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CHECK OUT WHAT WENT DOWN AT OUR WOMEN’S AND CCR RETREATS

Dave Smith Senior Vice President Construction & Development Team Lucky’s Market

Giving

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Inside the Lucky’s Market brand Check out our

Kitchens

Official magazine of

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November/December 2016 • www.ccr-mag.com

Exclusive Inside: See our Leading Sign & Security Manufacturing Listings Lighting up sports facilities Managing potential risks of storm water harvesting and reuse


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November/December • 2016 Vol. 15, No.6

38

24

62

FEATURES

24 Trail blazers  How Lapels is changing the dry cleaning game

114  Gold standard  How commercial daylighting systems are helping improve today’s sporting facilities

38  Full throttle Gimme shelter  Attendees discuss what lies ahead as 140   Managing potential risks of storm year winds down water harvesting and reuse 62  Making a difference  Attendees discuss importance of being a woman in today’s commercial construction industry

160  Set in stone  See how the exquisite design of the new Westin in Nashville is turning heads

Cover and feature photos by: Black and Hue Photography

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November/December • 2016 Vol. 15, No.6 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – New York

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS 86  Leading sign firms

100  Annual security firm manufacturers

SPECIAL SECTION

18

154

Commerical Kitchens 119 Where everybody knows the score  Inside the Glory Days Grill brand 132 Facelift  Inside the restoration of the facade of landmark row house turned wine bar Federal Construction 143  Home away from home  Re-energizing the Ronald McDonald House New York City 154 EUL relief  How to succeed with enhanced-use lease insights to optimize benefits

DEPARTMENTS

119

143 4

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 138 Perspective: Does architecture need a women’s touch? 164 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 166 Ad Index 167 Product Showcase 168 Publisher’s Note


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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Creating your legacy

P

eople think that Howard Schultz was the founder of Starbucks. But he wasn’t. Schultz was an employee when the iconic coffee shop just had four stores. After he was sent to Italy on a company trip, he returned feeling that Starbucks was in the wrong business.

Inspiring leaders are as not as passionate about the product their companies make as they are about how those products or services improve the lives of their employees and customers. What he saw in Italy was a lifestyle – a sense of community. Coffee was the center of the conversation in what he called “a symphony of activity.” Starbucks, Schultz believed, could become that third place in American culture – a home away from home and work. That Starbucks was a living legacy of his father is a different story altogether. At seven years old, Howard watched as his father, Fred, a diaper delivery serviceman, tried desperately to recover from a fall on a sheet of ice that broke his hip and ankle. Unable to work, the Schultzs’ struggled mightily to make ends meet. Fred had no health insurance, no worker’s comp or no severance. It was then and there that a young Howard vowed to spend his life helping take care of people. Starbucks has become the bastion of part-time workers, offering health benefits, tuition assistance,

veterans hiring practices and an employee stock purchase program. Today, with Schultz announcing that he’s stepping down on April 3, 2017, his legacy is cemented as one of the world’s most influential entrepreneurs. As he once said, “The more uninspiring your origins, the more likely you are to use your imagination and invent worlds where everything seems possible.”

In a commercial construction marketplace defined by the passion put forth in each sector – retail, restaurant and hospitality – there is still much to learn from Schultz’s undying legacy. To help keep your company aligned with your vision, here are five of Schultz’s leadership lessons to follow: • Inspiring leaders are as not as passionate about the product their companies make as they are about how those products or services improve the lives of their employees and customers • Inspiring leaders never grow tired of sharing stories that shaped their character • Inspiring leaders treat employees benevolently • Inspiring leaders obsess over every aspect of the customer experience • Inspiring leaders remind themselves — and their employees — of what business they’re really in

As we move into a new year, it’s important to remember that you are only as good as the effort you put forth. Learning from the success – and failures – of those who stand as examples of what we inspire to be is all part of the road we travel. Travel well.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes BROOKS HERMAN Project Manager of Construction Academy Sports + Outdoors STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company BRYAN NOVAK Sr. Director of Engin eering, Estimating, Quality Assurance Wal-Mart Stores DAVID OSHINSKI Director of Construction Home Depot

MICHAEL TIERNEY Director of Construction

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality

Cumberland Farms

RESTAURANTS MIKE HUDSON Director of Construction CEC Entertainment GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp. RON BIDINOST Senior Director of Franchise Operations & Administration Marie Callenders Restaurant & Bakery LLC

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development JOHN LAPINS Partner, Geolo Capital DENNIS MCCARTY Vice President, Technical Services, Construction InterContinental Hotels Group, the Americas

JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury

GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership

JANIS WILLIAMS Director of Store Facilities Tuesday Morning

ROBERT RAUCH President R.A. Rauch & Assoc. Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design

JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels

PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction GINA NODA Executive Director Business Development Rebcor Construction Inc.

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield STEVE JONES

International Director JLL MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP

ADA SCOTT OFFERMANN Managing Director Global Occupier Services Cushman & Wakefield

BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations & Project Management Interserv Hospitality Solutions

MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail Target Stores Target is set to open four new small-format urban stores, including a 45,000-square-foot location near the World Trade Center in New York City.

Ross Stores Ross Stores expects its Ross Dress for Less and dd’s DISCOUNTS stores to grow to 2,000 and 500 stores, respectively in the future

Dollar General Dollar General plans to introduce a new urban convenience store format called DGX, with the first stores slated to open in Nashville, Tenn., and Raleigh, N.C., next year. The 3,400-square-foot footprint will feature ready-to-eat foods and a soda fountain as well as grocery staples.

Winn-Dixie Winn-Dixie’s newest renovated store in Tampa, Fla., is one of five new formats the company will roll out to cater to different demographic groups in the markets it serves, said Ian McLeod, CEO of parent Southeastern Grocers. The revamped Tampa store stresses organic and local foods to compete with nearby Publix GreenWise, Whole Foods and The Fresh Market stores.

Amazon Amazon plans to launch 20 experimental AmazonFresh grocery stores by the end of 2018 and grow to as many as 2,000 in the next 10 years. The company will test different formats and features, including a members-only program, drive-thru pickups and in-store kiosks during the pilot phase.

Costco ramps up Canadian expansion plans US warehouse retailer Costco will open seven new Canadian stores in 2017 after several years of strong same-store sales growth in the country, the company said last week. Costco operates 91 stores in Canada and typically opens only one to three new locations each year.

Primark UK-based fashion retailer Primark will open three new U.S. stores and expand an existing location in Boston as part of a plan to increase its presence in the United States and other international markets.

Rouses Markets Rouses Markets is acquiring nine locations of the LeBlanc’s Food Stores chain, giving it 54 stores across Louisiana. Rouses will rebanner the stores and expand the perishables and seafood departments.

Toys R Us Toys R Us has introduced a smaller, interactive store model in Florida and California, with video screens, play labs and other tech-driven features designed to make in-store shopping more fun.

Save-A-Lot Save-A-Lot is looking to expand by 75 locations during the 2017 fiscal year.

Restaurants Friendly’s Friendly’s plans to open four to six locations in 2017, with as many as 10 new restaurants expected from franchisees. Veggie Grill Veggie Grill hopes double its stores by 2019 with plans to branch out to airports and university food courts. Chicken Salad Chick Chicken Salad Chick plans to add six more locations by the end of the year and as many as 35 more in 2017. Pei Wei Pei Wei is implementing a rebranding strategy that incorporates a modern design mixed with traditional Asian-inspired ambiance and a test kitchen open to the public.

12

Dairy Queen/Grill & Chill Dairy Queen plans to open 100 Grill & Chill restaurants in New York during the next 10 years, many of them in the Buffalo-Niagara, N.Y. area. The chain is hoping New York franchisees will take up the banner and open multiple locations within the first few years. Checkers Over the next 10 years, Checkers plans to open as many as 41 restaurants in and around Baltimore. &pizza Fast-casual pizza chain &pizza plans to expand to markets including New York City, with plans to open a store near Madison Square Park by summer of 2017.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


AroundtheIndustry Hospitality

(continued)

Six Senses Hotels Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas is planning to open its first U.S. property inside New York’s The Eleventh development. The hotel will have 137 rooms.

William Vale Hotel opens in Brooklyn The William Vale Hotel is the first of three new hotels coming to New York’s Brooklyn borough. The property has 183 keys.

Marriott/ M Beta Lab Charlotte Marriott City Center in North Carolina has been designated as the chain’s first laboratory property, dubbed “M Beta,” in which the Marriott will test service and design ideas. The property will provide a more local and residential feel for guests.

Atlantis Resorts Atlantis Resorts is preparing to build its first property in the United States now that it’s created a business entity in Hawaii. The plan calls for a 26-acre property near Ko Olina Resort.

Marriott International Marriott International is looking at several downtown locations in Bethesda, Md., for its new $600 million headquarters. A 200-room Marriott-branded hotel is included in the plans for the headquarters. Ritz-Carlton San Diego has approved a $400 million mixed-use building that will include the city’s first Ritz-Carlton hotel. Cisterra Development is heading the project, which also will have a grocery, retail and offices.

Trust Hospitality/The Stella The Stella. managed by Trust Hospitality is scheduled to open in March near College Station, Texas. The 176-room property will include a restaurant serving locally inspired dishes. Embassy Suites/Curio By Hilton New detailed drawings have emerged of the proposed dual-brand, two-tower Embassy Suites and Curio – A Collection by Hilton project across from Music City Center in Nashville, Tenn.

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NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

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CIRCLE NO. 11

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

It’s a bar, no wait, it’s a bookstore Barnes & Noble rolls out new concept

B

risket burgers, slow-cooked short ribs and the latest release from John Grisham. Thanks to new Barnes & Noble’s new concept store at the Galleria in Edina, Minn., patrons can have it all – and more. The 21,500-square-foot bookstore/ full-service restaurant and bar is designed to get people to stay longer. The 100-seat cafe, restaurant and bar serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. So yes, along with the latest in non-fiction and fiction releases, customers can order entrees and sides such as burgers, ribs, tabbouleh and potato purée. The Edina location is one of four around the country where Barnes & Noble is testing the idea. Other locations will be in Eastchester, N.Y., Folsom, Calif., and Loudoun County, Va. Barnes & Noble executives are hoping that people will stop by to meet a friend for a drink at the bookstore – social interaction that its online rival Amazon.com hasn’t duplicated.

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The percent that the construction sector is expect to grow next year, according to Dodge Data and Analytics’ “2017 Dodge Construction Outlook.” And while infrastructure spending will likely increase, power plant construction could decline dramatically, the report says.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

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Seek and Four Seasons opens Research and Discovery Studio

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“We’re hospitality minded and community driven, so we’re bringing those elements together and still giving our guests something affordable.” – Shake Shack VP of marketing Edwin Bragg on the burger chain’s plan to keep quality consistent as it grows and how it differentiates itself from competitors

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CIRCLE NO. 15

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Meet ya at Clyde’s

Vaunted sports bar sets tone for NYC CCRP

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ou never know who you might see at Clyde Frazier’s Wine and Dine – one of New York’s premiere sports-themed restaurant/bar/ lounges. Named after the beloved NY Knicks basketball star, Walt “Clyde” Frazier, the hotspot served as the perfect backdrop for the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) Big Apple event. If you want to get in on action in 2017, reach out to Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at Kristenc@ccr-people.com.

REGISTERED COMPANIES: Aeropostale ArcVision Argo Retail Services Ark Restaurants Barnes & Noble B-Free Hanger Chain Store Maintenance Cole Haan Concept National Construction One D M A -Plaskolite David Yurman DBooks DKNY

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

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Dollar Financial Group DWM Fairfield Suites Fi Companies Footlocker Giraldi Associati Architecti Godiva Chocolatier Grohe Guild 13 H&M H2 Hospitlity Group Hafele Horizon Retail Construction IECIS Jersey Mike’s

Schimenti Construction Joe Rotondo, Vice President 650 Danbury Road Ridgefield, CT 06877 Ph: 914-244-1900, ext 319 rotondo@schimenti.com

JLL John Varvatos Jones Sign Macy’s Magnetic Builders Group Management Resource Systems, Inc McIntosh Transforms Michael Kors Nestlé Waters North America Inc. New York & Company Newco Construction of America Noda Retail Consultancy North American Signs Orange Sparkle Balls

Pacifica Contractors Philadelphia Sign Pipp Mobile Porcelanosa Procoat Products Property Management Advisors, LLC Quality Building Services Ralph Lauren Rebcor Construction Retail Maintenance Specialists Rockerz Inc RW Real Estate Group, LLC Saks 5th Ave SBLM Schimenti Construction

Construction One, Inc. Don Skorupski, Business Development 101 E Town St, Suite 401 Columbus, OH 43215 Ph: 480-528-1145 dskorupski@constructionone.com

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

Service Repair Specialists Shop Talk 360 Simon Store Techs LLC Storefloors TD Bank The Vitamin Shoppe Tommy Hilfiger Travel Traders Tricarico UNIQLO – USA US Signs Vinyard Vines WD Partners Whole Foods

Porcelanosa USA 600 Route 17 North Ramsey, NJ 07446 Andrew Pennington/National Sales Director Ph: 201-995-1310 www.porcelanosa-usa.com apennington@porcelanosa-usa.com


CIRCLE NO. 16


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

9.

10. 1: David Corson, CCR; John Files, Rebcor Construction 2: Kelly O’Brien, Illumatech Signs; Troy Davidson, Jersey Mike’s; Joe Fairley, National Pavement 3: Bob Smith, Rockerz Inc; Jennifer Sussman, Tricarico 4: Scott Crissey, Dollar Financial Group; Ken Engle, Dollar Financial Group 5: Larry Schwartz, Inside Edge; Mike Ho, JLL; Lisa Ploss, ProCoat Products; Tom McGee, JLL; Chip Zoegall, Pacifica Contractors 6: Nellie McDermott, Jones Sign; Jeff Arps, WD Partners; Mark Bateman, WD Partners; Jacqueline Nation, DKNY; Kevin Rourke, Plaskolite

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8.

11. 7: Jordana Morche, Porcelanosa USA; Kelly Radford, New York & Company; Stacey Marks, New York and Company 8: Jim Sheuchenko, Property Management Advisors; Kevin Campbell, JLL 9: Leo Deonarine, Macy’s; Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialists 10: Karen MacCannell, The McIntosh Group; Allen Kieffer, Giraldi Associati Architecti; Kelly Quinn, Service Repair 11: John Risch, Hafele; Antonia, Koller, Grohe

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

3.

2.

4.

5.

6.

8.

7.

9. 1: David Bauer, David Yurman; Allison Brown, Store Techs LLC 2: Kara Zbrzezny, LVMH Fashion; Andrea Barragan, Quality Building Services; Greg Mooney, ArcVision 3: Burt Spitz, B-Free Hanger & Display; Amy Fonzi, Fi Companies 4: Sean Holmes, H2 Hospitality; Dedrick Kirkem, John Varvatos Enterprises; Paulino Salvatore, Ralph Lauren 5: Tim Grom, Magnetic Builders Group; Donna Debiase, Key City Builders; Ryan Mallory, Consultant; Sean Coakley, TD Bank; Julia Versteegh

10. 6: Don Skorupski, Construction One; Michael Lefande, SBLM Architects; Rob Ruscher, Aeropostale; Laura Reindeau, Chain Store Maintenance; Tim Anderson, Vineyard Vines 7: Meaghan Kennedy, Orangle Sparkle Balls; Glenn Ramanauskas, United Sign 8: Chris Hodnik, Pipp Mobile; Dan Klacik, Cole Hahn, Nikki Poppiti, Orange Sparkle Balls; Tom Karagianakis, Argo Retail Services; Alex Karagianakis, Argo Retail Services 9: Grace Daly, Shop Talk 360; David Wimmer, Barnes & Noble; Mary McCormack, Management Resource Systems, Inc.; Dante Tauro, JLL 10: Jose, Alacreu, Porcelanosa USA; Jordana Morche, Porcelanosa USA

22

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


Giving

back

Inside the Lucky’s Market brand By Michael J. Pallerino

T

wo chefs, a love of food and a concept that would help change the grocery shopping experience for scores of health-minded shoppers. That’s the quick story of the husband and wife team, Bo and Trish Sharon, who created Lucky’s Market in 2003 as an “Organic for the 99%” store format in Boulder, Colo., to offer an expansive selection of natural and organic foods. The selection includes fresh produce, meat and seafood, prepared foods and baked goods, as well as wine and beer and personal care goods. Today, their vision has expanded to include a team of more than 1,800 associates in 20 stores in 13 states throughout the Midwest and Southeast United States. The stores, which average approximately 30,000 square feet, resemble an indoor farmers market, with “garage door” entrances, field bins, barrels and wooden crates. Through its “L” private label, Lucky’s provides a broad range of grocery items at great value that have no artificial colors, flavors or preservatives. In addition, 10 percent of the profits from its private label are reinvested in the communities it serves.

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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GIVING BACK And that’s not all, Lucky’s culinary department showcases great tasting, restaurant-quality prepared foods made from recipes that include those developed by the Sharons. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Dave Smith, senior VP of the construction and development team, to see what the Lucky’s Market brand is up to in 2017 and beyond.

Give us a snapshot of Lucky's Market brand?

If you could sum Lucky’s up in 5 words they would be – access, quality, tradition, relationships and fun. Our whole mission is to offer the people in the communities we serve greater access to natural and organic foods. Those ideals are what guide us.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

It’s anybody who’s looking for relaxed, fun, yet high quality grocery shopping experience. A lot of our customers come to us

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“Every day is flavored with the opportunity to further build and develop processes that make us better at what we do. Our goal is always to work smart, as well as hard.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

because they can get better than expected products at a price less than they expect to pay. We also cater to customers shopping for a member of the family with food allergies. Additionally, we attract a lot of great folks who want really high quality products without a lot of pomp and circumstance.

How does your design cater to today's consumers' taste?

We have a big focus on transparency and freshness. We look to create spaces in our stores that allow customers to see their food being cut, wrapped, juiced, etc. Allowing them to see that process gets them closer to their food in a way they can feel good about.

Walk us through your design concept.

In addition to the aforementioned design elements, we work to create what we refer to as a retro/modern feel. Our decor and fixtures are inexpensive, yet well designed. We want young people to walk into the store and feel the modernity of the store. At the same time,


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CIRCLE NO. 19


GIVING BACK while another is focused on growing the “core” or existing business. Our centralized purchasing teams allow us to procure what we feel is the best product for stores. At the same time, stores are empowered to bring local products into their own stores quickly – allowing them to support local businesses while localizing each store location.

What's the biggest issue related to the construction side of the business today?

we want older shoppers to feel the familiarity of stores from the ’50s and ’60s.

Define your construction and design strategy.

Our strategy for the development of the design and construction of our stores follows our core thinking. We are a “What you see is what you get” grocery store. We design every store with the primary goal of enhancing our customers shopping experience. You will find our stores to be fresh, open and very transparent. During the planning & design of our stores, we focus on clean air, natural light, open areas and creating “happy spaces” that support and enhance the customer shopping experience.

Give us a rundown of your grocery store operation.

We’re a growth-oriented company, so we have a team dedicated to our expansion

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“People want good, more healthful food, and they want to get it in an environment that allows them to feel like they fit in.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

Lucky’s is fortunate to have a tremendous geographical network of first class contractors. We pay our contractors on a very timely basis and are extremely fair (yet tough) in all our business dealings with our contractors and vendors. Because of that, we receive superior service. Our continuous focus from the construction side of the business is to focus on building stores that are on (or ahead of) schedule, within budget, and that exceed the highest quality standards in the industry. Thanks to a solid contingent of competent contractors and strong in-house Construction Managers, we excel in an area where many struggle. As with many other grocery type businesses, the one issue that can be very challenging are late internal changes to the fixture plan or layout of the store. Our internal team is very mindful of the ripple effect that occurs when late changes occur, particularly where plumbing and electrical infrastructure are impacted.

Talk about sustainability.

We have recycling locations in all of our stores. Each has a food bank we donate product to in an effort to keep it out of landfills while helping others. And we avoid using plastic carry out grocery bags. In addition, each store supports a variety of non-profits each year that are working on local sustainability and environmental issues.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We expanded quickly across a large geographic region. We’re currently as far west as Billings, Mont., and as far east as Coral Springs, Fla. We’re now in the process of opening new stores in existing markets so we can create more efficiency for our business. It


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GIVING BACK will help with distribution, building team member bench strength, etc. We’ve also moved from an internal contractor model to an external general contractor model, allowing us to be more efficient with the way we build and open stores.

Are you optimistic about what you see in your marketplace?

Incredibly. The natural foods industry is booming and we feel we’re positioned to be a trusted partner for the large number of customers moving away from conventional grocery stores.

What’s behind the decision of your locations?

It’s 80 percent science and 20 percent art. There are a combination of reasons that include demographics, psychographics and lifestyle. We also just like to pick communities that feel good to us. Places we feel we can create a positive and mutually beneficial relationship in.

What is your growth plan?

What areas are you targeting? As I mentioned previously, we are looking to return to some of the markets we are currently in to add new locations. Additionally, we are very excited about our early success in Florida. We plan to open several new stores in the state this coming year. We are actually opening stores in Neptune Beach, FL and Plantation, FL in early December.

What trends are you seeing?

People want good, more healthful food, and they want to get it in an environment that allows them to feel like they fit in. They also want more education – where food comes from and ideas for how to prepare it. We’re seeing a return to the kitchen in a lot of communities and we’re working to be there for those people.

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What is the secret that "must visit" grocery store?

Making shopping for groceries more fun. For a lot of people, going to the store is like going to the bank. Not that much fun. Eating is fun and cooking is fun. We think shopping for groceries should be fun too. We do it through engaged team members, store events, music and programs like “Sip and Stroll,” which allows customers to enjoy a beer or glass of wine while they shop in certain markets.

What is today's consumer looking for?

They want to leave a grocery store feeling like they’ve won. That means different things for different people. For some, it means getting organic items for the same price of conventional items. For others, it’s a place they can trust when shopping for a child with food allergies. For others, it’s having a relationship with a butcher who knows exactly how thick they like their steaks cut. Regardless, the common denominator is feeling like they’ve done right by themselves, their families and their budgets while coming out a little better than expected.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Prior to my joining the Lucky’s Team, the construction model was to self-perform the build out of our stores and serve as our own general contractor. We have now fully modified that model to the General Contractor delivery method with great success. Currently, we are developing design criteria and design standards for our stores that support that delivery method. We are also finalizing the processes and procedures for our Construction & Development Department. My time has been devoted to the finalization of prototype design criteria, and the associated process and procedures that will enhance our Team’s ability to manage first rate projects, and

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 21


GIVING BACK

ultimately turn over and open stores that our customers will embrace & enjoy. Our growth plan for new stores in the upcoming years is off the charts. We are developing a “World Class” Team that will embrace and meet that new store challenge!

Describe a typical day.

My typical business day begins with a review of every project, either by reviewing current project photos with our Construction Managers or by reviewing progress / issue reports for each project under construction. My day then shifts to the management of budgets – for both current projects and for potential projects in our real estate pipeline. Ultimately, every day is flavored with the opportunity to further build, edit and develop processes that make us better at what we do. Our goal is always to work smart, as well as hard!

“We’re now in the process of opening new stores in existing markets so we can create more efficiency for our business.”

Tell us what makes you so unique. Our co-founder Trish Sharon once said, “We wanted to create a place where you could get exceptional customer service while shopping for really high quality food… all while wearing your pajamas.” I think that sums it up nicely. CCR

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 22


GIVING BACK

One-on-one with... Dave Smith, Senior VP, Construction & Development Team Lucky’s Market What’s the most rewarding part of your job? The most rewarding part of my job is the Team Building and Training function. Since joining the Lucky’s Team, our focus has been the development of a Team that utilizes proven processes, procedures and models to reach our desired goals of projects that are on schedule, within budget and that exceed the industry standards in every facet. To watch people grow in knowledge, technical ability and enthusiasm is what makes me smile.

What was the best advice you ever received?

My father was a good man. He always told me that “the man or woman who shoots at nothing – normally hits it.” Because of that encouragement and advice, I have always been a goal oriented person who strives to do a little better today than I did yesterday. That advice led me to a great football career and continues to challenge me every day as a father and businessman.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you?

That we approached their project as if it was our own home. I take much pride in the work that our great construction and development team is responsible for. Each of our new stores is unique and is given every bit of tender loving care that it deserves. Our mindset is that we are building unique shopping experience for our customers – not just buildings.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have.

1. Empathy:  to put yourself in the shoes of another. Treat people with dignity and respect. Honestly care about them and their concerns. Praise in public – take care of issues in private.

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2. Honesty: to be fair, honest and truthful in all that we do. People know those that walk the walk. 3. Humility:  Great leaders are energized not by being right, but rather by the glory that comes from the entire team reaching the pinnacle of success together.

What is the true key to success for any manager?

Communications. One of my favorite and most beneficial classes while completing my legal studies at West Virginia University was Alternative Dispute Resolution. Our professor’s primary focus was on effective communication. Ineffective or poor communications is the primary cause of most conflicts in our homes and businesses today. By utilizing good communication skills, we can turn “problems into successes” and “mediocre into exceptional.”

What book are you reading now?

I read a Bible based devotional by Dr. David Jeremiah every morning at breakfast to start my day off right. I’m also reading “Desmond Doss Conscientious Objector: The Story of an Unlikely Hero.” It’s an awesome story about a true American Hero.

How do you like to spend your down time?

I love to spend time with my wife and family. We are empty nesters now, but have our 6 year old grandson Isaiah, who spends a night with us every week.. It is awesome to be a part of his life and share in his fun, laughter and his dreams – to laugh and to love. We have favorite games we play each week, such as Stickman Golf, Legos or Scrabble. He normally whips me at each of them.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


MARK IT ON YOUR CALENDAR TO ATTEND THE

JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes, Orlando, FL.

January 11-13, 2017 www.ccr-summit.com

CIRCLE NO. 23

SPONSORED BY:

WANT TO ATTEND AS AN END-USER OR SPONSOR...

Contact David Corson 678.765.6550 or e-mail davidc@ccr-mag.com End-Users (retailers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc.) will receive complimentary hotel, airfare, transportation to and from airport, and food and activities, or contact David Corson for an affordable registration rate. Wednesday, January 11th, 2017: • Afternoon check-in • 5:30-7:30 PM Foot Golf Tournament • 7:30-9:30 PM Welcome Reception/ Table Top Exhibit with Dinner Thursday, January 12th, 2017: • 7:45 - 8:45 AM Breakfast buffet with Round Tables discussions & Speaker. • 9:00 - 10:15 AM AIA Seminars. • 10:15 - 10:45 AM Coffee Break. Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360 Erran Zinzer, US Cellular

Friday, January 13th, 2017: • 8:00- 9:00 AM End User Breakfast Only. • 9:00- 11:00 AM Bass Fishing Tournament/Water Activities • Early Afternoon Flight Home

• 10:45 - Noon AIA Seminars. • 12:15 - 1:45 PM Plated Lunch with Speaker. • 2:00 - 5:30 PM One-On-One Appts. • 7:00 - 10:00 PM Laser Skeet Shooting Tournament with Dinner & Prizes

CCRS 2017 Advisory Board members: Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group Gina Noda: Retail Consultant

Roz Strapko, Exclusive Retail Interiors John Stallman, Lakeview Construction


At JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes, Orlando, FL. January 11-13, 2017

REGISTER TODAY AT WWW.CCR-SUMMIT.COM Seminars 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Vaun Podlogar State Permits, Inc.

Permit Processing in today’s changing times... Obtaining plan approval is getting more and more difficult in these changing times. Electronic submittals, digital seals, 3rd party reviewers... It is getting more and more confusing and there seem to be so many “experts” out there to assist in the constantly evolving process. We look to sift through the permit process and offer some solutions and best practices to obtain permits faster and easier.

Grace Daly ShopTalk360.com

A Seat at the Table How Today’s Savvy Construction & Facilities Leaders are Creating their Sustainable Built Environment and Brand Experience. Join us for this retail and restaurant panel to share their candid POVs and strategies on presenting to the C-suite, partnering with Design and aligning with Field Operations for cost and time efficiency while protecting the Brand experience.

Seminars 10:45 AM - Noon

Robert Moore President, Gray/Retail Contractors Association

Top Ten Project Risks – Changes and Strategies Have you had a challenging retail project in the past year? What risk factor went unchecked? In this interactive presentation, attendees will develop a Top Ten Project Risks list, discuss how risks are changing and share risk management strategies for retail projects.

Steve Jones International Director, JLL

Creating Value The role of the Chain/Brand Executive is changing, and we are all tasked to do more with less. Listen to a panel of your Chain Store peers discuss how they have embraced this change and are creating value for their company.

Please select one in each time slot: Seminar 1

Seminar 2

Seminar 3

Seminar 4

Breakfast Round Tables and Opening Remarks 8:00 - 8:45 AM

Breakfast Speaker: Len Ferman Innovation is one of the most frequently heard business buzzwords of the 21st century. The constantly accelerating pace of change in technology, and its impact on customer and client needs, necessitates that all organizations must know how to innovate or become irrelevant. But what exactly is meant by innovation? And how can innovation apply to you personally? Innovation expert Len Ferman will provide a primer on the innovation process and show how you can leverage the process to improve your professional potential and help create a culture of innovation in your organization. The speech will be delivered in a unique fashion as the entire audience will learn how to juggle (literally!). Len Ferman is a 7-time world joggling champion (running while juggling). He teaches everyone to juggle using specially designed juggling scarves that float in the air. Everyone can learn in this manner as no prior skill is required. Len then relates each step in learning to juggle to a step in the innovation process. This makes the key information in the session easier to remember since each step is associated with a juggling activity (true multitasking!). The session is entertaining, interactive and informative. Session attendees will never forget where they learned to juggle and they will long remember the key principles of innovating for success.

Luncheon with Taylor Morton Taylor will discuss three key points that will help you overcome adversity in business and in life. Taylor travels the country speaking to businesses, churches and sports teams. Taylor’s core belief is that the true character of a person is not found when everything is going great, but the true character of a person is found when adversity strikes. His book is titled “It’s Only Pain: But Its Real And It Hurts”. Taylor’s motto is: Never, Never, Quit!

All seminars are AIA accredited 1.15 AIA CEUs

Return your Seminar selection to David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com or fax your selections to 678-765-6551


2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit End-User Complimentary Registration www.ccr-summit.com

JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes Hotel Orlando, FL January 11th-13th, 2017 Application Instructions

END-USER ATTENDEE INFORMATION ______________________________________________________________ Name

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______________________________________________________________ Company Name

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I would like to receive Commercial Construction & Renovation. YES

Mail completed applications as follows: Attention: David Corson F&J Publications, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024

CCRS 2017 Complimentary Registration includes air fare and transportation to and from Orlando Airport,

2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit Schedule:

Requirement to receive complimentary credentials: Attendee must meet and have breakfast and

Wednesday Jan 11th, 2017: • * Afternoon check-in. • 5:30-7:30 PM: Foot Golf Tournament • 7:30-9:30 PM: Welcome Reception/ Table Top Exhibit with Dinner.

participants of your choice for 15 minute meetings on January 12th, 2017 in the afternoon.

Thursday, January 12th, 2017: • 7:45 - 8:45 AM: Breakfast buffet with Round Tables discussions & Speaker. • 9:00 - 10:15 AM: AIA Seminars. • 10:15 - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break. • 10:45 - Noon: AIA Seminars. • 12:15 - 1:45 PM: Plated Lunch with Speaker. • 2:00 - 5:30 PM: One-On-One Appts. • 7:00 - 10:00 PM: Laser Skeet Shooting Tournament with Dinner & Prizes Friday, January 13th, 2017: • 8:00- 9:00 AM: End User Breakfast Only. • 9:00- 11:00 AM: Bass Fishing Tournament/ Water Activities • Early Afternoon Flight Home

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Hotel Room for two nights, Foot Golf Tournament, Dinner Table Top Exhibit, Breakfast Round Table, Two AIA seminars, Luncheon with Speaker, One-On-One Appointments, Lazer Skeet Shooting and Bass Fishing/Water Activities. Any incidentals at hotel are responsibility of attendee.

lunch with vendor participants of your choice. In addition must agree to meet with six vendor

PAYMENT: Registration: Complimentary Hotel Room: Complimentary Wednesday Foot Golf Tournament: Complimentary Please check here for Bass Fishing Tournament/Water Activities: Complimentary

I hereby authorize F&J Publications, LLC to reserve the Summit spots as indicated I acknowledge that I have read the 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit requirements above and agree to abide by all terms and conditions. I am an authorized representative of the company named on this Application and have full power and authority to sign this document. I understand that F&J Publications, LLC reserves the right to decline this document.

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CCRS 2017 Advisory Board members: Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360 Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group Erran Zinzer, US Cellular John Stallman, Lakeview Construction Gina Noda: Retail Consultant Roz Strapko, Exclusive Retail Interiors

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Full

Attendees discuss what lies ahead as year winds down

throttle

It was symbolic that attendees of the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat toured the grounds of the raceway at Daytona International Speedway as part of a group networking event. In a year defined by fast-paced projects on both the new build and renovation side, the atmosphere served as the perfect backdrop for the accelerated pace the industry experienced in 2016. Many of the items on the attendees agenda were focused on continuing the industry’s acceleration upward. Project management. Finding partners. Looking for opportunities. The lists, while varied from supplier to end user, were filled with items brands need to push the pace forward.

Representing all sides of the marketplace, some of the industry’s leading executives took part in our annual Retreat, held in Daytona Beach, Fla., Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at The Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort. The three-day conference, sponsored by Commercial Construction & Renovation magazine, featured a roundtable discussion on industry trends and challenges. It also included a series of networking opportunities – from the raceway tour, to several lunch and dinner parties, and the always anticipated one-on-one meetings. Included in the roundtable was a discussion, which featured insightful conversations on industry trends and challenges. Following is the first part of our two-part snapshot of the forum.

For more information, visit us at www.ccr-mag.com.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2015


Blake Brosa

Misty Cameron

Kevin Campbell

Darrel Chaney

Rick Connors

Steve DeBerardino

Michael Echeandia

Brad Gaskins

Fatima Hakim

Bret Hanks

Tim Hill

Dedrick Kirkem

L.J. Mohan

Scott Moseman

Jacqueline Nation

Gina Marie Noda

Kelly O’Brien

Herminio Pereira

Demetria Peterson

Julia Versteegh

Grace Daly

Sr. Vice President EMG

Consultant/Recruiter Prime Retail Services

Dir of Construction & Store Planning NY & Company

Business Development National Accounts Ameritech Facility Services, LLC

VP Facilities & Energy Engineering Polo Ralph Lauren

Executive Director Business Development Rebcor Construction Inc.

Construction Manager Bridgestone Retail Operations

Manager of Construction Services Firehouse of America, LLC

Dir of Construction Primanti Bros

Principal The McIntosh Group

Executive Vice President, Business Development The Beam Team

PowerSmart Energy Specialist - National Retail Accounts Graybar

Director-National Account Business Development Illumatech, Inc.

Vice President, Marketing and Business Development Storefloors

Senior Project Manager JLL

Director, Corporate & Hospitality Accounts Cosentino NA

Facilities Manager Ashley Stewart

Facilities Manager John Varvatos

Dir of Store Planning DKNY

Engineering Mgr. Caribbean Restaurants LLC/Burger King

Shoptalk 360

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

39


FULL THROTTLE CCR: What the biggest thing on your to-do list? Kelly O’Brien, Illumatech Signs: When I joined Illumatech, my challenge was to heighten its profile on the national stage. Even though it had an excellent reputation in the Southeast region with its name and quality products, it wanted to take the next step. I’ve spent time building the infrastructure to get them there. So my to-do list is pretty extensive. It’s raising our profile. It’s letting other retailers and people in the industry know what we have accomplished. My to-do list involves double sales. It’s a great rags to riches story. L.J. Mohan, Polo Ralph Lauren: What’s on my to-do list, I think applies to everybody not just me. The fact of the matter, simply, is I think we need to secure competitive advantages in everything we do. That means we have to be able to use state-of-the-art technologies, state-of-the-art developments and state-of-the-art innovations in our own particular spheres, wherever we come from.

So if it’s in construction, we need to know what time management and budgeting is, and how we do a job where the funds list absolutely zero. If it’s designed, we need to make sure we optimize that design and make sure the costs are relevant and that we bill something to the right extent. And if there is going to be repairs and maintenance and upkeep that we make sure it is a life cycle. For each one of these things, there are several different things that each one of us can do. We can write chapters and books on what would be on our to-do lists. Of course, there’s a personal to-do list in which we say, “I am this foxhole, and therefore I want make sure that I have my revenues increase, my sales increase and my customer increases, and so on. On the

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other end, you might say you have reduced cost because, so you have to figure out how to do that, and so on. I don’t know how I handle that question other than say that we must do what’s right in everything we do. And above all else, we have to make sure that what we are doing today is good enough for our children and grandchildren, who are going to inherit this world from us. That’s the sustainability equation. It’s always going to be in construction and design; so we have to do the right things in keeping up our facilities. That’s very important. To promote sustainability would be one of my personal objectives down the road. That is the one thing I would like to put on my to-do list. Bret Hanks, Ameritech Facility Services: We've been around for more than 20 years, with a strong market share in restaurant facility capital improvements. I was hired to expand our business into new industries, with emphasis on retail. It is difficult to expand our restaurant client base when we deal with almost every large chain now. There are a few restaurant chains out there that we don’t service, but we are transitioning our sales focus to the retail industry next. The facilities improvements, lighting- retrofits, flooring, remodeling and re-imaging of large chains is the same stuff that we’ve got experience in dealing with in restaurants. With retail, we don’t have to deal with kitchens, which is challenging work, so we find it easier and cleaner, which we like. The answer is simple; my goal is to develop the retail side of our industry. It truly is as simple as that.

We want to reduce cost so that our budgets can fit the financial model we’ve created. I want to find new ways to build, because as we know, time is money. – Rick Connors, Primanti Bros.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2015

Jacque Nation, DKNY: My list has changed significantly over the years. I think that currently seeing how things are moving forward and how technology’s changing, and how sustainability is a big thing for everyone, we’ve been working very hard to try to make our environments friendlier and more efficient through changing our lighting and some of the materials we use. It’s not always easy, and it’s always evolving so that’s something we’re working on to find new answers to questions that come up. My overall goal is to work smarter, not harder. I want to use the best resources I can find to get to the results that we’re looking for. It’s an evolution. It changes every week, every month and every year. It gets a little easier and a little better, and then maybe there’s a roadblock, but you move forward. I guess the biggest thing on my to-do list is to be more efficient and


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FULL THROTTLE more effective. We’re always looking to save many, do things faster, do things better, but sometimes the most efficient way isn’t always the least expensive way. Sometimes the best way to get things done isn’t always within your time constraints, so you have to be a little flexible. We’re trying to get things moving where we can be efficient and effective, and cost effective. We want to get things done the right way, the first time, so it’s not something you continually have to go back and address because it wasn’t right from the beginning.

CCR: Is the recruiter finding anything? Prime Retail Service's Chaney: The recruiter has found four electricians in the last six months.

Gina Noda, Rebcor Construction: My challenges are to learn the company, update their website, marketing materials and come up with a strategic business development plan. Rebcor has been in business for 25 years but the owner, John Files, just purchased the company about a year and half ago, most of the employees have been with the company like 15 to 18 years so the challenge is to bring the employees along with you as you move the company into a new direction. Change is sometimes very difficult for some people so it truly has to be a balancing act. They have had their core customers for many years and now they are looking to grow and expand. My own personal challenge is I was on the GC side for 15 years and then moved to the architecture side for the past 5 years so it will take me some time to adjust back to the contracting side of the industry but I am very excited to get back to the GC side to work operations and business development again. As I tell everyone, these are all good challenges to have!

Michael Echeandia, NY & Company: We looking at all of our budgets to see what projects will be done on time. We’ve been introducing new process and procedures within NY & Company. We have some new websites that we’re working with, different portals. We’ve also introduced all in a structured time, so now we can take a step back and see what we’ve really learned from this. What are the advantages? What are the disadvantages? This way we can roll out effective next year. We think from wholesale internally building better relationships internally within our organization, with our partners, such as operations and other departments, AP, finance. This way, they can actually come on board with what we’re trying to achieve and work with us so we can find better ways for them as well. We always have to make sure they’re very happy with what we’re giving them. That’s the way we approach things. We’re also working better with our external partners, even though they’re still part of the team.

CCR: How many was he looking for? Prime Retail Service's Chaney: We’re looking for enough to supplement the work that we have right now; we’re a little bit short there, so we’re subbing.

“My to-do list is pretty extensive. It’s raising our profile. It’s letting other retailers and people in the industry know what we have accomplished.”

Rick Connors, Primanti Bros.: We started in 1933 as a sandwich shop in downtown Pittsburgh. I came aboard Blake Brosa, EMG: My “to-do” list since about a year and half ago to take this conjoining EMG from Target Corporation has cept nationally. Now we’re in five states. been very focused: Transition my skill set – Kelly O’Brien, Illumatech Signs I oversee new design and construction from leading project teams and initiatives in creating budgets. My biggest thing on that Corporate America to becoming a trusted to-do list is value engineering. We want to reduce cost so that our business consultant partner for EMG’s retail, banking, hospitality, budgets can fit the financial model we’ve created. In doing that, we c-store, and restaurant clients, to help them deliver their C-suite tried to use a lot of reclaimed material – a lot of value engineering. strategic project initiatives. I want to find new ways to build, because as we know, time is Two years ago, EMG acquired one of the nation’s largest project money. We are opening our 36th store in downtown Indianapolis, management firms, QPM, and now offers an even broader range and which is a big flagship for us. We are entering a new market in a new depth of capabilities for real estate due diligence, asset management, type of store that we’re all looking very forward to. and construction project management services. Being the “new guy,” I wanted to take a step back with existing Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services: Our company’s to-do list customers and spend time with them to understand their perception of is recruiting skilled trade workers. We’re finding a difficult situation the “new” EMG. Even after nearly two years, it turned out that a majorout there because a lot of kids aren’t going to trade schools anyity of the time, they still just knew only one side of the business – due more. They just don’t go. We started an electrical division about eight diligence, asset management, or project management. months to supplement all the things we’re doing in construction work Right now, I’m blending my understanding of the real estate due and we want to grow, especially that division. My suggestion would diligence side, offering those services to all of our clients, and then be for a kid to finish getting that trade school degree because the baking in a cross-selling initiative to say, “On the real estate due dilidemand is out there. We’re not only recruit electricians, but all kind gence side, we have a lot of people who need construction manageof skill trades. But it’s quite a challenge, so we’ve hired the recruiter. ment services that we've not tapped into yet.” And vice versa, people

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CIRCLE NO. 25


FULL THROTTLE who had construction management services, we’re helping with their upfront real estate due diligence. The third piece is going back to say now that we have this new company, now that we’re out there as EMG, what are our clients' perceptions? What do they know about us? A lot of times, they know one side of the business, so how do we go out and ask those really simple questions: “What’s your perception of our skill set? And can we fill in any gaps that you might have with what we have to offer?”

analytics behind it and further enforce process. Over the last year, I’ve been collecting all types of data based on work order history, maintenance issues in all of our real estate, and then putting that data to use. I try to contact all my store managers and tell them that they have had three issues with locksmiths this year. Do they have a problem operating their gate? Do they understand the scope of work when they put a work order in? I try to help them understand what goes into the maintenance. Our goal is to get 89 stores as 89 business owners. So with that process, and with the analytics and the data I give them, it helps them Kevin Campbell, JLL: JLL provides real estate strategy, make better decisions. We’re a very social company. My team likes services and support to organizations around the globe. In the to send pictures. We text pictures and before they put work orders in product and development services side we are always striving the team is always, “I tried to fix it. I tried to take it apart.” They make to build long lasting relationships which allow us to deliver more the extra effort now that they understand what goes into repairs and than just a project. We continue to challenge ourselves to look maintenance in their stores. I want to take that information and data we’ve been training them the last year with working on and overlay it on top of their P&L. A lot of times, we put sales goals to the stores and the girls are celebrating or the teams rather are celebrating because they’ve made the goal, but then I’ll step in and ask them to evaluate everything. We like to be able to empower them with that knowledge and help them make better decisions, help them get involved with the maintenance and repairs in the stores, and it helps us keep the cost down and enforce the process. A lot of our best store managers understand the process. They understand the actual impact it has on their store. So that helps us save money. It helps us manage things. I’m also trying to take that data that I’ve at the technology and process in the collected and create predictive maintenance industry to be more efficient to work with programs. There are some things that from our client’s vision. those analytics that I have, I can see the JLL has followed a proven process patterns and create programs outside of from planning to close out that can be cayour traditional PM services on HVACs. I see tered to suit the client’s needs. We continue there are certain regions I’m seeing that to look at acquisitions that make sense for need gate maintenance. There are some our core business lines. Personally, I am other maintenance issues in those areas that always challenging myself to stay educated I can put into place now that I have all this on top of trends or whatever the hot ininformation and I’m able to spin the data to dustry item might be at the time. I also pay say hey I see these trends and I can prevent close attention to business development some of these issues. and recruitment. In addition, we’re building our first new prototype store. A lot of our build out is Fatima Hakim, Ashley Stewart: One simple and straightforward. There is a lot of of my biggest goals would be to create due diligence. Every little thing needs two process. We are a company driven by math. and three sign offs. Do they understand the Our CEO enforces math in the running of functionality? Do they understand this? Do our business, so in addition to having a they see this picture? Do they understand – Bret Hanks, Ameritech Facility Services process, I like to collect a lot of data, put what this means? I don’t want to have to

“I was hired to expand our business into new industries, with emphasis on retail. My goal is to develop the retail side of our industry. It truly is as simple as that.”

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2015


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CONSTRUCTION CIRCLE NO. 26

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FULL THROTTLE adjust anything. I don’t want to change anything. I want this to be done. I want this to be the process going forward. Once you do it once, we’re repeating it over and over again. So, that would be the goal is to have these projects with no punch lists. We’re planning on rolling out future stores using the things we’ve learned from our Newark prototype store.

“Our company’s to-do list is to recruit skilled trade workers. We’re finding a difficult situation out there because a lot of kids aren’t going to trade schools anymore.”

How can we build quicker, better and efficiently? We’re taking approximately 150 days to build a store. So, what can we do to get this down to 120 days? Are there opportunities in the design phase? Is it in the preplanning or due diligence phase? Where can we just cut out some of the waste and the fat as we continue to work toward our 2020 vision? These are the most important items on my to do list.

Steve DeBerardino, Cosentino North America: For me, it starts with trying to be the best partner and probBrad Gaskins, The McIntosh lem solver to my customers I can be. It’s Group: I have a real passion for about making sure that those customers accessibility, so I’m trying to help this are taking advantage of the low cost of industry be accessible and compliant. ownership that we think we can provide There are two reasons for this. First with our materials and services, and is that too many companies are going the fact that we’re very focused as a through lawsuits. We want to eliminate company on respecting the environment. these. The second reason is that by And when it comes to low cost increasing accessibility, you increase of ownership as a company, we really the opportunity to sell to a larger group focus on our product innovation. Our of people. We have a Silver Tsunami products are very competitively priced coming at us, which is a bunch of with great warranties. We cultivate a elderly folks who are going to have – Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services family of North American fabricators to disabilities of some kind that need help support the installation and fabrication to get into our facilities. of these materials. We have a company-owned distribution, second It starts with educating the architects. We have to make sure to none, with over 40 distribution centers that can be leveraged. they are working for all of us and all are educated. The second thing I want the customer I deal with to know that I am easy to deal is to work with those architects, not against them. We want to help with. They can call me when they need something solved. I want them make sure that the facilities they’re working on are compliant. them to know that I’m dependable – a true resource partner. I think Beyond that, we want to work directly with the retail people to make we do a very good job of imagining and anticipating needs. sure they get what they need to make their facilities compliant. If we can accomplish all of that, just a small portion of that, I think Demetria Peterson, Bridgestone Retail Operations: I’ve been we will be successful in moving our country forward to accessibility. with Bridgestone for a little over one year. One of the things that impressed me was their vision for 2020. We have quite a few initiatives Herminio Pereira, Caribbean Restaurants/Burger King: heading in to 2020. Who is the 2020 customer? How are we going We’re going to be remodeling on the corporation side in the restauto target them? What can we do differently to attract customers? rants. There will be less of an impact to the restaurants and to the We’re an automotive company. We sell tires. We do car repairs. How guests. We do a full renovation in 60 days, which is pretty good. do we differentiate ourselves from the competition? We’re always looking for energy efficient equipment or materials Bridgestone is evolving. For example, when we hire new techfor those renovations and new restaurants. nicians, they have to go through a very stringent training program. I am working with many different departments to create a suitable CCR: Do you shut down your facilities environment for this training that takes place all over the U.S. The during the 60-day remodels? environment involves a classroom and service bay so the technicians Carribbean's Pereira: Actually we never shut down. We close the can immediately put into practice what they just learned. I am proud dining room for four days to get it done. Closing earlier and opening to be a part of this team as I know the output will be great technia little bit later does the rest of the job. And on the four days that the cians in our stores for our customers. dining room is closed, the drive-thru is still working. We’re looking to be as innovative as possible. Coming from the QSR industry, it is apparent that we look at things differently. I feel it is imTim Hill, The Beam Team: To answer you on what’s top on my toportant to listen to different perspectives. It’s how you grow and become do list, we’re in the retail construction business. We have 800 people diverse in a rapidly changing world. Like everyone in the industry, we are scheduled on projects this next week. However, during the time also looking at cost increases and how we can streamline processes. period between Thanksgiving and the new year, we might have less

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2015


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FULL THROTTLE than 100 scheduled each week. So the top of my to-do list is finding work for our employees at the end of the year. Secondly, like many of you have already discussed, right now we are quite busy with retail projects. We are often having a difficult time hiring sub-contractors of quality. Many sub-contractors are stretched thin and recently some of their workers are brand new and not necessarily qualified. Next, is our efforts to learn about, bid, get awarded, and plan for projects in advance. The key word is “advance”. This year has been a year of “last minute projects”. We have often bid and been awarded and started a large rollout project all within a 10 working days period. JLL's Campbell: Because it’s come up twice now, is it safe to assume that the lack of quality people is because we’re in a surge and with construction on the rise, and we don’t have the talent pool

shift in the dynamics. We rely on our partners and relationships built over the years. Bridgestone Retail Operations' Peterson: One of our top priorities was to get some quality general contractors. The contractors would have a low bid but weren’t able to meet the project schedule. So as I’m looking for new contractors, I’m always asking these questions. What do you think happened to the construction industry? How is your company adapting to the decline in quality subcontractors? What are you doing to build your bench of contractors across the U.S.? Many of them felt like when most of the construction stopped so suddenly, trades and contractors just got out of the business. They just went to a totally different industry. It’s understandable because they put everything into their company and then they lost everything in a matter of months. So there’s a little bit of that going on. Those guys are not coming back to give us another chance and have the bottom fall out from under them again. In a sense, they have the upper hand because there’s more work than quality contractors. They can choose to charge more or pass on the job altogether. So, here we are, ready to build a lot and facing new challenges. The industry has changed and we must adapt quickly to stay competitive.

to pull from as we once did? Or are we just not seeing the quality of trade’s as we used to for other reasons.

Primanti Bros.' Connors: I read an interesting article about the vocational schools shutting down plumbing and electrical in the state of Ohio. It talked about how many of the vocational schools were actually shutting down their construction trade departments because kids are not signing up for them. They all want to go into the technical field – things like computer repairs. Nobody wants to learn the trades anymore and learn how to build things.

The Beam Team's Hill: I think it’s two-fold. We are in a surge of retail projects right now. We’ve had some of the busiest weeks we’ve had in years. Second, it appears more young people are attending college and not a trade school or trade apprenticeship program. It seems that younger people have an expectation to go to college and get some kind of degree. It appears fewer people are learning the trades. So, yes, there’s a shortage of trained trade workers. Plus, there is a surge in work that has been going on since spring.

Rebcor Construction's Noda: Same thing, I’m from Newark, N.J., and the churches and some of the older buildings have such amazing brick masonry work from years and years ago, and those type of workers just don’t exist anymore. It’s a dying breed and that’s sad. I have a 19 and a 16 year old, and I don’t see any kids their ages interested in any type of manual labor whatsoever. But they’re brilliant when it comes to social media, technology, shopping online, etc. It’s such a completely different generation.

JLL's Campbell: I’m seeing it as well. There is an increase in the construction business. It’s just getting harder to get available GCs. A few years ago, you called a GC and they wanted to get started the next day. Now it seems like the tides have changed. They’re in more of a let’s pick which project we’re going to work on because there are inundated with projects all the sudden. So it seems like there’s a

Prime Retail Service's Chaney: I attended a summit of technical and trade schools for the State of Georgia in Clarksville. It’s everywhere. From the comments I have heard, it’s grown into a nationwide issue for educators. These deans and presidents all expressed concern about kids today? Doesn’t anyone want to be a plumber or carpenter anymore? Now they’re talking about shutting down these

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2015


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CIRCLE NO. 28


FULL THROTTLE schools. This was two years ago, so I know it has been a concern for at least that long. JLL's Campbell: I think some of the educators are fighting for that money to get back into the system. But you can see that our industry is very niche. It takes on so many different parameters. We’re talking about skilled trade and early education in vocational schools. When those budgets are slashed, they impact our lifecycle and our trades. We didn’t think about that in 2008 when everything was coming down to the wire. But you can see the cycle has come full circle. It’s an interesting dynamic to look at.

“I want the customer I deal with to know that I am easy to deal with. They can call me when they need something solved.”

information. Give somebody a hint or two along the way to help him become you 20 years from now. Rebcor Construction's Noda: I think that is one of the reasons I love this industry so much, as everyone has been so mentoring to me. I went to nursing school out of high school, not college. The only reason I got into this industry 20 years ago was because my father owned a construction company and everybody I’ve talked to through all the different organizations, like the RCA (Retail Contractors’ Association) or RDI (Retail Design Institute) or ICSC (Internation Council of Shopping Centers) has always shared information and guided me along my career path. It has been extremely beneficial for me. I also do the same thing. I always try to help others in anyway I possibly can. I am a firm believer you get out of things what you put into them.

Rebcor Construction's Noda: Kids coming out of college today want to be project managers. That’s it. They don’t want to start as a superintendent. Years ago, people appreciated – Steve DeBeradino, Cosentino North America that. Now we have another struggle to get really good superintendents. It’s a dying breed. They think they’re entitled to a project manager Polo Ralph Lauren's Mohan: One of the other things apart position right away. You can’t find enough people. from all this stuff that we talk about, which is all very relevant, is what’s really happened on the microscopic levels. After the Industrial NY & Company's Echeandia: Going back to our racetrack tour Revolution kind of died in the United States, we came up with the this morning, some people might remember Al Hunter, Sr. and Al Information Age – computer technology, information and commuHunter, Jr. Al Hunter Jr. once said in an interview that his dad taught nications (etc.). The real drive for people to go into basic trades has him everything he knew, but he didn’t teach him everything he kind of dwindled. That has happened over the last 50 years. knows. So I think it’s a duty for older people in whatever industry It has not impacted the rate of the acceleration. It’s not anywhere to pass along to torch a little bit and don’t be so proprietary about close to that of China and some of the developing nations like Korea, and so on and so forth. Coupled with that, the laws that we have had so far have encouraged manufacturing and all these things overseas with the results that the world best manufacturing plans, which involve all kinds of mechanical, electrical trades – whether it’s electricians, plumbers, and so on and so forth – has kind of migrated. So if you were to go to China, you would see a lot of people working in industrial places – plants, manufacturing (etc.). What is really happening here is that we have been importing all of this. It has dwindled, and places like Pittsburgh and manufacturing facilities in Illinois, etc., have actually died. Cities have died. If you were promised a job where you would get a paycheck for 40 hours of work on a particular basis for all your lifetime, you had some security.

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CIRCLE NO. 29


FULL THROTTLE emphasis in the first 20 years of development in their training and growth. It is significantly higher than what we do here. So there needs to be a change. When we talk about the manufacturing age, when Detroit was the capital of manufacturing and we were proud of our auto industry and what have you and I’m talking about, we’re talking about maybe the 60s or the 50s. American was a dominant force. What has happened? Gina Noda of Rebcor: We outsourced it.

“Every week we’re meeting with somebody new. So we’re able to stay competitive and lower prices by increasing the number of competitors we’re working with.”

Polo Ralph Lauren's Mohan: It’s really going significantly down because of all these issues. So it is a very, very complex problem. But the fact of the matter is that I need a plumber today I’m not going to get one. That’s a sad state of affairs, isn’t it?

But when you look at plumber today, Firehouse's Cameron: I have a very he has a job and he doesn’t have a job short to-do list. It is basically to continue tomorrow. He has to market his job. He to enforce brand standards in our building has to find a job for himself. He has to go of our product. Also, while enforcing those ahead and, in some cases, be an indebrand standards, we also want to make it pendent businessman. So the question more cost effective for the franchisee. When simply is in the difficulty associated with a franchisee asks, we want to be able to that. It has completely taken off the flavor provide an average cost of a build-on. and fragrance of going into these trade schools. So wanting to go to a community Scott Moseman, Graybar: Our sales college now enamors kids. Let me become force’s goal is to educate our customers on a computer expert or whatever it is. I’m how we can help accomplish their goals. Evgoing get the same amount of whatever it eryone talks about having to reduce cost, but is and I can live a comfortable living. at the same time everybody’s putting more These are very subtle changes that technology into their space and trying to be are also happening, coupled with the fact more code compliant. Find another industry that the population in the age brackets where you’re trying to put in more technology between 20 to 45 years old is also diminand reduce costs or constantly value engineer. ishing in the United States. So the curve is That normally doesn’t go hand in hand, but actually negative. There are a lot of issues there are smart ways of doing it. You have to that really are under a microscopic and prioritize the technology that you need now must be tackled on both fronts. We need – Julia Versteegh, Storefloors and make sure that your cost savings in prodto revive manufacturing in this country. We ucts or design allows for future upgrades. want to make sure that people who go to Educating customers is No. 1 on my to-do list. It’s sitting trade schools are promised a good profession and a good career, down with our customers and personalizing the solution to fit their so that they can be assured that they will do as well as people are business and their needs. Everybody has different sustainability now in the Information Age or Communication Age. goals, cost savings goals, goals in reducing labor, and even goals in reducing maintenance. It’s never a one-size-fits-all solution. Gina Noda, Rebcor Construction: What they do with children in Asia is they go to school during the day and they have a trade school Dedrick Kirkem, John Varvatos: The biggest thing on my to-do list is at night. That’s a requirement. budget analysis. I have to make sure we do a little bit of renovation at the corporate headquarters. I have to do some reconfiguration, move some Polo Ralph Lauren's Mohan: Well no wonder. If you look at the people around different departments, small flooring work and lighting. United States today and you look at education, in Asia, they put an

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2015


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FULL THROTTLE Julia Versteegh, Storefloors: We hired a material strategist this year, and with them, we’re able to meet with a lot more product suppliers. That has been really great. Every week we’re meeting with somebody new. So we’re able to stay competitive and lower prices by increasing the number of competitors we’re working with. On my personal to-do list, I want to make use of technology software databases. I want to increase industry intel, but also be more efficient. I have a few things in the works, so I’m really excited about implementing those. I am going to start with attending NACS in a couple weeks, the National Association of Convenience Stores. We want to start growing the segments within retail. Almost all of our business is retail, most of it within apparel and specialty, so

“I think it’s twofold. We are in a surge of retail projects right now. We’ve had some of the busiest weeks we’ve had in years.” – Tim Hill, The Beam Team

Where the locals go Retreat opens with at a Daytona staple When in Rome... Yes, when you’re in Daytona Beach, you have to go where the locals go – it’s the place to be seen. So, on the first night of the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat, attendees did what most Daytona folks do – they go to the Ocean Deck. With its Carribbean-style atmosphere and hint of the ocean outside, it was a great way to kick things off. The welcome dinner was part of the Retreat, held Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at The Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort.

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we’d like to grow other areas of retail, such as grocery stores and convenience. Grace Daly, Shop Talk 360: I’m wrapping up two books in the “Inspiring Leadership” book series. These books are very near and dear to my heart because they capture and share life experiences of so many of our Industry colleagues. Having directed construction and facilities for national retail store chains for over 20 years, it became apparent to me – to fill a need to celebrate the people behind the roles of what we do. Publishing my books and recording ShopTalk360 podcasts have set a platform for our industry to share beyond our everyday businesses. It gives a glimpse of who we are, magnifies our similarities and our love for this industry. CCR


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CIRCLE NO. 31


FULL THROTTLE

I’ll have the seafood Chart House gives attendees taste of Daytona

When you carry around the nickname of “The world’s most famous beach,” you better be able to back it up with some great seafood. No worries there, as the Chart House, located at Marina Point in Daytona Beach, Fla., delivered the goods, and more. Situated beautifully on the water, attendees of 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat celebrated their first night with an array of amazing entrees. The dinner was part of the Retreat, held Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at The Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort.

On the water

Attendees hit beachside haunt for lunch with a view The locals know – Carribean Jack’s is the place to be on the beach. A tribute to famed Daytona Beach icon John “Caribbean Jack” Gilbert, a local mariner turned noted bootlegger, the restaurant offers all of the charms and history the town has to offer. Following their up-close and personal tour of Daytona International Speedway, attendees of the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat hung out on the deck for lunch. The gathering was part of the Retreat, held Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at The Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort.

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CIRCLE NO. 32


FULL THROTTLE

Meet you at the top Historic lighthouse sets up challenge

1.25 million bricks. 176 feet high. 164 feet 6 inches above sea level. Do you think you can make the climb? Well, why our executives were immersed in their one-on-one meetings, their significant others took the The Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse challenge. The lighthouse, one of the “must see” attractions in the Daytona Beach area, served as the perfect spot to get an ocean view and take in some history. The excursion was part of the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat, held Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at The Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort.

Face to face

One-on-ones give attendees to get down to business One of the most anticipated parts of the Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreats is the one-on-ones meetings – where vendors and end users take place in 10-minute meetings to discuss business opportunities and learn a little more about each other. The vaunted session was a vital part of the the Retreat, held Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at The Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort.

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» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 33


AMERICA’S

PEDESTRIANS PROTECTING TIMES SQUARE, NEW YORK

N

o other defined public space receives more pedestrian foot traffic than New York City’s Times Square. More than 40 million people per year pass through the area – tourists, business people, residents, and vendors alike. Almost one million people celebrate New Year’s Eve in Times Square, an event that is broadcast live around the world. Safety for such concentrated crowds of people is a full-time job for hundreds of police, fire, and security officials. Protecting tourists from crime, traffic accidents, and each other is not easy; taking into account the additional threat of an intentional vehicle attack (such as in Nice, France and Ohio State University) prompted the City of New York and many responsible officials to undertake a very large upgrade to the safety and security of

this world famous pedestrian area. Calpipe Security Bollards was tasked to create a removable bollard solution that would protect the public in Times Square from potential vehicle attacks. The bollards were to be installed between 42nd and 47th Streets, and at the cross-streets of 7th Avenue and Broadway. This assignment came with a Dream Team of collaborators - the design team at Snohetta Architecture, the security project management team at The LiRo Group, and a world class contractor in Tully Construction. This Dream Team went to work to satisfy the requirements of a very diverse and demanding constituency: The City of New York, the Mayor's Office, the Times Square Alliance, the Department of Homeland Security, representatives of the NYPD, FDNY and many other agencies.

This was a very challenging project for any manufacturer. We had to design, prototype, and fabricate something that had never been built or tested before. It had to include custom features, it had to satisfy mulitple agencies and specifiers, and it had to be operable from the very first day and every day thereafter for at least ten years. It was required for these bollards to be manufactured in the United States, and withstand the mischief and wear and tear that comes with 40 million visitors per year, uncounted taxicabs, and the worst that New York City could throw at them.” – Carlos Gonzalez, Division Manager “The safety and security of the public comes at a price. In the case of Times Square, money spent on good product design and stainless steel high security bollards will protect millions of visitors for years to come.” – Dan Markus, President, Calpipe Industries Inc. SPEAK TO ONE OF OUR EXPERT BOLLARDS ENGINEERS FOR HELP WITH YOUR NEXT PROJECT CALPIPEBOLLARDS.COM • (877) 283-8518


O

nce the final design and specifications were

The finished product is a field-tested removable bollard

agreed upon for the removable bollards, and

made entirely from Type 316 stainless steel. The bollards

once full scale articles were built and tested

feature custom lifting rings to help with insertion and

onsite, a final go ahead was given with the objective to have all bollards fabricated, shipped and installed within 90 days. Once fabrication began, representatives from Snohetta, LiRo Group, the Mayor’s office, and the Times Square Alliance came to inspect the fabrication and assembly for the actual production phase. Over 200 stainless steel bollards and almost 240 custom stainless steel embedment sleeves had to be cut, welded, assembled, and polished in time for the arrival of the inspection team.

removal, custom engineered embedment sleeves and covers designed to withstand the demanding conditions encountered in a dense tourist area with vehicle traffic and harsh summer and winter conditions. One of the most challenging tasks given to the design and engineering team at Calpipe Security Bollards, was the requirement to design, prototype, and incorporate into the bollards, a high security locking system which would be compatible with the locks and keys of several New York agencies but still unique to Times Square. Only specific agencies and third parties will be able to unlock and remove these bollards, and possession of that key will not allow unauthorized use at other city facilities. The world-class project was completed within the 90 day requirement. All of the bollards are currently installed and functioning, and the crowds of tourists are safer today than they were a year ago. As a result of the installation, pedestrians will be safe for many years to come, as the strength and corrosion resistance of these bollards gives them an expected life in the field of more than ten years. Calpipe Security Bollards is grateful to have been selected to be part of this world-class project. We would like to thank the design team at Snohetta, the project managers at LiRo, the Office of the Mayor of New York, the Times Square Alliance, and Tully Construction. A Dream Team indeed.

A division of

CIRCLE NO. 34

PROUDLY MADE IN AMERICA


Making a difference Attendees discuss importance of being a woman in today’s commercial construction industry

They came from different backgrounds and different generations. They work in different parts of the industry. But as women in the commercial construction industry, each has a fire that drives them to not only raise themselves and their companies to new levels, but the industry as well. Representing all sides of the industry, some of the leading female executives across the vendor and end user spaces took part in our annual Women in Commercial Construction & Facilities Retreat, held Aug. 4-7 at the Mills House Wyndham Grand Hotel in Charleston, S.C. The three-day conference, sponsored by Commercial Construction & Renovation magazine, featured a roundtable discussion on industry trends and challenges. It also included a series of networking opportunities – from an intimate bus tour of historic downtown Charleston, to several lunch and dinner parties, and the always anticipated one-on-one meetings. Included in the roundtable was a discussion on what it is like to be a woman in today’s ever-changing commercial construction market. In the following final installment of the forum, you will get a look at how they are excelling in what still is a male dominated industry. For more information, visit us at www.ccr-mag.com.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


Jennifer Abilez

Melisa Baune

Gabriella Bolm

Steak n Shake

Core State Group

Cedar Lake Cellars

Rita Briggs

Kelli Buhay

Magen Bybee

Fairmont Sign

Retail Maintenance Specialists

Genesis Lighting Solutions

Rebekah Cianfrocco

Bre Coe

Penny Czarra

Level Office

AC-Tech

Haylee Giere

Laura Gross

P&C Construction

American Signature Furniture

Patty Kelly

Sharron Koch

Broad Street

JHM Hotels

Emily McCready

Lisa McShane Los Angeles Dodgers

The McIntosh Group

Selser Schaefer Architects

Angela Peterson

Angie Roach

The Public Library of Cincinnati

Cedar Lake Cellars

Janel Scarborough

Rebecca Suen

Nicole Thompson-Floyd

Level Office

Patricia Davis Innovative Dehumidifier Systems

Jessica Hamilton Porcelanosa USA

Karen MacCannell

Hilliker Corporation

Broad Street

Grace Daly Shop Talk 360

TD Bank

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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MAKING A DIFFERENCE CCR: What does it mean to be a woman in today’s commercial construction industry; one that is primarily male dominated? Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialists: Prior to being with Retail Maintenance Specialists, I was in the signage industry for almost seven years, which is also predominantly male. Prior to that, I was with Minolta for 14 years, yet another predominantly male industry, a definite pattern. Now, I find it very empowering. I enjoy having the ability to have my feminine side; having the sensitivity as a woman, but yet still have the dominance of a strong woman in the industry, and feel that I’m competitive with my male counterpart, and I wouldn’t trade it for the world.

Jennifer Abilez, Steak and Shake: Because I’m a registered interior designer, it’s a primarily female industry, so being around other designers or contractors, I don’t feel out of place. As a director at Steak ‘n Shake, I’m constantly looking for female leadership, right now I do have to fight for a chair at the table with the boys. I think they have really have good respect for me. I listen a lot, and then I speak my opinion. And it seems like when I speak, they really listen and value my opinion. I feel very fortunate to be in the place that I am now. It’s taken a while for them to respect me, but I think it’s because I haven’t let them down. When they see me, they see a strong leader – a future leader.

Karen MacCannell, McIntosh Group: The architecture industry is very male-dominated, and our firm is no different. When I started there 11 years ago, I believe there were six women, and they were all in administrative roles. We’re a small firm, so I also do HR. I’ve worked hard to bring women with architecture degrees to our firm. Not long ago, we were very excited to have the first woman in our firm become licensed, and several others are close behind her. To keep up the momentum of our increasingly diverse workforce, our CEO encouraged us to start a women’s group within our firm that we have actually extended into our local chapter of the Amer– Haylee Giere, P&C Construction ican Institute of Architects. That group is new but already very popular and growing in participation. We address questions like: How do we compete in this environment today? What are some hurdles we face in our industry and how can we overcome them? When I attend a meeting like this, I try to take what I’ve learned to the owners of our firm to make sure we are hearing and serving our female employees.

“It goes without saying that in this industry there are definitely challenges presented to females that males do not have to deal with. I don’t expect to always be treated like one of the guys.”

Patty Kelly, Broad Street: As a woman in the industry, I personally feel like times have changed and women overall are well respected in their positions just the same as a male. I fell into property management 18 years ago by chance. I started off at the bottom, as a young woman in a very large well known company. I knew nothing about commercial property management and construction. I worked very hard to learn the business and was always appreciative for having patient leaders who were willing to take the time to show me the ropes. I am now working for a company where the leadership is top notch, encourages all

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CIRCLE NO. 35


MAKING A DIFFERENCE employees to set their own goals and is willing to be there as a resource with an open door policy. Haylee Giere, P&C Construction: I started out in an entry level position in my company, and have been working my way up ever since. I work directly with the vice president now. It goes without saying that in this industry there are definitely challenges presented to females that males do not have to deal with. I don’t expect to always be treated like one of the guys. However, I think that being a female in a male dominant industry offers a unique opportunity to provide a different perspective. I try not to focus on the fact that I work in a male dominated industry, but instead to take ownership of the position that I am in and do my best to utilize the skills and talents that I have to offer to my company and to the industry. There are definitely challenges and individuals in the industry who make it difficult for females, but I have to look past those individuals and keep the big picture in mind. Nicole Thompson-Floyd, TD Bank: I’ve been blessed to have really strong women around me throughout my career – women who’ve helped champion my career and me as an employee. They’ve

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“As long as you know what you’re talking about, people are going to respect you. So I feel like women need strong women behind them to push them along. I’m a mother of two girls, so I try to set the best example for them. I stress the importance of working your butt off to get where you want to go.” – Janel Scarborough, Broad Street

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

given me great advice and helped direct my career. So my responsibility is being a woman at the table who needs to do the same for them. And I take that very seriously. I’m a mentor to another woman in the real estate department. I keep in touch with other women I’ve worked with. We talk. We laugh. We seek advice and give updates on our careers and lives. That’s my thing. That’s my responsibility, because it was given to me as a gift. Emily McCready, Selser Schaefer Architects: entered the architecture industry through an ideal scenario. My firm was co-founded by a woman, Janet Selser. Janet is a strong, intelligent, and bold woman. She is also my mentor. Janet works throughout the company to make sure we are not creating gender divides. At Selser Schaefer Architects, women serve in a variety of roles; architects, interior designers, marketing, business development, human resources, accounting and administration. I do experience some stereotyping when I represent my firm and the architecture industry outside our office walls. People often expect an architecture firm to be represented by a male. Exhibiting knowledge is the best way to overcome these scenarios. I demonstrate my fluency


CIRCLE NO. 36


MAKING A DIFFERENCE

“As a woman, I read a lot of books because men think and act differently than women. So in order to understand that, I read to try and understand their process. I really think we are all going in the same direction. If I can understand where they’re coming from, I believe I can better relate to them. From my perspective, women fail less and can multitask more. I think men realize our strengths.” – Gabriella Bolm, Cedar Lake Cellars

with the design process and bring them a design team with the ability to meet their goals. I am fortunate to know many amazing women in the industry that are passionate about the built environment, creating visible impact, and building long-lasting communities. Being taken seriously may mean clearing additional hurdles along the way, but it’s well worth it. Janel Scarborough, Broad Street: I started in property management 20 years ago. When I started, I felt like it was more of a good old boys club. There were a lot of men in charge. And as I went along, I had a lot of women I looked up to. My vice president at my old job was a breast cancer survivor – a very strong woman. She was somebody I really respected. Today, I feel like the people in property management – vendors, engineers, everyone – have a lot more respect for women. They listen and

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take us more seriously. We don’t have to go out of our way to prove ourselves anymore. As long as you know what you’re talking about, people are going to respect you. So I feel like women need strong women behind them to push them along. I’m a mother of two girls, so I try to set the best example for them. I stress the importance of working your butt off to get where you want to go. The property management sector has come a long way, and I feel like women are really taking charge and leading that workforce. Sharron Koch, JHM Hotels: I’m really jealous of the women who had female leadership to look up to. I’ve never had that. I started out as an assistant to the owner. The first thing he ever asked me to do was to get him out of a speeding ticket. I felt like I was taking care of him ever since. So I never had that kind of role model where I could ask, “How do you navigate these waters?”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 37


MAKING A DIFFERENCE

“I think it’s all about embracing that inner strength and by seeing things in a positive light. I’ve encountered a lot of women who sit there and complain about their boss and all these disadvantages of being in a male industry. While that’s true, there are a lot of disadvantages there can be some positives, too.” – Janel Scarborough, Broad Street

On top of that, I felt like we were in a construction, male dominated world and I work for a family-owned, Indian-based company. They are very male dominated culturally. So I had to get to the point for the first time in my career where I was like, “How do I make myself heard? How do you hear my voice? How do I make you respect me?” For them, it was an education. My boss told me, “If you don’t have a degree, we’ll never promote you. It’s just that important to the family.” I was like 30 years old with three small children. Alright then. I went back to school and earned my degree. And I think I earned their respect. They could see I was going to do whatever it took to earn their respect. I was going to work the hours, even though I had small children. I was going to go back to school and get my degree. I was going to do everything they asked. Nothing was ever going to be beneath me, even if it meant getting their coffee. I felt like I finally got heard. I feel like I can walk onto a job site as an expert and not just a female expert. Melisa Baune, Core State Group: I began my career in the industry about ten years ago as a receptionist for a commercial construction company. I was incredibly thankful for the opportunity and worked extremely hard working up the ladder until I reached Project Management level. I found it challenging to find my place in this roll, as a young twenty-something female in a very male dominated industry; my mentors up to this point were men and I struggled to find my confidence. After a few years I took the valuable knowledge I had gained and moved into a business development role which is still what I do to this day. I have since found a lot of support through both men and women in the industry and have started a women in the industry

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networking group where we are able to share our own struggles and successes which are found in any industry. I am certainly thankful for all of the women in past generations who have paved the way for women like myself. Laura Gross, American Signature Furniture: I kind of have a strong personality, and I might not listen as well because I do like to be heard. But by doing that, I’m learning to push. I’m able to let the industry know that I’m here and that I have the education and the knowledge. They might need to sit back and listen to what I have to say and what I can do. My boss said from Day 1, “I know you’re one of the people who are doing this. This is yours. Just take it and do what you need to do.” So I grabbed the horse by the reins and ran with it. The different changes that I have made have been really good for the company. I gained the respect from a lot of different male role models in the industry. What I will talk about though is what I’m finding in the this industry, and only in the last few years is that there are more women to talk to with all of the people you’re in business with. NEED TO FIND PERSON: I’m a woman product manufacturer working with men in Germany and India. I have one colleague who’s a woman. When dealing with the subcontractors, they may not be the person putting the material down, but it’s the wife, sister or daughter who’s running the business. You now have someone to talk to who is a property manager. Then it’s the architect. They have somebody to talk to who’s involved in all aspects of the construction of their project. That has become quite empowering, because I think I’m seeing a trend here. We’re not giving business to each other because we’re

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR CIRCLE NO. 38


MAKING A DIFFERENCE

“I work with men twice my age as their equals. I can’t tell you how many times that an account I moved to another person comes back to me for advice. They know I will get it done. “Megan will take care of it,” they say. I love that.”

versus the ten 40- year-old white guys. You have to think like that to survive. You have to believe in yourself. You have to be a resource for your company. Once you have that, I think the confidence you build will naturally exude. I think that’s where you’ll get the respect you want. It’s not sitting here demanding respect or that things should be different. If you want something to be done differently, do something about it.

Gabriella Bolm, Cedar Lake Cellars: I came to the United States 20 years ago and was hired as an account executive. It was an eye opener to see all that happens within – Magen Bybee, Genesis Lighting Solutions other countries and within America. I realized that, unlike in other countries, America is very driven by women. They have job titles, they have relevant positions, girls or sisters, but it’s the way we communicate. We tend to think and they are leaders. I knew this was a place I had to be! I didn’t have outside the box a little bit more. a father, so we had a pretty female-driven family with my sister and my mom. It was important for me to see there are women who can be Janel Scarborough, Broad Street: I think it’s all about emextremely successful and wear so many hats. It’s all about being knowlbracing that inner strength and by seeing things in a positive light. edgeable. Once you have that insight in the region and the company you I’ve encountered a lot of women who sit there and complain about work for, I think you will get respect. their boss and all these disadvantages of being in a male industry. As a woman, I read a lot of books because men think and While that’s true, there are a lot of disadvantages there can be some act differently than women. So in order to understand that, positives, too. I read to try and understand their process. I really think we If I’m going to any commercial real estate event in St. Louis, I’m are all going in the same direction. If I can understand where most likely either the only female or one of the five in the room of 200 they’re coming from, I believe I can better relate to them. From men. So when I’m networking, they remember who I am. They’re not my perspective, women fail less and can multitask more. I think going to remember the 20 other guys they talked to. When they need men realize our strengths. somebody in real estate, I’m going to be the first person they think of

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CIRCLE NO. 39


MAKING A DIFFERENCE It’s a different era now than it was 10, 15 or 30 years ago. It is much better to be a woman today then it was decades ago. Magen Bybee, Genesis Lighting Solutions: I’m the only female sales person in my company. We have other females who work there, but none of them are in the management level. I feel blessed because I started in project management. And then I got promoted because I was putting in 14 hours a day doing everything I needed to do to build our division, which is a part of a larger company that has been open for 50 years. I helped us double in size. I was the only project manager, so I had to make sure everything was good. I’m proud of what I do. I’m proud of this industry. I keep learning more and more, as much as I can. I work with men twice my age as their equals. I can’t tell you how many times that an account I moved to another person comes back to me for advice. They know I will get it done. “Megan will take care of it,” they say. I love that. I’m proud of it. I hope that eventually we’ll grow and be able to have another female

“I want to be able to continue to improve the maintenance software we use for our stores and evaluate ours vendor to be able to understand more of what their needs are through our software system.” – Laura Gross, American Signature Furniture

salesperson. But right now I’m just glad that the other project managers who work there see what happens when a woman steps up to the plate. Angela Peterson, The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County: To be a women in the construction industry today is encouraging. We are being challenged by our colleagues to bring our personality and expertise into this trade that has been male dominated forever. I still have my trials where I walk onto a job site and have to prove to the men that I know what I am doing and I have to prove I am capable of the position I hold. That can be very frustrating. But that said, at the end of a project, when your project manager and or superintendent shakes your hand and tells you it was great to work with you; that is rewarding. That said, when you walk into the field and you’re the woman in the room, it’s frustrating. You have to prove yourself, prove your knowledge and prove you’re capable. But at the same point, at the end of a project, when your project manager shakes your hand and says thank you, it’s rewarding. That’s an awesome feeling. Patricia Davis, Innovative Dehumidifier Systems: I’m the only female in our company, too, but I love it. I feel very empowered. There have been several jobs I’ve had in my past where it has been very male dominated and I’ve never seemed to have had a problem. I think it’s because I go in with the fact that I don’t feel entitled. I don’t feel that because I’m a female I deserve certain things or certain ways. I have no problem going into that warehouse in my suit and heels, and digging a unit out or answering technical questions. I don’t have a problem with asking my counterparts questions. I’m aware that when I’m new to a business, I don’t know everything. So it’s not a problem whether I’m a male or a female. I need to learn the business. I think that knowledge always overpowers gender. Being a female brings a different way of thinking. When we have meetings, people listen to me. If it’s because I’m female and I’m a little more memorable, I’m fine with that.

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Integrated Program Delivery. It Defines Everything We Do. Engineering Architecture

Program Management

Development

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Construction

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MAKING A DIFFERENCE It’s never “I’m-running-the-show-kindof-scenario.” It’s very respectful. Everybody likes the ideas that are presented because it’s always been in a professional manner. I always treat them with respect, and vice versa. I never want to be treated a certain way. I always want to learn about new products and technologies. Lisa McShane, Los Angeles Dodgers: In baseball, it’s definitely still a boy’s club, but slowly but surely it is changing. I was born and raised in Ireland, women there are very strong. For me this has worked to my advantage in all job positions I have held within the USA. I’m am very good at what I do. I do meet lots of resistance internally as folks have done the same thing year in and year out so management is lucky that I don’t scare easy! I was very lucky to have a lady mentor who has worked in baseball operations for 34 years, I would always run things by her. I didn’t always know the language of what they were referring to as well as all off baseball’s superstitions. Men definitely think differently than women, when I would respond I would always go in to lots of detail

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“Sometimes you have to prove yourself. Sometimes you have to work harder than the other person, and sometimes you just have to be the person who stands out. I’ve had some very strong women in my life. And I have a great dad. You have to keep going, keep moving forward.” – Rita Briggs, Fairmont Sign

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

whereas men just want the bottom line. It is always challenging that way. At the end of the day, the executives come to me directly because they know I’m going to do the best job. We have a large diverse group here from 22-year-old kids all the way through to folks who have been within the organization for 35+ years. The MLB are making a huge push on diverse initiatives within all its teams but I am sure the older clubs will have a slower learning process to change its culture. Sometimes, I’ll get frustrated, but at the end of the day you have to do what you have to do. You cannot take it home with you. You’re only as good as the staff that works for you. I’ve seen people come in and move up the ladder faster, it’s just the nature of the beast and how times are changing. Rebekah Cianfrocco, Level Office: Level Office as a whole has more female than male employees, and we still are very small. Within the development team, we are 50/50. I feel like I do have a voice, and I’m always throwing around ideas. Also, when you’re the only one in your position, you kind of have to run the show.


selserschaefer.com CIRCLE NO. 41


MAKING A DIFFERENCE I’ve definitely worked for others who don’t listen and have brushed me off. You have to be willing to speak up, and unfortunately, prove that you have the knowledge and ability to do the job. Sometimes it’s just not worth the struggle, so you must move on and find where you can be accepted without fighting for it. Rita Briggs, Fairmont Sign: It means that you have to on top better than what is expected. It seems like in some ways, being a woman in a male dominated industry can be an advantage. Some men find it refreshing to talk to a woman and get a different perspective on the business we are involved in. However, there are those times when you have to prove that you are more than just the opposite gender and that you have the stuff to make the difference. I’ve been in business development nearly all of my life. I have four daughters, two sons and three grandchildren. And I’m a single mother. We have to teach our children to be independent and strong. We have learned to never give up. If you don’t try, you’ll never know. CCR: You have to prove yourself. Fairmont Sign’s Briggs: Yes, we’ve all said it. Sometimes you have to prove yourself.

“My boss told me, “If you don’t have a degree, we’ll never promote you. It’s just that important to the family.” I was like 30 years old with three small children. Alright then. I went back to school and earned my degree. And I think I earned their respect. They could see I was going to do whatever it took to earn their respect.” – Sharron Koch, JHM Hotels

Sometimes you have to work harder than the other person, and sometimes you just have to be the person who stands out. I’ve had some very strong women in my life. And I have a great dad. You have to keep going, keep moving forward. Things will happen. They will be in the past tomorrow. I’m the only female salesperson at my company. There are other women who work there – project managers, graphic designers. But I’m the only female salesperson. I’ve done really well. I listen. I challenge myself. And I learn. I’m always educating myself. CCR: Has it been hard as a single, working mom? Fairmont Sign’s Briggs: There were challenging times as a working mom. But I give my kids a lot of credit when things hit the fan. They’re there to back me up. So I feel blessed. CCR: What does 2017 look like from your perspective? Fairmont Sign’s Briggs: In 2017, I’ve grabbed several new accounts. The goal, of course is to get more. I just want to stay out there, keep plugging away and keep trying to bring more business in. Level Office’s Cianfrocco: Level Office is planning to open 12 more centers across the country in 2017. As a team, we need to develop better processes and procedures, and hopefully make some new hires. Innovative Dehumidifier Systems Davis: Next year, we’ll continue to increase our growth. The Public Library of Cincinnati’s Peterson: Next year is going to be busy. The construction industry seems to be on an upswing and there is a lot going on. At the Library we will be working on large maintenance packages and we hope to start an ADA renovation on at least one of our buildings. There is also talk of looking to expand another of our locations. It should be an exciting year. Genesis Lighting Solutions’ Bybee: Next year is going to be dedicated to landing

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CIRCLE NO. 42


MAKING A DIFFERENCE

another national account – maybe two or three. I already have four under my belt, but you always need to push for more. Cedar Lake Cellars’ Bolm: I would like the new leadership teams to establish their roles and responsibilities. I’m looking forward to seeing how they will successfully implement and execute their ideas. Female Speaker: In 2017 we hope to speed up, and make effective the way we talk, problems – specific tailor-made problems – with applicators and projects in the field, perhaps using new technology. It’s all finding them and going in and helping them that way, but speed that up. 2017, we’re going to figure out how to do that. American Signature Furniture’s Gross: I want to be able to continue to improve the maintenance software we use for our stores and evaluate ours vendor to be able to understand more of what their needs are through our software system. Core State Group’s Baune: Two-thousand and seventeen is going to be a very exciting year for our group; with continued growth in the retail, restaurant and hospitality market sectors we will continue to be

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“I have since found a lot of support through both men and women in the industry and have started a women in the industry networking group where we are able to share our own struggles and successes which are found in any industry. I am certainly thankful for all of the women in past generations who have paved the way for women like myself. – Melisa Baune, Core State Group

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

a trusted partner for our clients in these and other sectors. I am personally looking forward to maintaining and building new relationships in the upcoming year. JHM Hotels’ Koch: I’m just to continue to be a part of the team that builds great hotels and puts out a good product. I want to travel more, too. Female Speaker: In 2017, I’d love to have our systems in place that we’ve been working on, but expand our team. Broad Street’s Scarborough: I’m succeeding with Broad Street and taking on more square footage. On a personal level, I want to keep a healthy balance between family and work. Selser Schaefer Architects’ McCready: We have not had more meetings to market ourselves to the retail industry. All of our retail clients have come from an existing relationship built off of another referral, where somebody leaves a company, and then hires us. So, it has been awesome. It’s a great way to do it. But we haven’t learned how to market ourselves to national retail brands. And we need to. So we’re figuring out how to get materials to get in front of people.


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469.322.1900 www.making-light.com CIRCLE NO. 43

Brilliance is Our Business


MAKING A DIFFERENCE TD Bank’s Thompson-Floyd: My goal is to get a little more streamlined in how we are doing the projects. I want to work smarter, not harder. I want to find a way to figure out how to get all the information we need and not have 20 million conference calls to do something. P&C Construction’s Giere: We’d like to acquire new clients that we can build long-term business relationships with and do repeat projects with. We have found that this is beneficial to both parties. Broad Street’s Kelly: Our goal would be to work more effectively across the board and get a permanent maintenance program implemented for our facilities in engineering.

I want to improve efficiencies in a lot of aspects of the business. I don’t think it’s realistic for us to say we’re going to hire a bunch of people next year, even though they keep saying we are. We want to find ways to work more effectively, cut down hours at the office late at night, and exceed expectations for the amount of buildings we can grow into this year.”

which is why it’s so exciting to continue to grow with the company and work with some of the best talent out there. The McIntosh Group’s MacCannell: On a personal level, I want to continue to mentor and be a resource to women – both in our industry and others, locally and outside the local community. And for our firm, I want to continue to build and maintain the relationships we have with our existing clients – and with future clients. I’m always nurturing those relationships and looking for the next big thing. Steak n Shake’s Abilez: We’re going to open 50 new restaurants in 2017. We’re opening 30 this year.We’re not hiring any new people in the design department, so it is about being more efficient.

Level Office’s Coe: 2017 will be another exciting year as we will selectively seek to enter new markets while also managing Retail Maintenance Specialists’ – Rebekah Cianfrocco, Level Office a portfolio of over 850,000 SF of shared Buhay: We’re one year into a three-year office space throughout the country. We are lease. We moved due to our growth and very proud of our past performances but are always looking for new expansion. I’d like to be able to take those two years to continue our ways and methods to improve our processes. Working at a rapidly growth and build our own office. That’s important for me to be a part expanding company means that I will have plenty of new exposure of as we move forward, I want to continue to assist with building new to challenging projects and a heightened level of responsibility that business. I’d like to continue the expansion of our facilities manallows me to grow as a professional. Because we have a small team, agement side of things, where we’re taking the whole business and everyone has different skill-sets and has a different way of thinking, managing it from soup to nuts, which has been very exciting. CCR

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 44


» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 45


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS

A snapshot of the industry’s leading sign firms

S

ign, sign, everywhere a sign company. If you want to find the right fit for your project, our annual listing of the industry’s leading firms gives you everybody in one place. Our exclusive listing provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If your company was not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

ANCHOR SIGN, INC........................... $31,000,000.00 ICON................................................ $29,500,000.00 AD ART............................................ $24,000,000.00 JONES SIGN CO............................... $21,000,000.00 SIGNRESOURCE............................... $21,000,000.00 PRIORITY SIGN, INC.......................... $19,500,000.00

HOSPITALITY

PERSONA, INC.................................. $18,200,000.00

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RESTAURANT

PHILADELPHIA SIGN......................... $58,000,000.00

PERSONA, INC................................... $25,000,000.00 BLAIR COMPANIES............................ $15,000,000.00 PRIORITY SIGN, INC........................... $12,500,000.00 ANCHOR SIGN, INC............................ $7,500,000.00 SIGNRESOURCE................................ $6,000,000.00 ICON................................................. $5,000,000.00 SOUTH WATER SIGNS........................ $5,000,000.00 PHILADELPHIA SIGN.......................... $4,000,000.00

YUNKER INDUSTRIES, INC................ $17,500,000.00

WALTON SIGNAGE............................. $4,000,000.00

SOUTH WATER SIGNS....................... $16,000,000.00

JONES SIGN CO................................ $3,000,000.00

PERSONA, INC.................................. $30,000,000.00

SIGNRESOURCE............................... $90,000,000.00

BLAIR COMPANIES........................... $6,000,000.00 JONES SIGN CO............................... $5,000,000.00 PHILADELPHIA SIGN......................... $3,000,000.00 SIGNRESOURCE............................... $3,000,000.00 SOUTH WATER SIGNS....................... $3,000,000.00 DUALITE SALES & SERVICE, INC....... $2,500,000.00 SMI SIGN SYSTEMS, INC.................. $1,800,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

RETAIL

Top Ten Totals

PHILADELPHIA SIGN......................... $83,000,000.00 JONES SIGN CO............................... $79,000,000.00 LSI GRAPHIC SOLUTIONS................. $77,000,000.00 PERSONA, INC.................................. $76,200,000.00 BLAIR COMPANIES........................... $75,000,000.00 PRIORITY SIGN, INC.......................... $50,500,000.00 ICON................................................ $45,265,000.00

ICON................................................ $1,500,000.00

ANCHOR SIGN, INC........................... $41,000,000.00

ANCHOR SIGN, INC........................... $1,000,000.00

WALTON SIGNAGE............................ $40,000,000.00

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 46


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS 3M Commercial Solutions American Signcrafters

3M Center, Bldg. 220-12-E-04 Maplewood, MN 55144 Tony Fulco/Business Development Manager 651-736-1715 atfulco@mmm.com • www.3M.com/graphics Year Established: 1902, No. of Employees: 89,446, Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A, Types of Signage: N/A, Leading Clients: N/A

Ad Art

700 Parker Square #205 Flower Mound, TX 75028 Corey Perez/ SVP 469-322-1909 corey@adart.com • www.adart.com Year Established: 1953, No. of Employees: 80, Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 3990, Retail Billings: $24,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $N/A, Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000 Other Billings: $3,000,000, Total Billings: $29,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: National Retail, Restaurant, Fitness, Financial, Grocery, Storage, Gaming & More

Adams Tech

6235 Lookout Rd., Ste. A Boulder, CO 80301 James Cross/Product Manager 303-798-7110 info@channelbender.com • www.channelbender.com Year Established: 1997, No. of Employees: 30, Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Distributor for SDS ChannelBender Series, and Delta Maetro Router, Leading Clients: N/A

ASG

Advance Sign Group

5150 Walcutt Ct. Columbus, OH 43228 Andy Wasserstrom/Director, Business Development 614-429-2079 advance sign group andyw@advancesigngroup.com www.advancesigngroup.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 75 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 56, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Rebrands Leading Clients: N/A

Agfa Graphics

611 River Dr. Center 3 Elmwood Park, NJ 07407-1325 Lois Catala/Mgr., Marketing Communication 201-373-4025 lois.catala@agfa.com • www.agfagraphics.us Year Established: 1873, No. of Employees: 4,350 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Manufacturer of wide-format UV inkjet printing systems and consumables, Leading Clients: Print Service Providers and In-Plants

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171 Freeman Ave. Islip, NY 11751 Brendan Stanton/Dir. Marketing 631-273-4800 bstanton@americansigncrafters.com www.americansigncrafters.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 148 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Architectural Metal Work, Leading Clients: N/A

Anchor Sign, Inc.

2200 Discher Avenue Charleston, SC 29405 Cade Thompson/VP of Operations 843-576-3250 • FAX:: 843-576-7250 cthompson@anchorsign.com • www.anchorsign.com Year Established: 1991, No. of Employees: 191 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 68, Retail Billings: $31,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $7,500,000 Other Billings: $1,500,000, Total Billings: $41,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Value Engineering of sign packages to decrease overall signage spend, lower cost of ownership and increase warranties, Leading Clients: N/A

Apex Sign Group 7208 South WW White Rd. San Antonio, TX 78222 Dan Murphy/Managing Partner 610-715-3369 dan.murphy@apexsigngroup.com • www.apexsigngroup.com Year Established: 1946, No. of Employees: 90 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 100+, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $25,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Variance Hearings, Leading Clients: TJX, Five Below, CVS, Walgreens, Service King, Mattress Firm

Barlo Signs 158 Greeley St. Hudson, NH 03848 603-882-2638 FAX:: 603-882-7680 www.barlosigns.com Year Established: 1969, No. of Employees: 65 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Men’s Wearhouse, Ninety Nine Restaurant, Macy’s/Bloomingdale’s

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 47


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS Blair Companies Dualite Sales & Service, Inc. 5107 Kissell Avenue Altoona, PA 16601 Scott Rizzo/Vice President 484-356-2200 srizzo@blaircompanies.com • www.blaircompanies.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 337 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 52, Retail Billings: $12,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $6,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $15,000,000 Other Billings: $42,000,000, Total Billings: $75,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Architectural Leading Clients: GM, FedEx, UPS, Hertz, Sheetz, Wawa, BP, Gulf, Circle K, Party City, RAC, Arby’s

1 Dualite Ln. Williamsburg, OH 45176 Bob Stephany/National Sales Mgr. 513-536-3171 • FAX:: 513-536-4202 bstephany@dualite.com • www.dualite.com Year Established: 1947, No. of Employees: 200 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 175, Retail Billings: $9,500,000 Hospitality Billings: $2,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $500,000 Other Billings: $17,500,000, Total Billings: $30,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Rebranding, Digital, Value Engineering, Design Control Documentation, Leading Clients: MedExpress, Trueblue Inc., Finance of America, Famous Footwear, NFP Insurance, General Mills, MedPost, Medicine Shoppe

Clayton Signs, Inc. Egan Sign

5160 North Lake Drive Lake City, GA 30260 Jimmy Newmon/Sales & Marketing Mgr. 404-361-3800 FAX:: 404-361-7038 sales@claytonsigns.com • www.claytonsigns.com Year Established: 1965, No. of Employees: N/A Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Lighting & Maintenance, Digital Signage, Leading Clients: Chick-Fil-A, Verizon Wireless, Waffle House, Kroger, Hardee’s, Kauffman Tire & More

1100 Berkshire Blvd, #200 Wyomissing, PA 19610 Marilyn Brennan/Business Development Manager 844-460-6631 • FAX: 60-478-1332 sales@egansign.com • www.egansign.com Year Established: 1988, No. of Employees: 26 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 56, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Rebranding, Digital, Value Engineering, Design Control Documentation, Leading Clients: N/A

Coastal Signage & Wayfinding Elro Signs

4139 Avenida De La Plata Oceanside, CA 92056 Chad Spaman/President 760-744-2927 FAX:: 760-744-3118 chad@coastalsignage.com www.coastalsigninc.com Year Established: 2013, No. of Employees: 15 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 83, Retail Billings: $2,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000 Other Billings: $580,000, Total Billings: $4,580,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Leading Clients: RAF Pacifica Group, STOS Partners, Jamboree Housing

400 W. Walnut St. Gardena, CA 90248 Frank Rhodes/Vice President 770-579-8555 • FAX:: 770-579-9050 frankrhodes@elrosigns.com • www.elrosigns.com Year Established: 1947, No. of Employees: 75 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 15, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: UPS, Delta, Verizon, CubeSmart, First Watch, CNN, Invesco, Wescom Credit Union, UCLA

D|Fab Fairmont Sign Company

1100 E. Mandoline Ave. Madison Heights, MI 48071 Tony Camilletti/EVP 800-968-9440 • FAX: 248-597-0989 tcamilletti@dfabdesign.com • www.dfabdesign.com Year Established: 1970, No. of Employees: 80 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 30, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Architectural Alternatives, Leading Clients: Kroger, Lowes Foods, Orchard Supply Hardware, Whole Foods, Roundy’s

90

3750 East Outer Dr. Detroit, MI 48234 Deron Breeze/National Acct. Manager 313-368-4000 x-132 • FAX: 313-368-1649 dbreeze@fairmontsign.com • www.fairmontsign.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 80 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 48


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS Federal Heath Icon

2300 N. Hwy. 121 Euless, TX 76039 Lisa Peterson/Marketing Mgr. 877-620-SIGN • FAX:: 817-685-9103 marketing@federalheath.com • www.federalheath.com Year Established: 1901, No. of Employees: N/A Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Printed Graphics, Interior & Exterior Signs, Digital Signs, Leading Clients: Target, Exxon Mobile, Shell, Chili’s, BP, Texas Roadhouse, Paris in Las Vegas, Hyatt, Enmarket, Taco Bell

1418 Elmhurst Road Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 Kevin Hughes/SVP Sales & Marketing 847-631-3210 • FAX: 847-364-1517 khughes@iconid.com • www.iconid.com Year Established: 1931, No. of Employees: 400 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 117, Retail Billings: $29,500,000 Hospitality Billings: $1,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $5,000,000 Other Billings: $9,265,000, Total Billings: $45,265,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Our Construction Services Division provides refresh, remodel and ADA compliance services, Leading Clients: N/A

IdentiCom Sign Solutions Flash Right Displays 24657 Halsted Rd.

6210 Browns Bridge Road Cumming, GA 30041 Pete Monti/ President 678-455-9121 pete@flashrightdisplays.com • www.flashrightdisplays.com Year Established: 2009, No. of Employees: 4 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 200, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $300,000 Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $300,000 Types of Signage: Manufacturing, Leading Clients: Various QSR

Georgia PrintCo., LLC 90 South Oak St. Lakeland, GA 31635 Drew Barry/Director of Marketing 866-572-0146 • FAX:: 866-245-0867 drew@georgiaprintco.com • www.georgiaprintco.com Year Established: 2002, No. of Employees: 40 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $N/A Hospitality Billings: $N/A, Restaurant Billings: $N/A Other Billings: $5,000,000, Total Billings: $5,000,000 Types of Signage: Printer for all POP, POI and Advertising materials Leading Clients: Innerworkings, Webb Mason, Proforma

Howard Industries 6400 Howard Dr. Erie, PA 16405 Jeffrey Stewart/Sales 877-458-0591 sales@howardindustries.com • www.howardindustries.com Year Established: 1928, No. of Employees: 50 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $N/A Types of Signage: Design, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Leading Clients: Penn State University, Geisinger Health Center, Cleveland Clinic, First National Bank

92

Farmington Hills, MI 48335 John DiNunzio/President 248-344-9590 • FAX: 248-946-4198 jdinunzio@identicomsigns.com • www.identicomsigns.com Year Established: 2009, No. of Employees: 20 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 25, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Leading Clients: Domino’s, Harley Davidson, Pilot Centers, Loves Centers, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Vantage Hospitality Theory, Big Boy, Pizza Hut, Wendy’s, Pet Valu

Identity Management

1702 Minters Chapel Rd. Grapevine, TX 76051 Kirk Stateson/National Acct. Sales 817-912-0039 x- 103 • FAX: 817-310-0798 kstateson@identitybusiness.com www.identitybusiness.com Year Established: 2000, No. of Employees: 35 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Mattress Firm, Navy Federal Credit Union, Cinergy Cinemas, Prosperity Bank, First Cash Pawn

Illumatech Signs

3000 Main St. B Baker, LA 70714 Kelly O’Brien/Dir. Sales 313-580-1639 • FAX: 678-868-2047 sales@illumatechsigns.com • www.illumatechsigns.com Year Established: 2002, No. of Employees: 36 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 54, Retail Billings: $3,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $1,000,000 Other Billings: $4,000,000, Total Billings: $11,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: NAPA, Kroger Five Guys, Ruby Tuesdays, Auto Zone

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


United States based Philadelphia Sign officially joined forces with global partners to create The International Sign Alliance (TISA) – a partnership designed to provide global companies a onesource design, engineering, sign manufacturing, installation and project management partner for the tactical implementation of global corporate re-branding programs. For more information please visit our website at www.tisaglobal.com.

» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 49

PHILADELPHIA SIGN • 707 WEST SPRING GARDEN ST • PALMYRA, NJ 08065 • P: 856-829-1460 • WWW.PHILADELPHIASIGN.COM


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS Integrated Image LSI Graphic Solutions 201 S. Maple Ave., Ste. 300 Ambler, PA 19002 Natalie Rodriguez/Marketing Manager 813-319-8755 jrosenfeld@integratedimage.com • www.integratedimage.com Year Established: 2013, No. of Employees: 6 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 15, Retail Billings: $550,000 Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $150,000 Other Billings: $4,300,000, Total Billings: $5,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Pilot Flying J, Rite Aid, Herc Equipment Rentals

9260 Pleasantwood Ave. NW North Canton, OH 44720 Kevin Braun/Marketing Coordinator 330-494-9444 • FAX: 330-494-9991 kevin.braun@lsi-industries.com • www.lsi-industries.com Year Established: 1976, No. of Employees: N/A Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 30+, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $77,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Leading Clients: CVS, Burger King, Stop & Shop, Chevron, Dairy Queen, Circle K, Sport Clips, Whole Foods Market, Popeyes, AAA, Phillips 66, Sun Trust, Panda Express

MC Sign Company

Jones Sign Co., Inc. 8959 Tyler Blvd. 1711 Scheuring Rd. DePere, WI 54115 John Mortensen/President 920-425-9805 jmortensen@jonessign.com • www.jonessign.com Year Established: 1910, No. of Employees: 412 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 140, Retail Billings: $21,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $5,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $3,000,000 Other Billings: $50,000,000, Total Billings: $79,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt, Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Full Service Leading Clients: Auto Zone, Dollar Tree, Sophera

Kroy Sign Systems 7575 E. Redfield Road, Suite 113 Scottsdale, AZ 85260 Edward R. Hunter/President 800-950-5769 • FAX: 480-483-0235 info@kroysignsystems.com • www.kroysignsystems.com Year Established: 1983, No. of Employees: 25 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Program Mgmt., Manufacturing Leading Clients: Whiting Turner Contracting: Firelands Regional Medical Center; Sunbelt General Contractors: N/A

Laminators Incorporated 3255 Penn Street Hatfield, PA 19440 Shawn Crouthamel/Nat’l Sales Mgr. 800-523-2347 • FAX: 215-721-4669 info@laminatorsinc.com • www.laminatorsinc.com Year Established: 1963, No. of Employees: 75-100 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Manufacturing, Other Leading Clients: Sign Distributors

94

Mentor, OH 44060 Bob Patton/VP of Sales 800-627-4460 • FAX: 440-209-6277 bob.patton@mcsign.com • www.mcsign.com Year Established: 1953, No. of Employees: 214 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: N/A, Leading Clients: N/A

Nesper Sign Advertising, Inc.

4620 J Street SW Cedar Rapids, IA 52404 Phil Garland/President 800-332-8403 • FAX: 319-366-6493 pgarland@nespersign.com • www.nespersign.com Year Established: 1925, No. of Employees: 25 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 71, Retail Billings: $3,500,000 Hospitality Billings: $250,000, Restaurant Billings: $500,000 Other Billings: $750,000, Total Billings: $5,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Leading Clients: Hy-Vee Foods, VonMaur Dept. Stores, University of Iowa Credit Union

North American Signs

3601 West Lathrop South Bend, IN 46628 Gail Amor/Sales & Marketing Administrator 574-234-5252 • FAX: 574-237-6167 gma1@northamericansigns.com • www.northamericansigns.com Year Established: 1934, No. of Employees: 105 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Leading Clients: N/A

Peerless-AV

2300 White Oak Cir. Aurora, IL 60502 Ashley Zick/Inside Sales Support Mgr. 630-375-5100 sales@peerless-av.com • www.peerless-av.com Year Established: 1941, No. of Employees: 500 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Manufacturing, Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 50


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS Persona, Inc. SignResource 70 21st Street SW Watertown, SD 57201 Mike Peterson/VP-Business Development 605-882-2244/800-843-9888 • FAX: 605-882-3521/800-843-9890 mpeterson@personasigns.com • www.PersonaSigns.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 391 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 194 Corporate Brands + subsidiaries Retail Billings: $18,200,000, Hospitality Billings: $30,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $25,000,000, Other Billings: $3,000,000 Total Billings: $76,200,000, Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Persona offers value-engineering services to make the most of customers’ signage dollars Leading Clients: Best Western, McDonald’s, Holiday Stationstores, Marriott International, Choice Hotels, Cenex, Dairy Queen

Philadelphia Sign

707 W. Spring Garden Street Palymra, NJ 08065 Nate Doney/National Sales Executive 503-830-3841 • FAX: 856-829-8549 ndoney@philadelphiasign.com • www.philadelphiasign.com Year Established: 1911, No. of Employees: 415 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 67, Retail Billings: $58,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $3,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $4,000,000 Other Billings: $18,000,000, Total Billings: $83,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt.., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Refresh, ADA Compliance Signage, Leading Clients: N/A

6135 District Blvd. Maywood, CA 90270 Scott VanNess/CEO 323-771-2098 • FAX: 866-657-0927 Year Established: 1969, No. of Employees: 410 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 35, Retail Billings: $21,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $3,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $6,000,000 Other Billings: $60,000,000, Total Billings: $90,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Exterior Fascia Remodeling, Leading Clients: Shell Oil, Phillips 66, BP, Dollar General, ARCO, Sinclair, 7-Eleven, Citgo, Burger King, Dunkin Donuts, AutoZone, Best Western, Enterprise, Hertz, Exxon/Mobil, Tesoro, Circle K, Rite Aid

Signs of Success

247 Merrick Road, Ste. 101 Lynbrook, NY 11563 Steve Cohen/President 516-823-9000 • FAX: 516-823-1023 steve@signs-of-success.com • www.signs-of-success.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 20 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 34, Retail Billings: $2,500,000 Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $5,000,000, Total Billings: $7,500,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, TD Ameritrade, AXA Advisors, Dun & Bradstreet, AB(Alliance Bernstein), Salvatore Ferragamo, Kenneth Cole, Columbia Sportswear, Jimmy Choo

SMI Sign Systems, Inc. Priority Sign, Inc. 3903 Cornell Place

837 Riverfront Dr. Sheboygan, WI 53081 Andy Dykstra/President 920-280-0876 inquiries@prioritysign.com • www.prioritysign.com Year Established: 1997, No. of Employees: 96 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 83, Retail Billings: $19,500,000 Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $12,500,000 Other Billings: $18,500,000, Total Billings: $50,500,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: AT&T, Red Robin, Sprint, United Health

Frederick, MD 21703 Tom Stacy/VP 301-468-1132 • FAX: 301-230-9048 tom@smisigns.com • www.smisigns.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 48 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 128, Retail Billings: $2,100,000 Hospitality Billings: $1,800,000, Restaurant Billings: $1,200,000 Other Billings: $1,100,000, Total Billings: $6,200,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Buch Construction, Clark Construction, Skanska USA

Signage Solutions South Water Signs 2231 S. Dupont Dr. Anaheim, CA 92806 Jose Villanueva/Dir. of Business Development 714-292-2902 • FAX: 714-491-0439 josev@signage-solutions.com • www.signage-solutions.com Year Established: 1991, No. of Employees: 42 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 65, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $5,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Leading Clients: N/A

96

934 N. Church Rd. Elmhurst, IL 60126 Noah Pettit/VP of Sales 630-607-6297 • FAX: 630-333-4915 npettit@southwatersigns.com • www.southwatersigns.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 125 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 500+, Retail Billings: $16,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $3,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $5,000,000 Other Billings: $12,000,000, Total Billings: $36,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Alaska Airlines, H&R Block, United Airlines

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 51


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS Thomas Sign and Walton Signage Awning Company, Inc. 10101 Reunion Place, Ste. 500 4590 118th Avenue North Clearwater, FL 33762 Patti Canady/Marketing Director 800-526-3325 • FAX: 727-573-0328 info@thomassign.com • www.thomassign.com Year Established: 1969, No. of Employees: 180 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Leading Clients: N/A

San Antonio, TX 78216 David Gilgor/Channel Development Officer 210-886-0644 • FAX: 210-933-1497 dales@waltonsignage.com • www.waltonsignage.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 142 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 50, Retail Billings: $15,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $4,000,000 Other Billings: $20,000,000, Total Billings: $40,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Other Leading Clients: Extensive client list including Panera Bread

TransitScreen Warner Bros. Design Studio

1133 15th Street NW, 12th Floor Washington, DC 20005 Rachel Karitis/Communications & Support Mgr. 202-688-7433 rachel@transitscreen.com • www.transitscreen.com Year Established: 2013, No. of Employees: 20 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 250, Retail Billings: $5,350 Hospitality Billings: $8,162, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $767,410, Total Billings: $780,922 Types of Signage: Other, Leading Clients: AvalonBay Companies, JGB, City of Toronto, City of Austin, Harvard University, City of Seattle, Greystar, Skanska

4000 Warner Blvd., Bldg. 44 Burbank, CA 91522 Craig McNabb/Director 818-954-1815 • FAX: 818-954-2806 Year Established: 1920, No. of Employees: N/A Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $ N/A, Types of Signage: Design, Manufacturing, Installation, Leading Clients: N/A

Your Signage Source 10086 Woolwine Hwy.

United Sign Systems Woolwine, VA 24185 5201 Pentecost Dr. Modesto, CA 95356 Mike Noordewier/Co-Owner 209-543-1320 • FAX: 209-543-1326 miken@unitedsign.net • www.unitedsign.net Year Established: 1965, No. of Employees: 80 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 20, Retail Billings: $10,000 Hospitality Billings: $4,000, Restaurant Billings: $3,000 Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $17,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Complete Rebonding Services, Leading Clients: Dollar Tree, Grocery Outlet, Wingstop, In Shape

Chuck Freels/Vice President 276-930-1500 • FAX: 276-229-3059 chuckfreels@YourSignageSource.com www.YourSignageSource.com Year Established: 2004, No. of Employees: 6 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Manufacturing, We provide wholesale interior & exterior LED Displays and lighting for the industry. Small, Large, billboard, Curved and Specialty, Leading Clients: N/A

(Formerly US Signs) 5225 Katy Freeway, Ste. 350 Houston, TX 77007 Julie Lapacka/EVP 281-822-1704 julie.lapacka@vixxo.com • www.vixxo.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 50 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 40+, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Leading Clients: N/A

Elkhorn, WI 53121 Nadine Seitz/Marketing Manager 877-798-6537 • FAX: 262-723-3340 nseitz@yunker.com • www.yunker.com Year Established: 1948, No. of Employees: 105 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 3, Retail Billings: $17,500,000 Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $275,000 Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $17,775,000 Types of Signage: Design, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Leading Clients: Ross Dress For Less, Petco, JoAnn, TSC, Oportun, Cyde Cear, Ralph Lauren

Yunker Industries Vixxo Sign & Lighting 310 O’Connor Dr.

98

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 52

www.SIGNAGE-SOLUTIONS.com 800-655-9972

2231 S. DUPONT DR. ANAHEIM, CA 92806 T. 714-491-0299 / F. 714-491-0439


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING

Annual survey highlights leading security firm manufacturers

I

f you want the best in security options, our annual listing spotlights the marketplace’s leading companies in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. The report provides you with the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting firms. If you want to be a part of next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. 3xLOGIC Armortex 10385 Westmoor Dr., Ste. 210 Westminster, CO 80021 Wendi Burke/Sr. Director of Marketing Phone: 877-395-6442 wendi.burke@3xlogic.com • www.3xlogic.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

5926 Corridor Pkwy. Schertz, TX 78154 Yvonne Meza/Inside Sales Phone: 210-661-8306 • Fax: 210-661-8308 ymeza@armortex.com • www.armortex.com Security Product Type: Bullet Resistant Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

ASSA ABLOY 1430 Daffodil Way

Agent Video Intelligence (Agent Vi) New Haven, CT 06511

13 Hamelacha St., Afek Industrial Park Rosh Ha’Ayin 4809129 Israel Roni Kresner/Marketing Manager Phone: +972-72-220-1500 • Fax: +972-72-220-1501 sales@agentvi.com • www.agentvi.com Security Product Type: Video Analytics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Critical Infrastructure (gov’t buildings, jails, electricity stations)

Allegion

11819 N. Pennsylvania St. Carmel, IN 46032 Ashley Ahern-Blanton/Mgr. Content Marketing Commercial Americas Phone: 317-810-3366 ashley.ahern-blanton@allegion.com • www.allegion.com/us Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Arecont Vision

425 E. Colorado St., 7th Floor Glendale, CA 91205 Phone: 818-937-0700 • Fax: 818-937-0464 avsales@arecontvision.com • www.arecontvision.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government

100

Val Valenzuela/Mgr. National Accounts Phone: 951-212-0771 valerie.valenzuela@assaabloy.com • www.assaabloy.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial

Boon Edam

402 McKinney Parkway Lillington, NC 27546 Greg Schreiber/Sr. VP Sales Phone: 800-334-5552 • Fax: 910-814-3899 sales@boonedam.us • www.boonedam.us Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Turnstiles Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Bosch Security Systems, Inc.

130 Perinton Parkway Fairpoint, NY 14450 Phone: 800-289-0096 onlinehelp@us.bosch.com • www.boschsecurity.us Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Communication Equipment, Digital Video Recorders, Integrated Security Systems/BMS Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 53


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Brivo Covestro, LLC

7700 Old Georgetown Rd., Ste. 300 Bethesda, MD 20814 Jennifer Reidy/Marketing Manager Phone: 631-988-2902 jennifer.reidy@brivo.com www.brivo.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Shopping Malls

Calpipe Security Bollards 19440 S. Dominguez Hills Dr. Rancho Dominguez, CA 90226 Carlos Gonzalez/Dept. Supervisor Phone: 562-803-0246 • Fax: 310-885-1899 info@calpipebollards.com www.calpipesecuritybollards.com Security Product Type: Bollards/Protective Barriers Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Camden Door Controls 5502 Timberlea Blvd. Mississauga, ON L4W 2T7 Canada David Price/Marketing Manager Phone: 877-CAMDEN-9 • Fax: 888-436-8739 info@camdencontrols.com www.camdencontrols.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Bollards/Protective Barriers, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Corbin Russwin 225 Episcopal Rd. Berlin, CT 06037-4004 Phone: 800-438-1951 • Fax: 800-338-0965 ahssmarketing@assaabloy.com www.corbinrusswin.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Cornell Storefront Systems, Inc.

140 Maffet Street, Ste. 200 Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705 Dan Broda/COO Phone: 800-882-6773 • Fax: 800-882-6772 dbroda@cornellstorefronts.com www.cornellstorefronts.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls, Windows Markets Served: Retail, Shopping Malls

102

119 Salisbury Rd. Sheffield, MA 01257 Cindy Race/Marketing Communications Mgr. Phone: 413-528-7812 sfdinfo@covestro.com www.sheets.covestro.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Glass Protection, Security Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Covertech 279 Humberline Dr. Etobicoke, ON M9W 5T6 Canada John Starr/VP Phone: 416-798-1340 Fax: 416-798-1342 johnstarr@covertechfab.com www.rfoil.com Security Product Type: RF Shielding Markets Served: Corporate, Commercial, Government, Sci???

Dahua Technology USA 23 Hubble Irvine, CA 92618 Anna Boudinot/Content Manager Phone: 949-679-7777 • Fax: 949-679-5760 sales.usa@global.dahuatech.com www.dahuasecurity.com/en/us Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Deltrex USA 391 Concord Ave. Bronx, NY 10454 Elias Wexler/President Phone: 718-401-4006 • Fax: 718-401-4066 contact@deltrexusa.com www.deltrexusa.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Communication Equipment, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


National Contact: Ian Bannister, Director of Business Development 404-660-1003 (M) • 866-933-3456 • Ian@windowfilmdepot.com

GOT A STICKY SITUATION? Window Film Depot Is Your Nationwide Solution for Anything “Sticky” Applied to Windows or Walls SOLAR - SECURITY - GRAPHICS •Turn-key 3m window and wall film sales & installation services •In-house custom design & printing services •Custom vinyl murals and wall graphics solutions •Specialty films: anti-graffiti, one-way mirror, black-out films •Defenselite – retro-fit anti-intrusion glazing system •Bulletshield – retro-fit anti-ballistic protection

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» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 54


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Digital Watchdog Fike Corporation 16220 Bloomfield Ave. Cerritos, CA 90703 Mark Espenschied/Director of Marketing Phone: 866-446-3595 marke@digital-watchdog.com www.digital-watchdog.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

704 SW 10th Street Blue Springs, MO 64015 Dave Switzer/Mgr. Communications Phone: 816-229-3405 dave.switzer@fike.com www.fike.com Security Product Type: Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Fire Safety Equipment Markets Served: Hospitality, HealthCare, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Warehouse, Storage

FJM Security Products dormakaba 18424 Hwy. 99 2941 Indiana Ave. Winston-Salem, NC 27105 James Duff/Product Marketing Mgr. Phone: 800-849-8324 www.dormakaba.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Locks/Key Controls, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Eye Trax, Inc. 4200 Performance Rd. Charlotte, NC 28214 Jerry McSorley/Owner Phone: 800-594-4157 jerry@eyetrax.net www.eyetrax.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Construction, Oil & Gas, Power Transmission

Federated Service Solutions 30955 Northwestern Hwy. Farmington Hills, MI 48334 Jennifer Ferris/President Phone: 248-539-9000 • Fax: 248-702-2201 jferris@federatedservice.com www.federatedservice.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, CCTV Cameras/ Systems, Communication Equipment, Digital Video Recorders Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Financial

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Lynnwood, WA 98037 Nannette Howard-Westlake/Product-Sales Manager Phone: 800-654-1786 nhoward@fjmsecurity.com www.fjmsecurity.com Security Product Type: Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

FLIR Systems

70 Castilian Dr. Goleta, CA 93117 Matthew Bretoi/Vice President, Sales Phone: 941-351-5740 matthew.bretoi@flir.com www.flir.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cacmeras/Systems, Thermal Cameras Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Fluidmesh Networks 81 Prospect St. Brooklyn, NY 11201 Cosimo Malesci/Co-Founder, VP Sales & Marketing Phone: 617-209-6080 sales@fluidmesh.com www.fluidmesh.com Security Product Type: Wireless Mesh Networks Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government, Mining, Mass Transit

FST Biometrics 33 Lazarov St. Rishon Lezion, 75654 Israel Nicole Grubner/Sr. Acct. Executive Phone: 929-222-2201 nicole.grubner@finnpartners.com www.fstbm.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics Markets Served: Retail, Corporate, Commercial, Finance Institutions, Gyms

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


With multiple projects in multiple locations, which one do you focus on?

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Visit OxBlue.com to see live demos and time-lapse videos. For a quote, call us at (877) 460-9786.

CIRCLE NO. 55


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Gatekeeper Systems, Inc. ImmerVision 8 Studebaker Irvine, CA 92618 Karryn Lurock/International Marketing & Communications Dir. Phone: 949-271-3939 • Fax: 805-594-1011 klurock@gatekeepersystems.com www.gatekeepersystems.com Security Product Type: Loss Prevention, Shopping Cart & Pushout Theft Prevention Markets Served: Retail, Retail Storefronts, Supermarkets

Hager Companies

739 Victor Street St. Louis, MO 63104 Ginny Powell/Digital Marketing Specialist Phone: 314-633-2837 gipowell@hagerco.com www.hagerco.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Detection

Horton Automatics 4242 Baldwin Blvd. Corpus Christi, TX 78405 Giovanna Hewitt/Regional Business Mgr. Phone: 919-308-4986 • Fax: 815-366-7534 giovanna_hewitt@overheaddoor.com www.hortondoors.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Security

IC Realtime 3050 N. Andrews Ave. Extension Pompano Beach, FL 33064 Frank Fishman/General Manager Phone: 954-736-4207 • Fax: 954-827-5900 frank@icrealtime.com www.icrealtime.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems, Digital Video Recorders Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

IdentyTech Solutions America, LLC 8725 NW 18th Terrace Doral, FL 33172 Ephram Yeashoua/CEO Phone: 888-703-7150 • Fax: 305-603-7273 ephram@identytech.com www.identytechsolutions.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, CCTV Cameras/ Systems, Integrated Security Systems/BMS Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government

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2020 Robert Bourassa Blvd. Montreal, QC H3A 2A5 Canada Louis Brun/Marketing & Communications Phone: 514-985-4007 • Fax: 514-282-8612 louis.brun@immervision.com www.immervisionenables.com Security Product Type: 360° Panomorph Lens Design Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Virtual Reality, Broadcast, Action Cameras, Wearables, Drones

Instakey Security Systems 7456 W. 5th Ave. Lakewood, CO 80226 Cita Doyle/Director of Sales & Marketing Phone: 303-761-9999 • Fax: 303-761-6359 cdoyle@instakey.com www.instakey.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Fuel Dispensers

Key Tracer (a division of Real Time Networks) 16-1833 Coast Meridian Port Coquitlam BC V3C 6G5 Shannon Arnold/Director of Marketing Phone: 800-331-2882 info@keytracer.com www.keytracer.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, CCTV Cameras/ Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Locks/Key Controls, Safes/Vaults/ Lockers, Guard Tour Systems, Secure Visitor Management Markets Served: Hospitality, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Government & Utility Services, Casinos, Law Enforcement, Correctional

Morse Watchmans 2 Morse Rd. Oxford, CT 06478 Joseph Granitto/Dir. of Technology Solutions Phone: 800-423-8256 / 203-264-4949 Fax: 203-264-8367 morse@morsewatchman.com www.morsewatchmans.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Locks/Key Controls, Key Management Control Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Fleet Management, Data Centers, City & Municipality, Corrections, Government, Military

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


Makrolon® and Hygard®

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Covestro LLC 119 Salisbury Road, Sheffield, MA 01257 www.sheets.covestro.com


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Novi Security Rolland Safe & Lock 1070 East 800 North Orem, UT 84097 Jeff Keller/Dir. of Sales & Marketing Phone: 801-367-8456 jeff@novisecurity.com www.novisecurity.com Security Product Type: Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Oncam

900 Middlesex Turnpike, Building 5, Suite 2E Billerica, MA 01821 David Wedel/VP Sales - Americas Phone: 978-735-4860 sales@oncamgrandeye.com www.oncamgrandeye.com Security Product Type: IP Panoramic Surveillance Camera and Technology Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

OxBlue Corporation 1777 Ellsworth Industrial Blvd. NW Atlanta, GA 30318 Kelsey Collins/Marketing Manager Phone: 888-849-2583 • Fax: 404-917-0201 kcollins@oxblue.com www.oxblue.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems, Ultra High-Res Images Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

PROTECH (Protection Technologies)

529 Vista Blvd., A-3 Sparks, NV 89434 Cathy McHugh/Manager Phone: 613-341-1116 • Fax: 775-856-7658 cmchugh@protechusa.com www.protechusa.com Security Product Type: Communication Equipment, Fencing, , Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Perimeter Intrusion Detection Sensors, Fence-Mounted, Infrared, Microwaves, Motion Detection Sensors Markets Served: Corporate, Commercial, Utilities, Corrections, Airports

3410 Towerwood Dr. Dallas, TX 75234 Kerrie Crimmins/Sales Phone: 214-923-1019 kcrimmins@rslc.net www.rollandsafeandlock.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, CCTV Cameras/ Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls, Safes/Vaults/Lockers Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Ross Technology

104 N. Maple Ave. P.O. Box 646 Leola, PA 17540 Steve Luscian/President, Sales & Marketing Phone: 717-339-8895 • Fax: 717-656-3281 www.rosstechnology.com Security Product Type: Bollards/Protective Barriers, Bullet Resistant Systems, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Fencing, Windows, Anti-Ram Vehicle Barriers & Fencing, FE/BR and Blast Windows, Doors, Louvers & Escape Hatches Markets Served: Government/Military, Oil/Gas, Pharmaceutical, Power Generation, Mass Transit, Data Centers, Custom Residential

Rugged Cams

201 N. Elm St. Kemp, TX 75143 Allen Spears/Chief Engineer Phone: 903-498-3240 sales@ruggedcams.com • www.ruggedcams.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Markets Served: Commercial

Salsbury Industries

1010 E. 62nd St. Los Angeles, CA 90001 Ricardo Alva/Director of Sales Phone: 323-846-6700 • Fax: 323-846-6800 ralva@mailboxes.com www.mailboxes.com / www.lockers.com Security Product Type: Locks/Key Controls, Lockers, Mailboxes Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Protos Security SALTO Systems, Inc.

90 Town Center Street, Ste. 202 Daleville, VA 2408 Kris Vece/Dir. of Client Relations Phone: 540-798-7958 krisvece@protossecurity.com www.protossecurity.com Security Product Type: Nationwide Security Guard Services Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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1780 Corporate Dr., Ste. 400 Norcross, GA 30093 Michael J. Mahon/Sr. VP Commercial Sales Phone: 866-GO-SALTO • Fax: 770-452-6098 info@saltosystems.com • www.salto.us Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


One Family. One Brand. One Vision.™ At Hager Companies, we focus on products that not only keep buildings secure but the people in those buildings safe. With 12 product lines, Hager provides a single source solution for your door hardware needs.

CIRCLE NO. 57

Š 2016 Hager Companies www.hagerco.com


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Sargent Manufacturing Sensera Systems, Inc. Company 17301 W. Colfax Ave., Ste. 310

110 Sargent Dr. New Haven, CT 06511 Phone: 800-727-5477 • Fax: 888-863-5054 sales@sargentlock.com www.sargentlock.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Schneider Electric

1650 West Crosby Rd. Carrollton, TX 75006 Lainey Nakhleh/Sr. Marketing Specialist-Buildings Business Phone: 972-323-5413 lainey.nakhleh@schneider-electric.com www.schneider-electric.us/accessxpert Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Integrated Security Systems/BMS Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Golden, CO 80401 David Gaw/President Phone: 800-657-0437 Fax: 888-764-5831 sales@senserasystems.com www.SenseraSystems.com Security Product Type: Solar Powered Security/Surveillance Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Senstar, Inc.

13800 Coppermine Rd., 2nd Floor Herndon, VA 20171 James Quick/President Phone: 800-676-3300 info@senstar.com www.senstar.com Security Product Type: Perimeter Intrusion Detection Systems Markets Served: Commercial, Correctional, Transportation, Utility, Industrial, Military, Government, VIP

STANLEY Access Technologies Security Door Controls 65 Scott Swamp Rd.

801 Avenida Acaso Camarillo, CA 93012 Olga Lakomi/Marketing & Event Facilitator Security Door Controls Phone: 805-494-0622 service@sdcsecurity.com www.sdcsecurity.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Farmington, CT 06032 Adria Boyle/Brand Marketing Manager Phone: 860-679-6473 adria.boyle@sbdinc.com www.stanleyaccess.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Talkaphone Se-Kure Controls, Inc. 7530 N. Natchez Ave.

3714 Runge Street Franklin Park, IL 60131 John Mangiameli/Vice President Phone: 800-322-2435 • Fax: 847-288-9999 info@se-kure.com www.se-kure.com Security Product Type: Mirrors, Anti-Theft Systems Markets Served: Retail

Niles, IL 60614 Molly Walsh/Marketing Manager Phone: 773-539-1100 mwalsh@talkaphone.com www.talkaphone.com Security Product Type: Communication Equipment, Mass Notification Markets Served: Hospitality, HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Senseon by Tyco Security Products Accuride International 3301 Langstaff Rd.

13211 Shoemaker Ave. Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670 Greg Rewers/Dir. of Solutions Marketing Phone: 800-668-8242 grewers@senesonsecure.com www.senseonsecure.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Financial, Museum, Institutional

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Concord, ON L4K 4L2 Canada Denise Bruley/Director Promotional Marketing Phone: 905-760-3000 x-2414 dbruley@tycoint.com www.tycosecurityproducts.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Alarm Control Panels/ Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Integrated Security Systems/BMS Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 58


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING UniKey Technologies, Inc. Wanco, Inc. 111 West Jefferson St., Ste. 100 Orlando, FL 32801 Lee Odess/Vice President Phone: 202-999-8180 lee@unikey.com www.unikey.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls, Safes/Vaults/Lockers, Windows Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multifamily

Vanderbilt 2 Cranberry Rd. Parsippany, NJ 07054 Lynn Wood/Product Portfolio Manager Phone: 973-316-3900 sales@vanderbiltindustries.com www.vanderbiltindustries.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Vidsys 8219 Leesburg Pike, Ste. 250 Vienna, VA 22182 Jasmeet Kapoor/Sr. Marketing Manager Phone: 703-883-3730 kapoorj@vidsys.com www.vidsys.com Security Product Type: N/A Markets Served: N/A

Viking Electronics, Inc. 1531 Industrial St. Hudson, WI 54016 Mike Busby/Marketing Coordinator Phone: 715-386-8861 • Fax: 715-386-4344 info@vikingelectronics.com www.vikingelectronics.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Communication Equipment, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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5870 Tennyson St. Arvada, CO 80003 Tim Paulino/Business Development Manager Phone: 800-972-0755 tim.paulino@wanco.com www.wanco.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems, Trailers Markets Served: HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Window Film Depot, Inc. 4939 Lower Roswell Rd., Ste. 100 Marietta, GA 30068 Ian Bannister/Dir. of Business Development Phone: 866-933-3456 • Fax: 678-547-3138 ian@windowfilmdepot.com www.windowfilmdepot.com Security Product Type: Bullet Resistant Systems, Glass Protection, Windows Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government

Xtralis

175 Bodwell St. Avon, MA 02322 Drew Mason/Marketing Rep. Phone: 862-432-5432 marketing-americas@xtralis.com www.xtralis.com Security Product Type: Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Communication Equipment, Digital Video Recorders, Fire Safety Equipment Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Yale Locks & Hardware

225 Episcopal Rd. Berlin, CT 06037 Phone: 800-438-1951 Fax: 800-338-0965 yalemarketing@assabloy.com www.yalecommercial.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

ZKAccess

6 Kingsbridge Rd. Fairfield, NJ 07004 Larry Reed/CEO Phone: 862-505-2101 lreed@zkaccess.com www.zkaccess.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 59


Gold standard How commercial daylighting systems are helping improve today’s sporting facilities By Del Williams

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A

rtificial lighting cannot compare with the aesthetics and sustainable design of bright natural daylight in indoor gyms, sports arenas and recreational spaces. Daylighting not only enhances the function and beauty of these venues for students, athletes and spectators, but also makes viewing clearer and colors truer. Functionally, studies have shown that such daylight exposure also can enhance health, energy and mood. Yet, too often, participants and spectators at these venues find themselves under harsh, artificial electric or fluorescent lighting with minimal exposure to natural light. Today, commercial daylighting systems are making the aesthetic as well as design and functional benefits of natural daylight possible at indoor sports, fitness and recreational venues. They also are enabling a variety of creative architectural expressions such as spotlighting, full daylight, near darkness, and controlled dimming suitable for video presentations and concerts. These systems direct natural daylight far into such indoor settings via rooftop domes and highly reflective tubing, in place of costly electrical lighting.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


P.O. Box 3908, Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • 678.765.6551 corpcirc@ccr-mag.com

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Date _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

That’s why many architects, designers, administrators, and facility managers are Title _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ increasingly turning to such innovative daylighting Company _ _ systems _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _to _ _ showcase _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _indoor _ _ _ _ _ _events. ________________________________ Compared to the often yellow or bluish Address _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ hues of artificial lighting, bringing natural daylight City _ _ _ _ _ into _ _ _ _such _ _ _ _ _venues _ _ _ _ _ _ _improves _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ the _ _ _ State _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Zip _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ aesthetics of big games, workouts, and Phone ( ) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Fax ( ) ________________________ recreational events. It allows the true colors, action, or _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Web site _ _and _ _ _ _details _ _ _ _ _ _on _ _ _the _ _ _field _ _ _ _ of _ _ _play E-mail in the gym to be seen more clearly, easily, ❏ Please check here if you do not wish to receive third party information on the latest products and services. and vividly with ample, high-quality daylight. Such design isfromalso providing To receivesustainable FREE product information the individual companies featured in this issue, circle the number below that corresponds to the product number. Valid through May 31, 2013. substantial energy savings and enhancing 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 4 5safety. 2 3 and 1 health

Beyond skylights

(A) Retail Chain (N) Hospitality the(Hotel, skylight

(I) Developer

“[Daylighting systems] are a significant part of a sustainable retrofit renovation program where daylight allows us to save energy while also improving the interior environment for better member and employee wellness.”

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43

While traditional skylights long have been used to allow more sunlight to enter indoor spaces, they have a number of drawbacks. From a functional point of view, skylights are prone to leaks, and sunlight directly entering

❏ ❏

❏ some (Q)Management can leave indoor areas Motel, Resort,,too Cruise Company sunny and others in shade as the sun Line, etc. and Hospitality crosses the sky. ❏ (K) Financial/Purchasing Management Co.) Firm The direct sunlight also allows in a lot ❏ (C) Restaurant ❏ (R) Shopping Center of heat The added heat ❏ (O)Architecture Firm as well as UV light.Owner ❏ (G) Design Firm ❏ (S)while Healthcare Facility increases cooling costs, the UV light ❏ (P) Engineering Firm ❏ (L) Manufacturer/Supplier fades and deteriorates surfaces. ❏ (H) Contractor/Builder/ ❏ (Z) Other (please specify) Unlike skylights that allow sunlight to Construction _______________________ enter only from upper levels of the building, commercial daylighting systems, also known 2. Please indicate your primary job function: (choose one only) as Tubular Daylighting Devices (TDDs), can ❏ (1) Corporate Management ❏ (11) Estimator direct natural light ❏ through up to 100 feet of ❏ (2) Senior Management (12) Operations highly reflective tubing can accommo❏ (3) Management ❏ (13)that Security 90-degree angles. ❏ (4) Facilities date 45-degree and ❏ even (14) Purchasing ❏ (5) Maintenance ❏ (15) Environmental The natural light exits modern fixtures to ❏ (6) Construction ❏ (16) Real Estate evenly brighten gyms, sports arenas and ❏ (7) Architect ❏ (99) Other 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 other indoor recreational(please spaces. ❏ (8) Engineer specify): “By efficiently capturing daylight at the ❏ (9) Design _____________________ 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 roof, transporting it through reflective tubing, ❏ (10) Project Management and delivering it inside the gym or sports All information must be provided. The publisher reserves the right to determine qualification for a free subscription. – Paul Steinhauser, General Partner, arena through optically engineered diffusers, White Bear Racquet and Swim Club a first-rate TDD can be several times more

Name (please print) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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CIRCLE NO. 67 60 Circle No.

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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GOLD STANDARD is a boon to those exercising, competing, or otherwise engaged in rigorous sporting events. The results have been showcased in Olympic venues, school gyms and health clubs worldwide.

Daylighting success

effective than a skylight or window in terms of daylight delivered with minimal heat transfer,” says Dana Carlson, a product manager at Solatube. Companies like Solatube have developed better ways to capture, transfer and deliver sunlight without the heat, UV light, or maintenance of skylights through advanced domes, ultra-reflective tubing, customizable diffusers and other means in the past 25 years. Unlike traditional skylights, such engineered TDDs are designed to control the problematic aspects of sunlight. They reduce glare and inconsistent light patterns. They also screen infrared rays that can overheat indoor spaces as well as ultraviolet rays that can fade gym and stadium interiors. Because the TDD designs reject solar heat at the rooftop dome and allows essentially just the visible spectrum of light to enter, this reduces indoor heat and cooling costs, which

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

For example, at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, when architects were challenged with designing facilities to stringent environmental standards, this had to be balanced with creating competitive sports facilities that satisfied the needs of both athletes and spectators. Effectively daylighting the Science & Technology University Gymnasium, which served as an indoor sports facility for a wide range of fitness, aquatics and competitive sports activities, became a crucial design goal in order to reduce the need for artificial lighting. But it was determined that skylights could not meet the design requirements. The gymnasium’s steel-frame roof also presented a design challenge. In addition to the numerous obstructions, the diffusion plane was nearly 56 feet (8m) above the ground. To overcome these challenges, a daylighting system allowed daylight to be


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GOLD STANDARD

Daylighting not only enhances the function and beauty of these venues for students, athletes and spectators, but also makes viewing clearer and colors truer. transmitted over 26 feet (8 m) to avoid construction obstacles. Second, the high performance design provided ample natural light, which was evenly distributed throughout the space. An innovative Daylight Dimmer used a butterfly baffle design to ensure even light distribution in any position, controlled by a wall-mounted switch that allowed easy illumination level adjustments from 2 percent to 100 percent. “Compared with traditional lighting systems, [daylighting systems] have a unique advantage with better progressed view and a wide application field,” says Weimin Zhuang, architect dean at Architecture Design Institute of Qinghua University. “They reduced power usage and exceeded our environmental design goals.” When Westside Christian High School in Tigard, Ore., began construction of a new gym, incorporating daylight into the school’s gym became a main objective. Administrators wanted students to benefit from exposure to natural light during the school day while reducing the building’s electricity use. But this posed a problem because the gym was designated for an interior location with no access to the outside. The original strategy was to install traditional skylights, but concerns about adequate illumination and hot spots prompted the architect to seek other options. That is when InteriorTech, a building specialty contractor, proposed the use of a daylighting system to meet the administration’s daylighting needs. After reviewing daylight modeling data and comparing output performance to that of traditional skylights, the administration realized that a daylighting system would provide a greater abundance and higher quality of light while reducing energy use. Upon receiving approval, InteriorTech installed innovative daylighting system units for daytime lighting. These modular daylighting units are engineered to deliver massive amounts of daylight to large volume spaces with high, open ceilings. LED lights complemented this with timers for nighttime lighting.

Since installing the daylighting system, the school’s gym has become a showcase for natural lighting. The units’ advanced optics capture large amounts of high-quality daylight for abundant output during athletic events, assemblies and concerts. With daylight illuminating the gym, electric lights stay off during the day. This has allowed the school to cut its electricity consumption, lower its utility bills and minimize its carbon footprint. “In addition to providing such incredible natural light and reducing energy use, the units are attractive and fit into the overall ceiling structure in such a way that they enhance the beauty of the space,” says Dr. Deborah Miller, Head of School Westside Christian High School. White Bear Racquet and Swim Club in White Bear Lake, Minn., similarly sought to integrate daylight in many key areas of their facility to support their total wellness approach to fitness, provide a more natural and healthful environment, demonstrate their commitment to sustainability and reduce lighting energy requirements. A daylighting system was installed that provides full daylight coverage to the entry, reception, main circulation, Ingredients Café, and the 10,000-square-foot fitness center. An integrated photocontrol system controls the lighting in the daylit areas, ensuring that the lights are turned off during most of the daylight hours. The daylighting systems have reduced White Bear’s electric lighting load by half from 115.5 kWh/day to 57.75 kWh/day or 21,000 kWh/year while reducing air conditioning load from reduced electric lamp and ballast heat. “[Daylighting systems] are a significant part of a sustainable retrofit renovation program where daylight allows us to save energy while also improving the interior environment for better member and employee wellness,” says Paul Steinhauser, general partner of White Bear Racquet and Swim Club. “Our goal is to eliminate the use of fossil fuels completely, while increasing awareness in the community on the benefits of sustainable design practices.” CCR

Del Williams is a technical writer based in Torrance, Calif.

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LATE WINTER 2016

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Glory Days founders Richard Danker, Bob Garner and Jeff Newman

Where everybody knows the score Inside the Glory Days Grill brand

A special supplement to:

Also Inside: Restoring Norden Hall Photography by Mike Levin


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


D

uring the annual Glory Days Grill/ Sunshine Foundation Charity Golf Tournament, one of the restaurant’s longtime friends and vendors had just finished his round. The vendor, who had dealt with some health issues over the past couple of years, was elated. When co-founder Richard Danker asked him how he thought he did, the vendor said, “At the end of the day, he said to me, “You know what? Today was one of the best days of my life.” Wow. It blew me away to be able to affect someone’s life like that, especially someone we know and respect so much.”

Where everybody knows the score By Michael J. Pallerino

Inside the Glory Days Grill brand

The sentiment not only moved Danker, but served as a testament to the kind of atmosphere that he, and co-founders, Jeff Newman and Robert Garner set out to create when they opened their neighborhood restaurant in Burke, Va. in April 1996. Their goal was simple: to create a family-oriented, neighborhood gathering place that could offer casual dining and a place where people could celebrate life’s everyday victories – winning a game, birthday parties or a great report card. And, thanks to two different fundraising programs – Dining for Dollars and Cards for Causes – Glory Days Grill offers groups options to raise money for different causes. Today, with a menu featuring classic American fares and an interior featuring the “glory moments” of sports, the three veteran restaurateurs succeeded – and then some. With 20 restaurants in the Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia areas, Glory Days Grill is growing. It also supports seven franchised restaurants in Richmond, Va., and greater Tampa, Fla. area. Commercial Kitchens sat down with Danker to get his thoughts on where the Glory Days Grill brand is heading.

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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WHERE EVERYBODY KNOWS THE SCORE Give us a snapshot of the Glory Days Grill brand?

Glory Days Grill is a sports-themed American grill and bar that appeals to people of all ages with all types of interests. We maintain three pillars of focus: a commitment to quality food and ingredients, a love of sports and a dedication to the communities in which we operate. It’s not rare to spot the local high school football team celebrating a win in our dining room or families applauding a great report card. At Glory Days Grill, we are focused on providing customers an allaround excellent experience for our guests, no matter what the occasion.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Glory Days Grill continues to grow organically with 20 existing company locations and two more opening within the next year.

Our guests care about great food at affordable prices, outstanding service and real-time entertainment – and that’s exactly what they get. Our target customer wants a variety of tasty options that appeal to the whole family, but when dad gets a hall pass, he comes back and sits at the bar to cheer on his favorite sports team with his friends.

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What is today's consumer looking for?

Today’s casual dining guests are seeking a comfortable environment that allows them to relax with family and friends while enjoying incredible food. Our spirited atmosphere is equipped with numerous high definition TVs and individual volume controlled speakers at every table, always giving guests the best seats to their favorite games, and we also broadcast news, popular events and cartoons, making it the perfect restaurant for the whole family. We have games for the kids, and our interior décor features an open, modern atmosphere utilizing warm colors and tones.

Walk us through how and why it designed the way it is?

Glory Days Grill is designed to give guests a family-friendly environment where families, teams and neighbors can gather to enjoy great food in a comfortable atmosphere. The interior features large scale photography and hand-painted artwork highlighting the "glory moments" of sports. Each restaurant features

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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WHERE EVERYBODY KNOWS THE SCORE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS games for kids, a full bar for adults, and many feature private rooms for banquets and parties. Glory Days Grill was designed for both the every day and extra special "glory moments" in our lives. No matter who walks through the door or what they may be celebrating – Glory Days is the place to be.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

Our construction strategy is to work with our architect and engineers early as a lease is being negotiated. Each space brings unique challenges and opportunities, but our overall design elements remain the same. We want the access to be user friendly. We look for spaces that lend themselves to our interior design package as well as those that have potential for ease of to go access as well as patio space. We bid the build out and select a contractor that understands our priorities and timelines. We hold our contractors and kitchen design partners to high standards and quality workmanship. We trust them to find solutions to problems without losing sight of the end product: the ultimate guest experience.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 63


WHERE EVERYBODY KNOWS THE SCORE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS What's the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business? Rising costs of materials and labor, as well as dealing with the uncertainty of timelines due to things out of our control, such as the permit and inspection process.

What are you doing in the way of sustainability?

Most of our sustainability efforts are through our equipment. Our lighting is now all LED run by lighting control panels, which conserve energy. We recycle cardboard and glass, and we also recycle used cooking oil.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We look for spaces that lend themselves to our interior design package as well as those that have potential for ease of to go access as well as patio space.

Glory Days Grill continues to grow organically with 20 existing company locations and two more opening within the next year. But our largest opportunity is with our franchisee program. With seven franchised locations in southern Virginia and Florida, we are looking to aggressively expand into new markets with the help of partners who believe in the same values and have the same goal of success that we do. Open markets include Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace?

Yes, we’re very optimistic about what we see in today’s marketplace. There’s a lot of opportunity for growth and expansion along the eastern seaboard that we will be exploring in 2017 and beyond. We remain committed to slow steady growth in both company owned and franchised stores. We believe our concept is widely accepted and will be embraced in “Anytown, USA” where the demographics support it.

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

In addition to growing in Maryland and Virginia, we are seeking qualified franchisees to help grow the Glory Days Grill brand throughout southern Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. Specifically, interested candidates should have business experience, preferably in the restaurant industry; $750,000 in liquid assets and a

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 64

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WHERE EVERYBODY KNOWS THE SCORE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

minimum net worth of $1.5 million; and an initial investment of between $1.4 million and $2.1 million.

What trends are you seeing?

We are definitely seeing a trend toward technology. Guests want to be “plugged in” wherever they are. They want instant online access to your menu, your features and your specials. They want to be able to charge their phones at the table and have WI-FI for their tablets. They want to bring their own entertainment to occupy kids. They want state of the art TVs and sound to watch the big game. We take these trends very seriously, and we work to incorporate them into our operations to enhance guest satisfaction. With regards to food and beverage trends, guests want the newest craft beers and the best quality ingredients. It’s our goal to provide this for them. In addition, guests want nutritional and allergen information so that they are educated about the foods they are consuming, and we stayed ahead of this curve for years with our online nutrition calculator and allergy wizard.

What is the secret to creating a "must visit" environment in today's competitive landscape? Great food, friendly and knowledgeable servers, and treating customers like guests in your home are all keys to excellent hospitality. In addition, restaurants need to have the right balance of food quality with value offerings.

We maintain three pillars of focus: a commitment to quality food and ingredients, a love of sports and a dedication to the communities in which we operate. 128

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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WHERE EVERYBODY KNOWS THE SCORE

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What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Managing our growth and all that comes with it while not losing sight of what got us to the dance: the day to day details that go into running 20 company stores and seven existing franchise operations. Managing every employee, every shift, every guest with the idea of creating a great and memorable experience for all of them.

Describe a typical day.

We start by analyzing yesterday’s results and addressing any anomalies. We interact via email, text and phone with support staff to address upcoming opportunities and planning future business. Meetings with staff, employees, guests and vendors to find ways to make us better, smarter, stronger, more efficient. Study cost control and find ways to save money while growing sales. Strategize on marketing and sales building opportunities.

Tell us what makes you so unique?

Glory Days Grill’s three pillars of focus make us unique: a commitment to quality food and ingredients, a love of sports and generosity in the surrounding community. These priorities and points of differentiation from other casual dining restaurants have kept Glory Days Grill as a leader in the industry for more than 20 years. Our founders boast over 120 years of combined restaurant experience and expertise – and they are still actively involved in the day-to-day operations of the restaurant today. Our longevity in the industry and successful track record proves that our business model works. We have invested wisely to recruit the finest team in the foodservice industry, to provide support in the areas of operations, training, marketing and business development, and to provide many of the tools necessary to be a successful franchise owner. Glory Days Grill is a one-of-a-kind brand and experience. CK

One-on-One with... » Richard Danker Glory Days Grill co-founder

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

I find it extremely rewarding to see people in our company grow and come up the ranks. It’s satisfying to help develop great talent and watch those people turn into great leaders. In addition, everyone at Glory Days Grill is motivated by the happy guests and families who visit our restaurants, as well as our involvement in the communities in which we serve. Helping others and giving back is at the core of who we are.

What was the best advice you ever received?

Some of the best advice I’ve ever received and try to follow is, ““Work hard and lead by example.” It couldn’t be any more straightforward than that. In addition, “The world does not owe you a living” and “Always tell the truth”.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? We recently hosted our Annual Glory Days Grill/Sunshine Foundation Charity Golf Tournament, and one of our friends and longtime vendors (who has had some health issues the past couple of years) played in it. At the end of the day, he said to me, “You know what? Today was one of the best days of my life.” Wow. It blew me away to be able to affect someone’s life like that, especially someone we know and respect so much.

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Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why.

Honesty – Because your team needs to trust in you and believe in you and your company’s core values. Humility – Because you should never ask a member of the team to do something you wouldn’t do yourself. Hard Work – Because it is always best to lead by example. The famous coach John Wooden once said, “The most powerful leadership tool you have is your own personal example.” That couldn’t be more true.

What is the true key to success for any manager?

Passion for his or her job and to always lead by example. As they say, “You gotta care and you gotta share.”

What book are you reading now?

“Great Teams,” by Don Yaeger. “16 Things HighPerforming Organizations Do Differently.”

How do you like to spend your down time? With my family, reading, exercising, traveling and watching sports, of course.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 66


Facelift Inside the restoration of the facade of landmark row house turned wine bar By Adam Collins

R

epurposing historic homes for use as restaurants and bars

has become a popular trend throughout the United States. Developers naturally are drawn to the original hardwood floors, elaborate woodwork and exposed brick walls that only a turn of the century home’s interior can provide.

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But equally as important to preserving the structure's interior is restoring its exterior facade, hidden and neglected for decades by its adjacent buildings. The historic Samuel Green Rowhouse – Norden Hall in Des Moines, Iowa, was destined for demolition in 2013 to make way for expansion of the Iowa State Capitol grounds. Instead, the only intact 19th Century rowhouse known to exist within the city's near East Side, was relocated by private developer Jake Christensen to a new location in the city's popular East Village neighborhood. The two-story structure would be restored and repurposed as a wine bar in its new location. Designed in the Romanesque Revival style with red brick and cast stone ornamentation and sills, the rowhouse was constructed in 1884 by prominent business leader Samuel Green for his family. Green was an early resident of Des Moines who contributed to the city's development through his foundry and furnace, which would become the city's largest by the late 19th Century. Rowhouse construction in Des Moines peaked in the 1880s due to a population surge and housing shortage. At the time, rowhouses were easy to build and required little land as they were built right next to each other. Green lived in the rowhouse until 1900 when he started renting it out until 1946. In 1949, Norden Singers Inc., a Swedish choral and cultural group, purchased and remodeled the house for use as a rehearsal hall and clubhouse. During the building's five decades as Norden Hall, several Scandinavian organizations such as the Danish Brotherhood, Danish Sisterhood and Sons of Norway used the building for meetings. From the 1980s to 2006, the building, which had been converted back to a single-family home, had multiple occupants. The city purchased the building in 2006, and, in 2010, the Des Moines Rehabbers Club named the rowhouse one of Des Moines' Most Endangered Properties. Demolition was set for March 27, 2013.

Moving Norden Hall

Through an investment of $1 million, private developer Jake Christensen was

Repurposing historic homes for use as restaurants and bars has become a popular trend throughout the United States.

determined to save the historic rowhouse. He accomplished this by ambitiously moving the 440,000-pound building four blocks from 707 E. Locust to a new concrete foundation at 435 E. Grand. Wolfe House and Building Movers performed the delicate move at midnight on Sept. 25, 2013. The moving team used a Buckingham Power Dolly System with remote SmartSteer system to relocate the rowhouse to its new location in just 2.5 hours.

Restoring the building's facade

One of the key roles in preserving the the 134-year-old landmark building's new foundation and its facade was played by Western Specialty Contractors' Des Moines branch. Western started its work prior to the building relocation by completely waterproofing its new foundation prior to backfilling.

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FACELIFT

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

It was discovered after the move that the building's masonry and stucco facade was in need of miscellaneous repairs and it was not watertight. Western crews started the facade restoration by replacing all of the building's joint sealants, then began the process of resealing the structure by cleaning its entire surface to remove any residue that had accumulated over time. Miscellaneous tuckpointing was performed throughout the structure's three masonry walls, with Western crews careful to custom-match the mortar color and joint profile used in the building's original construction in order to maintain its historical integrity. Spray-applied concrete, or shotcrete, then was sprayed on the building's entire west elevation, where it had butt up against another building, to add structural integrity to the deteriorated masonry wall. Once the new concrete had cured, Western applied a textured acrylic coating to the west elevation to waterproof the wall and help maintain its historic appearance.

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Aided by an experienced team of architects, Norden Hall successfully was saved and repurposed into a one-of-a-kind wine bar.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 68


FACELIFT

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Since its restoration, the rowhouse has been registered as a historic landmark. those plans were scrapped when the building was rehabbed for a single tenant. Caligiuri, who also opened a Della Viti in Ames, Iowa, apparently was drawn to the growing East Village Neighborhood, due to its foot traffic and vibrant nightlife. Della Viti provides a relaxing atmosphere where patrons can listen to jazz and sample a variety of wines through its unique self-serve WineStations. Della Viti also features a full service bar, an outdoor seating area, a variety of craft beers and appetizers. Aided by an experienced team of architects, general contractors and specialty contractors, led by an equally dedicated developer, the Samuel Green Rowhouse – Norden Hall successfully was saved and repurposed into a one-of-a-kind wine bar for residents to enjoy for years to come. CK

The front facade of the building, constructed of red brick and cast-stone sills, was only slightly deteriorated. Western crews performed standard cleaning and tuckpointing on this elevation. On the backside of the building, Western performed rout and caulk repairs, which involved grinding the cracks out first, then tooling a new urethane sealant to seal the crack. Western completed the facade restoration, which took six months, in late 2014. Since its restoration, the rowhouse has been registered as a historic landmark.

Norden Hall today

Gerald "JJ" Caligiuri opened Della Viti wine bar in the repurposed Norden Hall. The developer's original plans called for a restaurant on the first floor, with offices on the second, but Adam Collins is the assistant branch manager for Western Specialty Contractors’ Des Moines, Iowa, location.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 69


PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

Does architecture need a women’s touch? W omen have been demonstrating their passion and skill in the field of architecture for a century and a half and, in recent decades, their enrollment in architecture schools has soared. Yet the number of women working as architects remains low. Whether it’s work life balance, lack of acceptance or the wage gap keeping them away, the industry is in need of change. I was raised in a family of designers. My father worked as an architect in Roanoke, Va., for 39 years, and my mother was an interior designer. They both had a passion for design that they carried through life and instilled in us. When it came time to choose a career path, following in my family’s footsteps, entering a field I’d been exposed to my whole life was a natural and meaningful path. I joined Duda|Paine Architects in Durham, N.C., following college in 2011. I was licensed in 2014 and became an associate in the firm in 2015.

By Jane Bamford

women by implementing initiatives focused on women – initiatives that ultimately will benefit everyone. One example is a mentorship program for women with women serving as mentors. Others include clear, written criteria for promotion and, in terms of continuing education, offering a credentialing program for individuals returning to practice after an extended leave so they can get back up to speed quickly on developments in technology and practice. Flexible start and end times for work, comp time, teleworking and phased-back-to-work plans for new parents also are ways to ensure that women stay active and engaged in the profession. The architecture field is evolving, but the challenge most women face as they’re promoted is one I’m currently in the midst of – juggling demanding project schedules while building and nurturing a family. AIA San Francisco’s “Equity by Design’s 2016 Equity in Architecture Survey” found that issues in work-life flexibility account for women increasingly reporting a detrimental effect on physical or emotional health, as well as falling short on personal responsibilities. Flexibility is key to keeping everyone in the field as their lives get busy at home. This can be accomplished through official policy, as might be required in a large firm, or can simply emerge organically in a firm’s culture (as happens at Duda|Paine). Issues of work-life balance, family leave, childcare and opportunities for personal and professional growth affect everyone. Architects – men and women – are deciding work life balance is essential to being the best person, employee, designer and parent they can be. The more the profession recognizes and adapts to these challenges, the more likely we will retain all types of talent and all experience levels.

Women must continue to gain confidence in their design work and voice in the architectural field, while never hesitating to ask questions and learn. Across my time in this industry, the absence of women always has been most notable out in the field. Routinely, I’m also the only female in the room for client and consultant meetings. Looking at the industry, this dearth isn’t surprising, because women are not well represented in the profession’s leadership. AIA has released facts and figures over the last few years regarding women in architecture and, unfortunately, there hasn’t been much progress. A 2012 AIA survey indicates only 16 percent of the its membership as female – just 17 percent of firm principals and partners were women. Compare that with 49 percent of architecture students and 39 percent of interns being women. In a 2016 survey, AIA found that more than 50 percent of female architects feel they’re less likely to be promoted to more senior positions than men. Clearly there’s work to do.

The future is bright

Great strides have been made in ensuring equity in the profession through initiatives like the AIA’s Women in Leadership Summit, The Missing 32% Project, which started in AIA San Francisco, and Equity by Design [EQxD]. Each highlight issues such as equality in salaries, promotions and opportuThe challenges we face nity, and have helped identify what pulls people out of the profession. How do we keep our female students and interns? It’s an important All professionals ultimately benefit from these organizations and question for women professionals as a whole – the more who stick the individuals involved in bringing more diverse voices to the industry. with it, the better our collective future will be. The challenge is to stay The gender gap is growing smaller. Women must continue to involved and take on more responsibilities so that women can start gain confidence in their design work and voice in the architectural representing our firms in leadership and outside the office. field, while never hesitating to ask questions and learn. A great I feel fortunate Duda|Paine provides opportunities for women way to earn respect is showing you know enough to ask the right architects, because advancing the number question, listen, and then learn from the of women in leadership has to be driven answer. Diversity of all kinds ensures the by every firm’s senior leadership. Research profession properly reflects the world Jane Bamford, AIA, is an associate at points to the idea that architecture and around us and brings fresh ideas to the Duda|Paine Architects in Durham, N.C. design firms can enhance opportunities for process of design. CCR

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


Continuing Continuing a a tradition tradition of of excellence... excellence...

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Gimme shelter

By Jacqueline McMillen

Managing potential risks of storm water harvesting and reuse

F

acility renovation creates opportunities to incorporate green features into the project site. Such features often include storm water harvesting or reuse, which are Low Impact Development (LID) principals for managing storm water throughout the United States. The many benefits that arise from storm water harvesting and reuse are becoming well-known. At the project site level, these benefits include increased availability of a recycled water supply, improved water quality of site runoff, decreased flooding risks, and the protection and improvement of wildlife habitats and green space in the local community. Use of LID for storm water management on project sites is a component of the U.S. Green Building Councils’ LEED Program for green buildings. Incorporating these benefits can create unanticipated problems if not managed appropriately.

Potential risks

Depending on storage conditions, storm water potentially can harbor pathogens such as Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Campylobacter, Legionella and Rotavirus. Legionella may be of particular concern in storm water harvesting and reuse application, because it’s found naturally in fresh water, including man-made water systems, and thrives in warm water that ranges in temperature from about 68°F and 122°F. Additionally, Legionella can persist in biofilms, which may be harbored by storm water management systems such as rain tanks or drainage piping with stagnant water. Exposure to Legionella occurs when people inhale small, aerosolized, droplets of water that contain the bacteria and can result

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in either Pontiac Fever or Legionnaires’ disease. Site features that aerosolizes captured storm water and may potentially pose a risk for Legionella exposure include, but are not limited to: • Retention basins with fountains, waterfalls or other water features • Irrigation using captured storm water • Using captured storm water for non-potable uses (toilet flushing, car washing, etc.)

Managing risks

To date, the EPA has not release any guidance or rules regarding the management of risks associated with Legionella specifically targeting storm water treatment, reuse, and recycling. However, there are existing standards and guidelines that address the risk of Legionella in building water systems, primarily ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 188-2015 “Legionellosis: Risk Management for Building Water Systems” (Standard 188) published by ASHRAE in June 2015. The purpose of Standard 188 is to establish minimum legionellosis risk management requirements for building water systems, which by definition include potable and non-potable water systems in buildings or on building sites. While Legionella typically is considered a greater risk for water systems in buildings, the risk management principals of Standard 188 may be applied to storm water infrastructure as well. According to Standard 188, if risk factors for legionellosis are identified, it’s recommended that the responsible parties development a Water Management Program through the following actions:

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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FACELIFT 1. Develop a Water Management Program Team Identify the appropriate parties responsible for the Water Management Program development and implementation. The team may include the building owner, employees, suppliers, consultants or other building owner designee. All members of the team should have knowledge of the building water system design and water management as it relates to legionellosis. 2. Create a Flow Diagram for All Water System Components Describe the entire water system for the facility, including both potable and non-potable, using a step-by-step process flow diagram. The diagram should show all end uses, the locations of water processing equipment and system components, and be representative of the system as built. 3. Conduct a Detailed Analysis of the Water System The program team should use the completed flow diagram to evaluate any areas in the water system that may result in hazardous conditions, where elevated levels of Legionella may exist.

Since it was published, Standard 188 has been considered to be a regulation-ready ANSI standard and local jurisdictions have already begun making the recommendations a requirement. For example, the New York City Council voted to require adherence to Standard 188 just two months after it was published in response to a legionellosis outbreak. Standard 188 provides a reasonable approach for avoiding risks associated with Legionella exposure by providing recommendations to determine if a project’s building water system contains devices or factors that relate to legionellosis. Storm water infrastructure elements potentially could represent such a device, if it releases water aerosols, like in retention ponds with water features or use of storm water for irrigation.

How are others addressing the Legionella risk in storm water?

Storm water capture and reuse has gained in popularity, particularly in areas affected by historic droughts, where governments and other stakeholders are looking to maximize the use of available water. For example, the Australian Government published the “Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling: Stormwater Harvesting and Reuse” in July 2009 to specifically address potential health risks associated with storm water. Similar to Standard 188, these guidelines use a risk-based management approach to provide guidance on managing potential public health and environmental risks associated with the reuse of roof water from non-residential buildings and urban storm water from sewered areas. The guidelines require: • Identifying the pathogens that likely are to be present in storm water • Determining the likelihood of illness • Estimating the level of exposure • Assigning a risk value

4. M  onitor the Key Control Parameters that Increase Risk for Legionellosis Determine any control measures to be maintained based on the analysis of the water system. Control measures may include treatment methods, technical and physical processes, and procedures that monitor or maintain the physical or chemical conditions of water to within established control limits. Additionally, a system for monitoring the control measures should be established. 5. Take Corrective Actions Whenever the measured values are not within the established limits, the program team shall identify the party responsible for taking required corrective action, as well as the appropriate response time for taking such action. 6. Establish Documentation Procedures Documentation and communication procedures should be established for all activities of the Water Management Program to ensure coordination among the project team and any subgroups responsible for the water system and any associated infrastructure or equipment.

Still others have developed recommended Best Management Practices (BMPs) for managing the risk of Legionella in storm water. Western Australia prepared the “Draft Alternate Water Supply Guidelines – Stormwater and Rainwater.” This outlines specific precautions that can be taken, including avoiding storm water storage in hot weather, controlling the aerosolization of storm water, using personal protective equipment to avoid direct inhalation of aerosols, and limiting storage of storm water to less than 24 hours. If there is any doubt as to the safety of the storm water, the water should not be used for any purpose, disinfected, tested for Legionella, and/or discarded. Project owners, designers and contractors more readily can mitigate risks of storm water harvesting and reuse when they’re aware of the conditions conducive to Legionella growth and exposure. Until accepted guidance is available that specifically targets such risks in storm water infrastructure, a risk-based approach similar to those for water systems in buildings is recommended to identify and mitigate potentially hazardous conditions to ensure protection of public health. Consider these risks during building renovation to ensure a safe, healthy and green outcome. CCR

Jacqueline McMillen, P.E., is the water resources project manager/senior consultant for Alta Environmental.

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LATE WINTER 2016

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

SUPPLEMENT

Home away from

home

Re-energizing the Ronald McDonald House New York City

Comfort for families away from home was one of the key considerations for the retrofit at Ronald McDonald House New York. A special supplement to:

ALSO:

How to succeed with enhanced-use lease insights to optimize benefits


Home away from

home

Ronald McDonald House New York is the charity’s flagship location.

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Re-energizing the Ronald McDonald House New York City

W

hat began in 1974 as a Shamrock Shake-driven fundraiser to help families with sick children is today a network of

322 Ronald McDonald Houses in 57 countries. The first Ronald McDonald House (RMH), in Philadelphia, was meant to serve as a “home away from home” for families spending time in the city for cancer treatment.

More than 35 years later, the focus remains. Each house is a comfortable safe haven in close proximity to pediatric medical care. The New York City location is the largest facility of its type in the world. Ronald McDonald New York, on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, is unique because it’s near 19 cancer treatment and major medical centers. The 13-story brick building, built in 1989, provides temporary housing to as many as 84 families. Though living space within the 70,000 square-foot structure is modern, the systems that served it were original until last year. “The boiler and chillers were past their life cycle,” says Ike Beyer, owner of Integrated HVAC Systems and Services Inc., the specialized, 30-person mechanical company that partnered with Rochester-based MEP engineering firm, Energy Concepts, for the design/build retrofit that materialized in 2014. “As a non-profit organization, the project’s payback and sustainability were equally important as the initial cost.”

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • HOME AWAY FROM HOME

Beyer worked with Chris Cafer, associate and senior mechanical engineer at Energy Concepts to design and install new systems at RMH. Both have LEED and CSBA (National Sustainable Building Advisor Program) accredited professionals on staff, and were early adopters of CHP (combined heat and power) – or co-generation technology. Decades of experience ultimately would lead to a solution that surpassed facility managers’ expectations of comfort and sustainability. “From the inception of this this project, the goal was to better serve children and families battling cancer,” says Mel Farrell, BSEE, chief engineer at RMH New York. “As such, we hand-selected the team who would move it forward. Energy Concepts has designed over 80 cogeneration plants in New York State ranging from 75kW to 10mW, and Integrated has flawlessly maintained our facility for years.”

Jr. Mechanic Steven Snyder on top of Ronald McDonald House New York.

‘If’ before ‘how’

In 2011, long before any plans for a retrofit were drawn up, Energy Concepts began a feasibility study to determine if a CHP plant would be right for RMH New York, or if an in-kind equipment replacement offered better value.

Needless to say, the two-phase project was formidable, but everyone involved had realistic timeline expectations when work began in December 2013.

The 12-cylinder IntelliGen CHP unit is mounted on the roof of the building.

146

Ike Beyer, owner of Integrated HVAC Systems and Services Inc, looks at the CHP unit.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • HOME AWAY FROM HOME

Steven Snyder and Frank Zeires check electrical connections.

Two, high-efficiency Laars NeoTherm boilers are used to supply backup heat and cooling to the structure. “All applications are different, based on energy use trends and the physical structures themselves,” Cafer says. “We took a holistic approach; energy models were developed based on past use and projected costs.” The study was funded in part by NYSERDA (New York State Energy Research and Development Authority). After two years of research and data collection, it was determined that on-site cogeneration equipment would provide the heating, cooling and DHW loads, while supplying 95 percent of the building’s power needs. “Making the changes necessary to convert to a CHP system would have yielded a seven or eight-year payback,” Cafer says. “But the charity wanted to make huge strides toward sustainability, occupant comfort and cost avoidance, so the decision was made to remove nearly all old mechanical components and start with a clean slate. This only pushed the retrofit’s simple payback out three more years, which is very impressive.”

148

Installer Kenny White pipes the boiler injection loop.

“It’s more than just an energy consideration; it offers precise control for optimal comfort for kids staying here are going through chemo and radiation therapy.” – Ike Beyer, Owner, Integrated HVAC Systems and Services

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016

Both Beyer and Cafer say the growing adoption of CHP technology in the Big Apple is growing (it’s up nearly 400 percent in the past decade). Cafer says that Hurricane Sandy stirred great interest in co-gen. And while much of the grid was down, several buildings they worked in continued operation as usual, courtesy of well-designed CHP systems.

Hardware

Integrated HVAC Systems and Services installed a natural gas-fired IntelliGen CHP unit on the roof. The pre-packaged unit combines a roughly-600HP, 12-cylinder reciprocating engine with a 250KW generator to produce power for the building. Heat from the engine – up to 1.5 million BTU under full load – is rejected into a large plate-and-frame heat exchanger, isolating the CHP unit loop from the building’s various needs for heat. Three loads draw from the heat exchanger: DHW production, the building’s two-pipe fan coil units when in heating


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CIRCLE NO. 73


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • HOME AWAY FROM HOME

mode, and three new, 50-ton Yazaki absorption chillers on the 12th floor. “Absorption chillers are the nearest thing to a magic box,” Cafer says. “You put hot water in and get chilled water out.” During the shoulder seasons, there’s potential for the CHP unit to produce more thermal energy than the facility needs. In the event there’s excess heat, there’s a dry cooler on the roof for heat rejection. “Being that the absorption chillers are now the only source of cooled water, both the heating and cooling elements in the building are entirely dependent on a source of hot water,” Beyer says. “During maintenance of the CHP unit, or in the unlikely event of failure, we needed complete redundancy in the form of condensing boilers. This is the case with almost every co-gen application.” A pair of Laars NeoTherm condensing boilers provides double redundancy. The larger, at 1.7 MMBTU, more than matches the output of the CHP unit. It alone is able to condition the building regardless of the season. The second, 1 million BTU boiler is in place for further peace of mind. If the CHP unit is turned off for any reason, the boilers fire together, each modulating to roughly 50 percent to meet design load. “The contribution of the boilers in this situation is critical, even more so than in a conventional heating application,” says Don Rathe, president of Rathe Associates, the manufacturer’s representative firm that helped specify components for the hydronic system and supplied the boilers. “In addition to carrying the heating and snowmelt loads, the cooling system would also go down if the boilers failed to run.” Integrated also replaced the building’s existing domestic hot water equipment with two 85-gallon instantaneous, indirect-fired water heaters. A new BAS simplifies the otherwise complex systems, and a snowmelt zone outside now keeps guests safe and eliminates costly winter sidewalk maintenance. Lighting throughout the structure was updated with LED fixtures, a joint project between Integrated and IESG-NY (Innovative Energy Solutions Group – New York), and also partially funded by NYSERDA. Needless to say, the two-phase project was formidable, but everyone involved had realistic timeline expectations when work began in December 2013.

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Ronald McDonald House New York is the charity’s flagship location.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 74


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • HOME AWAY FROM HOME

Maintaining operation

With all rooms full, Beyer, Cafer and Farrell faced the monumental task of renovating three systems without displacing occupants from a single room or letting comfort levels drop. Their second largest challenge was working within the small, existing mechanical spaces. “Because the project started in heating season, we began to demolish the old chillers on the 12th floor while the existing boilers in the basement remained online,” Beyer says. “Meanwhile, the CHP unit, new boilers and chillers were all rigged to the roof at one time.”

“We’ve used Laars boilers for years now, even in conjunction with other CHP projects,” Beyer says.

Control and comfort

Over the summer, 2,200 square feet of sidewalks and approach in front of the main entrance were removed and re-poured, but not before PEX was tied down to provide a snowmelt solution. For this portion of the project, Rathe donated material, while Integrated donated manpower to ensure safe winter passage for all guests. After walking over the clear sidewalk and into the building’s lobby, visitors now can interact with a screen that displays all the mechanical components and how they cooperate to meet the energy needs within the building. The display screen also shows energy use and production in realtime, courtesy of a full BACnet control system made by Reliable Controls. Among other things, the new controls were necessary to operate the final component of the retrofit, which is still in the planning phases and slated to begin later this year. “We’re looking to replace the existing two-pipe fan coils with a four-pipe system,” Beyer says. “It’s more than just an energy consideration; it offers precise control for optimal comfort for kids staying here are going through chemo and radiation therapy. A four-pipe system will allow us to provide heat to one room and air conditioning to the next.” FC

Ronald McDonald New York, on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, is unique because it’s near 19 cancer treatment and major medical centers. Once the old chillers were removed, the CHP and absorption chillers were installed in time for cooling season, at which point the old boilers were broken down and hauled out. The downstairs boiler room then became a pump room, supplying almost all circulation for the entire structure. All heat exchangers and DHW production equipment are here as well. Given their small footprint, high efficiency, and Beyer’s familiarity with the NeoTherm line, the boiler selection process was brief.

With 322 locations around the globe, Ronald McDonald House strives to make life easier and more comfortable for families traveling for children to receive cancer treatment.

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MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS www.communicatorsintl.com | info@communicatorsintl.com CIRCLE NO. 75


EUL relief

By Mark Davis

How to succeed with enhanced-use lease insights to optimize benefits

I

n some areas of the U.S., military base real estate is beset by the double impact of under-utilization and obsolescence. One solution that tackles both problems is the Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL). With an EUL, the government retains ownership of the land at a base and enters into a long-term land lease with a private developer. To pay for replacing deteriorating buildings and infrastructure, the developer uses payment in-kind consideration instead of appropriated funds, which saves tax dollars. EUL developments often move the base’s perimeter fence inward, which allows the creation of on-base and offbase facilities that are all part of the government-owned property. A poster child of EUL benefits is Falcon Hill National Aerospace Research Park, located at Hill AFB between Ogden, Utah, and Salt Lake City. Falcon Hill has created an EUL partnership between the Air Force and a private developer called Sunset Ridge Development Partners (SRDP). Sunset Ridge, in turn, is a partnership between Woodbury Corporation, a local Utah developer, and Hunt Companies, headquartered in El Paso.

Falcon Hill’s master plan development began in 2010. The 180-acre Phase One development plan includes more than 2 million square feet of commercial/office space and 45,000 square feet of retail space. The office space will provide on-base and off-base facilities for government defense contractors and services that support the missions of the Air Force. The research park also will include a hotel, restaurants and other retail facilities, as well as supporting services. In 2014 the federal government increased its oversight of defense contracts related to ICBM installations. It hired BAE Systems to help manage the new program. In the past, under the single contract policy, Northrop Grumman had been the prime integration contractor and was the single tenant in one building, Building 1575. Several other defense contractors supported Grumman in their own areas of expertise. They included such firms as ATK for propulsion, Boeing for guidance, and Lockheed Martin.

In the past, under the single contract policy, Northrop Grumman had been the prime integration contractor and was the single tenant in one building 1575.

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CIRCLE NO. 76


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • EUL RELIEF

For business reasons, some contractors, such as Boeing, want to be near the base but not on the base. That allows them to be double-breasted: they can serve both the federal and commercial market. Here is an early concept idea of where the “off-base” development is headed.

Today these contractors have direct contracts with the federal government and they are located in a multi-tenant building. The former lease from Northrop was reassigned to individual contractors because the government wanted to retain several of the cancellation clauses tied to their agreements with those contractors.

For example, this year saw the dedication of a Starbucks shop in a retail building outside the fence. Falcon Hill Westgate Retail has three restaurant pads and about 8,000 square feet of additional retail. It will build at least one fast food restaurant on the north end cap and install a variety of uses in the interior spaces. SRDP also has had interest in the property Outside the fence Line expressed by an instant care medical service and also by haircutters For business reasons, some contractors, such as Boeing, want like Great Clips. It recently sent a team to the International Council to be near the base but not on the base. That allows them to be of Shopping Centers in Las Vegas to meet with different users to double-breasted: They can serve both the federal and commercial discuss the next step for the restaurant pads. market. Building outside the fence will open up new markets, such The base buildings inside the fence must conform to a more reas retail food service. strictive protocol called ATFP (Anti-Terrorism Force Protection). The AFTP requirements add about a third more steel to the structure, blast-resistant glass, and setbacks from public parking of about 85 feet. Even the landscaping has to be modified so that an explosive device cannot be concealed behind plantings. Canopies on buildings must have observable tops. This cost difference makes it approximately 20 percent more expensive to build inside the fence than outside the fence. Defense contractors understand that they have to maintain a certain level of security in their contract with the Department of Defense to satisfy the ATFP requirements. SRDP also must comply with ATFP on base because federal employees may be working in those buildings at a future date. Several other defense contractors supported Grumman in their own areas of In order to co-locate the defense conexpertise. They included such firms as ATK for propulsion, Boeing for guidance, tractors with their client in one of its new and Lockheed Martin. Today these contractors have direct contracts with the buildings, SRDP "condominiumized" the federal government and they are located in a multi-tenant building. space by putting the Air Force offices on

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 77


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • EUL RELIEF

Building outside the fence will open up new markets, such as retail food service. For example, this year saw the dedication of a Starbucks shop in a retail building outside the fence. Design is underway for the balance of the available space in this building.

the first floor and the defense contractors on two other floors. This was a first for the federal government, which had never set up a condominium before. The first floor of the building is owned by the Military Installation Development Authority (MIDA) and is leased to the federal government at $1 per year.

Benefits

Much governmentowned land on military bases goes underutilized because of the way the bases developed and the way they were laid out.

One incentive for private sector groups to invest in the base economy is the advantage of being collocated with the Air Force. Doing so not only increases their opportunities for additional contracts, it also makes their daily routines more efficient. For example, even when you are carrying a base pass, it can be tedious to get on and off the base, but when a firm has its personnel in a space where they can walk next door or downstairs to an Air Force office, all meetings and transactions are more convenient and productive. Added to this is the additional layer of security. Employees and visitors have to be vetted when coming on base. For its part the Air Force likes to use the new state-ofthe-art facilities. SRDP built a 180-seat theater that is so well engineered acoustically that—when bad weather drove the ribbon-cutting festivities indoors before SRDP had had a chance

to install the AV system—the speakers could be heard clearly in the theater without using a microphone. Much government-owned land on military bases goes underutilized because of the way the bases developed and the way they were laid out. The EUL concept provides an opportunity for stimulus to the local economies to build commerce on that land. The government benefits from the EUL relationship because it receives in-kind replacement of aging facilities, in which Department of Defense employees now are using as office space. They are highly inefficient in terms of energy use and space planning. New and updated facilities will lower the ongoing cost to the government for energy and maintenance expenses. When government teams with private industry, it brings new and creative ideas to the table. It introduces new, state-of-the-art materials and systems. In private industry, the scope of projects is more diverse and innovation evolves more quickly. Nevertheless, EUL projects must occur during a period of economic growth, when demand is up. It always takes a few dedicated individuals with a strong vision – and on both sides of the fence (military and private) – to stay the course – and succeed with enhanced-use lease. FC

Mark Davis is a principal at Architectural Nexus.

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» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 78


Set in

stone

See how the exquisite design of the new Westin in Nashville is turning heads By Ron Treister

160

T

he number of visitors coming to Nashville, and the amount of money they spend while they are there significantly grew in

the last year, according to research by the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp.

And, as Nashville continues to grow not only as a very hot tourist magnet, but as a major convention city, the demand for more upscale hospitality establishments also grows exponentially. Starwood Hotels & Resorts’ Westin Nashville is a newly built hotel located adjacent to Music City Center, the city’s new convention facility. Designed in partnership with New York-based David Mexico Design Group LLC and Nashville-based Bullock Smith & Partners, the 27-story structure offers a veritable

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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SET IN STONE 360-degree visual feast for all its guests and other visitors. In particular, the custom stonework on public interior area floors is a glorious sight to behold. “Each of the hotel’s 453 guestrooms has custom artwork and design detail inspired by the city and the region,” says Patricia Barbis, director of interior design at David Mexico Design Group. Barbis’ team specified state-ofthe-art waterjet cut and fabricated flooring designed using exotic natural stone from various parts of the globe. To achieve the precise, one-of-a-kind stone flooring designs her firm created, the services of Creative Edge Master Shop, a world leading waterjet design & fabrication company in Fairfield, Iowa were contracted. In 1988, Creative Edge introduced the world to the remarkable possibilities of waterjet fabrication for architecture and design. Since that time, the firm has worked on more than 10,000 projects worldwide, many of which were within the hospitality sector.

the most precise designs using this powerful jetstream of water. “We can cut 3 inch thick granite to the most precise tolerances using our technology,” says Jim Belilove, founder and president of Creative Edge.

Going all space age

In the case of the Westin Nashville, once designs were approved and specific natural stones were chosen, Belilove’s team used it’s space-age technology to cut the various pieces of stone needed to achieve the design work specified by David Mexico’s team. Under the watchful eye of seasoned waterjet professionals, each piece was cut and then “assembled dry” to make sure the ultimate “fit” would be perfect. From there, various pieces were adhered together using high-quality epoxy adhesives, then carefully packaged and shipped to the Tennessee jobsite. Natural stone materials specified for the dynamic floor design included Honey Onyx, Persian Red Travertine,

A number of visitors upon initially seeing the waterjet cut production commented that it “looked almost like a custom-made natural stone rug.” What is a Water jet Cutter? A waterjet cutter is an industrial tool capable of cutting a wide variety of materials using a very high-pressure jet of water, or a mixture of water and an abrasive substance. The term “abrasivejet” refers specifically to the use of a mixture of water and abrasive to cut hard materials such as metal or granite, while the terms pure waterjet and water-only cutting refer to waterjet cutting without the use of added abrasives, often used for softer materials such as wood or rubber. In the case of Creative Edge, the waterjet cutter is located on the end of a robotic arm, which is programmed and driven to cut

Thassos White and Bottichino Florito. A number of visitors upon initially seeing the waterjet cut production commented that it “looked almost like a custom-made natural stone rug.” “The designers with whom we interacted were extremely professional and easy to work with,” Belilove says. “The stone material we provided to match their designs was sourced from a wide variety of locations worldwide. It was great to work with a forward-looking firm that wanted only the best visuals for their client. And in doing so, they had the vision to incorporate spaceage waterjet technology.” CCR

Ron Treister is President/Founder of Communicators International, Inc., a marketing communications firm headquartered in Jupiter, Florida. For three decades, his firm has worked with major accounts focusing on the commercial construction sector. He may be reached at: rlt@communicatorsintl.com

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CIRCLE NO. 80


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Spokane, WA

$600,000.00

2,400

New Construction

Q2 2017

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Carl's Jr. Arby's

Lake Forest, CA

$500,000.00

5,579

Remodel

early Q1 2017

Café Bizou

Agoura Hills, CA

$150,000.00

3,114

Remodel

late Q4 2016

Tractor Supply Co.

Temecula, CA

$2,500,000.00

21,702

New Construction

Q1 2017

Big Lots

Tacoma, WA

$880,000.00

30,000

Remodel

Q1 2017

Bath & Body Works

Vancouver, WA

$600,000.00

3,500

Remodel

Q1 2017

AutoZone #5207

Lihue, HI

$400,000.00

4,000

New Construction

Q1 2017

Pet Food Express

Glendale, CA

$170,000.00

4,423

Renovation

late Q4 2016

Herald Examiner Building Remodel

Los Angeles, CA

$40,000,000.00

100,000

Remodel

Q2 2017

Grant Warehouse Redevelopment

Portland, OR

$19,000,000.00

87,858

New Construction

Q1 2017

2100 E. Madison Apartments

Seattle, WA

$12,000,000.00

51,000

New Construction

Q1 2017

The Destination Place - Phase 1

Anza, CA

$4,000,000.00

12,000

New Construction

Q2 2017

Hyatt Centric - Marshall Hotel Redevelopment

Sacramento, CA

$25,000,000.00

155,000

Renovation/Addition

Q3 2017

Hampton Inn & Suites

Montebello, CA

$25,000,000.00

98,325

New Construction

Q2 2017

J&M Hotel Restoration

Seattle, WA

$10,000,000.00

25,450

Renovation

Q1 2017

McMenamins Kalama Waterfront Hotel

Kalama, WA

$6,500,000.00

44,534

New Construction

Q1 2017

Seattle, WA

$16,000,000.00

117,000

New Construction

late Q2 2017

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION: Seattle Pacific University - University Center St. Mary's School

Medford, OR

$10,000,000.00

25,000

New Construction/Addition

late Q2 2017

West Valley College Kvamme Planetarium Addition

Saratoga, CA

$4,860,000.00

3,000

Addition

Q1 2017

Central Washington University Lind Hall Renovation

Ellensburg, WA

$2,800,000.00

44,830

Renovation

Q1 2017

New City Hall - City of North Bend

North Bend, WA

$5,000,000.00

14,000

New Construction

Q2 2017

Port Administration Building - Annex Remodel

San Diego, CA

$227,500.00

11,050

Remodel

Q1 2017

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL: Schofield Barracks Health Clinic Addition

Schofield Barracks, HI

$76,000,000.00

77,000

New Construction/Addition

Q1 2017

Fallbrook Assisted Living & Memory Care Facility

Fallbrook, CA

$14,000,000.00

227,492

New Construction

Q2 2017

UC Davis Hospital Seismic Upgrade University Tower First Floor

Sacramento, CA

$6,500,000.00

10,000

Renovation

Q1 2017

Garlington Center Medical Clinic

Portland, OR

$6,000,000.00

24,450

New Construction

Q1 2017

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

3M........................................................................125...................63

Integrated Image..................................................141...................71

AC•Tech.........................................................CVR2-1, 65............1, 35

International Roofing Expo....................................157...................77

Ad Art/Genesis Light Solutions...............................81, 97..............43, 51

Jones Sign.............................................................89....................47

American Louver...................................................123...................62 Ameritech Facility Services, LLC ...........................41....................24 Anchor Sign...........................................................19....................16 Arecont Security....................................................31....................21 Assa Abloy............................................................149...................73 ATAS International Inc...........................................131...................66

Lakeview Construction, Inc....................................11.....................8 Mapes..................................................................154...................76 The McIntosh Group............................................59, 83..............33, 44 Newton...................................................................5......................3 nora.......................................................................23....................18

Beam Team...........................................................45....................26

OxBlue..................................................................105...................55

Bostik....................................................................21....................17

P&C Construction, Inc............................................79....................42

Calpipe Security Bollards.................................... 60-61..................34

Pabco Gypsum

Carney Contracting Services..................................29....................20

Philadelphia Sign...................................................93....................49

Cawley.................................................................115...................60

Porcelanosa USA....................................................71....................38

Chicago Clamp.....................................................129...................65

Prime Retail Services.............................................57....................32

Clayton Signs........................................................137...................69

Protos Security.....................................................111...................58

Commerical Construction & Renovation Summit 2017................................... 35-37..................23

Quite Rock......................................................................147...................... 72

Construction Data Co. (CDC).................................165...................81

R.E. Crawford Construction.............................................15....................... 12

Commicators Inter................................................153...................75

Rebcor Construction Inc.........................................51....................29

CONSTRUCT-ED....................................................163...................80

Retail Maintenance Specialists...............................73....................39

Construction One....................................................9......................7

Rockerz Inc....................................................... 7, 84-85..............4, 45

Controlled Power...................................................16....................13 Core States............................................................75....................40 Cosentino..............................................................47....................27 Coverings.............................................................161...................79 Covestro...............................................................107...................56

Salsbury.................................................................8......................5 Schimenti..........................................................8, CVR4..............6, 84 Selser Schaefer Architects.....................................77....................41 ShopTalk 360.........................................................13.....................9

Egan Sign..............................................................95....................50

Signage Solutions..................................................99....................52

Elro Sign...............................................................139...................70

SMI Sign System ..................................................87....................46

EMG......................................................................55....................31

Storefloors.............................................................53....................30

Fairmont Sign Company.........................................67....................36

SuperBright LEDS.................................................133...................67

Federal Heath.......................................................117...................61

Transceramica......................................................151...................74

FPL.......................................................................135...................68

UHC Corp...............................................................27....................19

The Garland Company, Inc.....................................17....................14 Georgia Printco.....................................................159...................78 Graybar.................................................................49....................28 Hager...................................................................109...................57 ICON.....................................................................127...................64 Identicom Sign Solutions.......................................91....................48

Viking Electronics.................................................101...................53 Wagner...............................................................13, 17..............10, 15 Warner Bros.........................................................CVR3..................83 WE Cork...............................................................167...................82 Window Film Depot...............................................103...................54

Illumatech, Inc.......................................................43....................25

Wolverine Building Group.......................................33....................22

Imagilux..................................................................3......................2

Yale Commercial Solutions....................................113...................59

Innovative Dehumidifier Systems...........................69....................37

ZipWall..................................................................14....................11

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


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PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Thank you and get ready for 2017

O

n Dec. 17, 2001, I resigned my position at Nielsen to become an entrepreneur. Fifteen years later and I’m still standing – proud of the anniversary that hits

right before the holidays.

It was a very scary thing to give up a six figure income, expense account for travel and entertainment, a 401K program and secure employment for the foreseeable future. Honestly, I probably could have retired from there comfortably. But life sometimes makes you roll the dice, think big and take a risk. Were there naysayers? Totally. Nine out 10 start ups don’t make it for one reason or another. In my mind, I knew I was going to be that one out of 10 that was going to live on and fight another day. And that’s what we’ve done. My motto has always been, “Just get-r-done!” It wasn’t easy to start right after the 9/11 attacks. The economy was coming off the dot.com bubble burst – everything was in a tailspin, as advertising dollars were kept close to the vest. But just like in sports, to be the best, you have to play the best. You have to go up against the big boys – and that included my ex-employer. I had to take it one day at a time. Knowing how important business partnerships and people are to your survival in today’s competitive business environment is crucial to anyone’s success. I had to have a nice set of blinders on and understand that getting a lot of “no’s” is a numbers game to get to those “yeses.” You just don’t know when they’ll come. Work hard and smart every day, stay determined

Knowing how important business partnerships and people are to your survival in today’s competitive business environment is crucial to anyone’s success.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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and never, ever quit. Do that, and you’ll most likely succeed while riding out the speed bumps that can make the ride bumpy on some days. Recently, I attended a Denver University (DU) Atlanta Alumni Chapter Dinner Reception. The speaker was the CFO from The Home Depot, Carol Tome. It was a very inspiring discussion. The one thing I took away from her talk was that you must “think big” and never, ever give up. So, as I reflect over the last 15 years on all those ups and downs, I want to say “thank you” to everybody who helped us keep the lights on today: First, a big “thank you” to my wife, son and family, which includes our five dogs that always have a smile on their face. Thank you to our subscribers, attendees, advertisers and sponsors – you’re golden in our eyes. Thank you to our staff and all the vendors that help us produces our magazine, websites, Summit, Retreats and Networking Receptions 24/7/365 with class and professionalism. Thank you to our printer and the USPS for working with us to print and deliver our top-notch B2B construction title. Thank you to my doctors and dentists for keeping me in tip-top shape. And most of all, thank you to our military personnel and first responders for keeping us safe so we can pursue life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Their sacrifices will never be forgotten. So to all, as we close out 2016, here’s to much success and good health in the New Year ahead. We’re looking forward to an awesome 2017 for us all. Happy Holidays and keep the faith.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2016


CIRCLE NO. 83


CIRCLE NO. 84

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR Nov Dec 16  

CCR Nov Dec 16