware cooperative in the world-Ace Hardware Corporation. Careyann and Franchise Logic has mastered a process that not only helps people find their perfect franchise match but allows for an abundance of possibilities.

We’re here to support your journey as you begin to explore opportunites in discovering the perfect franchise.

Contact us to find out how you can start today!

303.805.5078 • franchise-logic.com


Lead Up for Women hits the radio waves every week Whomever makes the statement that endless opportunity don’t exist needs to stop limiting themselves by the beliefs that exist between their ears. Our goal with Lead Up for Women is to empower as many women as we can to be the best version of themselves. Having a radio station allows us to do just that. Voiceamerica™ is the single largest producer of original internet talk radio programming in the world, with unparalleled scope and reach, which is why we teamed up with them. On March 27, 2019, we launched Speak Up to Lead Up with Host Colleen Biggs. Are you ready to lead without permission and take the steps needed to live your best life? Whether you want to start the business of your dreams, learn the steps you need to take so you can love what you do, or celebrate your present and future accomplishments, our radio show help take you there. Each episode dives into deeper subjects as we interview weekly guests who have already


walked in your shoes. Let the experts guide you for a clearer path to your most successful future. Our show is the perfect platform for all of our members to advertise their businesses, network and hear about upcoming events. We also recap of all of our monthly luncheons around the nation. With millions of listeners, we have the opportunity to pioneer change for women today, as well as in the future. We invite you to tune in to Lead Up for Women: Speak Up to Lead Up, as we celebrate the influence of women in business and beyond. Colleen speaks with guests who have stories to share, have faced adversity and are bona fide success stories in business, their communities and personal accomplishments. Join the strong and the brilliant ones and understand that the world is ready for you to be at your best. Listen to Lead Up for Women: Speak Up to Lead Up, live every Wednesday at 10 a.m. (PST) on the VoiceamericaTM Empowerment Channel. Visit www.voiceamerica.com/ show/3872 to bookmark the show and listen live each week. Do you have someone in mind that you feel would be a great interview on the show? Do you have a mentor, coach or sponsor? Have you been inspired by an amazing leader, entrepreneur, employer or friend? If so, we want to hear from you.

Please submit their name(s), contact information and why you feel they would be the perfect guest for the show to info@leadupforwomen.com. As the world’s largest producer of Internet talk radio programming, Voiceamerica™ can put your brand in front of millions of active listeners. If you are interested in getting your name out to millions of listeners, contact Tacy Trump, Executive Producer of Voiceamerica™ Tacy.trump@voiceamerica.com or 480.294.6421 for sponsorship package pricing.

Sponsorship Rates Full

Quarter

» 13-week sponsorship of show series » 30-second spot (production included) played 6 times (3 during live broadcast and 3 during rebroadcast) » 30-60 second video spot (content must be provided) » Banner ad on weekly eCard » Opening & closing billboards on show » One live mention by host » Banner ad on host page » Banner ad on host personal/business website » Possible guest appearance by key person within company (subject to host approval)

» 13-week sponsorship of show series » 30-second spot (production not included) played 2 times (1 during live broadcast and 1 during rebroadcast) » One live mention by host » Banner ad on host page » Banner ad on host personal/business website » Possible guest appearance by key person within company (subject to host approval)

Half

Optional Advertising for Half and Quarter Sponsors

» 13-week sponsorship of show series » 30-second spot (production not included) played 4 times (2 during live broadcast and 2 during rebroadcast) » One live mention by host » Banner ad on host page » Banner ad on host personal/business website » Possible guest appearance by key person within company (subject to host approval)

» 13-week sponsorship of show series » Audio commercial production » 30-60 second video (content must be provided) » eCard banner ad


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Lead Up for Women

January-February 2020


Extraordinary Leadership takes clarity, commitment, and courage Meredith Allan talks about BEing the Light and what it takes to Lead Up and Shine Bright! Give us a snapshot of your brand? If you are looking to take your business and life to the next level, I am your woman. I am a professional motivational speaker, executive coach and I lead a private Mastermind. After 20 years as a TV anchor and journalist, I launched my own marketing, media and publicity company because I am passionate about the power of sharing people’s stories. I have been helping clients get major publicity and create powerful memorable messaging for over a decade now. I am also a certified “Make Your Dreams Come True” coach. Serving my audiences and clients is extremely rewarding. I serve clients all over the world from my hometown in Los Angeles. I am truly living my dreams. These days, I lead both new and seasoned successful business owners to their personal and professional breakthroughs. I believe we are never arriving at a “destination,” but rather continuously transforming for the better. We are also so much more than our work. We are powerful friends, family and community members. Everything I teach and speak about on stages centers around leadership. Clarity, commitment, and courage are the pillars of my International Mastermind. It fascinates me that more people are not aware of the positive impact a mastermind can have on your business and life. It is essentially a group where we collectively solve problems, and benefit from ongoing leadupforwomen.com

professional education and shared resources in order to reach a higher success. The beauty of the mastermind is it is about giving and being of service to the group. If we are being honest, we can only achieve a certain level of success on our own. But if you participate in a Mastermind, the collective success can be limitless. Extraordinary breakthroughs are achieved in Mastermind and it is truly my favorite work. I am also leading two-day transformational leadership events throughout the year in Los Angeles and overseas.

Tell us what makes your brand so unique? I am a broadcast journalist who fell in love with storytelling in high school. I am honestly always looking at how I can help people tell their stories in a more powerful way. I can get obsessed with connecting my clients and friends. We are nothing without each other. For years, my favorite way to close a broadcast has been, “If you know someone who is out there doing something amazing, please don’t keep it to yourself—take a little bit of time and share the love.”

What type of person are you targeting? I work with ambitious clients looking to take their work to a higher level of performance. I help them strengthen their story and gain the brand recognition they deserve. I love coaching corporate executives and business owners on the

mindset, marketing and connections critical to allow them to play bigger. I am not for everyone. In fact, I believe in radical honesty and will not accept excuses from my clients or “playing small” from anyone. I require 100% commitment. My clients often have massive breakthroughs and success. When I speak at events people naturally get motivated in my trainings and want to be connected and supported in a bigger way. In 2020, I am putting on major events to fill the demand for workshops, more connections and leading a dream mastermind.

Why do you do what you do? I discovered long ago that when I share my light, people mirror it back. My greatest gift is reminding people that their dreams not only matter, but they are always possible. We cannot do it all on our own. Sharing my media and publicity connections with clients is a privilege. There is nothing more rewarding than helping people shine brighter and level up. Whether I am on stage, doing a live broadcast or coaching my Masterminds, I am always looking at how I can light up someone’s life, transform a corporate culture and provide life changing shifts.

What hurdles have you overcome being a woman in business? I never think about being a woman in business. I remember a time when Lead Up for Women

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I was both anchoring the news and managing a team on CNN HLN. I realized I was the only woman at the Christmas party who was not a secretary. It made me realize that it was critically important we are not competing with other women and that it is essential we support each other. I have coached hundreds of women on negotiating their value for higher pay, more benefits and to never ever accept the first offer given in a deal. My mother was always an executive, and her support and advice gave me so much confidence that my peers often lacked. She told me as a child that most mean acts from girls or women are rooted in jealousy and to never take it personal. She and my beloved father were my go to advisors when I was hired as a young president and chief executive officer in my 30s.

Meredith hosting The Meredith Show on NBC

No matter how tough the problem, my greatest lessons were to take time before responding in difficult situations. In the south I learned “when you mess up, you better fess up.” Owning our mistakes is so critical in leadership.

What do you do to give back? I speak and volunteer for The Make A Wish Foundation, foster children who are near to aging out of the system, and Domestic Violence events.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead? I have recognized that people really love my live trainings online and connecting with me in person, too. This year, I will be offering my clients and audience a series of two-day events both in my hometown Los Angeles and overseas. I am dedicated to teaching

Meredith with Actor, Rainn Wilson, from The Office

Meredith presenting her keynote “The M Factor”

10 Lead Up for Women

storytelling, magnetic marketing and deep connection. I have really built a beautiful tribe of loyal clients and trusted colleagues. This year, with the help of my friends and colleagues, I am creating a leadership program for teenagers. I have launched it with LA Foster kids and the feedback was remarkable and life changing. The world needs more mentoring, generosity, kindness and love. I find that everything stems back to leadership in our lives, and I am driven to empower as many people I can with more clarity, connections and courage.

What is your method to stay connected with other women in business? I recently created a meetup in Los Angeles to connect with local women in business because I could not find a local organization with women who share my values and ambitions. My two-day events and a live series on Facebook, called “Mornings with Meredith,” attract sensational powerful and generous women. I have committed to do more of what I love and less of what I do not this year. Connecting with and serving more heart-centered women is at the top of my list.

What mentors, sponsors, coaches have played an important role in your success? I actually cannot remember a time when I didn’t have a mentor. I think we attract what we put out into the world. I have been showcasing amazing people and organizations on TV since I was in high school, and learned very quickly that people want to help you. It starts with asking. My mom and dad were my greatest influencers. They owned several restaurants and even a comedy company through the years. They raised me to take risks, make moves and dream big. My newest passion is learning, and then teaching clients and my audiences how to master leadership. January-February 2020


I believe we are never done learning and growing. I always invest in coaching and have found it always pays back bigger than the dollars we put in. Now I am hired all over the world to speak, inspire and motivate current and future leaders. I am literally living my dream and it feels amazes to help fulfill others with that same invaluable gift.

How do you stay current with today’s trends? I am continuously taking courses, speaking at and attending conferences and connecting with my colleagues. It may surprise you to know that I choose not to watch the

Meredith speaking at the Las Vegas Women’s Leadership Conference.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Finalizing my book. I am also very excited to reveal my new speaker reel and anticipate doubling the number of speaking gigs I booked last year.

What’s the most rewarding part of your career? Watching my clients achieve major new breakthroughs, revenue streams, and elevate their status and authority and get on TV, podcasts and radio. Meredith and her rescue dog Biscuit, enjoy lunch in Marina Del Rey, CA.

news anymore. I was on TV, anchoring, reporting and producing for ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, CNN HLN for more than a decade and grew tired of the depressing reports and newscasts. Now I am very selective about what I fill my mind with. I prefer listening to TED Talks, and other motivational speakers in my free time.

What is your growth plan? My audience online and client growth this past year has been extraordinary. I am looking at how to handle the growth and onboarding the right team to support my tribe and events. This year, I am committed to surrender more and follow my bliss. I think burnout only happens when we try to do everything on our own. I have been there and am not going back. leadupforwomen.com

Describe a typical day. I rise at 5:30 a.m. to make coffee, meditate, fill a page in my gratitude journal, feed and walk my beloved rescue dog biscuit, speak for 30 minutes with my accountability partner. We pray together. Next, I plan my entire day by the hour. At 7:45 a.m., I kick off the day with my live Facebook Series, “Mornings with Meredith,” where my audience looks forward to inspiration and motivation from me. Midday, I take a long walk with my furry best friend and leave my cell phone behind to enjoy the nature. I always stop and literally smell the roses. Thanks to the power of technology, I coach clients from all over the world during the day. I commit to very few evening activities. I always go to an evening yoga class and do a short 10-minute meditation before bed and recheck my calendar to see if I accomplished my top three objectives.

When I stick to that routine, I have so much peace and feel lighter and brighter. When I start missing parts of my routine, I am truly not at my best. When I travel to speak, I bring my mediation bowls and incense. I decline the social gatherings when on the road, more than I used to. It helps conserve my energy. My new mantra is if it does not contribute to my health, wealth, or inner peace, I say no. It really feels good too.

What is your secret to success? I never ever stop learning, growing, transforming and giving back. I have learned to say no more, and also recently I have learned to ask for help more. I am more thoughtful about eating well, and how and who I spend my time with. I am very committed to my Kabbalah practice, and spend every Friday night with my friends and family for Shabbat dinner. Recently, I have also been going to Saturday worship services. It brings so much joy to me and balance when end my work week sundown on Friday nights. When things seem scary, my faith has carried me through. I completely believe the basic principles of Kabbalah are critical success factors: being kind, committing to sharing one’s light, being proactive versus reactive and daily meditation. These basic principles have attracted tremendous abundance and beautiful people into my life. Lead Up for Women

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One-on-One with...

Meredith Allan

Tell us about your family? My mother and father have literally been my best friends on earth. They have been the first I call for good news and bad. They had insane work ethic, and while I grew up a day care baby I never thought anything of it. In fact, later in life, when I learned my friends’ moms stayed at home I was totally confused about what they did all day. My younger sister, Brandie, and her husband, John, own an international executive protection company. Their recent wedding was the most special occasion in our family’s history. The best part was having family fly in from all over the world and seeing my father Allan’s joy as he walked my sister down the aisle. I am also thrilled now to have a brother because it was an unfulfilled wish of mine, for many years. The most difficult thing our small family has endured is my father’s passing. Just a few months after the wedding, my dad fell ill with pancreatic cancer. It was fast and heart-wrenching to see my strong dad die so quickly. Losing him has shifted my entire perspective of life. I do whatever it takes to manage the grief. Sometimes I take his shoes with me to the beach and smile and know he is still alive in my heart and I take his love with me everywhere I go. I dedicate all my work to my both my parents. I also use my dad’s name Allan as my last name to keep him with me always (and keep the crazies from finding me when on TV). In Judaism we say “May his memory be a blessing” and I like to add that my father’s legacy will always be my light.

How do you prioritize your health, family, and career? Without your health there is no wealth. It is a constant struggle and I rely on my support system to help hold me accountable for healthy eating and habits. My parents really taught my sisters and I “next level love” so this year I am on a mission to be as loving as possible. I am searching for “the one” to grow old with and am accepting all referrals and recommendations. I am excited to slow down and build a family, and cherish my time with

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Lead Up for Women

Meredith at The World’s Greatest Motivators TV Show

family and friends. My best friend Rocio reminds me that career success is not the top priority, having a family to share everything with is what matters and I am recovering from years of being a workaholic. I also believe perfection and balance isn’t the goal but working toward inner peace and living a meaningful impactful life can create happiness. I am the designer of my life, and I get to switch gears when things get off track but I never ever lose sight of my mission “Being Light”

What motivates you every day? I have such a highly motivated personality and I think it was the unbelievable love my parents have consistently shown me that keeps me going. Like many families, we had a lot of difficult times and watching my mom and dad recover over and over again was amazing. My mom and dad literally told me I could be president of the world if I wanted to. And I wound up being president of my class and a large organization in my 30s, and now the CEO of my company Drive Marketing LLC. My little sister was an undercover narcotics detective in the NYPD before launching her international company and my oldest sister, Marlo, lives in Africa with her husband, Aron, and my nephew, Max, working as the head social worker at an international school. I also have a “little sister” who I adopted for life through The Big Brother and Big Sisters of America Program during college. Her name is Julia, and I consider her my forever sister 25 years later. I am so proud of her because is an immigration attorney and proud mother living in New York City.

January-February 2020


How do you tap into the power of you that makes you unique? I can be super nerdy and silly and I have learned to embrace it. I love reading books, and watching TED Talks, and interviewing my guests and helping them figure out their unique messaging and share their powerful unique stories. My superpower is apparently lighting up a room, broadcast, or someone’s life.

And how has that pushed you forward? I recognize that the world needs my gifts more than ever. No one ever wakes up and says I think I will focus on being mediocre, and unmotivated. People never say something is too inspirational. Lifting others is a privilege and has proven to be the most rewarding work of my life time and time again.

Who inspires you? My 3 friends currently battling breast cancer and my mom who is living on her own for the first time in 47 years. At 69, she even works full time too! In fact everyone who steps up and decides to start living their dream inspires me.

What’s the best thing a consumer/client ever said to you? “Thank you for taking a stand for me and your love.” I often receive kind words about how inspiring my speeches are too. I recently had 2 viewers contact me because I was not live like usual with my ”Mornings with Meredith” inspirational broadcast at 7:45 am sharp and they were worried about me. It really touches me that they are so loyal and especially when they hit the share button on the video and post online about how inspired they are by my words.

What are your strongest traits as a leader? Over the years this has changed. I do alot of personal and professional development work, and I now see it is not good enough to speak about leadership as I am often paid to do. It is more important to live the distinctions of leadership. I value being authentic, in integrity, my commitment to excellence, my faith, kindness, generosity, endurance, and courage. I hold a vision where I am able to inspire and motivate others to understand how you serve the world can change the world for the better. I just happen to serve through speaking, broadcasting, and mentoring.

What traits of other leaders inspire you? The most magical inspiring traits of great leaders are radical honesty, willingness to press through adversity even when it is not clear how, and willingness to stand for what

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they believe in. I am so inspired by the story of Ghandi, because he held a vision for a free unified India and never ever gave up. He never ever supported violence, and never accepted the excuses for acts of prejudice or injustice. If more people would take a stand for what they believe in and for others this world would be a totally transformed place. As a Jewish woman I have experienced hatred, and prejudice over the years and am always shocked that communities and individuals tolerate that behavior. Kindness and generosity are what great leaders practice.

How are you mentoring/sponsoring others? I am completely devoted to mentoring high school students on overcoming adversity, and I lead ongoing masterclasses online teaching leadership. Recently I have become focused on giving talks on how you can overcome anything to foster kids. My dream is to grow the program to reach foster kids across the United States.

What was the best advice you ever received? Life is now. Also in the wise words of my mother, “You need to be in it to win it.” Which motivates me to take committed action. I have found that the magic doesn’t happen when you are sitting on the sidelines. I’m all in!

What does “Lead Up” mean to you? It means we are all here to lift each other up. I pride myself in leading with generosity. This has changed over the years for me. It does not mean to over extend yourself, but give as often as you can, as long as you can. I used to shrink back when receiving compliments, later in life I began to acknowledge my greatest gift is to lead. When receiving kind words, I now say, ”thank you I know.” Too often we play down our greatness, our accomplishments, and to me it shows a lack of confidence in your purpose. While I feel strongly that your ego is not your amigo, I do acknowledge myself for being a loving, courageous, powerful leader. I no longer shy away from difficult conversations, and I am first in line to take a stand for someone who is struggling and see them and hold them to their highest. Leadership and “leading up” is about who you get to be. Being kind, being generous, and committed to being in excellence and always being your word can impact millions. I am on a mission to impact millions, and the ability to lift, lead, inspire and motivate is a privilege. As long as I live, my plan is to keep learning, growing, and transforming. Being the one to light up a room, stage, or broadcast is an absolute honor. The world needs more light. Lead Up and light the world up, shine on my sisters. You were born to shine.

Lead Up for Women

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LEADERSHIP

What are you waiting for?

By Kelly Surette

that day, I pressed play on an episode of “The Chalene Show”—a podcast created by fitness superstar and business mogul Chalene Johnson. I could not tell you what the podcast was about, nor why I gravitated to it on that particular day, but one thing Chalene said (in her usual galvanizing style) stuck with me. It was, “What are you waiting for?”

What are you waiting for?

I was carrying a load of laundry when I happened to catch a glance of myself in the mirror. I could not believe what I saw. My younger daughter was just three months old and my oldest was two and a half years. The woman staring back at me had black, and I mean black bags under her eyes, from sleep deprivation, breast milk dripping down her T-shirt, and gray hairs sticking up from the roots of the dye job she had had six, no, maybe eight months earlier? Her my face had somehow altered—beaten down by the rigors of two pregnancies, childbirth, a past of trauma and pain, and from caring for two children under the age of three. I know many of you at this point might be shunning me in the name of the “beauty of motherhood,” but listen, I promise you this look was not pretty. I am sure I could have embraced my oversized breasts and tire-like tummy while dancing in the woods celebrating my newfound motherly glamour—and if that is your thing—go for it, girl. You are a warrior. But it just was not me. The me I wanted to be was the woman I knew I could be for myself and my daughters. So, for some reason 14 Lead Up for Women

The time I spent gloriously creating, editing and laboring over my book emancipated me in the rest of my life.

Now, I had been playing relatively small by my standards in the field of adaptive music instruction. And by “field,” I mean the unusually niche “Wild, Wild West” landscape of teaching music to students with disabilities. In other words, it was not exactly a field or career path—yet. But, I had a decade of experience building and creating unique music education curriculum specifically designed to meet the needs of this population while teaching music to every variety of disability. Those included deaf and hard of hearing learners, students with Down Syndrome, Autism, William’s syndrome, and a multitude of other cognitive, intellectual and physical disabilities. Music is a vehicle that transforms learners with disabilities on the deepest level. This was clear to me. I had witnessed its power first hand. I watched in awe as one of my profoundly deaf students felt music for the first time through a tactile audio device that used her skin as a hearing membrane instead of the cochlea in her ear. I cried along with support staff as a student with autism verbalized for the first time ever—singing the word “gorilla.” I danced the waltz with learners using wheelchairs—their elegant 360s rivaling that of ballerina’s at the Paris opera. I knew both the importance of music as a means to elevate learners with disabilities to their highest level of self and the way in which the majority of January-February 2020


LEADERSHIP

school systems, institutions and administrators were off the mark in serving this population through music. Students with disabilities are missing a critical component of a well-rounded liberal arts education. The falls between public music education programs inadvertently missing the boat by thrusting exceptional students such as these in general education music classes where they are under stimulated or overstimulated, music therapy replacing music education, and some students not receiving access to a music experience whatsoever.

Suddenly, additional words I was not ready for landed me like a ton of bricks. “Write. That. Book,” spoke the quiet, yet persistent voice of, well, something. The universe? God? My own heart? Whatever it was, it sure was commanding. “Um, universe?” I said, “No offense, but look at me. I am a mess. I cannot even find the time to make a cup of coffee, let alone write a book. You are out of your mind. My children are so little. Aren’t they supposed to be my sole focus and predominant source of joy right now? There is just no room for any other sources of joy in my world at this time.” “Write. That. Book. What are you waiting for?” Ok, listen. After questioning my sanity for about 10 minutes I resolved

I did not get to go to the beach that summer and Daniel Tiger was on more than I would have liked in my house. “Having it all” was more like having dishes to do with a sick baby on my hip while dictating a sentence into the recorder on my phone while laying out my clothes for work the next day. Ugh, and the fear and guilt. The blazing, nauseating, terrifying fear and guilt that wretchedly engrossed my body and mind over not giving my children my full attention and possibly missing some monumental first step or adorable giggle burp because I was looking at my computer screen. Facing the merciless emotions of fear and guilt were the one part of the process of stepping into who I wanted to be as exceptional mother/author/leader I just could not do alone.

So often we as women we do not go after the things that bring us the greatest happiness because we are waiting for something to free us from the definitions of our purported role.

I was sitting on all this knowledge, passion and experience. I was literally hiding away, excusing myself from the life I was meant to live because I was a “tired mother,” a “good wife,” and the pain from my past had beaten me up so bad I figured I “could not possibly find the energy to put myself out there again.” But something pushed me to look in the mirror a second time that morning. “What are you waiting for?” Chalene repeated, a little more fervently this time from my muddied cell phone speaker. 16 Lead Up for Women

to write a book? I guess? After several direct messages from the cosmos, you just stop arguing. Despite my initial hesitation and mental back and forth, I got to work. I was afraid, but I did it anyway. My “Friends” binge-watching sessions on Netflix during naptime were cut short, but I got to work. I mean, what was I waiting for anyway? Hustle and drive. In between nap times, on the weekends, after the kids went to bed, at 5 a.m., I took every piece of myself I had left at the end of the day and channeled it into that book. I wrote and wrote, pouring my heart out in every sentence, every letter, every punctuation mark. It was not without sacrifice; however, I do not want to give you that impression.

Enter Dr. Lori—the life coach who saved my life by leading me to the conclusion that all of my sources of joy matter. My goals matter. My dreams matter. We dealt with that fear and guilt head on in our gratifying Friday afternoon Skype sessions—weekly reminders that I was, in fact, born to raise two women who would go after their dreams because they saw their Mommy take action on hers. Because I asked for Dr. Lori’s help, asked my mother-in-law to babysit a few extra days, asked for extra support from my parents, and asked my husband to skip a few Patriot’s games so he could watch the girls while I worked, I finished that book. And the weird thing? The bags under my eyes actually got a little less January-February 2020


black and my eyes started to glow again. I somehow managed to get myself to the hair salon and even squeeze in a “Beachbody” On Demand workout or two during the week. When I was with my children, I was present, totally and unequivocally engrossed in playing with the Elsa castle or reading "Guess How Much I Love You?" while cuddling my two little snuggle bugs by the fireplace. The time I spent gloriously creating, editing and laboring over my book emancipated me in the rest of my life. I now had complete autonomy over that woman in the mirror. Life was not just happening to me. Now, I was in the driver’s seat—my creative and personal needs on an equal playing field with those I cared for around me. I made the choice to have my children—and

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I am beyond grateful I did—but I also made the choice to write my book. And both of these choices were okay and could exist side by side in the same, beautiful world. So often we as women we do not go after the things that bring us the greatest happiness because we are waiting for something to free us from the definitions of our purported role and the deep diversion we choose to take away from our own soul’s calling in the name of it. If you are a mom that derives your satisfaction from absolute, undivided devotion to your children, that is wonderful and you are to be commended for your choices and your heart’s calling. We all need to stay in harmonious alignment with exactly who we are and what ignites our spirit.

But if you are like I was—waiting to go after your dreams because according to societal expectations as a woman you are “supposed” to be and want only one thing and you have allowed this societal expectation to become the compass for your life—or you are using motherhood as one of many excuses for not living your potential—or the woman in the mirror looking back at you is half the version of who she wants to be because she is waiting for someone to give her permission to chase all of the unrealized dreams that set her soul on fire. Then I would challenge you to ask yourself right here, right now. What are you waiting for? We only get one life. What are you waiting for?

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LEADERSHIP

Finding Your Way

Helpful hints for your leadership career path

Working toward your career goals can sometimes be a daunting task. It can feel like you are in a forest of trees with multiple paths without the ability to see if it is a dead end. You try to choose wisely and follow the signs, but you still end up lost and frustrated. Having a guide to show you the way or explain where each path may take you is valuable. You do not have to travel the road alone. There are others who have gone before you, and can share their experience and knowledge to help you. At the end of the day, the decision to walk right, left or straight ahead is yours to own. Leaning on others to gain confidence in your decisions will enable you to move forward. I have 15 years of experience moving from a frontline role into leadership in Corporate America. I would like to share some of my journey and what has helped me achieve success in my path. A career path is not always up and forward, it may be a side-step to gain experience and exposure. There is a misconception that career paths are straight. Many describe it as “climbing the corporate ladder.” You do not have to make any decisions about where you are going when you are on a ladder—it is either up or down. Since lateral moves are not feasible on a ladder, this narrowly focused journey can cause you to miss what is to the right or left. 18 Lead Up for Women

I will never forget what Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg said during a webcast I attended. Sandberg, author of the bestselling book “Lean In,” compared trying did her career path to a jungle gym, where sometimes you may reach the bar above you to go up, and sometimes you move left to right. It is unpredictable, exciting and unique to you since you get to decide where to go next. There is nothing wrong with a lateral move. It may open an upward climb that you could not see from your previous vantage point. Sandberg’s simple concept had a significant impact on me personally. I was always looking straight up and did not see value in a lateral move. I became frustrated when upward mobility was not happening or opportunities did not exist. It was not until I started to look laterally that I identified valuable next steps in my career. While it was scary since it was not as clear where I would go next, it enabled me to learn new skills and work with different people. This experience was pivotal in the most significant career shift I encountered from leadership in the business to leadership in IT.

By Kristen Main

Take calculated risks that challenge you and help you grow in your career If I am being honest, risk taking is not easy for me. I am naturally risk averse. I have worked in the insurance industry for years—a market where this personality trait aligns very well. Early in my career, I did not have the confidence or see the value in pursuing career opportunities that were not 100% aligned to my skill set. That all changed when my company went through a “Lean” transformation. It was uncomfortable being a manager at the time and feeling like a new hire. I had to learn new ways to do my work and how to use the system we were implementing. It was the most difficult and rewarding experience I have had in my career, changing the path I was on tremendously. I realized I had strong problem-solving capabilities that I was not only able to use for what I was facing, but to help coach and train others, too. I recognized I was not as strong in the analytical aspect, so I went back to school to earn an MBA with a concentration in Six Sigma. I did not need this degree for a specific role or career move; I needed it for my own growth and confidence. In fact, I will never forget a colleague’s response when I told him. “Well that is similar to an engineering degree,” he said with a surprised and skeptical tone in his voice. At first, I had butterflies. His doubt nearly shook me. I ended up graduating January-February 2020


with a 4.0 and I am now in a higher-level position than he is. There will always be people around you who support you and believe in you, and those who doubt your decisions. Find your internal voice and confidence, and know that you can learn new things and achieve success when faced with a challenge. Going after a sure thing will deliver some satisfaction when you are successful. But trying something out of your comfort zone will bring you the greatest feeling of satisfaction, especially when you conquer it and achieve success.

Building relationships is essential to your career I currently work remote. I am not in the same office as the team I work with. Sometimes I go to a local office several times a week, even though technically I could work from home. I used to be a manager in the department, where I was able to see familiar faces daily. It is critically important for me to stay connected to people in the company and maintain relationships. Not only does this help me down the road, it also brings an element to my job that I find motivating and inspiring. Early in my career, I had a manager I worked closely with on a special project. When the project ended, I took a promotion and moved across the country into a new role. I occasionally tried to keep in touch with that manager by offering to help when he had a question that involved my department. We both moved into different roles. Six years later, he had an opening on his team I was very interested in. I ended up working for him for a couple of years. I believe that by helping him when it was not required kept my name relevant to him. It ended up positively impacting my chance at earning a spot on his team. Over the years, I have also helped others around me find opportunities for a career move based on connections I have. I encourage you to find a company that has a culture of teamwork and collaboration where people help each other and value relationships. leadupforwomen.com

So how do you get into leadership? Sometimes there is an opinion that only managers are leaders and that you must achieve a certain level within a hierarchy to be a leader. I believe leadership is needed at all levels within an organization and should be demonstrated regardless of your title or position. You should try to motivate and inspire others. Remember: We are all in this together. Set an example of high performance and exceptional work ethic and try to help others work at that same level. Make yourself available to help others and ensure that you are someone they look up to and respect. This attitude and effort will not go unnoticed and will bring job satisfaction beyond just achieving your own results. Management positions can feel like thankless jobs, but you are trying to get work done through others by coaching and developing them.

to take the plunge. Family can be a great source of encouragement, but they can be bias. Having work friends in your corner is very important. I made a life-changing decision to post for a position that resulted in my family moving across the country. I remember sitting at my desk staring at the application, struggling to decide if I should post. My husband supported me 100%, but the doubt I felt was more about my ability to do the job successfully. Suddenly, my phone rang. It was a manager I had worked with briefly in the company. I did not know what to expect when I answered. After she asked me about the posting, I shared my thoughts. She encouraged me to go for it. That two-minute phone call was all I needed to nudge me forward. That simple gesture had a significant impact on my career. We do not always know what someone

You should try to motivate and inspire others. Remember: We are all in this together. Sometimes, they will be successful and sometimes they will not. Try different things and find what works for each person. Be willing to identify when you might need to do something new. The best leaders are humble and willing to take advice from others and demonstrate agility in how they approach things.

Find your cheering section We talked about relationships, but this is different. Your cheering section looks out for and supports you through the good and bad. I have three women on my team who are my cheering section. They send me postings of jobs they think I would be excel at and encourage me to take risks when I am feeling self-doubt. I do the same for them. We all have had situations where we need someone to give us a nudge

needs or what they are thinking, so we should reach out and encourage others and be their “cheerleaders.� Over the years, I have achieved exceptional results, and received many awards and accolades. But what I am most proud of are the people I have been able to help move forward in their careers. I was recently brought to tears by a former employee who told a group that I was her hero. They looked at her strangely since I am not famous. She went on to tell them how I had helped her find success and that she would not be where she was without me. It was by far the best compliment I have ever received and I will cherish that forever. Who have you helped recently?

kristenrmain77@gmail.com

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BUSINESS

All for one

Why WBDC is the resource today’s women entrepreneurs can count on The Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC) is a nationally recognized nonprofit leader in the field of women’s economic development. Originally founded in 1986 to provide programs and services to support and accelerate women’s business ownership, WBDC has since grown to serve all underrepresented business owners.

The organization aims to drive business diversity and fuel innovation to increase the economic impact of startups, emerging and established business owners. WBDC and its dedicated team members empower entrepreneurs to succeed through business advising and coaching, certification and procurement opportunities, financial education and capital assistance. The WBDC serves a nine-state Midwest region with headquarters in Chicago and offices in Minneapolis, Kansas City, St. Louis, and Milwaukee. Within this region, WBDC is a partner for the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC), the 20 Lead Up for Women

country’s largest third-party certifier of women-owned businesses. They are responsible for certifying Women Business Enterprises (WBEs), a powerful tool that has helped thousands of women entrepreneurs compete for contracts with the government and major corporations. WBDC offers tailor-made programs to help business owners chart their path to success. These programs help business owners actualize their innovative potential to better serve their customers, increase their impact on their communities and achieve their business goals. Large-scale innovation across industries and micro-level innovation

within companies is essential for business growth. Ignite: Women’s Innovation Network is a space for women-owned companies to partner with corporations and other business owners to innovate and improve supplier diversity ecosystems. Top Shelf: High Volume Retail Growth Insights Program helps retail business owners expand their market to national retailers. Plan for Profit helps business owners create a profitable business plan. Since its inception, WBDC has served more than 85,000 women, held over 13,000 entrepreneurial training workshops, secured $82 million-plus in financing, and facilitated in excess of $1 billion in government and corporate contracts. WBDC also certifies approximately 1,900 Women Business Enterprises (WBEs) annually. WBDC’s success is owed to a very dedicated team of business leaders, including women’s advocate and current president and CEO Emilia DiMenco. Her career began at BMO Harris N.A., where she spent 30 years in corporate banking before joining the WBDC. DiMenco rose through the ranks at BMO Harris, eventually being elevated to executive VP in the corporate and commercial bank. She also led BMO Harris’ Women in Business Initiative, which made the bank the choice for many women business owners. During her time at BMO Harris, DiMenco also served on WBDC’s Board of Directors. She then refocused her career and joined the WBDC as COO to work under its original co-presidents, before transitioning to president and CEO in 2013. January-February 2020


Since DiMenco’s arrival, WBDC has dramatically expanded its direct lending program, which now offers a pool of more than $3.3 million. DiMenco is proud to advance the mission of WBDC as an advocate for women and other underrepresented business owners. But she credits her trusted team for WBDC’s ongoing innovation and success. The WBDC team consists of a group of experts who specialize in a variety of business categories and can advise business owners in any industry at any stage. The entire team embodies WBDC’s mission, and together are leveling the playing field for women and minority business owners. Through the years, WBDC has a built a long list of success stories and entrepreneurs that have benefited from their services. One such client is Kimberly Meek, owner and CEO of Hacha Products Corporation. A certified Women and Minority Business Enterprise, Hacha is the only lab solely dedicated to testing and treating water for PFAS—pollutants that have been linked to cancer, high cholesterol and other medical condition. With help from WBDC’s Ignite: Women’s Innovation Network, Meek and her team began partnerships with world-class research institutions and best-in-class industry leaders like Agilent Technologies to scale their technology. Hacha now has a dedicated private laboratory in Chicago where their team can prepare, test, and analyze samples collected by field technicians.

WBDC and its dedicated team members empower entrepreneurs to succeed through business advising and coaching, certification and procurement opportunities, financial education and capital assistance. Through the innovative partnerships established by WBDC, Hacha is addressing this large-scale issue with reduced testing times while informing policy, infrastructure, and treatment planning for future protection of our water and our communities. Another example is Jana Farmer of Ms Jana’s Candy, who turned her avocation into a full-fledged business in 2018 at age 67. What started as a hobby of making homemade treats

Emilia Dimenco

soon turned into a booming business. WBDC was able to guide her through what came next. By connecting with WBDC, “Ms Jana” gathered tools to grow her business. In fact, she recently secured her first loan from CIBC bank, and was approved within two weeks with guidance from WBDC, helping her financially grow her business. She was also certified as a WBE in 2020. Sue Tierno and her sister Kathleen Wood, co-owners and founders of Suzy’s Swirl, a frozen dessert company, are expanding their business thanks to the WBDC’s Top Shelf program. Following their success with frozen yogurt and sorbet, their next venture led them to the WBDC, where its team of experts guided them through the process of working with big name retailers to sell their new Suzy Swirl Spiked pints, an alcohol-infused frozen yogurt. As a result, Tierno and her business partners are in the process of arranging deals with several national retailers to sell Suzy’s Swirl Spiked Pints on their shelves. For years, WBDC has served as a resource for women and minority entrepreneurs and business owners like this. As the business landscape continues to evolve, WBDC is committed to evolving its services to best support their partners and clients. The organization will adapt existing programs and fill any gaps in the business landscape necessary to help businesses flourish.

For more information or to connect with one of WBDC’s experts, visit www.wbdc.org.

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BUSINESS

Embracing your ‘enoughness’ By Cat LaCohie

5 ways burlesque can positively impact every area of your life you judging your performance abilities? Your intelligence? Your achievements? Is the voice of judgment in your head created by a parent, a co-worker, a sibling, a supposed friend? (Hint: Stop hanging out with these people wherever possible.) I advise all my students to avoid the mentality of going on stage asking the audience, “Is this doing it for you? Is this sexy? Do you like what I’m doing?” It is not about asking the audience if you are good enough and if you are meeting their standards., it is about saying, “Look at me, I am awesome. Witness me in my height of glory.” Once you give yourself permission to do this on stage, you will find yourself instinctively walking into all rooms with the same confident attitude.

If you are looking to improve your confidence and charisma—from the bedroom, to the boardroom and everywhere in between—look no further. Burlesque is more than just flirtatious tease—it is an attitude of confidence that can positively impact every area of life. Here are five ways to show you the way:

1. Enhancing your "enoughness" Working on your “enoughness” in the world of burlesque trains this muscle for your everyday life. There are several things my new Burlesque students worry about when they first come to me, but usually it boils down to two main points: 1. Body image 2. Self-doubt in their ability What I love about creating solo acts with my students is that “it’s all about pleasing you.” I am not teaching group choreography where everyone compares themselves to everyone else. We create a solo act to celebrate you in whichever way you see fit. 22

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› What do you want to express? › What fires you up? › You make the rules to suit your needs and your strengths. Burlesque is about embracing your uniqueness, in life and onstage. For anyone who experiences self-doubt throughout the day—“I don’t belong here,” “I’m not good enough”—I would advise them to follow up that question with, “by whose standards?” By whose standards are you feeling that your body has flaws? Who says you should not proudly show off these areas of your body just because they have not been air brushed by photoshop? By whose standards are

2. Remove any stigma about flaunting your sexuality People feel guilty for wanting to look and feel sexy, especially in the world of business, which can be so masculine orientated. Too often, we shy away from embracing our feminine power and sexuality in order to be “taken seriously” (FTS!). Newcomers to burlesque may worry about what everyone else thinks of them. “Are my parents going to think less of me?” “What if my co-workers find out?” Again, these doubts are related to other people’s standards. Remember, when people judge us or prevent us from doing something, it is because it causes fear in them. Your action highlights their inaction, their inability to do the very thing you have the confidence to do. Burlesque is too often misinterpreted by those who have never experienced it. It is not solely about stripping January-February 2020


and revealing flesh, in the voyeuristic sense. Your act is about a peeling and revealing of layers and concepts. Rather than saying, "I’m naked and vulnerable,” you are actually rebelliously and joyously saying, ‘“I’m ripping off this mask that society has made me wear.” You are not doing this for anyone else. You are not taking your clothes off to titillate "some guy." You are celebrating yourself, peeling back the layers you are wearing in order to celebrate the beautiful human underneath.

3. Find your political voice Yes, you can use your burlesque stage as a public soapbox. If you feel you cannot voice your opinion at the dinner table or water cooler, whether that is because other people shun your opinion or you do not articulate enough to join the conversation, try Burlesque. Be political. You are making art. And for what other reason do people create art than to say something to the world? That is the essence of Burlesque. It is therapeutic and cathartic for the performer, and the audience gets something out of it, too.

4. Re-invent yourself (it is never too late) You never have to settle for the “you” that you are now. Just because you grew up a certain way, with specific experiences, does not mean you must keep that identity for the rest of your life. If you are stuck with something you do not like, change it. Large or small, you can move, quit your job, break up with somebody, or just color your hair. Some changes may take longer than others, but it is better to slowly crawl in the direction you want, than to sprint the other way. With this in mind, a huge life change and self-reinvention may seem overly daunting, so start with the Burlesque stage. Allow this to be your arena for a new persona. Embrace your brazen alter-ego. Give it a name. Let it take the blame for your newfound style and behavioral choices. Allow it the freedom to not “fit in” or leadupforwomen.com

meet somebody else’s expectations of you. You can gradually allow your new persona to filter into your everyday life and realize that the people who matter will fall in love with the quirkiness and weirdness that truly is you.

5. Draw attention to your “flaws” and make them your USP (unique selling point) Rather than hide the areas you have been made to feel bad about in your everyday life, your burlesque act is the perfect opportunity to draw attention to (and celebrate) those qualities. Maybe these qualities are not accepted or celebrated in the work environment or around your family, but those rules and regulations do not exist when your burlesque persona hits the stage. In the burlesque world, these qualities are no longer tainted as negative flaws, they are just a quality that makes you different from the person standing next to you. These qualities are what make you uniquely you—and you can start to embrace them as your USP.

As you gradually get used to confidently flaunting those areas, you will see it filter into your everyday life. The more confidence you have in every element that is you, the more you can start to surround yourself with those who value you for the person you truly are, rather than feeling the need to change for others. For anyone craving more tips on self-confidence and celebrating yourself, both on and off the stage, check out my intro to burlesque class, “Unleash Your Inner Vixen,” with me in Los Angeles. For more information, visit www.vixendeville. com/classes/introductory-workshop/. If you are outside the LA area, you can sign up for a free consultation with me online at www.vixendeville.com/ consultation-questionnaire.

Cat will be exhibiting at The Best You Expo at the LA Convention Centre, March 20-21. Check out her seminar, “Revealing The True You — No Apology Needed!” in the Empowering Women room, March 21, 11:30 a.m., and join her in the Inspiration Zone, March 21, 2:30 p.m., for the interactive session, “Walking on Broken Glass… and Other SelfDiscoveries.” For more information, visit https://thebestyouexpo.com/us/ speaker/cat-lacohie/

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23


LIFESTYLE

The Secret to a Passionate, Purposeful Life Just as the subtle morning sun casts its first rays into the canyon, I hit “send” on the final edits to my book editor. My living room is wall-less, and from the three acres of untamed jungle land I steward with my life-partner, Manex, comes a cacophony of squawking, squeaking, chirping, clicking and howling. This is the place I chose as sanctuary for healing and self-realization, and now seekers on the precipice personal change, comes to the Nicoya Peninsula, our little piece of paradise on Costa Rica’s pacific coast. It is no coincidence that the walls between me and the natural world have dissolved, just like the barrier between my dreams and reality.

From where I sit, it all feels orchestrated by some divine design, but of course it did not always feel like that. A decade ago, everything I had spent years diligently achieving had been unapologetically desecrated like an unsuspecting Midwestern town at the hands of a violent twister. Just shy of 30, I had attained a successful life that looked really good on paper. I was continually ranking No. 1 nationally at a top Fortune 100 company and living in a beachfront penthouse with my internet tycoon boyfriend, jetting off to extravagant vacations. The only problem was, when I got really real with myself, which was not too frequently back then, I knew that something big was missing. I just had no idea what it was or how to go about finding it. 24 Lead Up for Women

Adrenaline-pumping activities served as brief refuge from this pervasive apathy, and shiny things momentarily brought me to life. High falutin’ parties and friendship drama were temporary distractions from a deep-seated sadness churning inside of me. In my limited scope of consciousness, I blamed the man I was with. Obviously, he was not doing enough for me—for us. What I had yet to discover was that the spirit is always working on our behalf, guiding us into situations so we can wake up to our truth and power. And spirit guided me into the most devastating creation of my life, where I was stripped of everything I valued. It was then, when the boy broke my heart, I lost my luxe lifestyle, and my friends cut their ties with me, that my quest

By Emily Pereira

inward began. Much to my surprise, what felt like the most painful breakdown of my life, gave way to the most pivotal breakthrough I could ever imagine. It was then that the forces of the universe converged to connect me with powerful spiritual teachers, and I saw the greatest source of my pain was not from losing this man or this so-called perfect life; it was from unconsciously following a script I did not write. I had soaked up messages from the fabric of what was around me, and internalized these messages as my own. My narrow script left little room for creative risks, because taking chances might expose me as not being the image of perfection I had gotten used to portraying. This script urged me to find the most successful alpha-male in the room, and bask in his glow, so I would feel worthy and safe. Now mind you, I had no idea I was doing any of this. The most devious thing about my script was that it had me believing it did not exist at all. The first rule of the script is that there is no script. After my breakthrough, I pulled back the layers of illusion I had carefully constructed around me and got real with myself. I recognized that I had created a life based on external validation and in doing so, became an unwell, uninspired and unhappy woman. I wanted to be a woman who strode confidently in the direction of her dreams, but I could not identify anything I had a burning passion to do. When a teacher urged me to explore my creative side, I was like, “Um, what creative side?” January-February 2020


For 32 years, I had always assumed creativity was a genetic thing and that gene had unceremoniously passed me by. I soon learned that “blah” feeling I could not shake was merely fear of failure masquerading as apathy. My script had me believing that unless I was going to be perfect and do it perfectly, I may as well not even try. As I gained greater consciousness, I discovered that I did not have to be perfect to participate creatively, I just needed to be the beginner. In the book, “Zen Mind,” Shunryu Suzuki says, “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities. In the experts mind, there are few.” The beginner is Teflon armor against fear of failure because The Beginner is not supposed to know a damn thing. With this utterly simple, yet revolutionary insight, I gave myself permission to be the beginner and began to write. After literally writing nothing in 11 years but emails and, oh, I don’t know, the occasional thank you note, I was amazed that by suspending judgment. My creations flowed freely, and a most unusual thing occurred: I began to reveal myself authentically and vulnerably in a way I never had before, which restored a sense of integrity I had lost somewhere along my path. Then, it was as if a wildfire caught a tail wind and suddenly creative passion was tearing through every facet of my being. A 600-page book poured out of me (being published later this year). I began playing guitar, singing and writing songs. I started painting big canvases full of bright colors. I built an art studio in my home. I began taking improv classes and dancing burlesque. The overwhelming desire to create generated such a monumental shift inside of me, triggering a cascade of spiritual changes. I had no idea the creative and the spiritual were so intricately woven together, propelling one another forward like happy bedfellows. For the first time in my life, I was genuinely awake, alive and inspired. The resentment I had been harboring toward my ex-boyfriend finally leadupforwomen.com

evaporated like stubborn condensation on the bathroom mirror. I realized it was not he who had abandoned me; I had abandoned myself and my dreams a time long ago in a bid to gain approval and acceptance. Like a seesaw, as my belief in myself went up, I watched my competition with others go down. I developed a genuine camaraderie with other women who were courageously following their dreams, and a sincere compassion for those still trapped in their own private prisons of perfection. It was then when I knew that my life’s work would center around helping women access the source of their feminine power. The way to an adventurous, passionate, fulfilling existence is the exact opposite of what most of us have been programmed to believe. Life’s gifts do not come from being perfect and doing everything perfectly; they show up when we simply give ourselves permission. Permission is the golden key that unlocks a treasure trove of astounding passion. And passion is no accident. It is the compass directing you to your purpose. In my personal experience, and in the experience of the women with whom I am honored to work, I have witnessed a universal truth. When we are lit up by our own lives, and inspired by our own creations, living on purpose, competition and comparison fall away and genuine sisterhood becomes possible. Women truly supporting one

another—all on the same side—is the beginning of a whole new earth. My professional path unfolded organically. I began intensive coaching, facilitating online writing programs, speaking and hosting workshops internationally. I combined my passions—writing, surfing, yoga, clean eating, spirituality and empowering other women—and created a one-ofa-kind wellness retreat, where women can do all of this together. We call it “The Mermaid Sisterhood Retreat,” and I love watching how this carefully curated experience returns women to their innate, alluring, radiant light. Watching the monkeys swing from the Guanacaste tree through my wallless living room, as my second child grows in my womb, not a day goes by that I do not marvel at the silent intelligence of spirit, constantly working on our behalf. Life does not happen to us, it is happening for us. The secret is not to let the hardships break you down, but instead, let them break you open. It is then that you will find yourself facing an exciting new horizon again and again, even more astonishing than the last.

Best contact info: Website: emilypereira.com Email: hello@emilypereira.com Instagram: @emilybegins

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PHILANTHROPY

A Pivotal Space Do good. Be better. Lead best.

Women have always been givers. Look at Marie Curie. Her findings led to effective cures for cancer. Then there is Harriet Tubman, who freed not only herself from slavery, but also rescued 70 others. Think of Mother Teresa and her distinguished charitable work that stretches across the world. Women’s humanitarian efforts are well documented in books (Ruth Bader Ginsburg for gender equality), highlighted in movies (Norma Rae for organizing a union), and splashed throughout the media in today’s world (too many to mention here). But what about just looking in the mirror and at those around you? We are nieces, daughters, wives, moms and grandmas who are working toward a common goal: to make the world a better place filled with peace, compassion and goodness. Deep down, we are selfless creatures hungry 26 Lead Up for Women

to support our loved ones and help people we have never even met. As women leaders, our role as givers should be a no brainer. We must encourage philanthropy for ourselves and our peers. We should demand charity in conjunction with commerce. It is up to us to make these things happen. Women play a major role in the workplace, and we have the capacity to give back to our communities. If you have not had the time to give in the past—whether monetarily or through volunteerism—then now is the time to do so.

By Rochelle Brandvein

And, starting today, Lead Up for Women is going to join you in this very concerted effort.

Lead Up and Give Back It is safe to say women have big hearts and with that comes even bigger responsibility. Lead Up for Women’s current creed encompasses three pillars: Leadership (shares women’s inspiring stories); Business (highlights business powerhouses in various industries); and Lifestyle (focuses on finding the proper work/ play balance). Lead Up is now adding a fourth pillar dedicated solely to Nonprofits. This new section is a gift to every woman who has ever wanted to make a difference. With this pillar we will: January-February 2020


› Highlight the efforts of the women who have turned their pain into something positive; › Make you stop, take notice and step up for what is right. › Walk the path of self-actualization by reaching your full potential when it comes to spreading the good that we all have inside of us. Our newly dubbed “A Pivotal Space” section will make you ask yourself, “Am I doing enough?” If you are not, it is time to pivot toward the contribution process. According to Charity Navigator, an estimated $410.02 billion was given to charitable causes in 2017. Individuals accounted for 70% ($286.65 billion) of the giving, representing a 3% increase over 2016. The primary charity recipients were religious groups, education, human services and health charities. The best part of the data is that donating individuals—not big foundations or corporations—are responsible for the vast majority of annual donations. You do not have to go broke to make a difference. You just need to do so in your own way, which can be your time instead of your dollars.

Passionate women making a difference As altruistic beings, we appreciate others who are changing the world. Look at 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg, who was named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” for 2019. Her protests regarding climate change started with handmade signs and grew to a global climate strike in September that had four million participants. Thunberg, who has Asperger’s syndrome, is the publication’s youngest person to ever earn this designation. Talk show host and media mogul Oprah Winfrey created “The Oprah Winfrey Scholars Program,” which are given to students who will use their education to give back to both the US and abroad. She also funds “The Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa,” which is for young women leadupforwomen.com

who have provided service in their communities to create change. Outstanding work from a woman who began her broadcasting career at age 17. Melinda Gates and Microsoft chairman/husband Bill founded the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which helps improve the lives and health of those in developing countries and in the US. This foundation is the world’s largest private charitable organization in existence.

(financial gurus for funding strategies and initial set up, non-profit lawyer, an advisory board and a knowledgeable support system) to guide you through the process. Pick your cause — Select a specific industry that you are passionate about ranging from children and health to veterans and animals. Then find the right charity for you by doing plenty

Lead Up is now adding a fourth pillar dedicated solely to Nonprofits. This new section is a gift to every woman who has ever wanted to make a difference. World Humanitarian Day recently celebrated many unsung heroes who have produced authentic results for the world, including volunteers in the Red Cross or Red Crescent. These women—who make up more than half of the membership around the world—are among the first to respond in disasters, epidemics and conflicts. They include the late Asma Jehangir—a human rights activist who founded the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan)—and Alina Azhar, the first Pakistani woman to receive “The Diana Award” for her humanitarian efforts.

Just keep swimming “Finding Nemo” was an iconic movie chock full of wisdom. The forgetful yet motivational Dory used the mantra “Just Keep Swimming” to stay calm, get a grip and power on. Her persistence, which was key to helping find Nemo, should be an inspiration to all of us when tackling the non-profit component in your life. Here how you can unite your efforts and help those who need it most: Start your own nonprofit — Define your mission via a strong business plan before you take the leap. Surround yourself with a team of experts

of research (check out websites and reviews, as well as seek input from those who currently are associated with organizations you are interested in.) Dream big — Once you narrow down your selection, it is up to you to select how you visualize your pivot. Your generosity—ranging from financial support or weekend volunteering to lending your expertise as a board member— will be greatly appreciated.

Share Your Story A Pivotal Space is a place to share your wins, your hopes and your talents. Help us inspire others to make your best choices and live healthier lives. So get ready as we embrace an exploration of epic proportions together. Let’s do this.

Rochelle Brandvein is the owner of Brandvein-Aaranson Public Relations, a 30-year-old PR agency that recently pivoted to solely handling nonprofits and companies with a philanthropic arm or foundation. Her company specializes in publicity, copywriting and creative services.

Lead Up for Women

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PHILANTHROPY

The most important resolution you’ll ever make At the beginning of this year, many of us promised ourselves we would make improvements in our lives for 2020. It is no surprise that most are struggling to keep those New Year’s resolutions and will break and remake them many times hoping to get one to stick. According to the research group Ipsos, the top vows that Americans made this year were to get their finances in order, eat healthier and exercise more—all worthy pursuits. But studies of the happiest people on earth show that rich or poor, thin or not, there is something that matters more to our overall happiness. If you could make a single resolution during 2020—and because of it, be happier from now on—would you make it? Turns out you can. I was able to get motivated to be happier when I admitted to myself that I was not as happy as I could be. I felt an emptiness and a longing for something. But what? I felt well-rooted spiritually, in my home life and in my career. But something was missing. A friend told me about a program that provides food to families in need and encouraged me to volunteer. I had doubts that volunteering would make me happier, but I had nothing to lose and jumped in. To my surprise, collecting and distributing food to people with real needs was incredibly satisfying. The world’s problems are big, but knowing I could do something small to help a few people was inspiring and empowering. After a few months of volunteering, I actually felt more at ease and happier in my life. This feeling made me want to do more. I decided I would do something every day for someone in need. I was also inspired 28

Lead Up for Women

to kick the commitment up a notch. I had found a Mother Teresa quote that rang true. “In this life we cannot do great things. But we can do small things with great love.” I felt as though I had been personally challenged. I set a goal to think differently. As I served, I would make a conscious effort to be more observant, more patient, more kind and to grow in love. I was curious to see where that would take me. It turned out that making good on that two-part commitment had an almost magical effect. Day by day I felt more positive and energized. I also began to see and appreciate how fortunate I had been in my own life and, because of that, how much I had to give. I had never felt so grateful and content. This brand of volunteering— conscious, loving service to others—had replaced my longing with a deep sense of satisfaction. As it turns out, science backs up the benefits of helping others. Studies by United Healthcare,1 Carnegie Melon University2 and others have revealed that people who volunteer feel healthier.

They are less likely to develop high blood pressure, which often leads to a heart attack and stroke. Even more dramatic is the connection between volunteering and emotional health and well-being. People who volunteer report less stress, improved mood and self-esteem, closer friendships and a feeling of belonging. They report a powerful sense of purpose, which in studies of the happiest people on earth, turns out to be key to happiness and as a bonus, to a longer life.3 At first, it was tough to make time to volunteer regularly, and growing in virtues like patience and kindness is a life-long practice, at least in my case. Change takes time and practice. But it is been worth the effort. If I will live longer remains to be seen, but on all other counts I can confirm the studies. My stress declined, my mood lifted and the wonderful people I met volunteering became life-long friends. Not only did that nagging longing vanish, but this new path created the most fulfilling life I could have imagined— the stuff that real happiness is made of. And little did I know it then, but with this first step, I was well on my way to finding an abiding purpose in my life. Not too long after my first foray into volunteering providing food to families in need, I ended up volunteering in villages in the Guatemalan highlands. It was in those remote villages that I found a joy like none I had experienced before. I also found my purpose. January-February 2020


I founded a help organization that is still going strong today, nearly three decades later. In 2013, I was fortunate to be able to become a full-time volunteer in Guatemala. Now I have the honor of working with a wonderful team of volunteers to provide quality health care and education for young people with great need who live in those villages, and I am grateful for every day I have to serve. But fulfillment does not depend on making volunteering a career. With every new day, each of us have the opportunity to do small things with great love for family, friends, and with a little effort, for strangers. If you find joy in walking a dog at a nearby shelter, volunteering at a thrift store, staffing a help project in a far-flung h ttps://www.unitedhealthgroup.com/ newsroom/2017/0914studydoinggoodisgoodforyou.html 2 https://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2013/ june/june13_volunteeringhypertension.html 3 Shannon Freeman, John Garcia & Hannah R. Marston (2013) Centenarian Self-Perceptions of Factors Responsible for Attainment of Extended Health and Longevity, Educational Gerontology, 39:10, 717-728, DOI: 10.1080/03601277.2012.750981

Stay connected New Book Hope Dancing [www.amazon.com/dp/1732885605] Website [www.localhope.org] Donate [www.localhope.org/donation] Sponsor [https://xelaaid.org/sponsor/students-seeking-sponsors] Volunteer [https://xelaaid.org/volunteer] Facebook [www.facebook.com/xelaaid/] Instagram [www.instagram.com/xela.aid/] Twitter [https://twitter.com/xelaaid]

corner of the world as I do, or in some other form of loving service, the results will be life-changing for all involved. If you are already volunteering, you know the benefits. Pass the idea on. If

not and you believe the studies and the stories like mine, a happier, more fulfilling life is just one resolution away— and it’s not too late to do it in 2020. If not now, when?

1

Leslie Baer Dinkel has worked in critically underserved communities in Guatemala’s highlands for nearly three decades. She is the founder of the non-profit organization LocalHope.org. Her new book, “Hope Dancing: Finding Purpose and a Place to Serve among the Maya,” offers tremendous insight into poverty, the nature of self-determination and the transformational power of full-hearted giving.

Join us in leading Up through giving back

Donate: www.localhope.org/donation Volunteer: www.localhope.org/volunteer Sponsor a Child for School: www.localhope.org/sponsor/ students-seeking-sponsors

Did you know your gift of $30 can provide a night of safe housing for mother in need? Make your life-changing donation to Maggie’s Place www.maggiesplace.org.

SheLift is a 501(c)3 organization that empowers young women with physical differences to discover confidence and self esteem through outdoor recreation and mentorship. Donations accepted: https://shelift.org/ Founded by Sarah Herron (previous Bachelorette contestant)

One Love was founded in honor of Yeardley Love, a 22-year-old college student who was killed by her ex-boyfriend. After her death, the family started the One Love Foundation to educate young people about the difference between healthy and unhealthy relationships. For more information, visit joinonelove.org

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Lead Up Tips

10

TO TIPS UR LIFE E YO SIER K A M EL EA FE

By Geordoni McKoy

1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

How does the idea of slowing down feel?

6.

Minimize the heavy moments

7.

Ask for Help

When you ask for help, you create the opportunity to feel supported. Life is so much more fulfilling with a little help. Ask your added fulfillment will affect you and those around you.

30 Lead Up for Women

What did you like to do as a little girl? Did you enjoy roller-skating, dancing, singing and teddy bears? Are you someone who needs a birthday cake on your birthday. Hell yes to all of the above. Your permission is all you need.

9.

Are you really overwhelmed

As adults, we do not smile or laugh as much as we did when we were children.

What if you payed someone $15-$20 per hour for a total of 10-12 hours of work a month. How much lighter would that make you feel? There are talented people everywhere. It is up to you to put on your magician’s hat and go find them.

Stay in touch with your little girl

8.

Laugh every chance you get

Hire some help

Judgment, shame and blame of yourself and others is heavy. Instead, implement grace, compassion and surrender. They are much lighter and feel so much better.

What will other people think?

Like Nike: Just Do It

Perfection is not required—to wear that swim wear, to start dating, to launch that business, to love yourself, to go live on social media. Do it now and fine tune it later. You do not have to be great to start, but you have to start to be great.

Instead of eating in the car on the run, stop somewhere for 20 minutes and eat. Instead of speeding to get somewhere, take a deep breath and look for three new objects you have never seen before. Joy and happiness is now; it is not the destination.

10.

I have one question: If other people’s opinions did not matter, what action would you take right now?

Are you overwhelmed or are your thoughts overwhelming? If your thoughts are overwhelming, take a couple breaths and look around. Are you safe? Ask yourself if it is something you can step away from for a moment. If so, give yourself a moment and come back later. If taking a break makes you feel anxious, take one action step forward and reassess.

Let it go

Is something bothering you today? Is it forcing you to hold on? You are the only person you answer to. When you surrender the desire for control, you free yourself.

January-February 2020


THIS IS NOT YOUR ORDINARY GET-AWAY! This is a one-of-a-kind, I’m serious about being seen in this world and it starts NOW kind of get-away! Because you are WORTH IT!

Be You Be Strong is an Elite Sanctuary for Women that have a burning desire to lead their lives without asking permission of others. This Powerful supported gathering is designed to foster your unique personal story, and individual clarity and growth; all while nurturing the discovery of YOU and your personal brand. Perks of this Sanctuary • 5 star accommodations in a luxury mansion • Entertainment, Great Conversations, and Deep Connections with 19 other ladies • Healthy food prepared by our personal Chef V Capaldi-The Paleo Boss Lady • Daily yoga, meditation, journaling and self love! • Half day field trip to give back in the community to women that need our power • Live for 3 days under one roof while being pampered with great food, self care, massages, and much much more. • 4-week Accountability Coaching w/ Colleen & all attendees following the event • But, you have to Show Up to be seen...

SANCTUARY DATES: MARCH 26TH-29TH : ATLANTA, GA JUNE 4TH-7TH : UPSTATE NEW YORK JULY 16TH-19TH : COLUMBUS, OH SEPTEMBER 17TH-20TH : DALLAS, TX (Dates are subject to change)

Apply today, only 20 women will be chosen for each Sanctuary Your application will be used for the sanctuary you note on the application.

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The Women’s Series The Women’s Series The Women’s Series

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LATE WINTER 2019

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Family affair How Heidi’s Brooklyn Deli is putting the love in fast casual

Jenee Naples Massey President & CEO Heidis Brooklyn Deli, Naples Franchising Systems

Also Inside: Why stainless steel drainage is critical to your kitchen operation A special supplement to:

Cover story photography by Molly Corrine Photography


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Family affair How Heidi’s Brooklyn Deli is putting the love in fast casual

By Michael J. Pallerino

T

hey started with bagels, a few sandwiches and ice cream. In a small 1,400-square-foot space in a 100-year-old building in Denver, Heidi Bendiksen Naples and Steve Naples hung a sign that announced “Heidi’s Bagels and Ice Cream” was open for business. The Naples simply wanted to bring a little bit of home to the Mile High City. Having moved to Denver in 1990, Heidi coming from Bay Ridge Brooklyn, New York, and both being East Cost natives, they loved the free spirit and calming atmosphere of their new city, but they could not find a good bagel or sandwich.

Entrepreneurs being entrepreneurs, they opened their shop, which they later named “Heidi’s Brooklyn Deli,” on Sept. 9, 1994. As the story goes, bagels, a few sandwiches, ice cream and a whole lot of blood, sweat and tears go a long way. In May 1999, Steve and Heidi opened their second Heidi’s Brooklyn Deli in the northern suburb of Denver called Northglenn. The first franchise location opened in March of 2005 south of Denver in Lone Tree, Colorado. Today, the little sandwich that could has 15 franchises nationally with two in development, nine of which are in Colorado. And the march continues. Commercial Kitchens sat down with Jenee Naples Massey, President & CEO of Heidis Brooklyn Deli and Naples Franchising Systems, to see what the brand is doing heading into 2020 and beyond.

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Give us a snapshot of the Heidi’s brand?

Heidi’s Brooklyn Deli is more than a brand. It is my family’s legacy. In 1994, my parents, Heidi and Steve Naples, moved to Denver and co-founded Heidi’s with a simple idea that people in their community would appreciate dynamic food served with the warmth and hospitality that they grew up experiencing in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Premium quality is at the heart of every plate we serve. Beginning with the bread that is made from scratch every morning in each location, we serve up unforgettable deli sandwiches with unique flavor pairings alongside a robust menu of offerings, including salads, wraps, soups, smoothies and breakfast. In partnership with our wonderful franchisees and vendors, we have been building lasting relationships with our guests across the country. And thanks to our guests, we are proud to be in our 26th year of business. With my sister, Juliana, by my side, we are honored to be taking our brand into the next generation.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

A consumer with an appetite. At Heidi’s, we are proud to be building relationships with our guests ages 1-100. It is a true privilege to see a generation of people that came to Heidi’s as kids with their parents now bringing their kids and their parents in to dine with us. Our menu is dynamic and we strive to create an inclusive environment.

Practically, we do believe it is important to reinvest in and refresh your business. However, we do not believe in asking a franchisee to put their resources into re-imagining the aesthetic design of their space every few years. We feel the resources of the franchisee are better spent investing in their people and their community. To that end, we intentionally design our spaces with real materials like oak millwork and stone countertops. We are built to last.

Is there a location that really shows how the brand interacts with the community and customers? One of your favorites?

We are blessed to have incredible franchisees from coast to coast who have built incredible relationships within their communities. To highlight a couple, our franchisees in Arizona and Maine have been with us for over a decade and have become staples in their respective communities. Whether it is hosting community meetings or sponsoring the local youth league, these franchisees exemplify what it means to be a part of their community.

Walk us through how and why they are designed the way they are?

These restaurants are warm and inviting. The millwork throughout our restaurants are fabricated with mahogany stained oak. The Zero VOC paints on the walls are soft yellow with hints of burgundy throughout. We source light fixtures that create a cozy space with warm white LED light. We intentionally stay away from the cool white light throughout the space. Our restaurant is a gathering place, not a warehouse, and the choice of lighting is essential to creating this ambience.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

How does the design of Heidi’s cater to what today’s consumers are looking for?

Today’s consumers are tomorrow’s consumers just as they were once yesterday’s consumers. We have made the choice as a family and company not to constantly reinvent our image. With that said we understand the importance of striving to innovate and evolve alongside our guests, without losing the intrinsic value that makes us who we are. The magic happens when you are able to balance nostalgia with staying relevant. We are constantly working to find that sweet spot.

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We begin with getting valuable feedback from our franchisees and create a “wish list” of design ideas. Our strategy then begins in the kitchen. We have refined our layout to create the most efficient and effective use of space for operations and product production with a heavy focus around catering operations. It has become important to us to create a space where the key areas of the kitchen are visible to our guests. For example, the oven and bread mixer are visible and highlighted in our spaces to convey the message to our guests visually that we bake all of our breads from scratch every single day in each location. When considering the layout of the lobby, we consider how we can create a warm and intimate environment, while also ensuring the flow of the space is efficient and logical to the guest. When we choose the aesthetic design elements, we are considering impact and cost at every turn. Value engineering is a key element to our construction and design strategy.

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What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

We do not feel it is a new issue, but we do feel the labor market is stretched thinner today. We start any construction project with the intention of staying on schedule and within budget, but we communicate realistic expectations to our franchisees. A GC is often struggling to find subs or get their subs to the job on schedule. In our home market of Denver, there is building happening everywhere and not enough young people getting into trade professions to service the demand. As a franchisor, I have learned to ask the professionals around me what they are experiencing on a regular basis. Our architects, GCs, real estate brokers and equipment vendors experience the pressure points in construction every day. Instead of building an unrealistic project schedule and demanding results, we are working to create a realistic schedule in collaboration with all of our partners in order to set our franchisee up for success.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

Our co-founder, and my mother, Heidi, has been buying groceries with reusable bags since the early ’90s. We regularly discuss how we can make “green” decisions while also being budget conscious on behalf of our franchisees. We source repurposed tile and made the switch to Zero VOC Paints four years ago. We spec LED lighting in our design. On the product side, we spent the last eight years sourcing “clean” proteins and cheeses from multi-generational family farm partners across the country, including Rumiano Cheese Company and Fra’Mani Italian Meats, to name a couple. Sustainability is a popular and important buzzword right now. As a family, we are working to make thoughtful and truly impactful decisions about how to support the environment. I hope our industry chooses to be genuine in decision-making around sustainability and not simply play the “perception game.” That may mean slower progress than our industry thinks the consumer wants, but it is foundational progress and I feel that is much more important. There is a lot of waste in our industry, and it is going to require risk taking and complete sincerity to move the needle in the right direction for future generations. We want to be a part of that conversation.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We believe there is incredible opportunity when you choose to be authentic. We see the opportunity to have honest and meaningful relationships within our industry starting with our franchisees. The immediate opportunity I see in our business is supporting the franchisees I am already partnered with. They are, and will always be, my priority as a leader. As a brand, we are focused on three areas: technological innovation, meaningful storytelling and thoughtful growth. This is a very exciting time to be in the restaurant industry when you look at how impactful technology can be—whether it is connecting with your customer or developing your product. We believe in the power of rich and meaningful storytelling. The world is flooded with content. If we are going to put content out as a brand, we want it to be impactful. Our food vendor partners have powerful stories to tell and we are proud to be a vehicle to share these stores. We see tremendous opportunity for our brand to expand and become a part of communities around the world but not at

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Providing Solutions Anything, Anywhere, Anytime

Retail Solutions Construction Management Installation Services

Merchco Services, Inc. 140 Heimer Rd., Suite 500 San Antonio, Texas 78232 Office 1.888.879.8813 contact@merchcoservices.com www.merchcoservices.com

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the expense of our franchisees today. We learned many valuable lessons in the last 10 years. We are careful not to get ahead of ourselves as we enter into growth mode for the first time in a decade.

Heidi Bendiksen Naples and her daughters, Juliana Naples and Jenee Naples Massey.

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace?

We see great opportunities in non-traditional spaces. Currently, 25% of our locations are in non-traditional spaces like C-stores and airports. We see tremendous value in being part of a larger ecosystem. With occupancy rates pushing well beyond 15% in competitive markets, we are looking at non-traditional opportunities to bring the same delicious food and warm hospitality to our guests.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” restaurant environment in today’s competitive landscape?

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

For the last 18 months, our focus has been our current franchisee partners. We have focused on refining our systems and processes in all areas of the business. It was a period of reset after being in business for 25 years, and it provided our team and franchisees more value than we could have imagined. As we expand our focus to include growth, we are more interested in quality than quantity. We are only focused on markets where our distribution channels are solid. It is a chicken and egg conversation. We rely heavily on our distribution partners and we aren’t going to try and force a new market at a franchisees’ expense. We are based in the West, so we are focused on growth from the inside out, beginning with Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nevada, Arizona and California.

What trends are you seeing?

The desire for connection and community. But this trend is here to stay longer than a few quarters in a fiscal year. As a family and brand, we are more interested in creating meaningful relationships with our guests than anything else. Keeping up with trends is not what has kept us in business the last 25 years. It is the meaningful relationships our franchisees and employees build that keeps us relevant. With that said, we understand and appreciate the importance of continually innovating and creating new magical experiences with our guests, but we believe that more than ever, people are seeking connection—and breakfast all day long. We have been trending “breakfast all day” on handmade bagels for 25 years so we hope that trend continues on.

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I will refer to my answer above about trends and add consistency. Consistency is incredibly difficult to achieve in the restaurant industry and we are working daily with our franchisees to bring the consistent quality that our guests have come to love.

What is today’s consumer looking for?

Connection. Community. Consistency. Quality. Sincerity. Authenticity. I guess I could say, all of the above. That is what we believe today’s consumer not only wants, but deserves.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now? We are currently in the development of a new ordering system. We are bringing technology into the guests’ ordering experience for the first time. The technological elements are intended to support, not replace the employee. It is an exciting project to bring to life.

Describe a typical day.

My day typically starts with my four year old waking me up for breakfast around 5:30 a.m. The best alarm clock there is. Work out. Get the kids ready and drop them at school before heading to the office. It is 8 a.m.-6 p.m. at the office. Meetings. Calls. Franchisee checkins. I love having the privilege of being able to touch all areas of our business on a daily basis. I will bounce from construction reviews to vendor meetings to product tastings to marketing strategy, etc. Visiting our test kitchen is a highlight of my work week. Home around 6 p.m. for homework time with the kids, family dinner and bedtime at 8:30 p.m. for the kids. I get back to my

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work for a couple hours before winding down. Lights out by 11 p.m., fingers crossed. My role requires a fair amount of travel to visit my franchisees. It is one of my favorite parts of the job, but blending in family time is always interesting. I am blessed to have incredible children, and a supportive husband and community around me.

Tell us what makes you so unique?

My mother would always tell me, “You are unique—just like everyone else.” That is what immediately comes to mind. In all seriousness, being a part of a family business and growing up the daughter of entrepreneurs has provided me tools to see the world a little differently. When I come to a fork in the road, I rarely see just two paths. I am not afraid to step out and create my own path. CK

One-on-One with... » Jenee Naples Massey

President & CEO Heidis Brooklyn Deli, Naples Franchising Systems

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? I love people. I love connecting with people and supporting people in achieving their goals, be it a team member mastering a handmade bagel and becoming a star baker or helping a franchisee become a small business owner. It is the most wonderful and rewarding experience when you see someone have that moment of pure joy when they find true pride in their work. I am blessed to go on those journeys with my people.

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What was the best advice you ever received? My father always quoted Eleanor Roosevelt when I was a child: “No one makes you feel inferior without your consent.” I spent two semesters in college before the recession really hit our family and business hard. I chose to step back into the family business where I received a world-class education in my profession. There have been times over the last decade I will attend an event or be in a meeting where I am asked where I went to college, and a sense of inferiority creeps in and right behind that feeling is my father’s voice quoting Eleanor. Today, my answer is “the school of life” and I wouldn’t change a thing.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have. I am still learning from the great leaders how to be a leader every day. I just turned 30. My leadership journey is just beginning. I loved and deeply appreciated the book, “The Ride of a Lifetime,” by one of the greatest leaders of our time, Bob Iger. I carry that book with me everywhere I go. He talks a lot about optimism—and in my personal experience— that has been critical to my leadership journey. We are a family-owned business, and we have had many ups and downs. Making the choice to remain optimistic through the ups and downs kept me on the path toward my current role. My franchisees have great days and hard days. Negativity doesn’t help them through the tough days. Optimism is what makes those days just a bit brighter. I believe a leader must be honorable with their word. Be realistic and be honest. I believe a leader must lead by example. I love to teach my franchisees how to mop the floor as my father taught me. For one, knowing how to properly mop a floor is essential in the restaurant business. In addition, I believe it is important for everyone in your ecosystem to experience by example what is expected of them.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? I think actions speak louder than words. When a franchisee welcomes me into their home to stay when I visit and we share stories about life, business and family over blueberry martinis, that is better than words can express.

How do you like to spend your down time? Hide and Seek at the park with my babies. I am blessed to have two beautiful children, Hanalyn, 7, and Donovan, 4. Once in a while my husband and I sneak away to Copper Mountain for a powder day on our snowboards. That is pure heaven for me.

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Move over appliances Why stainless steel drainage is critical to your kitchen operation By Michael O’Brien

O

h the unappreciated commercial kitchen drain. It so often neglected. Kitchen designers, facility managers, chefs and other personnel tend to focus on a commercial kitchen’s many stainless steel appliances—whose brand names, equipment size and

layout—when considering a kitchen’s capabilities.

Granted, cooking is important in a large kitchen. But what about the most often overlooked facets of keeping a busy kitchen operational and clean, and yet another use for stainless steel: floor drains. Consider the need for kitchen sanitation. Many food morsels or ingredients, and most every drop of sauce, soup or stew that does not leave a kitchen on a plate or in a bowl, ends up on the floor. That is why many kitchens are cleaned between meals or, for food and beverage processing, as routinely as the need requires. Making sure that floor surfaces are squeaky clean and free of bacteria and debris places great expectations on a kitchen’s

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MOVE OVER APPLIANCES

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS drainage—to say nothing of the volume of water required to wash the floor and flush the drains. As the saying goes, time is money, right? Here are a few important facets to consider when considering drainage for commercial kitchens of food/beverage processing facilities. Sizing drain channels is a facet of the design tied directly to the volume of drainage required. One of the most important functions of a drain is to get waste material and water off the floor—quickly. Drainage should never be a bottleneck. The sooner the floor is cleaned, and dry, the sooner it is safe to work on again. Typically, there is a 4-inch drain and a P-trap. This meets the majority of flow capacity needs. While, in some cases, a larger drain surface and channels are needed. At larger facilities, the drains may be several square feet in size (we prefer sturdy, stainless steel grates), with water and waste material flowing into a broader and deeper channel for faster disposal. Keeping the floor dry is not just a safety issue. Sanitation is very important, especially when considering the possible presence of toxic contaminants such as listeria, salmonella and e-coli—what is occasionally referred to as the “Big 3.”

Material considerations

For kitchens drain systems, there is no doubt that stainless steel is the best material. It is best for plenty of reasons. It is extremely durable and easy to clean and sanitize. Another important consideration is the manufactured channel grade. All drains are not created equal. Be sure to compare the effectiveness of a drain’s ability to carry away wastes and flush water. The best vendors use only stainless steel for the drains, grates, the drain channel and even the P-trap. Drains, especially those for larger kitchen, brewing and food processing operations, may be 16 inches x 16 inches in size, or 20 x 40 inches, or larger. They should be chosen for their strength (sufficient to tolerate the weight of a fully-loaded fork lift) and durability. They should also be easy to clean, assuring that solids do not get hung up in them; avoid drains with square corners.

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MOVE OVER APPLIANCES

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Stainless P-traps have a distinct advantage in their ability to withstand the very temperatures of water that is either dumped into them from large kettles, or used to flush the drain channels, and surfactants (cleaning chemicals) that may also be used. There may also be organic materials and proteins going down the drain and into the P-trap; all of these can cause serious problems with PVC P-traps, over time. When very hot water is used to flush drains, PVC P-traps—especially when they are snaked during troublesome cleaning operations—are prone to deterioration, cracking and breakage.

Location, steel, cleaning

Because the main purpose of drainage is to eliminate waste and flush water with a facility, it stands to reason that the best place for the location of drains is where the most water is. Not only water dumped from kettles, but also water used to clean floors and flush the drains. Many cleaning procedures involve the drainage of highly acidic materials. This consideration alone has led to an industry debate comparing the effectiveness and durability of 316 and 304 stainless steel

One of the most important functions of a drain is to get waste material and water off the floor—quickly. 144

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

formulations. The superior steel for most drainage is 316; it contains 16% chromium, 10% nickel and 2% molybdenum. The molybdenum is added to help resist corrosion to chlorides and acidic compounds. When cleaning, it is best to avoid strong chlorine solutions—such as industrial bleach or sodium hypochlorite. Even stainless steel can oxidize, often looking like white blemishes. This will eventually weaken the material.

Installation

Typically, drainage is sloped to 1% from the drain and is anchored in place to become


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MOVE OVER APPLIANCES

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

a part of the floor. It is important to protect it during the concrete pour with a durable channel cover that is in place during all floor work.

Application notes

Some drains are designed specifically for use in the food and beverage industry, where maintaining hygiene is critical. Lacking corners or inside cavities to harbor bacterial growth and with resistance to a wide range of cleaning chemicals, these drain systems are unaffected by high-temperature cleaning, caustic cleaners and effluent, or steam disinfection. In Cincinnati, MadTree Brewery chose to install BLÜCHER HygienicPro® trench drains in its new 50,000-square-foot brewhouse. In its old facility, employees would spend 10 minutes to 15 minutes hosing down the floor after a tank cleaning to get all solids down the drain. With these drains in its new facility, most of the solids would make their way down the drain with little effort; an employee would only need to spend a minute or so cleaning up any loose ends. Floor/drain washing is required twice a day at MadTree’s brewing facility, so the new drains free-up half an hour of labor and save hundreds of gallons of water each day. Over a year’s time, the savings is significant and greatly impacts their ROI, simply by selecting the right drainage product. “The design and engineering of the drains made them stand out,” says Mike Stuart, MadTree director of people and social strategies. Clearly, use, function and drain design should be among the first considerations when selecting a commercial kitchen drain. CK

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CIRCLE NO. 49


COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION PEOPLE

2020 SCHEDULE: February 20 Miami, FL

March 18 Atlanta, GA

April 16 Dallas/Ft Worth

May 12

Minneapolis, MN

June 18 Philadelphia, PA

July 13 Boston, MA

July 28 Cincinnati, OH

August 18 Detroit, MI

September 16 New York City, NY

TBD

Los Angeles

December 3rd Phoenix, AZ

Dates/location will be confirmed by December 31st, 2019 on CCRP site at www.ccr-people.com.

For information about membership or events, contact Kristen Corson, kristenc@ccr-people.com • 770.990.7702 For information about co-sponsoring an event, contact David Corson, davidc@ccr-mag.com • 678.765.6550

www.ccr-people.com www.ccr-mag.com CIRCLE NO. 50


2020 Commercial Construc on & Renova on People (CCRP) Membership form must be completed in full and submi ed to: Commercial Construc on & Renova on People (CCRP) • P.O. Box 3908 • Suwanee, GA 30024 • (P) 770.990.7702 • (F) 678.765.6551 First Name: ____________________________________ Middle Ini al: ________ Last Name: _________________________________________ Title:

____________________________________ Company: ________________________________________________________________

Address:

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City:

_________________________________________ State: ________________________ Zip: __________________________________

Phone:

__________________________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________________________

E-mail:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ I AM APPLYING FOR (Please check only one – for membership descrip ons see first page) PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP (Membership is complimentary)

ο Retail

ο Hospitality

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COMPANY MEMBERSHIP

o

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP

Please indicate your company’s PRIMARY business func on (please check only one). ο Educa on

ο Correc ons

ο Healthcare

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ο Other

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(Annual Dues - $750) ο Building Products ο Architecture/Design ο Construc on/Contractor ο Execu ve Search ο Design Firm ο Consultants ο Manufacturer ο Marke ng/Adver sing/Public Rela ons ο Engineering Firm ο Product Supplier ο Facility Maintenance ο Other _______________________

Please indicate your company’s PRIMARY business func on (please check only one).

(Annual Dues - $199) ο Building Products ο Architecture/Design ο Construc on/Contractor ο Execu ve Search ο Design Firm ο Consultants ο Manufacturer ο Marke ng/Adver sing/Public Rela ons ο Engineering Firm ο Product Supplier ο Facility Maintenance ο Other _______________________

How many years have you been in the commercial construc on industry?

_____________________

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS • Ques ons regarding CCRP Membership? • Interested in co-sponsoring a CCRP Event? • Wish to invite a vendor or execu ve to a CCRP Event? CONTACT Kristen Corson, Membership Director, Commercial Construc on & Renova on People (CCRP) (P) 770.990.7702 (F) 678.765.6551 (Email) kristenc@ccr-people.com I hereby apply for membership with Commercial Construc on & Renova on People (CCRP). If granted, I will abide by the membership regula ons and by-laws, supports objec ves and pay the dues established by F&J Publica ons for my class of membership. If applying for Associate Membership, I a est that I am a salaried employee of the official member company and not a franchisee of that company. I authorize CCRP to send announcements (via e-mail, phone or otherwise) regarding CCRP programs and services that may be of interest to me or any of my business associates.

Signature of Applicant ______________________________________________________________ Date _________________________________________________

Membership dues MUST accompany applica on: ο Check Enclosed ο MasterCard ο Visa ο American Express ο Discover

Name (as it appears on card) _________________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________ Account Number ___________________________________________________________ Exp. Date ______________________ Security Code ___________ Billing Address ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Fax completed applica on to 678.765.6551 or save me and apply online at: www.ccr-people.com


By JoAnne Castagna

Green shelter

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Hazardous land used during Atomic Age has sustainable future

I

n In 1945, following the United States’ detonation of two atomic bombs over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, World

War II ended and the Atomic Age began. Research on the uses of atomic power also started

Exterior view of National Lead Industries in Colonie, New York. May 3, 1982 (Paul D. Kniskern Sr./Times Union Archive).

and the forming of the United States’ Atomic Energy Commission was created to foster this.

The former FUSRAP property today in Colonie, New York. CREDIT: USACE.

As part of its work, the Atomic Energy Commission licensed National Lead Industries in Colonie, New York to manufacture some items for them using thorium, uranium and depleted uranium. As a result of this production, the land and water on an around the site became contaminated. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, has since cleaned up the property and the land is now being eyed as a possible location for a green solar power site. “This is a milestone project because it is the 100th legacy site to be cleaned up and added to the Department of Energy’s Legacy Management Program,” says Jim Moore, project manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. “It’s the second legacy project that the Army Corps’ New York District has cleaned up and transferred to the DOE. This reflects the sustained progress by the DOE in partnership with the Army Corps in managing the responsibilities associated with the environmental waste legacy of World War II and the Cold War Era.” The National Lead Industries was a company situated on approximately 11 acres of land in the Town of Colonie in Albany County, New York. Active from 1937-1984, the company manufactured a number of items, including ones for the AEC from the 1950s through 1984. Thorium, uranium and depleted uranium were used to manufacture shielding components, aircraft counterweights, experimental nuclear reactors and artillery projectiles. This production resulted in residual radiological contamination of the site’s land and groundwater. Neighboring properties were also impacted by contaminated dust particles from the burning of depleted uranium chips. This occurred before the United States had environmental laws enacted. In 1984, the New York State Supreme Court closed the company due to environmental concerns, and subsequently ownership of the site was transferred to DOE. At the time, DOE oversaw the

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Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and began cleaning up what was named the Colonie FUSRAP Site, which included demolishing all of the site’s buildings. The FUSRAP was established by the U.S. federal government in 1974 to clean up low-level radioactive contamination from the nation’s early atomic research program. In 1997, the U.S. Congress transferred responsibility of the FUSRAP mission to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the agency continued the cleanup responsibility. The Army Corps excavated and disposed of 135,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Approximately, 2 feet of clean soil was placed over these affected areas. A groundwater monitoring program was also put in place to measure the progress in using natural processes to address contaminants in groundwater. The site and nearby residential and commercial properties were also investigated for contaminated dust particles. This contaminated land is in an urban area, near residences and businesses. Throughout the cleanup process, the Army Corps ensured that nearby residents and business owners were well informed and kept from the danger during the cleanup. This was carried out through the use of dust suppression efforts during active excavations and air monitoring at the excavation locations and along the perimeter of the property. Moore says that the most common concern of the community was the safety of the land. “The land is safe and suitable for reuse. Repeated investigations of the site and surrounding properties show that all of the land has been remediated to appropriate standards and the New York State Department of Health concurs.”

The FUSRAP Colonie project under active construction in 2004. CREDIT: USACE.

The FUSRAP Colonie project under active construction in 2005. CREDIT: USACE.

The former FUSRAP property today in Colonie, New York. CREDIT: USACE.

This fall, the Army Corps transferred the completed project to the DOE’s Office of Legacy Management that strives to identify beneficial reuse opportunities for its sites. The plan for Colonie is to turn it into a green solar power site. “This project was my first assignment when I joined the Army Corps in 2001 and it’s great to see our mission being accomplished," Moore says. "A lot of very talented people worked very hard to accomplish this task and every one of them deserve recognition. I’m proud to be part of this success story. Most importantly, the land is safe once again and will serve its community in a beneficial capacity.” From nuclear power to solar power, the land served a purpose that was important to the nation in the past and it will continue to in the future. FC

Dr. JoAnne Castagna is a Public Affairs Specialist and writer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. She can be contacted at joanne.castagna@usace.army.mil

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Open for luxury Inside Charleston, South Carolina’s Caroline Luxury Apartments By Siva Davuluri

L

ocated in the heart of Charleston, South Carolina, Caroline Luxury Apartments is an artistically inspired mixed-use residential community. Featuring a broad selection of customized floorplans and an amenity list a mile long, it has become a sought-after destination in the

city’s WestEdge neighborhood.

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CIRCLE NO. 52


Known for its cafes, restaurants, art galleries and easy access to activities along the Ashley River, WestEdge is a popular neighborhood where residents expect a blend of safety, security, design and features. New from the ground up, the “Caroline” features 237 units spread across five floors. While each apartment offers a unique combination of refinement and customization, the design and installation of the oversize rolling door serving the loading dock area stands out for its thoughtful integration and robust construction—something that has helped protect the building from back-to-back hurricanes. Thanks to the design and engineering prowess of CornellCookson and ACME Doors, the facility has a safe, secure, temperature-controlled and weather-resistant access point that masks an unsightly, yet necessary part of the building.

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Design challenges

One of the major challenges in specifying a door for the facility’s loading dock and trash collection area was finding a product that could do everything well. It needed to be attractive yet durable, fast yet quiet, and stand up to brutal temperatures in the summer and extreme weather events such as hurricanes and tropical depressions in the fall. Since the Caroline is located less than 1/5 of a mile from the water’s edge, this was a major concern. Another major challenge was the timeline of the project. The building was already under construction when bids were sent out to rolling door contractors. When companies started responding, it became clear that the structure and headspace surrounding the loading dock would not accommodate an insulated rolling door without major compromises or a serious redesign of the structure. In order to find the right fit, the general contractor tapped the expertise of Ric Morsch at ACME Doors. The CornellCookson distributor, which has been in business since 1969, won the bid based on its experience and design capabilities. Morsch first took field measurements and adapted CornellCookson drawings to fit the opening. The new drawings were presented to the general contractor, who modified the original opening to match the new drawings. Since the opening was already completed, this meant modifying the structure to properly mount the door. “The architect designed a thin slot that extended into the concrete ceiling of the loading dock area,” Morsch says. “In theory, this would make the head unit invisible and allow the door to retract into a small space—hiding it from view.” Morsch says the design created nearly impossible constraints when it came to mounting the motor and head unit into the opening—not to mention servicing the door in the future. He quickly involved CornellCookson to work alongside the building engineer and general contractor. Together they redesigned the structure to allow the door to fit into the header. They built headspace around the unit as well as developed access panels for any potential service or maintenance. This ensured that the large rolling door would fit and would provide ingress and egress for delivery trucks, garbage collection and maintenance

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


CIRCLE NO. 53


vehicles—in addition to protection against the elements.

A sensible solution

While each apartment offers a unique combination of refinement and customization, the design and installation of the oversize rolling door serving the loading dock area stands out for its thoughtful integration and robust construction.

The solution to the series of challenges at the Caroline was a custom insulated rolling door. Designed for exterior use, the product helps maintain different temperatures on each side of the door—a major necessity for a city that averages 90-plus degrees during the summer months. “It was a good fit for the Caroline facility as it combines climate control with security, and complements the light brick facade,” Morsch says. “Since this is a residential and retail facility, visitors and residents don’t want to see a tractor trailer being unloaded outside while they shop or lounge by the pool, located directly above the loading dock on the second level of the facility.” The rolling doors offer additional benefits as well, as they roll up compactly (critical for the small head space), require little to no maintenance and deliver a low life cycle cost. The door can also be configured to meet a maximum operational wind load of 20 PSF.

Foamed in place insulation offers superior protection against the elements, improved security and reduced sound transmission. “The performance and durability aspects of the new door are unmatched,” says David Burke, maintenance manager for the Caroline. “It helps maintain the luxury aesthetics of the complex while being easy to operate—allowing the vast majority of maintenance and day-to-day activities of the commercial spaces to happen out of view of residents.” The true power of the door came into focus not long after the completion of the project. As Hurricane Florence barreled up the coast in 2018, thousands of residents evacuated Charleston. Located less than 1/5 of a mile from the coastline, the Caroline was subjected to heavy wind loads and flying debris. As for the door? It stood up to the storm and had no damage. “The same thing was true when Hurricane Dorian hit Charleston this year," Burke says. "We’ve never lost a day or minute of work and has made all of our lives safer.” MH

Siva Davuluri is VP of marketing at CornellCookson. He has led many new product development projects for CornellCookson high performance product lines. He can be reached at Siva.Davuluri@cornellcookson.com.

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Under the hood

How data helped the Georgetown University Science Building save energy

G

eorgetown University in Washington, D.C., is one of the

world’s leading academic and research institutions, classified as a Very High Research Activity (RU/VH) University by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Completed in 2012, Regents Hall is a state-of-the art research and teaching center for biology, chemistry, and physics.

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With 154,000-square-feet of research space, it houses three classrooms, 12 teaching labs, and dozens of research labs in addition to conference rooms and student lounges. Knowing the enormous utility costs associated with running a science facility, the Georgetown Energy and Utilities department invited Aircuity to evaluate how their platform could help reduce energy consumption while improving lab safety. Working together, they assessed the labs on an individual basis and determined that 65 was a good fit for the application of demand-control ventilation. A proposal with a calculated annual savings was presented to GU management and the project soon got underway. The system installation took three months with very minimal impact to research and teaching activities. Subsequently, the new control system was commissioned in May 2017. Within the first year, the actual energy savings was nearly $124,000. Soon after completion, Georgetown’s analytics identified five areas of opportunity that the university could address to reach its full savings potential.

1. Fume Hood Behavior

Data showed that 10 fume hoods were left at full operational height continuously for several weeks. With each hood averaging—$4,500/year to operate (roughly same utility cost as a house), the ability to easily identify issues and modify behavior relative to these hoods provides for significant savings. Had these 10 hoods remained fully opened for year, it would have cost the university $45,000. Using this information, Environmental and Occupational Safety Manager Casey Cahill worked with Science Building Manager Kavita Tanksale, researchers and students to ensure these sashes are closed when the fume hoods are not in use. This action has achieved a measurable improvement.

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CIRCLE NO. 55


8 a.m. to 8 p.m.), the difference between the min and max flows is a combined 7500 CFM. We see this issue during 60 of the 168 hours in a week = 35.7% of the time. Estimating that a researcher works in their fume hood about 10% of the time, there is opportunity for saving 6750 CFM.

5. Increased Fan Power for More Duct Static in One Room

The lab ventilation energy model was run with an increase static of 20% at the exhaust fans only (1.5 to 1.8 = 20%). There was about 70,000 kWh attributed to the increase. In addition to understand the full savings opportunity, Georgetown’s Environmental, Health & Safety department used the information displayed at the Aircuity portal to verify the high performance of rooms, relative to Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ). A web app automatically ranks the rooms by their IEQ performance. Cahill reviewed the analytics and immediately identified a room that had considerably more IEQ events over the prior two weeks. Armed with this information, he went to the specific room to contain the source of the contaminants.

The system installation took three months with very minimal impact to research and teaching activities. 2. Rooms with High Thermal Loads

There were 13 rooms with cfm higher than their targeted rate. These excess flows total 2745 cfm, or approximately $13,725 in missed energy savings.

3. Rooms with Frequent DCV Responses

These events are all within normal operating parameters and are sufficiently ventilated by the system. They caused an excess flow of approximately 750 cfm.

4. Incorrectly Programmed Fumehoods

Fume hoods were found going to their max based on occupancy, not sash position. Adding up the combined CFM that these hoods are running over their minimum, during the occupied periods (approximately

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Using the platform, Georgetown University has: > Delivered energy savings in an already cutting-edge building > Gained quick and easy access to actionable information that is valued by multiple stakeholders > Created measurably better environments for all occupants Currently, Georgetown is developing a second project for its main campus. HC

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


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INDUSTRY

THE CANNABIS CHRONICLES

The rise of cannabis

The construction industry’s new Wild West

I

n case you have been living under a rock for the last five years, the cannabis industry is booming. With full “Adult Use” legalization across Canada and now in 11 of the US states, there is no going back. Another 20 states have some form of medical cannabis programs in the works—and even more have pending legislation to create new ones in 2020.

By Dan O’Neill Dan O’Neill is president and managing consultant of O’Neill Management Consulting LLC, a sales, marketing and business development company focused on customer facing solutions in targeted vertical markets.

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While most pundits still believe that federal legalization is still several years out in in the United States, virtually all experts see full legalization early this decade. The highly-fragmented marijuana industry is beginning to see major, national players emerge. US-based multi-state operators (MSOs)—many of which trade on the Canadian Securities Exchange (CSE)—had a banner year in 2018, accounting for the Top 5 raises for all companies on the CSE. Much of that capital will be deployed throughout 2020 to fund aggressive expansion plans—putting more pressure on small-to mid-sized cannabis businesses with fewer resources, but which are prepared to take on the challenges.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

Here are several of the takeaways:

Takeaway No. 1

After years of inaction, earnest marijuana policy reform discussions at the federal level are finally happening. Former Speaker of the House John Boehner was even quoted in the New York Times, saying, “This is one of the most exciting opportunities you’ll ever be part of. Frankly, we can help you make a potential fortune.” Bills to address issues such as banking and taxation have found bipartisan support in the US House. It is now a question of when—not if—federal changes around marijuana will happen.


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INDUSTRY

THE CANNABIS CHRONICLES Takeaway No. 2

Investments in the cannabis space from other industries—namely, tobacco and alcohol—reached a fever pitch in 2018. Altria Group―owner of Marlboro maker Philip Morris USA—and liquor giant Constellation Brands each made multibillion-dollar investments in Canadian marijuana producers— like Canopy Growth—while Molson Coors Brewing formed a joint venture with another Canadian firm to develop cannabis-infused beverages. The deals are expected to spur additional investment, mergers and acquisitions across the sector. And, of course, there will be some fallout as the industry solidifies and acquisitions occur.

ownership of cannabis businesses. This will be key to the physical growth of the industry—especially for those owners who have game plans to start of small and build upon growth plans in the coming few years.

Takeaway No. 4

The industry will generate an estimated $11 billion to $14 billion in retail sales in 2020, up from roughly $2 billion in 2013. But the pace of growth is slowing in some key recreational markets, including Colorado, Oregon and Washington state, and consolidation is materializing in several regions—for good reason. Like any other growth industry (let us use the internet in 1999), there will always

extremely high. Because cannabis/THC based products are still deemed a “Schedule 1” drug and considered illegal by the federal government the banking and logistics challenges are substantial. Each legal state has hyper restrictive regulations on every element of the production and sale of cannabis products in their state. And transporting cannabis products across any state lines remains illegal. These challenges are also unique opportunities for the construction industry. The largest national brands in cannabis are the multi state operators (MSOs) and most of these firms are vertically integrated in each state in which they hold licenses. Vertical integration typically means that a firm holds a license to cultivate, produce and sell their products to the public.

It has been written about in countless articles that the cannabis industry is the new Wild West— with a brain.

Takeaway No. 3

Social equality in the cannabis space has become a much more salient issue among politicians, advocates, regulators and industry stakeholders, forcing policymakers to identify practical solutions to ensure more diversity and fairness when crafting legalization measures—or risk failure. Earlier this year, an adult-use legalization bill failed in the New York Legislature primarily because of its lackluster approach to social equity, while the cornerstone of a promising reccreation bill under consideration in Illinois involves boosting minority

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be a “shakeout” where angel investors may go by the wayside and larger investors with not necessarily better knowledge in the industry will make their way to the forefront. That being said, there is no Magic 8 Ball that you can shake that will determine for any company, “You are on the right track.” It has been written about in countless articles that the cannabis industry is the new Wild West—with a brain.

Risks & rewards

There are still several major challenges to the industry, and risk and rewards are

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

Depending on the state regulations, each of these licenses typically require a unique compliant facility in which to operate. Construction professionals who can navigate the compliance road blocks or partner with experts in the space will find excellent opportunities to thrive by extending their expertise into cannabis construction. It is important to take the romance negative bias out of the picture, meaning treat cannabis as another unique vertical industry where strong business practices will achieve like any other space. In fact, cannabis tends to reflect several other markets that we are all familiar with, including healthcare, packaging, retail, restaurants and manufacturing. CCR


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CIRCLE NO. 59


JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

The Voice of Craft Brands

Kevin Carr, founder, Community Beer Co.

‘Beer For The Greater Good’

How Community Beer Co. is taking its brand to the people (everywhere)


The Voice of Craft Brands

‘Beer For The Greater Good’

How Community Beer Co. is taking its brand to the people (everywhere)

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CBAM-MAG.COM


By Michael J. Pallerino

Snicker Doodle Ale. Mosaic IPA. Brett’s Get It On. Silly Gose. When it comes to bringing the fun to craft beer, nobody does it better than North Texas’ Community Beer Co., the brewery that Kevin Carr brought to the edge of the Design District in Dallas in 2013. An area that was once known for Miller Lite now features scores of breweries pushing local beer creations. At the forefront is Community Beer Co., which features a state-of-the-art brewery made by Newlands, one of the premier manufacturers of brewery equipment in the world. Its highly demanded selection is complemented by a location that supports local artists, musicians and charities, a combination that Carr and company call “Beer for the Greater Good.” We sat down with Carr to get his take on how Community Beer Co. is helping change the face of craft spirits in the Great State of Texas and beyond.

I also believe you will find many craft breweries doing more with their taprooms, some (like us) adding restaurants to increase traffic (and revenue) to their facility.

What trends are defining the space?

Traditional lagers and ales have made a comeback. Many folks still want those sessional beers you can drink several of while being outside, by the pool, at cookouts or just sitting on the sofa. Also, the “better for you” category (that’s actually what it is called) includes the explosion of hard seltzers that have hit the market. Even these seltzer manufacturers are shocked by the explosive growth

Give us a snapshot of today’s craft brew market.

Since we launched our operation seven years ago, the market has become exponentially competitive. But as with most industries, things are stabilizing. This includes some corrections leading to some breweries getting stronger, while others decline or even go out of business. After years of many experimental beers and obscure styles being offered, consumers are now gravitating to many more traditional styles. IPAs are still the strongest category, but lagers and traditional ales are now being showcased by craft breweries again.

What’s likely to happen next?

I believe we will still see more shakeout of craft breweries, whereby a handful will continue to grow, and others will not. Consumers are starting to pick their favorite brewery brands in the market, and with so much visual noise on the shelf, it has become harder to pay attention to all the new brands.

of this category. As for beer, some breweries are offering low-calorie and/or low-carb options for this category. Community Beer Co. is doing this as well. We recently launched Hop Skinny, a low-calorie, low-carb IPA. It smells and tastes like a regular IPA, but better for your waistline. Lastly, consumers are seeing (and will continue to see) a plethora of new alcoholic options across beer, spirits and wine. Many small-batch, local spirits makers have joined the game. And a

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Community Beer Co.

large alcohol conglomerate is in its final testing of instant mixed drinks, whereby you would drop a K-cup-like pod into a maker, hit a button, and out comes a margarita, vodka soda, old fashioned, and more.

What is the Community Beer Co. story from a brand perspective?

Day in and day out, everything you do must align with the same “vibe” you want your brand to emit.

When I started Community Beer Co., I not only wanted to build a brand that represents high-quality brews, but also one that promotes community-building, goodness and love. This is precisely why I called the brewery “Community.” Our facility is highly visible and centrally located in Dallas, Texas. It has a large gathering space where we host a wide range of events that bring the community—from all walks of life—together. We also have a 501(c)(3) attached to our brand called “The Greater Good,” which gives back to the community in various ways such as homeless

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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

assistance, the deaf, disaster relief, support of various other charities, a charitable cycling team, and more. Through our marketing and actions, all of this defines our brand.

Walk us through your branding strategy.

Our branding strategy is three-pronged: No. 1: Making high-quality beer. There are no shortcuts in our brewing process and quality control. And we have validated this by winning many prestigious awards.

No. 2: Connecting with consumers: Use of our facility and market events to bring large numbers of the community together so they can connect with our brand. Showing folks a good time, interacting with our amazing staff and giving brewery tours really shape consumers’ connection to our brand, which translates to increased sales out in the market.

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CIRCLE NO. 60


Community Beer Co.

No. 3: Marketing: We leverage multiple marketing channels to continue to shape our identify and promote our brand. Our marketing team does an amazing job of creating fun, goofy, and engaging content across both social and traditional media channels.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the marketing/sales side of the craft beer business?

Quite simply, it is all the noise out there in our space. In Texas alone, there are around 400 breweries all competing for consumers’ attention. Nationwide, there are nearly 8,000. Therefore, it is challenging to stand out in social media marketing, winning shelf space and maintaining tap handles in a market with so many choices out there to choose from.

What is the secret to creating a branding story that consumers can buy in to?

There are three things: Passion. Marketers have to be passionate about their brand, and have fun marketing it. You cannot do anything well without passion. However, the second piece of the equation is understanding what you want your brand to represent. Understanding if your marketing activities and visual content is actually aligned with what you intend. Does the consumer react differently to your brand than you think? Are you too close to your brand to understand what it really means to the market? And finally, consistency is key. In an ever-changing market, it is easy to want to change your branding to react to the trend of the moment; however, marketers need to be consistent in their message. That repetition is how to solidify what your brand means to the outside world. Day in and day out, everything you do must align with the same “vibe” you want your brand to emit. Too much change— or inconsistency—only confuses the customer, and they will not resonate with your brand. CIRCLE NO. 61

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What is the one thing that every craft beer brand should be doing in the way of marketing?

Have deep expertise in social media and use it effectively. We all know social media is arguably the best marketing channel we have ever known. It is cheap, quick, engaging and we can get instant (often trackable) feedback of the effectiveness of our marketing. Part of this expertise means knowing how much is too much. There is a fine, delicate line of frequency of your posts so that you do not annoy consumers. And there are many best practices surrounding when to post, how often to post, how to effectively use images, when to use video, use of event pages, promoting posts, and consumer engagement.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Generally speaking, we have two major opportunities ahead. One is that as we continue to grow, we are strengthening relationships with grocery and restaurant chain managers so that we can continue to win large placements across their networks. This will also lead to expansion to other states. Two, we will be moving into a new facility later this year. Not only will this greatly increase our production capacity, but we will add more product lines for on-premise consumption, add a restaurant, expanded taproom, biergarten, concert stage, more private event space, and more—all of which will help execute the customer experience component of our marketing strategy.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

The aforementioned new facility. We are

currently in the design phase of our new 80,000-square-foot facility with construction about to begin. All the moving parts associated with our new facility takes up a considerable amount of my time these days.

How does your taproom space integrate into your branding/marketing strategies? Our taproom is integral to our branding/marketing strategy. Our facility is centrally located in Dallas

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Community Beer Co.

and offers a large gathering space for the public. We use it for a wide-range of events (or normal taproom “have a beer and chill” hours) so that consumers can really connect with what we are all about. It is critical for our customers to be able to see and feel first-hand what we are all about. Giving folks a reason to visit us is key to our marketing.

Does music and/or other arts play a role in your overall brand strategies?

Absolutely. We are a huge supporter of the arts. We regularly have live music in our taproom. We often invite local artists to display their work for sale, and they keep 100% of the proceeds. We are also about to release a series of cans designed by local artists.

Sitting down with... Kevin Carr, founder, Community Beer Co. What’s the most rewarding part of your job? There are so many rewarding aspects of my job. From seeing our beer available throughout the state, to having people nationwide say they know our brand. But the thing I really enjoy the most is seeing the diverse range of people our brand attracts. At any given time, you will find all walks of life in our taproom: young and old, all ethnicities, single and families, conservative dress and tattoos, and more. It is this that confirms our branding strategy is working. We are called “Community” for a reason.

What was the best advice you ever received? I’ve had lots of great advice in my nearly 25 year entrepreneurial career—either from direct communication or reading. But the one I adhere to the most is that success is temporary. Things can change quickly. And I have seen this many times in my career. So I never get complacent or feel I have “arrived.” I get up every day with the mentality that our successes can shift at any time. My team and I work hard each day with a start-up mindset, never taking for granted any successes we may have found along the way. We are always ready to react to big changes in our market.

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What’s the best thing a customer ever said to you? I am fortunate enough that on many occasions I have been told that Community Beer Co., is their favorite brewery. With so much great beer being made out there, this is high praise. However, the best compliment I have ever received is being stopped at a market event and she said: “Community Beer Co., means more to me than just great beer. Your company represents full inclusion of everyone without judgement.” She continued to say, “Sometimes I just visit your brewery to lift myself up.” Wow. Needless to say, I gave her a big hug.

What is your favorite brand story? There have been many. The best come from folks outside of the markets we sell. Sometimes it is shocking to run into someone thousands of miles from our home market who knows our brand. But this one takes the cake: My wife and I were on our honeymoon in the Virgin Islands a few years ago. To get to our resort, we had to jump on a small, six-passenger boat to take us across the bay. One of the couples sitting across from us saw our logo on my hat, and said, “You know Community Beer Co.?” I said, “Yes, I am the founder.” He nearly fell off the boat. He went on to say how much he loved our brewery and seeks us out every time he visits Texas. He had been to the brewery, knew all our beers, our awards, and even the events we have put on. It was absolutely surreal to make that connection on a small boat in the middle of the Caribbean Sea.

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CIRCLE NO. 62


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Longhorn Steakhouse #5616

Davenport, FL

$1,500,000.00

5,660

New Construction

Q2 2020

Popeye's - Bells Highway

Walterboro, SC

$500,000.00

1,930

New Construction

Q2 2020

Chipotle #3573

Chesterfield, VA

$100,000.00

2,232

Renovation

Q2 2020

Starbucks #56882

Chapel Hill, NC

$100,000.00

2,381

Remodel

Q2 2020

Tallahassee, FL

$10,000,000.00

62,179

New Construction

Q2 2020

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS: Publix #1656 - Oak Valley Kroger - Monroe Drive

Atlanta, GA

$1,500,000.00

64,788

Remodel/Renovation

Q2 2020

Burlington - Bermuda Square

Chester, VA

$1,300,000.00

35,000

Remodel

Q2 2020

Walmart Supercenter #716-235

Winona, MS

$900,000.00

184,297

Renovation

Q2 2020

Spring Hill, TN

$12,000,000.00

62,000

New Construction

Q2 2020

O'Town West Mixed-Use Development

Orlando, FL

$1,000,000,000.00

1,000,000

New Construction

Q2 2020

Goss Avenue Development

Louisville, KY

$2,000,000.00

28,000

Renovation

Q4 2020

Miami, FL

$1,500,000,000.00

2,300,000

New Construction

Q2 2020

ROOST Apartment Hotel

Charleston, SC

$14,000,000.00

30,000

New Construction/Renovation

Q3 2020

WoodSpring Suites

Concord, NC

$6,000,000.00

49,915

New Construction

Q2 2020

Delta Dental of Tennessee Building UT Health Science Center

Memphis, TN

$41,000,000.00

192,076

Addition/Renovation

Q2 2020

Douglas County High School Sports Complex

Douglasville, GA

$10,000,000.00

22,342

New Construction

Q2 2020

Major Renovations of Seaborn Lee and Stonewall Tell Elementary School

College Park, GA

$6,737,500.00

180,000

Renovation

Q2 2020

Spartanburg, SC

$11,521,275.00

54,000

New Construction

Q3 2020

Davie County Government Center

Mocksville, NC

$7,850,000.00

72,254

New Construction/Renovation

Q2 2020

City Hall and Police Station Building Hardening and Safe Room

New Roads, LA

$175,000.00

4,045

New Construction/Renovation

Q2 2020

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE: Tennessee Children's Home

HOSPITALITY: Marriott Marquis Miami Worldcenter Hotel & Expo Center

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY: Municipal Court/Police Building Spartanburg County

MEDICAL: Augusta University Health Medical Center

Grovetown, GA

$150,000,000.00

260,000

New Construction

Q4 2020

Caddis - Branan Field Medical Office Building

Jacksonville, FL

$20,000,000.00

35,000

New Construction

Q3 2020

Aspen Dental

Summerville, SC

$250,000.00

3,500

Renovation

Q2 2020

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


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AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

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CESO

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National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association

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Permit.com

91 41

Persona, Inc.

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148-149 50

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Poma Retail Development, Inc

83

Construction Data Co. (CDC)

181

Porcelanosa

79 37

Constructed-Ed

53 27

PPG Services

145

48

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11

8

Prime Retail Services

35

17

Controlled Power

16

10

Coverings

163

55

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Dynamic Air Quality Solutions

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Rogue Architects

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FacilityRX Services

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Salto

93 42

Federal Heath

155

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Federated Service Solutions

85

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Serigraphics

157 53

Fishbeck

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SGA Design Group

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FloorMax USA

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Signage Solutions

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Fortney & Weygandt, Inc.

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SMI Sign Systems, Inc

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Georgia Printco

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62

GSB, Inc. Architects & Planners

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The Blue Book Network

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IdentiCom Sign Solutions

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Visual EFX Group

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ISA Sign Expo

159

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Warner Bros

CVR3

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Jones Sign

143

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Window Film Depot

87

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Kingsmen

37 18

Wolverine Building Group

133

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L2M Architects

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ZipWall

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182

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020

8, CVR4

6, 65


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JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

183


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Hitting the reset button S tarting a new year is always exciting as its another trip around the sun, another birthday and all the unknown & anxiety of what is to become history. With the holidays over, its time to get back to your normal routine—which means getting things done on time and under budget. The first few months of 2020 have been exciting. We had the New Year’s Day celebration, the College National Championship game won by a very talented LSU squad, the elimination of some bad guys by the greatest military in the world, the Super Bowl win by the Kansas City Chiefs after 50 years and our 10th Anniversary Summit celebration in Jacksonville, FL.

Unfortunately, we also had the fatal helicopter crash and loss of nine souls, including Kobe Bryant one of the greatest NBA basketball players to play the game along with his daughter, family friends & pilot on a foggy hill- side in Southern California. The crash shocked many across the world. Kobe’s accident brought back memories of losing my father on January 7, 1978. His plane crashed while he was coming to see me play ice hockey versus my arch rival, The Hill School. The circumstances surrounding Kobe’s crash were similar—foggy weather and low visibility. He missed the approach the first time trying to land at a local landing strip with no radar in his twin engine Beechcraft. After circling around, he tried again, but was too low to see the runway and clipped some trees. I know Kobe, his daughter and the other passengers never thought their lives would end that day as it was just another normal helicopter ride. Hopefully, none of them felt any pain. Both crashes happened so quickly that they most likely did not know what Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

184

happened. Pilot error was evident in both. The helicopter did not have equipment on board to fly in fog, while my father could have flown to an airfield 10 minutes away with radar to land safely, but just wanted to get to the rink to see me play. When I saw the police car pull up at the rink and then my coach approach me after coming off a shift in a tie game, he looked me straight in my eyes and said sadly: “There has been an accident and you need to go to the hospital now, take your skates off”. No one told me what happened but knew what was waiting for me when I arrived was going to change my life forever. Life is really short. Kobe was just 41 and had a long life ahead of him. My father was 39. He was building his furniture business to be one of the largest privately held upholstery manufacturers in the country. In an instant, it was over. My heart goes out to the families who lost their loved ones on that flight. I know what they are going through and it hurts. At 14 years old, it was tough on me and my entire family. But we persevered. Time heels. My father passed doing what he loved, flying. The same was true for Kobe. He passed with his daughter and friends by his side doing what they all loved to do, coaching and helping others. The memory never leaves. It still feels like yesterday that I was driving from the ice rink to Pottstown Memorial Hospital with the police officer asking me how old I was with a tear in his eye. Life is short. You never know when your time is up which is why you need to make the best of life and live it. Smile. Laugh. Enjoy what you are doing and do not let things bother you, especially those things that are out of your control. Learn to roll with the punches life throws at you. Having thick skin and a metal jaw will get you through the tough times as well the fun times that life offers you. Every January 7th that arrives each year, my family & I miss my dad deeply. We wished he would have flown to the airport with radar instead of trying not to miss a few minutes of a meaningless ice hockey game. We know that all the families who had loved ones on that tragic helicopter flight will feel the same way we do every New Year in the future. With time though, the pain of their loss lessens, but never leaves, no matter how hard they try to relieve it. As we push ahead, we hope to see many of you at our monthly CCRP Receptions, our Women’s Retreat in Austin in early August, and our Commercial Retreat in Milwaukee in early October. And do not forget to mark your calendars for our 2021 Summit next January in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. As the song says: “Don’t worry, Be Happy.” Give it your all each day and leave it all on the field. Here is to prosperity, good health and safe travels for the rest of 2020. And as always, “Keep the Faith.” CCR

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2020


Turning imagination into reality.

™ and © 2019, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

CIRCLE NO. 64


From SoHo to Rodeo. We’ve expanded to the West Coast Bringing decades of experience building high profile retail and office environments for the world’s largest brands. We’re ready to build for you. Tom Fenton, Business Development Manager (914) 244-9100 x 322 / tfenton@schimenti.com

NE W YORK

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LOS ANGELE S CIRCLE NO. 65


INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Upcoming Events...............................pg 2 Member Directory..........................pg 4-5 President’s Message........................pg 3 New Advisory Board Member........pg 6 Milestone Memberships.................pg 3 Advisory Board Speaker Series..........pg 7

WINTER EDITION • 2020

NEWSLETTER

Celebrating 30 Years: RCA 2020 Annual Conference

The Retail Contractors Association’s 30th Annual Meeting will be held Friday, March 13 through Sunday, March 15, 2020 at the Gaylord Texan in Grapevine, TX (prior to SPECS 2020). Highlights of this year’s program include keynote remarks by Jay Papasan, bestselling author and Vice President of Learning, Keller Williams Realty International, an economic update Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc, a topical GC panel discussion, and breakout sessions for owners and project executives/project managers. We will also host our 4th Annual Golf Tournament on March 15. The conference kicks off with a welcome reception on March 13, followed by conference sessions on March 14. Jay Papasan is a bestselling author and Vice President of Learning, Keller Williams Realty International, the world’s largest real estate company. He co-wrote The ONE Thing with Gary Keller. The book describes that behind every successful person is their ONE Thing. No matter how success is measured, personal or professional, only the ability to dismiss distractions and concentrate on your ONE Thing stands between you and your goals. The ONE Thing is about getting extraordinary results in every situation. ONE Thing stands between you and your goals. The ONE Thing is about getting extraordinary results in every situation. Jay is also vice president of KellerINK, co-owner of Keller Capital, and co-owner, alongside his wife Wendy, of Papasan Properties Group with Keller Williams Realty in Austin, TX. He also co-authored The Millionaire Real Estate Agent alongside Gary Keller and Dave Jenks. The resounding success of the book, which focused on the systems, models and tactics used by the nation’s top real estate sales agents, brought him his first experience as an acclaimed author when the book became a national bestseller in 2004. Having landed on a formula for providing insight and easy to follow strategies for success, the group maintained their momentum and strung together a series of books that found their way on to numerous bestselling lists, including those found on The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and The New York Times. The books Jay has helped craft have collectively sold over 8 million copies. The ONE Thing has sold over 1.5 million copies worldwide and garnered more than 500 appearances on national bestseller lists, including #1 on The Wall Street Journal’s hardcover business list and has been translated into 34 different languages. In an article posted on the Huffington Post, Jay was named as one of The Top 5 Entrepreneurs to Watch in 2017.

In addition to keynote remarks, Jay will moderate a breakout session addressing the leadership challenges faced by project executives and project managers. We are pleased to welcome back Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO of Sage Policy Group, Inc., for his always popular and always enlightening economic update. Anirban’s firm provides strategic analytical services to energy suppliers, law firms, medical systems, government agencies, and real estate developers among others. In 2014, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan appointed him Chair of the Maryland Economic Development Commission. He also serves as chairman of the Baltimore County Economic Advisory Committee and is the Chief Economist to Associated Builders and Contractors and Chief Economic Advisor to the Construction Financial Management Association. He serves or has served similar functions for Visit Baltimore, Maryland Realtors, and Marcum, LLC. Anirban lectures at Johns Hopkins University in Global Strategy and has also taught international economics, urban economics, micro- and macroeconomics at Hopkins. His radio show can be heard weekdays on 88.1FM, WYPR, Baltimore. The conference will also include an owner’s session, a GC panel discussion reflecting on 30 Years of Retail Construction, and RCA’s business meeting. The evening of March 14 will feature a special dinner celebrating RCA’s 30th Anniversary. We will recognize the founding companies of the organization and be treated to the musings of Carmine Ciricillo, The Construction Comic®. Carmine has performed for The National Association of Home Builders, Associated Builders and Contractors, Associated General Contractors, The American Subcontractors Association, and more. The weekend concludes on March 15 with our 4th Annual Golf Tournament, to be held at Cowboy’s Golf Club. The tournament is a scramble format with prizes for top foursome, closest to the pin, longest drive, and more. Foursome and individual registration are available. Retailers can register for all events at no charge. The full agenda and registration can be found at retailcontractors.org/ annual-conference.

RCA’s mission is to promote professionalism and integrity in retail construction through industry leadership in education, information exchange, and jobsite safety.


NEWSLETTER

Upcoming Events We are planning a great slate of events for 2020. A tentative schedule includes: February Regional Member Event in Miami March Annual Conference in Dallas May CCRP Networking Reception, sponsored by RCA, in Minnesota June RCA reception at Retail X/Global Shop in Chicago July Regional Member Event in Denver (location TBD) August RCA reception at ICSC Conference in Orlando September CCRP Networking Reception in NYC October RCA reception at Procore BootCamp in New Orleans November Regional Member event in LA (location TBD) December RCA Members and Retailers Reception at Centerbuild AND CCRP Networking Reception, sponsored by RCA, in Phoenix

We’re We’re

Lion Tamers Lion Tamers

Commitment to adjust to the demands of jobs. Commitment toyour adjust to Not the other way around. the demands of your jobs.

Proactive support, consistency, trademark Proactiveand support, transparency. consistency, and trademark

Not the other way around. transparency. Access to everything on site at any hour, even at 3am. Access to everything on site at any hour, even at 3am.

Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617 Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617

800-915-9002 800-915-9002 cmi-usa.com cmi-usa.com

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All the above events are open and free to RCA members, and RCA sponsors/benefit providers (including CCRP events sponsored by RCA). Final schedule, locations, and events subject to change. Watch your inbox and this website for the latest updates.


ADVISORY BOARD

President’s Message Steve Bachman, President, Retail Construction Services

Isyol Cabrera - FOCUS Brands

Jeff Montang - JLM Retail

Ken Christopher - LBrands

Steven R. Olson, AIA - CESO, Inc.

Mike Clancy - FMI

Charles Ross -

Jeffrey D. Mahler - L2M, Inc. Jason Miller - JCPenney Company

Steve Bachman

Seritage Growth Properties

Brad Sanders - CBRE | Skye Group

ENOUGH ALREADY!

COMMITTEE CHAIRS

The President of ICSC, Tom McGhee, made an announcement during his speech in 2018 at the New York Deal Making conference that has stayed with me. He said he was taking to task all of the major news outlets that had been—and would likely continue to—talking about the “retail apocalypse” and all of the store closings (which he did by the way).

LEGISLATIVE/REGULATORY

SAFETY

MEMBER BENEFITS

SCHOLARSHIP

Mike McBride legislative@retailcontractors.org

David Martin memberbenefits@retailcontractors.org

MEMBER EVENTS

Fast forward to 2020, and we can tally up the net number of stores that have continued to be added across the U.S. Then, as today, we continue to stay in net-positive territory. It is difficult to find the true numbers from year to year, because like our press in general, “the facts” all tend to be based on various news sources. However, what they all do conclude is: 1) we continue to have a net add; 2) certain retail sectors continue to struggle; and 3) many continue to flourish and expand.

Jeff Mahler memberevents@retailcontractors.org

Knowing that the pundits say retail is challenged, (of which any U.S. person is aware), what really matters is this: Who do you work for today and will they still be here tomorrow? I would offer that the leaders in our companies should continue to be prudent in their business decisions. Do we stick with simply retail? Do we pursue more restaurants? Who is the next digital native? Do we stretch ourselves outside of our comfort zone and consider other commercial construction opportunities? As in any industry, there are always the naysayers crying that the sky is falling. But let us conclude by saying that retail isn’t dead, just different, and let’s go build a stronger roof.

OFFICERS

MEMBERSHIP

Hunter Weekes membership@retailcontractors.org

RECRUITMENT

Jay Dorsey recruitment@retailcontractors.org

Eric Berg Carolyn Shames training@retailcontractors.org

William A. Randolph, Inc.

Winkel Construction, Inc.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2020 Steve Bachman

Retail Construction Services, Inc.

2022 Ray Catlin

2021 Jack Grothe

JG Construction

2022 Eric Handley

William A. Randolph, Inc.

2021 David Martin

2020 Brad Bogart

Bogart Construction, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company

2021 Jay Dorsey

Triad Retail Construction, Inc.

2021 Phil Eckinger

Eckinger Construction Co.

Congratulations to our members celebrating milestone membership anniversaries! We appreciate your ongoing support of the RCA!

2020 Justin Elder

30 Years Commercial Contractors, Inc. De Jager Construction, Inc. Elder-Jones, Inc. Weekes Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc.

PAST PRESIDENTS

5 Years Construction One, Inc. Diamond Contractors Solex Contracting Travisano Construction, LLC

TRAINING

Immediate Past President - Rick Winkel

Schimenti Construction Company

If you have any feedback or ideas for the organization, please contact me. We are always looking for ways to continue strengthening the organization: SBACHMAN@retailconstruction.com

25 Years Desco Professional Builders, Inc. International Contractors, Inc. Russco, Inc.

Phil Eckinger sponsorship@retailcontractors.org

Vice President - Ray Catlin

Steve

10 Years ELAN General Contracting Inc. Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc.

SPONSORSHIP

Secretary/Treasurer - Eric Handley

Retail Construction Services, Inc.

Gray

15 Years Gray

Mike McBride Justin Elder scholarship@retailcontractors.org

President - Steve Bachman

2020 Eric Berg

Milestone Memberships

Eric Berg safety@retailcontractors.org

H.J. Martin & Son, Inc.

2021 Mike McBride

Westwood Contractors

2021 Carolyn Shames

Shames Construction

2021 Hunter Weekes

Weekes Construction, Inc.

2020 Rick Winkel

Winkel Construction, Inc.

Elder-Jones, Inc.

David Weekes 1990-1992 W. L. Winkel 1993 Robert D. Benda 1994 John S. Elder 1995 Ronald M. Martinez 1996 Jack E. Sims 1997 Michael H. Ratner 1998 Barry Shames 1999 Win Johnson 2000 Dean Olivieri 2001

Thomas Eckinger 2002 James Healy 2003 Robert D. Benda 2004-2006 K. Eugene Colley 2006-2008 Matthew Schimenti 2008-2012 Art Rectenwald 2012-2014 Mike Wolff 2014-2016 Robert Moore 2016-2017 Brad Bogart 2017-2018 Rick Winkel 2018-2019

2020 • WINTER EDITION

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NEWSLETTER

RCA Membership

RCA members must meet and maintain a series of qualifications and are approved by the Board of Directors for membership. They have been in the retail construction business as general contractors for at least five years; agree to comply with the Association’s Code of Ethics and Bylaws; are properly insured and bonded; are licensed in the states in which they do business; and have submitted letters of recommendation.

COMPANY CONTACT Acme Enterprises, Inc. Jeff Lomber All-Rite Construction Co., Inc. Warren Zysman Atlas Building Group Brian Boettler Beam Team Construction, Inc. Tim Hill Bogart Construction, Inc. Brad Bogart Buildrite Construction Corp. Bryan Alexander Comet Construction Bernard Keith Danzansky Commercial Contractors, Inc. Kenneth Sharkey Commonwealth Building, Inc. Frank Trainor Construction One, Inc. Bill Moberger Corstone Contractors LLC Mark Tapert David A. Nice Builders Brian Bacon De Jager Construction, Inc. Dan De Jager Desco Professional Builders, Inc. Bob Anderson Diamond Contractors Lori Perry DLP Construction Dennis Pigg, Jr. E.C. Provini, Co., Inc. Joseph Lembo Eckinger Construction Company Philip Eckinger EDC Christopher Johnson ELAN General Contracting Inc. Adrian Johnson Elder-Jones, Inc. Justin Elder Encore Construction, Inc. Joe McCafferty Engineered Structures, Inc. Mike Magill Fi Companies Kevin Bakalian Fiorilli Construction, Inc. Jeffrey Troxell Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Greg Freeh Fred Olivieri Construction Company Dean Olivieri Frontier Building Corp. Andrew Goggin Fulcrum Construction, LLC Willy Rosner Go Green Construction, Inc. Anthony Winkco Gray Robert Moore H.J. Martin & Son, Inc. David Martin Hanna Design Group Jason Mick Hardesty & Associates Scott Hardesty Harmon Construction, Inc. William Harmon Hays Construction Company, Inc. Roy Hays Healy Construction Services, Inc. James Healy Howard Immel Inc. Pete Smits International Contractors, Inc. Bruce Bronge J. G. Construction Jack Grothe JAG Building Group Matt Allen James Agresta Carpentry Inc. James Agresta KBE Building Corporation Michael Kolakowski Kerricook Construction, Inc. Ann Smith Lakeview Construction, Inc. Kent Moon M. Cary, Inc. Robert Epstein Management Resources Systems, Inc. Doug Marion Marco Contractors, Inc. Martin Smith Market Contractors Kerry Lobbestael National Building Contractors William Corcoran National Contractors, Inc. Michael Dudley Pinnacle Commercial Development, Inc. Dennis Rome Prime Retail Services, Inc. Donald Bloom PWI Construction, Inc. Jeff Price R.E. Crawford Construction LLC Jeffrey T. Smith Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. Art Rectenwald Retail Construction Services, Inc. Stephen Bachman Retail Contractors of Puerto Rico Sean Pfent Rockford Construction Co. Thomas McGovern Russco, Inc. Matthew Pichette Sachse Construction and Development Corp. Jeff Katkowsky

PHONE STATE EMAIL MEMBER SINCE 810-499-7127 MI jlomber@acme-enterprises.com 2009 973-340-3100 NJ warren@all-riteconstruction.com 1993 636-368-5234 MO bboettler@abgbuilds.com 2017 770-442-2534 GA timhill@thebeamteam.com 2019 949-453-1400 CA brad@bogartconstruction.com 2008 770-971-0787 GA bryan@buildriteconstruction.com 2013 561-672-8310 FL barney@danzansky.com 2016 616-842-4540 MI ken.t.sharkey@teamcci.net 1990 617-770-0050 MA frankt@combuild.com 1992 614-235-0057 OH wmoberger@constructionone.com 2015 360-862-8316 WA Mark@corstonellc.com 2019 757-566-3032 VA bbacon@davidnicebuilders.com 2011 616-530-0060 MI dandj@dejagerconstruction.com 1990 860-870-7070 CT banderson@descopro.com 1995 816-650-9200 MO loriperry@diamondcontractors.org 2015 770-887-3573 GA dpigg@dlpconstruction.com 2008 732-739-8884 NJ jlembo@eprovini.com 1992 330-453-2566 OH phil@eckinger.com 1994 804-897-0900 VA cjohnson@edcweb.com 1998 619-284-4174 CA ajohnson@elangc.com 2010 952-345-6069 MN justin@elderjones.com 1990 410-573-5050 MD joe@encoreconstruction.net 2018 208-362-3040 ID mikemagill@esiconstruction.com 2016 732-727-8100 NJ kbakalian@ficompanies.com 2017 216-696-5845 OH jtroxell@fio-con.com 2019 440-716-4000 OH gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com 2013 330-494-1007 OH dean@fredolivieri.com 1992 305-692-9992 FL agoggin@fdllc.com 2018 770-612-8005 GA wrosner@fulcrumconstruction.com 2014 412-367-5870 PA anthony@ggc-pgh.com 2017 714-491-1317 CA ramoore@gray.com 2005 920-494-3461 WI david@hjmartin.com 2016 847-719-0370 IL jmick@hannadesigngroup.com 2016 949-723-2230 CA scott@hardestyassociates.com 2019 812-346-2048 IN bill.harmon@harmonconstruction.com 2017 303-794-5469 CO r.hays@haysco.biz 2002 708-396-0440 IL jhealy@healyconstructionservices.com 1996 920-468-8208 WI psmits@immel-builds.com 2018 630-834-8043 IL bbronge@iciinc.com 1995 909-993-9332 CA JackG@jgconstruction.com 1998 239-540-2700 FL matta@jagbuilding.com 2019 201-498-1477 NJ jim.agresta@jacarpentryinc.com 2013 860-284-7110 CT mkolakowski@kbebuilding.com 1998 440-647-4200 OH ann@kerricook.com 2012 262-857-3336 WI kent@lvconstruction.com 1998 631-501-0024 NY repstein@mcaryinc.com 2014 336-861-1960 NC dmarion@mrs1977.com 1992 724-741-0300 PA marty@marcocontractors.com 1994 503-255-0977 OR kerryl@marketcontractors.com 2019 651-288-1900 MN bill@nbcconstruction.us 2013 952-881-6123 MN mdudley@ncigc.com 2018 732-528-0080 NJ dennis@pinnaclecommercial.us 2012 866-504-3511 GA dbloom@primeretailservices.com 2014 480-461-0777 AZ price@pwiconstruction.com 2003 941-907-0010 FL jeffs@recrawford.com 2011 724-772-8282 PA art@rectenwald.com 1996 651-704-9000 MN sbachman@retailconstruction.com 1998 586-725-4400 MI spfent@rcofusa.com 1996 616-285-6933 MI info@rockfordconstruction.com 2014 508-674-5280 MA mattp@russcoinc.com 1995 248-647-4200 MI jkatkowsky@sachseconstruction.com 2009 (Continued on page 5)

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Scheiner Commercial Group, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Shames Construction Co., Ltd. Singleton Construction, LLC Solex Contracting Southwestern Services Sullivan Construction Company Taylor Brothers Construction Company, Inc. TDS Construction, Inc. Thomas-Grace Construction, Inc. Timberwolff Construction, Inc. TJU Construction, Inc. Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Trainor Commercial Construction, Inc. Travisano Construction, LLC Tri-North Builders, Inc. Triad Retail Construction Warwick Construction, Inc. WDS Construction Weekes Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors, Inc. William A. Randolph, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc. Wolverine Building Group Woods Construction, Inc.

Joe Scheiner Matthew Schimenti Carolyn Shames Denise Doczy-Delong Gerald Allen John S. Lee, Amanda Sullivan Jeff Chandler Robert Baker Don Harvieux Mike Wolff Tim Uhler Aaron Rectenwald John Taylor Peter J. Travisano David Brown Jay Dorsey Walt Watzinger Ben Westra Hunter Weekes Mike McBride Tony Riccardi Rick Winkel Michael Houseman John Bodary

719-487-1600 914-244-9100 925-606-3000 740-756-7331 951-308-1706 817-921-2466 954-484-3200 812-379-9547 941-795-6100 651-342-1298 909-949-0380 530-823-7200 724-452-8801 415-259-0200 412-321-1234 608-204-7227 281-485-4700 832-448-7000 920-356-1255 864-233-0061 817-302-2050 847-856-0123 352-860-0500 616-949-3360 586-939-9991

CO NY CA OH CA TX FL IN FL MN CA CA PA CA PA WI TX TX WI SC TX IL FL MI MI

joe@scheinercg.com 2012 mschimenti@schimenti.com 1994 cshames@shames.com 1994 denisedelong@singletoncontruction.net 2012 jerry@solexcontracting.com 2015 JLee@southwesternservices.com 2017 amanda@buildwithsullivan.com 2012 Jeff.Chandler@TBCCI.com 2014 inbox@tdsconstruction.com 1994 don.harvieux@thomas-grace.com 2012 mike@timberwolff.com 2008 tim@tjuconstruction.com 2016 arectenwald@trcgc.net 2010 john.taylor@trainorconstruction.com 2012 pj@travisanocontruction.com 2015 dbrown@tri-north.com 2015 j.dorsey@triadrc.com 2013 walt@warwickconstruction.com 2008 bwestra@wdsconstruction.net 2019 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com 1990 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com 1990 tony.riccardi@warandolph.com 2011 rickw@winkel-construction.com 1990 mhouseman@wolvgroup.com 2012 jbodary@woodsconstruction.com 1996

Visit retailcontractors.org to view the profile of each RCA member company. Click on “Find a Contractor” on the home page to search the member list. Please notify the RCA Office (800-847-5085 or info@retailcontractors.org) of any changes to your contact information.

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2020 • WINTER EDITION

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NEWSLETTER

New Advisory Board Member RCA’s Advisory Board is comprised of representatives from retail markets including specialty, big box, department stores, developers, architecture/engineer, and restaurant retailers. Advisory Board members are appointed by the President and serve three-year terms. During that time, they actively assist the RCA Board of Directors in identifying key industry issues and formulating policies and programs designed to positively impact those issues. Meet RCA’s newest Advisory Board member. Jeff Montang currently serves as the President of JLM Retail, where he supports numerous brands in site selection for all retail site types. He previously supported AM Retail Group, a subsidiary of G-III. At AM Retail Group, he worked with Wilson Leather Outlets, Andrew Marc, Calvin Klein Performance, DKNY, and Vilebrequin concepts.

During his 40-plus years in retail, Jeff has participated in launching brands in outlets, malls, airports, and many other venues in the U.S., Canada, and England. His career started in the store operations area where he held various positions including VP of stores over different retail groups. Jeff has presented for the VRN, National Retail Federation, and the American Society for Industrial Security. He served as the Treasurer of the Developers of Outlets and Retailers (DOC&R). He has taught at the local college and international level and has also served on his community’s city council. Jeff is a graduate of Drake University with a BA in Public Relations. He has been married to his wife and best friend Deanna for 43 years and is the proud father of two: a son living on an adjoining hobby farm and a daughter living in Australia.

Jeff Montang

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866-933-3456

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Advisory Board Speaker Series The RCA Advisory Board Speaker Series provides members with relevant and timely industry content and insights from thought leaders pertinent to our industry. Speakers address critical topics in areas of retail trends, business operations, growth, culture, strategy, and more. We have hosted two webinars to date. The recordings for both are available on our website. Our first webinar, “The Future of Retail”, went beyond the headlines and discuss myths vs. reality in the retail marketplace. The session addressed the impact of the consumer, retailers and retailing, and real estate. Session speakers were Melina Cordero, Managing Director, Retail, Capital Markets, CBRE, and Brad Sanders, Senior Managing Director, CBRE|Skye Group. Our second webinar, “Mastering Succession: Key Points to Successful Ownership Transfer and Leadership Succession.” addressed the three components of succession planning: ownership transfer

plan, management succession plan, and contingency plan. The session speaker was Jake Appelman, Principal, FMI. Future webinars will address trends in restaurants and trends in development. Visit retailcontractors. org/advisory-board-speaker-series to watch the webinars and download supplementary materials.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION PEOPLE

Don’t miss our CCRP events March 18th (Wednesday) Atlanta, GA April 16th (Thursday) Dallas/Ft Worth May 12th (Tuesday) Minneapolis, MN

If you would like to sponsor a CCRP event, please contact David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com 2020 • WINTER EDITION

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NEWSLETTER

RCA Sustaining Sponsors PLATINUM

GOLD

SILVER

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SPRING EDITION • 2019

2800 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 210, Alexandria, VA 22314 800.847.5085 • www.retailcontractors.org

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR Jan/Feb 20