Page 1

^^^^rOy^LyM^

COMMEMORATION CEREMONY THE ONE HUNDIIEDTH ANNIVERSAllY OF HIS FIRST

INAUGURATION

East Front of

th

Capitol

IQOI

IVe

are not enemies, hut friends,

We

must not

be enemies."


c,,.-

C

i^'>


LINCOLN ROOM UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY

MEMORIAL the Class of

1901

founded by

HARLAN HOYT HORNER and

HENRIETTA CALHOUN HORNER


THE ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST INAUGURATION OF

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

•

I86I-I96I

REENACTMENT CEREMONIES

The mystic cords of memory, stretching from . . every battlefield, and patriot grave, to every living heart and hearthstone, all over this broad land, will .

yet swell the chorus

of the

Union, ivhen again

touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.

.

.

.


O X

o S & w Z

<

O Z Q < a:

o en u.

X u a!

^

^

> u u X w S H o < n. X M O H fZ z U. w o

o o I o

< < X O u

X < H z z w O z X g < a D < 2 ^ Z o o p < u. * z z

o u z J J

•*


£2

Z

O

o 3 ^ H O D Q O Pi

0.

w M o H z w

w X o u a z < o o b; P 03 Q Q H z X < V) o O X M £^ <; X H o O z z" o: 2 03 H z"

o \0

o !j >j H o o Z w

H U < M e:

o < J < OS D O D < Z Z -)

o o z


-^

87TH CONGRESS, 2D SESSION

.

.

HOUSE DOCUMENT NO. 523

}~

CEREMONIES AND RE-ENACTMENT OF

THE ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF

The

First

Inauguration of

ABRAHAM LINCOLN 1861-1961 On

the

East Front of the Capitol of the United States

March

4,

ig6i

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON

:

1962


Contents

Page

x

House Joint Resolution No. 155 Introduction and Synopsis

xvii

Congressional Record Report

Report 1

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Lincoln

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;March

9,

ig6i

Inauguration Centennial,

.... March

4,

21

961

Editorial from the

Arrangements

i

Washington Post

for the Original Lincoln Inaugural

31

...

33 37

Epilogue

[VII

]


Letter of Transmittal

The Honorable Lyndon

B. Johnson,

President of the Senate

The Honorable John W. McCormack, Speaker of the House of Representatives

Dear Mr. President and Mr. Speaker: of the Joint pleasant duty and high honor on behalf Civil War Columbia of the District on Arrangements,

my

It is

Committee

Sedgwick, Chairman, and the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia, Paul H. Gantt, President, to present to you and to the Congress this report of the One Hundredth Annias reproduced versary of the First Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, on the East Front of the United States Capitol and at the Willard Hotel,

Centennial Commission, Paul

March

4,

J.

1961.

Sincerely,

Fred Schwengel, Chairman.

[

IX

]


House

Joint Resolution No. 155

Congress of the United States of 2imerica

l^ightg'Scticnth

AT THE FIRST SESSION Begun and held

Washington on Tuesday, the third day of January, one thousaftd nine hundred and sixty-one

at the City of

Joint 'Resolution

To

commemorate the one hundredth anniversary inaugural of Abraham Lincoln.

committee

create a joint

of the

to

first

Whereas Saturday, March

Abraham

1961,

4,

will

mark

Lincoln's taking the oath of office

the

centenary of as sixteenth President

and

of the United States;

Whereas the anniversary will be widely observed and noted throughout this land and overseas; and Whereas the

the occasion will coincide with exercises

American

Civil

War

of 1861-1865;

Whereas Mr. Lincoln stood United States and

and

travail;

its

at the

Armed

commemorative

of

and

head of the Government of the

Forces during those years of tragedy

and

Whereas he foresaw the

difficulty of the task before

him

as "greater

than that which rested on Washington"; and Whereas he sought the guidance of Almighty God, saying, "Without the assistance of that Divine Being ... I cannot succeed. With that assistance

I

cannot

Whereas one who stood

later write, "the shouts

are

still

ringing in

Whereas from

a

fail";

and

in the audience at his first inauguration

my

wooden

which have resounded ears.";

for

him

would

at the Capitol

and

platform, projected from the eastern portico,

beneath an unfinished dome, he pleaded and reasoned that day for reconciliation

and the preservation of the Union, saying:

[X]


with no mental reservations, and

"I take the official oath today,

with no purpose to construe the Constitution or laws, by any hypercritical rules

....

I

hold, that in contemplation of universal law,

and of the Constitution, the Union of these States is perpetual .... It is safe to say that no government proper, ever had a provision in its

organic law for

its

own

.... Before

termination

entering upon

so grave a matter as the destruction of our national fabric, with all its

its

benefits,

memories, and

tain precisely

why we do

while there

any

is

its

would

hopes,

it

not be wise to ascer-

Will you hazard so desperate a

it ?

possibility that

any portion of the

ills

you

step,

from,

fly

have no real existence ? are greater than

all

Will you, while the certain ills you fly to, the real ones you fly from ? Will you risk the

commisison of so fearful a mistake?

.

.

.

Physically speaking,

we

cannot separate. We cannot remove our respective sections from each other, nor build an impassable wall between them. A husband

and wife may be divorced, and go out of the presence, and beyond the reach of each other but the different parts of our country cannot ;

They cannot but remain face to face and intercourse, either amicable or hostile, must continue between them .... We are not do

this.

;

enemies, but friends.

We

must not be enemies.

Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic cords of memory, stretching from every battlefield, and

patriot grave, to every living heart

this

broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union,

and hearthstone,

all

over

when

again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature."

and

Whereas the

better angels do, in fact, touch us:

Now,

therefore, be

it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of

America

next, the one

in

Congress assembled, That on Saturday, March 4

hundredth anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's

first in-

commemorated auguration may be determined by the committee on arrangements in cooperation with the national Civil War Centennial Commission, the Civil War Centennial shall

be

Commission of the

by such observance as

District of

Columbia, and the Lincoln Group of

the District of Columbia. this resolution, the President of the

Immediately upon passage of Senate shall appoint four the

House

Members of the Senate and Members of the House

shall appoint four

tives jointly to constitute a

the Speaker of

of Representa-

committee on arrangements. [

XI

]


Immediately upon passage of this resolution and after the Members of the Senate and House have been appointed, the Speaker shall direct the committee on arrangements to meet and select a chairman from

one of their

and needed

own group and such other officers as will who will immediately proceed to plan,

with the national Civil

War

be appropriate in cooperation

Centennial Commission, the Civil

War

Centennial Commission of the District of Columbia and the Lincoln

Group

of the District of Columbia, an appropriate ceremony, issue

United

invitations- to the President of the

States, the

Vice President of

the United States, Secretaries of departments, heads of independent agencies, office, and commissions, the Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the

Supreme Court,

the diplomatic corps, assistant heads

Columbia, members of the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia, centennial commissions from the various States, Civil War roundtables, State and of departments.

Commissioners of the

local historical

and

patriotic societies,

scholars in the field of history as

District of

and such other students and

may have

a special interest in the

occasion, organize a reenactment of Mr. Lincoln's

on

the eastern portico of the Capitol, select a

ticipants,

first

inauguration

speaker and other par-

prepare and publish a program and submit a report not later

than June

i,

1961.

Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

Lyndon

B. Johnson,

Vice President of the United States and President of the Senate.

Approved John F. Kennedy, March i, ig6i. :

[

XII

]


The

Joint

Committee on Arrangements Fred Schwengel, Chairman

For the Senate

For the House

Paul H. Douglas

Peter F. Mack,

of Illinois

Everett M. Dirksen

WiNFiELD K. Denton of Indiana

of Illinois

John Sherman Cooper

Fred Schwengel

of Kentucl{y

of

Vance Hartke

Iowa

William G. Bray

of Indiana

of Indiana

STAFF David C. Mearns, Secretary H. Newlin Megill, Chief Consultant

William A. Coblenz, Lloyd A. Dunlap,

Edmund

Jr.

of Illinois

Director of Tableau

Assistant Secretary

Gass, Consultant

Victor M. Birely, Consultant

Carl Haverlin, Consultant

i

XIII

]


1861

1961 CentenniAl

Com raem oration

Ccremonie*

IjuugniracioQ of

ABRAHAM LrNCOLN Admit Bearer

to East Front of Cnpttol

Mircl. Fourth l-^l

T'h'^

One

Owlt-wm.

Hundredth

Anniversary

°^ "le

Inaugura] of

Abraham Lincoln

AS PART OF THE

COMMEMORATIVE CEREMONIES

March Fourth

Invuaiion 10 LmLuIn Inuugunil Centennial Lunclicon 1

|>.m.

Sub>cri)><ii>n ul ten >liiMjt>

For rcscnadons

P.S.

lu lunilicim

ii

1961

Commemoration Ceremonies

WilUrd Hoiel Iti.iugurntmn of

Imluda

call: Sicrling ^-35^5,

— Subtcripiitw

CetitcnninI

iiiiiiniL'nmialivc pliic

Lincoln In.iu^i.ral CcnicnniaJ

not rn]uiin) iix iiIiciKlanic

at

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

ind ntnJal

Commii

Admit

HONORED

CUF.ST to OH The Capitol

Scn.itc ClinmK-.

Cipiiul ceremony

:^,4lC^y^-

INVITATIONS AND TICKETS TO FUNCTIONS OF THE LINCOLN RE-ENACTMENT CEREMONIES.


District of

Columbia Paul

War

Civil J.

Centennial Commission

Sedgwick, Chairman

Sigurd Anderson Marshall Andrews

Alexander Holtzoff

Elden Billings

C.

Henry Brylawski Leon Chatelain

William H. Press

J.

B.

Heffernan

M.

Keller

Mrs. B. Y. Martin

Henry A. Dudley E. M. Eller

William H. Price

M. McKelway Roger Robb B.

Robert E. Freer

West A. Hamilton

J.

Gay Seabourne

Samuel D. Sturgis

The Lincoln Group of

the District of Columbia

Paul H. Gantt, President

Elden E.

Billings, ist Vice President

Judge Arthur M. Smith, 2d Vice President Mrs. Louise

W.

Williams, Treasurer

George H. Landes, Jr., Recording Secretary Mrs. Anna V. Hausman, Corresponding Secretary

Lincoln Inaugural Centennial Committee Cochairman

Cochairman

Earle D. Chesney

C. Wyatt Dickerson

Chairman

of

Ralph

[

Arrangements

E. Becker

XV]


Introduction and Synopsis

the opinion of this

IS

ITCommemoration

Committee

that the

Ceremony, March

4th,

One Hundredth Anniversary of Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln,

1961, of the

the First

duphcating on the

steps of the Capitol the

Asia and thus encompassed the earth and reached even to vast competitive potentials of contention in outer space.

This was also a reenactment of history that

had for the current generation what the Lincoln

audience

could

expected to have had full knowledge

annals of the Capitol of the United States.

immense meaning

Historically far

less

It

reproduced.

was, in

so dramatically

it

fact,

:

American

a restatement

The grandeur and

government implying ation of Americans is ments

in unity

by Lincoln and It

and

sonality

who was

richly this gener-

disaster

had so grown

justice

bequeathed

his time.

that originally

people of the era of 1961 to match for them-

and

their posterity

by

their

own

Nor

had

figure,

what

their forebears of the era of 1861 to

make freedom

at

whatever

come

to witness this

cost —

—on

this very plaza

—witnessed

the actual inauguration.

deeds

done

in the century since,

play acting and listen to the contemporary speeches, was twice the size of the audience

it

afforded a remarkable stimulus to the

selves

the focus of this national

that the 1961 audience

living off the achieveto

cir-

the stature of the per-

and American

tradition

how

of the extraordinary

Nation into the greatest tragedy of its somewhat less than four-score and seven years.

of a powerful moral lesson in the philosophy

of the

of the

cumstances that were in 1861 to catapult the

was of course secondary and

it

than the event

actual

be

not

swearing in exercises of exactly a century before, was the greatest epic of its kind in the

tion,

For

that alone.

now

this

same

central

re-created in living personifica-

had shaken the

ideas of

world statesmen

fact on this soil. The restatement was the more compelling, not only because of the brilliant commentary from

and invested the thinking of nation builders from China's Sun Yat-sen to India's Nehru. Schoolchildren in

Tokyo named him

contemporary notables that was so

most respected of

all

an established

vital

part of the ceremony, but because the tion in 1961, as in 1861,

complex of crises that

Cuba

to Berlin

was

now

a

Na-

and from Berhn

O

-

62

-

2

men

of action, but poets

figures."

Not

and dreamers

everywhere, recognized in him the divine culmination of some turning point for good in the tortured record of mankind. Tolstoy

distressed by a extended from to Southeast

[ 88157

only

world

"the

XVII

]


LINCOLN ARRIVES IN WASHINGTON, I86I, FOR INAUGURATION

classified

went

"all

their

Lincoln the "only giant" among the great national statesmen of his-

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; tory" a formidable testimonial coming from this literary titan of

Even their

ante-Communist Russia.

Soviet propagandists of this decade, in

own

far out of their

CONCEPTION.

way

to pay Lincoln

kind of homage. For Americans the pure gold of the Lincoln story from 1861 to the end of time consists in

confused and distorted techniques, [

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ARTISTS

XVIII

the fact that this President,

any other President before or ]

more than

since,

and

per-


LINCOLN,

ON ARM OF PRESIDENT BUCHANAN, ENTERS SENATE CHAMBER BEFORE INAUGURATION.

haps more than any other figure in

and even reverently they trailed after the horse-drawn carriage that had

all

American

history, was so absolutely and indigenously, so utterly and typically, Amer-

ancient

belonged

Some like Andrew Jackson who approached him in this regard, and had much

him

ican.

of

the

stuff

of

greatness, have

not,

The

all this

was deeply

The

what was

of the crowds.

this 1961

Lincoln.

And

on

their

via television â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even â&#x20AC;&#x201D; phonograph records reporting the com-

and

memoration, was a further measure of the almost spiritual hold Abraham Lincoln has

lips of

then affectionately [

giving

repercussions afterwards in the news-

papers, on the radio

They followed avidly the

words of the 1861 Inaugural from the

ceremonies,

that took

"one of ours."

reflected

said that day by Speaker Sam and Rayburn by Carl Sandburg. It was inspiringly manifest in the reaction

in

Grant and

unspoken paean of thankfulness to Providence that this immortal of all the ages is

stage.

sense of

the

applause and their devotion as if he were, indeed, the real Lincoln of a century before. The crowd seemed to be expressing an

like

Lincoln, matched either his universal appeal, or made so compelling an impact on the

world

to President

from

upon XIX

1

the

minds and the hearts of whole


generations of his fellow-citizens. For this theatric reproduction had far less the quality

an

of

entertainment

or a documentary and much more the atmosphere of pageant

the reincarnation of the essence of history â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

almost like a devoutly religious play predicated upon a sacred event in Holy Writ.

What

follows in this

document

is

the ful-

fillment of the Committee's function, as pre-

House

scribed in

Joint Resolution 155, pre-

senting as compactly as may be, a full report of the commemoration to the Congress of the

United

The Committee

States.

is

especially

indebtedness not only to the participants in the event whose con-

earger to proclaim

tribution

behind planned,

was the

its

so apparent, but also to those

who organized and avoided a thousand and one and who made

certain that

the timing and pacing, the drama, the movethe whole, measured

up

to high

was

sunset

ing hour.

.

The

."

.

tone of these orations

was superbly set by the music of the U.S. Marine Band under the baton of Lt. Col. Albert F. Schoepper, and then, solemnly, by the invocation of the Reverend Donald W.

Mayberry, of Later,

John's Episcopal Church.

St.

on the same prayerful

note, the Rev-

erend George M. Docherty, pastor of the

New York

Avenue Presbyterian Church,

closed the formal portion of the ceremonies,

pleading that:

".

.

.

In our day and genera-

tion grant us such courage as

we do

this

notables,

and

self-sacrifice

day commemorate.

There was

scenes

who

possible pitfalls,

ment of

and dawn, moonrise and noon sun, dry leaves in an autumn wind, and springtime blossoms, dying time and birth-

it

an

Members

.

."

.

impressive assembly of of Congress from both

Houses, Ambassadors, Government officials and people prominent in the life of the country and the District of Columbia, who

For

formed part of the massive dramatis persons. Particularly distinguished among these and

Speaker Rayburn and Poet Sandburg lent a special significance to the event because

on the podium on the opposite end of the platform from Chairman Fred Schwengel,

each in terms of his position in American

was the Chief

Justice of the

Earl Warren.

It

standards of professional competence. all this was done.

life

was

a singularly outstanding personality.

The Rayburn

speech, referring to himself

as the son of a

Confederate

soldier,

had a

and a content that only he himself could have given it: "I have always thought," quality

he

said, "if

had not been for hotheads

it

in the

South and the inane and insane agitators of the

North

that

Abraham

Lincoln, by his

justice, his fairness his great statesmanship,

would have prevented the

The

Civil

War.

.

.

."

83-year-old Carl

Sandburg said of the first Inauguration: "It was a great day in American history, of which we might say [

United

was arranged

temporary speeches be delivered

was

to occur

from the podium

States,

that the con-

This

first.

built in replica

of the stand that served Lincoln in

When

1861.

contemporary portion of the ceremony was completed with the Sandburg this

Chairman Schwengel, the Chief Justice, and others invited to the podium, withdrew to a section on the steps address, the speakers.

of the Capitol reserved for them, and the reenactment began. For this again the reconstructed

stand,

built

on the

Lincoln original, was the stage

XX]

lines

of

setting.

the


ARTISTS I86I SKETCH OF LINCOLN INAUGURAL PROCESSION PASSING CAPITOL GATES.


The

hstened

Lincoln— 10,000

to

now—settled down

then,

20,000

nalia

for the pageant of the

Chairman Schwengel, pointing

day, as

to the

narrator, signaled the beginning of this part

of the

was the presence of communication parapher-

audience, twice the size of that which

From

commemoration.

the time that

The

pertinence and dramatic effectiveness occurred at the mo-

refurbished for the event

as

Tredway Gill,

Jr.,

A.

Stephen

to

high hat and buggy whip was careful wear the expressionless stone face suitable

The procurement of the carriage one of the smaller achievements of the was to his part.

Columbia

District of

:

Civil

War

Commission's Chairman, Paul

E.

He

Douglas; William

obtained

it

Centennial

J.

through Fearson

Sedgwick. S.

Meeks,

whose grandfather made the carriage, Meeks Body Works having prospered in

Roger B. Taney; Clarence B. Hannibal Hamlin, the Vice Presi-

as

as

to the

up

in the

entourage Mrs.

Mary Todd Lincoln; Ralph

Jane Gill as

Becker

his

—drove

steps of the Capitol to take "President Lincoln" to the Hotel Willard. The coachman

the grand stone

of the crowds.

formed

of

podium, to the moment the old Grant carriage disappeared with this Ulysses Lincoln down Pennsylvania Avenue, the reenactment won the wholehearted approval actors that

touch

ultimate

ment when, the reenactment over, a horsedrawn carriage of the Lincoln period

stairs to the

The

changes wrought

by a century.

Richmond, Va., and the Fellow Community Actors came with slow and steady steps out

down

of in Lincoln's time that

in bold relief the

provided

the duplicate Lincoln, John C. Collison, of

of the Capitol and

undreamed

Ray Moore as President James Buchanan H. P. Newson as Senator Edward

area

dent;

for

more

than

a

the the

This,

century.

incidentally, was the very carriage that served A Ulysses S. Grant during his Presidency.

;

D. Baker of Oregon; Al Carwil as Henry Watterson, the journalist; and A. Tyler as

second carriage that

Senator James A. Pearce from

and was of a similar vintage was obtained

costume

all in

—gave

— Maryland

for the event

The Committee

pageantry and the drama derived fur-

ther charm — and authenticity, too— from the

to the toilers

kind of guard of honor,

all

appearance, around the

Guard,

a

as

podium and

pressure of

"crash

them came

Union uniforms, With some of them in what

from

realistic

carrying the actual

were

complete

of the Sharpsburg Rifle

of Sharpsburg, Md., in brilliant, dis-

tinguishable,

rifles

their ladies,

said to be actual

general

The

with

interesting

and

the

what

a

who had

to

arrangements under the is

— program" in

generally

known

this instance in

Saturday to a Saturday.

i

as

a

week,

There

is

must be added, were the on the staff and directorial level of:

Oustanding, services

it

David C. Mearns, Victor M.

Lloyd A. Dunlap, Earle D. Chesney, Paul H. Gantt,

color.

and exciting anachronism [

behind the scenes

person named anywhere in the hardly program who did not make a contribution.

costumes of the Lincoln

conviction

feels particularly grateful

a

of the period.

era or reproductions, the whole filling out the

scene

joined the parade

by Henry Brylawski, another member of the Commission.

the pageant an added

note of validity.

The

now

XXII

]

Birely,


••?Ti

m'^_^

'^

'

1


THE

S FIRST INAUGURATION WITNESSED BY HALF THE SIZE OF THE CROWD THAT CAME TO ATTEND THE RE-ENACTMENT A CENTURY LATER.

I86I SCENE OF LINCOLN

confidence and the a

command, factor

performance key success. Moreover he had been an especially contrived

that

in

made

the

his

event's

fortified

with

difficulty,

it

was [

to cover the situation by

diverting

attention

difficulty

developed.

to

his

The

narration.

No

writing of the

script, direction of the pageant, rehearsal of

script so that in the

event of some unforeseen

his responsibility

the principals, arrangement for the settings,

XXIV

]


were assigned by the Chairman

William

to

was involved and none

A. Coblenz, Public Affairs Specialist of the Legislative Reference Service of the Library

Resolution.

of Congress.

the

It

acknowledge

is

a pleasure gratefully to

his magnificent contribution to

The

The Committee cannot

from

pass

this

mentioned

in the

Committee on Arrangements of is

Congress

to accord

pleased

recognition to the District of

War

the exercises.

Joint

is

special

Columbia

Civil

Centennial Commission for conceiving

and inspiring the idea of the commemoration

reference to the assistance rendered by Mr.

fully 2 years before

Coblenz without expressing its deep appreciation of his work. As the warm, vibrant

working toward the event long before the Congress gave it its massive endorsement and

author and director of the tableau, he wove

contributed

into the

commemorative program

a spirit of

was

sion

disciplined imagination can create.

instance to the

idea for the

commemoration may

be said to have been inherent in history itself. The event obviously called for observance

and the homage to

occur

in

to

many

it

was bound

places

at

therefore

once.

The

atmosphere in Washington that constantly bathed the Capital with an intense consciousness of the Nation's past

demanded

annals as

the

the idea

first

was a

Lincoln Inauguration.

for the

Commis-

Chairman, Mr. Sedgwick,

broached the commemoration idea in the

from whence

it

Washington Round gravitated to the

who first

Table,

Commission

under

his chairmanship. Wyatt Dickerson and Earle Chesney were called in to assist the Commission and the Committee as was

Ralph E. Becker the

who

served as

Chairman

of

Committee on Arrangements. In due Commission created plans for its

course the

in

the

operation between the

growth among the several committees named in this document, but matured quickly and on a giant scale

when

powerful and original

reenactment, for the

parade, and for the luncheon at the Willard. There was thenceforward wholehearted co-

nition for so signal a chapter in the Nation's

Thus

its

participation

recog-

final fruition, thus

The prime mover

plans.

realism and natural color which only the well-developed talents of a fine mind and

The basic

own

its

its

joint

Commission and the

Committee on Arrangements of the Congress when it was called into being in Joint

the Congress, on the initiative of Repre-

February 1961.

Fred Schwengel, who introduced the resolution, took hold to give it a national

Hotel Willard downtown, and the luncheon

momentum

there immediately after the Capitol proceed-

The complete

sentative

stance.

from

It

the

gained

immense

immediate

and

wholehearted

Sam Rayburn and

ings,

closing ceremonies at the

seemed to be invested with the

less

the

solemn and more gala note that probably

minority as well as the majority leaderships in both Houses. Cooperation from nonbut the major

marked that part of the day a century before. There were addresses again mostly extemporaneous from Carl Sandburg, Chairman

sponsor was, of course, the Congress of the

Schwengel, and others, and some comments

cooperation of Speaker

Government groups was United

States.

No

total,

Federal

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

from John C.

appropriation [

XXV

]

Collison, the impersonator of


Lincoln,

all

of

it

under the

Diligent efforts were

toast-

skillful

made

crown

to

the

mastership of Robert V. Fleming. Toastmaster Fleming, it was explained, is himself a distant cousin of President Abraham Lin-

commemoration with a Lincoln Inaugural Ball for the evening of March 4, but the

Hanks branch of the family, Joshua Hanks and Abraham Lincoln's mother Nancy Hanks

abandonment

having been distant cousins.

program without it.

coln through his relationship to the

The immense banquet

out to the elevators and the air was filled with the lighter and exultant note associated with the celebration of a political party enjoying a national triumph.

This was due in part

also to the sensation of seeking a repetition

down

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;of

menu Much of

even to the

a century ago.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

this occurrence

the felicity of the

Willard luncheon stemmed from the effort that

had been given the arrangements by the Columbia Civil War Centennial

District of

Commission under whose auspices

it

was

held in conjunction with the Metropolitan

nary

For the that this

note, but

added

a vital

and

a novel feature

business firms

by having present Washington that had been operating during and before 1861,

and

all

who

of

whom

were suitably recognized

are identified later in this report

its

great

the

accompanied

hope of

the

Committee

this

will serve as a footnote to

how

These, as we know, and the words, that perhaps

to deeds of greatness.

are the deeds

more than any other, immortalize the American story and make it enduring. Here, too, giving testimony to this reverence for a great

hour are the words of such respected and honored men of our time as will be found in the

ensuing pages. Finally,

this

Committee

most earnestly the hope that within of restraint and dignity, other his-

toric events in the annals of

American

his-

tory will, like Lincoln's First Inauguration,

become the

As

subject of renewal

representatives of the people,

tainly strive to that

and

we

end in order

revival.

will certhat our

people will forever derive faith and conviction

(p. 29).

to

no

left

our generation was in no small part touched by the eternal flame that moved Lincoln and his fellow-citizens

the limits

and singers of

it is

history revealing

mittee not only brought the U.S. Marine festivities,

rest

document

entertains

Orchestra into the

that

gratification

The Com-

Washington Board of Trade.

factors led

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;an omission that

disappointment in the light of the extraordi-

was crowded

hall

and other

lack of time

from

their

American

traditions.

The Committee.

[

XXVI

]


The Committee ment

inserts, at this

point in the report, the full account of the ceremony

as printed in the Congressional Record, Thursday,

March

9,

1961, pages

A

and

reenact-

iGyg-A 1682.

The 100th Anniversary of the Inaugural of Abraham Lincoln Extension of Remarks of Hon. Fred Schwengel, of Iowa, in the

House

Mr. Schwengel.

Mr. Speaker, on Saturit was the will of Con-

March 4, 1961, gress to commemorate day,

of Representatives, Thursday,

March

9,

796/

program, just as it took place, with the remarks of our beloved Speaker and

for the entire

the address of the distinguished

the looth anniversary

American

Abraham

author, Carl Sandburg, be printed in the

occasion took place at

appropriate ceremony for this 1 1 a.m. at the east front

Congressional Record so that it can be preserved for all time and made available to

of the Capitol.

others

was privileged to have a role in this ceremony and was pleased that we were blessed

of the program.

with good weather so that the some 20,000 who gathered there and those who saw and

include this

of the

first

Lincoln.

inaugural of President

An

I

Under

who

rience can testify that

program

it,

historic contributions to

one of the

we

Appendix

of the Record.

in

I

its

The

follows:

I

present the Reverend

W. Mayberry

of the St. John's Epis-

Mr. Schwengel.

Members could

appropriate, therefore, that

remarks,

conducting.)

Donald copal

Church

for the invocation.

Rev. Dr. Mayberry.

Let us pray.

Oh, God, who moves among the centuries and through faith in whom do we,

involved and because of other commitments. is

my

(Music: the U.S. Marine Band; Lt. Col. Albert F. Schoepper, U.S. Marine Corps,

Unfortunately, many not be present and thousands of others had to miss the event because of the travel distance

It

extend

PROGRAM

our heritage.

of the

to

commemoration ceremony

what we heard and saw

too, will take its place as

be interested to have a copy

THE LINCOLN INAUGURAL COMMEMORATION

shared in this rich expe-

on that day will be one of the highlights of the Civil War Centennial observance, and that

leave

entirety in the

heard the program on radio and television could relive this great moment in history.

Those of you

who may

as author,

provide

[I

I


M H < ai O < M I M s O o Z u < > o H z" w a:

-*

M

s ^

U

OS

< < BS

< u o Q -1

Z D < Z M

~ OS

<

i0-

^

lA <0

Z s

ai

X o

< X

<

a I a: a. O z ": O O £ u M M Z < 3 H »* u Z I .

Z I o z o < OS D D <

Z o H Z z M Q Q -! W z

G o a.

^


living as in the chapters therein, find out our

We

Hves become rich.

Abraham

servant

honor

Lincoln,

this day, Thy who standing here

amidst a people torn and anguished did lift his spirit above the false strength of malice to

beyond factions and Thy perfect will, and in Thee found way and his Nation's way, so may we with simplicity of heart find Thee in the com-

Thy

and

spirit,

his will

strive to

his his

selves to

we

us,

way

it.

pray, the endurance to possess

and

no peer

Mr. Speaker,

leagues, distinguished guests,

my

my

had, just as

to

A man who

country.

and

he

in our heritage

wisdom and example

chairman

from

better kernels of

Abraham I

and

all

audience

to

meet and greet

of you in the radio

who

will

share

in

and

low any

This experience,

if

sort of

demonstration on

al-

this plaza.

here today for a special reason, and that is, to reenact the inauguration of one of the

moving,

greatest

meaningful, and momentous experience in our national life, which took place here loo years ago today.

welcoming you today on Capi-

inaugurate our Presidents here, and have for more than a century; but we meet

television

this

to join the

We

you here

of

am happy

committees of the Senate and the House

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;American

all

in

I

and

There are few occasions upon which the

to plant in the hearts of

Lincoln.

am glad

as

tol Hill.

with better prospects for good people results for the future than from the life and

most American

remarks

care to make.

fellow Americans,

now

experience of our

for such

of the committee, distinguished guests

the seed that

brings forth the harvest of the future."

no place

may

American

Speaker Sam Rayburn. Sam Rayburn. Mr. Chairman, members

Building here in the District of Columbia are inscribed these words:

is

to

knows now that I speak of Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives, and now I yield

a pillar to the entrance of the Archives

There

as

All of America

fellow coun-

to this great

which we can take more or

has served his people

the Congress.

col-

of you.

is

honor and

Nation extremely well, and longer Speaker than any other man ever elected

each and

heritage of the past

a great

his

trymen, speaking for the Congress, whose I am, I extend a cordial welcome to

"The

is

it

first,

me to present a man who has the man we honor with this pro-

gram, a tremendous influence for good in our

servant

On

an American

privilege for

our beloved Mr.

all

listen to

America.

in

Now, and

Amen. Mr. ScHWENGEL.

we

as a part of this

statesman and to an American sage, poet, and historian whose respect and reputation has

God's name.

in

it

and proper,

fitting

experience, that

Thy peace and may the blessing of God be amongst us and through us illumine

We ask

as

It is

distribute

the lives of others.

do

commemorated, can

our day to help us along our difficult we prepare ourselves to contend with

in

the struggles of our day.

our day. In the self-giving of ourThou has set out happiness. Give

plexities of

and

understood

much

Americans

one of the greatest

in

men

all

of

our history and

all

Prejudice, hate, agitation

the Civil War.

properly

[3]

I

time.

brought about

have always thought

if

it


had not been for hotheads

South and

in the

Abraham

that

his

fairness,

Lincoln, by great

his

justice,

statesmanship,

Our

country that needed.

after that

was

over,

so,

come upon

I

today

;

this platform,

I

presented a

resentatives

him

short

to the

House

War

ument

of

American

with

Mr. Sandburg. I

when

people

gotten

that

that hate,

and

I

am

occasion

prejudice,

we have

when we

heart, that

man

for-

silence

Beyond

there were

10,000

the words of the speaker

immediate audience

this

into

on

all

such questions

or that?"

Union.

Six States

Big

as,

"How will

be your policy?"

"What

will

on

this

you

act

had seceded from the

screaming

black

letters

in

Charleston, S.C., cried to the wide world.

celebrate the inauguration

"The Union

with a

with a heart of gold, and

an old reporter

fragments. During the 4 months since his election Lincoln had kept

forgotten

man

as

years ago to the day were 10,000

who hung on

shattered

and today we are proud indeed, happy to welcome you on this great

of that great statesman, that

I

of people

prevented, some terrible things happening in some parts of our beloved country. But

we have

that

wondering whether the American Union of States would hold together or be

that

he could have prevented, and would have

north, south, east, and west,

with

were 30 million people in 34 States who Over to know what he was saying. in the countries of Europe were more millions

the hearts

North

mon-

is

wanted

to assassinate Lincoln. in

100 years ago

of the day.

and the Southland was

in the

It

Sam Rayburn and

Here 100

saddest thing that ever happened to

and minds of the people

and

it

myself are agreed that the crowd here today is nearly double that

while ago, that Carl

Lincoln was strong enough

has

could offer the point of information that

Mr.

of Rep-

ing.

man

literature."

Perhaps

listening to Lincoln.

insane

has quickened

and eager expectancy

understood him better than any man who has ever written about him since his pass-

the border States

He

has lavished his

present the magnificent, the incomparable Carl Sandburg.

of

for an

telling.

Years," are acknowledged through-

Sandburg had studied Lincoln more and

The

its

He

it.

He

it.

grateful pride

and

many distinguished people and many out in front of me, to say to you as I have said when

and

out the world as constituting "a noble

he was

proud our great Union was preserved

inseparably identified with

life to

genius upon

you, Mr. Sam.

made it enduringly a part of ours. His "Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years and the

As a son of a Confederate soldier, who did what he thought was right, I say for him and for myself

speaker

devoted his

time was so sorely

at that

is

the Lincoln story

his

would

have prevented the Civil War which destroyed the flower of our young manhood in this

Thank

Mr. ScHWENGEL.

the inane and insane agitators of the North

is

dissolved."

papers had asked in

I

am

glad and I am happy, I am honored, to have the privilege of being a part of these

since

ceremonies.

and

you know you

States back, will

[4]

start a

effect,

"Mr. Lincoln,

can't coax the seceded

you go

bloody

Scores of news-

civil

so far as to use force

war?"

The General


of the

Army, Winfield

Scott, liad

for riflemen in squads to be hiding

Presidential

were:

carriage

"To watch

site side

and

His

passed.

fire

on the

There came from him

orders

Alongside squadron of cavalry. In front of carriage."

thousands of times, "Suppose you go to war, you cannot fight always; and when, after

a

much

marched

it

West Point cadets along with company infantrymen and riflemen from the District Columbia.

of

who

On

either,

refused to cheer.

Out over the Pacific

there be a

the country

from the Atlantic

to

its

was the everyday question, "Will war?" The new man, about to

become the

i6th President

sides,

and no gain on

cease fighting, the identical old

institutions,

inhabit

it.

belongs to the people

Whenever

they shall

their constitutional right of

who, in minutes, would take the oath be faithful to the Constitution, was draw-

States

their revolutionary right to

to

overthrow

The Government

assail

you.

it

Though

passion

any

In

this

he was speaking

knew well that as Commander in Chief he

Navy

somewhat

like a

man

thick velvet glove

in the best

However,

From

President he was also of the

of the United States.

with an iron hand in like a

Union

of these States

is

perpetual.

.''

Intelligence,

way,

all

still

competent

our present

to adjust,

difficulty."

a Capitol doorway, standing with

tor Louis T. Wigfall, of Texas,

a

who in his man in a

South Carolina years had killed a

solemn

oath he declared, "I hold, that in contemplation of universal law, and of the Constitution, the

"Why

folded arms watching Lincoln and plainly wanting to be seen watching him was Sena-

Army and the He spoke, too,

and almost

better, or equal

favored land, are

a President,

majestic, kindly, understanding.

or

patriotism, Christianity, and a firm reliance on Him, who has never yet forsaken this

affection."

as

dismember,

or

it."

able can be lost by taking time.

have strained

may

it,

My hope in the world countrymen, one and all, think calmly and well upon this whole subject. Nothing valu-

will not

You can have no conflict, without

must not break our bonds of

amending

should there not be a patient confidence in Is there the ultimate justice of the people.?

being yourselves the aggressors. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies.

grow weary

Like an elderly counselor he asked,

ing to the close his inaugural address, saying, "In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war.

who

of the existing government, they can exercise

United

of the

you

on both

upon you." There were crimson shadows flowing from some of his sentences. "This country, with

who

cheered and people with stony faces

loss

questions, as to terms of intercourse, are again

were people

sidewalks

gnarled nug-

wisdom which in the lOO years since he spoke them have been spoken and printed

of

a

little

gets of

Presidential

carriage rode

the

express provisions of

will endure forever."

the

to fire

all tiie

our National Constitution, and the Union

the

windows on the oppoon them in case any attempt

made

should be

on the

Avenue when

roofs along Pennsylvania

tinue to execute

arranged

duel.

Plainly wearing contempt, defiance

Wigfall was saying now in pantomime what he had said in the Senate,

on

Con-

[5]

his

face,


name of Congress boldly avow

that the old United States of America, the

was how "to give it a decent burial." questioned the backbone of the Presidentelect

and

laughed some-

in Senate speeches

of fat merry clowns and

war meant

ture

neither

Tom

of Lebanon, Ohio, spoke in the

Corwin,

House

you

pro-

hold upon the throats of our wives and children, than that we should prove faithless to our trust and all our bright

had

Corwin wrote Committee

in a

of Congress

men then, appaHng we must dissolve and

comprehend Southern

war must

the

men

treme northern

is

follow.

madness

of

[sic]

I

these are piness.'

to all

in

in the air

mad

as the

of

O

-

62

His

creatures, to the

man. In

whole great family

their enlightened belief,

degraded, and imbruted by its fellows. They grasped not only the whole race of man then

Ex-

living, but they

The

upon

reached forward and seized

the farthest posterity.

beacon

former.

around us everywhere.

to

They

erected a

guide their children and their

dren's children,

[7 8SI57

and the pursuit of haplofty, and wise, and

nothing with the divine and likeness stamped image was sent into the world to be trodden on, and

as

times.

are practical fools.

life, liberty,

This was their

noble understanding of the justice of the Creator to His creatures. Yes, gentlemen,

long cannot

the

are created

;

a

are theoretically crazy.

men

latter are really quite as

Treason

equal that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among

this

judgment: no more harmonious

men

"I

of

and opinions than these 35

civil

old Independence Hall, said to the

to be self-evident: that all

from nearly all this com-

representative

and bloody

being of service told in an ad-

It is

to

which Corwin was chairman and

is,

world leadership.

tives in

and north served on

"If the States are

the idea

story

Lincoln was a

dress in Illinois in 1858: "These representa-

which knows

letter for Lincoln's eye only.

have been for 30 days,

their feelings

and

whole world of men: 'We hold these truths

January i6 of 1861

he gave to Lincoln

When

Washington.

you

best wit

a vision of his country

in the

no coming dawn."

mittee, of

if

with

a threshold preparing his farewell. This i6th President of the United States

gers, lay

Members

think

it

live,

on

States south

horrid pic-

may take the oath." The last two sentences were addedly

deaf to our prayers; better than famine, with her cold and skinny fin-

Lincoln a

this

have been able to gaze on I

five

driving before

Now Corwin felt himself a presence lingering

God

hopes die out in that night

Four or

Congressman in Washington he and Corwin often had fun together with their stories.

"Better for us that the fruitful earth should

33."

I

teller in

be smitten and become dry dust; better that the heavens for a time become brass, and

On

till

secessionists.

acknowledged

fear can help us.

have looked on

in

and the public

it

are gone, others are I

Men

patriotism.

found coming from the

a bit-

ter grief:

the ear of

I

perfect calmness.

cadavers nor ashes. In contrast, Representative

alone

the gale.

as

Wigfall,

offices are full of

God

States

though the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse were a quartet this

times,

goes by the

It

now He

Union, was a corpse and the question

chil-

and the countless myriads


who

should inhabit the earth in other ages.

Wise statesmen

as they were, they

knew

this:

tendency of prosperity to breed tyrants, and so they estabHshed these great self-evident truths, that

man, some

when

in the distant future

faction,

some

the doctrine that

up

He

might look up again to the Declaraof Independence and take courage to battle

which

their fathers began."

A ity

years later

well and deeply what he said 2 the smoke and blood of con-

"The

through which we pass, honor or dishonor, to

flict:

Party ticket:

the latest generation."

is

not often witnessed.

time; attacked from both

represented

have wanted us of the

under compulsion to

latest

face.

Lincoln came out of the pioneer time of America. He began his journey to the

charged with saying too much and saylittle, he slowly, conscientiously and

sides;

in

generation today to remember how he stood amid the terrific toils and turmoils he was

In every such

Misunderstood and mis-

down,

He would

passage of a nation there ought to be a char-

at the

fiery trial

will light us

transition,

acter like Samuel.

man and

amid

these long thoughts about Lincoln, the 1864 candidate for President of the National Union

change,

good

in political

stands before you a not perfect

He knew

preacher in Auburn, N.Y., having sagacand wisdom gave his listeners in the pews

"Such an epoch of perplexity,

His

yet

posterity

renew the

His growth

the

more precious than fine gold." As Lincoln spoke on that day which we memorialize now a hundred years later he knew death was in the air and so was birth. What was dying men did not know. What was being born no one could say for sure.

or

none but white men, were entitled to life, liberty, and die pursuit of happiness, their tion

consists in carrying out

knowledge, his steady movement are but the growth and movement of the national mind.

some

men

rich

executes the will of the people.

sense of the Nation.

interest should set

none but

He

wisdom

the

White House

honestly works out the mighty problem. He was not a founder of a new state of things

one-room log cabin with a floor of packed down dirt and one window and one door. Perhaps we can say now that

Moses; he was not a champion of the

there can be generations taking hold with

ing too

like

He

in a

stood

the loneliness and genius to struggle that

between the two; between the living and the dead; between the past and the present; be-

always dwelt in the hearts of pioneers, as

existing order of things like Elijah.

spirit

praise

from

healer binding spite of

itself;

partisans, but

is

probable.

dren â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

The

explanation of his every act

belongs to the

chil-

This means that they and their

tions dictated

age, in

own

by events not

any well accepted prophets.

the good surgeon knitting to-

peculiar direc-

now known The

to

living

might plan and blue-print a world for the unborn, who on becoming born and grown

gether the dislocated bones of the disjointed times.

yes.

Tomorrow

children will take their

the careful

up the wounds of the

restless

shall

exploits

the best hope for any permanent solution of the questions which torment it. He has but little

and venturing human perform again tomorrow with today declared visionary and im-

though the

tween the old and the new; with that sympathy for each which at such a period is

is

[8]


CROWD ASSEMBLES FOR LINCOLN INAUGURAL RE-ENACTMENT, EAST FRONT OF THE

MARCH

to

man

size

would decide

4, I96I,

morrow belongs

to forget the ar-

else.

With

and

are plenty of precedents."

There are

might do what they do in time, acting under wills, theories and

compulsions

unknown

to

the

will

they will muddle and while muddling some may look backward saying, "There

ancestors they their

They

Or

respect

for the elders

to the children.

mold that tomorrow with care and wisdom.

rangements made for them while they were unborn. Starting in on their own they

might shape something and affectionate regard

CAPITOL,

BEFORE CEREMONIES BEGAN.

careless generations

dawdle, decay.

marks

Founding

Still

others leave

who

drift,

tall

lantl-

of liberty, of discovery, invention,

and

of achievement

at

Fathers.

culture,

This has happened across history. More than once this has precisely happened. To-

which no succeeding generation can take a

setting

targets

horse laugh of derision and belittlement.

[9


"All the

Hem

That's Fit to Print'

r"

"""'"'

^bt ^«to jflflrk ^mt$.

'

Story of Lincohis ji,

to,™. t.„™.

New

Serale Meets

f/iuit^iira I

li«oi« tWE«f»'

orrukWA, wtrttLO to. Bt *

W *C

P.

NOBRIS

A FRAGMENT OF THE ENORMOUS IMPACT

ON COMMUNICATION MEDIA MADE BY THE


5;M:ubd^' K<lii„

''.

Star

iriBi

"^-^-^^^.

^pover

' :'"v^--

.1,,

'itl^t'S

Uli\

"^^vl

'•'""//.

Cen^e

iMaU'. Medallion

^a,tr«™<»p»s'

To Garnish Lunch Al

Limohi nhnW 1

tt

t'ndo

'^

.„.

IBT

f

^^^ Stor 100

r

<W^//«

f AtV

Lite

,„,-—-

I


What

the

autumn wind, and

young people want and dream

blossoms,

springtime

across the next loo years will shape history

dying time and birthing hour.

more than any other motivation to be named. Youth now living and youth as yet unborn

a privilege to face this magnificent audience, I hope it has been worth your while. I thank you. Mr. ScHWENGEL. My friends, to try to com-

unfolded in the shapes to come. None shall look back on this hour and say we did not have hope and faith.

ment on

shall

a magnificent address like that

impossible but

man and take on new

of justice between

man, nation and nation,

has been

and

hokl the seeds and secrets of the folds to be

The mystery

It

that all of

it

must be

America and

is

Mr. Sandburg,

said,

liberty-loving people

everywhere are grateful for

this

eloquent,

phases.

appropriate, meaningful, and moving

Dreamers of deep sacred dreams, finders and welders, sons and daughters of burning

ence that you have helped to create for us so

quests, shall

come. of

actions

In

courage

and

endurance

magnificently today. My fellow countrymen, what size

today in this

program

is

experi-

we empha-

not the conflict,

lighted with inner humility, lighted some-

but the tragedy, that at frightful cost enriched

times with a fine balance of motives as be-

and made

tween freedom and

phrase, "Conceived in

clothe

human

discipline,

they

shall

dignity with wider meanings.

Youth when

lighted and

sporting chance

strong for

is

and given a struggle and

alive

not afraid of any toils, punishments, danWhat shall be the course gers, or deaths. of society

100 years

?

and

civilization

across the next

For the answers, read,

if

you can,

the strange and baffling eyes of youth.

As

the

new

night in the White House, his inaugural address had gone by telegraph to

Pony Express relays were rushing West with it. They would be 7 days and 17 hours reaching Sacramento, Calif., Joseph, Mo., and

with his plan for the east and west coasts, the Great Lakes and the gulf, the Rio Grande

and the Penobscot

to

belong to one

common

was

liberty

and dedicated

men

to the proposition that all

a great

day

in

American

history, of

which we might say it was sunset and dawn, moonrise and noon sun, dry leaves in an

The

tradition.

are created

equal," acquired a magnificent

meaning dur-

ing and since the war for

of us and for

With

time.

all

under

God was

divide.

What

all

the result that our Nation

and made strong beyond any power again to separate and unified

has emerged

now

is

the

mankind.

last

The

fragment of history we show so humbly today may furnish an insight into the tumult, the bitterness, that in the

end cleared the

the triumph forever of the for justice

From our and from

American genius

early revolutionary beginnings

this

Lincoln heritage

country's leadership in a

all

is

world of

forged our this hour,

freedom

for

mankind everywhere.

And now

the reenactment of the Lincoln

inaugural in 1861:

[12]

air for

and freedom.

a leadership that gives promise of

country. It

American

great hope of an imperiled

President, loo years ago, slept

his first

St.

clear the


LINCOLN INAUGURAL REENACTMENT, Narrator: Roger

Abraham

1

"The

86 1

Mudd.

Lincoln, President-elect of the

United States: John C. Collison. Mary Todd Lincoln, wife of the PresidentMrs. Jane Gill. Stephen A. Douglas, Senator from

Roger William Tredway. Hannibal Hamlin, Vice President of the

United States: Clarence B.

Edward D. Baker, Senator from Oregon: Henry Watterson,

journalist:

Capitol

"The

New York

Herald reported that

Al Tyler. Mr. MuDD.

Capitol, with

its

unfinished

dome surmount-

ed by gaunt derricks, braced with ropes of

"The model dom,

of the statute of

Armed

there in the grass,

among

a litter of

marble

about the

guests, ladies

and

gentlemen, you actment of the opening act in the greatest

American

history

—the

War

"This platform and the scene about to be

happened 100 years slow and dignified walk

way its

it

to the

platform for the ceremony of inauguration. "Shortly before this entrance, the Senate

was

called to order

and the oath of

President, by the outgoing Vice

President, John C. Breckenridge.

played before you, constitute not a precise, but a reasonable approximation of the prop-

"This, that you are now about to see inauguration is the main event.

and what happend in this very Capitol plaza, here, on the steps of the east front of

of the hour,

—the

"Of

erties

course, this

"Here

the Capitol of the United States, just lOO years

is

is

a

condensed reenactment

done almost

in capsule form.

the President-Elect

Abraham

Lin-

coln, escorted by the President, James Buch-

to the very day.

"The platform,

was

office

administered to Hannibal Hamlin, the in-

coming Vice

States.

— — ago

the Lincoln Presidential party

is

beginning

"Honored

Free-

destined for the dome's apex, stood back

"Here

are about to witness the reen-

ago

a

crowd of 30,000 gathered where you are now and they saw the spreading structure of the

Al Carwil.

James A. Pearce, Senator from Maryland:

Between the

the

blocks.

Newson.

of

match

steel.

Gill, Jr.

James Buchanan, President of the United States: Ray Moore.

tragedy

to

now,

;

Taney, Chief Justice of the United

States:

P.

as

oflwhite,

Illinois:

Ralph Becker.

H.

were provided only for the central group under the simple wooden canopy made of rough boards and painted an Building.

elect:

B.

guests remained standing through

out; the chairs

the small table

which you

anan, a former Minister to Russia and Senator

may

from Pennsylvania.

recovery

on

"Immediately behind them are Mrs. Mary Todd Lincoln, flanked by Henry Watterson,

at-

on your right, the famous Kentucky journalist, and Senator Stephen Douglas, of Illinois.

see up front there, and the chairs taken from the U.S. Senate are a nearly authentic

March

of

the

scenic

background

4, 1861.

"But on that occasion, extensions were

tached to either side to hold the distinguished guests.

"It

was

in the Illinois senatorial

campaign

of 1858 that Mr. Lincoln had forced the Sen-

[13I


RE-ENACTMENT CROWD.

MASSES ON

MARCH

4,

I96I,

WERE DOUBLE THAT

WILLARD HOTEL LUNCHEON AFTER RE-ENACTMENT CEREMONIES

C

DUPII


i

DRAMATIZING LINCOLN

S

INSPIRED

FESTIVE SCENES IN LINCOLn's

HOLD ON THE IMAGINATION OF AMERICA.

OWN

DAY AFTER THE INAUGURAL EVENT.


which wrecked

ator to take a political position

coln was greeted by cheers as he approached

Douglas' chances for the White House.

to deliver his inaugural. "

'He then put down

"Directly behind Senator Douglas on the left is

Taney, Chief Justice of the

B.

Roger

United

another

gural; and Mr. Lincoln's great friend

journal,

pockets and

States, participating in his ninth inau-

from

his

'claps

hands

in

his

pulls out a pair of steel-bowed

This

spectacles.

his manuscript,' said

a signal for

is

A

merriment

Oregon, Senator Edward D. Baker, who will introduce the President-elect for his inaugural

eyed fellow cries out: "Take off them spec-

address.

tacles,

"And

finally to the rear

President Hamlin, and Pearce, of Maryland,

on your

Vice

right.

who is

a

member

"That's the party. 4

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 100

years

warm

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

sunshine and the crowds were

by what the reporter of the York Herald called an overwhelming

and debris

had no

just

street

and

New dust.

had been scraped of its the day before and the

and that

it

city

far

too, participated actively

from

this

and

hold the President's Senator Baker.

tree.

A

little

man

dressed part of the

fell

Mr.

Lincoln.

United

oratorical

"One newspaper

reported that Mr. Lin-

citizens,

I

intro-

the

of

citizens

the

compliance with a custom

Government

itself,

I

appear

ters

is

States,

by the President 'before he en-

on the execution of

"It

to

your presence, the oath prescribed

by the Constitution of the United his Office.'

72 years since the first inauguration

of a President under our National Constitution.

"Hecklers and well-meaning enthusiasts took small liberties with the ceremonies.

"Fellow

"Fellow

States, in

to be taken

out of a

flourishes.

" hat.'

before you to address you briefly, and

with red whiskers ad-

crowd with

today's tableau

duce to you, Abraham Lincoln, the President-elect of the United States of America."

take, in

platform and on the

plaza grounds, one youngster

"

the principals in

as old as

noisily in the inaugural.

"Not

remarked another,

have happened. In any event, sometime Senator Douglas reportedly said: later. if I can't be President, at least I can 'Well,

was 'heard by

thousands.'

"The crowds,

"I didn't

"You see Mr. Lincoln fumbling a little with his hat and Senator Douglas gracefully relieves him of it. This may or may not

dirt

sprinkling system.

distinct'

glasses,"

your eyes."

dent-elect.

"All reports say Mr. Lincoln's voice was 'clear

he wore

"Now,

Pennsylvania Avenue, from the White House to Capitol Hill,

to see

hawk-

lusty,

have ceased chatting with each other. Senator Baker is about to introduce the Presi-

ago began as a But when Lincoln

afflicted

we want

ain't in the picture.'

"they

of the

cloudy and raw day. stepped forward to speak, Washington was beset by what one report called an unseasonably

one portion of the crowd.

know

Senator James A.

inaugural committee on arrangements.

"March

in

During

that period 15 different

and

greatly distinguished citizens, have, in succession, administered

the executive branch

of the Government.

They have conducted

[16]


APPROACHING INAUGURAL RE-ENACTMENT PLATFORM. CARL SANDBURG WALKS BETWEEN SPEAKER SAM RAYBURN AND CHAIRMAN FRED SCHWENGEL WILLIAM MILLER, ON LEFT. ;

L. TO ALMIGHTY FATHER REV. DONALD MAYBERRY GIVES INVOCATION AT RE-ENACTMENT. CHAIRMAN SCHWENGEL (LEFT), SPEAKER SAM RAYBURN, CHIEF JUSTICE EARL WARREN. .

R.


it

many

through

now

I

precedent,

upon the same

enter

under great and peculiar ruption

term of 4

now

is

"I hold, that in

is

extent of

formidably attempted.

contemplation of universal

Union

upon me,

Union

my

this will

only

is

unbroken;

ability,

shall

I

itself

in

all

and, to the

take care as enjoins

expressly

that the laws of the

executed

fully

of

therefore con-

I

perpetual.

Constitution

the

dis-

view of the Constitution and

sider that, in

the laws, the

years,

the

Union be States.

faith-

trust

I

not be regarded as a menace, but purpose of the Union

as the declared

that

it

maintain

will

constitutionally

and

defend,

itself.

Government,

in the short space of 4

years.

"My countrymen, one and and

upon

well,

this

whole

all,

think calmly

subject.

valuable can be lost by taking time.

admitted that you

who

are dissatisfied, hold

the right side in the dispute, there single

good reason

Nothing it were

If

still is

no In-

for precipitate action.

telligence, patriotism, Christianity, and a firm reliance on Him, who has never yet forsaken this

favored land, are

still

competent to ad-

the best way, all our present difficulty. "In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous just, in

The Government

issue of civil war.

will not

You can have no conflict, without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no assail you.

should there not be a patient con-

ernment, while I shall have the most solemn one to 'preserve, protect, and defend' it.

who

its

institutions,

inhabit

it.

fidence in the ultimate justice of the people

In our present differences,

is

either

am

"I

?

there any better, or equal hope, in the

world.'*

jure the

oath registered in Heaven to destroy the Gov-

longs to the people

Is

of wickedness or folly, can very seriously in-

be-

"This country, with

"Why

"While the people retain their virtue, and vigilance, no administration, by any extreme

heretofore

law, and of the Constitution, the these States

task

A

difficulty.

Union

the Federal

only menaced,

this scope for

all

for the brief constitutional

of

with

perils; and, generally,

Yet, with

great success.

but

friends.

Though

We

loth to close.

We

passion

are not enemies,

must not be enemies.

may have

strained,

it

must

the

not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every bat-

the North, or on yours of the South, that

heart and hearthstone,

party without faith of being in the right

?

If

Almighty Ruler of nations, with His eternal truth and justice, be on your side of truth,

the

and that

judgment

justice, will surely prevail,

of this great tribunal, the

tlefield,

ican people.

vided for the return of that

hands

at

little to

very short intervals.

their

own

all

over this broad

when

again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature."

Mr. MuDD.

"By the frame of the Government under which we live, this same people have wisely given their public servants but little power for mischief; and have, with equal wisdom, pro-

patriot grave, to every living

land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union,

by

Amer-

and

"It

is

at this

Lincoln took the oath of

point that Mr.

office

old Chief Justice Taney. ports reveal

stood ists

18]

from

81-year-

Contemporary that when the oath was given,

up and took

all

The journalnew President

off their hats.

that day wrote that the

re-


THE

THIS IS THE SCENE AS ACTOR JOHN LINCOLN ACCEPTING OATH OF OFFICE.

I96I LINCOLN TAKES OATH.

EFFORT WAS DILIGENT TO

MAKE

I96I

RE-ENACTMENT OF LINCOLN

AS POSSIBLE LIKE

S

THE ORIGINAL.

FIRST

C.

COLLISON DUPLICATES

INAUGURATION

AS

EXACTLY


repeated the oath after the Chief Justice in 'firm but modest voice.'

(The oath of office)

Lincoln.

"It

do solemnly swear

"I

"And

will you, to

"And,

I

all his

guration

is

now

on the edge

drama

great

ended.

A

nation

of the great abyss.

President, the

new

First

words, they will serve to

festivities at

and de-

of the inauis

teetering

The new

Lady, the ex-Presi-

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;many of them not tableau â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are preparing to

horsedrawn carriages

Willard's Hotel

gaiety, the elegance,

to the

downtown.

all

and the gran-

Nor, by the same token,

who

have had a part

we thank

all

of you

We hope you feel And now

I

it

program and

in this

good people for coming. was a worthwhile effort.

present the Reverend George

Docherty, pastor of the

New

M.

York Avenue

Presbyterian Church, for the benediction.

Rev. Dr. Docherty. Let us pray.

O, God of the nations, the wounds of the Nation have, indeed, been bound up and the have healed and in unity will live one In our day nation, indivisible under God. us and generation grant such courage and scars

deur of the inauguration and its subsequent events cannot be completely captured for this reenactment.

lift

the ages."

Mr. ScHWENGEL. Ladics and gentlemen,

great galaxy of notables

depart in their

mankind through

the committee, the Congress, are grateful to

dent, the Chief Justice, the Senators, and a

to be seen in this

life.

will, to the

ability, preserve, protect,

"The

has

enemies' became, of course, the main theme

"Like

fend the Constitution of the United States."

Mr. MuDD.

place.

President

"Yet the words he spoke today: 'We are We must not be

the moral tone of

States?"

my

same

this

spoken will be remembered more than the words he spoke today.

and defend the Constitution of the United

Abraham Lincoln.

that

of his Presidential

the best of your ability, preserve, protect,

"The

words

"Other

not enemies, but friends.

dent of the United States.?"

best of

this

is

the reenactment today in the

to faithfully execute the Office of the Presi-

Chief Justice Taney.

and blackberry pie and demitasse. same menu that will be served at

lied potato,

:

Chief Justice Taney. "Do you solemnly swear to faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States?"

Abraham

ket of corned beef with green cabbage, pars-

is

it

self-sacrifice as

that

we may

we do

day commemorate, labor until across the whole this

and highly possible charged atmosphere of impending doom,

world every child of the earth shall know a full life, enjoy liberty, and seek that happiness

which, in

that

to

the

reenact

this hour,

hung

tense

like a pall over the

Nation.

"But they were there. "For this is the eve of disunion and tragedy. "The inaugural party, then as now, returned to Willard's Hotel for the luncheon.

The menu was mock

and the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God, the fellowship of the Holy Spirit rest upon and is

the blessing of

all

abide with each one of us and children everywhere,

now and

Am.en.

turtle soup, special bris-

[20]

all

God's

forevermore.

(Music: the U.S. Marine Band.)


The Metropolitan Washington Board of Trade, William H. Press, Executive Vice President, presented to the Committee on Arrangements, its otvn concise and complete summation of the events of the commemoration largely under its charge, from the conclusion report of the Committee follotvs verbatim.

of the exercises

on the Capitol Plaza.

This

Reportâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lincoln Inauguration Centennial March 4, 1961

THE recnactment of the Inaugural Ceremonies at the Capitol, Abraham _ AFTER

red, white,

Lincoln proceeded toward the Willard Hotel

The menu for the luncheon consisted of mock turtle soup, special brisket of corned

drawn by two smartly groomed Army horses, loaned by Fort Myer. He was

in a carriage

followed by another carriage in which were Mary Todd Lincoln and Senator Stephen Douglas.

burg

Rifle

They were escorted by the SharpsGuard in authentic Union Army

uniforms.

Followed

gressional

Committee

the

by

Joint

New

there proceeded

Jersey

down

Avenues and from

green

cabbage,

parsley

blackberry pie and demitasse.

menu

potato,

This was the

that Lincoln himself requested at the

Willard Hotel 100 years before. The head table guests included:

Mr. C. Wyatt Dickerson, Cochairman the

Lincoln

Inaugural

of

Com-

Centennial

mitttee;

The Reverend Donald W. Mayberry, D.D.,

Police at the intersection of Inde-

pendence and

with

beef

Con-

in cars, the procession

was joined by the National Capital Park

Mounted

filled

and blue bunting and flags, was with a sellout crowd of 600 people.

Rector of

Pennsylvania Avenue.

St.

John's Episcopal

Church

;

Mr. Harry McGill, Administrative Assiststaff of the Clerk of the House; Mr. William H. Press, Executive Vice

Thousands of people lined the streets to watch the small, but dignified, parade. Both

ant on the

Washington Post and the Evening Star reported that the crowds numbered 20,000.

President of the Metropolitan Washington

the

Upon

arrival

at

the Willard

Hotel, the

portrayers of the key figures in the Inaugural Ceremony and the Sharpsburg Rifle Guard

with their wives and children

in

costumes of

the period proceeded to the ballroom for the

luncheon.

The

ballroom,

decorated

with

Board of Trade

;

Maj. Gen. Charles K. Gailey, ing General of the Military

Washington Mr. Ralph

CommandDistrict

of

;

E.

Becker,

Chairman

Committee on Arrangements Inaugural Centennial;

[21]

of the

of the Lincoln


HERE

IS

THE

I96I IDEA OF

CROWD.

HOW

MAY HAVE LOOKED WAVING TO THE FROM FELLOW COMMUNITY ACTORS.

LINCOLN AND HIS SON, TAD,

CAST TAKEN


Brig.

Gen. Fred

J.

Clarke, Engineer

missioner of the District of Columbia

The Honorable

man from

Peter F.

Com-

Lincoln Inaugural Centennial Committee;

;

John C. Collison, portrayer of Abraham

Mack, Congress-

Lincoln

the State of Illinois; J.

Mr. Carl Haverlin, President of Broadcast Music,

Inc., of

New

Civil

York;

Mr. John C. politan

War

Washington Board

the luncheon guests

the District of Columbia;

gress,

;

-

62

and

and plate and

and Members of Con-

reissues of

contemporary

COMMEMORATION SHOWS LINCOLN AND HAMLIN.

[23 O

of Trade;

newspapers. The plate is centered by a drawing of Thomas Nast's sketch of the Inaugural

The Honorable Winfield Denton, Con-

88157

lo, 1962;

Each of the luncheon guests received a commemorative medal made especially for

McLaughlin,

I96I

Commis-

Pyles, President of the Metro-

President of the Board of Commissioners of

MEDAL STRUCK FOR

Centennial

Church.

;

gressman from the State of Indiana

;

Betts, Executive Director of

The Reverend George M. Docherty, Minister of the New York Avenue Presbyterian

Board of Riggs National Bank; The Honorable Vance Hartke, Senator E.

S.

Mr. Betts died on June

sion.

Committee on Arrangements; The Honorable Robert V. Fleming, Toastmaster at the luncheon, and Chairman of the

The Honorable Robert

Centennial Commission

the National Civil

the Joint

State of Indiana

War

Mr. Karl

Mr. Carl Sandburg; The Honorable Fred Schwengel, Congressman from the State of Iowa, and Chairman of

from the

;

Mr, Henry Dudley, member of the D.C. Civil War Centennial Commission; Mrs. B. Y. Martin, member of the D.C.

Sedgwick, Chairman of the D.C. Civil War Centennial Commission;

Mr. Paul

Earle Chesney, Cochairman of the

Mr.


Ceremony showing Abraham Lincoln being sworn

in

The

by Chief Justice Taney.

bor-

ably in so

many capacities including the porof Senator trayal Stephen Douglas, did a tre-

der depicts various scenes of the Inauguration and a beardless Lincoln and Hamlin as they

mendous

appeared during the election campaign.

so that

The commemorative medal Lincoln

Inaugural

and the D.C. sion

is

a replica of

Committee

Centennial Commis-

an 1861 medal issued for

This

the Inauguration.

the

is

first

The

reverse

medal was suspended by a

is

blank.

red, white,

Mr. Becker also furnished the draw-

terity.

ings for the design of the

from

plate

commemorative Amer-

his collection of Political

icana at the Smithsonian Institution.

medal

showing Lincoln with a beard and the first medal with jugate busts of a President and a Vice President.

meaning to this historical occasion mementoes will be preserved for pos-

significant

issued by the

Centennial

War

Civil

job in bringing authenticity and

Capt.

Earle

White House

Chesney,

formerly

of

the

and Cochairman of the

staff

The

Lincoln Inaugural Centennial Committee, devoted much time in coordinating and

and

managing

the great

number

of people

who

blue ribbon bearing the gold inscription: "Lincoln Inaugural Centennial 1861-1961." The official medal struck for the com-

participated in this event.

Captain Chesney

daily followed through on

many

memoration of the Centennial

the same,

President of the Metropolitan Washington

but the reverse has the inscription, encircled by palm leaves: "In Commemoration of the

Board of Trade and business community

Centennial of dent."

is

Abraham Lincoln

as

Presi-

This medal was especially engraved

and struck

in bronze, a limited

sterling silver

and one

in

number

in

gold for presenta-

tion to the President of the

United States

John F. Kennedy on September

6, 1961,

and

another to the Chairman of the Joint Committee on Arrangements Fred Schwengel.

This medal was struck by

Political

Her-

itage, Inc.

This luncheon was made possible only by the herculean efforts of many people and organizations

who managed

in a very brief

space of a few weeks to re-create the rich

experience of so those

memorable an event

who attended were

moment

that

able to relive a great

Mr. William H.

Press, as Executive

leader, provided his able staff

of the

numerous

tickets, seating,

details.

who

took care

details in connection

with

bookkeeping, distribution of

the plates and medals,

etc.

Maj. Gen. Charles K. Gailey, Commanding General of the Military District of Washington,

was on hand

at all times to see that there

was unity and cooperation accorded by the military units of the metropolitan area.

The

Committee depended a great deal on General Galley's wisdom and guidance in bringing about this historical occasion.

knowledge and complete press handled by Mr. William A. were coverage Public

Ring,

who

is

the Public Relations Director

of the Metropolitan

Washington Board

of

Trade.

Mr. Henry Dudley of the D.C. Civil

in history.

Mr. Ralph E. Becker, Chairman of the Committee on Arrangements, who served so

Vice

War

Centennial Commission provided valuable assistance

[24]

and cooperation from the Commis-


LINCOLN COMMEMORATIVE PLATE: I86I-I96I.

sion

and was

in charge of the decorations

furnished by Lord & Taylor of New York. Mr. Paul J. Sedgwick, Chairman of the

D.C.

Civil

War

Centennial

arranged plans for the

one of the contributions of the Nation's Capital to the National Civil War Centennial

commemoration. Mr. Victor M. Birely of the Lincoln Group

Commission,

commemoration

as

of

[25]

Washington served

as a consultant to the


THE

Joint

I96I PARADE PROCEEDS

Committee and was

DOWN PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE TO WILLARD INAUGURAL LUNCHEON.

Assisting these people

of assistance in

connection with the participation of the Lincoln Group in the event.

ginia

Without Mr. John C. CoUison and his Fellow Community Theater Actors, the reenact-

reenactment.

ment would not have been

Abraham stirring

possible.

As

He

this

of

costumes for

New

all

York who provided

Miss Meyer even

them up brought them

to

Vir-

the

those participating in the

made many

especially for the occasion

of

Washington

and

personally.

Chief Robert V. Murray and Deputy Chief

Lincoln, John CoUison recreated a

and believable living image of

Meyer

was Miss Helen

Howard

Covell provided the cooperation of

tab-

Department so that the parade, though small, would carry with it the dignity and seriousness of the occasion.

leaux presented at the luncheon followed the historical drawing of Nast pictured in the

Mr. Robert A. Miller, head of Newspaper Americana of New York, the organization

great national figure.

and expense unselfishly ticity

of this

center of the

devoted both time

to insure the

memorable

occasion.

commemorative

plate.

authen-

The

the Metropolitan Police

that contributed the reissues of the

26]

New York


THE

I96I LINCOLN

WAVES TO CROWDS AS THE REAL LINCOLN

Herald Tribune, distributed both at the Capitol and the luncheon, made the trip to Washington

with his

staff

members

to

insure

Mr. Toke Nelson, Promotion Living History, Inc., was responsible for sendDirector of

ing of the 600 Harper's

Weekly

Iowa which were distributed

The commemorative

reprints

at the

from

luncheon.

were provided which is Authentic Inc., Distributors, by headed by Mr. Thomas Woroniecki of Massapequa,

Long

Island.

plates

The

medals

were

provided by Political Heritage, Inc., for Authentic Distributors. Mr. Charles Mc-

CENTURY BEFORE.

president of Political also be noted here that

Sorley of Closter, N.J.,

Heritage.

may

It

is

the plates were jointly designed by

Reighart

proper delivery.

DID A

of

Kettlespring

Kilns,

Mr.

J.

F.

Alliance,

Ohio, and Mr. Ralph E. Becker, mentioned above.

Mr. McSorley, Mr. Woroniecki, and Mr. Reighart performed the almost impossible task

of

producing

and

souvernirs in the limited available.

The

plates

had

delivering

amount to

these

of time

be carefully

packaged and sent by motor freight from Ohio, while the medals were personally delivered only

[27]

i

day early by Mr. McSorley.


THE RE-ENACTMENT LINCOLN IN THE CARRIAGE THAT ONCE BELONGED TO PRESIDENT GRANT

Lord & Taylor of sentative to

New

York

sent a repre-

a full 2

Washington

weeks

in

advance of the Centennial to make preparations

for

the

extensive

decorating of

Willard Hotel ballroom without cost

the as

a

contribution to the Commission.

possible the use of the material and articles plates

in every

Mr. Harry Megill, Administrative Assistant on the staff of the Clerk special note

is

Mr. Megill was responsible the beautiful and informative programs

of the House.

presented

to

each

These are truly

guest at the luncheon.

collectors' items

and provided

to the activities.

meaning Finally, the Committee was fortunate

special

to

have on hand the U.S. Marine Band and

In this connection the Library of Congress

terial

Of

and

medals.

and the National Archives

and cooperated

appropriate way.

for

Dr. Leonard Carmichael, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, with his staff made

needed for the design of the

torical significance

also provided

and background needed

ma-

to insure his-

Orchestra for ceremonies at the Capitol and at the luncheon. They rendered music that

was

[28]

fitting

and appropriate

for the occasion.


NOTHING QUITE CAUGHT THE IMAGINATION OF THE I96I CROWDS

Also honored

at the

100 years or more.

They

Washington

Ballantyne

Baltimore

&

& Ohio

D.C.

H. W. Fisher & Sons, Inc. FrankHn & Co., Opticians

are as follows:

D. Ballauf Manufacturing Co.,

Wm.

Firemen's Insurance Co. of Washington,

luncheon were those

firms having been in business in

AS THIS CARRIAGE SCENE.

Inc.

Gait

Sons

&

Brother, Inc.

Joseph Gawler's Sons, Inc. Geier's Sons Co.

Railroad Co.

Frank

Joseph F. Birch's Sons

Z.

D. Gilman

Brink's, Inc.

Harvey Restaurant

Butler-Flynn Paint Co., Inc.

Jacobs Transfer Co., Inc.

Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co.

Lansburgh's

A. Eberly's Sons

J.

William Lee's Sons Co.

C. Engel's Sons, Inc.

Marlow Coal Co.

The Evening

Melvern-Fussell Ice

Star

Newspaper Co. [29]

Cream Co.


Mutual Benefit Insurance Co. of Newark, N.J.

National Bank of Washington

thought for themselves in the giving of their time and aid to make the Lincoln Inaugural Centennial observance a most memorable and

Oriental Building Association

Riggs National Bank Sealtest

Foods Division of National Dairy

Products Corp. J. H. Small & Sons

Thomas Somerville

The Committee on Arrangements is again pleased to make its acknowledgments for extremely valuable services to members of

Bros. Brick Co.

the District of

Western Union Telegraph Co.

tennial

Willard Hotel

As

nificant

illustrated in the above, a great

of people gave both time

number

and expense

in the

organization and management of the Lincoln Men, many of Inauguration Centennial.

whom

known both locally and nationally, and others who worked and traveled from other cities in order to make this event are well

possible,

were able

meaningful historical occasion. The luncheon was self-sustaining. This completes the verbatim report of the Metropolitan Washington Board of Trade.

Co.

Tophams, Inc. W. H. Turton & Sons Washington Gas Light Co.

West

events of the past. These people provided invaluable assistance and cooperated without

to

do the tremendous job most important

of re-creating one of the

Columbia

Civil

War

Cen-

Commission, whose work was sigand outstanding, and who include:

Henry A. Dudley, Elden

Billings,

Eller, Mrs. B. Y. Martin, Col.

Adm. E. M. J.

Gay

Sea-

bourne, Hon. Sigurd Anderson, William H. Press,

Henry Brylawski,

Col.

West Hamilton,

Judge Alexander Holtzoff, Roger Robb, and Lyle Kendall man-

Chairman Sedgwick.

aged problems of transportation and was the Marshal of the Sharpsburg Rifles and of the Parade under Col.

J.

Gay Seabourne.


The following i()6i,

and

is

its

editoyial

from The Washington Post on the day

of the reenactment, Saturday,

reproduced here because of its pertinence, its information, superb comment on Lincoln's ti'ords in the inaugural:

its

perspective after a

March

hundred

4,

years,

Centennial

HAD BEEN nothing rcsembUng blizzard THERE

in those early days of

we can make

1861; yet as far as

much

a

March,

out nearly

was spent in tamping and out the dirt roadway of Pennsylsmoothing vania Avenue between the White House and as

the last

still

effort

uncompleted Capitol

as

was expended

January in getting rid of the

snow.

The

inaugural weather was about normal for time of year, which is to say damp and

this

rather

alternating cloudiness and

windy with

high passion might be described as interested but unenthusiastic.

some days the town had been seething with rumors about plotted assassinations, abductions and what not, and many, for

Still,

including General Scott, took them quite seriIndeed, Mr. Lincoln himself had ously. slipped into

having changed Washington's his eastward itinerary when he was met at Harrisburg by Allan Pinkerton with a story of

worse while waiting for the ceremonies has

murder him.

how

The

is

usual on such occasion,

a

a barber

escaped recording. as

mob

in Baltimore, putatively led

named

Inaugural, however, passed without

any incident

more untoward than

a

few

regulars out of sight of the

hallways or wherever else they could find

though he had them moving along

from the

them were ardent

cold.

A

good many

of

new Presiwho had followed him from the Midwest. Some were fanatical secessionists prepared to make trouble if the opportunity offered; but most of those who formed the partisans of the

dent

crowds along the Avenue and in the eastern grounds beside the Capitol were permanent residents, whose attitude even in that day of

by

Ferrandini, was preparing to

was swarming with visitors, many of whom had been sleeping in the railroad depot or in shelter

on

surreptitiously

Birthday, after

sunshine; but the precise number of persons who caught influenza or even something

Our town,

town almost

jeers.

General Scott was prevailed upon to keep

main

his

procession, parallel

routes so as to be ready in case of trouble, and

the job of guarding the President was

left

ostensibly to the District militia.

How many

of those at the Capitol actually

heard the Inaugural Address delivered by the

new

President in his

somewhat

shrill

accent

and highly nasal twang there is no way of knowing. It was not, except for the preoration,

[31]

one of Mr. Lincoln's more eloquent


was merely on which he

For the most part

utterances.

it

a restatement of the principles

made

his

it

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;at the â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Seward con-

Mr.

said, of

is

nature.

There,

we

submit,

is

an example of

not enemies but friends

are

may have

passion

must not break the bonds

The

tion.

Being ... I

cannot

.

it

fail.

.

.

.

that

any language or by any passage from Demosthenes or Cicero or Mirabeau or Burke or Webster. After a hundred years the nobility and emotional power of the phrasing

with no mento con-

by any hyper-

."

seem

all

it ?

law, and of the Constitution, the these States

is

perpetual.

safe to say that

ever

had a provision

own

termination.

.

is

greater than

all

the real ones you

.

of

."

its

organic law for

its

.

.

its

memories, and

we cannot

separate.

We

cannot remove our respective sections from each other, nor build an impassable wall

"A husband and

wife

may be divorced, and

go out of the presence, and beyond the reach of each other; but the different parts of our

."

the destruction of our national fabric, with benefits,

from?

between them."

"Before entering upon so grave a matter as

its

fly

Will you risk the commission of so fearful a ." mistake

no government proper,

in .

.

Union

step,

any possibility that any portion of the ills you fly from, have no real existence ? Will you, while the certain ills you fly to, are

.''

contemplation of universal

why we

Will you hazard so desperate a

"Physically speaking, "I hold, that in

the greater.

not be wise to ascertain precisely

it

do

while there

."

and with no purpose

reservations,

Divine

With

succeed.

strue the Constitution or laws, .

.

of our affec-

"I take the official oath today,

critical rules.

strained,

of that

assistance

cannot

I

.

mystic chords of memory,

"Without the

is

political

rhetoric unsurpassed in

Though

"It

and

again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our

embattled sections.

tal

and

when

Union,

it

and reconciliation between the angry and

assistance

battlefield

hearthstone, will yet swell the chorus of

cluded with a magnificent plea for peace

We

from every

patriot grave to every living heart

for election; but

campaign

insistence,

stretching

its

hopes,

country cannot do this."

all

would

"Though

passion

may have

must not break our bonds

[32]

strained,

of affection."

it


Here, from the files of the Library of Congress {Call No.: FigS.Wj^) is a set of the actual arrangements made in 1861 for the original Lincoln Inaugural by the Inaugural Committee of that crucial year.

as It

follows verbatim :

Arrangements for the Lincoln Inaugural

TITLE: Arrangements of

the

States,

AUTHOR:

for the Inauguration

President

United

the

of

on the Fourth of March,

Washington,

D.C.,

1861.

Inaugural

Treasury, Treasurer, Commissioners, Judges,

and

The Mayors

of Washington and Georgeand the town, reporters in the Senate.

All of

1861.

Committee,

Library of Congress Call No.: F198.W35,

The

PP- 1-3

SUBJECT: LINCOLN

Washington, D.C.

Inaugural Committee, 1861.

The doors opened

of the Senate

Chamber

at 11 o'clock a.m. for the

will be

admission of

and others who, by the arrangement of the Committee, are entitled to

whom

will be admitted at the north

door of the Capitol. families of the Diplomatic Corps will

enter at the north door of the Capitol,

conducted to the diplomatic gallery. Seats will be placed in front of the Secretary's

United States and

the

Justice

and Associate Judges of

Supreme Court.

The Diplomatic

Corps, Heads of Depart-

ments, and Ex-Members of either branch of Congress, and

Members

Officers of the

left,

for

the

Committee

Arrangements. The Chief Justice and Associate

Ex-Presidents and Vice-Presidents.

The Chief

and, on their

PRESIDENTS of the the PRESIDENT elect;

the

table for

Senators,

admission, as follows:

of Congress elect.

Army and Navy who,

and be

of the

Supreme Court

will have seats

of

Justices

on the

right of the Chair.

The Diplomatic Corps will occupy seats on the right of the Chair, next to the Supreme Court. Heads of Departments on the left of the Chair.

by

name, have received the thanks of Congress. Governors of States and Territories of the

Army and Navy who, by have the thanks of Congress; received name, Governors of States and Territories of the

Union, and Ex-Governors of

Union,

ant

Secretaries

of

States.

Departments,

Assist-

and

the

Assistant Postmaster General; the Comptrollers,

Auditors, Register, and Solicitor of the

Officers of the

Ex-Governors of

Secretaries of Departments,

States,

Assistant

and the Assistant

Postmaster General, Comptrollers, Auditors, Register, and Solicitor of the Treasury, Treas-

[33]


urer, Commissioners, Judges, and the Mayors of Washington and Georgetown, will occupy seats on the right and left of the main

will

entrance.

After a short pause, those assembled in the Senate Chamber will proceed to the platform

Members

entrance, and

will

Arrangements in the Senate Chamber.

Members elect, Chamber by the main

occupy

scats

on the

left

on the central portico of the Capitol

of

who

The The The The The

galleries will be reserved for the ladies,

will enter the Capitol

from the

terrace,

by the principal western door of the central building, and be conducted to the gallery of the Senate.

The Rotunda,

shall be closed,

and the

pas-

sages leading thereto kept clear.

o'clock the

PRESIDENT

and the

of the Capitol, and entering

proceed

to

the

PRESIDENT'S elect

will

him on

be

Arrangements

accompanied to the Capitol by a member of the Committee of Arrangements, and conducted into the

VICE PRESIDENT'S

rear of the

Next

room,

take the seat pro-

the front of the platform.

the the Justices of

Supreme Court will enter Chamber a few minutes before

PRESI-

DENT elect. The Senate will assemble at 12 o'clock. The Senate being ready to receive them,

PRESIDENT

and the

PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT

Committee

of

in the

elect.

Chief Justice

in the rear of these the

Justices of the

on the

seats

Supreme left, and

VICE PRESIDENT, Secretary and Mem-

bers of the Senate, those

on the

The Diplomatic Corps

the Senate the

the

occupy a position

Court will occupy the

VICE PRESIDENT.

the

will

and the Associate

and afterwards into the Senate Chamber, where the oath of office will be administered

The Diplomatic Corps and

Secre-

of the portico, the

The PRESIDENT and

The VICE PRESIDENT

States

of Departments, Governors of States

vided for

room.

by the

of Arrangements.

On reaching the front PRESIDENT elect will

will proceed in a carriage to the north door of

wing

Committee

and Territories, the Mayors of Washington and Georgetown, and other persons who have been admitted into the Senate Chamber.

elect, accompanied by two members of the Committee of Arrangements,

there will

Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate.

Heads

PRESIDENT

the north

of the United States.

The Members of the Senate. The Diplomatic Corps.

arrangement, will be kept closed. II

Supreme Court

tary of the Senate.

other doors and entrances to the Capiexcept those to be open under this

At

in the

Marshal of the District of Columbia.

PRESIDENT of the United and PRESIDENT elect. The VICE PRESIDENT and the

The tol,

of

them

following order:

the Chair.

The

Committee

introduced by the

to the seats prepared for

of Congress, and

will enter the Senate

be

right.

will

occupy the

Supreme Court. Heads of Departments, Governors, and ExGovernors of States and Territories, and Exseats next in the rear of the

the

Members

of the Senate, Ex-Members, and

elect

Members

elect of the

[34]

House

of Represent-


the rear of the

in

atives

Members

execution of these arrangements; and aided

of the

by the police of the Capitol, will preserve

Senate.

Such other persons preceding

the

All horses and carriages will be excluded

in readiness, the oath of office

from the Capitol square. Should the weather prove unfavorable, the

will

arrangements

and the residue of the

steps,

by the Chief Justice;

clusion of the

Members

of

PRESIDENT

Senate,

ceremony of the Inauguration in the Senate Chamber.

and on the con-

PRESIDENT'S

the

occupy

portico.

All being wil be administered to the elect

order.

included in the

as are

Solomon Foot,

address, the

preceded by

Committee

at-Arms, will return to the Senate Chamber,

PRESIDENT,

Committeee to the

of

L H iSCHiU

-'>' ^'

"""^y

^

of Arrangements.

accompanied by the

Arangements, House.

will

proceed

PRESIDENT'S

The Sergeant-at-Arms

Here

of the Senate, with

the Marshal of the District, are charged with

is

a sketch of the

the seating arrangements

podium

itself

and

taken from the

1861 records.

W.

dour Sciiaic C'liamlicr.

L35J

..

~-f^\j^>^ •//

James A. Pearce, Edward D. Baker,

the

VICE PRESIDENT, Secretary, and Sergeantand the

will take place

««.


Epilogue LINCOLN INAUGURAL COMMEMORATION

THE project from the birth of the idea down to the last

word

in this report

is

regarded by your Joint Committee on Arrangements as

report.

others, to the Prints

and Photographs

merely

chronological

included in these pages, and to the experts in

Rather the object was to obey fully

Typography and Design of the Government

It

was decided,

not

permitted,

routine,

among

Division of the Library of Congress for materials about the Lincoln Inauguration period,

a labor of love. talent

photographs, not only of Lincoln's time but especially of the event in 1961 that paid him homage. The thanks of the Committee go,

mechanistic,

to

insofar as

a

print

and

the implied injunctions of the Congress and to produce a

report that

would have the

amplitude, integrity, and reverence,

reflecting

Printing

for

Office

There was

tribution to this report.

con-

invaluable

their

the intent to create a report that

overall

might prove

throughout the powerful impact, inspirationally and pictorially, of the ceremonies

useful perhaps a century hence to evoke a

March

memoration and

4, 1961,

that duplicated

on the

steps

of the East Front of the Capitol the

first

Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln. Thus the aim of the report basically is to be accurate. It

seeks to avoid the dreary uniformity of a

tabulation of events without doing too

much

violence to the needs and the format of an

acceptable government print. that a preponderant emphasis

Yet

had

it

was

to be given

commemoration itself and to its participants because the commemoration was the light that zoomed into better view in 1961 memorable day

now being

a

century before that was

The letter size of the report, as distinguished size,

ferred by the Joint

report

more

was

deliberately pre-

Committee

to

make

to provide suggestions

perhaps a model,

future

for

memorations, not only from

and

com-

the steps of the

Capitol but from places of vantage anywhere in the country.

For here was the most positive testimony by speech, by tableaux, by the distinction of the

by the response of the people and the communication media, that there had been indeed since Lincoln's

personalities taking part,

day the fulfillment of the prophecy that "this nation, under God, shall have a new birth

so devotedly recalled.

from document

ideas,

com-

felt

to the

the

truthful feeling of the atmosphere of the

of freedom

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and

that

government of

the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish

from the

earth."

the

The Committee.

inviting to the pictorial contents,

Fred Schwengel of Iowa, Chairman.

allowing for the desired use of sketches and

[37]

U.S.GOUERNMEM PRINTING

OFFICE. 1962

O

68157


Lincoln First Inaugural Centennial Reenactment  

Offficial report on the commemoration activities that took place at the Capitol and Willard Hotel on March 4, 1961

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you