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D ALLAS C HILDREN ’ S A DVOCACY C ENTER SOAR: Strategic Organization Audit Report | May 2013

This strategic organization audit report presents a comprehensive overview of the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center’s current state and business model. It contains critical data needed to help DCAC board and staff to develop a shared understanding of the organization, discuss critical factors and issues that may impact the future, and decide a future direction and strategy to achieve it.

Bobbi Bilnoski, CEO 5/28/2013

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DALLAS CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER TABLE OF CONTENTS A. STRATEGIC PLANNING TASK FORCE _____________________________ 2 B. CURRENT PERFORMANCE RESULTS _____________________________ 3 1. Business Model 2. Program Performance 3. Financial Performance C. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE & LEADERSHIP ____________________ 32 1. Board of Trustee Self-Assessment 2. DCAC Workplace Climate Survey 3. Corporate Culture D. EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT _______________________________________ 35 1. Political / Legislative Factors 2. Economic Factors 3. Societal Factors 4. Technological Factors 5. Competitive Analysis E. INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT _______________________________________ 44 1. Corporate Resources 2. DCAC Staff Feedback 3. DCAC Multi-Disciplinary Team Feedback 4. DCAC Client Feedback 5. DCAC Education Client & Partner Feedback F. STRATEGIC FACTOR ANALYSIS __________________________________ 59 G. STRATEGIC ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS _________________________ 59 H. STRATEGY RECOMMENDATION __________________________________ 60 I. STRATEGIC END RESULTS _______________________________________ 60 J. STRATEGIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION ___________________________ 61 K. EVALUATION AND CONTROL _____________________________________ 61 DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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A. STRATEGIC PLANNING TASK FORCE The purpose of the Strategic Planning Task Force is to develop a Roadmap of the strategic decision-making process to help DCAC determine its future. The Roadmap consists of five phases:

1

Assess the Current Environment (April/May)

2 3 4 5

Set Strategic Direction (April/May)

Determine End Results and Strategies (May/June)

Develop the Implementation Plan and Timeline (June/July)

Monitor and Evaluate Progress (September/October)

The team members are: o

Steve Martin, Chairman, Board of Trustees (Chairman)

o

Lynn M. Davis, President and CEO

o

Debby Ackerman, Board of Trustees

o

Bobbi Bilnoski, CEO, Concinnity Network

o

Irish Burch, Chief of Partner Relations

o

Chris Culak, Chief Development Officer

o

Heather Emmanuel, Chief Financial Officer

o

Melissa Hensley, Board of Trustees

o

Tracey Kozmetsky, Board of Trustees

o

Ashley Lind, Chief Programs Officer

o

Ellen Magnis, Chief of External Affairs

o

Gail McDonald, Board of Trustees

o

Autumn Williams, Director of Community Education

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B. CURRENT PERFORMANCE RESULTS 1. Business Model*1 We are a 501(c)3 accredited by the Children’s Advocacy Centers of Texas and the National Children’s Alliance as the only Children’s Advocacy Center in Dallas County.

Mission The mission of the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center (DCAC) is to improve the lives of abused children in Dallas County and to provide national leadership on child abuse issues.

Vision Currently there is not a documented “vision statement.” We will create one as part of this strategic planning process.

Core Values The following core values define our culture and business environment. 1. Children come first in all that we do. 2. We operate as a seamless team. 3. Each of us acts with a servant's heart.

Tagline: Where healing begins for abused children

2. Customers*2 Community Children & Families We provide free services annually for 2,400+ children (and their non-offending family members) who were sexually abused, severely physically abused, or who witnessed a violent crime. We conducted 1,700 forensic interviews, and 11,000 therapy sessions in 2012. Our average client is a 9-10 year-old girl, sexually abused by someone she knows and trusts.

Employees We support approximately 50 employees at DCAC. We provide medical and dental benefits at no cost to our employees, 403B retirement (with some matching funds) and professional training.

Professionals / Organizations In 2012, we served 30,000 individuals with Education Services to teach employees/volunteers who work with children how to Recognize and Report

1 2

See Business Model Handout See Customer Focus Group Results DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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suspected abuse and parents how to Keep Your Children from Harm. Our education services are currently available free to these customers. We provide internationally-recognized fee-based training to 3,000+ professionals annually through our annual Crimes Against Children Conference to help them fight crimes against children and help them heal and are piloting spin-off strategies for fee-based training through an online conference portal and smaller year-round face-to-face trainings in our new training facility.

Referral Sources We serve clients who are referred by more than 26 Police Departments in Dallas County and Child Protective Services. Working with an agreed upon investigative protocol with our partners, we see the most severe cases of child abuse in Dallas County. We provide referral services to help our clients. They include The Child Care Assistance Group, HHSC (for food stamps), the Dallas Furniture Bank, the Dallas Food Bank and multiple other non-profit agencies that provide services (so that we do not duplicate other organizations’ work).

3. Value Proposition Multi-disciplinary team (MDT): A highly trained team comprised of a police detective, assistant district attorney, Child Protective Services caseworker, forensic interviewer, therapist, and consulting physician manage and coordinate each child's case. The Texas Family Code allows MDT participants to share detailed case information throughout the span of client care promoting responsiveness to continued developments in the case leading up to the court date. We also provide free expert testimony for child abuse cases for the District Attorney’s Office as well as an approximate county/city cost savings of $1,000/case (National Research Study on Cost-Effectiveness of CACs). We provide complimentary access to our Crimes Against Children Conference by distributing more than $75,000 worth of scholarships to MDT members each year and also offer a limited number of free seats to MDT members to attend our year-round face-to-face fee-based trainings. Additionally, MDT members are provided with extensive orientation and ongoing professional development through private MDT-focused trainings.

Children & Families: We provide free expert therapy to all non-offending family members, family support through the investigation and prosecution of criminal cases and family assistance services in a client-focused atmosphere. We operate as a seamless team to remove obstacles to healing for children and their families. We help traumatized children recover rather than succumb to DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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substance abuse, teen pregnancy, failure in school or suicide. We provide support for parents (and siblings) to enable them to support their victimized children through crisis and healing. Clients are eligible to receive emergency financial assistance, clothing, and food distribution for urgent needs as well safety awareness through groups and summer camps. Annually, families have the opportunity to receive provisions for holiday giving and back to school needs for all of the children living in the home.

Community: We provide free education and training services to parents and community members. We strive to raise the level of awareness of our cause, help parents protect their children, and help professionals learn how to recognize and report abuse through our education and training programs. This enables individuals to better protect children and to be more aware of the issues and complexities of child abuse cases should they ever serve on juries. We communicate with the society at large through our website, Facebook, Twitter, enewsletters, op-eds, news stories, radio and television opportunities, letters to the editor of newspapers, annual report, etc.

Employees: We provide our employees a competitive wage, medical and dental benefits at no cost, 403B retirement (with some matching funds) and professional development/training. We also provide multiple methods of managing exposure to investigative materials such as a debriefing consultant, on-site workout room, quiet room for meditation, team building, stress reducing retreats and exercises. We aspire to become a Best Place to Work in North Texas.

Professionals: For professionals who fight crimes against children and help them heal, we provide expert training that is known as the premier training in the country (Crimes-Against-Children Conference). We are also finding new ways to offer the content from these trainings on a year-round basis through smaller training events and inexpensive online strategies. From an education perspective, we also work closely with Children’s Medical Center of Dallas and the UT Southwestern Department of Pediatrics to provide training to medical professionals as they enter the workforce. We communicate via newsletters, phone, mail, and email.

Donors and Volunteers: We promise a meaningful opportunity to engage in the fight against child abuse and are good stewards of investment of time and/or money. We provide a social return on investment by performing as Best in Class in impacting the lives of children and families victimized by abuse and by teaching the community how to keep children safe. We work with our donors by hosting events and conducting tours. We produce an annual report, visit with donors in person, and use direct response mailings to communicate with supporters. DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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4. Current Strategic Plan “Directions” A. Enhance Fundraising through Strategy and Staff Expansion (Status: completed) 

Hire a CDO, who along with the CEO and Development Committee, would establish a comprehensive fundraising strategy.

B. Reformulate Board Governance to Realize Board Potential (Status: ongoing) 

The establishment of a simple, implementable governance system will address many of the core issues at the heart of the organization.

C. Nurture and Grow Relationships with Partner Agencies (Status: completed) 

Hire a top-notch MDT coordinator to ensure the relationships are always top of mind and well-managed.

D. Support Staff through General and Specific Protocol (Status: Ongoing) 

A nurturing work culture will be constantly promoted to mitigate against staff burnout and attrition.

E. Launch Bold Clear Brand to Enhance PR Strategy (Status: Rebranding project completed; annual marketing/PR planning in progress) 

A consistent, unified branding and communication strategy is of utmost importance

F. Enhance Task Force to Implement Volunteer Strategy (Status: Volunteer Program re-design by staff almost completed; no ad hoc task force formed) 

This particular task force capitalizes on the collective potential of the volunteer community.

G. Charter a Task Force to Define Goals and Plans for a Research Institute (Status: New task force forming May 2013) 

The Research Institute expands the position of DCAC on the national stage. A task force can indeed be engineered now to bring this project to life.

H. Improve and Expand Community Services (Status: Ongoing) 

The annual Crimes-Against-Children Conference provides education and training, and positions DCAC as a lead player.

5. Core Strategy The strategy identified in the last strategic plan was focused primarily on improving governance, moving into a new facility and rebranding DCAC with a unified message and new logo.

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6. Policies & Oversight Practices The following are common policies and practices found in non-profits, some of which may not be applicable to DCAC under our form of governance. Policies and Practices

Yes

No

Board Policies Risk/Crisis Mgmt Policy (Note: Ad Hoc Risk Mgmt Task Force formed 5/13)

x

Directors and Officers Insurance Policy

x

Code of Ethics/Conduct Policy

x

Conflict of Interest Policy

x

Electronic Voting Policy

x

Whistleblower policy

x

Intellectual Property Policy

x

Political Activity Policy

x

Financial Policies Investment Policy (Foundation)

x

Major Gifts Policy (Definition of what is considered a major gift)

x

Discretionary Fund Policy Donor Privacy Policy

x x

Employee Policies Internet Policy

x

Computer/Laptop Policy

x

Employee Credit Card Policy

x

Expense Reimbursement Policy

x

Benevolence Policy Cell Phone Policy

x x

Volunteer Policy

x

Child Abuse Policy

x

Social Media Policy

x

Reimbursement/Travel Policy

x

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Board Practices Formal board member orientation

x

Defined board member terms

x

Defined board term limits

x

Board committees and ad hoc task forces have written charters describing their authority, responsibility and deliverables

some

Annual conflict of interest disclosure by board members and staff (Note: staff upon hire)

x

Annual retreat to strengthen relationship and focus on future challenges

x

Supervision Practices The chief executive has a written job description

x

The chief executive is evaluated, formally and in writing, annually by the board

x

The board reviews the chief executive compensation at comparable organizations

x

Transparency Checklist How do you answer these questions on the Form 990? Independent Voting Board Members

Yes

No Material Diversion Of Assets

Yes

Audited financials prepared by independent accountant

Yes

Prohibit Loan(s) to or Receive Loan(s) from related parties

Yes

Documents Board Meeting Minutes

Yes

Provided copy of Form 990 to governing body before filing

Yes

Conflict of Interest Policy

Yes

Whistleblower Policy

Yes

Records Retention and Destruction Policy

Yes

CEO listed with salary

Yes

Written process for determining CEO compensation

Yes

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Does your website include the following information? Are board members compensated?

No

Vision, Mission and Value Statements (not vision)

Yes

Programs and Services

Yes

Donor Privacy Policy

No

Current Board Member Contacts

No

Current Staff Member Contacts

Yes

Audited Financial Statements

Yes

Form 990

No

Key Staff Listed

Yes

Geographic Service Area

Yes

Location Map

Yes

Calendar of Events

Yes

Community Impact Statement/Results

No

7. Territory DCAC serves Dallas County. To reach our entire territory, DCAC programs are delivered through the following channels. a. Onsite Services (Dallas and at Irving Family Advocacy Center) b. Online Services c. Education and Training Workshops d. Client-Site Services e. Annual Crimes-Against-Children Conference

8. Key Resources Legal Structure: In 1991, DCAC was established as a 501(c) 3 Nonprofit Corporation. In addition, it is also one of 68 local chapters of Children’s Advocacy Centers of Texas, a statewide organization. Financial: $5.4 million Operating Budget Governance: 36 member Board of Trustees; 10 member Foundation Board of Directors, and a 6 member Executive Team: President & Chief Executive Officer, DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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Chief of External Affairs, Chief Program Officer, Chief Finance Officer, Chief Development Officer, Chief of Partner Relations Qualified Staff: 47 Full-time employees 3 Part-time employees and 145 Volunteers Key Vendors: Bill Walsh Training and Consulting (contracted through 2021 for Conference), Sheraton Dallas Hotel (contracted through 2016). The Rees-Jones Center for Child Protection: Opened in January 2013, this is a new 56,000 square foot facility with ample parking and a 200-seat training facility. Technology Systems: Harmony, Convergint Technlogies, CVENT, Raiser’s Edge, Financial Edge.

9. Key Partnerships Strategic partners and suppliers provide cost-effective resources and services to deliver quality programs to our clients. Education: Region 10 and 18 Education Service Centers, CAC of Texas, SMU, multiple ISDs, YMCA, HPUMC, etc. Elected officials: New/developing relationships with state senators and reps, county commissioners, mayors, and appointed officials, such as the US Attorney. Conference: Varies from year to year, but usually includes DPD, NCMEC, FBI, USMS, ICE, NDAA, NCPTC, corporate sponsors such as Facebook, PayPal, Google, AOL, Yahoo, Time Warner Cable, Twitter, etc. Media: New/developing relationships with Dallas Morning News, radio stations, news stations. MDT Partners: In addition to in-house MDT (Child Abuse Unit of DPD, District Attorney’s Office and CPS): Law Enforcement: More than 26 police agencies in Dallas County. Medical Partners: Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, UT Southwestern Department of Pediatrics, Medical City Children’s Hospital.

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10. Revenue Streams The following revenue streams result from delivering our value propositions to each customer. 26% - Private donations 24% - Special Events 19% - Net Conference/Education 18% - Public Funding 9% - United Way 4% - Investments/Other

11. Program Performance*3 Program Portfolio DCAC has invested its resources in the following program portfolio:

Case Coordination and Partnership Relations

Direct Services

o Forensic Interviews o Family Assistance o Therapy Services: art, play, music, animal assisted, therapeutic gardening, EMDR, psychological testing and psychiatric services

Education and Training:

o Community outreach/awareness building with parent and professional-focused trainings

o Crimes Against Children Annual Conference and associated spin-off year-round strategies

3

Volunteer Services

See Organizational Logic Model DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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 

Research Institute (planning phase)

Theory of Change: Program Logic Model Each program offering can be categorized under the following “pathways” that drive change: 1) Community Awareness 2) Healing and Restoration 3) Justice and Conviction The combination of these pathways reveals the complex network of activities that is required to bring about change and solve community and social problems and ultimately the cost and efficiency savings gained by working together to make a collective community impact. Assumptions: Assumptions explain both the connections between early, intermediate and long term outcomes and the expectations about how and why proposed interventions will bring them about. Often, assumptions are supported by research, strengthening the case to be made about the plausibility of theory and the likelihood that stated goals will be accomplished. Stakeholders’ value theories of change as part of program planning and evaluation because they create a commonly understood vision of the long term goals, how they will be reached, and what will be used to measure progress along the way.

DCAC’s Key Assumptions about the future are: (to be completed by the team on the 28 th) 

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DCAC’s Theory of Change Model: Programs

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Outcomes

Community Awareness (Ellen Magnis, MBA) Annual Conference

 Revenue: $1.7M

(Earned Income Strategy)

 Surplus: +$800K*

 Expenses: $900K  Staff: 2 FTE.

 Develop and execute the Annual Crimes Against Children Conference

 1 Contractor

Past: 2010 2011 2012 2013 est.

3,400 2,807 3,014 3,000

Projected:

 @150 Volunteers, including staff

2014 2015 2016

3,200 3,400 3,600

*spread as “other” across program revenue below

 Provide premier national professional training of its kind (DCAC’s national outreach strategy) with >95% positive response on key conference metrics  Build community awareness and skills for prevention/ intervention of child abuse  Return $800K+ net revenue each year

Education

Budget: $492,715 Designated Rev: $150,000 Deficit filled by unrestricted: $342,715

 Develop/update curriculum; roll out in variety of organizations, with primary focus on adults in schools

 Provide online learning for those Revenue by category: who cannot  42% private/grants attend face-toface trainings  36% other/events  Shift to re-design  16% government R+R to earned income strategy  6% United Way beginning in mid2013; reduce emphasis on Staff: 3.5 FTE + training Trained Volunteer facilitators since Facilitators we cannot control quality of their delivery

DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

Past: 2010 – 8,273 2011 – 7,833 2012 – 27,978 2013 13,013|/Q1 Projected 2013 – 30,000 2014 – TBD* 2015 – TBD 2016 – TBD *For 2014 may set targets based on revenue or other metric TBD

 Build community awareness and skills for prevention/ intervention of child abuse  Increase organizational and individual awareness, understanding, and accountability to protect children.  Achieve greater than 10% increase in knowledge between pre- and post-tests on R+R training

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Programs

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Outcomes

 Individual, Group, and Family  Psych. Testing  Psych. Services  Court preparation

Past: 2008-7,180 2009-8,063 2010-9,756 Clients/Sessions: 2011-947/9,872 2012-1,016/11,282 Projected: 2013- 1,400/14,000 2014- 1,500/15,000 2015- 1,600/16,000 2016 -1,700/17,000

 Clients completing therapy with a minimum of 6 sessions will exhibit a 10 point improvement in the GAFS.  Clients completing 6 or more sessions will complete 66% or more of treatment goals

 Meet basic and ongoing needs of clients in crisis  Summer Safety Camp and Classes for Youth  Provide clients with Holiday/School Support in giving back program

Past: 2011-1402 2012-2984 Projected: 2013-3,000 2014-3,500 2015-3,700 2016-4,000

 Clients referred for counseling receive triage for crisis care within 72 hours of referral.  Clients in service receive support from holiday giving/back  Children receiving a forensic interview will have created a safety plan including being able to verbalize three safe persons to report unsafe touches and will be able to define inappropriate touches.  Integration of research based practices at CAC’s.  Establish DCAC as a National Expert

Healing & Restoration (Ashley Lind, Ph.D.) Therapy Services

Family Assistance

Budget: $1.54 M Designated Rev: $900,000 Deficit filled by unrestricted: $640,000 Revenue by category:  38% private/grants  26% government  19% other/events  17% United Way Staff: 14 FTE, 1 Contractor, 20 Volunteer Interns, 10 Volunteers Budget: included in Therapy Designated Rev: $24,000 Revenue by category:  100% private/grants Staff: 6 FTE, 1 PTC, 5 Volunteers

Forensic Interviews

Budget: $476,325 Designated Rev: $240,000 Deficit filled by unrestricted: $236,325 Revenue by category:  48% private/grants  38% government  13% United Way  1% other/events Staff: 5 FTE, 1 Debriefer, 10 Vols

 Forensic interviews and evaluation for abuse victims and witnesses to violent crimes  Participation in MDT case staffing  Court testimony  Peer reviews/forensic interview training

Past: 2010 -1,505 2011- 1,643 2012 -1,749 Projected: 2013- 1,900 2014 -2,000 2015- 2,100 2016 -2,200

Research Institute

Budget: $240,000 Designated Rev: $0 Deficit filled by unrestricted: $240,000 Revenue by category:  63% private/grants  38% other/events Staff: 3 FTE, 1 Contract, 3 Volunteers

 National Research Institute to identify, develop and document promising and evidence based practice and longterm community impact

Past: N/A Projected: 2014 One Long. Study, 2015 One Long. Study, 2 Collaborative Studies, 2 Nat’l Presentations 2016 – above + 2 publication submissions

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Programs

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Outcomes

Coordination of x cases annually

Continue to build partner relationships and increase awareness and knowledge of MDT process through monthly orientations and training events.

Justice and Conviction (Irish Burch) MDT Services

Budget: $292,232 Designated Rev: $120,000 Deficit filled by unrestricted: $172,232 Revenue by category:  42% other/events  41% government  17% United Way Staff: 1 

 Orientation and training  Case coordination  Conflict resolution  Develop, update and maintain interagency agreements with all partner agencies  Police >26 law enforcement agencies

X orientation sessions X training sessions

Expand “First Responder” Training to Law Enforcement Patrol and remote CPS units to increase awareness of MDT process.

 CPS – 5 units in house; others remote  DA, 1 grand jury ADA in house; multiple outside agency  Medical Partners: e.g., Children’s Medical Center and Medical City Children’s Hospital

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

Delivery Channels Our customer value propositions are promoted and delivered through the following communications, distribution, and outreach channels. 1. Onsite at Rees-Jones Center for Child Protection: We work with children and families face-to-face with onsite interview, therapy and education programs in a family friendly environment. We provide both individual and group therapy sessions in a variety of ways – Talk, Art, Music, Garden, Play, Animal-Assisted, etc. 2. Onsite Training Facility: We offer educational workshops in a classroom setting. We also provide the space for community meetings and local civic groups. 3. Online: We have an informative website, a training campus that provides for automated demographic collection, testing and certificate production, a trainer’s portal, and online registration system for events. We also have a conference resource portal for attendees (and others for a small fee) to download handouts and watch video-captured sessions. We also utilize social media with an active Facebook page (1585 likes), Twitter Account and a Blog. 4. Client-Site: We work with universities, schools/day cares, corporations, civic groups and nonprofits to provide education and training on ways to combat and prevent child abuse. We also provide therapy and forensic interview services at community satellite locations and in certain circumstances in outlying police departments or hospital settings.

5. Conference Center: Our 25th Annual Conference will be hosted at the Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center in downtown Dallas.

12. Financial Performance*4 Ratio analysis determines the overall financial condition of an organization. It puts the information from the financial statements into perspective, helping to spot where the business is at risk or whether negative financial patterns threaten the health of the organization. Ratios are useful for making comparisons between your 4

See Financial Ratio and Trend Analysis Worksheet DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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organization and other organizations in the industry. Donors and investors use them to decide whether a business is a good credit or investment risk. Managers look at ratios to monitor operations and determine whether or not the company is running efficiently. Philanthropists and donors take ratio analysis into consideration in making their funding decisions. Websites like Charity Navigator rate nonprofits based on the following nine ratios to measure capacity and efficiency. Financial Ratio Indicator

General Standard

Audited 12/31/2012

Audited 12/31/2011

Audited 12/31/2010

Audited 12/31/2009

Audited 12/31/2008

Audited 12/31/2007

Quick Ratio

1:1 or higher

2.15

14.68

17.99

6.24

11.49

11.24

Cash on Hand

Best = 90 Days, 60 days acceptable

181.15

503.38

210.78

133.42

149.73

115.78

Debt/Equity Ratio

30% or less

13.33%

3.86%

2.43%

7.69%

18.42%

2.51%

Primary Revenue Growth

Near rate of inflation greater than expense growth

130%

-5.47%

24.71%

35.74%

-12.98%

-1.12%

Primary Expense Growth

Near rate of inflation, less than revenue growth

11.14%

1.93%

16.36%

7.28%

7.50%

6.87%

No deficit trend

0.55%

15.17%

100.64%

44.01%

-8.17%

4.00%

75% or greater

88.70%

89.90%

82.94%

82.13%

82.47%

82.71%

Support Costs

25% or less

17.43%

15.62%

21.39%

22.68%

22.95%

25.67%

Fundraising Efficiency

35% or less

5.10%

8.84%

6.85%

7.27%

7.94%

9.73%

Net Asses/Cash Flow Change (Profitability)

Program Expenses

Notes: Green squares indicate where DCAC meet the standard, Yellow where barely falling short, and Red squares indicate where DCAC significantly fell short of the standard. The decrease in 2007 was due to a loss of the ICAC Conference which formerly co-located their event with ours. The loss in 2008 was due to an agreed-upon release of accrued receivables from the Foundation as well as a $300K loss in investment income. The decrease in 2011 was due to a shift in Federal agency participation and attendance at the Conference due to an unexpected Presidential “no travel� mandate following several conference scandals. Also, during 2011 there was no full-time executive leadership from Jan-October solely focused on Education/Conference or Development. DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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Sources of Revenue: DCAC has an overall budget of $5.4 million dollars. The 2013 projected revenue is very balanced and diversified and includes the following sources of funding:

C. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE & LEADERSHIP 1. Board of Trustees: DCAC has a 36 member Board of Trustees, each of whom is provided with bylaws, mandatory agency orientation, and mandatory governance orientation. Some seats are held by partner agency representatives: Dallas Police Department, Dallas County District Attorney’s Office, Child Protective Services, and Children’s Medical Center of Dallas.

2. Executive Management: DCAC has a 6 member Executive Team consisting of the President & Chief Executive Officer, Chief of External Affairs, Chief Program Officer, Chief Finance Officer, Chief of Partner Relations, and Chief Development Officer.

3. DCAC Multi-Disciplinary Team: The new Rees-Jones Center for Child Protection houses DCAC as well as the MultiDisciplinary Team (MDT) which is comprised of    

Child Abuse Unit of the Dallas Police Department, Five units of Child Protective Services, and A Dallas County Assistant District Attorney. Multiple external partners also benefit from these services, such as —

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o o o

>26 law enforcement agencies Children’s Medical Center Medical City Children’s Hospital

Data regarding local community needs drives the MDT composition and the portfolio of programs and services. The data serves as a roadmap for determining the scope of the local program, what services it should offer, what the target population looks like, and which local agencies need to be involved and at what level. In addition, they provide an important benchmark for determining if the program is truly making a difference in these cases and in the lives of child victims. Some of these indicators in Dallas County are: Performance Indicator

2012 Dallas County

2013 Trend Up/Down

1. Number of investigations conducted by Child Protective Services 2. Number of investigations and arrests related to crimes against children recorded by all local law enforcement 3. Number of grand jury presentations connected to alleged crimes against children in the projected service area 4. Number of indictments connected to alleged crimes against children in the projected service area 5. Number of convictions/prosecutions connected to alleged crimes against children in the projected services area 6. Number of "no bills" or cases dismissed connected to alleged crimes against children in the projected service area 7. Number of juvenile adjudications connected to alleged crimes against children in the projected service area 8. Statistical information from medical and mental health providers indicating the number of child abuse victims seeking services in the service area

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4. Staff*5: DCAC has 47 Full-time employees and 3 Part-time employees.

5. Volunteer Fundraising *6: The 10 member DCAC Foundation Board of Directors functions as a volunteer organization that oversees the investments contained therein that are for the sole benefit of the agency’s needs.

6. Governance & Leadership Assessment Board of Trustees Assessment 

Jonathan Schick, DCAC’s governance consultant and Bobbi Bilnoski are working together to modify a survey to align with the new governance structure. It will be administered at a later time. Additionally, the Governance Committee is working on an individual self-assessment for board members.

DCAC Workplace Climate Survey 

5 6

DCAC conducts an annual Workplace Climate Survey that is based on the Gallup Workplace Audit of 12 questions of High Performing Organizations. While the majority of the responses were very positive (with >90% agreeing or strongly agreeing with 6 of 12 statements), the areas for improvement noted at the beginning of 2013 are: 1) In my work, I have the opportunity to learn and grow.  87% agree or strongly agree 2) My supervisor or someone at work cares about me as a person  87% agree or strongly agree 3) Someone at work cares about my professional development.  83% agree or strongly agree 4) At work, my opinions seem to count.  83% agree or strongly agree 5) In the last six months, my supervisor talked to me about my progress.  79% agree or strongly agree 6) In the last weeks, I have received recognition or praise  65% agree or strongly agree

See Supervisor and Non-supervisor Focus Group Results See Volunteer Survey Results DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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In addition, during strategic planning focus groups, the staff expressed concerns about sharing verbatim comments from the annual Climate Survey in an all-staff environment, and management has responded to this feedback and will provide only summaries in the future. Some staff expressed concerns about the wording of the questions; however, the agency will rely on the research basis behind the exact wording of the questions and make attempts to educate the entire staff on the derivation of the questions. Some staff also desired a third party source to provide the annual survey because of fear that their identities could become known. Because of the costs associated with an external sourcing of this kind, the executive team will educate and reinforce the anonymity of the survey by showing the back end system to all staff during a meeting.

Corporate Culture 

D.

The MDT (internal) focus group identified that the MDT itself has never been as high performing as it is right now. They did however identify several areas for improvement in the relationship between DCAC and the MDT. These issues are currently being addressed by the DCAC executive team.

EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT PEST Analysis is a tool to identify the key external factors that might influence the future of the organization. What is happening outside that will at some point affect what is happening inside? It's useful for organizations to scan their general environment, by domains, for events, trends, and occurrences that could lead to opportunities or threats for the organization. The four elements form a framework for reviewing the organization are Political, Economic, Societal, and Technology. Here is the PEST analysis for DCAC:

TOP 3 Political Factors 1. 2. 3.

1. Political / Legislative Factors  Decrease in Federal funding affects state grants like VOCA; sequestration has cut training for Federal agency employees for 2013, dramatically decreasing the ability for individuals to pay for and travel to conferences.  Federal grant/sponsor funding was previously utilized as funding stream for Conference; we have adjusted each year to accommodate significant decreases  Charitable contribution tax deduction periodically at risk.  Changes in elected officials with whom we have strong relationships – elections and election results cause uptick in

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 

resource requirements for relationship building and playing all sides of election outcome. Strong support for our cause at DA’s office, commissioner’s court, state reps, etc. can change overnight following an election. Child abuse and the Children’s Advocacy Center movement have no national voice. Ineffective national level agency. No national campaigns for awareness, full-time lobbying, etc. Distinct lack of leadership at the national level could be space for DCAC to step up in ways that we have not in the past, but brings political consequences and would require significant financial investment in marketing/public relations. We have not invested in marketing/PR even in the local area beyond one FTE and a nominal expense budget so would require significant thought, planning and resources. Changes in training requirements in this state legislative session may drive more users to DCAC’s educational offerings (all teachers vs. new teachers); University/College training mandates (Sandusky rule). CPS funding driven by Texas legislation. CPS currently has 35% turnover in workforce each year. Budget issues are driving more CPS workers to work remotely without office-based supervision; changes in CPS policy as a result of legislative change or court cases can change how they operate, create confusion and inefficiency. CPS class action lawsuit with (now) adults who were in foster care system may drive some policy changes depending on outcome. CAC of Texas funding through Texas legislature. $4-5 million increase a trickle down benefit for DCAC; however, some years no increases; some years more CACs developed so dollars split differently. New laws that come through state legislature can create minor or significant shifts – waiting and watching for any such laws for this session that could be policy or practice changing. City funding and policies around resource allocation for detectives is reactionary (following recent family violence deaths, more detectives assigned to that Unit). Our DPD child abuse unit is overstretched; burn out is common; new detectives drive stress level for training on experienced detectives. Fear brewing that multiple children will have to die before attention is paid to their workloads. OJJDP restructure driven by national legislative changes – OJJDP funds regional CACs, National Children’s Alliance (not effective as a voice for our cause at the national level) and Internet "Crimes-Against-Children Task Forces (affects funding for conference attendance and DPD grant – which affects conference revenue).

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2. Economic Factors 

Recession effects.

Increase in divide between “have’s” and “have not’s”

Dallas not as hard hit as many communities; now in a housing boom.

Limited availability for low-income families to access long-term care/inpatient treatment for children who need services beyond those provided in outpatient service delivery.

TOP 3 Economic Factors 1. 2. 3.

As part of our expansion to provide care for even more abused children, as we settle into our space and new ways of operating, we will seek additional relationships to drive clients in who we believe we should be seeing, such as children affected by family violence (relationship building with family violence detectives), children living in drug endangered homes (relationship building with drug case detectives), and children who have been victimized by child pornography (relationship building with US Attorneys, FBI, etc.)

3. Societal Factors 

Population growth = more potential clients.

New immigrants with language barriers and very limited resources drives challenges in care (transportation, etc.) and language barriers (more Spanish-speaking professionals)

Pathologizing (“he just has ADHD”) and medicating kids may cause a “miss” in detecting underlying abuse issues.

DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

TOP 3 Societal Factors 1. 2. 3.

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Disintegration of generational family unit; more single parents.

Changes in cultural make-up of Dallas County.

High profile cases (Sandusky) have opened opportunities for media and community engagement – better “appetite” for discussions around taboo subject matter.

Engaging in therapy/healing more socially acceptable in some groups but still not acceptable in all cultural groups.

Norms in some cultures (Asian/Southeast Asian, etc.) for lack of disclosure, secrecy, tolerance of acceptability of harm is generational.

Younger donors want to be more deeply engaged and consider their donations investments with desire to see ROI.

Aging population may drive attention away from child-related issues when it comes to resource allocation for services.

4. Technological Factors 

More internet crimes against children – pornography creation and distribution, exploitation, etc.

Social media – information (both positive and negative) travels so rapidly; news cycles are now a blink.

Everyone is a reporter who has a blog, iPhone.

Social isolation.

Easier to access data about nonprofits – good for those operating well; negative for those who are struggling.

Juries expect CSI results in real world.

DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

TOP 3 Technology Factors 1. 2. 3.

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Competitive Analysis Nonprofit Analysis Texas has 97,942 nonprofits. There are 28,105 registered 501(c)(3) organizations in the 16 counties that make up North Texas. The vast majority of these non-profit agencies operate on $100,000 or less annually (83%). There are 511 non-profits in North Texas with budgets over $5 million. 28% of non-profits in North Texas are in the category of human services. (Center for Nonprofit Management Report, 2013). While every nonprofit competes for dollars, donor time and talent, DCAC is in a position to leverage our uniqueness in the community to engage our donor base. From a state funding perspective, we receive an allocation according to the formula set by the Children’s Advocacy Centers of Texas. Children’s Advocacy Centers Because of the structure of our organization within the context of the CAC of Texas guidelines, there will never be another Children’s Advocacy Center in Dallas County. The Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center is the only one of its kind providing the services we do. While there are other agencies that may provide therapy services to children, we do not consider them competitors. Our clients come to us through CPS and law enforcement referrals only.

Education Program Competition We currently provide our video-based Recognizing and Reporting Child Abuse education services in the community (to teachers, day care workers, staff and volunteers at places of worship) at no charge. We also teach parents how to keep their children safe at no charge. We have field tested Recognizing and Reporting, launched a train-the-trainer model and garnered thousands of pre- and post-test evaluations to demonstrate that our program increases knowledge of important objectives. We have proven the quality of our product with a number of important constituencies, and we plan to explore a transition to an earned income strategy for this program. We plan to explore a budget for 2014 that will allow us to sell a “packaged” version of Recognizing and Reporting to allow schools, day cares, places of worship, etc. to provide their own trainings and will include a culturally appropriate Spanish version of this training, which is not seen in the current marketplace. This transition could occur more quickly with a special budget allocation in 2013 following a review of the associated costs and staffing needs. Anticipating this potential strategic shift, we have analyzed potential competitors that are providing similar trainings, particularly those registered with and approved by the State of Texas as being compliant with requisite legislation. DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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The vast majority of the 50 Sexual Abuse and Child Molestation Awareness Training and Examination Programs approved by the State of Texas are provided to in-house constituents. For example, a Baptist group received approval to show their child abuse training to all of their employees involved in the Texas Baptist Camping Association. Because of the internal focus of these programs, a fee is not applicable. Some are publicly accessible on a website without charge. Outside of these in-house type of programs, the most common competitors for a newly packaged fee-based program would be: 

Stewards of Children – Darkness to Light – sexual abuse focused only. $350 to become a facilitator; $10-25 per person for training.

MinistrySafe – sexual abuse focused only; includes extensive online resources with sample policies and tools. $100/year + $5/person trained.

Praesidium – full service risk management services including litigation support and media management for high profile abuse situations. Their services include face-to-face and online trainings; however, a customer pays a lump sum contract/retainer for all support – this is not an exact comparison for our purposes.

Prevent Child Abuse Texas – provides a traveling face-to-face training in a workshop/conference setting (1-2 times/month) for $20-25 per person. This covers six hours of training, primarily targeting day care centers. According to their Form 990 from 2011, they made <$150K on training/conferences. The format is, as follows:

8:30 - Recognizing Child Abuse  

Types of Abuse - Physical, Sexual, Emotional, & Neglect Characteristics of Victims and Perpetrators

12:00 - Lunch - On your Own 1:00 - Documenting Child Abuse/Neglect    

Record Keeping - When Do You Report Protecting Yourself Against False Accusations How To Report Child Abuse And The Process Of Investigation Aftermath of Report

2:30 - Preventing Child Abuse 

What You Can Do /Community Resources

3:30 - Evaluation & Adjournment DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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The Education team has developed a working draft concept paper that is currently in exploration with the executive leadership team to determine cost, staffing, implications, opportunities and risk related to truly “compete” in this space. Conference Competition The conference planning team is in a continuous state of analyzing competitors, looking for opportunities to turn our competitors into collaborators, and exploring ways to differentiate our conference from others. As the market leader for conferences in our space, we continuously assess customer satisfaction and implement new ideas and strategies for improvement. In addition to surveys of each workshop and lab at the conference, we provide an overall conference survey, test new concepts with our >20,000 customers (with email addresses) in our database. Over the years, we have learned the following from our conference customers: 

Face-to-face training is the desired model for professional training and is considered a best-practice due to the sensitivity of our topics and the amount of interaction and collaboration of those involved in the field. Those involved in fighting crimes against children show a preference for case studies, active discussions, problem solving sessions, sharing experiences and learning from experts and peers.

Online learning is “tolerated” but is a clear second choice learning model for these professionals. From a price sensitivity perspective, online learning must be free or very low cost in order for professionals to consider engaging. This model of learning does not allow for the rich dialogue, problem solving or networking that these professionals desire for the complex cases they experience. We have tested this model on numerous occasions as an answer to reaching a greater proportion of our customer base outside the annual conference; however, consistent feedback is that these offerings must be free and that, even then, the learning environment does not allow the rich experience that face-to-face trainings provide.

We also have the benefit of having more than two decades of experience in observing the behavior of our target audience as we have introduced different expert speakers at our annual conference and pilot tested new models of learning (such as online learning or videocaptured sessions). We closely monitor feedback and evaluate each speaker and each learning opportunity. We periodically pre- and post-test a subset of our learners to ensure that learning objectives are met as well as routinely evaluate the experiences of our learners so that we stay in close connection to their training needs and expectations. Importantly, not all of the professionals who attend our conference each year are able to return the following year. Consistently, more than 98% of attendees each year intend to return to our conference the following year, yet less than 25% of attendees each year indicate they attended the prior year. When digging deeper into this metric, it makes logical sense that entire police units or CPS teams cannot attend the same training at the DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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same time and so must essentially “take turns” to attend our annual training with others in their departments. We have previously explored capturing conference speakers via video and offering these out to professionals online or on DVD at a low cost. The feedback and our direct experience with this model is consistent that this passive training is unsatisfying and that our professional customers have a very strong preference for face-to-face training. Following the 2012 conference, we packaged a small number of videos from conference speakers with conference handouts accessible online at a $99 fee and received little interest. We are relaunching a second effort in 2013 at a lower price point ($49) based on the feedback received from the pilot, as our audience communicated via survey that they would need to personally pay for this access. We are also piloting this year a number of small face-to-face trainings in our new training facility to assess the staffing and resource requirements versus potential revenue capture, while carefully monitoring unforeseen impact on the Conference, with our first exploration of this model outlined below. Test Case In order to test the market for a smaller face-to-face training offered outside of our August conference, we sent four emails over a period of two months to our conference database to announce a day-long training on Understanding Sex Offenders, promoted as “A Day with Jim Tanner.” Dr. Tanner is one of our conference experts who agreed to train for us on a deeply discounted basis to test our concept. In a very brief period of time and very limited promotion, we had 124 professionals registered to attend our event, hosted on February 25. The professionals who attended came from Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Louisiana. Just over 100 of these seats were sold for $99 each, with the remaining seats offered to our staff and partners for their own professional development. We surveyed the attendees postevent to ascertain their ongoing interest in these intensive trainings. These survey results demonstrated almost identical feedback as received for our annual conference:    

98% intend to return for another training, if able 100% agree or strongly agree that the training was well organized 98% agree or strongly agree that they would recommend this training for others 95% felt that the training was relevant to their professional needs

A grant has been created to provide seed funding for a more concentrated focus on this new delivery model. Until seed funding is secured, we will continue to test different speakers and topics as time and budgets allow. Ideally, we will work towards producing a year-at-aglance marketing piece for the 45,000+ mail recipients and 20,000+ email recipients, marketing our smaller face-to-face events in a focused way.

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Specific to other conferences in our space, the table below shows our top competitors and the respective strengths and weaknesses of each. Crimes Against Children Conference

Quality education by experts

Cost Networking / Camaraderie

Strengths:

Weaknesses:

Fox Valley (Partner)

ICAC (canceled in 2013)

San Diego Conference

Huntsville Conference

Locally Focused Conferences

Known for this in law enforcement (LE) and MDT

Known for this with LE

Narrow in scope but yes for ICAC profession -als

Narrow in scope; mostly medical and therapy

Mostly CAC staff focused

Hit and miss

$$

$

$

$$

$$

$

Known for this

Some

None

Some

Some

Some

Year-round training; defined curriculum progression

Singular focus on internet crimes against children; sometimes mandated and offered at no cost

Destination conference

CAC focused

Accessibility - local and cheap

Few networking opps; online is tolerated as second best option

Isolated from outside partners; not multidisciplinar y; Federally controlled; no food

Few offerings for LE; lack of industry relationship s; few networking opportuniti es; small size

Limited networking and offerings for LE; small size

Quality of training is inconsistent

Reputation for quality; multidisciplinary; relationships w/ experts, training partners, industry relationships; collaboration between law enforcement and industry Single annual opportunity; accessibility barriers (location, cost).

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E. INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT 1. Corporate Resources a. Customer Programs and Services*7 1. Crimes Against Children Conference 2. Education and Training 3. Family Assistance Program 4. Forensic Interview Program 5. Multi-disciplinary Team 6. Research Institute Program 7. Therapy Program 8. Volunteer Program

b. General Operations 1. Information & Technology DCAC’s Information Technology system was born out of DCAC’s functional priorities and needs and includes networking servers, computers, service cameras, surveillance cameras, digitized phones, printers, and copier/scanner/faxes. One contract IT technician and a technical volunteer support group manage the entire infrastructure. Software that supports daily operations includes: Microsoft Office, Raiser’s Edge, CVENT, Financial Edge, Harmony Information Systems, Avigilon Recording Management, and NUUO Surveillance System. A primary goal is to better align business strategies and technology. To that end, we have recently upgraded the e-mail environment, added smart phone business access, added a technology service desk reporting system, and prepared for VPN implementation. We will soon launch an intranet for partner and staff communications. As the Research Institute becomes an integral data analysis component, data security, quality and integrity will be re-evaluated to ensure that the current systems optimize storage, data aggregation and access.

7

See Individual Program Logic Models DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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2. Marketing & Communications With the move to our new facility, we concurrently launched a new logo in order to build our brand within the community to better match the professionalism of the agency. This included a complete overhaul of all marketing materials, collaterals such as letterhead, business cards, take home pieces for client families, brochures, educational tools, website, Facebook page, etc. In addition to the new logo integration into all signage throughout the facility, a comprehensive set of branding and style guidelines was created. We have almost completed a process to re-orient all event logos into the new color scheme and style guidelines. We produce a monthly e-newsletter that goes out to all donors and constituents to provide basic updates and information about the agency, including upcoming events. We have an active Facebook page where more frequent updates and alerts are provided and a brand new Twitter feed. Following years of outsourcing public relations work to external agencies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which produced limited results - we opted to pull the resources from that effort to an in-house position and combined the formerly part-time PR role with a formerly decentralized marketing effort, creating our first PR and Marketing Specialist position in the late summer of 2012. Since that time, we have greatly exceeded all prior yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts with press mentions and premium placements in the Dallas Morning News and multiple other outlets. Additionally, through a competitive process, we were able to secure a seat in a coveted national media mentoring collaborative, which has resulted in more than eight nationally-published op-ed pieces to highlight our agency and its cause (Huffington Post, The Guardian, Al Jazeera English, etc.) In 2013, for the first time, we also led a nine-county-wide effort to raise awareness of our cause during April Child Abuse Awareness Month, with a campaign that will be repeated in future years: I Stand Up for Children. In addition to securing media attention for this effort, we engaged approximately 100 local businesses, places of worship, elected officials, etc., working with an internal champion who led sort of activity during the month of April. We will be celebrating these efforts with our champions in the upcoming months, securing feedback and ideas for a deeper level of DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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engagement for 2014 and beyond. Some of these organizations also provided fundraisers for our cause during the month and agreed to additional engagement with us on a year-round basis to educate their employees and constituents. Absent a cost-prohibitive formal baseline and ongoing awareness study, we measure success in PR/Marketing by proxy measures such as: o o o o

Increase in funding Number of visits to website Number of “likes” on Facebook Number of media mentions/placements in a given year

Advocacy We work through the Children’s Advocacy Centers of Texas on a coordinated approach (required according to our agreement) to public policy strategies at the state level. These initiatives typically involve a strong emphasis on maintaining or increasing the $16 biennial state funding that resides in the Office of the Attorney General’s budget as well as updates to the Texas Code that would benefit the collaboration of CACs with CPS, law enforcement and prosecutors, or that would improve the overall system of care for children victimized by crime. During this current legislative session, DCAC staff and board members (including the strong participation of an Ad Hoc Task Force on Government Relations) participated in a variety of engagement strategies to educate our elected officials at the state level on the importance of our agency’s services to the community. Because we are Dallas County wide in our service area, we make specific outreach to all elected officials at the state level whose districts fall within Dallas County; however, where there are districts that have only slight areas of overlap into Dallas County, we defer to our sister CAC in the predominant county. Phone calls, emails, letter writing campaigns and personal visits are all included in the outreach to these elected officials. This year, we expect to see an outcome of a $4-5 million biennial increase in the state budget. These dollars are then allocated by a formula by the CAC of Texas. We have worked over the past year to increase our exposure to the mayors who serve cities within Dallas County to help them understand the value that our CAC brings to their respective communities. This has resulted in new relationships with school superintendents, public DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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speaking engagements at mayoral prayer breakfasts, and engagement of mayors at our fundraising and special VIP events (such as during the conference). We also work to forge strong relationships with the county commissioners, elected DA, Sheriff, appointed US Attorney and others who influence and support our cause, often helping us reach constituents we normally could not. Following this state legislative session, we will host a happy hour for all elected officials and their staffers, as they missed our open house and grand opening. We open up our training facility to allow elected officials to talk to their constituents for legislative updates and other purposes. All that we ask in return for the free use of our space is 5-15 minutes to explain to their constituents the unique and important role our agency plays in Dallas County. This strategy has brought Representative Eric Johnson and Senator Royce West onto the premises, triggering a letter-writing campaign (by the visitors) on our behalf to all state representatives serving Dallas County to urge an increase in our state-level appropriation. We work with coalitions and other advocacy groups to stay closely apprised of any pending or finalized legislative actions that could impact our agency, either positively or negatively. For instance, through a relationship with the Child Abuse Prevention Coalition, we keep in touch with TexProtects, a non-profit that works for positive changes at the state level for CPS and stricter requirements for teachers and others to participate in mandatory training around Recognizing and Reporting Child Abuse. Our program is noted as compliant at the state level with a number of enacted pieces of legislation, enabling us to reach out to target audiences and let them know that we have a solution to their state mandated training requirements. Also of significant note, Lynn M. Davis has a three-year (renewable for a second three-year) term on the statewide Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Advocacy Centers of Texas Board, providing our agency with the latest information on trends, statewide issues, potential risks and opportunities for our agency. This close relationship also provides DCAC a voice in making decisions that affect the advocacy center movement at the state level.

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3.

Fundraising

We completed an $11 million capital campaign and built a new facility with the donations from fewer than 150 individuals/foundations. We engage the community in two ways in regards to volunteer and financial resources. We engage the community through our volunteer program that allows individuals, organizations, and corporate groups, to volunteer within the building, on event and fundraising committees to support our fundraising programs. Volunteers have opportunities to work in our waiting rooms, in our Clothes Closet, on administrative tasks, or on fundraising and event committees. The in-kind value of volunteer time is accounted for at a per hour rate that is in accordance with national standards. We engage the public in fundraising for annual operating revenue in a number of ways. We build and maintain relationships with state and federal agencies, groups, individuals, foundations and corporations, and utilize board contacts through an annual campaign. Board members are expected to give according to their means, be involved on event or ad hoc committees and to introduce new potential donors to the agency through a variety of mechanisms. We host three signature events and receive supplemental revenue through the work of third party groups that designate DCAC as the beneficiary of their events. We are a United Way agency, and receive funding and volunteers from the Junior League of Dallas, Dallas Junior Forum and the Assistance League of Dallas. Notably, a special and long-term volunteer and fundraising group for DCAC is the DCAC League, a group formed more than two decades ago to support the needs of our agency. Additional dollars come to us via investments. Our signature events tie directly back to our cause: ď&#x201A;ˇ ď&#x201A;ˇ ď&#x201A;ˇ

Luncheon = education Art + Advocacy = art therapy Encore for Advocacy = music therapy

Other third party or special events hosted by outside groups may or may not tie back directly to our services. We communicate with current and potential donors through face to face meetings, tours, email and phone calls. We are continuously exploring ways to bring in new donors through a young professionals group and targeted outreach to specific categories of donors. DCAC: 2013 Strategic Organizational Audit Report

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2. DCAC Staff Feedback The following is a summary of feedback from 9 Supervisors, 23 Non Supervisors — the DCAC Staff.

Strengths o

The CAC / MDT model works!

o

Good teamwork within the non-supervisor staff

o

Knowledge & expertise on child abuse prevention and intervention

o

Good relationships with external partners

o

Visibility – We are doing a better job of outreach and awareness building

o

New building is a great asset

o

Free services to community

o

Culture & work life environment

o

Focused on vision, mission, values & goals

o

Financial sustainability

Opportunities 

Professional development and care of staff

More effective climate survey internally

Invest in technology

Expand staff positions

Expand use of volunteers

Strengthen partnerships

Address building issues

Model & program development

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Aspirations 

Nationally recognized model & educational programs

Influence legislation to improve systems

Staff development, compensation, and benefits

Care for service dogs

Client engagement programs and events

Improve internal communication

Improve external communications

Social services referral network for clients

Increase funding & budget

Results 

DCAC has ample resources to pursue its mission and accomplish its strategic plan

DCAC serves as a National Research Institute for the prevention and intervention of child abuse.

DCAC has qualified, exemplary staff that enjoy the work

Client programs and services encompass the family unit

Staff office/facility needs are met

The Community is educated about child abuse prevention and intervention.

Realistic expectations on growth and services

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3. DCAC Multi-Disciplinary Team Feedback The following is a summary of feedback from the 20 participants who participated in the MDT Focus Group

What do you like about DCAC, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working? o

The new facility increases efficiency and teamwork

o

Communication between the MDT is really working well now

o

Having a committed, dedicated partnership

o

Growing professional expertise in DCAC

What areas could DCAC improve or expand? o

Increase staff capacity to handle caseload and have some margin for flexibility.

o

Find a solution to serve children who are in CPS Foster Care

o

Continue building and improving the DCAC/MDT partnership.

o

Proactively address mental health and self-care of all our workers.

o

Establish a consistent, quality brand in all programs and services of the DCAC | MDT Partnership

What changes could make the MDT even better? o

Improve and strengthen the DCAC|MDT Partnership to improve corporate morale

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4. DCAC Client Feedback The following is a summary of feedback from 18 DCAC clients — consisting of parents who participate in therapy and group activities and whose children are also in therapy.

Strengths What are our greatest assets – what are we doing right? o

Great customer service

o

Caring, professional staff

o

Quality programs and services that are free to clients

Opportunities What are our opportunities to improve and explore? o

Respond to customer feedback to increase satisfaction. Be sensitive to client “touch points” to increase comfort and build trust (waiting room, refreshments, etc.)

o

Improve therapy services and expand options

o

Build staff and volunteer capacity

o

Build community awareness about DCAC’s programs and services

Aspirations What is the best possible future we could imagine? o

Expand the delivery of DCAC programs and services throughout Dallas County

o

Increase staff compensation

o

Educate the community

o

Build public awareness

o

Improve customer / detective relationships and communication

o

Increase response time to client needs for interviews

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Results What measureable results could we achieve? o

Families heal and move forward with their lives.

o

Be a light in the dark for families suffering abuse.

o

Helping children heal physically, mentally, and emotionally.

o

Teach the children how to recognize and report, and how to stay safe.

5. Education Client & Partner Feedback The following is a summary of feedback from those who have utilized the services of DCAC’s community education team, predominantly those who are receiving free Recognizing and Reporting training online or in free face-to-face sessions. Note that only one of the respondents had been exposed to a fee-based face-to-face training in DCAC’s new facility at the time of this survey and that our target audience for fee-based professional training is professionals who are periodic attendees at our conference, rather than those we reach with community education efforts.

What do you value most? o

DCAC is a local and national expert

o

DCAC helps universities respond to SB1414 – required child abuse prevention training on campus

o

Knowledgeable staff, very supportive and accommodating and willing to support in any way we need it. There is a positive answer to every challenge. They are easy to work with and don't let small details get in the way! They are so passionate about their mission they always find a way to make things work for us.

o

Quality, professional education and training – always prepared

o

FREE programs

o

Programs are clear, concise and helps me in my job as safe environment director

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Please rate DCAC educational programs/services. DCAC Education Offerings

What new services could DCAC offer? o

This message needs to move out of Dallas County in other parts of the region.

o

Provide training to diverse communities - specifically ESL communities must be culturally competent in various culture Nepalese, Burmese, Spanish - our top 3 cultures. (Catholic Diocese)

o

Reach a more diverse cultural group - targeting the Spanish-speaking church communities

o

More advocate training.

o

Interactive Internet Safety course

o

Professional training programs - both adults and children.

o

More training for Recognizing and Reporting facilitators

o

Facilitator Forum so trainers can learn together from each other.

o

More involvement within the school system, especially with school counselors

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Strengths o

Pulling together those professional resources, police, legal

o

Direct client services - ability to meet the specific needs of the customer.

o

Prevention and awareness

o

Professional offerings for all levels of attendees.

o

Evidence based curriculum

o

Training the trainers

o

Coordination of quality training speakers at a national level

o

Training in the community.

Weaknesses o

Perhaps a bit understaffed - due to limited budgets! They need more trainers.

o

Lack of knowledge or implementation of child abuse prevention crossculturally.

o

Professional Spanish material (video)

o

DCAC doesn't teach children. They are all about keeping children safe and yet they don't have a curriculum for talking to children. If they could give the parents some sort of hands-on guide to talk with their children or some sort of activity they can do with them.

o

Office and partner relations

o

Go directly to the populations who may be able to receive the benefits of recognizing and reporting training (poverty and low income families).

Opportunities o

Hot topics - Bullying, no one is doing it aggressively. Child on child abuse trend - elementary school level, some physical, some bordered on sexual. Also work with online sexual harassment to prevent cyber-bullying.

o

Cultural competency - Facilitate in multiple languages

o

Workplace social policy assistance - engaging students who are making a commitment to the community. DCAC could help us with a formal policy

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o

"Round table" between all educators for ideas and population niches that may not be currently identified

o

Our SANE nurse is not offered credits for attending so she goes elsewhere. There are lots of subjects she would like to learn about, but sees no reason to be here if no credits given.

o

More training modules that we can use out in the community.

o

Having trainings that are more specific to each field - school settings, medical setting, church setting, camp /after school setting. Instead of having all of them listed in one short video.

o

More focus on evidence based training with data to back it up.

o

SMART phones mobile app for post-testing of clients.

o

Mental health programs

o

Mental health for staff / forensic interviewers.

Weaknesses o

Not involving direct practice staff with the research "arm" to identify emerging best practices

o

Discouragement at the never-ending onslaught of cases.

o

Complacency - the idea that bad things only happen to some other people some other place.

o

Competition for funding - although I think they will see an increase since the community is talking about it more. Especially in the area of prevention.

o

Lack of collaboration with other prevention and training organizations

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If DCAC didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist? o

Detrimental - If no DCAC we would have tragically broken children who have a long life ahead of them and potential to cause others to suffer.

o

Would have trained only those absolutely required, not as extensive as now

o

A lot of hurting children & families

o

There would be no awareness. It would still be something that is hush-hush and secretive. Instead, DCAC faces it head on.

o

Much less coordinated efforts in healing and in prosecution of predators.

o

Continued under-reporting of abuse.

o

Victims not receiving the help and care needed to heal.

3 Wishes for the Future o

DCAC become nationally known. Be a leader in research and studies related to sexual abuse. Gain more respect and credibility for their R&R program - as best in class.

o

Unlimited funding to meet all their needs. An endowment gift to endow operations, get staff depts. endowed.

o

Not to lose sight of the goals. Growth in departments and continuity of staff

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o

DCAC trainers who will deliver programs at our site.

o

Team building for ED's and upper management and offer experienced staff additional training

o

Extend their expertise to others - empowering others to speak on their behalf - engaging younger generations.

o

Make the new building much warmer and friendlier - it's cold and impersonal

o

Larger outreach to small rural Centers

o

Create strong presence and education within Spanish-speaking communities

o

Continue to strengthen relationship with ISD's

o

Continue partnering with organizations.

o

Work in the area of respectfulness to stakeholders - do good without being stuffy about it

o

Works themselves out of business!

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Sections Below To be completed at the June 28 Strategic Task Force Meeting F. STRATEGIC FACTOR ANALYSIS Key Strategic Factors to Address 1. X 2. X 3. X

G.

STRATEGIC ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS Scenario 1: Pro/Con Scenario 2: Pro/Con Scenario 3: Pro/Con

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Section Below To be Completed at the June 1 Board Retreat H.

STRATEGY RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Strategic Direction — 2. Overarching Strategy — 3. Strategic Issues to Address: a) Customer — b) Financial — c) Operational — d) Governance & Leadership —

I. STRATEGIC END RESULTS 1. Executive Performance — 2. Ends Policies — 3. Key Performance Indicators —

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Section Below To be Completed Post Board Retreat by Executive Management and Strategic Task Force Meeting J. STRATEGIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION 1. Pathways to Change: Strategic Initiatives — 2. Balanced Scorecard Goals and Objectives — 3. Implementation Work Plans and Timeline —

K.EVALUATION AND CONTROL 1. Quarterly Milestones — 2. KPI Dashboard — 3. Evaluation Plan —

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DCAC_SOAR_2013  

Strategic Organizational Audit Review

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