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The Breeze THE MAGAZINE OF BLUFFTON

Bluffton.com

The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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NOTES FROM THE EDITOR: I recently met a couple that has lived and worked all over the world—from Cape Cod to Switzerland, England, India, and China—and guess where they chose to retire. You guessed it— right here! We all know why; it’s the same reason we are here as well. Summer is a warm memory, we have Labor Day vacation, kids are back in school and The Breeze is chock full of great articles. It doesn’t get any better than this! September is the beginning of oyster season so we could not let that pass by without an article on our favorite food. We could have called it “The Sex Life of an Oyster,” but children read The Breeze as well, so we went with a milder title. You’ll learn a lot about these saltwater bivalves and also find a couple of yummy authentic Gullah Oyster recipes. We always talk about our natural resources but haven’t written a word about the swamps, the freshwater cousin to the marshes. Kelly Dillon takes us to this mysterious place and captures its aura in her “Ode to the Swamp.” This spectacular piece will definitely give you the chills; it’s not one you want to miss. But the swamps aren’t the only place we venture into in this issue; we also visit a beautiful home on Spring Island that has been dropped lightly into its habitat. From the surroundings to the sustainable and recycled materials, it is truly a home we hope you enjoy reading about. And we can’t stay away from the water—we are in Bluffton! Gene Cashman takes us out with his son as he teaches him how to fish. This feel good piece is sure to take you back to fond memories, the ones that are everlasting. With the help of the McCracken’s we have started a monthly antique feature. In this issue, readers get to discover the story of Blue Willow china and learn how this item that’s been made for over 200 years is still being used today. Make sure you email us to let us know how you like it.

The Breeze

THE MAGAZINE OF BLUFFTON PUBLISHER Lorraine Jenness lorraine@hiltonhead.com 843-757-9889 EDITOR Randolph Stewart randolph@bluffton.com 843-816-4005 COPY EDITOR Andrea Six andrea@hiltonhead.com 843-757-9889 SALES DIRECTOR Chierie Smith chierie@bluffton.com 843-505-5823 GRAPHIC DESIGNER Liz Shumake liz@hiltonhead.com 843-757-9889 ART DIRECTOR Jennifer Mlay graphics@hiltonhead.com 843-757-9889 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Amber Hester Kuehn MS, Kelly Dillon Art Cornell, Bill Newby, Joan Morris, Jevon Daly, Stephanie Dickinson, Michele Roldan-Shaw, Anne M. Jennings, Elizabeth Robins, Carol Marsh Longmeyer, Thelma Naylor

Every chance we get to talk about someone who has done so much for so many people without asking for anything in return. John Kinser is such a man. Laura Wilson did a great job letting all of us get to know him and his family.

PHOTOGRAPHERS , ARTISTS Art Cornell, Eric Horan, Chris Hefter, Margaret Palmer, Matt Richardson, Chierie Smith

Jevon Daly rocks. Make sure you do not miss this month’s installment of Bluffton Music Town. This time, it’s “Who Said Bass Players Can’t Sing.” Jevon shows us some great ones.

CORPORATE OFFICE 40 Persimmon St. Suite 102 P.O. Box 472, Bluffton, SC 29910 843.757.8877

Make sure you check out YOUR website: bluffton.com. We are just beginning to get it into shape, but in a few months we hope to be the number one site in Bluffton (it’s already number 2), with ease and access to find your way around town, make a reservation, find out where to shop and what’s going on, read The Breeze and so much more! It will be a complete resource for locals and visitors alike. As always we welcome your comments and ideas, and don’t forget to mention to our advertisers that you saw them in The Breeze!

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The Breeze is published by Island Communications and The Breeze LLC. All rights are reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or stored for retrieval by any means without permission from the Publisher. The Breeze is not responsible for unsolicited materials and the publisher accepts no responsibility for the contents or accuracy of claims in any advertisement in any issue. The Breeze is not responsible or liable for any errors, omissions, or changes in information. The opinion of contributing writers do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the magazine and its Publisher. All published photos and copy provided by writers and artists become the property of The Breeze. Copyright. 2015


CONTENTS

SEPTEMBER 2015, VOLUME 13, NO. 9

F E AT U R E S

8 Lighting up the Lowcountry, Lighting up the World 10 A Fishing Lesson 16 Ode to the Swamp 20 Oysters: Then, now, and hopefully, forever 24 Blue Willow 28 Let the Land Speak A Spring Island Home & Habitat 40 Who Said Bass Players Can’t Sing D E PA R T M E N T S

13 Fellowship 18 Golf Courses 23 Tide Chart 24 Antiques/History

38 Over the Bridges and Beyond

40 Bluffton: Music Town 42 Restaurant Guide

26 Your Corner 34 Bulletin Board 36 Thoughts in the Breeze

COVER PHOTO : Wading Bird Eric Horan

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Lighting up the Lowcountry, Lighting up the World. By Laura R Wilson

Spending his summers on his family’s turkey farm in Southern California, John for high school, boarded at Webb School in Claremont, CA where he graduated valedictorian and lettered in football, basketball, baseball, track and played badminton. Majoring in physics and minoring in mathematics at Pomona College, John spent part of a summer working on rockets at Point Mugu Naval Air Station leading him next to Stanford University for his master’s in electrical engineering.

A

visionary, humanitarian, hard working, kind hearted, strong, community-minded, brilliant and compassionate man are just a few descriptors to illustrate the life of John Kinzer. John’s contributions to the Lowcountry were recently recognized with a Rotary Charter Member Award for his 25 years of service. And, service is a key word to his contributions in the Bluffton and Hilton Head area that John and his family call home; service that has also made history. Early in his professional life, John had ties with NASA, working as an electrical engineer for North American. He was involved with the initial talks in Houston on how to put a man on the moon, helping to launch the first astronaut. John’s son-in-law, South Carolina State Representative, Bill Herbkersman commented in a 2010 interview, “John was one of those ‘can do’ fellows with the flat-top haircuts and the slide rules that made President Kennedy’s pledge to go to the moon a reality. John’s stories of how the space program overcame long odds to put the United States at the forefront of space exploration certainly made our appreciation of what we saw all the more profound. We witnessed a Space Shuttle Discovery launch while on vacation with our family. We saw the brilliant light of blastoff and then felt the tremendous sonic boom. It gave us new respect that our family includes one of the early NASA engineers, my father-in-law, John Kinzer.”

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Continued tenacity and having a good head for business, John started a development company, IDM in Long Beach successfully building offices, condominiums and apartment buildings. After 10 years, John sold the company, “retired” at 44 and embarked on the next phase in his life—Lowcountry living and serving others. John and his family moved to Hilton Head Island in 1981. From the time his feet hit the Lowcountry terrain, John became involved in his community. He was a founding member of The Rotary Club of Bluffton, board member of Water Oak, and Full Circle Corporation, a group of Moss Creek Plantation owners that purchased the remaining assets from the developer in 1985. Some of the assets included unplatted land and Water Oak Utility, a fully operating water and sewer company. Full Circle also assumed the developer responsibilities for funding and administering Moss Creek Plantation. John directed the job of laying out and platting 145 home sites as well as creating the Blue Heron Sanctuary and the Blue Heron Pond. Full Circle worked very closely with the home owner’s association, and in 1991 turned over all remaining assets, rights and responsibilities to the Moss Creek Property Owners. Friend Buddy Whitaker states, “The work and ingenuity that John put into Full Circle, in my opinion saved the day!” Rotary is without a doubt, one of John’s greatest passions. As read on the Rotary History, “Rotarians are your neighbors, your community leaders and some of the world’s greatest history-makers.” Light Up Rotary is the 2015 Rotary International theme and “Service above Self” is a standard with rotarians worldwide. Friend and fellow Rotarian, Dee Dee Graham relays how John is known as the International Ambassador


When the Bluffton Rotary was in the beginning stages of building the community center in Oscar Frazier Park, John went to Steve Tilton, builder and fellow Rotarian and asked him what kind of flooring would be put in to the Community Center. Steve told John they had budgeted for carpet. Steve relayed how John told him that, “Margaret and I want to dance,” and asked what the difference would be to put in a wood floor. John paid the difference of the cost of the flooring so he and his lovely wife could dance as well as many others have been able to over the years.

of Bluffton. According to Graham, John is the longest serving member, recipient of several Paul Harris, the Founder of Rotary International, awards and spent countless hours volunteering with the public school as a Rotary Reader. Dee Dee Graham fondly recalls John’s work as a Rotary Reader with three boys from Bluffton. John took these three kids under his wing for many years, had them work weekends cleaning up roadways, they sold the scrap to raise $200, his stipulation, for he and Margaret to then take them on vacation to Disney. Buddy Whitaker adds, “John helped change their lives, showing those three boys what hard work and perseverance can do to make a decent life.”

Other passions? The love of travel and learning new cultures. How many of us can say we have been to every state, every capital, all National Parks and have traveled to all continents except Antarctica? Impressive! John and his wife Margaret of 55 years traveled by motor home in the United States, Canada, Nova Scotia, Australia, New Zealand and Spain. The couple cruised Alaska, Indonesia, Scandinavia, Greek Islands, Mediterranean, South America, Amazon River, Caribbean and Russia. They traveled extensively by car throughout Europe and the United Kingdom and toured China, Africa and Borneo with a group. Dee Dee Graham relays, “John attended Rotary meetings in every state, country or village he visited. He gave them a Bluffton Rotary banner and brought many banners from all over the world back to Bluffton. He spread Bluffton Rotary throughout the world.” Thank you, John Kinzer for your kindness, service and being a light in your community and in the world.

A great learning trip for kids & adults!

Voyage of discovery

Discover the local marsh habitat. See the richness of life in our tidal estuary. Learn measures for water quality. All trips led by Captain Amber Kuehn MS in Marine Biology Contact: SpartinaCharters@gmail.com or Spartinacharters.com 843-338-2716

The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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A Fishing Lesson By Gene Cashman

A father and son’s joy, shared out on the water

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“Dad,” he said with intentionality in his voice, “where did that fish come from?” I turned to see my son looking up at a trophy fish on the wall of his grandfather’s workshop. My chest puffed out a little bit as I cheerfully responded that I had been the one who had caught the fish. His eyes got big and he smiled broadly. “No way, really?” I walked over placing my hand on his shoulders, drawing the memory of that day from the depths of my mind. “Yep,” I said proudly, “matter of fact I wasn’t much older than you.” He continued to stare up in wonder. “Wow,” he said after a few moments. “How did you know how to get him?” I lifted him up to get a closer look. “Well,” I said, “your grandfather taught me.” He didn’t speak for a moment but I could tell his mind was racing. Finally, as I was putting him down, he muttered what every father who loves to fish longs to hear a child say, “Can you teach me too, Dad?”

No

fish, no fun and no good memory for anyone.

We didn’t need to make a trip to the local tackle and bait shop. There was adequate equipment on hand in the workshop for a first lesson. However, I rationalized, to not make the trip would be breaking the first rule I was taught, which, of course, was that one can never have enough fishing tackle. Off we went. He dutifully walked by my side up and down each aisle. “Dad, what’s that for,” he’d ask pointing at a brightly colored cork. “Son, that’s a trout rig,” I would say, or “that’s a flounder rig.” This went on as we picked up a few essentials until we came to a section that seized all of his attention. He stopped in his tracks and pulled hard on my sleeve. “Dad,” he breathed as if being squeezed, pointing, slack-jawed at a massive hook and weight dangling from a display. “What in the world is that supposed to catch?” I lifted the large hook and weight from the display and stretched it out before him

“This,” I said with great dramatic effect, “is for sharks.” His eyes bugged out. “Whoa, are we going to catch any of those?” Being an inshore traditionalist, I quickly stated, “Our aim is to catch trout and redtails.” He looked at me funny and shrugged “Oh, okay” as if to say “dad, don’t be such a fuddy-duddy.”

It was a windy afternoon, the sun was blazing hot overhead and the tide was quickly approaching its highest peak in the marsh grass. In other words, it was a terrible tide for trout and reds. To make matters worse, I had no fresh bait but was relying solely on frozen shrimp. It was a perfect storm for getting skunked, which in my family and general fishing vernacular means you aren’t catching fish. Nevertheless, my son wanted to learn to fish and, daggummit, he was going to learn to catch what I considered to be the best. The boat turned over with a thunderous roar and off we went to the furthest point upriver I could navigate to try and beat the tide. Now, in the wind and tide with only a five-year-old shipmate, we were not able to secure the most desirable of spots. Still, I convinced myself we were within casting range of a decent high water fishing hole. We clumsily anchored and prepared ourselves to fish. “Son,” I said making a long cast to the grass, “let’s sing a time honored tune.” My hope was that if we could catch a fish he would be hooked for life. “Fishy, fishy in the brook,” I sang out loud as he looked on in confused amazement, “come and bite my little hook.” After a while with no action he poked me and said, “Can I cast?” I handed him my rod. “Hold this.” He took it and repeated his question, “Can I cast my own rod?” Finally, after another long stretch with no bites, I relented. I handed him a rod and reel and quickly realized my error. It was a spin rod. His first cast created a dozen

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yards of backlash and his reverse reel created dozens more. My haste to give him an experience failed to consider his skill level. It created a mess for me and disappointment for him. I sat down to undo the tangle and handed him my pole with the explicit instructions to “watch the cork.” Morale can quickly plummet on a hot afternoon, out on the water, with no shade and no fish for even the most seasoned veteran. For a five-yearold it’s brutal punishment. “Dad,” he’d say, “something is on the line, it’s pulling.” I would look up from his tangled reel and proclaim, “No son, it’s just the tide.” He would then repeat the refrain, “Dad, there is definitely something on the line, it’s a fish I know it.” This exact conversation went around and around for at least 20 minutes. Frustrated and hot, I stood up and took the rod from his hands. “There is nothing on that line,” I said sternly as I reeled it in. “Yes there is dad” was his quite reply. Sure enough I reeled in a greedy and very stubborn blue crab all the way to the boat. I netted him for effect. “Son,” I said humbly, “you were right. We didn’t get skunked. Let’s go home.” It was the most enthusiastic I had seen him since he spotted the shark rig. Firmly back on dry land, I assessed the day. There was the high of having my son ask me to teach him how to fish to the low of me getting in the way of the experience in every way possible. No fish, no fun and no good memory for anyone. That night as I tucked him in I asked him for another chance. “Son,” I said, “fishing is so much better than what you experienced today. You think you can give your daddy another shot?” He winked at me. That was affirmation enough for me to begin to properly prepare for the next day. I waited until everyone else had left the breakfast table. “Big guy,” I said, “you want to try again?” He looked at me with a strong degree of hesitancy and rightly so. I had taken a simple request and turned it into a miserable experience. “Buddy,” I humbly offered, “today will be much different.” He looked at me cautiously. “No heat and no orders?” I sat down and patted him on the head, “only fun.” I had gotten up early to ensure we had what we needed to succeed. We gathered two prepared poles, a shrimp net and

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headed to the river. It was a gorgeous May River morning. The sky was blue with small cotton ball clouds. The river was low and exposed in all her glory. I tossed the cast net, much to his amazement, over a school of finger mullet. “Bait!” he exclaimed excitedly as if this alone would suffice and atone for yesterdays blah experience. He furiously moved about the dock picking up the flopping bait-fish carefully dropping them in a bucket. “This is awesome,” he exclaimed. “More to come,” I cautioned. “This is only the beginning.” We sat leg-to-leg on the edge of the floating dock, our bottom-rigs with fresh bait, and cast from ‘age appropriate reels’ out into the mighty May. My soul relaxed watching him study the water. I knew this was sure to produce something. It wasn’t five minutes later that my son called out, “I feel a tug.” Resisting the urge to teach I simply told him to land the fish. He pumped at the reel. His face contorted with each strained turn of the handle. I realized he might actually have something more than a crab. “Go, Go!” I encouraged as his rod bent with the pull of an actual fish. What emerged from the brackish waters was a (very) small black-tip shark. He pulled it, with my assistance, onto the dock and sat down with a thud and stared. As soon as he processed what happened he took off like a firecracker to the house to tell everyone. I shook my head knowingly. Of course his first catch would be a shark. Within a few moments a small crowd gathered to watch me release his catch back to the river. “Dad,” he said like a seasoned veteran, “that was awesome. We have to do this all the time.” He was hooked. Everyone, my son included, soon sprinted off to other things and as I stowed the tackle my dad put his arm around me. “Reminds me of some good times son,” Pop said as he hugged me, “every bit of these past two days. I remember a similar start. I would take you out and you’d sleep on the bench of the boat under the canopy.” I put my arm around his shoulder, “Pop, those times we fished this river and others are the best memories of my life.” I kissed his cheek. “I pray my son can have the same joy we’ve shared out on the water.” He looked back at me square in the eyes, “You made a good start today son. Good start.”


FELLOWSHIP AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL Cambell Chapel A.M.E. 25 Boundary Street, 757-3652 Sunday School: 8:45am Worship: 10am ASSEMBLY OF GOD New River Worship Center Hwy 170 & Argent Blvd. (next to ESPY) 379-1815 Sunday: 10:30am Wednesday: 7pm BAPTIST First Baptist Church of Bluffton Boundary at Church Street, 757-3472 Sunday School: 9:15am Worship: 11am First Zion Baptist Wharf Street 757-3128 Sunday School: 9am Sunday Worship: 10am May River Baptist Church SC-170, North of US 46, 757-2518 Sunday School: 9:45 am Sunday Worship: 11am St. John’s Baptist Church 103 Pritchard Street, 757-4350 Sunday Worship: 11am St. Matthew’s Baptist Church SC Highway 170, 757-3255 Sunday Worship: 11am Indian Hill Baptist Church Hwy 278 next to Eagle’s Point, 757-2603 Sunday School: 9:45am Sunday Worship: 11am JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES Kingdom Hall, SC 46, 815-4455 Sunday Public Talk: 9:30am & 3:30pm Spanish Public Talk: 12:30pm

Bible Missionary Baptist Church Goethe Road Community Cntr, 815-5523 Sunday Worship: 11am Bible Study: 6pm CATHOLIC St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church 333 Fording Island Road, 815-3100 Sat.: 4pm, 6pm Sun.: 7:15am, 9am, 11am, 5pm, Spanish, 12:45pm Mon.-Fri.: 6:45am Chapel, 8:30am Church ANGLICAN The Church of the Cross 110 Calhoun St, 757-2661 495 Buckwalter Parkway, 757-2661 Sunday Worship: 8am & 10am

METHODIST Bluffton United Methodist Church 101 Calhoun Street, 757-3351 Sunday School: 9:45am Sunday Worship: 8:45am & 11am Church of the Palms United Methodist 1425 Okatie Highway, 379-1888 Sunday Worship: 10:30am St. Luke’s United Methodist Church SC Highway 170 near Sun City, 705-3022 Sunday Worship: 8:30am and 10am

St. Andrew By-The-Sea UMC Bluffton Campus One University Blvd. (USCB’s HHI Gateway Campus, Hargray Building), 785-4711 The Church of the Holy Trinity (Grahamville) Sunday worship: 10:30 a.m. 2718 Bees Creek Road, Ridgeland, 726-3743 Sunday Worship: 8:30 and 11am PRESBYTERIAN Sunday School for All Ages: 9:45am Lowcountry Presbyterian Church Midweek Services: Wednesday, 6:30pm US 278 and Simmonsville Road, 815-6570 EPISCOPAL Sunday School: Adult 9:40am, Child 10:30 The Episcopal Church of Okatie Sunday Worship: 8:30am & 10:30am 231 Hazzard Creek, Okatie, SC 592-3965 Grace Coastal Church (PCA) Worship: Every Sunday 9am 15 Williams Drive (off 170), 379-5521 Sunday School: 11am GREEK ORTHODOX Sunday Worship: 9:30am Holy Resurrection Church at St. Andrews Catholic Church NON-DENOMINATIONAL 220 Pickney Colony Road, 837-4659 Live Oak Christian Church Orthros: 9:30am, Liturgy 10am Bluffton High School Auditorium, 757-5670 Kidstreet: 9:15am, Worship: 10:15am JEWISH Temple Oseh Shalom Lowcountry Community Church at Lowcountry Presbyterian Bluffton: 801 Buckwalter Parkway, 836-1101 278 Simmonsville Road, 705-2532 Sunday Worship: 8:30am, 10am, 11:30am Shabbat Worship 3rd Friday of month, 8pm LUTHERAN Lord of Life Lutheran Church 351 Buckwalter Parkway, 757-4774 Sunday School: 10am Sunday Worship: 8am, 9am, 11am

Unity Church of Hilton Head Island Seaquins Ballroom 1300 Fording Island Road, Bluffton (Near Tanger I), 682-8177 Sunday Services: 10am

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O L D T O W N

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la petite breeze sixth_Layout 1 8/4/15 11:41 AM Page 5

“An intimate little gallery filled with fine local art” Featuring works in oil, acrylic, pastel, watercolor and mixed media by: Margaret Crawford Peggy Duncan Don Nagel Murray Sease Emily Wilson Adjacent to “The Store” 56 Calhoun Street Tues - Sat 11 am - 5 pm Mon by chance 11 am - 3 pm lapetitegallerie.com

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ENVIRONMENT

Ode to the

I

Swamp

By Kelly Dillon

No doubt, it is easy to think we own the world and all of its hidden places, and that we may walk through the wilderness like kings and make it ours. There are the plains and the hills, the mountains and the marsh. But not the swamp.

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No, the swamp remains separated from us, but its presence, looming at the sides of schools, of stores, of houses and homes, is something that makes the Lowcountry the Lowcountry. There is the marsh one easily remembers, with its open air and tidal channels, but its darker cousin the swamp is another world hidden behind leafless branches and gnarled underbrush: the primordial heart of the land. A silence coils there, unlike the marsh where seagulls caw and the sudden roar of a boat zooms. The swamp is not pierced by these or by car horn or by cellphone chime. It is pierced by nothing at all. Standing among its brackish water, its high trees, its span of green reeds, gives the affect of hovering in time, as if the whole world has come to a sudden stop in this wild place.


p But there is a sound – the slap of water as a turtle returns to the filmy lakes, and then another, a flap of an unseen bird’s wings high above in the linked canopy. Not much light leaks through there, and the light that does is like a spotlight, shining in sudden, disorganized places upon the swamp. It is something like twilight here, and the depths of the green palette, of all the different shades of color, are easily lost in the dark. Here, it smells of the marsh without the brine: that smell of mud and of gentle decay. The humidity makes the smell linger, and is something like a blanket in summer. It brings a sense of claustrophobia, for even the trees hug close and the roots reach out to hold on to you. Firm land gives way suddenly to water – water that could be shallow or deep. The thick green film hovering atop the surface hides that and more. Driftwood is mistaken for an alligator, and the back of a rising turtle is mistaken for driftwood. And finally, there along the banks of one of the false-lakes is movement. A white egret stalks through the reeds. He makes for poor camouflage; the brilliance of his feathers remain something like an eyesore against the swamp backdrop.

But he makes up for it with his movements. Like the swamp, he has taken to moving slowly. Each footstep is careful and precise. The reeds do not sway as he passes through them, and his watching eyes remain transfixed on the water beside him. No fish will be lucky today. He passes his cousin, the Great Blue Heron, standing near the brush. And surely, she is great. Unlike the egret, her plumage is duller but no less beautiful: a streak of black is painted across the side of her head, and her body gives her the name blue for its storm coloration. She does not move like the egret; she does not move at all. Her size is surprising, and studying her, it is easy to see how the dinosaurs became the birds. But another link to the dinosaur lurks here. Her presence is signaled by the ripple along the water, which makes the stalking egret freeze mid-step. And the gator rises. Her head and back become immediately present as they break the surface: false-logs. If it were not for her eyes it would be difficult to tell her from the driftwood floating alongside her. But her eyes are like amber and filled with an animal cunning, and with them she takes note of the birds standing there among the reeds. And she moves. The slowness of her swim, her nose cutting a wake through the still water, is like that of the egret’s. There is no rush here – only when food is taken, when a heron strikes or the gator drags the unsuspecting animal below the surface, is this primordial stillness broken, and only then, so briefly, only with a sudden splash. But even at this quiet movement the egret flees, and his slow grace is lost in the clumsy whirl of his wings. But the Heron does not flee, even when the alligator pulls herself onto the muddy bank and crushes reeds underneath her squat legs and dragging belly. The Heron only turns her head to watch, and the gator pays her little mind, as if there is some understanding among them – at least for today. The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015 17


GOLF COURSES Golf Course

Designer Course

Yds*

Rating*

Belfair Golf Club 200 Belfair Oaks Blvd, (843) 757 0715

Tom Fazio: East West

6,936 7,129

74.4 75.3

Berkeley Hall Golf Club 366 Good Hope Road, (843) 815 8444

Tom Fazio: North Tom Fazio: South

6,936 7,129

75.1 74.6

Chechessee Creek Club 18 Chechessee Creek Dr, (843) 987 7070

Coore & Crenshaw

6.606

71.8

Colleton River Plantation Club 60 Colleton River Driver, (843) 837 3131

Jack Nicklaus Pete Dye

6,936 7,129

76.1 74.7

Crescent Pointe Golf Club 1 Crescent Pointe Dr, (843) 292 7778

Arnold Palmer

6,733

n/a

Eagle’s Pointe Golf Club 1 Eagle Pointe Dr, (843) 757 5900

Davis Love III

6,738

73.1

Hampton Hall Golf Club 170 Hampton Hall Blvd, (843) 815-8720

Pete Dye

7,503

76.6

Hilton Head National Golf Club 60 Hilton Head National Dr, (843) 842 5900

Gary Player Bobby Weed

6,731

72.7

May River Golf Club, Palmetto Bluff 350 Mount Pelia, (843) 706 6579

Jack Nicklaus

7,171

75.4

Moss Creek Golf Club 1523 Fording Island Road, (843) 837 2231

George Fazio: South Tom Fazio: North

6,885 6,555

73.4 72.5

Island West Golf Club 40 Island West Drive, (843) 689 6660

Clyde B. Johnston Fuzzy Zoeller

6,803

73.2

Oldfield Golf Club 9 Oldfield Way Okatie, (843) 379 5052

Greg Norman

7,142

75.4

Old South Golf Club 50 Buckingham Plantation Dr, (843) 837 7375

Clyde B. Johnston

6,772

72.4

Pinecrest Golf Course 1 Pinecrest Way, (843) 757 8960

Rocky Rocquemore

7,489

n/a

Rose Hill Golf Club 4 Clubhouse Drive, (843) 757 9030

Gene Hamm

6,961

74.1

Sun City Golf Club 672 Cypress Hills Dr, (843) 705 4057

Mark McCumber: Hidden Cyprus Mark McCumber: Okatie Creek

6,946 6,724

73.2 71.9

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*Ratings for the longest tees


Course Notes The East course wanders through lakes and ponds and is very walkable. The West Course has subtle beauty with gnarled oaks, and sparkling lagoons. The North Course is a marvel of tranquil lakes, bold fairways and challenging bunkers. The South Course offers a classic parkland golf experience. A timeless golf experience nestled within a landscape of ancient, mossy live oaks and long-leaf pine forests. Park and links settings for two of Golf Magazine’s top 100 courses. Pete Dye said it’s “the best I’ve ever built”. Home to the USGA Junior Amateur in 2015. Generous fairways but challenging elevated greens. Beach bunkers create an island experience. Water holes and huge oaks. Great golf for great value. Neither too long nor overly difficult with interesting boldly contoured greens. The course is routed through pines, oaks and native coastal wetlands. Relatively new, this links style golf course is well cared for and has generous fairways with challenging undulated greens. A collaboration between two designers this course is well accessible in every way. Enjoy the challenging final hole flanked by a marsh and elevated green. In the beautiful Palmetto Bluff compound, the course meanders through the May River Forest. Bermuda greens with undulating slopes are challenging. The “Devil’s Elbow” courses are lined by magnificent oaks and tall pines as well as salt marshes that change with the tides. Good for all levels of golf. The scenic design of Island West, with rolling fairways, elevated tees, preserved natural marsh areas, and large live oaks presents a magnificent experience. The Audubon Certified course runs through canopies of live oaks, broad savannahs and soaring pines up to the banks of the Okatie River. Rolls from an open pasture to dense forests, and views towards Hilton Head. Most holes are surrounded by nature and the course has a lot of character. Features tall pines, many challenging water hazards and picturesque holes. It has a good practice facility and is a good value. The course is enveloped in a peaceful setting of trees and blue lakes. It is well designed to be player friendly yet holds its challenges on the back nine. Okatie Creek lets the casual golfer enjoy golf, while Hidden Cyprus offers greater challenges. Both courses capture the magic of low country beauty. The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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ENVIRONMENT

Oysters:

Then, now, and hopefully, forever.

By Amber Hester Kuehn

“Learn from the past, educate in the present and conserve for the future.” –An ancient staple

that a shift from wandering hunter-gatherers to coastal residents had taken place. The seaside climate was mild and transportation by water was easy. These Indian tribes, collectively called Creek Indians, could “sit themselves down and stay awhile.” Sound familiar? That tradition is still true today.

Oysters have been around for millions of years. Approximately 4,200 years ago, Indians started stacking oyster shells to form shell rings, or shell middens (mounds) found in South Carolina, Georgia, Northern Florida, and Louisiana. These rings range from 50 to 300 feet across and two to 10 feet tall. It is amazing that there are 19 registered in Beaufort and Charleston Counties that remain intact after thousands of years in the elements.

So what do these shell rings tell us? Archaeologists think the shell rings are trash piles because they also contain broken pottery, broken hand tools fashioned out of shell and stone, blue crab remains, terrapin turtle, alligator, fish (including shark), other mollusks, and animal bones. Think about it. What would you do with the empty shells if there were no hole in the middle of the table? Carbon dating indicates that the shell rings were abandoned about 3,000 years ago. Some scientists speculate that the Indians depleted the oysters as a food source and had to give them a break for a while. European colonists established permanent colonies

Evidence of ancient oyster roasts suggests that oysters provided a stable local food source that was consistently harvested over time – which meant

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in Carolina by 1670 and eventually forced the Indians to leave the coast after the Yemassee War, 1715 – 1717. Colonists were no strangers to eating oysters and by the mid to late 1800s, oysters were sold on street carts like hotdogs!

T

he valves (shells) of oysters are not identical. The cupped side is the left side and the flat side is the right side. Oyster larvae settle on the left side developing the adductor muscle – the chewy thing that may stay attached to the shell when you dig in and leaves the purple “scar.” The adductor muscles opens and closes the shell of a live oyster.

But these bivalves gave the people more than just food: lime produced from oyster shell was sold as fertilizer and chicken feed. It was also used to make tapia or “tabby,” a concrete-like building material made of lime, oyster shells, sand, and water. Empty oyster shells were used as road and dock building material. When the hurricane of 1893, “the Big Blow,” destroyed many food sources, oysters provided income for people who had lost everything. The oyster business expanded outside the immediate coastal area with refrigeration and canning. The L.P. Maggioni Company established its cannery on Daufuskie Island in 1893 and was one of four South Carolina canneries – along with others in Charleston and Beaufort. Today the brand Daufuskie Oysters® is alive and well – distributed in San Francisco from farm-raised Korean oysters in cans that can be bought in the supermarket. The Bluffton Oyster Company is the last remaining hand shucking oyster house in South Carolina, and the last cannery, Lady’s Island Cannery, closed in 1986.

How oysters do it Crassostrea Virginica is the scientific name for our local eastern oyster. This bivalve (two shells connected with a hinge) is quite impressive! Did you know that the oyster spends the first year of its life as a male and then switches to female after it spawns for the first time? Eastern oysters release sperm when water temperature reaches 68 degrees and this action stimulates the females to release eggs. (Remember when you got out of the river feeling all sticky and your mom told you it was salt?) Spawning begins as early as May and continues through November in warmer years. Each year, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources determines when the oyster may be harvested. From May to August (the months without a R), they are less firm in texture since spawning is in progress and they are highly concentrated with the abundance of micro-organisms ingested in the warm water. So we will let them “eat, drink, and be merry” for those months and stick to blue crab and Lowcountry boil in the summer. However, “In South Carolina, sex ratios were skewed toward more males when growing in aggregate as opposed to those growing singly,” according to a report produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association in 2007. I’m sure there is a good-ole’ -boy joke in there somewhere. To continue the biology lesson: The two gametes (sperm and egg) meet in the water to form a zooplankton called a veliger. After about two weeks, it loses its locomotive appendage and is ready to settle down.

It prefers to cement itself to an oyster shell, hence the cluster, but will settle for any hard surface in a pinch. Now it is called a spat and will grow rapidly for two or three years before it is ready for harvest. Coincidentally, there are two good pet names here.

How oysters feed They suck water in, ingest phytoplankton, and spit it out clean. It’s called “filter feeding.” Bluffton oysters are intertidal, spending half of their lives out of the water at low tide (closed up tight) and half under the water at high tide (shell is slightly open to filter feed). Because they are generally harvested at low tide, it takes a little steam to open them up at an oyster roast.

Environmental impact

Our oysters are a keystone species, namely an organism that has a large effect on the environment relative to its abundance. Along with marsh grass, it functions to improve our water quality with filtration and stabilize the topography of the marshland by creating a buffer for erosion. It also provides food and habitat for a diverse range of organisms in the estuary. Since oysters filter the water, they retain any bacterial matter in it. So it is critical to control pollution and siltation entering the May River. The Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) tests the May River water quality monthly as a way to monitor the safety of shellfish consumption.

Conservation Despite Maggioni’s belief that this area had an inexhaustible supply of oysters, harvesters began to realize that returning the empty oyster shells would keep the beds productive. Although this practice was initiated to keep up with demand, we will call it a step in the right direction. Mr. William Fait, manager of the Charleston Canning company, was the earliest to warn about pollution and its effects on the oysters in 1905. The South Carolina oyster industry was at its height of production between 1900 and 1935. Today, Beaufort County is responsible for 45% of shellfish harvest in South Carolina. The Bluffton Oyster Company leases the commercial oyster beds on the May River and supports conservation by returning empty shell to the oyster beds as required by their permit. All oysters are picked and shucked by hand. South Carolina Oyster Restoration and Enhancement also places empty shell at 44 sites to encourage spat recruitment. You can recycle empty shells at the Trask Landing drop-off site at the end of Sawmill Creek Road from September 15 to April 30. Local oyster shells only!

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Oyster Recipes

MaMa’s Oyster Pie

Recipe from Luke Peeple’s mother, probably passed down to her by her mother, “Doctor” Jane Guilford. Ingredients: 3 bacon strips 1 tablespoon of finely chopped onion 5 tablespoons of flour 1 ½ quarts of oysters Salt and pepper 3 pinches of nutmeg 1 pie crust Preparation: 1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. 2. Fry bacon strips until crisp. Remove and drain grease. 3. Sauté 1 tablespoon of finely chopped onion in 3 table spoons of bacon grease. Brown flour in same pan. Add 1 ½ quarts of oysters. Season with salt and pepper to taste (Some oysters are already salty. Taste the oysters before sprinkling with salt and pepper). 4. Add 3 pinches of nutmeg – sprinkle a small amount over the top to give it the distinctive flavor. 5. Put in casserole with pieces of bacon mixed in. Cover with pie crust. Prick crust with a fork and bake at 450 degrees for 15 minutes or until crust looks done. *Note: Always use Bluffton oysters! And the best bacon and pie crust you can find! Many thanks to Jeanne Saussy Wright, author of A Gullah Psalm, The Musical Life and Work of Luke Peeples, for the recipe above.

Mulled Down Oysters This recipe is similar to MaMa’s Oyster Pie but is served over rice without the pie crust. It is spicier and yields approximately 2 servings. Ingredients: 4 strips of bacon, cut 1 medium onion, diced 2 cups of fresh oysters 1 tablespoon of cornstarch 3 tablespoons of cold water 1 pinch of browning seasoning Creole or Cajun seasoning Chopped chives Rice Preparation: 1. Cut 3 or 4 pieces of bacon into one-inch pieces and fry bacon in a skillet until crisp. Set bacon aside, pour off drippings and reserve 3 tablespoons. 2. Peel and dice 1 medium onion. Brown in bacon drippings. Add one or two cups of fresh oysters with liquid as desired. 3. Stir and cook about 5 minutes over medium heat until oysters are hot and the edges begin to curl. 4. Mix one tablespoon of cornstarch with three table spoons of cold water and add to the oyster mix. Add a pinch of your favorite browning seasoning (such as Kitchen Bouquet) along with Cajun or Creole seasonings to taste and chopped chives. 5. Serve over hot, cooked rice. Crumble bacon and sprinkle on top.

A Poor Man’s Mulled Down Oysters Cook oysters in your favorite brown sauce or gravy seasoned as desired. Serve over hot rice.

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SEPTEMBER TIDES

Tide chart is calculated for the May River. Full Moon September 28.

Tu 1

L H L

5: 2 4 AM 11:43 AM 5:48 PM

F 11

L H L H

2:08 8:29 2:22 8:44

AM AM PM PM

M 21

H L H L

2:56 8:44 3:32 9:42

W 2

H L H L

12:14 AM 6:13 AM 12:39 PM 6:41 PM

Sa 12

L H L H

2:49 9:11 3:05 9:24

AM AM PM PM

Tu 22

H L H L

3:53 AM 9:47 AM 4:31 PM 10:45 PM

Th 3

H L H L

1:10 7:04 1:38 7:37

AM AM PM PM

Su 13

L H L H

3 : 2 7 AM 9:51 AM 3:46 PM 10:02 PM

W 23

H L H L

4:52 AM 10:54 AM 5:31 PM 11:46 PM

F 4

H L H L

2:08 7:57 2:37 8:37

AM AM PM PM

M 14

L H L H

4:02 AM 10:28 AM 4:25 PM 10:39 PM

Th 24

H L H

5:52 AM 11:58 AM 6:31 PM

Sa 5

H L H L

3:07 8:55 3:35 9:41

AM AM PM PM

Tu 15

L H L H

4:37 AM 11:04 AM 5:03 PM 11:15 PM

F 25

L H L H

12:42 AM 6:51 AM 12:58 PM 7:29 PM

Su 6

H L H L

4:04 AM 9:57 AM 4:32 PM 10:45 PM

W 16

L H L H

5:11 AM 11:40 AM 5:40 PM 11:52 P­­­­­­M

Sa 26

L H L H

1:36 7:49 1:56 8:24

AM AM PM PM

M 7

H L H L

5:01 AM 10:58 AM 5:28 PM 11:45 PM

Th 17

L H L

5:46 AM 12:16 PM 6:19 PM

Su 27

L H L H

2:29 8:44 2:52 9:16

AM AM PM PM

Tu 8

H L H

5:57 AM 11:56 AM 6:23 PM

F 18

H L H L

AM AM PM PM

M 28

L H L H

3:20 AM 9:36 AM 3:46 PM 10:07 PM

W 9

L H L H

12:37 AM 6:51 AM 12:48 PM 7:14 PM

Sa 19

H L H L

12:30 6:22 12:57 7:00 1: 1 3 7:03 1:43 7:47

AM AM PM PM

Tu 29

L H L H

4:10 AM 10:28 AM 4:39 PM 10:59 PM

Th 10

L H L H

1:25 7:42 1:37 8:01

Su 20

H L H L

2:02 7:49 2:36 8:41

AM AM PM PM

W 30

L H L H

5:00 AM 11:21 AM 5:31 PM 11:52 PM

AM AM PM PM

AM AM PM PM

The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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ANTIQUES/HISTORY

Blue Willow

Thomas Minton

Editor’s Note: What is it about antiques that have endeared us through the ages?

Almost everyone has a piece that has been passed down in their family. Is it the sentimental value of an heirloom? Is it the exquisite craftsmanship that is a lost art in many cases, or the primitive simplicity that tells the story of our history? For some collectors, is it the increasing value that they hold? For whatever the reason antiques are a part of our past and admired in the present, to be passed on after we are gone. We only have the use of it while we are here. As an antiques dealer for 20 years with shops in Savannah, Tampa and Atlanta. Every piece is different, each with its own purpose – some for beauty and some for function. I have teamed up with renowned second-generation antiques dealers, Emmett and Teddy McCracken, to bring you a series of such stories of interest in the coming months. We hope that they will entertain you, give you perhaps something that you might not have known, tell a bit of history, and impart our experience that we have learned through the years. Let’s begin with Blue Willow and porcelains. Enjoy!

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I

t is said that the Chinese invented porcelain from ceramics around 2,200 years ago. Almost every house has some in one form or another even to this day. Now, it isn’t their most famous of inventions, we leave that to gunpowder and printing, and ahh, chopsticks. But porcelain became one of their main exports. Chinese porcelain was coveted in the West because of the artwork, colors, its durability, variety of functions, and let’s not fail to mention that it is comparatively inexpensive, even after Europeans found out how to make it themselves in the 1700s. As antiques, they are collectable, prized as heirlooms, and – as with most antiques – their value increases through time. Export porcelain from China includes a wide range of objects that were made, painted and fired by use of cottage industry labor. One village would make a specific shape, another would paint specific designs and colors. They would then be collected and sold to a trader. As a whole this porcelain generally was made exclusively for export to Europe and later to North America between the 16th and the 20th century. “Export china” was not used in the Chinese households.


In the 16th century, Portuguese traders began importing late Ming dynasty blue and white porcelains to Europe, resulting in the growth of the Kraak porcelain trade (named after the Portuguese ships called carracks in which it was transported). European traders had to have ballast to stabilize their ships across the ocean, and the voyage would often take a year. Once in China, the ballast and any other cargo they had brought to trade, was dumped, and barrels of the porcelain took their place for a stable journey, and large profitable cargo, home to Europe. This trading between the East and West continued until the mid-17th century when the Ming dynasty fell in 1644, and civil war disrupted porcelain production and the Eastern export trade. The export began again in the late 17th century, after China recovered from their internal war, but the English and French porcelain manufacturers had other ideas – how to present it to the masses in Europe and later to the emerging market in America. An English potter by the name of Thomas Minton had the answer. Mass produce porcelain in a blue and white pattern that was affordable to the masses and it did not have to be shipped all the way from China. First, he created a pattern with Chinese figures, which was stamped or transferred in blue to the white dinnerware, to provide mass production. But to create great demand he called it Blue Willow, and in 1790 Minton invented a Chinese Romantic Fable about the pattern (although some historians attribute this to Thomas Turner of Caughley porcelain in 1780). This pattern is still made today, and I bet if you look in your grandma’s cupboard you will find some. Consider the marketing genius!

Study the pictures as you read the fable that began a design that is over 200 years old. Once there was a wealthy Mandarin, who had a beautiful daughter. She had fallen in love with her father’s humble accounting assistant, angering her father. It was inappropriate for them to marry due the difference in social class. He dismissed the young man and built a high fence around his house to keep the lovers apart. The Mandarin was planning for his daughter to marry a powerful Duke. The Duke arrived by boat to claim his bride, bearing a box of jewels as a gift. The wedding was to take place on the day the blossom fell from the willow tree. On the eve of the daughter’s wedding to the Duke, the young accountant, disguised as a servant, slipped into the palace unnoticed. As the lovers escaped with the jewels, the alarm was raised. They ran over a bridge, chased by the Mandarin, whip in hand. The lovers escaped on the Duke’s ship to the safety of a secluded island, where they lived happily for years. But one day the Duke learned of their refuge. Hungry for revenge, he sent soldiers, who captured the lovers and put them to death. The gods, moved by their plight, transformed the lovers into a pair of doves.

The fabled WIllow Tree

Well we can’t stop just yet. The impact of the story was turned into a comic opera in 1901 called The Willow Pattern. It was a silent film in 1914 called Story of the Willow Pattern. It was the china used by William Randolph Hearst at his famous estate in San Simeon. It was common china in several western movies and even on TV in The Munsters home. Opie and Aunt Bee ate off of it every day, as did Angela Lansbury in Murder She Wrote. If you want to see a few pieces stop by Emmett and Teddy’s shop at Stock Farm Antiques in Old Town Bluffton.

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r u r o Y rne o C

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The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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ARCHITECTURE

Let the Land Speak 28 bluffton.com

A Spring Island Home & Habitat


By Randolph Stewart Spring Island is such a special place. All of the owners take great care of their surroundings and are committed to preserving the natural environment and habitat. Recently, I was fortunate enough to receive an invitation from an old friend, John Strother with Spring Island Real Estate, to tour the Schepps-Cottrell home. Turning off the paved road onto a dirt trail, we rode by dense woods of pines, gums and oaks, only interrupted by a big fenced-horse pasture on our left. Upon approaching a small fork in the road, we found a weathered sign hanging on a tree with a painted arrow pointing the way. How do you design a home on ten pristine acres sited adjacent to a large tidal creek and marsh with a unique ravine running through the center of it? You know that the place is peaceful and private. You get a sense of respect and reverence for where you are. You let the land speak to you. The owners, Lee and Barbara, knew what they were looking for. A place to keep their horses during the day, a design that takes full advantage of the water, marsh and oak views, a house that is organized and yet part of nature with well thought-out private spaces. Lee is a Master Naturalist and you can tell how important the site and its natural assets were to him. Finishing the short ride, a green curtain opens and the house begins to unveil itself. Low slung as if dropped into its natural surroundings, the house sits lightly on the land, not appearing large or extravagant in any way. A simple metal low-pitched roof, cypress siding, and deep eaves with exposed rafters provide shade and moves the rains away from the face and foundation. As you begin to park in an oversized pervious gravel motor court, you notice the brick piers and trellis that run across the front of the garage face to the front door, from left to right, and perpendicular, from right to left, to the front door which is not immediately evident. The piers are covered in jasmine, which sweetens the air and surrounds the home when the white flowers bloom. You stop to take in the tabby wall that gives notice of the old ruins on Spring Island, and a garden that is natural and self-sustaining, with

liriope ground cover, camellias and dogwood. Beyond is a natural, undisturbed open area protected by an array of live oaks with palmetto understory. The limbs of the grand old trees surrounding the property cast shadows with dappled light that becomes pervasive. Every green thing on the site is indigenous. After continuing on your easy stroll down the trellis, you see that the design of the house isn’t an accident. The design of the home orchestrates the entire experience. Joel Newman of Thomas & Denzinger Architects was the conductor. He got it! Lee and Barbara get it! From here the components came together. Wooded approach, the pasture, the forked trail, the entry experience, the main house, and a wonderful footbridge crossing the ravine to the guest house in its own little world. From the moment you enter the lobby and get a peek of what is beyond, you know that the experience has just begun. The oversized doors are half-French and actually on the side of a corner, flanked on the opposing side by a wall-to-wall window with bottom awning and overhead transom, allowing the light to flood inside. You will find these windows throughout the home continually bringing the outside in. As you stop in the vestibule and chat for a second to our host (and a wooden sculpture of a seated woman with a basket of pine cones), you can’t help but admire a larger-than-life painting of colorful flowers by Greg Osterhaus. As the story goes, the owners saw this painting in Maine in 1989 and did not buy it, but while planning their home, they realized it was the perfect piece for this important space and bought it. This is just a short interlude into what is to come. As you take a few more steps, you pause to take in a true great room. Reclaimed oak and beech beams, walls, floors, and cabinets. The use of colorful paintings, fabrics and oriental rugs creates a balance of color to the warmth. A stone floor hall, with no walls, bisects the kitchen from the living room. A brick see-through fireplace separates the living space from the dining space. Keep in mind that you are surrounded by an abundance of floor-

The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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to-ceiling windows that frame the view of the surrounding exterior natural forest and open tidal marsh views. How organic and sustainable. The wood was recycled from a large barn in Ohio and processed by a team of Amish craftsmen, the stone—a multicolored slate—is laid in the five-size pattern. Most of the barn oak covering the walls is sawn and unfinished and the milled-barn siding and beech that was used for floors is in wide, random widths. The semi-finished baseboards differentiate and separate the unfinished walls from the finished floors. Recycled oak posts and beams outline the pitch of the ceiling, which is made of white tongue-and-groove wood, defining the limits of the beams. As you look around, taking in all of this orchestrated experience, your eyes move to the monumental fireplace and the wonderful painting of a cow (again by Osterhaus), anchoring the whole space. Around the backside of the fireplace is the dining room. The furnishings throughout each space have a purpose. The various collections of folk art, which have been obtained over years of worldly traveling, contribute to the color and interest, while the more than a few antiques are simple but with a purpose, whether functional or aesthetic. Joel placed the kitchen so that the chef can communicate with whoever is there and not loose contact with nature. Brick surrounds the island with oak cabinets inset. A masterfully built reclaimed countertop with a farm sink—carved out of one piece of soapstone from Vermont— anchors the space. The unfinished zinc hood is custom designed and adds metal to the palate that surrounds. The commercial stove and glass door refrigerator with a fitted butlers pantry close by means the owners love to cook for guests of the house. Yet it works for daily meals quite nicely. The back screen porch is another entirely different living space. You have gathering and lounging space—a large fireplace, outdoor grill, kitchen and dining table—with two wide access points back to the house. The main attraction during the day is the surrounding nature outside with an oak in the center. It all was planned to be part of the space. Walking into the master bedroom you first see a panorama of live oak forest. Double French doors lead to a screened porch with a day bed, perfect for falling asleep while listening to the symphony of tree frogs during those wonderful fall and spring months. But Lee’s favorite room is his office. The surrounding forest again becomes an important part of the space, bringing the outside inside. The sitting area, desk, wood walls and old floors. The fireplace displays a painting of Dagny, their English Waterdog, by local Bluffton artist Murray Sease.

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The house is only two bedrooms. Newman and the Schepps-Cottrell decided to build a wonderful walk through the woods, over a bridge that traverses the ravine that empties into the marsh, to a private twobedroom guest house. The general contractors were Tom Gollihugh and Charlie Hull of Beaufort. The pride in their workmanship and attention to detail can be seen in every aspect of construction and finishing. The execution of the plans,

experience and understanding on what they were doing is evident. On the ride back to the main road, you feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to visit a home that totally embraces its surrounding habitat —both inside and outside. To contact John Strother, email him at JStrother@springisland.com.

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BULLETIN BOARD

CHECK THE WEBSITE PROGRAMS ALL MONTH http://beaufortcountylibrary.org

Shrimp Trawling Expedition Saturdays starting September 12 and ending November 28 Reservations required 843-689-6767 ext 223 Weekly Programs www.coastaldiscovery.org

Concert which will be presented Sunday, September 20, 4PM Bluffton United Methodist Church 101 Calhoun Street.

Join Our Own Chierie Smith Begins September 25th www.dothelocomotion.org

Tuesdays 2-6pm

Bluffton Visitors Center 70 Boundary St 843.757.6293 info@heywardhouse.org

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For future announcements and photos Email The Breeze


Family Owned & Operated Free Pick-up & Delivery Drop off -Pick up Each Garment Inspected Dry Cleaning Shirt Laundry

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Alterations & Repairs Stain Removal Leather Cleaning Household Items

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Bluffton Plant: 373 Red Cedar Street 843.815.5885 door2door@hargray.com Mon.-Fri. 7:30 am-5:30 pm

匀瀀漀爀琀娀漀渀攀 ☀ 䈀䔀䄀䴀 䜀爀愀瀀栀椀砀 ⠀㠀㐀㌀⤀ 㠀㌀㜀ⴀ㤀㘀㘀㌀ ㄀㈀ 䨀漀栀渀猀琀漀渀 圀愀礀 ⌀ 䄀 ☀ 䈀 䈀氀甀û琀漀渀Ⰰ 匀䌀 ㈀㤀㤀㄀ 

The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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Thoughts in the Breeze Drenched Again Heavy August morning rains draw a silver sheet across the lagoon. The pure platinum sky is flawless. No nick or smudge of color mars its smooth surface spread bright behind stands of dark green pines like clumps of lint caught in feather dusters. With a drummer solo’s ferocity curtains of roof water attack the railing, burst like July 4th sparklers, and settle in a mirror across the deck.

Passing It started in the cold; wind hissing through the walls, howling down the chimney, kicking ashes across the floor. Late spring rain beat hard against the windows, and the cabin creaked and swayed like a wooden boat swallowed in a storm. The hot breath of summer came early to the flatland as did sand dwellers and two wheelers. By late July I notched my 74th passing ever grateful to watch the marsh

No fish jumps. No ripples sweep. Minnows lounge in the grasses.

grass bend against the wind as clouds ran

Bill Newby

before blowing eastward to die.

Summer Heat I’m hot, it’s hot, too hot So hot it feels like The sun is burning a hole in the top of my head I need to be in the water By the water Of the water I want to be the water The ocean, the river , the pool Cooling, calming, soothing relief But I haven’t finished my outdoor chores So I bargain with myself Self I say, “if you get all your chores done you can Drink beer and Go swimming.” And that is what I need to hear Anne M. Jennings 36 bluffton.com

before a late-day storm, raging briefly

Grinding slowly through the final weeks of August, ominous clouds formed each day suggesting change was coming along with darker days, the long months. Summer became a memory and something changed inside me, a missing, like a brief kiss filled with promise – gone. On the horizon across sand and water, I watched storms blackening the sky like bruises, marking this place, marking me. Art Cornell

W

e invite thoughts, poems, essays from our readers, young and old. Bluffton has a deep creative spirit, often eccentric, but also deeply caring, thoughtful and observant. We encourage submissions, and while we cannot guarantee publication, we will make every attempt to reflect the musings of our talented community.


The KUDZU Monster

Awash

I’ve moved next to a monster, And KUDZU is its name. Growing is its hobby; Eating is its game.

Awash in white moonlight the ocean aquarelle undulates, breathlike murmuring wavelets caress the beaches escorting grains of sand ashore lapping them back lest they escape to the land.

It ate my car for breakfast, It ate my house for snack, And when I go outdoors I’ve learned Not to turn my back! I have to wear my hipboots When I go out to hang the clothes, Cause Monster Kudzu will sneak over To do a taste test on my toes. Why just today it ate a tree, Gobbled the garage for dinner, I can’t seem to find the lawn mower, And my dog looks like he’s thinner. Especially after it rains, This monster acts most hungry, So our family takes turns Look out for neighbor Rumley. I know you think I’m kidding, But I sure have a hunch ... That this monster known as Kudzu Ate my kids for lunch! Carole Marsh Longmeyer

Rainy Days Shattered petals, fragile stamens a colorful spring snow of sprinkled bits and bruised, beaten stems-The brutality screeches. In the vestiges of a spring rain, nature offers only puzzles: how what should nourish might lovingly caress, chooses demolition-Instead beating down, tearing out limbs sweeping away entire trees, stripping bare what’s new and beautiful with a love Possessing no mercy. ©Elizabeth Robin

Suddenly, stillness grey and windless. Brutally, the moon is extinguished lightning rips the blackness ferocious waves swirl all they carry howling, rushing inward beyond the shore, beyond the dunes expiring as they engulf the land awash in ebony darkness. ©Thelma Naylor

Fiddler Crabs Fiddler Crabs are never sad They are too busy Building a home in the sand Fighting the tide Protecting their own The girls are checking out the boys The boys are busy waving that big claw Hoping to be chosen And we know they are successful Millions of them Teeming with life In that pluff mudd Living as hard as they can Watching us Watching them Being purposeful Eat, explore, procreate, protect, endure Small and potent Fiddler Crabs Guardians of the marsh Anne M. Jennings The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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OVER THE BRIDGES

*Wheelchair accessible event. Additional fees may apply.

BLUFFTON AND HARDEEVILLE

BEAUFORT AREA

*Sept. 3-24 BLUFFTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, 120 Palmetto Way, 843-757-6293. Free. Sept. 3: MOVIE The Book Thief, 1-3 p.m. Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24: BLUFFTON GENEALOGY Debbie DuBrucq guides the group with Ancestry.com Library Edition, 2-4 p.m. Sept. 15: RIBBON CREEK INCIDENT Author Jay Stevens will explain the court martial and the effects of the Ribbon Creek Incident on the U.S. Marine Corps, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Sept. 18: MOVIE City of God, 1-3 p.m.

*Sept. 3 SONGWRITERS IN THE ROUND Carrol Brown, Frank Waddell and David Owens return with their unique blend of music and humor. More like a back porch get together than a concert, the three performers trade original stories and songs in a free flowing dialogue. Beaufort County ARTworks, 2127 Boundary St. (K-Mart Plaza), 843-379-2787, 7 p.m. $20.

*Sept. 18 SUMMER SUNSET PARTY Food court featuring German and American favorites, Octoberfest and Harvest Beer Garden and live music. Lawn chairs and leashed pets are permitted, but no outside food or drinks. Sponsored by Bear Foot Sports, 843757-8520. Bluffton Sunset Party, Oyster Factory Park, Wharf St. 5-9 p.m. $5 (kids free). Sunset After Party at Vineyard 55, 55 Calhoun St., 9 p.m. Sept. 18-19 HARDEEVILLE CATFISH FESTIVAL Corn hole tournament, live entertainment, food and craft vendors, cook-offs, rides, games and tons of fun! Parade (from Rt. 17 at I-95 Exit 5 to Main St.) Sat. at 10 a.m. Fireworks Sat. 10 p.m. Hardeeville Catfish Festival, 843-368-1706, behind City Hall, 205 Main St. Fri. 6-10 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Free. *Sept. 19 BLUFFTON BOILED PEANUT FESTIVAL Enjoy a boiled peanut eating contest and the ever popular Ms. Peanut and Little Mr. Goober contest, as well as a boiled peanut cook-off and live music. Come for the peanuts, stay for the block party! Eat Sleep Play Beaufort or Bluffton Boilers, 843-757-1010. Event held at Bluffton Village (between Post Office and Library). Noon-5 p.m. Free. *Sept. 20 PRAISE CONCERT Featuring guest musician, Lavon Stevens, a regular at the Jazz Corner Restaurant and Jazz Club, along with the church Praise Worship Team. The concert celebrates the church renovations and will include audience participation and contemporary and gospel selections. Bluffton United Methodist Church, 101 Calhoun St., 843-757-3351, 4 p.m. Free-will offering. *Sept. 24 ROMEO AND JULIET The performance by the San Francisco Ballet has passionate choreography, spine-tingling swordsmanship, and celebrated score by Sergei Prokofiev. The audience will be treated to a behind-the-scenes look at the acclaimed company and interviews with the artists. Cinemark, 106 Buckwalter Pkwy., 843-757-2859, 7 p.m. $18 (seniors $17, kids $16). *Sept. 26 OKTOBERFEST – BEER AND BRATS FESTIVAL German food, craft beers and German wines, live music by The Rhinelanders (1-3 p.m.) and Cranford Hollow (4-7 p.m.), classic car show, children’s activities and more! Bring lawn chairs. No coolers allowed. Old Town Bluffton at Bluffton Village (between Post Office and Library). 1-7 p.m. $5 (kids free).

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Sept. 4-5 LANDS END WOODLAND FESTIVAL, 100 Lands End Rd., St. Helena Is. , 843-838-4503. Fri.: Old fashioned fishfry, featuring local live entertainment in the perfect setting on the beach. 5 p.m. Free. Sat.: All day festival of Gullah singers, dancers, musicians, and storytellers, with a special performance by Aunt Pearlie Sue, plus hand-made crafts and delicious Lowcountry cuisine. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. $3 (kids free). *Sept. 4-6 EDISTO BEACH MUSIC & SHAG FEST Enjoy arts and crafts, food vendors, and great music! 843-869-2156, Bay Creek Park, 3702 Docksite Rd., Edisto Is. (beside Edisto Marina). Fri. Noon-11 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-11 p.m. (shag contest at 9 p.m.), Sun. Noon-7 p.m. $10 (kids free). *Sept. 4-26 “SEA ISLAND SEPTEMBER” ART EXHIBIT Local artists working in the Gullah tradition are featured. Beaufort County ARTworks, 2127 Boundary St. (K-Mart Plaza), 843-379-2787. Opening night reception with refreshments on Sept. 4 is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Gallery is open Tues.-Fri. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. Noon-4 p.m. Free. *Sept. 7 LABOR DAY AT PENN CENTER The program begins at 11 a.m. at the Frissell Community House with a guest speaker and historical information about Labor Day on St. Helena Island at the heart of Gullah culture. Fish fry, car show, vendor fair, and music starting at 12:30 p.m. Penn Center, 16 Penn Center Cir. W., St. Helena Is. 843-838-2432, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. *Sept. 11-20 LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Audrey II, a foul mouthed, carnivorous plant, promises unending fame and fortune to Seymour, a meek, down-and-out floral assistant, as long as he keeps feeding it … blood! USCB Center for the Arts, 805 Carteret St., 843-521-4145, Fri.-Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. $25 (seniors/ military $20, students $15). *Sept. 24 GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS The premiere Chinese acrobatic touring company combines award-winning acrobatics, traditional dance, spectacular costumes, ancient and contemporary music to provide breathtaking skill and spellbinding beauty. USCB Center for the Arts, 805 Carteret St., 843-521-4145, 7 p.m. $30-35 (seniors/military $20-25, students $15-20). *Sept. 24-26 SHORT STORY AMERICA FESTIVAL AND CONFERENCE Receptions, author book readings and signings, panels and workshops. See website for details. Beaufort County ARTworks, 2127 Boundary St. , 843-379-2787, $45 for all events.


*Sept. 25-26 OKTOPRFEST Eat Sleep Play Beaufort or Old Village Port Royal, 843-522-0322. Fri.: Craft beer and wine party at The Shed of Port Royal, 809 Paris Ave. 6-10 p.m. $25 in advance, $30 at door Sat.: “Party Port Royal Style” on Paris Ave. Classic car show, live music, food and beer, artists and craft booths, children’s activities, and much more. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. *Ongoing PORT ROYAL SOUND FOUNDATION MARITIME CENTER “Tuesday Talks” and other events. Check the website for special events and pricing. Port Royal Sound Foundation, 310 Okatie Hwy., Okatie, 843-655-7774. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Donations accepted for Maritime Center.

HILTON HEAD ISLAND *Sept. 10 THE PINK PARTINI PARTY! Music, appetizers, door prizes, and drink specials. It’s All Pink, 843-842-7465. Big Bamboo Cafe, Coligny Plaza Shopping Center, 1 N. Forest Beach Dr. 5:30-8 p.m. Free. *Sept. 10-11 2ND ANNUAL JAZZ FESTIVAL Thurs.: Noel Freidling Quintet presents music of the Beatles through the lens of Jazz. H. H.  High School Seahawks Cultural Center, 70 Wilborn Rd., 843-689-4800, 7 p.m. $15 Fri.: Joe Gransden and his band celebrate Sinatra’s 100th birthday. Sonesta Resort, 130 Shipyard Dr., HHI, 843-842-2400. 7 p.m. $25. Both shows open with Junior Jazz “Rising Stars.” Tickets: jazzforallages.com.

SAVANNAH *Sept. 3 LABOR DAY WEEKEND CONCERT Fantasia and Anthony Hamilton with guest Lyfe Jennings. Martin Luther King Jr. Arena in the Savannah Civic Center, 301 W. Oglethorpe Ave. 912-651-6550, 8 p.m. $25-55. *SAVANNAH THEATRE, 222 Bull St., 912-233-7764, $37 (coupon $34, kids $18) Sept. 4-30: JUKEBOX! A real “blast from the past!” Wed. & Fri. 8 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. Sept. 5-29: SAVANNAH LIVE High-energy song, dance, and comedy! Tues., Thurs. & Sat. 8 p.m., Sat. 9/26 3 & 8 p.m., no show 9/8. *Sept. 12 FREE FAMILY DAY AT JEPSON CENTER FOR THE ARTS Meet characters from the history of the Owens Thomas House and learn about tea and entertaining customs of the period. See demonstrations of traditional methods of spinning and bread making. Telfair Museums, 124 Abercorn St., 912-790-8800, 1-4 p.m. Free. *Sept. 12 OPENING NIGHT: PRAYERS OF RAIN & WIND Weber’s Overture to Der Freischutz, Hedges’ Prayers of Rain & Wind, and Brahms’ Symphony No. 1, Op. 68. The Savannah Philharmonic Orchestra, 912-232-6002. Tickets: SCAD Box Office, 912-525-5050, Lucas Theater of the Arts, 32 Abercorn St., 3 p.m. $16-75. *Sept. 18-20 GODSPELL An eclectic blend of songs ranging in style from pop to vaudeville and hefty dose of comedy are employed as the story of Jesus’s life dances across the stage. Savannah Christian Church, 55 Al Henderson Blvd., 912-629-4730, 7 p.m. $5.

*Sept. 11 SUMMER POPS CONCERT Celebrate the music of legendary musicians Cole Porter, the Gershwin brothers, Hoagy Carmichael, Leonard Bernstein, and the king of Americana, Aaron Copland. This concert kicks off the Hilton Head musical season. Hilton Head Choral Society, 843-341-3818, First Presbyterian Church, 540 William Hilton Pkwy. 8 p.m. $20-30 (kids $10-20).

*Sept. 20 TANGO LOVERS Share the cultural essence and evolution of tango with an award-winning cast and worldclass dancers, accompanied by the rhythms of an orchestra with members of symphonic and philharmonic ensembles. The Johnny Mercer Theatre in the Savannah Civic Center, 301 W. Oglethorpe Ave. 912-651-6550, 6 p.m. $28-79.

*Sept. 19 ITALIAN HERITAGE FESTIVAL Grape stomping and pizza eating contests, live entertainment, dunk tank, cooking demonstrations, and sports. Italian-American Club Hilton Head, 412-897-1148, Coastal Discovery Museum, 70 Honey Horn Dr. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $6.

Sept. 20-27 Annual SAVANNAH JAZZ FESTIVAL The festival will offer all types of jazz, from Dixieland, traditional swing, straightahead and bop to melodic standards and funky down-home gutbucket blues. 404-997-3281. See website for entertainers, locations, and times. Free. savannahjazzfestival.org.

Sept. 27 KITCHENS OF NOTE Tour six designer kitchens in the Sea Pines community. Each kitchen will host an Island chef from one of their fabulous restaurants. The tour benefits the Hilton Head Symphony Orchestra and its youth programs. Call 843-681-4635 for reservations. Noon-4 p.m. $40 (Entry to Sea Pines is included).

*Sept. 21 SAVANNAH RIVER SESSIONS Jeremy Davis and the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra jazz band will play classic favorites as you enjoy a three-course gourmet dinner. Westin Savannah Special Events, 1 Resort Dr. Call 912-201-2085 for reservations. Cocktails at 6:30 p.m., show starts at 7 p.m. $40 (includes dinner).

Ongoing COASTAL DISCOVERY MUSEUM Honey Horn History Walk, Exploring Pinckney Island, May River Expedition, Salt Marsh Discovery, Dolphin and Nature Cruise and Shrimp Trawling Expedition – Just a few of the many lectures and boat trips offered at Coastal Discovery Museum. Coastal Discovery Museum, 70 Honey Horn Dr., 843-689-6767 ext. 223. Reservations required. See website for details. coastaldiscovery.org.

*Sept. 26 CHAMBER CONCERT NO. 1: BRIGHT IS THE RING OF WORDS Romantic songs from the mid-1850s to the 20th century. The Savannah Philharmonic Orchestra, 912-232-6002. Tickets: SCAD Box Office (all events), 912-525-5050, Lutheran Church of the Ascension, 120 Bull St. 5 p.m. $20.

For a full calendar of events, go to Bluffton.com. The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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BLUFFTON: MUSIC TOWN

Photo by Male-zet

40 bluffton.com

Photo by Jkadvany

Photo by Enrico Frangi


y

W

ho Said Bass Players Can’t Sing?

By Jevon Daly Bass players … you need ‘em. The unsung heroes of the rock band. The dude or dudette in charge of makin’ sure the booties be shakin’. The ‘holder downeth of the low endeth.’ I remember as a kid growing up, my dad always played ‘air’ drums in the Volkswagen driving us around when we lived in St. Thomas. Bob Marley was playing on the radio at the time. THE RADIO. BOB MARLEY. What? “Family man” played some wicked grooves on his Fender bass. I heard Robbie Shakespeare. Then it happened. I heard Sting. Sting is a yoga-doin’ bass player whom we have all heard of. The Police was his band, and they played reggae. Sorta ... go back and listen to ‘Walkin on the Moon’ or ‘Bed’s Too Big Without You.” Reggae bass with a high lead vocal. Very cool. I guess for a long time i had no idea he was playing bass while he was singing or how difficult that actually was. Ask Gary Pratt. Ask Clarence Williams. Ask Billy C. Ask Eric Moore. These local guys make it look easy. I went to see Les Claypool from Primus fame when he came to play the now defunct Shoreline Ballroom on HHI. Great show, huge bass sound. Les made it look effortless. Same thing when i listened closer to The Beatles. Wonky, crazy bass lines going on during these intricate harmony vocals. Wow. Maybe the first guy to really come out and play bass in a melodic style and sing too. Throughout my life i have been into a bunch of different styles of music. I went through a Rush phase. Getty Lee had a high soaring voice and a very growly bass sound. Maybe he heard Jack Bruce from Cream. Jack had a high, grainy voice and played very melodic bass through Marshall Stacks! Gene Simmons from Kiss also turned me on to the fact that a bass player could sing, play bass and move around or maybe even dress up a little. Bootsy Collins sang a little here and there (his solo albums are a bit weird) but maybe inspired Esperanza Spalding, a modern ‘jazz’ singer who sports a super sweet afro and sultry vocals. Thundercat is another guy who i like that you might have only heard recently on Kendrick Lamar’s newest album. Of course, in the ‘80s we had Kip Winger, doing some hair metal with difficult playing and singing, maybe inspired by Brian Jones of the Beach Boys. Two totally different sounding guys, but both had high voices and liked hair. Lemmy from Motorhead is a great writer, and has a young man that he hired to walk around and make sure his drink is always full. Was Phil from Thin Lizzy inspired by Jack Bruce? Is this getting confusing yet? Kim Gordon from Sonic Youth plays bass. Tom Araya from Slayer is a bass player with beautiful long hair and a very fast right hand. Next time you’re out and about, you can ask Marc Cote (local hair metal connoisseur and avid runner) or Super Dave Mckinley (drummer and captain) how many left handed bass players they can name that sing. Photo by Helge Øverås

The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

41


Restaurant Guide

CAHILL’S CHICKEN KITCHEN** - SOUTHERN HIGHWAY 46 757-2921 LUNCH MON-SAT 11-3 SUPPER THU-FRI-SAT 5-9 BREAKFAST SAT 7-12 BRUNCH SUN 9-3

THE VILLAGE PASTA SHOPPE** ITALIAN DELI & WINE 10 B JOHNSTON WAY (across from Post Office) 540-2095 TUE-FRI 10-6PM SAT 10-4PM

CORNER PERK** - BREAKFAST, LUNCH, COFFEE THE PROMENADE & MAY RIVER ROAD 816-5674 MON-FRI 7-4PM SAT 8-3PM SUN 9-2PM

AGAVE SIDEBAR 13 STATE OF MIND ST 757-9190 MON - THUR 11AM-10PM FRI & SAT 11AM-11PM

LATITUDE WINE BAR** - WINE, TAPAS & LUNCH 6 PROMENADE 706-9463 WED-SAT 11AM - TO CLOSE NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH MAY RIVER GRILL** SEAFOOD CONTEMPORARY 1263 MAY RIVER RD., OLD TOWN 757-5755 TUE-FRI 11:30-2PM LUNCH MON-SAT 5-9PM DINNER MULBERRY STREET PIZZERIA** 15 STATE OF MIND ST. 757-7007 TUE-WED11-9 THUR 11-10 FRI-SUN 12-WHENEVER POUR RICHARD’S** - CONTEMPORARY BLUFFTON PARKWAY 757-1999 MON-SAT 5:30-10PM SONIC DRIVE IN** - FAST FOOD 5 SHERINGTON DRIVE 815-3630 OPEN DAILY SQUAT N’ GOBBLE** - AMERICAN/GREEK 1231 MAY RIVER ROAD 757-4242 EAT IN OR TAKE OUT OPEN DAILY 7-3PM TOOMERS BLUFFTON SEAFOOD HOUSE** 27 DR. MELLICHAMP DRIVE 757-0380 LUNCH/DINNER MON-SAT 11-9PM

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BLUFFTON BBQ - BARBEQUE PORK & RIBS THE PROMENADE 757-RIBS WED-SAT 11AM-WHENEVER THE BLUFFTON ROOM - FINE DINING 15 PROMENADE STREET 757-3525 TUE-THUR 5-10PM FRI-SAT 5-11PM CLOSED SUN & MON BRITISH OPEN PUB - PUB, SEAFOOD, STEAKS SHERIDAN PARK 705-4005 MON-SUN 8-9PM SUN BRUNCH 8-1PM BUFFALO’S - CONTEMPORARY PALMETTO BLUFF VILLAGE 706-6630 LUNCH MON-SAT 11-4PM CAPTAIN WOODY’S SEAFOOD SANDWICH SALADS THE PROMENADE 757-6222 MON-SUN 11-10PM CLAUDE & ULI’S BISTRO - FRENCH MOSS CREEK VILLAGE 837-3336 MON-SAT LUNCH & DINNER CORKS WINE CO. - CONTEMPORY, TAPAS THE PROMENADE 816-5168 BIZ HOURS TUE-SAT 5-12 KITCHEN HOURS TUE-WED 5-10, TH-SAT 5-11


DOWNTOWN DELI - BURGERS & SANDWICHES DR. MELLINCAMP 815-5005 MON-SAT 8-3PM HOGSHEAD KITCHEN - CONTEMPORARY 1555 FORDING ISLAND ROAD 837-4647 MON-SAT 11:30AM-11PM, SUNDAY CLOSED INN AT PALMETTO BLUFF - CONTINENTAL PALMETTO BLUFF VILLAGE 706-6500 DAILY 7AM-10PM KATIE O’DONALD’S - IRISH AMERICAN KITTIES CROSSING 815-5555 MON-SUN 11-2PM

PEACEFUL HENRY’S CIGAR & WINE BAR 161 BLUFFTON ROAD 757-0557 PEPPER’S OLD TOWN - AMERICAN, SEAFOOD 1255 MAY RIVER ROAD OLD TOWN BLUFFTON 757-2522 7 DAYS A WEEK 11AM-9PM MUSIC 5 NIGHTS A WEEK REDFISH - CONTEMPORARY 32 BRUIN ROAD OLD TOWN 837-8888 MON-SAT 1130-2 & 4:30-10 SUN 10-2 & 4-10 SIGLER’S ROTISSERIE & SEAFOOD - CONTEMPORARY 12 SHERATON PARK CIRCLE 815-5030 MON-SAT 4:30PM-9:30PM

LONGHORN STEAKHOUSE - AMERICAN 1262 FORDING ISLAND ROAD 705-7001 SAT 11AM-11PM, All OTHERS 11AM-10PM

SIPPIN COW AT PEPPER’S OLD TOWN BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER 1255 MAY RIVER ROAD 757-5051 TUE–SAT 7-3PM SUN 9-2PM DINNER THURS-SUN 4PM - 9PM

MULBERRY STREET TRATTORIA - ITALIAN 1476 FORDING ISLAND ROAD HWY 837-2426 TUE-SAT 11-3 & 5-10 SUN 10:30-9

SOUTHERN BARREL BREWING CO. - AMERICAN 375 BUCKWALTER PLACE BLVD. 837-2337 MON - CLOSED, TUES - THURS 2-9PM, FRI 2-11PM SAT 11 - 11PM, SUN 2-8PM

NEO - GASTROPUB - FARM TO TABLE FARE 326 MOSS CREEK VILLAGE 837-5111 MON-THUR 11:30-9 FRI-SAT 11:30-10 SUNDAY 5-9

THE COTTAGE - BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER 38 CALHOUN STREET 757-0508 BREAKFAST M-SAT. 8-11AM LUNCH 11-3PM EARLY BIRD THUR FROM 5 FRI & SAT 5 - 5:45PM DINNER FROM 6 PM SUN BRUNCH 8AM-2PM AFTERNOON TEA M-W 3:15PM

OKATIE ALE HOUSE - AMERICAN SUN CITY 706-2537 LUNCH & DINNER 7 DAYS A WEEK OLD TOWN DISPENSARY - CONTEMPORARY CALHOUN STREET 837-1893 MON-SAT 11AM-2AM SUNDAY BRUNCH

VINEYARD 55 PIZZA AMERICAN 55 CALHOUN STREET 757-9463 OPEN DAILY 11:30AM-CLOSE ** See the ads in the Breeze for more info

The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

43


Come for the wine. Stay for the food!

Now serving lunch! Over 100 great wines to sample! Delicious tapas meals all day We d n e s d a y - S a t u rd a y : F ro m 1 1 : 0 0 a m Live Music Thursday night! 843-706-9463 6 Promenade Street

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we cate partie r large a s n small! d

5 Sherington Drive Bluffton, SC 29910 (843) 815-3630

The

Village

Pasta Shoppe

Delicious homemade Italian dishes ready to heat and serve.

Enjoy home-made Italian dishes without paying restaurant prices. Bring us your dish (or use ours) and we’ll fill it up with authentic Italian favorites like Lasagne, Chicken Parmesan, Ziti, Eggplant Parmesan and more. We also have Fresh Pasta and many hard to find Italian deli products.

It’s like mom or grandma made it! 10B Johnston Way www.villagepastashoppe.com (opposite the Bluffton Post office) 843.540.2095

Tue - Fri 10am - 6pm, Sat 10am - 4pm The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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46 bluffton.com


HAMPTON LAKE

31 A NCHOR C OVE C OURT MLS# 336889 $179,000

LAWTON STATION

209 G RAND C OURT S OUTH MLS# 338904 3 BR / 2 BA $284,900

BLUFFTON

993 M AY R IVER R OAD MLS# 335075 3 BR / 1 BA $350,000

Neil Castellane | 843-338-6345 neil@theneil.com

The Cobb Group | 843-338-7256 allison@charteronerealty.com

Rich Reed | 843-368-3040 rich@explorehhi.com

OKATIE

THE HAVEN AT NEW RIVERSIDE

HAMPTON LAKE

251 O LD B AILEYS R OAD MLS# 337026 6 BR / 4.5 BA | DEEP WATER $798,000

19 B LACKSTONE R IVER R D MLS# 337440 3 BR / 2 BA $305,000

21 D RIFTWOOD C T W MLS# 336893 $74,900

Rich Reed | 843-368-3040 rich@explorehhi.com

Nancy Marshall | 843-304-4447 nmarshall@hargray.com

Neil Castellane | 843-338-6345 neil@theneil.com

SUN CITY

ROSE HILL PLANTATION

MOSS CREEK

9 O RCHID L ANE MLS# 336919 3BR/3.5BA $489,000

19 M ARTINGALE E AST MLS#338741 4 BR/4FB/3HB $1,400,000

13 O KETEE C OURT MLS# 339282 3 BR / 2.5 BA $419,000

Donna D’Ambola | 843-247-7301 donna@donnadambola.com

James Wedgeworth | 843-686-9513 james@jameswedgeworth.com

The Cobb Group | 843-338-7256 allison@charteronerealty.com

HAMPTON LAKE

PALMETTO POINTE

HERITAGE LAKES

9 P ALMETTO C OVE C T MLS# 335369 4 BR / 3.5BA $595,000 Rich Reed | 843-368-3040 rich@explorehhi.com

61 I SLE OF P ALMS E AST MLS# 338838 3 BR / 2 BA $225,000 Neil Castellane | 843-338-6345 neil@theneil.com

54 HERITAGE LAKES DRIVE MLS# 338687 4 BR / 3 BA $370,000 Vince Harrison | 843-422-2029 Vincent@charteronerealty.com

The Breeze SEPTEMBER 2015

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48 bluffton.com

The Breeze September 2015  

The Magazine of Bluffton

The Breeze September 2015  

The Magazine of Bluffton

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