bluebee magazine - volume 2

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Issue Nº 2 Winter

Emerging Artists

10 Art Fair founder Ryan Stainer talks about the gallery’s role in today's art world.

Art Collectors

32 Photographer Marco Castelli reflects on the excessive sharing of human identity in the contemporary age.

Art Curators

46 Painter Young-sung Kim contemplates modern society, where living species are threatened and many have disappeared.



bluebee •Magazine•

©Blue Bee Gallery BlueBeeGallery.com Editor:

Stefan Finsinger

Creative Director:

Angy Avendaño

Editorial team:

Elena Isaeva

Mónica Müller-Witte

Linda Bertolissio

Jean Mora

Contributor:

Gloria Sanders

Artwork in Cover:

Fragment of Alejandro

by Tomer Peretz

Marketing Director:

Stefan Finsinger

Contact:

Stefan@BlueBeeGallery.com

Printer:

Youloveprint.

bluebee is available as digital magazine on BlueBeeGallery.com or as printed version for £21. The magazine was printed on fully recycled paper to reduce the impact on the environment.

Editorial material and opinions expressed in the magazine do not necessarily reflect the views of Blue Bee Gallery or the publisher. Blue Bee Gallery and bluebee magazine do not accept responsibility for the advertising content. Paid for promotions are clearly highlighted with the phrase “Featured Artwork” or similar. Please email Stefan@BlueBeeGallery.com for any comments or complaints.


Stefan Finsinger - Photography Jean Mora & Karin Stöttinger

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Editor’s letter

Launching something new isn’t an easy task. Therefore, I am honoured and overwhelmed by the positive response to our first issue of bluebee magazine. I hope that you will enjoy the second edition as much, and the next editions to come. Being an artist isn’t easy. Running an art business is probably even less so. But it’s still possible to make a living out of art – the question is just what kind of living you expect. We have spoken to some people in the industry and explored different areas of what it means to be an artist nowadays. Just because you create it does not mean people will buy it. There is more to an art business than just the art itself. Art is not just paint on a canvas; art should have something to say. Art doesn’t have to be shiny and bold to stand out. But you need to do your research and know your buyer base. Gallery representation isn´t the golden rail to success. We have been overwhelmed by submissions from many brilliant and excellent artists for this edition. It is great to see so many talented people out there. It was a difficult task for our editorial team to pick only 50 for this issue, but space is limited. If you haven’t been featured in this issue, this doesn’t mean that you aren’t good. It just means that another artist may just have fit slightly better for this issue, and we encourage you to apply again. Our featured artists are all brilliant minds, and it’s great to see how different artists approach their artistic expressions in different ways. Topics range from the thought that capitalism has widened modernday slavery, to the human union with nature, and to initially captured fragments of reality. As always, it’s worth exploring them further. Go and explore. Art is fun.

Stefan Finsinger Editor in chief

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Index

9 bluebee Meetups

17 bluebee Artists Feature

63 bluebee Something Else

10

Ryan Stainer

12

Matteo Bernasconi

15

Meike Brunkhorst

18

Andrea Ehret

29

Daniil Alikov

19

Claire Witteveen

30

Stefan Finsinger

20

Ania Luk

32

Marco Castelli

21

Angy AvendaĂąo

34

Tomer Peretz

22

Joshua Dunlap

36

Emily Strong

23

Tomas Clayton

38

Lourdes Ortiz

24

Rosemary Hurrell

40

Julija Goyd

25

Rhiannon West

42

Rebecca Fontaine - Wolf

26

JosĂŠ Duacastella

44

Jason Anderson

27

Alejandra de la Torre

46

Young - Sung Kim

28

Ioannis Lassithiotakis

48

Maciek Jasik

78 Gloria Sanders


49

Peter Untermaierhofer

60

Norris Yim

71

Merav Leibküchler

50

Tarek Sebastian Al - Shammaa

61

Robert Jacka

72

Paula Revigliono

51

Matteo Fieno

62

Linden Eller

73

Rosso Emerald Crimsom

52

Thomas Thorby - Lister

63

Pava Wülfert

74

Randomagus

53

Garreth Griffiths

64

Praween Karmakar

75

Olivier Lamboray

54

Giulia Borsi

65

Alex Fernandez

55

Tania Mason

66

Paul Valentine

56

Nicholas O’Leary

67

Tracey Esteves

57

William Holt

68

Marcos Guinoza

58

Niall Kirby

69

Olivier Leogane

59

Kateryna Bortsova

70

Julia Rose Sutherland


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bluebee Meetups

bluebee is always keen to hear what people in the art world have to say. It doesn’t matter if it’s art curators, collectors, critics, artists or just art lovers. Everyone has something to say, but most people won’t listen to them. We met three brilliant minds. They may be not well known globally yet, but this makes their advise even more intriguing. Here they share some of their thoughts and opinions on the art market and give advises for emerging artists.

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Ryan Stainer - Photography Hannah Burton

bluebee magazine met with Ryan Stainer to talk about some of the overlooked traits artists should have and the gallery’s place in today’s art world.

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Ryan Stainer is the founder of ‘The Other Artfair’, a fair for emerging artists, now in its ninth year and with 14 shows around the world. His shows have a growing number of visitors due to their unique concept. While most fairs offer their booths to galleries, it is important for Ryan to work directly with artists and for art collectors to meet them in person. He thinks that it is always better to hear the meaning behind the artwork from the artist directly. This concept may remove the barrier for most emerging art collectors, giving them the confidence to invest in their first piece. Ryan is not against the gallery system, and gallerists are still among the VIP invites for his fairs. After all, it is still the number one goal for the majority of emerging artists to get signed, and he wants to support this. However, the growing and diversifying collector base means that there is greater opportunity for emerging artists to become well known and to sell their artwork directly. This allows them to decide their faith themselves and not to be channelled in a direction with which they may not be comfortable.

Social media, online selling platforms and even art fairs make it easier than ever to sell to and interact with potential buyers all year long. Increasing numbers of cooperate clients are also seeking direct relationships with artists nowadays. While technology has made it easier to be an artist, there is much more competition out there. SaatchiArt.com alone counts over 60,000 artists’ profiles. Emerging artists need to find a way to be on top of the crowd, to be noticed and visible. Doing great art alone is no longer enough. This means that artists need to think of all elements of entrepreneurship, not only their product. The things artists should seek advice on include selling techniques, pricing artwork correctly, curating shows, marketing and promotions, as well as other elements of being an entrepreneur that may even include the setting up of card payment facilities in their studios. This doesn´t come easily to everyone. Then again, not everyone is made to be an entrepreneur. One piece of advice Ryan offers is to collect the contact details of potentially interested people.

Grow your network. Ask people to leave their business cards to enter a competition. Not everyone who appreciates your artwork will buy on first sight. Keeping in touch with them may lead to a purchase at a later stage. Invite them to your next private viewing; perhaps one of the new paintings will fit their taste even more. While it is time-consuming and may be exhausting after a busy week in the studio, it should not be overlooked and it does work. Having a finger on the pulse of time may increase your chance of stirring up a conversation. For instance, one artist in Dallas is an active member of the Extinction Rebellion movement and currently dedicates his artwork to this cause. However, be true to yourself and stand behind the meaning of your artwork. People can smell a red herring. Nevertheless, Ryan recommends sticking to doing art. Always be consistent with your style, and don´t be afraid to explore different subjects, because, one day, something will happen. Keep your vision clear. Keep going.

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Matteo Bernasconi - Photography by Vincent Long

bluebee met Matteo Bernasconi to talk about what it means to be a real artist and how selfrepresentation can be successful.

Since Matteo left Italy 12 years ago, he has lived all over the world, eventually settling in Sydney six years ago. There, he runs a multifunctional art gallery with a jewellery designer friend. For Matteo, galleries that are run by artists are more interesting than the stiff-upper-lip, posh places that are normally found in the city centres of the world. In bringing to Australia a new concept of art, Peach Black seeks to bring to the city a new playful and innovative art space, not only a traditional exhibitor and seller, but also a space to experience and live, to build a dialogue and a conversation about contemporary Australian art. Peach Black works to

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deliver a rich art program consisting of workshops and multidisciplinary cultural events.

if they are not experienced in person. Prints can be sold easier digitally.

Art should invite people to talk about it. It should trigger interest from all social classes. His secret is that his gallery also hosts concerts, and he gives art classes for beginners. This encourages more people to broaden their horizons and to interact with all sorts of artistic forms, thereby breaking down barriers. However, offerings also contribute financially so that he can still do what he loves most – art. Currently he concentrates only on selling his art in his own gallery. Although he sells online, he believes that original art pieces can be difficult to sell

Matteo doesn’t like to put a label on his art style, as he tries to explore and change his style over and over again. He doesn’t have a specific method; instead, he feels that his method and technique change every time he starts a new painting, and the approach needs to be related to the subject and the topic. Moreover, he uses techniques in ways that are different to how they worked before or for which they were originally made. He thinks that the word consistency often becomes confused with repetition, and


Matteo Bernasconi at Peach Black - Photography by Vincent Long

Art should invite people to talk about it. It should trigger interest from all social classes. success can sometimes represent the death of an artist. The themes he explores often portray the depths of humans, hidden sides that we don’t often explore, rather than just the mere physical appearance or façade. Matteo recommends taking a time-out from painting every now and then, just to explore other things. Read about something you are interested in, such as literature, philosophy or even physics, history or other areas that you normally don’t experience. Immerse yourself fully within something new. This allows you to see the world differently and to grow as an artist. Because art is more than colour

on a canvas, artworks represent something and should make a statement. A painted portrait can tell so much more about a person than photography. It is not just pigments on canvas, although that is an important part. If your art doesn’t have anything to say, it’s not worth looking at. If you think of the masters such as Picasso, they first studied to paint in a realistic style. Thereafter, they pushed boundaries, developing and changing their style, becoming more abstract and expressive. However, the art market is tough, and if something sells well, it is difficult for some galleries to adapt to an artist’s new style. Matteo advises that art should

not be done only for the sake of gallery representation. Do not think that if you are in a gallery, this is the road to success. Rather do art for the sake of the art and yourself, first. If you are serious about being an artist, do art not only when you feel like it. One day Matteo thought that if he wanted to be a professional artist, he needed to act like one. Therefore he decided to do art every single day for one year. This was when his art improved significantly. Commitment is important. Art has a powerful way to bring you to different places you may have never thought about. Art is your life. Live it.

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Meike Brunkhorst - Photography by Mateusz Łapsa - Malawski

bluebee met with Meike Brunkhorst to talk about art marketing and running your art like a business. Meike has been surrounded by art and artists for nearly all of her life. However, as life wanted it, she decided against pursuing a career as an artist and followed her second passion, mathematics. Even during her previous career as an advertising sales manager for international art and lifestyle magazines, Meike organised gigs and art events for her friends on the side. This way she always sought to be personally involved in the arts. Being surrounded by talented musicians and artists, and increasingly disillusioned with

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the media industry, she decided to return to the art world, but as an art marketing consultant, rather than as an artist herself. Today, Meike runs factor-m, a consultancy providing essential guidance and strategic support for artists seeking to improve efficiency and to achieve set goals. She does some art herself, but only for her own ‘therapeutic’ self. Career-wise, she prefers to be judged by her work as a marketing consultant, which is difficult, because marketing as art itself is very subjective, and

success lies in the eye of the beholder. Meike is passionate about all her clients and really takes the time to understand each artist’s work individually. Supporting her artists is at the core of everything she does, and at first sight it seems that she may not practise what she preaches. She doesn’t have the biggest internet presence or thousands of followers, for instance, instead relying on organic growth and word of mouth. This approach allows her to avoid being swamped by inbound leads,


and she doesn’t need to turn down amazing artists due to her workload. It’s all about quality over quantity.

Just because you have built it, people won’t necessarily come. You need to tell them about it, and this is where the penny tends to drop.

There is no fast track to fame and fortune, and if someone promises something like this to you, don’t believe it. Some steps may seem very easy, but they must also be taken. Most artists could do it all themselves but may decide to spend time in the studio instead. Very often Meike is called at the very last minute, when artists realise that there is more to be done than just putting on a show.

In order to run your art practice as a business and not a hobby, and to do it all yourself means that in the worst case you end up only doing what you love, art, for 20% of your time. This frustrates a lot of people. However, you need to gain a competitive advantage over your fellow artists to succeed in the art world, and marketing will be important to help you do that. The good thing

is that there are people who can help. It may not come for free, but in some cases it comes cheaper than you think. Number one piece of advice: Get a website.

Even a free website is better than nothing, and it’s irresponsible to have no digital footprint nowadays. Make it impossible not to be found. Even if you don’t like Facebook, an art collector who likes your art may. There are many stories of artists getting big on Instagram, but you can’t put all your eggs into one basket.

In order to run your art practice as a business and not a hobby, and to do it all yourself means that in the worst case you end up only doing what you love, the art, for 20% of your time.

It’s more difficult to stand out in a crowded marketplace. For example, Saatchi Art is now overrun by artists, and therefore it may be good to look for a curated alternative, such as one dedicated to photography or abstract artists only. Do your research. In a related example, it’s surprising how often emerging artists reach out to galleries for representation without doing any research into the gallery. Furthermore, most don’t even care to show interest in the current exhibition or know anything about the other artists represented. Don’t think ‘what can the art gallery do for me’ but ‘what can I do for the art gallery?’. Why would they be interested in representing you?

The same applies to journalists. Why should they write about you? What’s in it for them? If you are an unknown artist, don’t expect the art editor of The Guardian to come to your show. Do your research and find out which journalists write about upcoming, undiscovered artists and normally make the journey across town to see new talent. It sounds difficult, and it may even take some years, but running a business isn’t normally a ‘Get Rich Quick’ thing. Nevertheless, it can be done with the right strategy, and it doesn’t have to be expensive. Sometimes there are easy wins. You just need to do it.

It’s still possible to make a living out of art, although society

generally expects artists to be less well off. This is a shame, and it may come from history, when even brilliant artists such as Picasso paid for their wine with art. However, Meike believes that there should be artists from all social classes and that artists should be considered equal members of society. Collectively we need to recognise the value of creative ‘content’, not as a commodity to be exploited, but as an essential contribution in the ‘value chain’. Reading this interview, you may be an artist yourself. Meike recommends that you don’t give up. The world needs artists. If you aren’t successful in an open call, this doesn’t mean that you aren’t good. It just means that another artist may just have fit slightly better in this situation.

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bluebee Artists Feature

We travelled the world to discover new talents, but feel that we still only scratched the surface of the industry. Every artist is as individual as a snowflake, with their style and urge to artistically transport their message to the wider audience. We tried to give a glimpse of their thought processes, but as mentioned before, we always encourage you to explore them further. The following artists are only a small selection of our creative director and editorial board. Some of the included artworks may be controversial, however other brilliant minds may not have made the shortcut for this issue.

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Indigo Calligraphy II - 2018 - Acrylic, oil, metal gold on canvas

Andrea Ehret Slovak artist, lives and works in the Czech Republic Her artwork, strongly inspired by Eastern philosophy, can be viewed as an expression of inner meditation, reflecting the artist’s inner world, embracing her light and her shadow through

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balancing tones and flowing brush strokes; perhaps there is even a feeling of harmony and powerful energy at the same time. Everything is related to everything.


Petrol - 2019 - Oil on canvas board

Claire Witteveen Amsterdam, Netherlands Claire usually draws on experiences that, while universal to all people, feel unique when they happen to us; such an experience feels like a colour only we can see – like déjà-vu or heartbreak. Petrol is part of a series entitled ‘Visceral’, about

the memories we associate with particular smells. The artist likes to keep a sense of mystery in her work, as though the viewer is peeking at a secret.

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Summertime 8 - 2019 - Acrylic on canvas

Ania Luk Warsaw, Poland

Ania reflects on women’s beauty and topics related to narcissism, perfectionism, the self-centeredness of a ‘selfiegeneration’ and the sexual freedom of the twenty-first century. She explores what it means to be feminine and

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whether it still has any value in a society that has become increasingly genderless. Her style, which has an industrial feel, is characterised by the use of geometric abstractions and a soft colour palette. There is a particular harmony in her

artwork’s composition solutions, textures and coloration that beautifully portray the borders between woman’s body, mind and soul, thereby offering a study of human identity in a space.


Yoru - 2019 - Digital painting

Angy Avendaño Venezuelan artist, lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina This painting is part of the ‘Noche’ series, portraits of the faces of women, which reflect the artist’s own feelings of nostalgia and desire. The feelings are a self-reflection of

a life that has been lived so far versus what will come, under the constant pressure of time.

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Joshua Dunlap Philadelphia, United States

Joshua Dunlap’s artistic pseudonym – ‘Chemical Messiah’ – speaks eloquently of his approach and vision as a graphic designer. Absurdism is his key source of inspiration, and Albert Camus, Franz Kafka and Samuel Beckett are his main influencers. Joshua works in the pop-art and surrealism styles, creating collages that represent pieces of our subconscious mind: the weirdest dreams, associations and superstitions. The artist combines vintage images with recognisable visual symbols of the mysterious, supernatural or religious. Like horror movies, his artwork catches the viewer’s attention immediately and paralyses them, provoking an inexplicable feeling of awe.

Empty vessel - 2019 - Collage Art

Keep digging - 2019 - Collage art

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Tomas Clayton Bridgnorth, United kigndom

These classical-style portraits have nothing in common with contemporary trends and topics, which is surprising, given that Tomas worked for many years as a graphic designer for the most up-to-date corporations. These portraits represent a liberation from the imposed norms of kitschy aesthetics and come to the grain. Through historical motifs, Tomas talks about subtle, incommunicable human feelings. Henry’s bicycle - 2019 - Oil on masonite

The images ‘Sobre las olas’ and ‘Henry’s bicycle’ belong to his oil-painting series, which explores the psychological impact of the Great War. Although the artist never depicts combat directly, through facial and posture expressions, he reveals that people’s worst scars are private.

Sobre las olas - 2019 - Oil on masonite

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Rosemary Hurrell British artist, lives and works in Ireland Rosemary works in an abstract style, using machine embroidery to create three-dimensional forms. Her sculptures focus on texture and detail, inviting the viewer to engage and observe at close range. The artist finds emotional inspiration in her family history, memory and countryside landscape, all of which are intrinsically linked. ‘Autumn Leaves’ highlights the skeletal beauty of a season heading towards dormancy, yet to be rejuvenated in spring. This fragile herbarium reminds one of the circularity of life, which consists of moments we already know and predict but which touch us emotionally again and again, like an old photo in a family album.

Autumn leaves - 2019 - Embroidery sculpture

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Rhiannon West British artist, lives and works in Sydney, Australia Rhiannon, a founder of weSTUDIO, creates immersive installations, where natural landscapes and energies, such as sunlight, wind and sound, play the leading role. The piece ‘Wind Reflections’ was made for the annual exhibition ‘Sculpture by the Sea’ on Bondi Beach. It features 128 dichroic glass lenses, positioned to reflect the light from sunrise to sunset. The wind generated by the turbine, located nearby, is used to control the RPM of the sculpture throughout the day, as well as powering a series of LED uplights at dusk. The sculpture signifies the importance of renewable energy and the effortlessness of powering and illuminating artwork.

Wind Reflections - 2017 - Sculpture

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Flamenco - 2019 - Digital Collage

José Duacastella Buenos Aires, Argentina What might this surreal collage with the pink flamingo between huge expressive clouds mean? For José, it is all about representing moments, which are elusive as a dream, which have no explanation or balance

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between the real and unreal worlds. A soft colour palette and a touch of humour are characteristic of José´s collages. They are aesthetically simple, despite containing very elaborated

detail. The sky filled with fantastic clouds is the artist´s frequent motif, through which he tells the story, captures the attention of the viewer and shows that there is mystery and beauty in each instant.


Heritage 5 - 2016 - Mixed media on canvas

Alejandra de la Torre Valencia, Spain Alejandra mainly works using the painting technique, combining it with drawing, screen printing and installations. Through her artwork she explores human relations with everyday-life objects. She doesn’t focus on the objects themselves; rather,

they are the means of telling people’s stories of their various reasons for accumulating things. Is it a case of attachment or fear of emptiness? Does it seem like a sentimental collection of memories or an insane fetishism? Where is the line

between a normal desire to possess and an obsession? By looking at this image from her series ‘Heritage’, what would you answer and why?

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The black circle - 2017 - Oil on canvas

Ioannis Lassithiotakis Athens, Greece The titles given to the paintings arouse the viewer’s imagination but, at the same time, generate a justified aporia regarding the so-called meaning that could be extracted from these austere, almost naked works. As the world is not completely

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describable through language, artistic creations can provide us with one more path to investigate its mystery and our place in it.


IG224+spectral - 2018 - Acrylics, fabric, mixed media on canvas

Daniil Alikov Vancouver, Canada ‘We can’t predict the future, but we can create it’. But isn’t attempting to create the art of the future a naïve way to deal with the unbearable feelings of uncertainty? What is the role or art in the future world, and which world are we talking about? Different cultural values

and views about beauty are an intuitive and immanent concept native to the human mind. In the ‘Spectral’ series, Daniil Alikov attempts to explore and test how the perceiving of something as beautiful may change in the future and how an actual piece of art might look to

the post-human eye or maybe even to a non-human analytic apparatus. How will art look in the future? Will there be any art at all and who will appreciate it? Humans? Machines?

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Tranquil Passion - 2019 - Giclée print

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Deep Ocean - 2019 - Giclée print

Stefan Finsinger Austrian artist, works and lives in London, United Kingdom The pattern of life and the struggles with the compresence of our existence influence the art of Stefan. New insights are crafted from both simple and complex – but always imperfect – layers. It is estimated that we are bombarded by around 4,000–

10,000 adverts every day. These patterns remind one of scribbles in a meditative mindset. We live in a fast-moving, attentionseeking culture. A simple repetitive task may be exactly what we need to recharge. Although the artworks shine with simplicity, the message is

not simple. Art does not need to shout and deal with controversial issues to have meaning. ‘Tranquil Passion’ reflects on the different levels of passion and love in a relationship. ‘Deep Ocean’ deals with the potential beauty of the unknown and the risk of losing it.

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Marco Castelli Firenze - Italy

Marco studies the human environment and life, always looking for different approaches to visual art and creative communication. ‘The Big Nudes’ series reflects on the excessive sharing of human identity in the contemporary age, analysing people and their sex through a dehumanising geometrical impression. The visual choice refers directly to the matter: the close-up society is leading to an obsessive search for one’s own individual being. Starting with a compulsive socialisation, the evolution of the 2.0 generation makes it impossible to distinguish between real beauty and the product of standard hyperconnection.

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The Big Nudes # 3 - 2014 - Photography

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Tomer Peretz Los Angeles, United States

‘Nothing is flat, neither is my canvas’, announces Tomer on his official webpage. Indeed, thick layers and meticulous attention to colour tones mark his portrait paintings, which are deeply psychological. This work represents the actor Alejandro Edda (from the Narcos series), starring in the short film El Bus, about a family man who commits suicide. Impacted by the story, Tomer took pictures of Alejandro on set in Mexico City for a whole week and later created this portrait. Leaving the face ‘incomplete’, the artist expresses his fears about a sudden disappearance from life and not being present for his own children.

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Alejandro - 2019 - Oil on canvas

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Emily Strong Pennsylvania, United States

Emily’s background in psychology and sociology studies have heavily influenced the content and formal qualities of her artwork. She explores how culture, media and surroundings shape our relationships with our physical selves and aims to dismantle the most negative stereotypes about body types, age and gender. In these paintings, the augmented flesh folds have become a unique and selfsufficient landscape. There is no clue as to how many bodies are depicted here, or whether they are male or female. But why should it matter? The body is free to be viewed without any context or judgement. Beauty exists independently of such socially constructed paragons.

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Inward passage - 2018 - Oil on canvas

Resilience - 2019 - Oil on canvas

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Pintura Construida - 2016 - Stainless steel

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Lourdez Ortiz

Veracruz, Mexico

This sculpture explores how light encounters the shapes on the human body. The arrangement of the different elements limits the full appreciation of the artwork to a small geographical window. This may demonstrate that attractiveness is in the eye of the beholder if he meets the strict guidelines set out by the artist.

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Water to air - 2019 - Photography 40

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Julija Goyd Lithuanian artist, lives and works in Berlin, Germany The subjects of Julija’s work are balanced between eroticism and studies of nature. This series investigates the mysteries of water and its contact with the human body. Julija reflects on water as a unique space, which is alien to human life but, at the same time, might be the most harmonious. The artist is mesmerised by the way in which water changes all our perceptions as soon as it embraces us. So, do these images represent the human union with nature, or is it just a moment of introspection, or a captured instant of genuine bliss and pleasure? Dive in and find your own answer!

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Daughters of Medusa - 2019 - Oil and acrylic on linen

A Savage Beauty Disturbed by Restless Dreams - 2019 - Oil and acrylic on linen

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Rebecca Fontaine - Wolf Australian artist, lives and works in London, United Kingdom Rebecca explores female identity, desire and mortality, raising questions about gender and representation. She works in a figurative manner, inspired by mythology and Vanitas painting. In depicting female bodies, the artist reflects on where the line between the feminine divine and the monstrous lies, what is desired and what is taboo for society and for women themselves. She underlines natural aspects of womanhood such as menstruation or giving birth, offering a balance between very personal matters and many stereotypical beliefs. Rebecca’s images are a combination of her own vision and thoughts from her female sitters.

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Glide - 2019 - Oil on wooden panel

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Jason Anderson Dorset - United Kingdom

Jason started his art career as a stained-glass apprentice and participated in many huge cathedral restoration projects. This experience deeply influenced his painting style. In this oil landscape, for example, Jason boldly plays with the colour spectrum and applies it in geometric slabs, thus creating an enigmatic, slightly blurred and pixelated feel. Reflections and the element of water are the most characteristic motifs in his works. Jason draws inspiration from the contrast and drama of W. H. Turner and the jewel-like qualities of Gustav Klimt, reflecting on the aesthetical harmony of nature.

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Young-Sung Kim Seoul, South Korea

These images belong to Kim’s series ‘Nothing. Life. Object’, representing his reflections on modern society, where lives are threatened and many things have disappeared due to the advanced development of material civilisations. Kim chooses the genre of hyperrealism on purpose. By creating images that seem more real than a photo or a brand-new TV, the artist aims to shock the viewers and make them think about the fragility of the natural world. Life objects, appearing as a zoomed-in piece of advertisement or theatrical installation, reveal humans’ negligence of life and the superficiality of values, rooted in commerce.

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Nothing.Life.Object - 2018 - Oil on canvas

Nothing.Life.Object - 2017 - Oil on canvas

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Snow Canyon - 2019 - Photography

Maciek Jasik Polish-American artist, lives and works in New York, United States

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This image is part of Maciek’s landscape project, ‘The World With Us’, shot in Utah, Arizona, and Iceland.

know what we do not see. By focusing on what is visible to the camera, we ignore what is not.

Maciek reflects on the subjectivity of photography, manifesting that we do not

To underline this idea, Maciek avoids showing a straight landscape, instead presenting

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a combination of what is to the left, right, above and straight ahead. His work is influenced by the paintings of Francis Bacon and is deeply motivated by colour and a penchant for subverting reality.


Once I was home - 2015 - Photography

Peter Untermaierhofer Munich, Germany Since 2009, Peter has been photographing abandoned places, mostly in Europe, including Italy, Luxembourg, Belgium and France. In 2017, Peter visited the Ghost Town Pripyat in the Chernobyl

Exclusion Zone for five days. His main principle is to capture the beauty of uninhabited places as they are in real life, without any excessive post-editing or use of colour filters and high contrasts. This helps to allow the viewer to

feel the genuine mood of each spot, which always has a proper reason for decay. Look at this ghost room; wouldn’t you agree that it awakes imagination and curiosity? What do you think has happened here?

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Tarek Sebastian Al Shammaa London, United Kingdom

Tarek, a self-taught artist, was born in London to Iraqi and French parents. The fact that he was raised in a migrant family influenced his mindset and the topics he chooses to touch upon through his art. Tarek reflects on history and migration, Eastern and Western cultures, war, death and sex. It seems as though Tarek’s images have been created just a moment before, during an emotional outburst – such strong energy, impulsiveness and dynamism they emanate! Rebellious colours, sketchy figures and a great deal of movement are the key markers of his style.

Self Portrait in front of a Spot Painting - 2017 - Oil stick and acrylic

Night moves - 2019 - Oil stick and acrylic

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Gazebo - 2019 - Acrylic, oil, soft pastel and oil bar on cotton canvas

Matteo Fieno Langhe, Italy Disillusioned by consumer society and the rush of technological changes, Matteo returns to the values of the past by focusing on the simple beauty of the individual. Postures, variant colours and altered proportions are the means by which he emphasises

the identity of his female personage and provokes the feeling of having lived a similar situation. This woman says to us, ‘Today, on a warm midsummer afternoon, I fell asleep in the shade of the gazebo.

At the “piedi del monte”, the scent of mulberries, the heat that makes me tired, the singing of crickets and cicadas create a dreamlike and at the same time bucolic atmosphere ...’

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Untitled (Crumple 01) - 2019 - Synthetic Polymer Paint on Fine Weave Italian Cotton Canvas

Thomas Thorby-Lister Sydney, Australia An austere, monochrome palette and an industrial-style aesthetic, with clearly depicted details, are characteristic traits of Thomas Thorby-Lister’s style. Thomas examines the boundaries between the material object and de-materialised

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image by merging painting and technology. He reflects on the daily objects of the urban environment and uses form, surface, tone and texture as an expressive means, with an evident root in the conceptual art movement.


Garreth Griffiths Leeds, United Kingdom

The sculpture originates from an examination of 1940s Googie architecture, based in Los Angeles. These buildings were made to draw people closer, by introducing interesting shapes, bold colours and sweeping roofs, appearing top heavy, i.e. falling from the sky.

Culver - 2019 - Powder coated steel

Brentwood - 2019 - Corten steel bluebee •M a g a z i n e •

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Cranium & Acherontia Atropos - 2018 - Pencil on paper

Giulia Borsi La Spezia - Italy The paintings should remind us that we are part of something bigger. Nature is not a collection of individual pieces; rather, everything is interlinked and influenced by everything else. The closer you look, the more similarities you will find.

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Pelvis & Papilio Machaon - 2018 Pencil on paper


What Has Been Left Behind - 2019 - Gouache, watercolour and acrylic on canvas

Tania Mason Sydney, Australia Tania draws her inspiration from neuroscience and nature. Floral motifs are especially characteristic of her art. Through her work she tells a story of formation, creation and connections within nature. Her style is slightly figurative,

minimalist and very detailed. This floral pattern, meticulously painted as if under a microscope, is the artist’s visual parallel to the synapses in our brain. We are all a part of something bigger and can be decomposed into particles.

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Beech - 2019 - Oil on canvas

Spruce - 2019 - Oil on canvas

Nicholas O’Leary New Zealander artist, lives and works in Bergen, Norway Originally from New Zealand, Nicholas has resided in Bergen since 2009. The Norwegian climate, with its constant threat of rain and long, dark winters, has deeply influenced his work. The artist creates dynamic landscape compositions with

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deliberate, sharp lines. His works are filled with harmony and peace. Nicholas expresses his love for the beauty of the wild forests but also reflects on the fragility of such blissful moments in the green; the ecosystem continues to change rapidly,

the sun might not come out tomorrow and you may never find again that idyllic meadow you have painted today.


New Light - 2019 - Acrylic on canvas

Riverbed - 2019 - Acrylic on canvas

William Holt Melbourne, Australia William’s artworks reflect on the human connection with nature and its fragility. The artist aims to preserve his initial inspiration to impart a sense of immediacy in his piece, and the dynamic paint application serves, for him, as an epitome of pure life force and

vitality. William promotes a multisensory creative experience, believing that each piece of work influences the environment around it as well as the viewer’s interaction with it. The artist recycles everything

from paints to previous works in order to achieve his concept and a maximum sculptural energy. The result is a distinctive style of painting that hovers between the abstract plane and the visual tension of the natural world.

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The European Connection - 2019 - Black ink drawing on a road map

Niall Kirby London, United Kingdom

Inspired by Banksy and Warhol, as well as the up-cycling and recycling culture, Niall chooses maps or book pages as the medium to deliver his statements and create intimacy with the viewer. His images are fulfilled

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with homoeroticism and the allure of taboo. Niall explores the parallels between desire, disdain, lust, shame and self-expression. This drawing from “The Europe Connection” series depicts men on the maps of the different

countries. The artist shows that despite our nationality and life style, we are linked to the nature and finish our life destination alike: becoming dust on the roads.


Bubblegum love - 2018 - Acrylic on canvas, mixed media

Kateryna Bortsova Kharkov, Ukraine Bubbelgum Love reflects on the contradictions of people’s authenticity in a world of mass media and advertising. Are your character and prejudices mass fabricated by your view of the biggest influencers or a real depiction of your own opinions and beliefs?

The image of the girl presents a symbol of the ‘sweet life’ imposed by the standards of society that surrounds us. But, in fact, this glossy style is simply empty candy wrappers. Even ‘love’ becomes an empty bubble that you can pierce.

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Norris Yim Hong Kong - China

These illusory and dark portraits are part of Yim’s ‘Nameless’ series, where, through the black-and-white palette, the artist reflects on the present situation in Hong Kong, and the hypocritical essence of human life-style in the capitalist society. In order to survive, people bury their natural appearance, so their names are no longer important. New faces replace the old ones, and soon, even heavy makeup becomes a new type of selfforgetting, filled with falsehood and fear.

Nameless 19 - 2019 - Acrylics on canvas

Yim’s abstract works raise the topics of individuality and selfexpression and are based on three principles: observation, memory and imagination.

Nameless 24 - 2019 - Acrylics on canvas

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Robert Jacka San Bernardino, United States

Robert Jacka works with traditional painting and digital art techniques. His art is influenced by the symbolism and expressionism genres. Through the intense colour contrasts, distorted proportions and dynamism of brush strokes, the artist tells us in a skillful way about the inner mood and strong emotions of this portrayed man. We know for certain that his state is not peaceful; however, is it anxiety? Is it grief or anger? The artist gives no clue in the title, inviting the viewer to take a more active role and make his own psychological analysis and guess. The Portrait - 2019 - Digital Painting

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Linden Eller Flagstaff, United States

Linden’s collages emanate strong expressive energy and can be seen as a visual representation of human stream of consciousness. The artist seeks to explore mind paradoxes and memory, and especially the process of recollection, which often transforms the initially captured fragments of reality. Blending autobiographical narratives with larger collective subjects, such as childhood, longing and home, she represents multiple interpretations and perspectives of the same story.

1234 - 2019 - Collage and mixed media

Linden’s style is minimalist; her images often combine floating abstract shapes with sewn elements in a pale colour palette. The artist names the American abstract expressionists, such as Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly, among her key influencers.

Garden - 2019 - Collage and mixed media

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Untitled - 2019 - Mixed media on canvas

Pava Wülfert Ibague, Colombia Pava works in an abstract manner and receives his inspiration from works by Kandinsky and Joan Miró, as well as the Bauhaus movement. He works with traditional painting techniques such as raw canvas, coal, oil, linseed oil and acrylic, and adores

the process of painting itself. Colour is an important expressive medium in his work. For this painting, for example, he chose acid and sweet tones to underline the fact that we are living in an excessively infantilized society, with childish and immature values.

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Men at work - 2019 - Watercolour

Praween Karmakar Ranchi, India

Praween specialises in watercolour painting, depicting everyday life moments. He looks for the beauty in the simple; local scenery and ordinary people are among the most frequent motifs in his art.

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This image depicts the common people of his country, engaged in extremely difficult work that they must undertake to survive. In spite of telling the story of this hard life, the painting does not

emanate depression or sorrow; rather, it is filled with sunlight and vitality. It reminds us that we should be thankful for each instant in our lives and find reasons to feel hope and joy in the small things around us.


Free Labor - 2018 - Linoleum Print

Alex Fernandez New York, United States

The depicted work explores social-emotional issues currently afflicting the U.S. and how they impact our current society. Capitalism has widened modern day slavery to a whole new generation. The harsh black

and white elements show that the gap between the poor and wealthy is wider than ever.

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Pinned Butterfly - 2015 - Oil on canvas made of recycled clothing

New Religion - 2015 - Oil on canvas made of recycled clothing Paul Valentine Doha, Qatar Paul is a painter, wood carver and printmaker, whose style balances between popsurrealism and psychedelic. He is influenced by Salvador Dali, German expressionists and the aesthetics of Art Nouveau.

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Paul reflects on modern consumerism culture, which obliges people to constantly waste and buy new things. Many of his artworks contain an image of a TV set, a car or a fast food cup. These three objects are epitomes of the misplaced

priorities of a materialistic world in which people are too obsessed with their possessions and status and will never refuse them, despite the discomfort and harm they cause.


The Festival of the winds, a time gone by Bondi Beach - 2019 - Oil, acrylic and Posca on canvas

Tracey Esteves Sydney, Australia This artwork reflects on those left behind in a world full of attractions and attention-seeking elements. While interesting at the moment, even the most

loved and treasured things can fade into the background when the next thing comes along.

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Kiss me quick - 2019 - Digital collage

Marcos Guinoza São Paulo - Brazil Digital collages by Marcos Guinoza are influenced by the surrealism, minimalism and suprematism genres. Through his poetic artwork, the artist explores human feelings and contradictions, such as loneliness, melancholy and

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emotional disturbances. Marcos confesses that his works serve as a source of a study of himself. The artist almost never chooses a subject for his image but follows a stream of consciousness. Indeed, this collage has an ephemeral,

dreamy and spontaneous feel. It might be compared with a question mark (it intrigues and provokes us to explore and doubt), but it is in no way a full stop or a firm and certain resolution.


In her eye - 2019 - Mixed media on paper

Olivier Leogane Montreal, Canada Olivier is a self-taught artist whose works are based on a unique technique of fractal art. Olivier expresses himself through the repetition of geometric patterns and vibrant colours, which create a particular energetic message and sense

of harmony. These fluid forms and vague contours seem to be painted intuitively, in a dreamy or hypnotic state; they mesmerise immediately and plunge the viewer into a world of their own subconsciousness and introspection.

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Corpse - 2019 - Refined cooked sugar, mixed media

Julia Rose Sutherland Calgary, Canada Julia is a multidisciplinary artist who explores the trauma and social issues rooted in genocide, racism, rape culture and spiritual restrictions brought about through the colonisation of North America.

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To reflect on the loss of traditional lifestyles, Julia chooses sugar as a medium for this artwork. First, sugar is a staple resource in the history of the slave trade and is directly linked to the commodification of the human body and the theft of

territory for resources. Second, it is the most addictive substance in the world, allowing capitalism to continue to devour society in a cannibalistic way.


Quantum Reality - 2019 - Multimedia performance

Merav Leibküchler Israeli artist, works and lives in Berlin, Germany Merav is a multidisciplinary artist who explores the unknown. Her works are a playful interpretation of questions from physics and philosophy to worldview and zeitgeist.

What is matter? What is our mind? How does everything fit together and what does ‘nothing’ look like? These are some topics she reflects on through this performance, where she chooses her own body as a key expressive

medium. Through movement, the artist underlines that human bodies are the bridge to reality and our understanding of things. Through our bodies, we look at the world, and the world looks at us.

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Paula Revigliono Buenos Aires, Argentina

Paula is a member of the artistic collective ‘Grupo Boedo’ and specialises in painting. In these two works, her interest is focused on the space containing human figures. For this purpose, she depicts the summer beach, peppered with colourful bodies in various positions reflecting the culture of an era. Between possibility, silence and the unfinished, Paula’s artwork is shown as an exploratory open assessment, which proposes a more active role for the viewer. Expressive colour contrasts and Tetris©-like geometricity of details are distinctive of her style.

Playing in colours - 2017 - Oil on canvas.

Without mirror and without compass - 2017 - Oil on canvas.

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Young Climate Rebel - 2019 - Oil on wood

Rosso Emerald Crimsom Italian, lives and works in London, UK Rosso is a Sicily-born artist, who has lived in London since 2000. Inspired by classicism and painting mainly in oils, she has adopted a version of realism that combines abstract expressionism, mixed media and occasionally collage to create aesthetically engaging content.

She names Paula Rego, Jenny Saville and Lita Cabellutas as her main influencers. This image is a reflection on the recent international youth strikes for climate action. Rosso observes how cultural constructs shape our identity and

perception of freedom, unveiling through metaphors and subtle irony the intimate feelings and taboos related to gender, sexuality, beauty, childhood, motherhood, religion and power structures.

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Randomagus Barcelona - Spain

Randomagus finds inspiration for his collages in very different art sources: from horror movies to graphic designer Juan Gatti, from Dutch painters to Andy Warhol, taking a detour via Pina Bausch and becoming deliberately lost in the area of vintage gay porn along the way. Tropical birds, flowers and men’s figures are frequent elements in his delicate cut’n’paste artworks, which revolve around the concepts of masculinity, beauty and desire. The artist aims to underline the canon of men’s handsomeness as too stereotypical, in need of revamping. His works are filled with spontaneous energy and are much more emotional than analytical.

The dissapearance - 2019 - Collage

The mess we make - 2019 - Collage

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The Intricate Realm of Separation - 2015 - Acrylics on canvas

Olivier Lamboray Belgium Olivier´s surrealistic images are based mainly on the artist´s intimate life moments. The deep-blue colour of the skies has become his recognisable trademark. Olivier reflects on universal subjects, such as our place in the world, the value of

time, and outer space and its wonders and secrets. This painting depicts the situation of a family separation, which causes mixed feelings and many new existential questions. On the one hand, the ordinary

lifestyle and rituals should now be changed, provoking fear and insecurity. On the other hand, it gives a feeling of hope and the possibility of opening new doors.

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bluebee Something else

While visual artworks engage with the beholder in a dialog of substance and interpretation, the written word invites us to a completely different dimension. Visual art can be viewed for as long as the beholder wishes. Stories hold the reader hostage until their final words have been said. The final message has been communicated and the reader has the full picture of what the artist wanted to express. But this also makes it interesting, no two people will experience the world they enter through reading alike.

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Gloria Sanders British - Spanish artist, works and lives in London, United Kingdom Gloria’s practice has incorporated theatre and performance for over twenty years, with poetry often resulting from journeys taken. Crossdisciplinary collaboration plays an important role in continually shifting focus, affecting the internal and external aesthetic of her work. The two poems featured here were written following experiences with visual art and reflect outward and inward processes respectively.

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Modern Economy

If you were to place my cheeks – reflecting red from floodlit room upon a canvas, higher even higher still so that it hung on the too-white wall of the gallery faced by a weeping woman and a wooden wave you might come close to understanding. Poets needs economy – must Mondrianise not envy chalk that chucks forth boldness but tease, optimist, to stretch out rib spindle to clutch at framed eyeballs and weep out a Friday night staring at shapes. My lungs, kidneys, liver are as buoys tethered to a canvas seabed losing function for a blink then swiftly drowned in gravity. Visitor, you scrutinise my flaming cheek having loosened its four-sided self, to escape order through a tear in the paper.

Visitor yours are tears and you should tell the guard economy does not mean repetition. Variation keeps economy repeating within limits – take pride in primes to Mondrianise. Specifics elude nocturnes or études revert to cheap tricks for kicks. Prostrating myself before the grid I sleep like the pilgrim given sanctuary.

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Boulevards (Parts I and II) I. When you resist being on a bus and then another bus, because feet meet road in such a way and rhythm fits with thinking, remember – a Monk in Cannes! A woman twisting her wedding ring in front of a glass of something minty and sparkling (I’m not saying Mojito for sure) but look! how that man, trim in his linen bronzed but beyond his better years attacks those salad leaves like a lover lost to the sea (by sea I mean the new young model strolling by who snapped up taught tan Nepotine. That is her name I think?) That sun-soaked, saturated, so and so sells France high-rise. The great equaliser (all bodies sit the same on hot plastic) passes awnings yawning over great monoliths to the Riviera. Here and there you see the lips plumped skin smoothed but a real Monk! with a tonsure! and a silver grey robe! a real one!

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II. Man on promenade goes to kiss nape of lover but sunhat scuppers lusty moment! Woman lowers specs, seems to purse lips as we catch eyes passing XXX! Sex Shop Show Live XXX! or was she simply adjusting her glasses? It must be autumn here too as a leaf has spiralled to the tiles at a juncture of rues. A villa in the hills. A villa named Nina. Music drifting lands on blue flower an - on the Rue – flower, an over you under you – wear in your hair – flower. You have followed a flag painted on rocks, trusting a stone to lead the way. He moved into the same street as a great artist to be a great artist, and shortly thereafter that street was named for the other gouache grafter. Chagrin is putting it lightly so the sensible thing is to consecrate your own sacred space. Now the holy blue of a view is yours all yours and the pigeons on the balcony are majestic as those on the villa. To revel within rival view with a wry smile must surely be a villain’s winnings.

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Artists contact

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Ryan Steiner

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www.obra68.com

@theotherartfair

@lourdesortiz6808

Matteo Bernasconi

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www.julijagoyd.com

@matteo_berna_art

@julijagoyd

Meike Brunkhorst

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www.rebeccafontaine-wolf.com

@meikebrunkhorst

@rfwolf 44

www.jasonandersonartist.co.uk

Claire Witteveen

@jasonandersonart 46

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Ania Luk

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www.maciekjasik.com

@anialuk.art

@maciekjasik 49

www.untermaierhofer.de

@angyavendanomtrk

@untermaierhofer_photography

Joshua Dunlap

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Tomas Clayton

www.matteofieno.it

Rosemary Hurrell

@female_art_design

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29

30

32

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www.thomasthorbylister.com

www.westudio.com.au

@thomasthorbylister 53

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Garreth Griffiths

José Duacastella

www.garrethgriffithsartist.co.uk

@lookattheparkinglot

@garrethgriffithsart

Alejandra de la Torre

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Giulia Borsi

www.alejandradelatorre.com

www.giuliaborsi.com

@alejandradelatorrework

@cichetonga

Ioannis Lassithiotakis

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www.taniamason.com

@ioannis_lassithiotakis

@taniamasonart

Daniil Alikov

@fdez.art 66

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@paul.j.valentine 67

www.nicholasoleary.com

@d_alikov

@nicholas_oleary_art

Tracey Esteves www.traceyesteves6.wixsite.com/website @traceyestevesart

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Marcos Guinoza www.curioos.com/marcosguinoza @marcosguinoza

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Olivier Leogane www.olivierleogane.com/hogaraishop @creationshogarai

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Julia - Rose Sutherland www.juliarosesutherland.com @julia.rose.sutherland

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Merav Leibküchler www.leibkuechler.com @meravleibkuechler

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Paula Revigliono @paularevigliono

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Rosso Emerald Crimsom www.rossoart.net @rossoartist

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Nicholas O’Leary

www.daniilalikov.com

Paul Valentine www.pauljvalentine.com

Tania Mason

www.lassithiotakis.com

Randomagus www.randomagus.com @randomagus

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Olivier Lamboray

William Holt

www.olamboray.com

www.bluebeegallery.com/stefan-finsinger

www.williamholtar.com

@olamboray

@stefan_finsinger

@abstractlywill

Stefan Finsinger

Marco Castelli

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Niall Kirby @nlmkart

Editorial writer

Kateryna Bortsova

Elena Isaeva

www.tomerperetz.com

www.bortsova6.wix.com/bortsova

boredbutsuddenly.wordpress.com/

@tomerperetzart

@katerynabortsova

@boredbutsuddenly

www.marco-castelli.com 34

Thomas Thorby - Lister

Rhiannon West @westudioau

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Matteo Fieno

Alex Fernandez www.fdezart.com

Tarek Sebastian Al - Shammaa

www.tomasclayton.co.uk @rosemaryhurrell 25

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Praween Karmakar @praween_karmakar

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@tareksebastianartist

@chemicalmessiah 23

@pavawulfert 64

Peter Untermaierhofer

www.bluebeegallery.com/angyavendano

Pava Wülfert www.pavawulfert.co

Maciek Jasik

www.anialuk.com Angy Avendaño

@lindeneller 63

Young - Sung Kim @_y_kim

@cgmwitteveen

Linden Eller www.lindeneller.com

Jason Anderson

@andreacircles

Robert Jacka @jacka.robert

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Rebecca Fontaine - Wolf

www.factor-m.co.uk/ Andrea Ehret

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Julija Goyd

www.matteobernasconi.com

www.claire-witteveen.com 20

Lourdes Ortiz

www.theotherartfair.com

Tomer Peretz

Emily Strong

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Norris Yim

www.emilystrongfineart.com

www.sarchiart.com/norrisyim

@emilystrongfineart

@norrisyimart