CCR Issue 8

Page 1

5 TIPS FOR DEALING WITH CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN CONSTRUCTION

August 2021 • www.ccr-mag.com

In the heart of the city How White Castle’s largest restaurant ever is changing how patrons view the brand

Official magazine of

Also inside:

Mike Guinan, Vice President, Operations Services, White Castle System, Inc.

Exclusive Inside: How best practices can curb vendor, third-party cyber risks Our annual Project Management Services/ Construction Software report Saving an NHL community ice rink from meltdown



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CIRCLE NO. 1


Vol. 20, Issue 8, 2021

70

28

76

FEATURES 28 ‘Craver’ worthy How White Castle’s largest restaurant ever is changing how patrons view the brand 56 The push ahead Men’s CCR Roundtable ramp up their to-do lists amid the continuing pandemic 70 Out of nowhere 5 tips for dealing with crisis management in construction 76 They shoot; they scooore... Stellar helps save NHL community ice rink from meltdown despite Texas heat wave 82 A winning decision Arena Opts for Ventilated Facade Adhered using “The Chemical Method”

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

82


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Vol. 20, Issue 8, 2021 INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

40 Project Management Services/ Software Products

DEPARTMENTS 4 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 108 Women in Construction 140 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 142 Ad Index 144 Publisher’s Note

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Multi-Housing 87 Blended living How Avalon Sudbury is changing the game for multi-family communities

87

The Cannabis Operations 97 Step by step Theory Wellness continues to roll out its blueprint for cannabis success Commercial Construction in Healthcare 113 Texas strong Ensuring success in today’s dynamic behavioral health environment Federal Construction 123 It’s back baby Inside the renovation of the Old Chicago Post Office

97

Craft Brand and Marketing 131 An Alaskan tale Welcome to the Girdwood Brewing Company Communityt

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


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CIRCLE NO. 3


EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

You say Target, I say Disney, we all say, 'Partnerships' I n these times of unprecedented crappy news, isn't it great when you hear some that makes you smile. Now, I am a few years past (okay, so I'm more than a few) having kids old enough to really appreciate this, but Target is tripling the number of Disney shops it will have in its stores. And while the move will help drive foot traffic as the holiday season approaches, it also gives us a sense of hope. When a national retailer with some 1,900 US stores teams with another well respected brand, it gives us some sense that we are looking ahead, and not focusing so much on what sits right in front of us, i.e., more sad songs about viruses and enough unrest for 10 lifetimes.

So, when you shop at some 160 Target stores, you will see Disney-themed merchandise—everything from toys to costumes—in the aisles. Retail analysts say that Target’s partnerships are helping transform its stores into mini-malls—a place where shoppers can see a little bit of everything under one roof (hey, remember malls?). You can grab a Starbucks, grocery shop, fill a prescription, get a vaccine (hint) or check out the latest in homewares or apparel. You want technology, Target has Apple. You want health and beauty aids, Target has mini Ulta Beauty shops. In the end, it's less about shopping variety and more about partnerships. And let's face it, in these days of "up-is-downdown-is-up-and-everything-gets-throwninto-a-box-and-shaken (not stirred)", isn't that a good thing. Think of the partnerships you have built with your vendors, subcontractors, site management teams, architects (you name it, and they are there), and see how you can make them even stronger. "We're all in this together" is more than some words thrown together to make us sound committed to the fight that still looms ahead, it is a rallying cry for what makes our industry great—good companies and good teams working for the same goal. Now, if you'll excuse me, it's time to finish off this issue and start on the next— just one partnership in a chain that keeps us all connected.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • Fax 678.765.6551

EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 561-203-2981

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CIRCLE NO. 5

PUBLISHER/EDITOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702 LIST RENTAL: Brian Clotworthy • bclotworthy@inforefinery.com 800.529.9020

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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC Commercial Construction & Renovation is published monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Articles/content appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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CIRCLE NO. 7


CCR EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Design & Construction Belk Inc. STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture

GREGG LOLLIS Sr. Director, Design Development Chick-fil-A DAVID SHOTWELL Construction Manager Atticus Franchise Group ISYOL E. CABRERA Director Development and Construction Focus Brands LLC DEMETRIA PETERSON Project Director, Design and Construction at HMSHost DAVID THOMPSON Construction Manager The Honey Baked Ham Company, LLC ROB ADKINS, LEED AP CDP Project Development Manager- Licensed Stores- National Accounts Starbucks Coffee Company

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Principal Executive Vice President at Stormont Hospitality Group LLC

ANDY BRIGGS, CHA Principal A14 Capital

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI President Schimenti Construction JOHN STALLMAN Marketing Manager Lakeview Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT

MEGAN HAGGERTY Founder Legacy Capital Investment

JIM STAPELTON Vice President Nelson

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

RON VOLSKE Construction Project Manager Orscheln Farm & Home

JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG

DEDRICK KIRKEM Manager, Office Operations (Facilities Manager) Essilor/Luxottica

RICK TAKACH Chairman Vesta Hospitality

STEPHEN HEKMAN Executive VP Kingsmen Retail Services US

SAMUEL D. BUCKINGHAM, RS CMCA AMS President & Co-Founder Evergreen Financial Partners LLC

KEN DEMSKE Vice President Jones Lang LaSalle

RESTAURANTS RON BIDINOST Vice President of Construction at Bubbakoo’s Burritos

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LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

TOMMY LINSTROTH CEO at Green Badger, LLC

JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M

JIM SHEUCHENKO President Property Management Advisors LLC

PUNIT R. SHAH Chief Executive Officer of Liberty Group+ Part-Owner of Miami Marlins

NUNZIO DESANTIS, FAIA CEO & Founder of Nunzio Marc DeSantis Architects

PAM GOODWIN Goodwin Advisors, LLC Goodwin Commercial The Pam Goodwin Show

ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

HEALTHCARE

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS

JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little

JOHN LAPINS Project Management Consultant, Greystar

CLINTON “BROOKS” HERMAN, PMP Senior Facilities Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

GINA NODA Founder Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

KAY BARRETT NCIDQ, CDP Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield

GARY RALL Vice President of Design and Development, Holiday Inn Club Vacations

ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design

CONSULTANT

BOB WITKEN Chief Operating Officer KCA Development MIKE KLEIN, AIA, NCARB Senior Architect Core States Group

FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Managing Principal, Global Design Leader at DLR Group STEVE TURNER Director, GPD Group STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA President CESO, Inc.

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

AroundtheIndustry RESTAURANTS Schlotzsky’s Deli Schlotzsky’s Deli has signed more than 75 new franchise agreements this year and expects to have 100 by the end of 2021. The 329-unit chain is on track to open 25 to 30 new locations annually over the next several years. Dickey’s Restaurant Brands Dickey’s Restaurant Brands will create a brick-and-mortar restaurant for the Wing Boss delivery-only virtual brand it launched earlier this year. The restaurant is scheduled to open in Addison, Texas, in September and will include a full bar and seating. 800 Degrees Fast-casual pizza chain 800 Degrees has teamed with robotics firm Piestro on a plan to roll out fully automated pizza-making machines to 3,600 high-traffic locations over the next five years. Customers input their orders on a touch screen and watch as the machine prepares the pizza to order, and each $60,000 machine can hold ingredients for up to 80 pizzas at a time. Wingstop Wingstop is in urban growth mode with plans to open 25 New York City eateries that will be a mix of ghost kitchens and brick-and-mortar restaurants. The chain now boasts 15 ghost kitchens around the world, with the first slated for Manhattan soon. Krispy Kreme Krispy Kreme franchise partner Americana Group has opened the brand’s first shop in Cairo, one of 10 the operator plans to open in Egypt over the next year. Americana Group has upward of 200 doughnut shops in other countries, including the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait, and the expansion into Egypt is part of Krispy Kreme’s current focus on international growth. Dirty Bird Fried Chxx Investment firm Wags Capital has acquired Utah-based Dirty Bird Fried Chxx with plans to invest $20 million to open 30 new units of the fast-casual concept over the next year or so. Dirty Bird’s menu features a handful of items including chicken sandwiches, fries and banana pudding, making it ideal for small spaces and drive-thru locations.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Freebirds World Burrito Fast-casual Freebirds World Burrito is on a mission to grow from 55 units to 100 over the next five years in a push to become the biggest burrito chain in Texas. Plans call for expansion into nontraditional locations, including college campuses, starting with a new unit at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

RETAIL Ace Hardware Ace Hardware has grown by 110 new stores this year and 60 more are planned to open before the start of 2022. The hardware retailer’s cooperative model puts independent local owners in charge of Ace’s 5,500 stores throughout 70 countries and all 50 US states. Hoka Running shoe brand Hoka will open its first two branded retail stores today, one in New York City’s Flatiron neighborhood and the other in West Hollywood, California. The goal of the stores is to give customers a chance to experience the shoes before buying. The stores will feature lockers so shoppers can place their stuff and take Hoka sneakers out for a run. Allbirds Sustainable footwear brand Allbirds has filed plans to go public in an initial stock offering, after raising $100 million last year in a funding round that valued the company at $1.7 billion. Digital channels generated 89% of last year’s sales at Allbirds, which recently launched an activewear line and also plans to expand its brick-and-mortar presence to “hundreds” of stores. GameStop GameStop has added more than 1 million square feet of new fulfillment center space, including a 700,000-square-foot space in Pennsylvania and a 530,000-square-foot facility in Nevada. The gaming retailer outlined a four-point growth strategy that includes expanding its distribution capability and building a bigger catalog of products. Forever 21 Low-cost fashion brand Forever 21 will have its full collections available at certain Hudson’s Bay Co. stores across the country, as the U.S.-brand returns to the Canadian market.


BJ’s Wholesale BJ’s Wholesale is looking to open a 105,000-square-foot store in Noblesville, Indiana, which would mark the retailer’s entrance into the state, according to reports. BJ’s plans to build on its pandemicdriven momentum to continue growing and open six stores this year.

Salish Inn A new four-story hotel called the Salish Inn opened at 30th Street and Q Avenue in Anacortes, Washington. The hotel includes 27 guest rooms, six kitchenette suites and three one-bedroom view suites with two-person Jacuzzi tubs and kitchenettes.

Ulta/Target Ulta Beauty, which recently opened its first mini-shop inside Target stores, plans to open more than 100 by year’s end—eventually reaching 800 shops. Ulta will sell more than 50 prestige makeup, skin care and hair care brands in the shops and through Target’s e-commerce site, and the partnership is focused on drawing new shoppers and increasing shopping trips and loyalty.

Red Hawk Casino Red Hawk Casino in California plans to build an entertainment center atop its eight-level parking garage. Plans for the 75,000-squarefoot venue include virtual reality gaming suites, an indoor go-kart track and a bowling alley. The project is part of the casino’s planned expansion, which also includes a new hotel opening in fall 2022.

HOSPITALITY

GROCERS

Resorts World New York City Resorts World New York City, on the grounds of Aqueduct racetrack in Queens, has opened a $400 million Hyatt Regency JFK Airport hotel. The new eight-story facility includes 400 rooms, a Sugar Factory cafe, a large lobby that can accommodate events and additional gaming areas.

Publix Publix plans to enter its eighth state with a store in Louisville, Kentucky, opening in late 2023. The 55,000-square-foot site will also feature a Publix Liquors outlet next door, the first such store outside Florida. The grocer is exploring additional sites in the Bluegrass State.

Conrad Hotels & Resorts The debut of Conrad Hotels & Resorts, a 305-room luxury tower, is planned for next year in The Grand, a $1 billion mixed-use development across the street from Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. The 1.6-million-square-foot complex designed by noted architect Frank Gehry will also feature more than 430 apartments along with multiple retail and dining outlets. 21c Museum Hotel Construction has begun to turn the 10-story building into a 21c Museum Hotel, a Louisville-based brand that renovates historic buildings into boutique hotels and fills their lobbies with modern art—including, at every location so far, whimsical statues of the flightless bird. ONE Casino + Resort The casino at ONE Casino + Resort in Richmond, Virginia now is expected to be ready for an October 2024 opening, a delay from the original launch date of 2023 due to the time required for state approvals. The hotel, which will have 250 luxury rooms, is set to open in October 2025. Hyatt Place The first hotel to open since 1929 in Lake Forest, Illinois shares the city’s themes of science and nature and claims as its neighbor the Chicago Bears’ training camp. The Forester Hotel also is the world’s first boutique-inspired Hyatt Place.

Hy-Vee Hy-Vee plans to debut a fitness equipment “store within a store” concept under a new partnership with Johnson Fitness & Wellness. Lowes Foods Lowes Foods will turn the 25,000-square-foot site of a former Earth Fare store in Huntersville, North Carolina into a combination food hall and community event center. Although no opening date has been set, plans call for foodservice that includes prepared food options overseen by an on-site chef, with the store’s mezzanine area offering space for community events, parties and classes. Albertsons Albertsons has started building a large solar array in Maine, which ultimately will generate 8.5 million kilowatt hours of renewable energy to help power its Shaw’s banner stores in the state. Working with Dynamic Energy and Soltage, the grocer expects to complete work on the solar farm by the end of this year. Amazon Fresh Amazon Fresh has opened its latest brick-and-mortar location in California at the site of a 38,000-square-foot former hardware store in Whittier. The grocer will utilize Amazon Dash carts, which tally purchases as customers shop so there is no need for a checkout, and offer free same-day pickup and delivery for Prime members.

ISSUE 8, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

13


INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Preventing Lawsuits 5 questions to better assess responsibility and correction for latent construction defects By Jim Gallagher

W

hen construction defects are detected during the performance of work, it generally is accepted that such faulty workmanship will be corrected by the contractor before the project is considered complete. But when there is a latent construction defect, determining responsibility for the defect after the project has been completed and turned over to the owner for beneficial use is not always clear and potentially can lead to legal action. Defective construction can be tricky because it may not reveal itself until many years after the project has been completed and placed in use. Whether the defect should have been discovered earlier through the normal construction inspection process also will be of consideration—while assigning responsibility to correct such a defect may be limited by warranty or state statute. Dependent upon the stage of construction when non-conforming work or faulty workmanship is observed, the owner may be faced with deciding whether to require the contractor to correct the construction defect, retain a separate contractor to correct the defect, seek the recovery of the estimated costs to correct such work or accept the work as non-conforming.

For example, water intrusion caused by faulty workmanship on the construction of the building envelope may not manifest itself until a leak is detected within the building. Were it determined that the faulty workmanship could not have been reasonably detected through the normal course of building inspection, it is more likely that the owner will be successful in demonstrating entitlement to recover the costs to correct the defect. As no two construction projects are the same, there is no single approach to rectifying defective work. Each issue should be viewed based on the specific contract requirements applicable to that project and the actual circumstances that preceded/succeeded the specific event. The following five questions can help begin the process of assessing responsibility for the defect, including late discovery, and thus help determine how best to correct it: > Is the defect one of performance whereby the end-product may function but not to the level specified? > Will the project stakeholders require inspection and verification of the construction defect to determine liability and/ or the corrective measure necessary to bring work into conformance with the specifications? > Is the cost to correct the defect prohibitive such that the actual cost of repair significantly will exceed the lost benefit of having the defect corrected? > Is there an alternative approach to correcting the defect, that while not consistent with the specifications, may be acceptable to the owner and comply with the intended function of the product? > Should the owner correct the defect first before proceeding to recover the associated costs from the responsible party, as compared to providing an estimate of the cost to correct? Ultimately, the actions and steps taken subsequent to the discovery of a latent construction defect are as important as the actions that preceded it and/or caused the work to be deemed non-compliant. Establishing the necessary records to demonstrate a causal link puts all parties in position to better assess responsibility and determine the appropriate course for correction.

Jim Gallagher is a Professional Engineer licensed in 15 states, and a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), where he serves as Chairman of the Highway Construction Committee, a member of the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB) Committee on Contract Law, and a member of the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC), where he serves on the Construction Management at Risk (CMAR) Taskforce and Liaison Group Committee. For more information, visit Resolution Management Consultants Inc. (RMC) at resmgt.com.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Shields up Fire safety reminders for multifamily complex owners By Chad Connor

A

n estimated 75,000 apartment and multi-family home fires occur each year, resulting in 380 civilian deaths and $1.3 billion in property damage, according to FEMA. Ask any fire inspector and he will tell you that the danger typically rests in the places people overlook the most. Identifying and correcting these issues will help keep your tenants and employees safe in case of a fire emergency. Here is a six-part plan you can employ to keep your buildings safe: capable of putting out small fires involving wood, oils, paper and gases. Extinguishers must be placed 75 feet apart throughout the complex, according to OSHA. Individual apartments are not required to have fire extinguishers, but it is recommended to place small multipurpose extinguishers in an easily accessible place inside the unit. Maintain your fire extinguishers by checking them periodically to make sure they are at the proper weight and gauge limit. This information can be found on the label on the side of the extinguisher. If the gauge limit or weight is lower than the requirement you must replace or recharge the extinguisher. You must also replace extinguishers after each use.

No. 1 — Communicate your action plan

Property owners must provide their tenants and employees with a written emergency action plan. This will allow everyone to know the exit routes and what fire emergency procedures are in place. Emergency action plans should cover designated actions property staff and management must take to keep the tenants and property safe during a fire emergency, according to OSHA. These actions include directing tenants to the nearest exits and helping people in compromising situations. Management also must ensure all staff understand the fire suppression procedures and escape routes to be followed by each location in the multi-family complex. Evacuation route signs must be posted by the exits and in the tenant's apartment. In addition, management is required to review the emergency action plan with each employee when they are hired when their responsibilities change and when the overall plan changes.

No. 2 — Correct placement of fire extinguishers

Class A, B and C multipurpose fire extinguishers are required in all apartment and multi-family complexes. These fire extinguishers are

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

No. 3 — Declutter doorways and stairwells

Property managers must be aware of the number of wall coverings in hallways, business areas and recreational rooms. Bulletin boards with pamphlets and other documents are high-risk fire areas. A small flame can potentially turn these areas into an uncontrollable fire. Too often, emergency exits and stairwells are blocked by debris like empty boxes and trash cans. Have your employees regularly inspect doorways and stairwells for easy access. Move any boxes, equipment or trash cans from these areas which can impede exiting the building in case of a fire.

No. 4 — Maintain exit signs

Exit lighting in an apartment building and multi-family complexes are crucial in getting people out of a burning building. During a fire, conditions can lead to confusion. Smoke can obscure vision and make it difficult to navigate even familiar surroundings. Illuminated exit signs make it more likely that people will be able to locate the exits faster and see how to exit the building. Exit signs are designed to switch to emergency power if the building loses its electrical power source. The lighted signs need regular testing by property managers and staff. This often is done


by pressing a test button on the side of the sign to make sure they switch to standby power.

No. 5 — Test alarms and conduct fire drills

Fire alarms are considered the most crucial element to an apartment or multi-family complex’s safety system. When an alarm signals, the tenants in the building immediately know the possible danger exists and evacuation is needed. Property managers should have staff members conduct regular tests of the fire alarm system. Most fire alarm systems can be tested through the control panel. First, set your control panel to test mode. This will keep the system from contacting the fire department. After the system is in test mode, press the button again to set off the alarms. For manual systems, activate the alarms by opening the alarm lever boxes and pressing the button within. Record the results of the test and keep a list of the devices that were tested and how they reacted. If there are a few faulty alarms, this will help a technician locate the problem quickly. It also is recommended to conduct fire drills when testing your alarms.

Property managers and staff should conduct periodic fire drills for employees and tenants as part of the emergency action plan. These drills allow tenants and employees to practice evacuation of the premises and will show areas that need improving within the plan. Fire drills are not mandated by State or Federal law, but still are highly recommended conducting them regularly. No. 6 — Property Inspection Apartment complexes and multi-family housing units should have their alarms, lights, extinguishers and sprinklers inspected on a yearly basis. Many complexes neglect their annual services. Neglecting fire safety systems can cause the equipment to erode over time resulting in faulty devices. After a professional fire inspection, you will receive a report from the inspection company. The inspection report will include the name and address of the property, the date and time the property was inspected, type of occupancy, issues that need addressing, and contact information for the building owner. You are required to keep this document on file for at least two years, but five is recommended.

Chad Connor is President of Affordable Fire & Safety (www.affordablefireaz.com) in Gilbert, Arizona. His group conducts thousands of fire inspections each year.

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ISSUE 8, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

17


INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Did you

know

On its current growth curve, Amazon is poised to outpace top Walmart based on gross merchandise volume by next year, according to research from JPMorgan. Amazon grew its e-commerce market share from 24% in 2014 to an estimated 39% last year, with 2020’s sales fueled by a pandemicrelated surge in online shopping, the report found.

The numbers game

54.7

The percent of hotel occupancy that is expected in the US market for 2021, up 1.4% than the prior forecast, according to research by STR and Tourism Economics. The companies project a 2021 average daily rate of $115.50, up from $109.47 in the May forecast, and revenue per available room of $63.16, up from $58.39.

7.8

The percentage increase of open-air retail center vacancies by the end of the year, according to Jones Lang LaSalle. On the other side, indoor retail center vacancies could drop to just below 9%. The shift from indoor facilities to outdoor centers is following the trend by leasing space in smaller shopping centers, the study found.

They said it “While improvement in each of the key metrics can be seen as a win, we must remember many hotels are still being hit hard financially, and labor costs remain depressed when compared with pre-pandemic levels, meaning hotel staff are doing a lot more with a lot less help.” — STR’s Senior Director of Consulting & Analytics Joseph Rael on the impact of the continued growth of gross operating profits in the US hotel sector

18

“I feel like, historically, the restaurant industry really made the experience about the restaurant. And now, we all have to adjust and make it about the customer.” — Gail Seanor, VP of Digital for Outback parent Bloomin’ Brands, on how customer demand for convenient online ordering has fueled innovation at restaurants like Outback Steakhouse

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

“Our job is to look at unlocking opportunities and to make sure that we are really relevant to the under 40s, which is a demographic that is increasingly diverse.” — Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette on how the pandemic has created a number of opportunities for the retailer to expand its omnichannel efforts and grow categories


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INDUSTRY NEWS

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21st Century project deliveries Pandemic accelerates AI to give developers more predictable outcomes

T

he global pandemic has been a catalyst for tech adoption in the commercial real estate industry. The unexpected disruptions that spread through the market was a wakeup call for techaverse firms more comfortable with gut-instinct handshake deals, than data-driven decisions governed by analytics that get project teams easier, more predictable outcomes. The real estate development, project delivery and construction process is already fraught with recurring pitfalls and unanticipated risks that can derail a project from delivering on-time and within budget. These mishaps often come from relying on error-prone spreadsheets and manual processes to store and manage vendor and budget information. Another recurring stumbling block is development teams’ reluctance to leverage historical data to glean proactive insights from past projects to inform current project outcomes.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

By William Sankey

These old-school practices often can result in stalled project timelines, and escalating costs eating into returns and overall project profitability. Compound the above stumbling blocks with the unprecedented disruptions brought on by the global pandemic, and you can understand why these teams are turning to technology to be more data-driven and proactive in their management and delivery of real estate spaces. Just last quarter, a survey conducted by International Data Corporation found that a large percentage of more than 500 developers and construction project owners in the United States and Canada are delayed and over-budget on their projects. The study found that 78% of the 505 commercial real estate owners surveyed had exceeded their project budgets and were on average 70 days late compared to their original estimates.


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Just last quarter, a survey conducted by International Data Corporation found that a large percentage of more than 500 developers and construction project owners in the United States and Canada are delayed and over-budget on their projects.

Per project, those polled said they experienced an average of six changes to the budget and five changes to the schedule. The study ultimately found that respondents who had incorporated technology into their processes were not as behind in schedule and over-budget as their peers. “The survey identified significant differences between high and low performers ... Better on-budget and on-schedule performance often corresponded with embracing integrated technology,” the study reads. “Owners recognize the importance of data centralization as a key building block for supporting new technologies that can help increase on-time and on-budget performance.” Taking an idea from the conceptual napkin stage and seeing it through to completion requires the exchange of up-to-date, real-time data between key stakeholder partners and upper management. By utilizing a centralized database to organize critical project information and store historic project data, development teams are better equipped to anticipate budget issues, manage vendor bids and contracts, and proactively mitigate potential risks to the project—all while keeping upper management, design and financial partners informed. The resulting benefits are plentiful. Firms managing groundup developments, fitouts, and major renovations on a centralized,

cloud-based platform find they have better insight into escalating project costs and are able to execute more deals with a leaner, more nimble team. Key project stakeholders are kept informed and up-to-date on the project more frequently, with senior leadership able to field questions from various stakeholders faster and with more confidence by utilizing real-time information. Project managers also find that their design partners and vendors are equipped to make better decisions throughout the development because they have access to up-to-date budget projections—eliminating the need for value engineering or slashing desired functionality from within a project due to constricting costs. To improve the overall project management and delivery process (including vendor selection, price negotiation, draw request and change order management) and to stay ahead of their competitors, best-in-class developers are embracing intelligence platforms powering artificial intelligence, data analytics and automation. Software like this propels project delivery into the 21st Century, enabling commercial real estate developers to glean insights from past projects, proactively monitor escalating costs, vet vendors and have better line of sight into how shifting business cycles and unplanned market disruptions impact projects underway.

William Sankey is the co-founder, CEO, and Head of Product of Northspyre. Prior to founding Northspyre, he had a formative career as a New York City real estate developer and project lead at prominent firms such as Madison Realty Capital, Macklowe Properties, and Jones Lang LaSalle.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

Web watchers

How best practices can help curb growing vendor and third-party cyber risks By Michael Corcione & Frank Giunta Editor's Note: The information provided in this article is intended for general educational purposes only—it does not constitute legal, accounting, or other professional advice, and it should not be relied upon as the basis for your business decisions.

I

n recent years, cyber-attackers have preyed upon the weaknesses of vendors and third parties to access computer systems at hospitals, banks, financial services firms, retailers, utilities, transportation systems and other critical infrastructure. For many construction companies, outside vendors or third parties provide services or support for nearly every part of their construction projects. While companies may feel confident their security controls are well hardened, they have limited visibility into the security controls of their vendors, thus creating heightened risk exposure... Mitigating this growing area of risk requires a thoughtful mix of careful planning, objective monitoring and diligent management.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Vendor and third-party risk management must start with a solid program with supporting policies and procedures that identifies how a company will assess, manage, monitor, remediate and, in some cases, accept risks. The proliferation and use of technology throughout construction projects, and the Internet of Things (IoT), has increased construction companies’ cyber-attack surface and risk exposure. IoT has been expanding in the construction industry at a rapid pace including site management, asset tracking, worker tracking, safety improvements and product utilization. IoT devices include wearable technologies such as smart helmets and glasses, sensors


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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE that monitor equipment, RFID tagging and tracking and building information modeling software (BIM). All these technology advances now are key components that help construction companies manage costs and reduce project risks. Additionally, construction companies will be installing IoT devices throughout their end products. Building access controls, HVAC systems, lighting, safety controls, sprinkler systems, media distribution and appliances are all included in the IoT ecosystem. The expansion of IoT use in the construction industry, and subsequent implementation in buildings and infrastructure, increases the number of vectors that cyber attackers will try to infiltrate for various motives. Attacker motives will include theft of money, intellectual property, and sensitive information. These individuals or groups might also want to wreak havoc on projects and cause disruption to supply chains. Since all vendors and third parties aren’t equal in terms of security protocols, a vendor and third-party risk management policy must outline how it will risk-rate its vendors. This risk-rating has many components, with the heaviest weighing in two categories: What is the vendor or third party’s level of access to the most sensitive data, key systems and business processes? (The more access, the higher the risk. And what is the vendor’s maturity level? (Maturity is a reflection of several characteristics, including the length of time a vendor has been in business, its size, and the history of the product or service it offers.)

Generally, the more mature a company is in these categories, the more secure it is likely to be. Risk assessments also should answer other questions: > Has the vendor or third party kept up on its security investments? > Does it train its own employees in risk management? > What are its plans for cyber-incident response and recovery? > How does it manage its own vendor and third-party risk? (Which, essentially, becomes a “fourth-party” risk for the airport.) It may be prudent to request a copy of the vendor’s cyber- and information-security procedures. Also, scrutinize the vendor’s financial posture, reputation, and compliance with laws and regulations. On-site visits also may be a good idea, especially if the company is providing data-hosting services. Potential vendors should demonstrate that their cybersecurity program meets industry standards and, ideally, are certified by a reputable external auditor.

Vendor and third-party risk management must start with a solid program with supporting policies and procedures that identifies how a company will assess, manage, monitor, remediate and, in some cases, accept risks. Companies should implement their own controls and risk management systems for vendor and third-party risk-rating, due-diligence, on-boarding, continuous monitoring and off-boarding. There are several risk management software programs on the market. In most cases, one solution alone may not be enough, and companies should select tools based on their immediate and long-term needs and budgets. Training can be invaluable in on-boarding new vendors and managing overall vendor risk, and should be updated as new technologies—and new risks—emerge. It is important to remember that cyber-attackers aren’t going away. To effectively manage and minimize risk, companies must establish, maintain and continually improve a comprehensive cybersecurity program that manages risk at all levels and at all touch points. While the task is not easy, it is achievable.

Michael Corcione is a Partner at HKA, and has more than 30 years of experience in advising companies and boards of directors on technology, cybersecurity and privacy and risk management strategies. Frank Giunta is a Partner and head of HKA’s Americas Group. He is an experienced expert in the area of construction claims, disputes and risk mitigation.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


‘Craver’ worthy How White Castle’s largest restaurant ever is changing how patrons view the brand Interview by Michael J.Pallerino

M

ove over Disney, there’s a new castle in town. At 4,567 square feet, the new White Castle located in The Village at O-Town West, at the intersection of Palm Parkway and Daryl Carter Parkway off Interstate 4 in Orlando, Florida, is drawing cravers (as the brand’s fans are known) to the chain’s largest free-standing location. Just how big and how much of a draw is White Castle’s new Orlando digs? During its grand opening in May of this year, not only was the flood of cars in line for the drive-thru national news worthy, but people actually slept overnight to get a shot at the famed slider burgers. Eventually, the restaurant will operate 24 hours a day, every day of the week. With roots going back to 1921, when Billy Ingram launched his first family owned business with $700 in Wichita, Kansas, the fast-casual chain has posted a steady and dominant presence across 14 states. Over the years, along with creating a rabid fan base, Time magazine even dubbed its iconic Original Slider the most influential burger of all time. To get an inside look at the “World’s Largest White Castle,” we sat down with Mike Guinan, Vice President, Operations Services at White Castle System, Inc.

ISSUE 8, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

29


‘CRAVER’ WORTHY Give us a snapshot of the White Castle brand.

White Castle is a 100-year-old family owned business, with 360 Castles in 14 states, and a consumer packaged goods business that sells frozen sliders in the freezer aisle of grocery stores coast to coast. Known for incredibly loyal fans, White Castle even has a Hall of Fame to celebrate its most devoted Cravers.

Tell us a little about the “World’s Largest White Castle.” What are some of the features and benefits?

Our new Castle in Orlando is 4,567 square feet, and features a distinctive dining room and a kitchen that was created with crave satisfaction in mind. The drive through features a “walk out door” that allows team members to deliver orders directly to customers as they make their way to keep their day going strong. The challenge was the Florida location. White Castle locations are mainly found in cold-weather states. They’re built to withstand ice, snow and freezing temperatures. But what about hurricanes? Building the world’s largest White Castle was just a matter of doing what they’d already been doing, only bigger. But translating this cold-weather classic to tropical storm-prone Florida required a true team effort, which included design, distribution and application expertise. To deal with the weather and the state’s stringent NOA requirements, the team turned to Sto, using a combination of systems: StoTherm® ci and StoTherm® ci MVES with stone. Because StoTherm ci integrates continuous insulation, innovative water- resistant barrier technology and drainage features, it was ideal for dealing with frequent, punishing tropical storms and hurricanes. And StoTherm ci MVES with stone made it possible to match the stone and stucco design aesthetic of White Castle restaurants while maintaining continuous insulation and incorporating critical control layers, making it more energy efficient. At 4,567 square feet, the Orlando restaurant is much larger than most other locations. The bigger footprint meant more material, but distributor Foundation Building Materials Orlando had no

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


CIRCLE NO.16


‘CRAVER’ WORTHY issues sourcing everything required for a seamless build, ensuring the design could be accurately rendered by the expert applicators of Rue Quality Systems. That’s exactly what Rue did, flawlessly executing the vision of MS Consultants to create a weathertight building. Utilizing one of Sto’s StoGuard® air and moisture barriers over the wall assembly, they sealed the building tight and employed the continuous insulation of the Sto EPS insulation board to create an energy-efficient building. They finished it off with a beautiful stone façade, courtesy of the StoTherm ci MVES system. Together, MS Consultants, Foundation Building Materials Orlando and Rue Quality Systems brought the project home, with a huge assist from StoTherm ci’s fully engineered system, the single source solution for the building envelope.

With an elegant and fun dining room—and a state-of-the-art double drive-thru—the location has the capacity to make lots and lots of hot and tasty food to quell the cravings of all of our fans. What’s the coolest thing customers can expect to see?

Dozens of happy team members behind the counter moving with a synchronicity and efficiency that rivals the world’s most renown symphonies. We have a total of more than 130 team members at this location, and there’s a spirit of camaraderie and shared sense of purpose that exudes a spirit of fun.

What will be the biggest surprise? Customers might be surprised to see a Latin phrase on the exterior tower of the building. “Desideres ~Ego ~ Ergo~ Sum”—which translated means, “I Crave, Therefore I Am.”

Is this the first of what will be a trend in the larger restaurants for White Castle?

We always consider the nature of each site individually—size of future Castles will reflect the uniqueness of where it’s being built. We are especially happy with how the Orlando Castle turned out, and appreciative of all the hard work from dedicated partners that made it possible.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


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GENERAL CONTRACTOR · CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT · DESIGN BUILD CIRCLE NO. 17

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‘CRAVER’ WORTHY

Why did you pick Orlando for the construction of the new restaurant?

Over the years, lots of fans of White Castle have petitioned and lobbied us to get a location in Central Florida. When we saw this location, we knew it felt like a great fit. We’re honored to have a restaurant in Florida, and thankful for the warm embrace we’ve received from the Sunshine State.

How does the overall design cater to what the area needs?

With an elegant and fun dining room—and a state-of-the-art double drive-thru—the location has the capacity to make lots and lots of hot and tasty food to quell the cravings of all of our fans. The outdoor seating area provides a nice alternative to those who prefer a different dining environment. It is an ode to the comfort you crave.

34

At 4,567 square feet, the Orlando restaurant is much larger than most other locations. Did you work with any focus groups on the design?

Because we’re certain a lot of our competitors also read your publication, we are not at liberty to disclose what work we do from a research design perspective. What I can share is that we ask our customers good questions, listen intently to what they share with us, then act accordingly.

What are today’s customers looking for?

In the world of restaurants and food, first and foremost, it’s the taste. Value and convenience are also important drivers— but if the food falls short, there’s no hope

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

of success. We are fortunate in having a menu that customers crave—and the ability to create a space and place where we can create memorable moments every day.

What’s the brand’s short-term strategy? Long-term?

The best and most complete way to share where we are focused and what matters most to us—because it drives every decision we make—is to share our vision and our mission. Our vision is to feed the souls of craver generations everywhere. And our mission is to create memorable moments every day.


CIRCLE NO. 18


‘CRAVER’ WORTHY With so many months of a COVID restricted world being something we have all encountered in common, our focus remains on connecting with our customers and being relevant for the long haul. We were able to celebrate our 100th birthday this year, and we’re eager for all the adventures that come next.

Give us a rundown of what you are seeing out there.

Creating environments and spaces and places that are not only customer focused, but team member focused is going to become increasingly important. The labor shortage is real, and being able to attract, hire and retrain individuals with a heart for hospitality is an opportunity for good design to help make a difference.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

Uncertainty over cost volatility and changes in local regulations and guidelines that vary dramatically across the country.

Talk about the continued importance of sustainability today. What are you doing?

We are doing what we have always done as a family owned business. Taking the long view.

We do that with decisions regarding packaging, building materials, and all parts of our supply chain. We recently built a new home office building in Columbus, Ohio, and we’re happy to say we received Gold LEED certification. CCR

ONE-ON-ONE WITH... White Castle’s Mike Guinan What type of opportunities do you see moving ahead? As the country recovers from the pandemic, there will be opportunities to connect and reconnect in meaningful ways that have the possibility to strengthen brand loyalty. People want brands and companies they can trust. That requires authenticity and doing the right thing for the

36

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

right reasons. Our hope is that’s how we’re viewed. What type of challenges have you seen? Supply chain challenges, labor shortages and lots of cost volatility. What changes do you expect to see heading into 2022? More people, eating more White Castle sliders,

everywhere you look, but admittedly, our view is somewhat Castle-centric. What are the brand’s plans moving forward? To continue to be a great place to work, to continue to grow revenue, and to focus on continuous improvement and profitability. And to provide more jobs to more people.


COST-EFFECTIVE. HYGIENIC. SUSTAINABLE. THE RIGHT CHOICE IS EASY TO SEE. T HE X L E R ATO R ® H AND DRY E R W IT H H E PA FILT RAT IO N IS A CO MPLE T E LY TO UC HLE SS , H YGIE NIC H AND- DRYING S O LU T IO N T H AT PROVIDE S A 95% COST SAV I NGS OV E R PA P E R TOW E LS AND RE MOVE S 99. 999% O F VIRU S E S F RO M T H E A I R ST R E AM 1 .

M A K E T H E C H A N G E F R O M P A P E R T O W E L S T O D AY !

1

Based on April 2020 testing performed by LMS Technologies

SALES@NEWTONDISTRIBUTING.COM WWW.NEWTONDISTRIBUTING.COM C A L L N O W 8 7 7 - 8 3 7 - 7 74 5 CIRCLE NO. 19


How to Make Your Advertising in CCR… By Jim Nowakowski, President Accountability Information Management, Inc. We do a lot of advertising research. And today, there’s a lot of confusing information about what advertising is and isn’t. The Readership Circles chart on the right will help you cut through this confusion. Because today, an “ad” is just part of the equation: readers get information digitally. They go through Google to find you (over 4-billion searches each day), so your ad investment in CCR is just part of the equation. This article explains how to maximize that investment. Content is the Key Your ad appears in the print and digital version of the media outlet. The publisher of CCR, David Corson, invests most of his time and money building his “overall audience” for your ad (you can see his audience in this auditing tool: http://intrln.com/ccr) But he also has his website to handle the audience he can’t control: the Google audience. Therefore, you can help maximize your investment by sending in your company information for CCR's website. The more content you have on the internet, the more chances you have of being found and purchased. Simple, huh? Your Product is Really Information No matter what product or service you are selling, your real product is information. Thus, you are in an information war competing for the attention of buyers with not just your competitors, but with everyone on the internet. The more content you have that’s yours, the more opportunities for them to see you and go through the readership circles. Why We Know This AIM places a tracking code on CCR’s website and each month monitors visitors. Then, because you advertise, you receive 10 “dossiers” seen on the right on companies who have consumed data – companies that represent high-valued ACCOUNTABILITY WEBSITE AUDIT targets because their need is NOW for what you are selling.

Accountability Information Management, Inc.

CCR-MAG.COM

David Corson has us audit this activity. You receive this audit if you advertise, and it represents a rich field of leads for you. Call David Corson 678.765.6550 today to find out more details! Or, call us and we’ll help you understand the powerful information at your disposal.

Always Trusted Information Accountability Information Management, Inc. 553 N. North Court, Suite 160 Palatine, Illinois 60067 847-358-8558 www.a-i-m.com

IMPORTANT. This audit covers the above website for the period of September, 2020. It was conducted by allowing Accountability Information Management, Inc. (AIM) by placing a proprietary Code on the website to provide deeper analytics from the thousands of monthly visitors to the website to the publisher (i.e., the companies utilizing the website). AIM is in the business of auditing and verifying data. For information, contact: AIM, 553 N. North Court, Suite 160, Palatine, Illinois 60067. PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT. Commercial Construction & Renovation, CCR-MAG.COM, is a community of leading commercial construction professionals within the retail, restaurant, hospitality, health care, federal, multifamily and other commercial sectors. The website content spans the design, construction and facilities operations of major commercial construction segments to meet the information needs of today’s high level executives. Visitors will find information relevant to the collaborative management process required to complete projects on time and on budget, and to efficiently manage these facilities. PRIVACY. F&J Publications, LLC discloses the information we collect on this website and how it is used. This report is based on visitors to CCR-MAG.COM. Specifically, the information in this report is aggregated to provide our advertisers information on website usage. F&J Publications always reserves the right to release information about visitors, including non-personal information. NUMBER OF COMPANIES

XXX

This is the number of companies that the Code identifies. This number is the monthly universe of companies that can be identified from the thousands of visitors to this website.

NUMBER OF TIMES THESE

X,XXX

This is the number of times these companies visited the website. The average per company is 1.41.

PAGE VIEWS BY

X,XXX

This is the number of page views that these companies viewed on the website. The average pages viewed by a company this month is 2.04.

SEARCH TERMS USED BY

XX

This is the number of identifiable different search terms these companies used to arrive on the website. The search terms, for example, were put into a browser which delivered results. Among the results was a page on this website. For example, while many people find it by typing in “commercial construction and renovation” or “CCR” in a search engine like Google or Bing, other terms deliver specific pages from this website based on what users type into the search engine. These searches account for less than 5% of the total search terms used. The top ten (listed) account for 48% of the identified total (not counting CCR itself).

INDUSTRIES

XX

This is the number of companies that the Code is able to classify. It represents 5% of the total companies that visited this website, and is supplied for reference only. See UNDERSTANDING THE DATA.

FIRST PAGE VIEWED

X,XXX

The Code keeps track of the first page viewed by the companies, and is the same number of times the companies came to the website. The chart Key First Pages Viewed lists the top ten landing pages from this grouping (excluding CCR-MAG.com itself, which is among the top, but not more than 12%).

SEPTEMBER 2020

SEARCH TERMS USED TO REACH US • “Christopher Bushnell” AND Social Security • gary falco architecture • hi macs color TERRAZZO LUNA • inverter eon model el3 10 watt pricing • metal work very essential tools • mulehide jts1 colors • penncolor uv dispersions • permeable pavement concerns • rampart yellow wallcovering • silicone molds KEY FIRST PAGES VIEWED (other than CCR-MAG.com) • 7-essential-tools-for-your-metalworkingprojects • what-is-soil-reinforcement-and-how-is-it-done • 8-important-safety-measures-forconstruction-sites • new-menards-store-in-paducah-ky • construction-procurement-101 • conversations-with-bennett-van-wert-dwm • conversation-withbobby-darnell-cmc • american-dream-mall-in-nj-to-reopen-onoctober-1 • cny-group-names-new-vp-of-people-andculture • the-impact-of-building-materials-inconstruction COUNTRY BREAKDOWN OF COMPANIES United States India Pakistan Canada United Kingdom Other (64 countries)

XX% X% X% X% X% XX%

UNDERSTANDING THE DATA This report is provided to you from the publisher to help you understand the creation, distribution and consumption of information on the digital highways. The companies that are provided to you in this report have visited CCR-MA G.COM and consumed information. Knowing the name of the company gives you a “heads up” to pursue for your sales efforts. If you need to explore additional ideas, including ways to utilize this information, please contact the publisher or AIM directly. In addition to the INDUSTRY/COMPANY listings, you will see a list of companies that are not categorized by Code into industries. These are sometimes more valuable and should be considered carefully for your sales efforts. Finally, often a company will utilize a general channel (like Comcast), which does not provide the individual company’s IP. These visitors are often just as valuable in terms of “what” they consume on our website. We would happy to help you pursue this type of analysis. CCR7002.1


...Pay Dividends. The magazine or newsletter or website has a specific number of possibilities - the overall audience. You must factor that into ROI.

No matter where you place your message, this is the pattern of what we call the “Readership Chain.” And the weakest link in the chain will break it. That’s why you need as much content as you can on the Internet. People, your buyers, get distracted easily. Your messages must be compelling.

Some convert into readers of your message.

Not all people will "see" what you are selling. You must know some of these basics.

Some also raise the hand and ask for information.

Accountability Tools from CCR The audience audit tool (on the left) enables you to see CCR’s audience for yourself. The Company Dossier tool on the right highlights 10 companies who have consumed CCR content that month for your marketing purposes. Advertising in CCR gets you these dossiers. And there’s much more. Below are the highlights from the prior month for your review. Imagine being able to see who is consuming content like this, and then putting them in your marketing sights!

ACCOUNTABILITY WEBSITE AUDIT Each month advertisers receive powerful information to help them market their products and services. Here is a taste. 98,819 pages were consumed by over 2,000 companies. Among them: • • • • • •

Architectural firms like HDR Inc. and Smithgroup Universities like Illinois Wesleyan, Yale or University of Massachusetts Energy companies like BP America or Schlumberger Financial companies like American Express, Mckinsey & Company and Wells Fargo Materials companies like USG Corp and Carlisle Industrial companies like Aecom, Eaton and General Dynamics

And thousands more like CBRE, Texas Instruments, Goodyear, St. Lukes Episcopal Hospital. All these companies have projects going on – projects you can access to sell your products and services. Call the publisher, David Corson for a complete details. 678.765.6550. Or email him at: davidc@ccr-mag.com. CIRCLE NO. 20


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES/SOFWARE PRODUCTS

Project Management Services/ Sofware spotlighted in annual listing

A

t the heart of every commercial construction project is the management system that keeps everything in line. Implementing this part of the process effectively is critical. To help you give you the options you need, our annual Project Management Services/Software listing highlights the leaders in the retail, restaurant, hospitality, healthcare (and other) sectors. In addition, the report provides the contact information and contact person for each firm. If you didn’t make the list, contact Publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. 3MG, PSC

Manuel Ray, President P.O. Box 9023772 San Juan, PR 00902-3772 (787) 979-9982 www.3mg-pr.com • mray@3mg-pr.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Architecture/Engineering Services Construction Software Features: N/A, Business Size: N/A Platform: N/A, Intended Users: N/A, Open API: N/A, Pricing Model: N/A

airSlate, Inc.

Eveline Buchatskiy, VP Special Projects 17 Station St., 3rd Floor Brookline, MA 02445 www.signnow.com • eveline@airslate.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: e-Signature Solution Provider Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Other

American Time

Jonah Cagley, Director of Marketing 140 3rd St. S P.O. Box 707 Dassel, MN 55325 (800) 328-8996 • Fax: (800) 789-1882 www.american-time.com • theclockexperts@atsclock.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A, Construction Software Features: Synchronized Clocks and Clock Systems, Emergency Notification/Mass Communication Systems Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/ Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per Project

40

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Aquiline Drones

Barry Alexander, President/CEO 750 Main St., Penthouse Suite Hartford, CT 06103 (800) 361-7958 www.aquilinedrones.com info@aquilinedrones.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/ Engineering Services, Facility Maintenance Construction Software Features: Document Storage, Project Management, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per Project

Autocase

Cansu Ostojic, Marketing Manager 230 Park Ave., 3rd Floor W New York, NY 10169 (800) 440-1592 www.autocase.com • cansu@autocase.com Project Mgmt. Services: Architecture/Engineering Services Construction Software Features: Project Management Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, Property Owners/Brands Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per User, Per Project

Autodesk

Alexa De La Parra Ramirez, Content and Communications Coordinator Alexa.de.la.parra.ramirez@autodesk.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Architecture/Engineering Services, Facility Maintenance Construction Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription based


CIRCLE NO. 21


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES/SOFWARE PRODUCTS B2W Software

Greg Norris Director of Marketing Communications Martingale Wharf 99 Bow Street Portsmouth, NH 03801 800-336-3608 www.b2wsoftware.com • gnorris@b2wsoftware.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations Construction Software Features: Estimating, Scheduling and Dispatching, Field Tracking, Equipment Maintenance, Safety, Forms, Data Driven Decision Making/Business Insight, Business Size: Large, Medium, Small, Platform: Online, Mobile, On Premise, Intended Users: General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per Seat/Per User

Beam Team Construction, Inc.

Tim Hill, Executive Vice President, Business Development 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com • timhill@thebeamteam.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Facility Maintenance Construction Software Features: N/A, Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: N/A, Intended Users: N/A, Open API: No, Pricing Model: Per Project

The Blue Book Network

Ed Haege P.O. Box 500 Jefferson Valley, NY 10535 (800) 431-2584 www.thebluebook.com • info@thebluebook.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Architecture/Engineering Services, Facility Maintenance Construction Software Features: Bidding, Document Storage Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: No, Pricing Model: Other

Bureau Veritas

Blake Brosa, Senior Vice President 17200 N Perimeter Dr., Suite 100 Scottsdale, AZ 95255 (480) 777-1800 • Fax: (410) 785-6220 www.bvna.com blake.brosa@bureauveritas.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/ Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance, Surety/CPA Services, Construction Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

42

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

C3Solutions-Inc. Jen Nendick, President 4427 Woodward Ave. Downers Grove, IL 60515 (630) 445-3224 www.c3solutions-inc.com jenn@c3solutions-inc.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Construction Software Features: N/A Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile Intended Users: N/A, Open API: N/A, Pricing Model: Per Project

Capacity Builders, Inc. Wayne J Rausch, President 5563 S Prince St. Littleton, CO 80120 (303) 356-9672 www.capacitybuilders.com • wayne@capacitybuilders.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs, Construction Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Other

CDO Group Jonathan Wozniak, Marketing Manager 333 Harrison St. Oak Park, IL 60304 (708) 383-0586 www.cdogroup.com jonathanw@cdogroup.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys Construction Software Features: Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On Premise, Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Property Owners/Brands, Open API: No, Pricing Model: Amount of Data

Coast2Coast Survey Corp. Tim West, Director, Multi-Site 7704 Basswood Dr. Chattanooga, TN 37416 (423) 710-4714 www.coast2coast.net twest@coast2coast.net Project Mgmt. Services: Site Surveys, Due Diligence Construction Software Features: N/A, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: N/A, Intended Users: Architects, Open API: N/A Pricing Model: N/A


CIRCLE NO. 22


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES/SOFWARE PRODUCTS Construction Market Consultants

Bobby Darnell, Managing Principal 3651 Peachtree Pkwy., Suite E-275 Suwanee, GA 30024 (770) 887-4941 www.cmconl.com • info@cmconl.com Project Mgmt. Services : N/A Construction Software Features: CRM Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, Building Products, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription based, Per User

Cooldronepix.com

Mike Levin, Owner, Operator 2941 Susquehanna Rd. Roslyn, PA 19001 (215) 740-1747 • Fax: (215) 366-1060 www.cooldronepix.com mike@cooldronepix.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A, Construction Software Features: Drone Aerial Services, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On Premise, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: No, Pricing Model: Per Project

Core States Group

Kevin Behnke, Senior Director 3039 Premiere Pkwy., Suite 700 Duluth, GA 30097 (813) 319-8755 www.core-states.com • info@core-states.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence Construction Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User, Per Project

CS Hudson

Brittany Peavy, Client Development Manager 700 Veterans Memorial Hwy. Hauppauge, NY 11788 (713) 252-8336 www.cs-hudson.com • bpeavy@cs-hudson.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Construction Software Features: N/A Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: N/A

44

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Extracker Ryan Crosbie, VP Marketing 2603 Camino Ramon Blvd. Suite 200 San Ramon, CA 94583 www.extracker.com rcrosbie@extracker.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Project Management, Change Order Communication, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

Flexecution Nick Harraugh, VP, The Americas 16601 Blanco Rd., #112 San Antonio, TX 78232 (858) 752-1168 www.flexecution.com • nickh@flexecution.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs Construction Software Features: N/A, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: N/A, Intended Users: N/A, Open API: N/A Pricing Model: N/A

Green Badger Tommy Linstroth, CEO P.O. Box 8003 Savannah, GA 31412 (912) 401-2888 www.getgreenbadger.com • demo@getgreenbadger.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Project Management, LEED Certification, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per Project

Harbor Compliance Laura Worker, Marketing Manager 1830 Colonial Village Ln. Lancaster, PA 17601 (888) 995-5895 • Fax: (717) 202-2576 www.harborcompliance.com • info@harborcompliance.com Project Mgmt. Services: Other Construction Software Features: Entity Management and Licensing Software, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: No, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Amount of Data


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Professional Design and Project Management Services for the Retail, Restaurant, Hospitality, Entertainment and the Commercial Markets. Expertise and a practical know-how. We execute your branded concepts with a focus on quality, scalability and speed to market.

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WWW.PMCONSORTIUM.COM CHRIS.LOVE@PMCONSORTIUM.COM 347-392-1188

CIRCLE NO. 23


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES/SOFWARE PRODUCTS Inspected

Anthony Perera, Founder 2801 Evans St. Hollywood, FL 33020 (754) 243-5301 www.inspected.com anthony@inspected.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Architecture/Engineering Services Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Service Management, Remote Virtual Inspections Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based

JLL

Nicole Mouren-Laurens, Senior Vice President 3344 Peachtree Rd., NE Atlanta, GA 30326 (818) 620-2974 www.us.jll.com/en/deliver-projects nicole.mouren-laurens@am.jll.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Project Management, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based

JobNimbus

Taylor Edwards, Public Relations Strategist 3451 Triumph Blvd., Suite 650 Lehi, UT 84043 (855) 964-6287 www.jobnimbus.com sales@jobnimbus.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations Construction Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

Journey Builders Inc DBA Core

Jenny Austin, Head of Operations 555 Bryant St. Palo Alto, CA 94301 (831) 292-4077 www.bycore.com • jenny@bycore.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Project Management Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: General Contractors, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription Based

46

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

JStephens, LLC

Jeff Stephens, President 5415 E 109th Pl. Tulsa, OK 74237 (918) 299-2900 www.jstephenscm.com • jeff@jstephenscm.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs, Due Diligence Construction Software Features: N/A Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: N/A Intended Users: N/A, Open API: N/A, Pricing Model: N/A

Kingsmen Projects US

Stephen Hekman, Vice President, Retail Services US 3525 Hyland Ave., Suite 225 Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (619) 719-8950 • Fax: (949) 544-1286 www.kingsmen-int.com/global-presence/usa/ stephen@kingsmen-usa.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence Construction Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: No, Pricing Model: Per User, Per Project

KMI International

Eric Quinn, Chief Executive Officer 7335 Lake Ellenor Dr. Orlando, FL 32809 (407) 757-3523 www.kmiintl.com equinn@kmiintl.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs, Due Diligence Construction Software Features: N/A Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: N/A Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: N/A, Pricing Model: N/A

Knowify

Terrin Kalian, Director of Customer Experience 45 Broadway, Suite 1440 New York, NY 10006 (212) 233-3230 www.knowify.com • knowify@knowify.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Service Management, Project Management, Job Costing, Submittals Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Specialty Contractors, Open API: No Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User


ES T

2010

CIRCLE NO. 24


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES/SOFWARE PRODUCTS Laser Facility Management

Joe Fairley, Director 110 Commerce Rd. Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (561) 235-7444 www.laserfacility.com • joseph@laserfacility.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance, Construction Software Features: N/A Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Per Project

Levelset

Alex Dunn, Director of Demand Generation 1121 Josephine St. New Orleans, LA 70130 (866) 720-5436 www.levelset.com • alex.dunn@levelset.com Project Mgmt. Services: Due Diligence Construction Software Features: Document Storage, Payments & Lien Rights, Materials Financing, Payment History Vetting, Legal Help & Education, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Intended Users: General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, Material Suppliers & Equipment Lessors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User, Per Project, Amount of Data

Manufaction by Vizz Technologies

Raghi Iyengar, President 2915 Courtyards Dr., Suite C Peachtree Corners, GA 30071 (855) MFACTON www.manufacton.com • sales@manufacton.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A, Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Logistics, Materials & Production Management, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Modular Builder Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based

Monograph

Robert Yuen, CEO + Co-Founder 165 11th St. San Francisco, CA 94103 www.monograph.com robert@monograph.com Project Mgmt. Services: Architecture/ Engineering Services Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Logistics, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms Open API: No, Pricing Model: Per User

48

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Motili, Inc

Kirill Kniazev, Marketing Director 1900 Wazee St., #1533 Denver, CO 80202 (800) 669-9656 www.motilli.com Project Mgmt. Services: Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Estimating, Service Management, Project Management Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium, Homeowners Platform: On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Property Owners/ Brands, Open API: No, Pricing Model: Per User, Per Project

Newforma, Inc.

Aaron Kivett, Director of Partnerships 1750 Elm St., 9th Floor Manchester, NH 03104 (877) 875-8252 • Fax: (603) 248-6145 www.newforma.com • support@newforma.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A, Construction Software Features: Document Storage, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

OpenSpace

Chris Balandran, Director of Marketing 333 Kearney St., Floor 4 San Francisco, CA 94108 (415) 373-6806 www.openspace.ai • crystal@openspace.ai Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Logistics, Project Management, Photo Documentation and Analysis, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based

Pantera Tools

Susie Martzahl, Account Executive 10411 Corporate Dr., Suite 208 Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (877) 219-9777 www.panteratools.com • susie.martzahl@panteratools.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Due Diligence Construction Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Project Management, Pre-Qualification Platform Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User


CIRCLE NO. 25


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES/SOFWARE PRODUCTS PlanHub

Kevin Priddy, Founder & CEO 1666 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Suite 950 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 656-4701 www.planhub.com • info@planhub.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Bidding, Document Storage Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, Construction Suppliers, Open API: No Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Free to General Contractors

Poma Retail Development Inc. Tony Poma, President 222 W 6th St., # 345 San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 833-7662 www.pomaretail.com • tonyp@pomaretail.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance, Fixture Roll Outs and Shop in Shops Construction Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: N/A, Intended Users: N/A, Open API: , Pricing Model: N/A

Premier

Rex Tullius, VP of Strategic Partnerships 14185 Dallas Pkwy., Suite 1400 Dallas, TX 75254 (972) 778-9500 • Fax: (972) 392-2006 www.premierpm.com • requests@premierpm.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Architecture/Engineering Services, Construction Software Features: N/A, Business Size: Large Enterprise Platform: N/A, Intended Users: N/A, Open API: N/A Pricing Model: N/A

Prime Retail Services Inc. Donald Bloom, President 3617 Southland Dr. Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 • Fax: (866) 589-3605 www.primeretailservices.com • dbloom@primeretailservices.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Construction Software Features: N/A, Business Size: Medium, Platform: N/A, Intended Users: N/A Open API: N/A, Pricing Model: N/A

50

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Projectmates by Systemates Inc.

Laura Wards, Marketing Director 2435 N Central Expy., Suite 640 Richardson, TX 75080 (214) 217-4100 www.projectmates.com • laura.wards@systemates.com Project Mgmt. Services: Software, Construction Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based

ProjectPro

Kerry Evans, Marketing and Partner Growth Manager 1250 Pittsford Victor Rd., Suite 310 Pittsford, NY 14534 www.projectpro365.com • kerry@projectpro365.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Accounting, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Project Management, Document Tracking, Accounting Process Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On Premise, Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Property Owners/Brands, HVAC, Utility Contractor, Mining Contractor, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

Property Management Advisors, LLC

Jim Sheuchenko, President 260 Exec. Dr., Suite 250 Plainview, NY 11803 (516) 470-1423 www.pmadvisors.co • js@pmadvisors.co Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Planned Capital Programs, Facility Maintenance Construction Software Features: Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Intended Users: Property Owners/ Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per Project

Project Management Consortium (PMC)

Chris Love, President 7728 Henefer Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90045 (347) 392-1188 www.pmconsortium.com • chris.love@pmconsortium.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance, Construction Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Estimating, Project Management Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Target User, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Per Project, Best Fit for Client


CIRCLE NO. 26


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES/SOFWARE PRODUCTS RedTeam Software

ShareIn Tech

Rhombus Services, LLC dba BrandPoint Services

Smart Safety

Kyler Wagner, VP of Marketing 8623 Commodity Cir. Orlando, FL 32819 (407) 720-8309 www.redteam.com • kwagner@redteam.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations Construction Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

Michael Volpatt, Chief Marketing Officer 100 Castleview Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15234 (412) 942-0200 • Fax: (412) 942-0200 www.getshareintech.com • michael@getshareintech.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Document Storage, Project Management, Safety, Productivity & BIM, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

Steve Hearon, President 820 Adams Ave., Suite 130 Trooper, PA 19403 (267) 908-9780 • Fax: (484) 392-7520 www.brandpointservices.com • shearon@brandpointservices.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Due diligence, Facility Maintenance Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Intended Users: General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based

Keyan Zandy, CEO 1810 N Greenville Ave. Richardson, TX 75081 (214) 850-8555 www.smartsafetyalert.com • kzandy@skilesgroup.com Project Mgmt. Services: Other, Construction Software Features: Safety, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per Project

Schafer Construction, Inc.

Matt Vetter, Vice President 150 N First St., Suite 100 Brighton, MI 84116 (248) 767-0512 www.schaferconstruction.net mvetter@schaferconstruction.net Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/ Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance, Facility Condition Assessments Construction Software Features: N/A, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: N/A, Intended Users: N/A, Open API: N/A Pricing Model: N/A

SFV Services

Josh Rosen, Chief Operating Officer 25550 Grand River Ave. Redford, MI 48240 (800) 630-1021 www.sfvservices.com info@sfvservices.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Due Diligence, Construction Software Features: N/A Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: N/A, Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands, Open API: N/A, Pricing Model: N/A

52

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Soil Connect

Teresa Bonfiglio, Chief of Staff 998C Old Country Rd. Plainview, NY 11803 (833) 230-7645 www.soilconnect.com • teresa@soilconnect.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Architecture/Engineering Services Construction Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Project Management Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

STACK Construction Technologies

Phil Ogilby, CEO, Founder 4600 McAuley Pl., Suite 400 Cincinnati, OH 45242 (866) 702-6078 www.stackct.com • contact@stackct.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A, Construction Software Features: Document Storage, Estimating, Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Intended Users: General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, Suppliers/Manufacturers, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription Based


State Permits, Inc

Vaun Podlogar, President 319 Elaines Ct. Dodgeville, WI 53533 (406) 222-3333 www.permit.com • vaun@permit.com Project Mgmt. Services: Permit Expediting Construction Software Features: Permit Tracking and License Management, Platform: On-Line Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Sign Companies and Facility Maintenance Companies, Open API: N/A, Pricing Model: N/A

The Subcontractor Institute

Karalynn Cromeens, Founder/Owner 1345 Campbell Rd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77055 (346) 234-6974 www.subcontractorinstitute.com info@subcontractorinstitute.com Project Mgmt. Services: Due Diligence Construction Software Features: Education, Contract Review, Collections & Lien Rights, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, Subcontractors, Material Suppliers Open API: No, Pricing Model: Per Project

Think Power Solutions, LLC

Hari Vasudevan, Founder & CEO 9720 Coit Rd., Suite 220-345 Plano, TX 75025 (877) 741-0668 www.thinkpowersolutions.com partner@thinkpowersolutions.com Project Mgmt. Services: Planned Capital Programs Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Service Management, Project Management Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

The Townson Company

Roni Townson, CEO/VP Marketing 7157 Colleyville Blvd., Suite 101 Colleyville, TX 76034 (817) 421-1177 Fax: (817) 421-1181 www.townsoncompany.com roni@townsoncompany.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Due Diligence Construction Software Features: N/A, Business Size: Small-Medium Platform: N/A, Intended Users: N/A, Open API: N/A, Pricing Model: N/A

UL Product iQ

UL Customer Service 333 Pfingsten Rd. Northbrook, IL 60062 (913) 307-9010 www.productiq.ul.com customer.service@productiq.ul.com Project Mgmt. Services: Due Diligence Construction Software Features: Certification Verification Business Size: Large Enterprise, Platform: On-Line Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Many Features are Free

USGN (USGlobalNet)

Douglas Sperr, Founder & CEO 7465 E Osborn Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (602) 745-2492 www.usgn.net • info@usgn.net Project Mgmt. Services: N/A Construction Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management, Site Selection, Asset and Equipment Tracking, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Retail, Restaurant Chains, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per Active Project

YellowBird

Abby Barenholtz, Company Outreach Manager 2355 E Camelback Rd., Suite 950 Phoenix, AZ 85016 (888) 780-3935 www.goyellowbird.com sales@goyellowbird.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Due Diligence, Construction Software Features: EHS Personnel on Demand, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, Subcontractors, Open API: No, Pricing Model: Per Project

Zepth

Anjali Singhal, VP of Marketing 201, Tower D, Pioneer Urban Square Sector 62 Gurugram, Haryana India 122102 +91-124 46751000 www.zepth.com • contact@zepth.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence Construction Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Service Management, Project Management Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per Project

ISSUE 8, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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CIRCLE NO. 27


The push ahead Men’s CCR Roundtable ramp up their to-do lists amid the continuing pandemic

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


M

ore than 18 months into a pandemic that has changed the way each of us do business, commercial construction professionals are still keeping the pedal down. As our podcast series shows, as we move

into the end of the year and on into 2022, the industry is in an “all systems go” mode—pandemic be damned.

The podcast, hosted by CCR Publisher David Corson and Editor Michael J. Pallerino, included a diverse set of commercial construction professionals representing the vendor and end-user sides of the business. Following is an edited look at the July discussion.

Jim Nowakowski Accountability Information Management (AIM)

Don Harton Cinemark USA

Chris Love Project Management Consortium (PMC)

Steve Hekman Kingsmen Projects

Mike Morelli National Sign Team

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THE PUSH AHEAD CCR: Give us a snapshot of what you do? Jim Nowakowski, Accountability Information Management (AIM): We are a lead service and audit company. We monitor projects in the world of data and construction. We monitor information with our other sources for project information as construction flows. We do market research on an ongoing basis. Don Harton, Cinemark USA: Cinemark is a global theater operator. We have about 320 locations in the US, and theaters in 13 countries across Central and South America. Our Design & Construction group is responsible for new projects in the US as well as for maintenance of all the existing theaters in the US. Chris Love, Project Management Consortium (PMC): We’re a client representative (outsource), specializing in retail design management and project management services. I have nearly 35 years in the industry and most of our team has 20-plus years of experience.

has been a real hot thing as of late for new concepts.

What is the pressing item on your to-do list?

PCM’s Love: We have a constantly running scenario; it’s ever changing. Hot topics are immediate and require immediate attention. I usually set my to-do list the night before and work to get to thru them straight away in the morning before the phone starts ringing. That’s when all the priorities start changing. I try to keep my priorities in front of me as I go throughout the day. We have three-, six- and nine-month goals that we strive to achieve to satisfy our clients. Those are ever changing as well. We stay focused and positive while having a bit of fun. Kingsmen’s Heckman: My to-do list flows a lot, too. We have priorities that start the day, every day, but a lot of our business is on the East Coast and in the Midwest. So we get up in the morning trying to be on top of all those priorities. The biggest thing

“I’m surrounded by a team of people who keep us on track. I generally operate now from a distance and just step in for new business or data analysis. My to-do list is to keep everything on track. I work until I go to sleep, and when I get up, I keep working.” — Jim Nowakowski, Accountability Information Management (AIM)

Steve Hekman, Kingsmen Projects: I started with Kingsmen about 15 years ago building brands overseas, eventually opening an office here in 2014. We work on supplying millwork, FFME, installation, services and do a lot of design build. We also get involved in value engineering, helping people bring down costs of their existing programs. Mike Morelli, National Sign Team: We do national sign programs throughout the US, including a lot of brand rollouts and prototypes. We also do rebranding, which

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we’re trying to do is be forward thinking. We’re basically making sure that we’re getting things lined up for our customers, lots of preplanning. We have a lot of overseas projects—Singapore, Korea—so I have to plan my days around that. It does make for longer days. But that’s the skinny. Cinemark’s Harton: The overall function is to keep projects moving forward. Did we hit our budget targets? Did we hit our timing targets? My day might also include working with a project manager in the field to

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

determine how to resolve a concern that has been identified. It might be visiting a theater to look at a particular issue the GM has reported. It is good to get a better understanding of those things. And, of course, with the pandemic, we do most of these visits virtually. We’re always looking at issues on a small-scale and large-scale basis. National Sign Team’s Morelli: My to-do list spills over like everybody else’s. First thing in the morning, I like to have a team meeting to set goals on what can be accomplished for the day and the week. We like to forecast what we have coming up for installs within the next 30 days and find out if there are any glitches with things like permits or logistics. Every day is ever-evolving. There are all kinds of different challenges that we try to avoid. We don’t want mishaps or miscommunication, so a lot of time is spent emailing and on the phone with clients. AIM’s Nowakowski: I’m fortunate coming from the agency business where I was trained in that we used a hot sheet. This has all the projects upcoming for the week, which changes instantly. The minute you publish the hot sheet, it changes. It’s all data. I’m surrounded by a team of people who keep us on track. I generally operate now from a distance and just step in for new business or data analysis. My to-do list is to keep everything on track. I work until I go to sleep, and when I get up, I keep working.

What are some of the lessons learned over the past 18 months?

Kingsmen’s Hekman: Last year was a tough year. We got a little PPP money, but honestly, we were in the shields business. Six months out of the year, all my projects slid. All the jobs slid into the fall. So we went out and got some orders to satisfy those shield needs. Things have come full circle. We finished the jobs that slid and now we have more work. There is more work out there than the supply chain can hold. There was a shortage of work last year, but this year it has protracted because there are eight- and 10-week lead times, where we normally


727.859.1044

www.nationalsignteam.com CIRCLE NO. 28


THE PUSH AHEAD work off four- to six-week lead times. We’re having a hard time getting material. I have four to five shops and they all have labor issues right now. Nobody wants to work in the factory, so it’s a problem. Just like a restaurant, we cannot get enough staff—places like Sacramento, Fort Wayne (Indiana) and even in Montreal. There are no workers. But we do have the work. We’re even having to turn down some projects because we just cannot place them into the mix. So it went from having nothing to having too much. With lag times on supply side—it’s taking about 10 to 12 weeks, we’re not even bringing anything over. We’re just focused on things made here. The hardest thing for us, opportunity-wise, is the amount of work out there. There’s so much work being bid right now and re-bid. I think the opportunities are for some of our existing customers trying to value engineer some of their existing programs. It’s much different than two years ago. We’re just trying to find a niche—a balance.

$100 to get the whole auditorium— people you quarantined with. We will keep that moving forward.

Cinemark’s Harton: When the pandemic hit, we closed all our theaters and began to imagine what to do. What would we have to do to reopen? We learned about the difference between disinfecting and sanitizing. We learned about the EPA List N, which I didn’t even know existed. As the CDC began to shift battling the virus from surface to airborne transmission, we learned about mitigation strategies and air purification. There was so much to learn—an enormous amount of technology for eliminating airborne or surface viruses. Lots and lots of people entered the game and are still sort of playing in it—trying to push different products in those areas. One of the things we realized is that we needed to differentiate how we deliver. There are so many product lines and product ideas. We’re looking at where we can engage with our guests and bring them something new and exciting—something that makes them want to leave the safety of their homes again. We offered private watch parties, where people could reserve the theater for movies with their friends. We charged

We thought about what happened to the industry when the markets crashed in 2008. The same thing is occurring now, as many companies have furloughed staff and closed stores. When the market started to return in 2010, everything picked back up quickly. Many retailers outsourced people and responsibilities in order to catch up with the demand. We thought about a business model where PMC could be a flexible resource for clients having that objective. PMC provides white glove management service while adding value. We spent 2020 positioning ourselves for the 2021-22 influx of projects. We looked for the right people who are seasoned professionals and have a love for servicing clients. Our business model is more cost effective than larger companies, as we do not have all the overhead as we are virtual. Thus, we pass those savings on to our clients. That’s another way of doing business that’s different than it was 18 months ago. Our internal business model is focused on maintaining our people. What’s the incentive to keep them excited? The work and the money of which the majority is shared among the people working on a project and

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PMC’s Love: We started PMC a little over a year ago. The lessons we learned from the pandemic are how to function and start a business in a pandemic. As a client representative in the retail industry, which was devastated as we all know, our thought process was to imagine what the industry will look like when everything reopens. How can we position ourselves to be a differentiator in making those things happen for our clients?

or client. This way, their focus and attention are on that client and their project outcomes. Our team earns more money than if working for a traditional firm and it’s a win-win, as the client pays less and each person on that account has more of the fee. Again, PMC needs to be a differentiator in this industry. The pandemic has allowed this new business model to flourish for PMC where 18 months ago it would be unheard of. Firms must be flexible in this ever-changing industry and thus far, it’s working for us. We’re a little over a year old and have more than a dozen amazing clients and counting.

“The pandemic has allowed this new business model to flourish for PMC where 18 months ago it would be unheard of. Firms must be flexible in this ever-changing industry and thus far, it’s working for us.” — Chris Love, Project Management Consortium (PMC)

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Kingsmen’s Hekman: Like Chris said about over-servicing the client and servicing, I have built stores for five years. I was a director of construction for a small chain and I built a couple hundred units. I didn’t get paid a lot back then. I used to put in 80hour work weeks. It was a lot. In essence, I basically just took all that knowledge and started working on the supply side—using it to service some of our clients. Not long ago, I had a contractor walk off the job on a client in Canada. The contractor was in San Marcos (California). He took the keys with him. Gone. I got a truck on the road. There was no panic in our client because he knew we would put the things in motion. It is what we take pride in. We know how to solve problems related to our business. And we work on both coasts and overseas. We’re still up working when a lot of people have already signed off. You have to work ahead of the clock. PMC’s Love: One of our major clients is based in London; we have calls very early in the morning and late at night as our team is


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Stephen Hekman • (619) 719-8950 • stephen@kingsmen-usa.com CIRCLE NO. 29


THE PUSH AHEAD spread over three time zones. It is never a problem. It’s all relative, as at the end of the day, the client put their trust in PMC to deliver.

What type of opportunities do you see moving forward?

PMC’s Love: Our concept was based on what the industry is looking for. We positioned and established our business based on providing great service while adding value. We think a virtual office is one of the options, as there’s a lot of technology catering to this new way of doing business. so why add that expense to your overhead. Pass the saving on to the client. Retail brands main concern coming out of the pandemic are cost, speed to market, while maintain quality. Firms should act upon this as their business mantra and focus on delivering to client expectations.

My old company unfortunately couldn’t keep me on anymore. I was one of several who had to take a leave. So I was able to zero my game a little bit. It got to the point where I still had clients and people I talked with. The opportunity came up with a client who acquired a restaurant out of bankruptcy and wanted me to do a rebrand throughout the country. But I had no home. So after some back and forth conversations, I started National Sign Team last August. It catapulted me off the ground and back into the sign business. We don’t fabricate in house. We don’t have 100 installers all over the country. We have great project managers who vest our partners all over the country so we could deliver a quality product. What I found was that everybody can build the widget. You have to be able to transform what you offer and deliver it. Quality

“We’re making our suppliers better because some of them may not know how to package something for a particular site or for a union delivery, or things like that. It’s the same thing. If you’re going on to that site, you’ve already anticipated those things.” — Steve Hekman, Kingsmen Projects

National Sign Team’s Morelli: I’ve been in the sign industry since 1986. I was with the same company for a really long time—a great family-owned sign company. A lot of our focus was retail—probably 60%. We had it broken up between entertainment and restaurants, QSR being the other 40%. When this pandemic hit, retail hit a brick wall. Everything just stopped and there was a signage graveyard. But after working in the industry for so long, you know how to deliver your goods, how to exceed expectations and how to listen to what your clients’ needs are instead of just building the widget and slapping it on the wall. When COVID started, we were just really zeroing in on our project management team. We were looking at what would really make our company successful. You have to communicate with your clients.

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standards must be met, but that’s what spec pages are for. And we’ve zeroed it in to some great partners around the country. Kingsmen’s Hekman: We’re in similar shoes. We know how the product should be made in a shop; we know what the specifications are, and how it should be delivered. So we’re really thinking ahead and preparing. We’re making our suppliers better because some of them may not know how to package something for a particular site or for a union delivery, or things like that. It’s the same thing. If you’re going on to that site, you’ve already anticipated those things. We’re providing that extra customer service. AIM’s Nowakowski: What I am learning is that what you all did during COVID was to

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

migrate into an agency-like model. Agencies were born many years ago to help companies do their communications because they didn’t want to do it in house. Now that’s reversed. But advertising agencies were basically an outsource for all the communications, whether it was ads, direct mail (etc.). What I’m hearing is that you’re migrating into that service business. Part of our service, nothing has changed in 30 years, is to answer the phone in two rings. I always ask, “What do you need?” When COVID hit, we did the same thing we always do. We adapt, change or we knew we would disappear. We took the PPP to try to keep people employed, but the business today is very different. It is about adapting, changing or disappearing. What we learned in COVID is the same thing we’ve been practicing in our prior experience, and that is to keep moving forward and try different things. Never stop moving.

Tell us a little about your story.

National Sign Team’s Morelli: I grew up in Upstate New York, a town called Rochester, which is famous for Kodak and Xerox. I had my first child when I was 20 and had to go to work. I ended up working at a sign shop back in 1986. Over the years, I have watched this whole industry morph into what it is today. It has been pretty cool watching how signs were made in the ‘80s versus how they are made today. I started a sign company after a while and had it for 11 years in New York. After I went through a divorce in 2005, I went to work for a company in Orange County, California. I built relationships with a lot of retailers and restaurants over the years. I really enjoyed it. We all became great friends. I was at that company until COVID hit. Everything came to a screeching halt. That’s when I decided to take the leap and make National Sign Team happen. When you come from nothing and build your whole career up, then have it pulled out from under you, everything is up to you. I work hard every single day. It’s 24 hours. That’s my drive. PMC’s Love: I grew up in Queens a borough of NYC. My first year of college, I was a fine arts major, and then transferred over to architecture. I started in the retail design


CIRCLE NO. 30


THE PUSH AHEAD business working for Walker Group CNI in 1986 as a junior draftsman. At the time, they were the largest retail design firm in the world with the focus on large department stores and shopping centers. Brands were just beginning to emerge as shop in shops in these locations. I went into business with my father in Miami from the late ‘80s to the late ‘90s. Our retail design firm was called CLDA, which specialized in national department store chains and shopping center, including the Caribbean and South America. That was a fantastic experience on how to run, market and manage a business at a young age Back to New York in the late ‘90s for Calvin Klein as international director of store planning, responsible for design/project management of retail stores and showrooms globally. Next, I was VP of project management for Robin Kramer in NYC, soon followed as they were the in-house design and project management firm for Donna Karen, and many other brands. A business development opportunity came about with a GC specializing in luxury retail, which gave me great insight on how the other side of the business operates— many of lessons I still apply for my clients today. California called with women’s fashion house, BCBG Max Azria Group, where I was the VP of architecture, construction and procurement for nearly 13 years. We managed the design and construction of thousands of retail locations, showrooms, shop in shops, and offices globally. Before starting PMC in 2020, I was with JLL as VP of retail multi-site for nearly three years assisting national brands with their retail growth until the pandemic. I am very fortunate to have been in this industry for nearly 35 years. I’ve worked with so many wonderful people and I’ve had amazing tutors over the years. As hard as the struggle was to climb the ladder, there was always someone pulling me up. For that I am very grateful. Today at PMC, we are focusing a lot of attention on clients new to the industry and need help with their retail expansion. At the end of the day, where can PMC add value? I’d love to have McDonald’s as a client and be awarded a 5,000-store rollout to project manage. But what value would we add? A

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lot of these new companies either online or cannabis brands opening brick and mortar locations today need our kind of experience and guidance. This is where I feel PMC is the lovingly elder statesmen—the passionate ones who can add value to the process and assist these brands through their journey. Spending time mentoring people I have worked with over the years is my ongoing passion. It is important to give back and develop new leadership. I think the future of our industry is on the verge of a culture shock with regards to how people interact and understand relationships. All of this white glove service that we’re talking about is not taught in school. I wonder about the next wave of executives as the roll is very conflicting.

I went to high school in Clear Lake, just south of Houston. I went to Texas A&M for an undergraduate program and received a Bachelor of Environmental Design. I worked for a couple of years for a large architectural firm doing programming in Houston, and then went to Oregon for a graduate degree in architecture—a Master’s in Architecture. I came back to Dallas again because my wife got a financial degree and wanted to work for a bank. There was a large bank that had just laid off a bunch of workers in Seattle, so back to Texas it was. I went to work for a small architecture firm before going to work for another architecture firm for a number of years. I started working on movie theaters in 1986,

“I started working on movie theaters in 1986, designing a variety of them. After working largely for Cinemark doing projects for a number of years, they invited me to work in-house. That was 1996, and I have been here for 25 years in various roles, but always in design and construction.” — Don Harton, Cinemark USA

Today, you must be a compassionate A-type personality, a fantastic listener, have a great vendor connection, and master a clear understanding of how this industry works and how to maneuver through it on behalf of your clients. If not, this business will swallow you whole, and fast. Cinemark’s Harton: I was born in Dallas; my father took a job with one of the subcontractors for the space program so we moved to Florida. I lived near the Space Center in the Cape Canaveral area. My dad was involved in building those large satellite tracking systems down through the Caribbean. He would go to the Caribbean and bring back slideshows and we’d watch how they lived on those exotic islands. He came back to Texas as the manned space program was developed and was involved in developing navigation systems for the space shuttle.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

designing a variety of them. After working largely for Cinemark doing projects for a number of years, they invited me to work inhouse. That was 1996, and I have been here for 25 years in various roles, but always in design and construction. I now have five grandkids, so we’re enjoying that aspect of life as well. Kingsmen’ Hekman: I grew up in Riverside, California, about an hour and 45 minutes from the beach. We were kind of inland for the California people. I attended Cal State San Bernardino, where I was a student body president. I only ran for office because they were changing the beer prices in the student union. I got a job right out of college and moved to Boston, working as a tenant coordinator on the Burlington Mall. I was basically thrown into it. It was where they


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THE PUSH AHEAD had raised the second level—probably the third mall in the country where they cut the roof and put a mall on top of a mall. I did that for a few years. My wife—my girlfriend at the time— was with me. We moved back in two years after I completed those projects. I tried to get a job on the tenant side, but ended up building stores for a company called Three Day Blinds. We built about 250 stores. But I didn’t have all the tools they have today. We had a sky pager, if you are old enough to remember that. I had the contractors call me on a 1-800 number because they didn’t want to call until the end of the day when they returned from their jobs. Cellphones were very expensive. I’ve

I was fortunate enough to have. They were stopping construction here and wanted to build their first stores in China. I spent four or five years just building Abercrombie stores. I had a handful of clients I was working with. That’s what led me to Asia, where I was doing stores for them—general construction and the like. It was really a learning experience for the client for them to take us over there. In 2014, we opened this office so we wouldn’t have to fly so much. I own part of this office. They have been a good partner, good supplier for as long as I’ve worked for them. I have learned a lot with these brands. I love working for brands I love. And I love to learn about them and to be a part of their

“We are working with a brand now coming here from Australia. They want to open 200 stores and I’ve never heard of them before. But they’re big in Australia. It is the kind of things that energize us.” — Steve Hekman, Kingsmen Projects

been in the business since 1988—since I started—but I went from the landlord side to the tenant side, and ended up working on the supply side. That is where I got a job working for a fixture company in Mexico called Associated Wood Products. One of my first customers was Rubio’s Restaurants. I just started out working on projects that weren’t very complicated—tabletops and bars, things like that. I started Hekman Company, and just started getting one customer after another. As you build that base, your customers take you with them. I landed at Skechers in ‘97, where they started signing leases here and overseas. They wanted us to build their stores overseas, so we hired a company in London. That took me overseas. Consequently, I did a number of projects in Europe. In 2007, the market tanked. It tanked in Europe in ‘08/’09 and everybody wanted to go to Asia. It was quiet here. I ended up building Kingsmen around ‘07 or ‘08. Abercrombie was another client

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stories. As you evolve with a brand, it can take you different places. We are working with a brand now coming here from Australia. They want to open 200 stores and I’ve never heard of them before. But they’re big in Australia. It is the kind of things that energize us. AIM’s Nowakowski: I was born in Chicago, and went to college at Lewis and DePaul University. My degrees are in English. I was a teacher for 10 years. I have an authority complex and was fired for defending a student. I transitioned to advertising, breaking in for $500 a month as a copywriter. I had great mentors. I studied under Bill Robinson, who traveled with Jack Dempsey across the United States. He was the former director of DeVry Advertising. I learned a lot. Keep learning every day is what keeps me young. I was fired a couple more times. The third time I was a creative director at the eighth largest direct response agency in the

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

country, which is now defunct. I said, “Okay, I can try this on my own.” And my wife said, “Whatever.” She is my great support and couldn’t have done this without her. We have been married a long time and she is the love of my life. When we started this service, I was a problem solver. One of my clients called me a provider. I was fabricating metal plates in China for a client. I only had four clients. And then ‘09 hit. Everything just stopped. I had to do something. I had 25 people. So we reinvented ourselves and started expanding into the areas of our expertise. We now have a menu of services. We started soliciting new business. That was a major learning thing for me. I didn’t want new business because I had this fiduciary interest with these four clients, but when everything collapsed, it was winner take all or whatever. So I went and looked at the competitors, which I never did. One of my competitors ended up asking me where the hell I had been. I started the business in 1990, and after five years, I had to make a decision. I had a New York client coming to Chicago and I was working out of my house. I couldn’t invite him to the living room, so I started renting an office. I meet people who cannot make up their mind every day. And if you can’t make up your mind in business, inevitably, it’s a tragedy. So like Hamlet, and everything else I’ve studied as an English teacher, really plays philosophically into the movement of business today. Once you have realized the worst thing that can happen to you is you can lose your business, there is nothing else. You have to figure out how to keep it going. I’m very blessed. I’m very grateful. I’ve met a lot of different people and learned from each of them. Our ability to adapt, change or disappear is really the Alexander the Great strategy. Anticipate, react, and then adapt. You know as well as I do, you have to write a great lesson plan. So, I’d write a great lesson plan and then you get in front of the 20 underachievers and they haven’t read the lesson plan, you world collapses. But it makes you stronger, and you realize a lesson plan is good, but experience is better. CCR


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CIRCLE NO. 33


Out of nowhere 5 tips for dealing with crisis management in construction By Tobias Cushing

Editor’s Note: The information provided in these materials is intended to be general and advisory in nature. It shall not be considered legal advice. If you are seeking to resolve specific safety, legal or business issues or concerns related to the information provided in these materials, please consult your safety consultant, attorney or business advisors.

I

t is no secret that all businesses should have a plan in case of emergency. For construction companies, it is extremely import-

ant because the business can be shut down due to disasters or unexpected events. From natural catastrophes to global pandemics, a crisis can come at any moment and have a huge impact on job sites and projects, affecting all subcontractors and trades involved. This includes carpenters, laborers, plumbers and electricians. No matter what happens or who’s on the job, every emergency requires prompt action to help minimize or control the potential effects on the business and development. So, knowing what to do and how to create a crisis management plan can help.

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OUT OF NOWHERE A crisis can come out of nowhere

Construction contractors like residential and commercial plumbers, municipalities and pipe cleaning contractors may encounter an unplanned event that requires immediate and decisive management action. This event may involve such things as: a natural disaster, major medical emergency, fire, crane or scaffolding collapse, a hazardous material event, threats of violence, serious injury/fatality, or any physical situation that endangers people on-site or the project itself. And a crisis can occur on active or inactive job sites. Idle construction projects are not immune from a crisis, and can present challenging conditions as well, so a risk assessment plan as part of a comprehensive crisis management plan can also help reduce the sudden impact and likelihood of losses. The key to success is the implementation of tactics that are specific for the type of construction and project location, as well as clearly communicating the plan’s strategy and initiatives to all contractors involved with the site.

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It is important for your plan to have specific steps to follow in creating and navigating a successful course of action that mitigates fallout from the crisis and protects workers, neighbors and the community.

Economic crises

There also may be a crisis situation involving economic impacts, such as labor disputes, loss of key personnel, technology breakdowns delaying communications or problems with material delivery schedules. These also can evolve into crisis situations that may present threats to the firm’s reputation, ability to conduct business and ultimately its overall financial success.

Develop a written plan

Regardless of the type of event or situation, a crisis requires prompt action to help minimize or control the potential impact. To help prepare for such possible scenarios, companies should develop a written plan for their specific construction sites. The crisis management plan should outline step-bystep procedures and responsibilities for all

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

personnel on-site as well as key personnel off-site. The following five steps may be used as a guide for construction companies, contractors and subcontractors to navigate the situation:

Step 1: Identify Potential Crisis

The planning process should begin with an attempt to identify any potential crisis before construction begins. Tailor the plan to the nature of the project. For example, construction companies should examine risk factors and unique hazards for each job site and evaluate weather patterns and external conditions that could lead to a crisis on the job site. Then, the construction team should evaluate and consider the equipment and materials to be used and establish site security measures to help mitigate any fallout from a mishap. The plan also should ensure that adequate resources are available to effectively deal with the crisis. Construction company


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OUT OF NOWHERE leaders and job site forepersons should assess emergency escape routes, particularly if there are multiple floors or remote work areas involved and take evacuation procedures into consideration. In addition, it is imperative to make note of available offsite resources, including the proximity of hospitals, police/fire departments and other first aid responders.

Step 2: Select Responders and Their Roles

The plan should identify the best people to respond to and manage a crisis, which is key at the early stages of the process because it establishes a crisis management team that begins with a team leader responsible for coordinating activities. This crisis management team would hold regular meetings to discuss step-by-step plans for specific emergency situations, and define each person’s role before, during and after a crisis. From here, responsibilities

would be assigned for collecting statements, preserving evidence and other areas of investigation. At the regular meetings, team members also would review and discuss progress or updates to the written plans in order to maintain transparency and operational efficiency.

Step 3: Establish Communication Channels and Chains of Command

Next, a communications plan that enables all members of the crisis management team to contact one another should be created, and an off-site staging area or command center must be identified in order to designate a place where the crisis plan can be coordinated from when the crisis occurs. In addition, it is important to develop a network that facilitates immediate contact between first responders and construction engineers, project managers or others who have detailed knowledge of the

infrastructure, while maintaining a list of key personnel for suppliers and subcontractors, as well as utility company contacts. Then, the company should form an efficient and effective way to promptly communicate with employees and their families in the event of an emergency.

Step 4: Develop a Public Relations Policy and Plan

It is imperative to not only have a plan to deal with the realities, but also to handle the perceptions of the crisis. Construction companies should formulate a public relations strategy and appoint an individual who will be responsible for media relations in the event of a crisis. This is important because the image and reputation of the company and its leaders is at stake during a crisis. One misstep or misstatement can cause irreparable damage to a company’s credibility and revenue following a crisis. As a result, a business should establish a strict policy that only approved, accurate information is to be released to the media.

Step 5: Conduct Practice Drills and Train New Workers

Ideally, in order to test the crisis plan a business should conduct mock drills aimed at increasing preparedness and identifying weaknesses. As part of their job site orientation, construction workers should receive detailed instructions on what to do in a crisis. The information should be updated regularly as the construction project moves toward completion or as new personnel rotate in. Planning is a necessary part of any construction project, and a carefully considered crisis management plan can help contractors quickly take charge and more efficiently manage unplanned events. If remembering all the things that need to take place before an emergency is difficult, The Hartford offers a convenient checklist to help make sure key considerations are not overlooked. This may help ensure construction sites and projects stay as safe and secure as possible. CCR Tobias Cushing serves as the Head of Construction for Middle & Large Commercial at The Hartford. He has worked in The Hartford’s claim group, law department and underwriting units since 2010.

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CIRCLE NO. 35


They shoot; they scooore... Stellar helps save NHL community ice rink from meltdown despite Texas heat wave

I

n early June, the Children’s Health StarCenter, a community ice rink affiliated with the NHL's Dallas Stars, was anticipating a weekend full of events when the facility discovered a sudden malfunction to its refrigera-

tion system—a failed cooling tower. With a triple-digit heat wave spreading across Texas, the ice on the Health StarCenter rink would begin to melt in only a matter of hours and the weekend’s events would be in jeopardy.

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Just before midnight on Wednesday, June 9, StarCenter personnel realized the problem. Because melting ice would threaten the scheduled youth and adult hockey games, the ice rink staff turned to their refrigeration contractor, Stellar, for a solution. The rink called the company's after-hours service line and from that moment, Stellar took immediate action, which triggered

Photography courtesy of the City of Mansfield (Texas)

By Jose Mergulhao


CIRCLE NO. 36


THEY SHOOT; THEY SCOOORE... the swift response that led to a fully repaired system in short order. A Stellar service technician, Mike Womack, responded to the call around midnight, putting off scheduled personal leave to take care of the client. He identified the issue and started work immediately. He quickly noticed the broken fan, which prevented heat from escaping the rink. As pressure began to rise, the ability to keep the building cool began to slip. “When you reach 190 pounds of pressure, the temperature increases and it's more difficult to cool the facility," says Eric Adams, Stellar's regional service manager for the Birmingham, Alabama and Ft. Worth, Texas, regions. With both temperatures and compressor head pressures rising, it was only a matter of time before the ice would melt and be unusable for the weekend. To help mitigate this, nonessential systems were

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In an effort to save the ice, Stellar controls specialist Brad Smith remotely tapped into the customer’s refrigeration system to monitor temperatures and pressures. turned off, including the air conditioning, to lower head pressure and reduce the load on the system. To correct the problem at the Children’s Heath StarCenter, the important part needed was a fan shaft and bearing assembly for the facility’s cooling tower. After assessing the problem and identifying the required parts, Womack was able to streamline a speedy fix. “Their efforts and sacrifice in going above and beyond ensured our customer’s equipment problems were resolved quickly,” Adams says about his team.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Communication + Teamwork = Win

The Stellar team collaborated across the country to locate and quickly ship parts to the facility. As the torch was passed, Ariel Tort, in the company's Texas parts office, tracked down the parts needed and made sure it was handled without delay. “Even though it was late afternoon on Thursday before it was approved to move forward, Ariel made sure the factory would expedite shipment of the parts,” Adams says. Tort was able to get the parts to the facility before 10 a.m., Friday, on an EVAPCO


CIRCLE NO. 37


THEY SHOOT; THEY SCOOORE...

truck, saving valuable time that was needed for the repair. The quick delivery by EVAPCO was a crucial piece to the repair puzzle. The two teams worked together to get the necessary parts boxed and shipped same-day on a dedicated truck. Back at the office, service coordinator Carlena Avery gathered the information relayed to her by Texas technician Womack and secured a rental crane from the local Sunbelt facility—despite the short notice. Sunbelt stepped up with the all-important scissor lift, which hoisted the fan assembly to the rooftop condensing unit.

The need for speed

An on-site crew of four Stellar technicians, including two ammonia refrigeration specialists, responded to the facility’s call for help. One technician arrived in the middle of the night to begin the initial troubleshooting at the StarCenter and get the ball rolling. The

other three took charge of the repair after the replacement fan shaft and bearings arrived. In an effort to save the ice, Stellar controls specialist Brad Smith remotely tapped into the customer’s refrigeration system to monitor temperatures and pressures. Despite not having a cooling tower, the controls division was able to maintain the ice, even from afar. "The use of videoconferencing platforms like Zoom was important to this success. That technology has come a long way," Adams says. “Without Brad's part in this, it would have been nearly impossible to avoid melting ice and the lost revenue from the customer’s planned events that weekend.” The repair was ultimately completed by 11 p.m. on Friday, June 11, with technicians enduring harsh conditions and 100-degree temperatures inside the equipment room. The speed of the parts delivery, assessment and teamwork prevented a potential

meltdown, which would have required a long re-freezing process. “The Stellar team came to our rescue,” says Damon Boettcher, Senior VP of StarCenter Facilities. “Their quick actions and expert knowledge of ice rinks saved our ice and allowed us to host the youth, adult and summer high school games on schedule.” The collaborative effort among team members across the country contributed to the win for the StarCenter and the surrounding community. Tracking down and shipping the parts in a truck overnight, securing the rental crane on short notice, and accessing the customer’s control system remotely saved the rink and its big weekend plans. “Without the coordinated effort across these different divisions, this most likely wouldn’t have been a success,” Adams says. “This is what Stellar is all about. I’m absolutely proud to have these folks on my team.” CCR

Jose Mergulhao, PE, is a Director of Operations, Ice at Stellar with extensive experience in the industrial and recreational refrigeration industry. He can be reached at jmergulhao@stellar.net

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CIRCLE NO. 38


A winning decision C

hase Center is the new indoor arena in the Mission Bay neighborhood of San Francisco, California. The home venue for the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA) had its official grand opening on September 6, 2019, highlighted with a concert by Metallica and the San Francisco Symphony. The first preseason game at the Chase Center took place on October 5, 2019, as the Warriors lost to the Los Angeles Lakers, 123–101. The Warriors played their first regular season game there with a 141–122 loss against the Los Angeles Clippers on October 24, 2019. Whereas these two matches resulted in losses, the construction process of the Chase Center turned out to be an absolute winner. The arena is composed of multiple layers and floors, has a seating capacity of 18,064 and a multi-purpose area that includes a theater configuration with an entrance overlooking a newly built park. The venue also contains 580,000 square feet of retail space. Bostik’s

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revolutionary façade cladding system, Panel Tack™ was specified. The story of how this took place is particularly interesting, as product specification was made well before Panel Tack™ was formally introduced to the United States. Evolv, a blue chip direct source distributor for engineered quartz, sintered stone and natural stone, received a specification contract from architectural giant Gensler. The firm was tasked to deliver Neolith cladding material to be installed on the walls of Chase Center’s retail space. According to Peter Wazna-Blank, Vice President of Evolv, “We distribute Neolith, a Spanish company which produces a lightweight, large format

Photos courtesy of Bostik

Arena Opts for Ventilated Facade Adhered using “The Chemical Method”


sintered surface, to seven states in the Pacific Northwest. Our colleagues at Neolith were emphatic that for this project, we included an installation product by Bostik that had received rave reviews throughout Europe for years. We quickly found out that this product, a ‘chemical method’ for façade cladding, was called ‘Panel Tack™,’ and indeed had been successfully used in Europe for more than three decades. We contacted Bostik, and were directed to Daniel Sanchez, Bostik’s Sales Director for Latin America, based in Monterrey, Mexico. We found out that Panel Tack™ was not yet distributed in the States, already hundreds of restaurant and hospitality projects were insisting on this system for stateside projects. Daniel quickly gave us a highly professional presentation of the benefits offered by this system.”

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A WINNING DECISION

more favorable stress distribuAccording to Sanchez, tion with this system. And, that “Whether it’s for new building or Panel Tack™ improves both retrofit projects, Panel Tack™ acoustic and thermal efficiency offers an amazingly clean, modof the building, while increasing ern look with a blind attachment its lifespan. “People inside method. Post-installation, one experience noise reduction, does not see any of the attachstable temperature change, ment pieces such as unsightly Daniel Sanchez cost reductions on HVAC… screws and support clips, which and more,” stated Sanchez. can lead to dirty stripes and “So we did some testing,” continued streaks appearing on the façade. AdditionWazna-Blank,” and discovered that Panel ally, with this system, no electrical plug-in Tack™ would cover 95% of the panels source is required on the jobsite. Translated, planned for the Chase Center retail area. this results in no harmful silica dust… and Most importantly, we found out that no harsh noise caused by drilling and screwonce the material has cured, it’s almost ing. Importantly, there is no weakening of impossible to get it off the surface to which the panel. For example, thinner wall panels, it is adhered! Moving forward, we went to such as large format gauged porcelain tiles, Gensler, showed them all these benefits… can easily be used and, Panel Tack™ quickly became part of in conjunction with Panel Tack™.” our specification! Sanchez added that Panel Tack’s™ “It’s much easier to apply than typical chemical method is more resistant to thin-sets for large format panels,” Wazna-Blank vibrations and tremors than any mechanical added. “Frankly, it’s a great solution for all method; that there are no cold bridges and

large format cladding projects. This system is fully available in the United States now, and many new projects have been specified. At the cost of roughly $500 million, the Chase Center broke ground on January 17th, 2017 and opened its doors 33 months later. Manica Architecture was the building’s design architect, while Gensler primarily handled the interiors. The structural engineering firm was Magnusson Klemencic Associates and general contracting was handled by the joint venture of Clark Construction Group and Montenson Construction. More than 1,200 workers representing 96 different trade suppliers worked on site, collectively putting in place $2.3 million of work daily. Despite the rapid pace of construction, the project maintained a stellar safety record with an incident rate four times lower than the national average. “Simply stated, we’re very proud to have contributed to this great project,” declared Wazna-Blank.

Ron Treister is Founder/President of Communicators International Inc., a marketing communications firm in Jupiter, Florida. For three decades, his firm has worked with major accounts in the commercial construction sector. He can be reached at rlt@communicatorsintl.com.

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IS YOUR SUPERINTENDENT CERTIFIED?

Being a retail superintendent requires a unique set of skills different from other market segments. While all construction superintendents have responsibilities for schedule, productivity, safety, and quality on the project site, the challenges and constraints of the retail environment mean that a special training focus is needed. Superintendents must learn how to think like a retailer and a contractor throughout these projects. RCA’s Retail Superintendent Training Program addresses this need. Certified Retail Superintendents have:

Ask your GC if

• At least three years of experience in retail construction

they have a

• Completed OSHA 30-hour certification

Certified Retail Superintendent

• Completed RCA's two-day workshop, which includes in-depth training on retail-focused customer service

on your project.

• Passed the Certified Retail Superintendent exam

CIRCLE NO. 39

Learn more about the program & view a list of participating companies: retailcontractors.org/superintendent-training-program Toll Free: 800-847-5085 | Phone: 703-683-5637 | retailcontractors.org


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Issue 5, 2021

Blended living How Avalon Sudbury is changing the game for multi-family communities

Edward R. Bradford, AIA NCARB, LEED AP, Principal, The Architectural Team (TAT)


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Blended living How Avalon Sudbury is changing the game for multi-family communities

E

levating where you live is about blending it seamlessly with how you live. If the Avalon Sudbury community in Sudbury, Massachusetts had a mantra, that would be the one. By going to great lengths to design amenities and choosing locations that put everything within everyone’s reach, Avalon Sudbury is the place to be. Offering one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments and townhomes in a pet-friendly and smoke-free community, every apartment home is part of its Signature Collection. You want stunning, check out its modern kitchens with stainless steel appliances, quartz stone countertops and glass tile backsplash. To get a look at Avalon Sudbury, we sat down with Edward R. Bradford, AIA NCARB, LEED AP, Principal for The Architectural Team (TAT), which helped design the community.

Give us a snapshot of the AvalonBay brand

AvalonBay Communities is one of the country’s largest and most influential developers and owner/operators of multifamily rental properties. The firm has a longstanding relationship with AvalonBay, and in addition to planning and designing dozens of its properties across New England and the

New York metro area, we also have helped develop several of its prototype unit layouts, which shape its national portfolio. This client service relationship has been at the core of TAT’s practice for 50 years. Our goal is to help create transformational housing that is more livable, exciting and sustainable.

What type of consumers is AvalonBay targeting?

Our collaborations with AvalonBay target sophisticated, design-savvy residents who want to live in fresh and exciting communities, but also contextual to its location. This is a strong psychographic profile that extends across many demographic groups. For example, many of our AvalonBay projects are mixed-income properties, and offer a wide range of unit types and sizes. This reflects the wide appeal that well-planned, well-located multifamily communities can command in the current market.

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How does the overall community design cater to what today’s consumers want?

Today’s multifamily consumers have high standards, and rightfully so. They are looking for efficient, functional, and well-designed units that prioritize sustainability and wellness. Consumers also are looking for properties that support hybrid work and other evolving lifestyle needs with advanced technology infrastructure, work pods and touchdown spaces that connect to a broader social and urban experience. A strong amenity and service package is important, too. In today’s market, this extends from dedicated pet amenities, to well-designed and secure mailrooms, and package drop-off spaces. Avalon Sudbury directly addresses this by offering 250 mixed-income apartment homes across a series of 31 residential scaled two- and three-story buildings, including townhomes and a unique eight and 10-unit “direct-entry” building type that incorporates a private entry, garage and generous balcony space for every unit.

All of these buildings are oriented around a central clubhouse that offers a focal point for socialization and engagement. Our master plan for the development includes a substantial amount of outdoor amenity space, which has proven to be a critical element for multifamily properties in the past year. From an architectural perspective, Avalon Sudbury is informed by classic vernacular New England style but draws on this design influence in contemporary ways with an overall focus on creating a community feel. This can be seen in Meadow Walk Sudbury, a larger 50-acre mixed-use community located on a former research campus less than 30 miles from Boston. The result is a town “hub.”

What adjustments have you made to your business model during the recent state of events? COVID-19 had an impact at a project level. The pandemic brought challenges ranging from supply chain issues to project delays and shutdowns.

On a more positive note, we have seen a greater focus on issues that we’ve taken seriously for a long time—such as creating healthy and sustainable designs for diverse building types. More developers are placing an emphasis on better access to light and air, biophilic interiors, advanced mechanical and filtration systems, and similar elements that improve quality of life for residents in any context.

Give us a snapshot of today’s multifamily market.

Most fundamentally, there simply is a need for more multifamily housing, across regional markets and across income levels. This certainly is a challenge, but we also see creative solutions emerging that will help address these housing shortages in compelling ways. TAT just completed a large-scale project in Boston called Bower, which redeveloped a series of parking lots and other underutilized plots of city owned land into hundreds of units of new housing, along with improved transit connections and public open space. This is just one example of how the design and development communities are creating new value. We currently are involved in several mixed-use and housing initiatives that will help transform cities with vibrant, 24/7 activity and thoughtfully designed public realms that reconnect multiple neighborhoods. These projects are emblematic of some of today’s most significant planning and urban design trends. They are walkable and offer access to transit. They incorporate biophilic design elements and pursue cutting-edge certifications like Fitwel. And they place a strong emphasis on contextual design and a positive contribution to the larger city fabric.

What’s likely to happen next?

The crucial role of resilient, energy efficient, and affordable housing will become even more apparent in coming years. From our position, we ultimately see a growth trajectory for sustainable and accessible infill,

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CIRCLE NO. 41


transit-oriented developments, well-planned workforce and affordable housing, a continuation of historic adaptive reuse, and other inventive multifamily design solutions that overcome unique and complex challenges.

What trends are defining the space?

Today’s best multifamily projects are defined by a deeply researched focus on resident needs. An inviting public realm and proximity to public transit is key in the current market, as are mixed-use spaces on the ground floor that can activate the surrounding streetscape. Other important elements include well-designed units, private and public outdoor space and amenities that can facilitate wellness—such as fitness centers, yoga rooms, and bike storage and repair rooms. Healthy materials are becoming more popular, and maker spaces and other opportunities for creative engagement are also more important than ever before. There also is a significant emphasis on supporting a sense of community, connection and engagement between residents of a given property.

What’s your short-term strategy? Long-term?

In the near term, we’re excited to continue project work in our firm’s core sectors, which include ground-up multifamily developments (market-rate, affordable, and mixed-income), historic adaptive reuse initiatives, large-scale mixed-use complexes, senior and assisted living communities, and urban waterfront developments. We also have a strong pipeline of hospitality projects, and are thrilled to leverage our multifamily experience into the student housing market. Looking down the road, waterfront development with a strong resiliency component is an area we feel will become more important in coastal communities around the country. Smart design solutions such as living shorelines, which our firm incorporated at the Clippership Wharf project in East Boston,

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will be critical moving forward. We’re also exploring a number of innovative and highly sustainable building practices for a wide range of projects, including Passive House for affordable housing and adaptive reuse.

What’s the most defining part of the units/location?

Avalon Sudbury is defined by its walkable community feel, and also by the diversity of building and unit types. Unit entry doors and front porches line new streets, contributing to the neighborhood’s walkability and character, while most garages are discreetly located to the rear of buildings. Residents can choose the kind of unit that actually serves their needs; this is an approach we bring to all our projects, but it’s still relatively rare. The direct-entry buildings provide a unique assortment of units, not often provided in one building type. One-, two- and three bedroom flats are located at the first floor, with multi-story units, many with lofts and dens, located above. A distinct set of smaller townhome buildings compliment the direct-entry buildings with larger two- and three-bedroom

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

unit types. This is a kind of comprehensive planning that isn’t found in many other developments within the same region.

Walk us through how and why Avalon Sudbury is designed the way it is?

Our design approach grew out of a holistic focus on resident experience. This is a large development, but we know how important it is for many residents to live in a setting with a neighborhood feel, so we designed a sidewalk and street network, siting the buildings and setting their massing, all with an eye toward forming a comfortable residential scale. Avalon Sudbury really feels like a town, and it is a significantly more approachable plan than one might expect for a 250-unit development.

Take us through your construction and design strategy. As with all of TAT’s work with AvalonBay, this project aims to offer a strong array of unit types that are most desired in the current market. The residences range in size from


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one- to three-bedroom units, and they all feature upscale and contemporary finishes that today’s residents seek out—including modern kitchens with stainless steel appliances, quartz stone countertops and glass tile backsplash. A community’s amenity package also is critical in attracting residents, so we set a program that includes an outdoor swimming pool, landscaped courtyards with fire pits and gas grills, a work center with various table options and custom knotted wool carpet, and a fitness center and yoga room located in the large central clubhouse structure.

have created long-term effects on construction schedules and costs. These impacts will have a long tail, but we do see movement trending back towards pre-pandemic levels.

Talk about sustainability.

Sustainability is an important focus for us. Our approach is holistic. We are always exploring innovative building practices that enhance the sustainability of our projects. We currently have a number of Passive House developments underway, including for senior and affordable housing—two sectors

What type of opportunities do you see moving ahead?

In the multifamily sector, there are lots of opportunities to add more housing through creative infill development, repositioning and adaptive reuse, and the redevelopment of sites like the large underutilized property that now is home to Avalon Sudbury. Similarly, our firm has always prioritized transit-oriented development (TOD) and we help our clients site projects to take advantage of transit networks (and sometimes even contribute to them, through the creation of bus stops or connections to rail stations); now, even in smaller cities we are seeing interest in this approach, which will help to make these communities more livable and sustainable. There also are many exciting opportunities to blend green building strategies such as Passive House with the expansion of affordable and workforce housing options.

What is the secret to creating a “must live in” community today?

Crucially in the current market, the clubhouse’s design reflects an understanding that today’s amenities are about work as much as play—the communal spaces are fully connected with WiFi and dedicated computer hook-ups. Multiple types of seating options offer a dedicated space for residents who freelance or work from home, serving as an extension of the living space.

What’s the biggest issue related to the construction side of the business?

Supply chains are a challenge at the moment. Overseas material sourcing and closed borders

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where this rigorous building approach has not been utilized enough in the past. We’re also involved in several forward-looking adaptive reuse projects that move towards decarbonization, for instance by utilizing geothermal power. This is quite rare for a historic retrofit project, but we anticipate it will become an important trend. It is worth noting also that adaptive reuse, which is a longstanding specialty of our firm, is an inherently sustainable approach, especially now that the building industry thinks more carefully about embodied carbon. It is likely retrofits and adaptive reuse initiatives will become even more popular.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

In order to create a successful multifamily community, architects, developers, and owner/operators must understand—and design for—what residents want and need. This means functional and efficient units that support wellness with natural light and air, a design approach that makes a compelling architectural statement, a flexible amenity package that embraces current modes of hybrid working, and a focus on a strong urban design scheme and master plan that respects neighborhood context and fosters a sense of community and connection. This final point really is about placemaking and the creation of a memorable experience, which is one of our firm’s core tenets and is central to our approach. By integrating art, landscape, architecture and interior design into a holistic and uplifting experience, we can ensure that a multifamily property captures and holds a consumer’s attention as a place they’d like to call home. MH


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August 2021 • Issue 7

Step by step Theory Wellness continues to roll out its blueprint for cannabis success

Nick Friedman and Brandon Pollock, co-founders, Theory Wellness


THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

STEP BY STEP

Step by step Theory Wellness continues to roll out its blueprint for cannabis success

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on’t reinvent the wheel. That was the drive behind the creation of Theory Wellness, the East Coast medical and recreational cannabis brand that continues to find ways to change how to succeed in today’s growing cannabis landscape.

Started in 2015 and opening its first dispensary in 2017, every step Theory Wellness has made is a methodically strategic one, from cultivating its product, operating extraction labs, manufacturing infused marijuana products and serving its loyal customer base. Operating from cannabis dispensaries in Massachusetts and Maine, the Theory team focuses on small batch, craft cannabis cultivated using sustainable techniques on our outdoor cannabis farm and at our state-of-the-art indoor gardens. In-house premium products include flower, concentrates, edibles, and an array of infusions for medical and recreational consumers in New England. To get a feel for how Theory Wellness is continuing its expansion efforts, we sat down with COO Scot Lee and VP of Marketing Thomas Winstanley.

GIVE US A SNAPSHOT OF YOUR BRAND? Theory Wellness is a vertically integrated cannabis brand on the East Coast looking to define the future of cannabis as it begins to take shape in the social fabric through legalization. We think holistically about the brand experience through each touchpoint from retail, to packaging, to digital. We’re a team of enthusiasts who enjoy the thrill of helping define an industry as it starts to take shape.

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WHAT TYPE OF CONSUMERS ARE YOU TARGETING? We believe that cannabis access should be available to all adults, and we cater our experience to all types of consumers. Unlike other industries that target certain groups or subsets of consumers, we’ve worked to make our brand as accessible to a wide array of consumers and patients from the connoisseurs to the canna-curious. Through the diversity of products and their effects, there is something for everyone.

WHAT ADJUSTMENTS HAVE YOU MADE TO CATER TO HOW CUSTOMERS SHOP TODAY? This is a great question. In a lot of ways, our stores are dynamic by virtue of the fast evolving industry in cannabis. Over the past two years, we’ve seen a rise in pre-ordering, added capabilities for curbside, and scaled for additions of new products that need to be displayed like apparel or beverages. We even put in a drive-up window for consumers to pick-up orders which was an industry first on the East Coast. Every new store we build evolves a little differently from what we learn as we grow. Reapplying knowledge and feedback from our staff and customers is crucial to continue to enhance the experience at retail, especially during COVID.

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Interview by Michael J. Pallerino

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THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

STEP BY STEP

HOW DOES THE OVERALL DESIGN OF YOUR SHOP CATER TO WHAT TODAY’S CONSUMERS ARE LOOKING FOR? Every part of the experience at Theory has intent—from the pathway outside the store to the engagement with a cannabis consultant. We want to provide consumers with a memorable retail experience that’s thoughtful, educational and, most important, fun. Legal cannabis is still new, and many are visiting a dispensary for the first time. We take that very seriously and want to make a good impression, not just for Theory, but the industry as a whole, and what it can offer.

WHAT TYPE OF AREAS DO YOU LOOK FOR WHEN SEEKING STORE LOCATIONS? We like to look in areas that are accessible for guests to access us quickly. We have some limitations by state/municipality we need to work within and are constantly seeking high quality, high impact real estate locations with ample parking and universal accessibility. We always appreciate being mixed in with a diverse portfolio in any community and blend well into the landscape.

WHAT’S YOUR SHORT-TERM STRATEGY? LONG-TERM? Hoping to come out of COVID in entirety, we have been pushing consistently and thoughtfully to secure and bolster ourselves in existing and emerging markets. We’re now seeing more viability in the landscape to expand operations and scale into other states over the next six-12 months. This is exceedingly prescient with legalization growing in states like New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and many more. As we look forward into 2023 and beyond, we’re expecting to have operations in many states and will start expanding our line of unique products, which include fast-acting beverages and edibles under the Hi5 brand.

WHAT ADVICE CAN YOU OFFER OTHER BRANDS ON HOW TO DEAL WITH WHAT’S HAPPENING RIGHT NOW? We believe it is critical to be patient and nimble, yet stand ready to pounce on opportunity. Cannabis moves fast, sometimes it’s difficult to secure the right dream spot or land exactly where you desire. There

is a tremendous amount of opportunistic space after dealing with the pandemic, it is inherently offering some more choices to companies that may have struggled to find that space a couple years ago. Some landlords are offering incentives to help lock these vacancies down. Ultimately, be prepared to pivot, change course and prepare for the unexpected.

WHAT MAKES YOUR LOCATION ENGAGING TO TODAY’S CANNABIS CUSTOMER? HAVE YOU ADDED ANY IN-STORE FEATURES? We believe it’s all about the people. Our team drives 100% of the engagement, whether we’re growing and developing stellar products on the back end, or serving them all the way through a consultation. Our people make the absolute difference. We have been on the forefront of technology here at Theory, always innovating ways to ensure a quick and seamless experience for our guests.

WALK US THROUGH HOW YOU DESIGN YOUR SHOPS? Our business is thoughtfully designed to balance a complex array of heavy security, consumer pathways and aesthetics under the umbrella of regulations. It all makes sense, but we have taken time to really make sure the experience flows, is natural and offers a world-class experience guests expect. We work tirelessly with experts and our team to ensure every facility is made with the most modern tech and highest level of standards across the board. It involves the input of our consumers who are always vocal about what works and doesn’t—that feedback is crucial. We take pride in bringing all stakeholders together within the company to share in the vision and have input on key details that lead to our success.

GIVE US A RUNDOWN OF YOUR MARKET’S LAYOUT. Theory Wellness is vertically integrated in the two largest recreational markets on the East Coast. We started in Massachusetts with a medical dispensary and cultivation/ production facility in 2017. Later that year,

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THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

STEP BY STEP

we opened another medical dispensary in Great Barrington. Things changed in 2019 when recreational cannabis went into effect, and our Great Barrington location became the sixth dispensary in Massachusetts and one of the first on the East Coast. We followed the emergence of recreational cannabis with one of the first-ever outdoor farms on the East Coast for a more sustainable approach to cultivation. Then, mere weeks before the pandemic, we opened our third location in Chicopee, which is co-located with medical and recreational sales. In October 2020, we opened one of the first recreational dispensaries in Maine on their opening day. A few months later, we opened our second dispensary in Waterville, where our cultivation and manufacturing are located, too. Most recently, we opened our third retail store in Bangor, Maine. Today, Theory operates a total of six retail locations, consisting of nine total retail licenses between recreational and medical. As it goes in the industry, this number will likely change in the coming months with further expansion plans in both markets.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST ISSUE TODAY RELATED TO THE CONSTRUCTION SIDE OF THE BUSINESS? Finding contractors that get the complex needs and unique attributes to our business. We have special infrastructure needs in this industry that often create layered challenges for project leaders in the field. We sometimes need to bring in many specialists around IT, CCTV, security systems and find it difficult to get firms with a great portfolio of experts on hand to solve these issues. Given the complexities we are facing, we need to find experts that can scale and take atypical approaches along the way. A great example was our flagship in Chicopee that required a wide range of solutions to complex business scaling needs, like, a striking retail experience, a comprehensive vault solution, a logistics hub for wholesale, and general warehousing non-cannabis related items. To pack all of these elements together with a vendor who could meet our vision was daunting until we partnered with CS Hudson who fundamentally understood the vision and helped us make it a reality as a partner.

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TALK ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY. Sustainability is an incredibly important element of our business as we scale. At every step of our growth, we’re looking for more sustainable solutions around things like packaging that is recyclable or running recycling programs in our stores, using renewable energy at our production facilities and expanding outdoor cultivation which reduces our environmental footprint. We’re even investing in hybrid vehicles for delivery. It’s not as easy as one would think, for example, packaging that requires child safety often requires non-recyclable components. It’s a commitment we have both from an investment and culture standpoint

WHAT TRENDS ARE YOU SEEING/EXPECTING? We’re starting to see things like delivery and diversification of products come into play in the industry. We’re working hard to develop new technology and product assortments to compete in this landscape. We have launched medical delivery in Bridgewater and Boston and we’re onto recreational delivery in Chicopee and the Springfield, Massachusetts area. We want to be highly competitive in the pandemic and going forward as we adapt to an ever-changing market.

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WHAT TYPE OF OPPORTUNITIES DO YOU SEE MOVING AHEAD? We see tremendous growth opportunities in states where ballot initiatives are going up, and we see a significant runway on expanding product portfolios and diversifying assortments to suit the needs of consumers. The largest challenge will be continuing to work on the stigma of cannabis and getting into certain markets with open arms.

WHAT IS THE SECRET TO CREATING A “MUST VISIT” LOCATION IN TODAY’S COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE? A beautiful and clean look with a warm and approachable staff. Most people are still learning how to use cannabis and are starting to learn about all of the different methods of consumption that will help them. Our job is making sure they feel welcome, comfortable and heard.

WHAT IS TODAY’S CONSUMER LOOKING FOR? Every consumer is different and looking for something to meet them where they are in their cannabis journey. It’s our job to help them in any way we can whether it’s making


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THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

STEP BY STEP

a recommendation, troubleshooting an ailment, or helping them really enjoy a movie on a Friday night. Regardless of what your experience or intent is, we likely have something for you and our team is there to help.

TELL US WHAT MAKES YOUR BRAND SO UNIQUE? This is a tough question to answer. In general, we like to think broadly about our brand and what it means to our staff, our customers and the growing industry. The brand is a reflection of the many attributes of our operations and we want to be thoughtful about the aesthetic and let it show the future of cannabis we want to see. At the end of the day, the people who work at Theory are passionate about cannabis and its future adoption socially. We want our brand to be that, too, and we’re unwavering in that pursuit.

ONE-ON-ONE WITH... Theory Wellness’ Scot Lee What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Serving our team and our guests. We get to serve people in need and provide them a natural option to help them manage many challenging conditions. We see people from all walks of life, their stories are powerful and being there to serve and help them is truly incredible.

Describe a typical day. What’s the biggest thing on your to-do list? We need to continue to refine operations, from increasing productivity, cost savings and finding renewable energy sources to compete

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in an expanding marketplace. Like so many companies in this space, we have grown extremely fast and with that comes the opportunity to refine and tighten up operations on a regular basis. Our largest priority in 2022 will be systems and infrastructure to continue scaling and sustaining our model.

What was the best advice you ever received? Listen to your team. While this sounds obvious and we should all do it, leaders often fail to give their team appropriate time, venues and support to communicate. Companies that miss that valuable feedback often lose ground in innovation

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

and development. We pride ourselves on our Theory team being the core to our success.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? “You’re helping me enjoy my last few weeks on this planet.” I had someone with courage in front of me sharing a powerful moment and it changed everything I did from that point going forward. We often don’t realize the impact of pain on people and what they are going through unless we experience it ourselves. These moments teach us how precious life is and how important it is to realize the powerful benefits cannabis has in helping people manage

complex issues and give them a better quality of life.

How do you like to spend your down time? Like many people in our cannabis communities, we’re passionate about our earth, our people and our pets. We take pride in balancing a great sense of support to those in need, donating time to help those less fortunate and also spending immense time enjoying mother nature. Theory, along with myself, love to be involved in helping others be better. We have been on the forefront of social equity and helping to innovate free education for our team, along with other incredible community support missions to better our towns and the quality of life.


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indow film has made significant technological advancements since Window Film Depot began in 1992. When the average consumer thinks of window film, tinting is typically the first and only word that comes to mind. Maybe that was closer to the truth in the 90’s, but the window films of today offer modern solutions to modern problems. Let us debunk the top three misconceptions this industry faces to bridge the gap between what consumers do and do not know about window film.

Misconception #1: Window films are just for tinting.

Did you know that there is a type of window film that can blackout digital screens? The importance of information privacy grows with each passing day in our data-driven world and the window film industry is one of many industries addressing concerns around information protection. Casper™ Cloaking Film from Designtex is an office window and glass film that hides data from screens so that information can remain private and confidential in an open-office environment. This ensures sensitive information remains unseen to the wandering eye. This is just one of many examples of problems window films can tackle that go beyond tinting.

Misconception #2: Window films will darken windows.

Major advancements in window film technology include transitional film and switchable film. CoolVu™ Transitional film, also known as photochromic film, blocks ultraviolet radiation when sunlight hits it during the day but appears clear at night to provide a crisp view of

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CIRCLE NO. 48

the environment outside. This provides consumers with up to 99% blockage of UV rays and up to 80% reduction in solar heat gain without compromising their views. Switchable “Smart” Film is an alternative for light control as well as privacy for interior applications. This film can be manually switched from transparent to an opaque state, allowing for a wide range of uses in commercial settings. These films are great options for sun and light control that will not change the appearance of the building’s exterior or interior.

Misconception #3: Window films are for flat-glass applications only.

Most consumers are surprised to learn about the variety of applications available for window graphics and wall graphics. High-quality commercial graphics can meet a plethora of business needs regardless of an idea’s complexity. For example, we created a word wall and glacier wall wrap for the IceBox Cryotherapy studio location in Reno, Nevada to bring the personality and feel of the brand directly into the building for their customers to experience. Being semipermanent, vinyl graphics are also an ideal solution for building owners with changing tenants. Whether you want to make an entire wall look like a glacier or simply need your logo and store hours on your front door, vinyl graphics can achieve it. From blocking out computer screens to custom wall wraps, most consumers do not realize the variety of business solutions that their local window film vendor offers. Do you have glass walls that need distraction markers? Window film can help. Is your building too hot and uncomfortable for employees? Window film can fix that. Are you rebranding your business and needing your office space to reflect the new branding? Again – window film! Visit www.windowfilmdepot.com to learn more.

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INDUSTRY

WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION

Find your big umbrella Our conversation with Monograph’s Joann Lui

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sk Joann Lui what she loves most about her job and she’ll tell you that technology is bliss. Known as a process design leader, Lui, Senior Content Strategist at Monograph, is passionate about helping project teams incorporate new technologies that improve workflow. A registered architect with more than six years’ experience at global architecture and design firm Gensler, she recently brought her influential voice and unique perspective to the Monograph team.

We sat down with her to her take on the ever-changing, always innovative architectural design world.

What are you seeing out there? As an architect, I see more and more technology infused into the AEC industry—and it’s very exciting. For one of my previous projects, we modeled the entire building in BIM with the contractors in advance to resolve any conflicts before we released

to be an effective architect. There are more conversations around mental health and burnout, and industry professionals are embracing firms that put people first. More employees are looking for work-life balance and flexibility. I love this. Architecture shouldn’t take over our entire life, no matter where we are in our careers.

Name some opportunities available for women in the industry?

There are so many. Since I started the Women Architects Collective—a community of 3,000-plus female architects—I’ve met so many women across the AEC industry, from design to construction, architects and contractors, and consultants and the clients’ side. That’s what I love about this industry. If you figure out what you love to do and what you’re good at, you can find a place under the big umbrella of the building industry.

What challenges remain?

In addition to her work at Monograph, Lui founded the Women Architects Collective in 2018 to initiate and inspire conversations between female architects and designers to unravel the challenges they face, particularly within a male-dominated profession. The collective quickly grew to more than 3,000 individuals from around the world—each committed to sharing best practices, tips and personal experiences. Lui also expanded the collective to Clubhouse, a new, invitation-only knowledge-sharing platform––her group has grown to over 5,000 people.

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any materials on site. It was a collaborative and fun process that strengthened my belief in technology as a vital tool for minimizing errors in the field. The right technology helps lead to less material waste, better construction schedules and a better end product.

What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen lately?

There’s a cultural shift in architecture driven by the next generation of architects. I think we no longer accept the mentality that you have to work 80 hours a week

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

Empowering women to ask for what they want. Men apply for a job when they meet only 60% of the qualifications; women only apply if they meet 100% of them. I’m a firm believer that if you want it, ask for it. Within the Women Architects Collective, whenever people don’t know if they should apply for a job because they’re not 100% qualified, I always encourage them to do it. The hiring process is less about finding someone completely qualified for the job, as I’ve noticed personality and culture fit also are important.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

“Everything will work out and everything will be okay.” I’m the most indecisive person in the world. Even if you just want me to pick a bathroom tile at work, it’ll take me a long time—let alone a life-changing decision. One day an old friend of mine told me that


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CIRCLE NO. 49

Registration Now Open For more for more info, visit: www.ccr-mag.com/gwic-nov-3rd-4th-2021


INDUSTRY

WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION everything will always work itself out no matter what decision you make. As an overthinker, I was so afraid of making mistakes, but this advice changed my life forever.

What advice would you share with women just entering the industry?

Instead of working harder, focus on community and branding yourself early on. The most significant barrier I had was this constant fear that I had to work harder to prove myself because I wasn’t being heard. That’s a mistake a lot of young architects make early on in their careers. We think we have to work hard for many years to eventually become a leader in the profession. This leads to burnout, toxic work culture and unnecessary peer competition. What I realized is that in reality, you need two things: Find a community that supports you and build a personal brand that communicates your worth. Focusing on these two aspects helps me let go of my imposter syndrome and self-doubts. It helps me become more confident and I no longer need to work overtime to prove myself. This is why I built the Women Architects Collective and offer personal brand coaching to other architects. The support in the community and making an impact by coaching is what gives me the motivation to show up every day.

What’s the biggest lesson the 18 months has taught you?

Your life is what you make of it. I used to work, work and work non-stop, and I was a proud workaholic. This past year has been eye-opening. I had more time to stay at home to contemplate what I wanted in life. I realized I was just accepting my burnout and constant work schedule as the norm, but it really shouldn’t be. I was letting my career drive my personal life away, so I put a lot more intention into how my life should be. This is part of the reason I made a career change.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list?

Revamping the content side of Monograph. I’m very excited about this new role because it’s the perfect combination of my

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There’s a cultural shift in architecture driven by the next generation of architects. I think we no longer accept the mentality that you have to work 80 hours a week to be an effective architect. love for marketing and architecture. I can’t wait to implement all of my ideas for our content strategy.

How did you get started in the industry?

I moved to the US in 2006 after I graduated from high school in Hong Kong. I went to a community college at first and took many of my general classes there. In Hong Kong, for the last two years of secondary school, you had to choose between liberal arts or science. I was in science class in high school, but I also took art as a minor. When it came time to go to a university, I initially thought I wanted to attend art school for illustration or become a doctor. Then my dad prompted me to look into architecture. I had no idea what architecture was, but like every good child, I followed his advice and went to a college fair asking

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

everyone if they had an architecture program. One person recommended the New Jersey Institute of Technology. I applied; I was accepted, and started architecture school. After graduation, I worked for a few smaller firms before ending up at Gensler for the past six years. I recently made a career transition to Monograph, a startup that develops project management software for architects. I’m now helping architects build a better practice.

The first thing you’re going to do when everything gets back to normal?

Go home to see my family. I had to cancel my flight last year because of COVID, so I haven’t gone back home to Hong Kong in two years. I have missed my niece growing up and my sister is having a second baby, so I’m very excited to see them. CCR


CIRCLE NO. 50


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CIRCLE NO. 51


August 2021

Texas strong

Ensuring success in today’s dynamic behavioral health environment


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Texas strong

Ensuring success in today’s dynamic behavioral health environment

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cKinney, Texas’ Medical City McKinney has been committed to the care and improvement of human life for more than 100 years. The 257-bed acute care hospital offers comprehensive services, including a Level III Trauma Center, cardiovascular, neurological, general surgery, orthopedics, women’s services, a neonatal intensive care unit, and is a primary stroke and stroke rehabilitation center. Medical City McKinney also has been the leading inpatient behavioral health provider in North Texas’ Collin County for more than a decade. In recent years, this region of Texas has struggled with providing fewer licensed behavioral health beds per capita than smaller counties in the state, due to numerous behavioral facility closures. This lack of local behavioral health services creates challenges for patients and staff in area hospital emergency departments, which are not typically designed, staffed or best suited to treat behavioral concerns. So, the hospital’s leadership announced their plan to build the new Medical City McKinney Behavioral Health & Inpatient Rehabilitation Institute to better address the community’s needs. To check in on their progress, we sat down with Josh Meadows, Healthcare VP at JE Dunn Construction, who provided an inside look at the unique nuances of the Medical City McKinney Behavioral Health & Inpatient Rehabilitation project.

Tell us a little about your history with Medical City Healthcare.

With 16 hospitals in North Texas, Medical City Healthcare is one of the region’s largest, most comprehensive health care providers in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. JE Dunn has been fortunate to partner with several of its hospitals on numerous projects over the last five years. We also are currently managing Medical City McKinney’s latest project, which includes an emergency department expansion and renovation, a new three-story patient tower, plus an expansion to the existing central energy plant to accommodate the hospital’s continued growth.

Give us an overview of the Medical City McKinney Behavioral Health & Inpatient Rehabilitation Institute facility.

The facility is a two-story, 80,000 square foot pavilion with multiple interior courtyards. The behavioral health component, with

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80 patient rooms, serves adults, including geriatric patients, with acute behavioral health needs. The inpatient rehabilitation component, with 20 patient rooms, provides treatment for strokes, amputations, brain injuries, cardiac rehabilitation, trauma, neurological and spinal cord injuries, orthopedics, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s. Contemporary evidence-based design for clinical spaces recommends more exposure to natural light and other natural elements through features like greenery, windows with views and access to outdoor spaces, to reduce cortisol levels and stress for patients and their caregivers. Therefore, open floor plans in common areas, natural lighting and an extensive outdoor garden enhance the facility’s healing environment. The pavilion also features views of a 300foot retention pond that utilizes the newly constructed storm drain system to capture the campus’s rainwater. The 80 rooms dedicated to behavioral health patients required a particular focus on patient safety, resulting in numerous safety and ligature-resistant features, and many other behavioral health environment best practices.

What were some of the project goals?

Because this project used a design-assist delivery method, fostering high levels of involvement and collaboration between all partners, including the design partner and key trade partners, early in the project was key. Delivering a leading-edge, high-quality specialty facility to serve the unmet needs of the community meant speed to market and schedule certainty were also critical to the project’s success. Given the significant behavioral health component of the facility, operating with a “safety first” mindset was essential throughout the project. Beyond those specific goals, our teams recognize that all healthcare job sites are hospitals, first and foremost. Therefore, we are always focused on limiting disruption to the hospital’s operations and stand ready to assist the hospital however we can, regardless

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of whether it falls outside the official scope of the project and our contractual obligations. This is part of how we fulfill our corporate vision to become an indispensable business partner for our clients.

What are some of the unique nuances of building a behavioral health facility?

National demand for behavioral facilities is so strong, and best practices for clinical approaches and facility designs are rapidly evolving. So, one of the greatest risks on projects with significant behavioral health components like this is the schedule. Lead times are longer for many specialized, behavioral health safety products—such as shatter-resistant light fixtures and ligature-resistant doors, bathroom fixtures, doorknobs and diffusers—which could have easily threatened the project’s schedule. These schedule risks were further exacerbated by the early months of the pandemic and some key stakeholders’ unfamiliarity with behavioral facility best practices and requirements. For example,

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

toward the end of the project, an authority having jurisdiction determined the owner’s standard for anti-ligature doors was no longer acceptable. At the time, our team could not reach the New York-based manufacturer due to COVID-19 shutdowns. We remained committed to doing whatever it took to resolve the issue, and eventually found a solution, ordering replacement doors from the manufacturer’s parent company in Ireland, without jeopardizing the overall project schedule.

How were the risks of the novelty accompanying behavioral health projects mitigated?

Because behavioral facility project teams are often challenged with charting new territory and at least a few firsts, our team proactively allowed more time for critical decision-making, reviews, approvals and communications. This involved allocating additional time in the schedule for ensuring shared understanding about key stakeholders’ priorities, making decisions, ordering specialty products and conducting additional inspections.


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We also gave extra attention to client coordination early in the process and ample time to educate everyone about the unique aspects of the facility to prevent issues and delays. Extra time was allowed to coordinate some of the facility’s smallest details, like caulk and screws, which have special implications for behavioral patient safety. For example, snake eye screws used to be standard for these projects, but now we use pin torque screws. Screws are used throughout the facility, including under sinks for plumbing and on furniture. So, identifying the correct screw and ensuring all trade partners and manufacturers were aware of the requirement early in the project was a critical step in maintaining schedule certainty.

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What special efforts were made to enhance safety for the facility’s future patients and staff? Newcomers to these types of projects are often challenged by the diversity of risk tolerances and safety approaches from one facility to the next. This can be impacted by factors such as the patients’ acuity level and the facility’s staffing model. Therefore, one

key to an effective “safety first” mentality is to try viewing and experiencing the environment through the eyes of rehabilitation patients with limited mobility, or behavioral patients who might try to harm themselves or others. Starting during design, we conducted mock patient walk-throughs with the facility’s staff to help the entire project team see and experience the facility more like a

National demand for behavioral facilities is so strong, and best practices for clinical approaches and facility designs are rapidly evolving.

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patient. The increased awareness, understanding and empathy helped us be more proactive about safety throughout design and construction. We also contracted with a third-party ligature consultant to review the drawings and walk the jobsite at various points throughout the project. This provided more peace of mind for everyone and helped prevent costly rework and delays.

With the additional time required to communicate and educate the team, and coordinate and deliver a safe facility, how did you accomplish the speed to market goal? Through early design involvement, we were able to work with the design team and local planning and zoning to develop exterior wall panels for the building’s envelope that could be prefabricated off-site. The panel design included the glazing, which also underwent initial quality control testing to prevent water issues prior to installation.

This reduced the schedule by 15% and helped us achieve dry-in of the facility two months sooner than possible with conventional construction. The prefabricated skin helped not only with the schedule, but also with quality. With assembly in a conditioned warehouse at ground level, workers were able to attain better quality, and inspections occurred more frequently to ensure a high-quality exterior. We also leveraged prefabrication for patient room headwalls to further accelerate the schedule and reduce construction congestion on the hospital’s campus.

What general construction challenges were encountered?

While most of our challenges were related to the specialized nature of the facility, we also faced other obstacles. For example, the project was originally designed as a slab-on-grade facility. However, due to the location, the geotechnical engineer recommended elevating the slab and creating a crawl space. The facility’s

interior courtyard feature, and countless underground utilities that had to be relocated, made the late addition of a crawl space particularly challenging.

How did the team overcome that challenge?

We leveraged our familiarity with the campus to identify risks early and used field teams to precisely identify and survey all existing utilities. The team found that numerous utilities were not documented on the facility’s as-built documents, but rather were discovered in the field during our proactive evaluation of the site. Our in-house virtual design team then used the field data collected to create a 3D BIM (Building Information Modelling) model of all existing underground services. The model helped us coordinate those utilities, identify tie-ins, and aided our decision-making and pricing efforts related to rerouting the utilities to accommodate the crawl space. This was critical for mitigating risk and managing costs.

What advice can you offer to firms embarking on their first behavioral health project?

First, commit to comprehensive, proactive communication with all stakeholders from start to finish. This will prevent issues later in the project and will give everyone more peace of mind and buy-in with plans and decisions. Second, do not underestimate the value of involving partners with behavioral health experience. This will help the team make the right decisions and have the right resources necessary to develop the best plans and promptly address issues throughout the project. Finally, be prepared to do things a little differently. Building a facility with many behavioral health safety components may require you to subcontract and coordinate the project differently. But adjusting your approach to best serve the project will pay off in the end.

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A L S O C O V E R I N G L O C A L , S TAT E & R E G I O N A L P R O J E C T S A N D FA C I L I T I E S

It’s back baby

Inside the renovation of the Old Chicago Post Office


It’s back baby Inside the renovation of the Old Chicago Post Office

B

uilt in 1921, the Old Chicago Post Office was once the largest of its kind in the world, capable of handling 19 million pieces of mail each day. But in 2016, after sitting vacant for nearly two decades, the building underwent the largest historic redevelopment in the nation to serve as one of Chicago’s business hubs. The building is a testament to increased health and wellness efforts thanks to products like Sloan touch-free restroom fixtures that current tenants such as Walgreens, Uber and Home Chef are able to enjoy. Tackling such a major overhaul and bringing an architectural icon back to life requires a major effort—and BEAR Construction Company was up to the task. Founded

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in 1984, the Illinois-based company focuses on every aspect of construction—with the help of over 200 full-time professionals— with specialties ranging from interiors and industrial special projects to healthcare and new construction. We sat down with BEAR EVP Scott J. Kurinsky to discuss the unique opportunities and challenges that went into restoring 2.5 million square feet of historic real estate.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

What were the challenges of modernizing a 100-year-old icon? Looking back, it really ended up being a four-phased approach. The first phase pertained to safety, addressing a court order filed by the City of Chicago to ensure that the building was not an imminent danger to the public. We had to bring temporary power and water into the building, safeguard over 2,000 holes in the floor, bring back three of the 50 abandoned elevators into operation, replace 2,200 exterior windows, and much more. Phase 2 was about building confidence where we restored and repaired areas including the main historic lobby and its


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marble floors and plaster ceilings. These restorations were all subject to historical review and approval by both Illinois and Federal agencies. Phase 3 was to maintain momentum with new systems such as HVAC, fire protection, life safety, plumbing, and more. Finally, phase four was to deliver. After the first lease was signed, and growing interest in the property developed, ownership was ready to continue improving base-building amenities such as over 150 restrooms, a full-service fitness center, a food hall, and more.

Were there any unforeseen challenges?

Simply put, the building was a disaster at first. Seventy years of use and two vacant decades of neglect and lack of utilities resulted in tremendous amounts of decay, mold, and water damage. It was filled with asbestos coatings, and lead paint lined nearly every surface including the ceilings and remaining mechanical equipment. Not to mention, the building straddles the eightlane Eisenhower Expressway, 40 active AMTRAK rail lines, and the Chicago River.

However, many of the challenges of the project are the things you cannot see—the amount of debris that had to be airlifted off the roof, identifying the stability and support of the structure throughout, working with the Historical Preservation group to maintain sightlines and height lines, and restoring new domestic water service to 100-year-old main lines below the train tracks were a few. One of the project’s most challenging aspects was boring 80 feet below and across the Chicago River to connect the Old Post Office to a central cooling station that provides efficient chilled water to many of Chicago’s buildings.

How did you work to preserve the initial design and golden bronze interior aesthetic that has become synonymous with the building?

The Gensler Chicago team was at the helm of the design and worked directly with ownership to restore the historical art deco behemoth with a modern flair. They methodically surveyed the space before construction began to assess items that could be salvaged, restored, or reused. These items range from mosaic tile floors and plaster ceilings to transforming vaults, conveyors, mail chutes, and scales into the design you see today. As the general contractor for the building, we were there to assist in bringing their vision to light and delivering the final product.

How did you seek to incorporate the restroom into those overall design goals?

Restrooms were a significant challenge to the project for several reasons. First, while Gensler developed early plans based on best practices and code requirements, due to the extremely large and unusual floor plates of the building, it was difficult to predict how the facility would eventually lease up and be divided. We also wanted to take the iconic golden bronze that has been a hallmark of the building since its inception in the 1920s and extend it into the restroom. Sloan

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commercial restroom fixtures with Polished Brass special finishes helped to deliver an eye-catching aesthetic with a touch of gold.

How big of a part did health and wellness play into the retrofit?

Health and wellness are a major priority in the modern workplace and central to the Old Chicago Post Office project. While the project was completed just before COVID-19 hit, we wanted to provide tenants with a space they can feel safe in. For example, the restroom has a number of potential “hightouch” surfaces and Sloan helped to eliminate those touchpoints with its touch-free products. Providing everything from touchfree faucets and matching soap dispensers to flushometers, tenants experience a very hygiene-friendly restroom experience.

Where else in the building does this element of health and wellness extend to?

As we installed all new MEP systems into the building, we already met or exceeded the highest quality HVAC standards to filter the air circulating through the offices and provide variable levels of fresh, outdoor air on demand. The expansive 3.5-acre rooftop meadow allows building occupants to enjoy outdoor, socially distanced space whenever they like, and another exterior plaza recently completed at street level provides nearly an additional acre of serene outdoor space adjacent to the Chicago River. These types of outdoor amenities are not only gorgeous, but virtually impossible to find elsewhere in the heart of the city. Due to the owner’s forward thinking, these areas were not only planned, but mostly complete and available to tenants when COVID turned our world upside down. But with the start of the pandemic, we also worked closely with ownership to develop pre-built office spaces that took COVID, and frankly any other infectious diseases, into consideration with a flexible density plan—meaning that businesses can scale up or scale down how many people are in the office based on the threat level of COVID flares, or even just the seasonal flu.

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What trends are defining the industry right now?

There has been a shift in building amenities—what started as a trend, has now become an expectation, and we see owners willing to take a financial risk because it will ease the transition back to the office. Amenity spaces were once a small 1,200-squarefoot fitness room in the basement of a building, but they have transformed into full-floor plates encompassing full-service fitness facilities, conferencing centers, lounges, and outdoor roof decks.

additional air monitoring and filtration systems beyond previous standards.

How does the company’s strategy fit into those trends?

We see ourselves not just as general contractors or a construction company, but as true partners and strategic advisors to our clients. Since we work in so many markets with so many varied clients, we see trends that we work to implement for our clients across the entire development team from leasing agents and owners, to

On the renovation, the owner’s goals often were calendar-driven milestones to deliver certain areas of the building that were often feeding into key leasing or finance activities. property managers and architects to deliver a successful project.

What is the best piece of advice you could offer when undergoing a retrofit on a 100-year-old building?

As a result of the pandemic, we have seen an increased focus on air monitoring and filtration systems. The HVAC systems in office buildings, hotels, and healthcare facilities have always been critically important, but COVID has sparked even greater interest in these systems across all markets. BEAR is an expert in advanced MERV filtration, often used primarily in healthcare settings, and we are seeing a greater investment from ownership groups across the board in areas like commercial and residential real estate to implement

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

BEAR’s philosophy is to always put its client’s needs first, no matter the project size or type. By communicating openly with our clients from the outset, we’re able to assess their goals and pain points. Armed with this knowledge, we can chart a course that maximizes on those goals and minimizes or eliminates the problems. Specifically, on the renovation, the owner’s goals often were calendar-driven milestones to deliver certain areas of the building that were often feeding into key leasing or finance activities. Prioritizing those areas allowed us to meet each milestone, and I am proud to say that all were delivered on time, all while other work continued seamlessly in the background. The success of our efforts is evidenced in the building being over 80% pre-leased upon completion in late 2019 with multiple awards and accolades. FC


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VOL 6 • ISSUE 8, 2021

The Voice of Craft Brands

Rory and Brett Marenco

An Alaskan tale

Welcome to the Girdwood Brewing Company Community


The Voice of Craft Brands

An Alaskan tale

Welcome to the Girdwood Brewing Company Community Down the Chute. IP-AK. No Woman No Cryo. Hippy Speedball. Saison De Collab. Alpen Go. If you’re ever up Alaska way and you want a life altering experience, stop by the Girdwood Brewing Company. Sure, you can fish, hunt, ski, mountain climb and all those other cool Alaska things, but if you truly want the Alaska experience, Girdwood is the place. And those aforementioned beers are worthy of the visit. Just so you know, the brewpub, complete with its timber-framed taproom filled with local art and ski relics, also features epic views of the Chugach mountains. And if that is not enough, there is a beer garden, fire pits and food trucks. And if you need help deciding on which of the 12-ounce pours to try (there are myriad to choose from), Girdwood’s team of Taproom Attendants will not only help with beer decisions, but even share the best things to do and see. The brainchild of twin brothers Rory and Brett Marenco, Josh Hegna, Amy Shimek and Karl McLaughlin, Girdwood Brewing is a state treasure for craft beer and outdoor enthusiasts. We sat down with co-founder and Brew Engineer Rory Marenco to get an inside look on what makes the craft brand so special and where the Alaskan brewing is heading.

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Interview by Michael J. Pallerino

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Girdwood Brewing Company

Tell us a little about your brand.

Welcome to the Girdwood Brewing Company Community. We provide fellow beer and adventure enthusiasts with fresh, flavorful craft beer. We were founded in 2017 by me and my twin-brother, Brett, and our social drinking advocate Josh Hegna, and chief tasting officers Amy Shimek and Karl McLaughlin. The brewery is a stone’s throw from the Alyeska Resort in scenic Girdwood, Alaska. We like to think of ourselves as a brewery with a powder addiction. Being a small operation means we can brew our beers to exacting standards and try out plenty of new ideas along the way. Our 4,200 square foot brewery and tap room has panoramic views of the surrounding Chugach mountains. Whether you are surfing the bore tide, riding Alaskan powder, pedaling the mountain bike trails, boating a nearby river or landing a trophy fish, you can cozy up to our fire pits and share your adventure.

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What kind of conversations are you having with your customers today?

While we have a dedicated local following, a good portion of our customers are tourists making their way through Alaska. We strive to provide a top notch customer experience by providing local brews and epic views. Our Taproom Attendants are able to converse with customers about other adventures to undertake in Girdwood outside the brewery since they are all locals who enjoy everything the great state of Alaska has to offer outside of work. In addition, our Taproom Attendants are certified beer server cicerones and take pride in educating customers about craft beer and its many facets.

Give us a snapshot of today’s craft spirits market from your perspective.

For beer, it is fruit sours, milkshake IPAs, barrel aged pastry stouts and contemporary pilsners.

CBAM-MAG.COM


What’s likely to happen next?

We commissioned our Wild Goose Gosling canning line just before the new year, so we’re just trying to keep up with the 16-ounce, four-pack demand. We want to continue to improve our customer’s experience in the taproom as well as keep our beer at the pinnacle of quality that customers have come to expect.

What trends are defining the space?

In the beer world, everyone is looking for something new and tasty, but they also want something familiar. We aim to provide our customers with both by having four core beers, a selection of seasonal rotating beers, and an ever evolving series of new beers that continually push the boundaries of craft beer.

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Girdwood Brewing Company

Haas Doors installed at Girdwood Brewing

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What is your story from a brand perspective?

Girdwood Brewing Company started as a taproom focused brewery designed to be a local gathering space that is truly rooted in our community. We donate to a number of nonprofits and outdoor adventure organizations. Our brewery also provides year-round employment to over a dozen locals. We have a beautiful timber-framed taproom adorned with local art and ski relics. And for those who prefer the outdoors, we have an awesome beer garden with multiple fire pits and plenty of seating. Food trucks are on-site every day, and we have stylish merchandise for you to take home.

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We let our beer do the talking for us. Word of mouth and social media shout outs are the best, most authentic form of advertising. In addition, our merchandise provides a great canvas to promote our brand.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the marketing/sales side of the craft beer business today?

In Alaska, it is the antiquated brewery laws. We can only sell 36 ounces, per person, per day for on-site consumption. We are not allowed to stay open past 8 p.m. We cannot have televisions or live entertainment and we are not allowed to have guest taps (the beer served at the brewery has to be brewed onsite, so if we do a collaboration with another brewery offsite at their brewery we can’t serve it at ours). And the list goes on...

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Girdwood Brewing Company

What is the secret to creating a branding story that consumers can buy into?

Authenticity. The modern consumer is attracted to something they know is produced locally. At Girdwood Brewing Company, guests can see and smell the beer being brewed, and taste the freshness.

What is the one thing that every craft beer brand should be doing in the way of marketing?

Striving to support local talent to help promote your brand. We use all

While we have a dedicated local following, a good portion of our customers are tourists making their way through Alaska.

local Alaskan Artists for our beer can label designs.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Staying committed to supporting our local community and capitalizing on the small and local movement that we started our brand with.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Continuing our focus on a quality product, whether that is the beer, the merch or the customer experience.

Sitting down with Girdwood Brewing’s Rory Marenco What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Without a doubt, it’s seeing the expressions of joy and satisfaction on customers’ faces as they drink our beers. Being able to create delicious and memorable experiences for others is amazing.

What was the best advice you ever received? You only get one chance to make a

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good first impression so don’t try to rush a beer to market; let the beer tell you when it’s ready.

What is your favorite brand story? YT Industries Bikes. The owner was watching local kids at the bike park one day and they were rallying their cheap bikes because they couldn’t afford the overpriced bikes of the day. His mission was to create an

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CBAM-MAG.COM

affordable, quality product so that kids everywhere could have access to proper mountain bikes. YT stands for Young Talent.

What’s the best thing a customer ever said to you? “This is the best IPA I’ve ever tasted.” And this was coming from an east-coaster who lives among some of the tastiest IPA producers in the world.


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PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Raising Cane's #685

Monrovia, CA

$1,500,000

3,172

New Construction

Q4 2021

Nothing Bundt Cakes

La Quinta, CA

$200,000

1,928

Remodel

Q4 2021

AutoZone #3619

Longview, WA

$1,500,000

6,500

New Construction

Q4 2021

Dollar General #22921

Boardman, OR

$900,000

10,640

New Construction

Q4 2021

Purple Mattress

Rancho Cucamonga, CA

$225,000

3,137

Renovation

Q4 2021

800 Stewart Street Mixed-Use Tower

Seattle, WA

$180,000,000

553,044

New Construction

Q3 2022

West College Apartments

Santa Rosa, CA

$44,000,000

130,000

New Construction

Q3 2022

15th Street Group Housing Building

San Francisco, CA

$13,100,000

58,663

New Construction

Q2 2022

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

Mettler, CA

$600,000,000

353,400

New Construction

Q1 2022

Tempo by Hilton

San Diego, CA

$20,000,000

92,707

New Construction

Q4 2021

Saddleback College Gateway Building

Mission Viejo, CA

$45,000,000

77,985

New Construction

Q4 2021

Irvine Valley College Fine Arts Building

Irvine, CA

$41,000,000

61,851

New Construction

Q4 2021

Miracosta CCD Oceanside Campus New Chemistry and Biotechnology Building

Oceanside, CA

$37,400,000

24,000

New Construction

Q2 2022

EDD Modesto HVAC Replacement

Modesto, CA

$1,839,000

25,000

Renovation

Q4 2021

AMHS Marine Engineering Facility Upgrades

Ketchikan, AK

$1,000,000

4,285

Renovation

Q4 2021

Mary Bridge Children's Hospital

Tacoma, WA

$342,800,000

300,000

New Construction

Q1 2022

Signature Dental

Kirkland, WA

$825,000

3,380

Renovation

Q4 2021

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

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AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

3mg PSC

51

26

Kingsmen

61 29

ADART/Gensis Lighting Solutions

81

38

Lakeview Construction, Inc

9

aim

38-39 20

Laticrete

7

54-55 27

Allegion

73 34

Metropolitan Ceramics

ANP Lighting

19

11

McNichols

3 2

Beam Team

63

30

Mike Levin

8

5

MRP Design Group

27

15

Bostik

CVR2-1 1

136

60

Bureau Veritas

67

32

NAC

23

13

C3 Solutions, Inc.

95

43

National Sign Team

59

28

Capacity Builders Inc.

41

21

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Assocation

65

31

CDO

43 22

Navien

5 3

Pantera Global Technology

35

Permit.com

129 58

Poma Retail Development, Inc

47

24

Portico Systems

101

45

Project Management Consortium (PMC)

45

23

Projectmates

91 41

PTS Contracting

105

47

Retail Contractors Association

85

39

Chicago Faucets / Geberit Group

68-69

33

Commerical Construction & Renovation 2022 Summit

112

51

Construct Connect

141

63

Construction One

25

14

Controlled Power Company

17

10

Creative Edge

75

35

CS Hudson

49

25

D/13 Group

37

19

Dynamic Air Quality Solutions

11

8

Rockerz, Inc

7

4

Emser Tile

103

46

SAR Floors

125

56

FloorMax USA

111

50

Schafer Construction, Inc.

127

57

Frannexus

130 59

Schimenti

8, CVR4

6, 65

Garland

117 52

SMI Sign Systems, Inc.

79

37

Georgia Printco

139

62

Soil Connect

121

54

Geo Week

122

55

The Blue Book Network

96

44

Global Women in Construction

109

49

Trinity National Accounts

119

53

Goodwin Commercial

86

40

Visual EFX Group

137

61

Graf Brothers

93

42

Window Film Depot

106-107

48

Hunter Building Corp

15

9

Wolverine Building Group

33

17

CVR3

64

WT Group

77

36

31

16

ZipWall

21 12

Impact Security Jones Sign

142

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021

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ISSUE 8, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

143


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

3 rules you should live by

A

s we move into the fourth quarter, many of you are slammed trying to get projects completed. After all, there is only so much time in a day to get things done.

And hired help is hard to come by these days, even though there are more than 10 million open jobs to fill in the US hindering many small businesses to grow. Finding qualified labor is the name of the game to keep your doors open and stay ahead of your competition. I saw on a LinkedIn post from one of my connections that stuck with me and I thought it was appropriate for this dialogue. It is called “Three Simple Rules in Life:” #1: If you do not go after what you want, you'll never have it. #2: If you do not ask, the answer will always be "No".

the high side. Only the elite players hit over .300, which is one out of three, by the way. Pretty nice gig if you ask me. In sports, if you don't shoot, you can't score. And the more you shoot, the more goals will come your way. Practicing correctly can only improve your percentage of scoring and winning. I’d like to add one more simple rule to this list—above all else, "Never, Ever, Quit." Do your best. Leave it all out on the field. As we have seen, there might not be a tomorrow. Life is precious and unpredictable. So,

I always tell people: Ask and you will know where you stand—knowledge is power.

#3: If you don't step forward, you will always be in the same place. You can apply these three simple rules to your business or personal lives, relationships, sports pursuits or job search—the list is endless. I have lived these rules and they are right on point. Back in December 2001, when I set out to start my own publishing firm, everyone told me not to do it. But I knew what I wanted to do and I am still standing today. And 20 years later, what a ride it has been. I always tell people: If you don't know, ask and you will know where you stand—knowledge is power. Nothing is 100% bullet-proof and taking risks is a daily occurrence. The more risk, the more reward. Just do your due diligence so you can make the right decision to move ahead toward success. Look at baseball players who get paid millions of dollars trying to hit a ball with a bat. Many make contact one out of 4 times—or a .250 average—which is on

144

enjoy every minute of it, have fun, smile and just have a good time. We hope many of you will attend our "Virtual Global Women in Construction: Building Partnerships for the Future," which is being held via Zoom, 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. (EST), Nov. 3-4, 2021. Both men and women are welcome to register. So, as we head into the Q4, here’s to good health, prosperity and safe travels. And remember to get things done on time and on budget. And as always, “Keep the Faith.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 8, 2021


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From Fifth Ave to Venice Beach. We’ve expanded to the West Coast Bringing decades of experience building high profile retail and office environments for the world’s largest brands. We’re ready to build for you. Tom Fenton, Business Development Manager (914) 244-9100 x 322 / tfenton@schimenti.com

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