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Lakeshore

Shuswap Vol. 29 No. 9 March 2, 2018

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Saying no to bullying

A4 Pie contest

Tasty fundraiser helps out museum. Plus Opinion A6 South Shuswap A9-10

Janice Porter works on a lesson with kindergarten students Alexis Hill, Mackenzie Vegelj, Estelle Milton and Jordan Booker on Pink Shirt Day, Wednesday, Feb. 28. Pink Shirt Day is an internationally observer day focused on condemning bullying. (Jim Elliot/Salmon Arm Observer)

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Chase’s top cop was part of Musical Ride. Plus Heat eliminated from playoffs A30

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Council pursues panhandling bylaw Police say it would help them deal with aggressive behaviour.

Lachlan Labere salmon arm observer

Salmon Arm council has decided to pursue a bylaw that would help address, but not necessarily prohibit, panhandling in the downtown. On Monday, Feb. 26, the city’s mayor and council unanimously approved a request to staff to draft a panhandling bylaw. The decision followed receipt of a detailed report on panhandling bylaws by development services director Kevin Pearson, a presentation by Salmon Arm RCMP Staff Sgt. Scott West and debate between councillors on the necessity of the bylaw, as well as desired outcomes.

Pearson explained the report stemmed from a Jan. 15 request by council to see how other municipalities are dealing with panhandling. His report includes historical approaches to panhandling and reference to current legislation at the federal and provincial levels, as well as panhandling bylaws of neighbouring communities – Kamloops, Kelowna, Enderby, Vernon and Penticton. Federally, the Canadian Criminal Code enables police to deal with solicitation activities where people feel threatened or harassed, while provincially, there’s the Safe Streets Act which, Pearson explained, “pro-

hibits solicitation (panhandling activities) along any public street that’s carried out in an aggressive manner or intimidating or harassing manner.” “It also bans solicitation outright within five metres of any ATM bank machine.” Pearson remains objective in his report, highlighting the merits of a panhandling bylaw, as well as the associated challenges, including enforcement and fines, noting it is, “questionable if tickets would be paid and panhandling would decrease.” But Pearson also acknowledged comments offered by West, who said

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a bylaw would assist police with complaints. Asked by council for his input, West concurred a bylaw would provide one more tool for officers when addressing panhandlers. But he also cautioned council to consider how it supports the city’s social services available to help those who are genuinely down on their luck and resort to panhandling as a “way to get over the hump.” “I would suggest a bylaw officer or a police officer could write a bylaw ticket, but they can also inform the public, or the person that’s partaking in this activity, that what Continued on A3


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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A3

Salmon Arm council favours ‘proactive approach’ Continued from A1

they’re doing right now is illegal, but if they go over here, it’s not,” said West. “And if you have that person who is legitimately trying to support themselves through a rough time, I find they’re more than happy to try and follow the rules to do what they need to do in order to get by. It’s the people that will be aggressive, and they are professional panhandlers, and they know how to pander to people and get the most money out of them, those are the ones that a bylaw such as this one could potentially have some

effect on.” By and large, council favoured the proactive pursuit of a panhandling bylaw. Only Coun. Kevin Flynn expressed reluctance to make a motion, suggesting the report should first be sent to Downtown Salmon Arm, the Salmon Arm Economic Development Society and the city’s Social Impact Advisory Committee for input. Regarding concerns a panhandling bylaw could have an impact on other activities such as busking or public expression, Coun. Alan Harrison, who put forward the motion, said he has no intention of

the bylaw doing that. He reiterated it would be a tool that could be used by police if and when there’s need. “In fact, in many cases there are those who we would classify as panhandlers who are not causing any problem at all,” said Harrison. “That’s not why we pass a law. We pass laws for the few people who are causing a problem. And we’ve had a few people who have caused problems in downtown. And I think that unless we’re proactive… then we’re going to be reactive, and it’s very difficult to be reactive. I think we want to be ahead of the curve on this.”

Salmon Arm City Council is going to move forward with a bylaw to regulate panhandling. (File photo)

Okanagan-Shuswap MP gives Liberal budget failing grade Roger Knox Black Press

Mel Arnold gives Tuesday’s federal budget a fail. The Okanagan-Shuswap Conservative MP said finance minister Bill Morneau’s $18.1 billion deficit budget is another sign the Liberals’ spending is out of control, and the budget did not address some key constituency concerns. “They could have worked toward balancing the budget but

now we’re saddled with another $18 billion debt,” said Arnold, who accused the Liberals of ignoring the middle-class working Canadians that are “struggling to balance their own budgets at home.” “What we’ve seen so far is raising taxes on 90 per cent of middle-class families, the ones they claim they’re working for. Increasing taxes on businesses, the businesses that create jobs and it’s the working class

that needs those jobs.” Arnold did identify possible opportunities for the North Okanagan-Shuswap in some budget proposals. “Over the past couple of months, I have worked with elected leaders from across the riding to identify needs and priorities of the people we represent and I submitted these to the Minister of Finance,” he said. “Budget proposals for housing, dealing with the growing opioid cri-

Mel Arnold OKANAGANSHUSWAP MP

sis and improving water supply on reserves align with needs identified in these consultations and I will be tracking these

initiatives and others to help connect federal funds with projects in local communities.” However, other funding needs and priorities identified by communities and submitted by Arnold such as municipal water infrastructure, Trans-Canada highway improvements, aquatic invasive species prevention in B.C. and an elimination of the new escalator tax on spirits, beer and wine were not provided for in the budget.

Morneau said his budget is one that puts people first; that invests in Canadians and the things that matter most to them. The budget includes a $3 billion adjustment for risk, saying that spending money is a good thing for the long-term future of Canadians. There is, however, no timeline to get the budget balanced or back into the black. “Businesses or families cannot continue to

go on this type of deficit spending as they plan to for the next decade, actually, with no plan on returning to a balanced budget,” said Arnold. “You wouldn’t be able to do that in your home, I wouldn’t be able to do that in my home or my business. It’s not fair for government to expect to get a pass on that.” Arnold said he hopes voters will remember the Liberals’ propensity for spending when it comes around to the next election.


Page A4 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Falkland feels impact of Greyhound service cuts By Barry Gerding Black Press

Regional transit expansion will have to be relied on to off-set the further loss of Greyhound bus service to the region. Rene Talbot, electoral area D director for the Columbia Shuswap Regional District, says planned service cutbacks will impact Falkland residents without transportation of their own needing to get to

Kamloops or Vernon. “It just seems to be a bit of cash grab for Greyhound in they only want the high revenue stops,” Talbot said. He said the reduction in Greyhound service has been gradual, starting with the stoppage of package delivery and this is now the last straw. “There was one person talking about starting a regional bus service between Falk-

land and Westwold a few years back but that ran into issues with the Armstrong tax service license territorial rights to Falkland, even though we never see them here anyways,” Talbot said. “That idea might start to gain some traction again. Greyhound was an important service fixture for all these small communities across the Interior and now that seems to be disappearing.”

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Lake Country Mayor James Baker says Greyhound offered some means of convenience for local residents to travel up and down the valley or to other regions of the province, a service however that began eroding more than five years ago with the cancellation of the Winfield stop. Baker compared the waning popularity of buses to rail travel as it was abandoned in

changing times. “Greyhound seems to be abandoning most of its inter-municipal stops along the main Highway 97. We had already seen the Winfield stop cut out and the same thing happened with Peachland,” Baker said. Earlier this week Greyhound acted on approval from the B.C. Passenger Transportation Board to reduce service on two trips per week in each direction

CSRD director Rene Talbot is concerned about the impact of Greyhound bus cuts to the Falkland area. out of Kelowna. The routes include between Kelowna and Penticton, Kamloops, Vancouver and the Alberta border. On the route between Kelowna and Kamloops, Greyhound will also cut what is called “point-of-service” stops in Oyama, Falkland, Westwold and Monte Lake. Long-time Oyama resident and orchardist Allan Gatzke said the Greyhound stop in Oyama was reliant on pre-arranged booking for pickup. “I’m not sure how eliminating the Oyama stop will save them any money or alter the schedule as it would bypass us anyway unless booked for a stop in advance,” Gatzke said. For Oyama, Gatzke said the loss of Greyhound is a further impact on the rural com-

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munity that already is under-serviced for transit, such as having no bus service on the east side of Wood Lake. “The biggest impact will probably be on the seasonal orchard workers who relied on the Greyhound service to travel outside of Lake Country,” Gatzke said. “But for anyone in Oyama who had to rely on the Greyhound service, they are kind of screwed now.” Baker also acknowledged the impact felt by seasonal workers “to get up and down the valley.” “There is some convenience that is lost there,” he said, reiterating that regional transit will have to address the needs of local residents to access Kelowna and Vernon to hook up with other Greyhound routes.

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Missing plane might be in North Okanagan

The family of a man whose plane went missing in November, believes they may have a clue that could lead to his discovery near Enderby. Ashley Bourgeault and her boyfriend, pilot Dominic Neron, 28, left from Penticton on Nov. 25, 2017 at 2:30 p.m., en route to Edmonton in a single-engine Mooney airplane. When their plane failed to arrive, it was speculated that the aircraft went down. The last evidence of their location came late that evening when a tower picked up a ping from Neron’s cell phone, approximately 20 kilometres north-

east of Revelstoke. A recent development now has the family wondering if the plane could be in the North Okanagan, near Mabel Lake. On Monday afternoon, Neron’s sister, Tammy said a witness contacted her and reported seeing a burgundy plane around 4:45 on Nov. 25. In a post on her Facebook page, Missing Plane: Find Dominic and Ashley, Neron said the witness reported the plane’s landing gear was fully extended, and it was travelling north to north west. “Dominic had mentioned, should weather be bad that day he would land in Golden, or Revelstoke, or if it was really bad he

would head back to Salmon Arm,” said Tammy. “Landing in Salmon Arm would fit this timeline of being spotted near Mabel Lake.” At this point, Tammy said the family has accepted that Dominic and Ashley may have “passed on.” Her hope is that his plane will be located and friends and families “can get closure.” She intends to continue search efforts as soon as the snow has melted and is encouraging anyone with any information on the incident, or who might have seen something, to contact her through Facebook on Missing Plane: Find Dominic and Ashley or by phone at 780-405-7649.

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Pastors Major Carolyn Doonan Martin Ketteringham SUNDAY SERVICE 10:30 a.m. 191 - 2nd Ave. NE ~ 832-9196 Everyone Welcome!

Emmanuel Free Lutheran Church Salmon Arm Elks Community Hall 3690 30th Street N.E.

Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m. 250 832-6859

www.aflccanada.org

Joyfully centered on the word of God and led by the Spirit.

Salmon Arm Mennonite Church 4590-10 Ave. SW Sunday Worship ............ 10:00 am Sunday School ................10-11 am Message ...................... 11-11:45 am Every 4th Sunday evening Hymn Singing 5:30-6:30 pm Every other Thursday Prayer Service & Bible Study 7:30-8:30 pm

Pastor James Baer 250 832-3615

Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church (LCC)

10:30 am Sunday Worship SASCU Rec Center, Rm. 101 (west side) Phone for Information

Flagger hit by beer can Jim Elliot Salmon Arm Observer

The Sicamous RCMP are hoping for information from the public that will identify a driver who allegedly threw a full beer can at a flag person working on the Trans-Canada Highway on Monday. Shortly after 9 a.m. on Feb. 26 a male employee of a flagging crew was struck in the head with a can of beer as he was setting up a caution sign west of Sicamous. The can struck him with enough force to knock

his hard hat and glasses off his head. RCMP say the hard hat prevented any significant injury. The vehicle is described as a small black car with no front license plate. The victim couldn’t identify the make and model of the vehicle. The information was relayed to the Salmon Arm RCMP hoping they could intercept the vehicle as it travelled west on the highway. A release from the RCMP said a time delay in the report being

made to police resulted in the vehicle not being located. “This incident illustrates the danger that highway flaggers face in their duties. The flagger could have easily been seriously injured by the dangerous and senseless actions of the person responsible for this assault,” the release reads. Anyone with information regarding this incident are asked to contact the Sicamous RCMP at 250-836-2878 or via Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

p wa Salmon Arm and the Shus

Worship

Ashley Bourgeault and Dominic Neron were reported missing after the plane they were flying from Penticton failed to arrive in Edmonton at the end of November. (Submitted photo)

Erin Christie Black Press

he churches of e to t d i u g

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A5

250 675-3841 or 250 832-5908

Little Mountain Bible Chapel

3481 - 10th Ave. S.E. 250 803-0161 ~ Salmon Arm www.littlemountainbiblechapel.com

• Sunday ~ Worship & Remembrance - 9:30 a.m. • Family Bible Hour/Sunday School - 11 a.m. • Thursday ~ Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m.

Co-sponsor of Morning Star Bible Camp, Westbank, B.C.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Join us each Saturday ~ All ages

9:15 am - Sabbath School 10:45 am - Worship Service Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study - 7:00 pm 3270 60th Avenue NE • 250 832-8936

Web: www.facebook.com/salmonsda Study Online: www.bibleinfo.com

New Life Outreach

Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mel Janzen 250 675-3839 or 250 803-5247 4409 Trans Can. Hwy., Tappen www.newlifeoutreach.ca

Cornerstone Christian Reformed Church Pastor Clarence Witten

10:30 a.m. Worship

Nursery Care & Children’s Programs 1191 - 22nd Street NE

250 832-8452

First United Church

450 OKANAGAN AVE. 250 832-3860 www.firstunitedsalmonarm.ca

Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. Rev. Jenny Carter Joanne Koster, Children & Youth ALL ARE WELCOME!

Living Waters Church WORSHIP SERVICE Sundays 10:30 a.m. Everyone Welcome! TUESDAY NIGHT PRAYER 7-8 p.m. every week #180 Lakeshore Dr. NW Right behind Boston Pizza www.livingwaterschurch.ca

250 832-3433

St. Mary’s Anglican/ United Church 1188 Trans Canada Hwy., Sorrento Ph. 250-675-2294 www.stmarysorrento.ca Tuesday Eucharist 10 a.m.

saintmary@shaw.ca The Rev. Marcus Germaine SUNDAY WORSHIP - 10 am

Church of Christ We meet at 490 - 5th Avenue SW

11:00 am Worship & Communion 10:00 am Classes for all Ages www.sa4Christ.com 250 833-0927

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9 a.m. (St. Andrew’s Presbyterian) 1981 - 9th Ave. NE SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 a.m. Ministry Center 4480 - 30th St. NE 250.833.5636

River of Life Community Church

Pastor Reuben Pauls - 250 675-3636 Sunday Worship - 10 a.m. Nursery and Childrens Program (up to age 12) 2405 Centennial Drive, Shuswap Lake Estates Lodge, downstairs www.riveroflife.ca

THE SHUSWAP’S MULTI-SITE CHURCH

SALMON ARM

Saturday Night Service at 6:00 pm Sundays at 9:00 am & 10:45 am 3151 - 6th Ave. NE

Crossroads Free Methodist Church

Children’s Ministry & Childcare for all ages, all services

Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m. Rev. L. J. Dixon

SICAMOUS

Sundays at 10:30 am Parkview School, 605 Parksville St. Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs Weekly Ministries for all ages

SORRENTO

Sundays at 10:30 am Sorrento Memorial Hall, TCH Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs Visit us at: aplacetobelong.ca Contact: 250 832-4004, email scc@aplacetobelong.ca www.aplacetobelong.ca

CATHOLIC CHURCHES Shuswap Lake Area Mass Time:

SALMON ARM: St. Joseph’s 60 First Street SE Sat., 5 pm & Sun., 9 am www.stjosephssalmonarm.com SICAMOUS: Our Lady of Fatima Saturday at 2:30 pm BLIND BAY: Our Lady of the Lake 2385 Golf Course Drive Blind Bay Sunday, 11:15 am

250 832-8068 121 Shuswap Street SW

St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church 10:00 a.m. Services Sundays & Thursdays 170 Shuswap Street SE, Salmon Arm

Tel: 250 832-2828

www.st.johnsalmonarm.tripod.com

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian T.C.Hwy. across from RCMP

Rev. Shirley Cochrane Worship service 11:00 am Email: www.standrews-salmonarm.com 250 832-7282

Broadview Evangelical Free Church Worship Service at 9:45 Nursery Care for ages 2 & under Sunday School for ages 3 - Gr. 5 350 - 30th Street NE 250 832-6366 www.broadviewchurch.ca

If your church would like to advertise their services and location, or special events happening at your church, please call The Salmon Arm Observer, 250-832-2131 (Ext. 9207) for advertising here.


Opinion

Page A6 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Be wary of budget

The immediate reaction to Tuesday’s provincial budget release by the NDP government ran the gamut from applause to expressions not printable in this newspaper. That’s likely to turn out to be the long-term reaction, as well. When a government rolls out an announcement of increased or improved public services (yay!) it typically comes with a corresponding jump in taxes (boo!). It’s the classic case of robbing Peter to pay Paul. Therefore, your reaction to the budget release probably depended on your name. Paul likely enjoyed a pretty good day, but rest assured, Peter was not happy. Within the first hour following the budget announcement, groups representing and advocating for unions, the environment, contractors, child care, housing, health care and mental health, the energy sector and education all quickly fired off their first impressions through news and social media releases. Many of them split their vote, saying the government did something beneficial over here, but needs to do more — or anything — over there. The Canadian Taxpayers Federation criticized the shift of health-care funding onto employers through an increased payroll tax, which follows the government’s commitment to eliminating individual MSP premiums. This could have a chilling effect on businesses, large or small, that are riding on the margins of profitability. The B.C. Chamber of Commerce said the payroll tax will stick businesses with a $1.92 billion MSP tab by 2020. In a worst-case scenario, that could depress new hiring and potentially hinder efforts to attract investment. On the other hand, the Canadian Mental Health Association cheered what it called long-overdue investments in affordable housing, child care and Indigenous rights and reconciliation. The government’s efforts to rein in an outof-control real estate market will hammer non-resident speculators like Peter with a four-fold hike in the tax penalty. But wait, what’s this? Some days, it can feel like we’re all Peter. -Parksville Qualicum Beach News

President: 171 Shuswap Street NW Dave Hamilton Box 550 Director of Sales: Salmon Arm, British Columbia Karen material Hill V1E 4N7 vertising and editorial appearing in the to reproduce inEditor: any form must be obtained in Phone: 250-832-2131 subscription $44.50; Seniors $39 including GST. Tracy Hughes Fax: 250-832-5140

This Shuswap Market News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, the input from both the newsof the British Columbia Council,holder. a self-regulatory paper andPress the complaint If talking with the editor or publisher does not industry. The council complaints from theorpublic resolveconsiders your complaint about coverage story treatment, you may contact the B.C.the Press Council.Your written concern, documentation, should be sent s. Directors oversee mediation of complaints, withwith input within 45 days, to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. int holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

r story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. If you did not receive the Shuswap Market News, call circulation for re-delivery: on, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, 250 832-2131. tion, phone 888-687-2213 or go to 2010 2010 WINNER

Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N7

Rick Proznick

Tracy Hughes

PUBLISHER

EDITOR

reading the water, taking in the sights the great outdoors James Murray Time spent fishing on fishing the lakes and streams any of British Columbia’s of B.C.’s Interior, I have Interior lakes involves a lot often found myself being of time just sitting there – drawn back to certain wawaiting. ters. In part because of past Not that there isn’t any- successes, and also because I thing wrong with being out have come to understand the there in your boat, taking seasonal changes that take in all the sights and sounds place above and below the and smells that surround surface of these lakes. you. After all, the time spent Although it has taken between casts does provide many years, I now have a fair an angler with the unique understanding of the strucopportunity to observe ev- ture of these lakes – where erything that is going on the drop offs are and where around them. there are underwater islands, I know I have spent a fair where there are shoals and amount of time figuring out where there are weed beds how to read the waters of and, equally important, each lake that I have fished. what sub-aquatic insects It continues to be a work in inhabit the weed beds. progress. I have also come to learn Learning how to read the when certain insect hatches waters of any lake requires are likely to come off as well having an understanding of as where on the lake they are lake structure and the ability likely to happen. Through to identify fish-holding wa- observation I have come ters. It is achieved, in most to learn and retain a fair part, by making observaCopyright subsists in all display advertising and material appearing in the amount ofeditorial understanding Salmon Arm Observer. Permission to reproduce in any form must be obtained in writing from the publisher.and Annual knowledge subscription $44.50; Seniors $39 including GST. tions and remembering or, about these better yet, recording your lakes, and that has proven observations in some sort of a member of the British when other, The Salmon Arm Observer is useful Columbiafishing Press Council, a self-regulatory governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public journal so that youbody can refer familiar lakes. about the conduct of member less newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not themCatherine on subsequent trips. Ultimately, being able to complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Jenniferto Bertram Dillon resolve your Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, CIRCULATION CREATIVE SERVICES B.C.of V9G 1A9. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to Over the past 50Ladysmith, years read the waters of a lake, www.bcpresscouncil.org 2007 MANAGER MANAGER

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any lake, is knowing how to add together all of your knowledge and observations so that you can make a calculated guess as to where the fish might be and what they are most likely to be feeding on at any given part of the day and/or season. Although fish are relatively opportunistic feeders, they can also be quite selective. Fish are also, by their very nature, relatively wary creatures. Here in are two important clues as to where they might be feeding. While fish are constantly seeking food, they also continuously seeking protection from anything which might be inclined to feed on them. Fish tend to cruise through areas where there are both the prospect of a meal and a certain amount of safety from predation. Fallen trees, weed beds, sunken islands and marl provide protective cover for sub-aquatic insects and forage fish. They also provide both cover and food sources for larger fish looking for something to eat. Look for areas where there is natural protective cover for both insects and fish, and you will find fish hanging around that feel safe enough to go after anything which ventures out from within. Fish will also often cruise the shallows along the shore-

line after sunset under the cover of failing light. Creek mouths, where the surface of the water is broken by moving water entering the lake, are always a favourite spot for opportunistic fish to hold while waiting for food. Just as there are really ardent anglers, such as purist fly fishers who know the taxonomic names of all the different insect species and can effectively match pretty well any hatch, there are also anglers who are equally adept at casting and/or trolling lures and spoons that represent bait fish. I am not a purist. I have probably caught as many fish on lures and spoons as I have on the fly. All I know for sure is that any way you look at it, being able to read the waters quite simply translates into catching more fish. When it comes to fishing and spending time on the water, again, I am not a purist. I enjoy catching trout on the fly every bit as much as hooking into a carp on a spinning rig. I guess, when it comes right down to it, I’d have to say that I enjoy fishing, quite simply, for the pure and simple pleasure of being out there on the water taking in all the sights and sounds and smells that surround me.


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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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shuswAp pAssion Jim Cooperman Given the winter we are experiencing, it seems odd to be concerned about climate change. Yet, despite the high snow pack and cold temperatures, this winter is still far warmer than the average Shuswap winters of the past. Meanwhile, arctic temperatures have been averaging 15 to 20 degrees above normal, which confirms the science of climate change that explains how extremes will appear more frequently closer to the poles. When I last wrote about the need for local governments to invest in climate change adaptation measures in 2012, the Shuswap had just experienced its most serious flooding since 1972 and was reeling from two serious landslides at Mara Lake. Other than beefing up the emergency response team, little has been done since then. Now the province’s

Auditor General (AG) has joined the chorus for action by releasing a new report, Managing Climate Change Risks: An Independent Audit. The findings are blunt, both the provincial government and local governments have not done nearly enough to address the growing impacts from climate change. The provincial government has not completed a comprehensive risk assessment or prioritized risks. There is no clear plan to move adaptation forward and there is a lack of mandate and resources. As well, there are gaps in available climate data, there is an inability to manage increasing flood risks and wildfire prevention activities are inadequate. The greatest risk to the Shuswap is from wildfire and last year it was only luck that allowed us to dodge the bullet, as the normal pattern of intense

Homeowners also need to take responsibility for reducing fuel loads on their properties. The first step for rural property owners is to obtain a copy of the FireSmart Manual that is available on the Internet and follow the directions to reduce risks by removing forest fuels close to buildings. Given that last year’s disastrous Elephant Hill fire began in dry grasslands, it is also important to cut down tall, dead grass as well as nearby bushy conifers. The second greatest threat to Shuswap residents as the planet heats up is from flooding, as there is an increasing risk for higher snowpacks and more intense spring rainstorms. The AG’s report explains how climate change modeling shows that floods that once occurred every 200 to 500 years could happen every 50 years. Risks are difficult to assess because of the lack of floodplain mapping and many local governments do not have the capacity or funding to do the mapping needed. Yet

Vernon

more than mapping is needed, as too often areas most at risk have been developed. The third greatest threat is from landslides and last year the Shuswap experienced an unprecedented amount of damage including one death. Intense rain events are becoming more frequent everywhere and when heavy rain falls on snow covered cutblocks the results can be devastating. An analysis is needed to provide direction to those residents who live near streams that are most at risk for debris flows. With climate change intensifying, we can expect the unexpected. Forests not lost to wildfires could be hit by unexpected diseases or pests. Freak weather events like sudden damaging windstorms could become more frequent. The AG’s report focuses on what governments should be doing to be better prepared for our uncertain future, but every homeowner and particularly rural residents also need to be prepared.

Cows deserve a chance to graze ers the animals’ welfare, as the industry has had some bad publicity lately concerning the treatment of cows. I think it is long overdue that the dairy industry have a look at itself and stop trying to convince the rest of us that all is well. Over the years I have worked with cows on ranches

and on my own farm, and also worked on one of the local dairy farms for several years. From these experiences, this is what I have come away with: generally the cows are treated very well. They are well fed, treated for any illnesses, and calved out carefully. There is only one very big thing

lacking. Cows like to be outside and graze, then sit down and rest in the shade, chew their cud and enjoy their environment. Allowing them this would be a small return for all the milk they give us. For a cow it should be a right. In the 1950’s when I was growing up all dairy cows grazed out-

side. Now it is deemed financially unfeasible. If that is truly the case, perhaps we the consumers need to pay a bit more for a more humane way of treating our cows, as is already the way in the organic sector. Doug Saba, Grindrod

what’s the Liberal leader afraid of? One might well ask why Andrew Wilkinson, the new leader of the B.C. Liberals, is so afraid of proportional representation.

Is it because it is bad for British Columbians as he declares, or is it really because it is bad for the Liberal party?

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Mailbag Having read the article (Feb.15) about the Okanagan Dairymen’s Association’s plan to give local politicians a tour and talk this spring on one of the area’s dairy farms, I have an opinion I’d like to share. One of the reasons for the tour is to reassure the politicians that the dairy industry consid-

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A7

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Adapt or face consequences lightening storms did not emerge in August. Ideally, both the regional district and local municipalities should take advantage of provincial funding to undertake forest fuel reduction efforts to reduce the threat of fires. Unfortunately, the previous provincial program only provided a portion of the funds needed and this drawback is just one of the reasons that little has been done locally to date. The Auditor General’s report explains how the Strategic Wildfire Prevention Program only resulted in just over 11,000 hectares to be treated, which is only one percent of the total number of hectares considered to be highrisk. This program is currently on hold as the province waits for the completion of the report by George Abbott on last year’s record-breaking wildfire season. Hopefully, more funding will soon become available and Shuswap local governments will take action to reduce fuel and help minimize the risks.

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Page A8 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A25

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CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPES

CLUES ACROSS 1. Chop or cut 4. Green veggie 7. Bar bill 10. Doctors’ group 11. One who buys and sells securities (slang) 12. Be in debt 13. Lively ballroom dance 15. Singer Charles 16. Polish city 19. Former 21. Dismissing from employment 23. Minerals 24. Plotted 25. Consult 26. After a prayer 27. Agents of one’s downfall 30. Leaseholders 34. Supervises flying 35. Voodoo god 36. Alfalfa 41. Apply another coat to 45. Witnesses 46. Jai __, sport 47. Ones who proof 50. Recant 54. Small group with shared interests 55. Part of warming headgear 56. Woolen cloth 57. Snag 59. Central American fruit tree 60. Woman (French) 61. The 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet 62. Type of bed 63. Soviet Socialist Republic 64. Consume 65. Japanese freight company (abbr.)

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

Capricorn

Capricorn, you have enough sense to balance your imagination with reality. Take your clever ideas and figure out a practical way to make them work.

Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Aquarius, although the destination is in view, you have not yet developed a plan to get there. Be sure you include integrity in your decisions and skip shortcuts.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Pisces

ARIES

Apr. 21-May 21

TAURUS

Taurus

1. Czech monetary unit 2. Able to arouse intense feeling 3. Elk 4. Muscular weaknesses 5. Geological time 6. Depths of the ocean 7. Burns to the ground 8. Becomes cognizant of 9. Cause to shade 13. US political party 14. Refers to some of a thing 17. Single 18. Type of beer 20. Ancient Iranian people 22. Grocery chain 27. Gridiron league 28. English river 29. __ and cheese 31. Peyton’s younger brother 32. Long time 33. High schoolers’ test 37. Respects 38. Organize anew

39. Filippo __, Saint 40. Intrinsic nature of something 41. Cheese dish 42. Ancient Greek City 43. Patron saint of Ireland 44. Produced by moving aircraft or vehicle 47. Shock treatment 48. __ Jones 49. Things 51. Having wings 52. Panthers’ QB Newton 53. Third-party access 58. Satisfaction

May 22-June 21

GEMINI

Gemini

Gemini, everyday things seem magical to you this week. This may be because you’re looking at the world through the haze of happiness spurred on by new love.

June 22- July 22

CANCER

Cancer

LEO

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

VIRGO

Virgo

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

Libra

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

Scorpio

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

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Aries, you are inspired and ready to take on the world. Make the time to thank the people who spurred your motivation, then get moving toward your goals. Taurus, your positive outlook can help not only you, but also others. Where some people only see problems, you see all the possibilities lying ahead of you.

Transparency is your middle name this week, Leo. Others know just what is going on in your life and in your head. This may encourage others to be more open. Virgo, since you don’t want to be misunderstood in any way, you need to be very careful in how you express your thoughts this week. Clarify details, if necessary.

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Pisces, conformity is certainly not your thing. But at some point this week, you’ll need to go with the flow. Find a way to make it your own.

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

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Chances for success in all areas of your life are magnified by your innovative spirit, Libra. Keep the good ideas flowing and bring others into your future plans.

SCORPIO

Confidence is on the rise, Scorpio, and that may lead you to take a few risks. There may be great gains to be had, or not much change. However, it can be worthwhile to try.

SAGITTARIUS

Intentions aimed at distant goals may keep you busy in the long run, Sagittarius, but this week direct your focus to items that will provide the most immediate results.

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South Shuswap

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Plenty on the go DIRECTOR’S NOTES Paul Demenok This month’s article addresses a number of projects happening in Area C, and provides a general update as follows: • Sorrento/Blind Bay Sewers – The Columbia Shuswap Regional District board unanimously approved the application to the Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) to exclude the Balmoral corner lands from the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR). This is the first and necessary step towards the development of a sewer system to service Blind Bay and Sorrento. After years of study it was determined this is the best location for the liquid waste treatment facility, which uses spray irrigation as the planned effluent disposal method. It should be noted the ALC is charged with the preservation of farm land and that most applications for exclusion are denied. It’s hoped the significant agricultural, economic, environmental and social benefits outlined in the submission will be able to convince the ALC to exclude this property. The time frame for the ALC response is undetermined. We’re keeping our fingers crossed. • Workshop Series for Businesses and Non-Profits-Based on favourable feedback from previous workshop sessions, and on inputs obtained during the Shuswap Labour Market and Economic Development Plan projects, I’m pleased to announce the South Shuswap Chamber of Commerce, Shuswap Community Futures and the CSRD have collaborated to develop and offer a series of educational workshops. The workshops will be offered in two streams, one for busi-

nesses and the other for non-profit groups, and will run once a month from March to June, and then from September to November. Each session will be professionally lead for approximately two hours on a Saturday morning, and the cost to participate will be significantly discounted because of CSRD supportive funding. Content of the sessions will be driven by the results of surveys conducted with businesses and non-profits, so the goal is to address the issues of greatest interest. Our thanks are extended to those who provided their inputs. To obtain more information, please check the South Shuswap Chamber of Commerce website at www.southshuswapchamber.com. • John Evdokimoff Park update – A new playground and sport court will be installed in John Evdokimoff Park this spring. The CSRD Parks department worked with local families and kids in the White Lake area to select the equipment and to plan the site. Our sincere thanks are extended to the volunteers for their insights and capable assistance. • South Shuswap Destination Trail Residents of the South Shuswap have known for many years there is some terrific hiking to be had in the area between the Balmoral trailhead, Eagle Bay, Cinnemousun Narrows, Sunnybrae and White Lake. This summer, the Shuswap Trail Alliance (STA) will be conducting a mapping and ground exercise to look at the opportunity to develop this area as a major destination trail. By definition, a destination trail represents a significant tourist attraction and provides the oppor-

tunity for overnight and/or full day hiking adventures. We look forward to the final report from STA on this exciting opportunity. • CP Rail Trail – The first rail trail workshop was held recently at which the groundwork was laid for development of the Sicamous to Armstrong rail trail. The CP Rail property was acquired by a partnership involving the CSRD, Regional District of North Okanagan and the Splatsin First Nation band. While the acquisition of this property was funded by a provincial grant, several economic development funds and taxation, the development and maintenance of the trail will be funded through non-taxation means. It should be noted that we are at early days on this project, and that it may take many years to fully develop this property for widespread recreational use. In short, there is a lot happening in our region and it’s exciting to see the progress being made. -Paul Demenok is the Area C Director for the Columbia Shuswap Regional District.

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A9

Carrier of the

PUBLIC NOTICE’re

You tYear TNRD 2018-2022 Five ar! Financial S a Plan Public Consultation

Month

Jacob Spencer

What is the Five Year Financial Plan about?

The Thompson-Nicola Regional District currently provides more than 120 government services to taxpayers including fire protection, 911, lan The Shuwap Marketplanning, News, would like management, to Mail solid waste water and sewer, regulatory service Sponsored by: #300-465 Victoria St invasive thank Jacob Spencer for all hisplant hardmanagement work and as well as access for residents to librarie Kamloops, BCover the past recreation facilities. dedication few months delivering V2C 2A9

our newspaper. KeepRegional up the Districts amazing work must have a 5 year financial plan adopted by bylaw ann

www.panago.com by March 31 . The Board will consider and adopt its 5 year financial plan Jacob Spencer.

Phone (250) 377-8673 1-877-377-8673

When?

Thursday Feb. 26, 2015 Email 10:00 a.m. finance@tnrd.ca For info & submissions



Website www.tnrd.ca Mail

st

March 29 regular meeting. th

Who should attend the Public Consultation Session?

Thompson-Nicola Regional District PUBLIC NOTICE The Regional District encourages all community members to attend and d theAudited budget with the Director of Finance. 2017 Financial Statements NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

If you cannot attend the session, please feel free to view the information o

The Regional District Board will be receiving the Thompson-Nicola andDistrict’s fill out an online input form. Statements at an upcoming Regional 2017 Audited Financial The Board of Directors of the Thompson-Nicola Regional District gives notice regular Board meeting. that it will hold ais Public in the TNRD Boardroom, 4th Floor - 465 Victoria When the Hearing Session? Street, BC, to consider proposed Bylaw No. 2497. When Kamloops, is the Meeting?

When: Thursday, March 8th 2018

WhatWhen: is Temporary Use Permit 6 Bylaw No. 2497, 2015? Thursday, March 29, 2018 Time: 10:00 AM - Noon Bylaw No. 2497 will allow seasonal assembly use, for up to 5 events annually, Time: 1:15 PM as an ancillary use to the existing rustic guest ranch at 4036 Campbell Range Where: TNRD Office RoadWhere: (legally described as theRoom SW Âźlocated of Section 35,4th Township TNRD Board on the Floor 18, Range 16, Board RoomKamloops located on the 4th Floor W6M, Kamloops Division YaleStreet, District), as shown shaded in bold outline on the 465 Victoria Street, Kamloops map below, for a period465 of 3Victoria years. The specific and limited permit conditions Theas financial statements and anypermit reportswhich to beispresented at the 2497. meeting are stipulated in the proposed a part of Bylaw will be How available inspection the regional district offices one week dofor I get moreatinformation? prior to the meeting date.

To view the Provisional TNRD 2018-2022 Five Year Financial Plan, go t

For more information contact the Director of Finance at 250-377-8673 TNRD website at www.tnrd.ca or visit the TNRD office located at 465 Vi or at finance@tnrd.ca.

Street on the 4th floor, during regular office hours.

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All persons who believe that their interest in property may be affected by the proposed Bylaw shall be afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard at the Public Hearing. Additionally, they may make written submissions on the matter of Bylaw 2497 (via the adjacent options) which must be received at our office prior to 4:30 p.m. on the 25th day of February, 2015. The entire content of all submissions will be made public and form the public record for this matter.

Thursday, March 15th Email planning@tnrd.ca 6admin@tnrd.ca pm

How do I get more information?

Please pre-register A copy of the proposed Bylaw and supporting information can be inspected from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday (except statutory holidays) at our at the store asoffice, seating from January 26 , 2015 until 10:00 a.m. the day of the Hearing; or please contact us via any of the adjacent options. will be limited to 50Nopeople. representations will be received by the Board of Directors the Public has been concluded. Cost $20 per person and after is due uponHearing registration Website R. Sadilkova, Director of Development Services Fax (250) 372-5048

th

www.tnrd.ca

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Page A10 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

South Shuswap

Choir begins concert series Jodi Brak Salmon Arm Observer

The Northern Lights Chamber Choir is setting out to examine human nature through the lens of musical notes in their next series of concerts in the Shuswap. Beginning Sunday, March 4, the choir will be holding three concerts, one in Sorrento and two in Salmon Arm, that aim to showcase the many common threads of human nature and human experience. “Each selection in this year’s concert is a facet of the crazy, wonderful complex called human nature,” reads a description of the choir’s 2018 concert on their website. “It is human to love – to thrive and sometimes

fail in relationships. It is human to dream, to make music, to sing to energize our physical labour. It is human to immerse ourselves in the natural world, or to find images from nature to express our human experience. And it is human to play.” Steve Guidone, founder of the Northern Lights Chamber Choir, teased a few of the concert’s themes in a phone call to the Observer, saying that time will be a major focus. For example, the idea people all have ‘alarm bells’ in their lives, significant moments that suddenly snap one back to reality. One arrangement, according to Guidone, asks the question: Where has the summer gone?

The Northern Lights Chamber Choir presents their 2018 concert series beginning on March 4 at St. Mary’s Anglican United Church in Sorrento. (File photo) The concerts will feature original songs as well as performances of classical arrangements, cello solos, latin dance music and poetry readings in the choir’s own style. There will be at least one song from popular culture, a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young tune, performed as part of a choral arrangement. The Northern Lights

Chamber Choir will hold the first concert of their 2018 series on Sunday, March 4 at 2:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s Anglican United Church in Sorrento. The final two dates run the following weekend on Friday, March. 9 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 11 at 2:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Salmon Arm.

www.saobserver.net

Dates to Remember Carlin Coffeehouse, Saturday, March 3, 7 p.m., Carlin Hall. Hall is scent-free. Voices in Song, Sunday, March 4, Northern Lights Choir performs at 2:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church in Sorrento. Tickets at Acorn Music. Northern Lights Choir, in Sorrento on Sunday, March 4, 2:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s Anglican/United Church, and in Salmon Arm on Friday, March 9, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 11 at 2:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. Concert’s theme is Human+Nature= Human Nature, each selection representing a facet of the crazy, wonderful diamond of human nature, tickets $15 adults, $5 students/ children, available at

Acorn Music, from choir members, at the door or at www. northernlightschamberchoir.ca. Keg, Barrel and Plate, come and enjoy tastings and sips from many fine Shuswap area wineries, breweries, distilleries, sausage and cheese makers on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, from noon to 4 p.m. at the Blind Bay Memorial Hall, 2510 Blind Bay Road, Blind Bay. Tickets: $10 each (no minors). For more information, visit the Blind Bay Memorial Hall and Reedman Gallery Facebook page or www.blindbaymemorialhall.ca. Join the Blind Bay Blues Club for the Tuesday Night Jam Session at the Blind Bay Hall, 2510 Blind Bay Road, Blind Bay

every 3rd Tuesday of the month, 7 p.m. Cost is $30 for hall members and $5 drop in fee. FYI, contact Chris Emery at 250-6752865, or ccemery@ hotmail.com. Blind Bay Garden Club, discuss your love of gardening; learn, share, or just enjoy friendship with fellow gardeners every 3rd Wednesday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon, 2510 Blind Bay Road, Blind Bay. For information,e email blindbayhall@gmail. com, visit www.blindbaymemorialhall.ca or call 250-675-3139. Gleneden Hall dance takes place on the first Saturday of the month, 7 to 11 p.m., 50/50 draw, door prizes. For information, call Roger at 250-8321599.

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SBAH Central Intake (250)253-2749 Wysteria Sholtz Wysteria Sholtz www.betterathome.ca

Our company has been providing quality timbers and beams to customers for over 30 years. In 1983, Alan and his wife, Kim returned to the family farm to raise their two children. At this time, Alan started to re-build the mill that he had once worked in as a child. It took a year to re-build the old mill. Alan started cutting ties for the Railroad which were in great demand at the time. He was also cutting cedar cants for a re-saw mill along with beams and timbers for many homes that were built in Sicamous and the area. Alan and Kim operated this mill for seven years. Over time, the

orders kept increasing and the old mill could not keep up with the increase of large oversized timber and beams. In 1990, Kim’s father (Merv Siegrist) and mother Anne moved to Sicamous to become partners. Alan and Merv bought a new mill large enough to fill the orders of the beams and timbers that the old saw mill could not handle. The next generation has now joined the business. Alan and his son Tyler work the mill together making a great father/son team. Our team at Hyde Sawmill takes great pride in their workmanship and in supplying a superior product to customers.

Locally owned business give back to communities Locally owned business give communities unique character Independent shops contribute to the fabric of a community and what makes it special and unique. Tourists and other visitors will be much more inclined to remember a local shop rather than a big chain in a particular neighborhood. When travelers want to get a feel for a community, they seek out small, local stores that are much more likely to stock a high percentage of locally-sourced goods

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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News

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A11

New audio-visual equipment for city hall Analog system to be replaced by digital following flood in council chambers. COUNCIL Briefs

Replacing the already-outdated audio-visual equipment in city hall’s council chambers will cost about $140,000. The equipment was damaged by a flood in March last year that started in a meeting room above the chambers and dripped down onto the mayor’s desk over the course of a weekend. Testing revealed that some of the equipment components were completely ruined, some were working inconsistently and the remainder were operational. “The city has been advised that there is no guarantee that the pieces of electronic equipment that currently work in council chambers will not fail prematurely because of their direct or indirect exposure to moisture,� stated a staff report to council.

“As the current system is analog, many of the components are obsolete or difficult to source. Due to the changes in technology that have occurred since the original system was installed, the city has opted to migrate to a digital system.� Construction began on the new city hall/ courthouse in 2004 and the grand opening was held in June 2006. Two companies responded to the city’s request for proposals and Houle Electric Systems based in Kamloops was the successful bidder with the low bid of $138,577. Erin Jackson, the city’s corporate officer, told council that almost half will be covered by insurance and the rest will come out of reserves. Coun. Kevin Flynn commended staff. “If half is covered and

we’re also getting the system we want, staff has done a good job.� He asked if there is any salvage value to what will be left. Jackson said staff asked a consultant about that. “As much of it is obsolete, it’s not much value,� she said.

Bannister recognized

The city’s chief administrative officer, Carl Bannister, received thanks and recognition from city council recently. Coun. Tim Lavery took note of a letter that Bannister received from the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing’s board of examiners. “It’s not too often we get a chance to shout out to the CAO and his accomplishments in his career‌,â€? said Lavery, pointing out that Bannister has the highest level of certification available in local government executive

management, and holds one of only 10 such certificates awarded in B.C. since 2006. The letter encouraged Bannister to apply for a professional development endorsement, which he said he is pursuing. Lavery said the provincial recognition enhances his admiration for Bannister and the job he does. Bannister received a round of applause from council, staff and the gallery. Mayor Nancy Cooper remarked: “We always know what great staff we have. You’re always highly appreciated and we thank you for all you do for us.�

Building stats booming

While last year was an excellent year for building starts, 2018 began even better. Coun. Kevin Flynn pointed out that while 2017 was “an almost statistically breaking year� in terms of the high number of building starts, “we started the year with a month three times bigger than last year’s.� Last year in January three new single family dwellings were underway at a value of $760,000. This year in January, there were six single family dwelling starts at a value of $1,825,000.

City council met in a temporary meeting room after council chambers in city hall flooded in March 2017, damaging the ceiling and the audio-visual equipment. (File photo)

Letters Welcome

The Market welcomes letters but reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and legality. We do not print anonymous letters. Letters must be signed and include writer’s address or phone number for verification purposes only. Submissions must be less than 300 words. No thank yous to specific businesses please.

PUBLIC NOTICE Parcel Tax Rolls Thompson-Nicola Regional District PUBLIC NOTICE

The Thompson-Nicola Regional District (TNRD) has prepared the 2018

Parcel Tax parcel tax rolls Rolls as required by the Community Charter. The parcel tax rolls li NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING the parcels eligible to be taxed for the following services:

The Thompson-Nicola Regional District (TNRD) has prepared the 2018 parcel tax as Pines required by the Community Charter. The parcel tax  rolls Black Community Water Service When? The Directors of the Thompson-Nicola Regional District gives notice rollsBoard listtheof parcels eligible to be taxed for the following services: Blue River Community Water Service that it will hold a Public Hearing in the TNRD Boardroom, 4th Floor - 465 Victoria Thursday Pines DelCommunity Oro Water Service − Black Water Service Street, Kamloops, BC,Community to consider proposed Bylaw No. 2497. Mail2015 − Blue River CommunityCommunity Water Service  Evergreen Water Service Feb. 26, Temporary Use Permit 6 Bylaw No. 2497, 2015? #300-465 Victoria St What − Delis Oro Service  Community Loon LakeWater Community Water Service 10:00 a.m. − Evergreen Community Service Kamloops, BC Bylaw No. 2497 will allowWater seasonal assembly use, for up to 5 events annually,  Maple Mission Community Water Service as an ancillary use to the Water existing rustic guest ranch at 4036 Campbell Range − Loon Lake Community Service V2C 2A9  Mission Pritchard Community Service35, Township 18, Range 16, Road (legally described as the SW Water Âź of Section − Maple Community Water Service For info &  Pritchard Community Sewer W6M, Kamloops Division Yale Service District), as Service shown shaded in bold outline on the − Pritchard Community Water below, for a period of 3 years. TheService specific and limited permit conditions submissions map − Pritchard Community Sewer Service  Savona Community Water are as stipulated in the Water proposed permit which is a part of Bylaw 2497. − Savona Service  Community Spences Bridge Community Water Service − Spences Bridge Community Water Service  Vavenby Community Water Service − Vavenby Community Water Service  Walhachin Community Water Service − Walhachin Community Water Service  Paul Lake Community Sewer Service − Paul Lake Community Sewer Service Mail − Paska Lake Utility Service – Hydro and Telephone  Paska Lake Utility Service – Hydro and Telephone Phone #300-465 Victoria St − Loon Lake Fire Lake Protection Service (250) 377-8673 Kamloops, BC Loon Fire Protection Service − South Green Lake Fire Protection Service 1-877-377-8673 V2C 2A9  South Green Lake Fire Protection Service The parcel tax roll will be available for inspection starting Wednesday, The parcel tax roll willmay be be available inspection starting February 28, 2018 and viewed for at the TNRD office, 4th Wednesday, floor, th 28, 2018 and may viewed at theFriday TNRDbetween office, 4the floor, 465 465February Victoria Street, Kamloops BC, be Monday through Victoria Kamloops hours of 8:30Street, am and 4:30 pm. BC, Monday through Friday between the hours of



Phone (250) 377-8673

Email

admin@tnrd.ca

Email

planning@tnrd.ca admin@tnrd.ca



Fax (250) 372-5048 Website www.tnrd.ca

WWW.RHLLP.CA

Website

www.tnrd.ca

8:30 am and 4:30 pm.

Property owners located in these parcel tax areas may request a correction to owners the parcel tax rollinonly in relation ownmay property Property located these parcel to taxtheir areas request a correction andtoonly the following reasons: thefor parcel tax roll only in relation to their own property and only for the following reasons: All persons who believe that their interest in property may be affected by the 1. an error or omission respecting a name or address on the proposed Bylaw shall be afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard at the parcel tax roll; Public Hearing. Additionally, they may make written submissions onon thethe matter 1. an error or omission respecting a name or address parcel ta 2. an error or omission respecting the inclusion of a parcel; of Bylaw 2497 roll;(via the adjacent options) which must be received at our office error or on omission the taxable area or entire taxable th prior 3. to an 4:30 p.m. theomission 25respecting dayrespecting of February, The content of all 2. an error or the2015. inclusion of a parcel; frontage of a parcel; or submissions willerror be made public and form the public record area for this 3. an or omission respecting the taxable ormatter. taxable frontag 4. an exemption has been improperly allowed or disallowed. of a parcel; or How do I get more information? 4. for ananexemption been improperly allowed or disallowed. Requests amendmenthas to the parcel tax roll must be received in A copy of the proposed Bylaw and supporting information can be inspected writing and received at the address below no later than 4:00 PM on fromRequests 8:30 a.m. for to 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday (except statutory holidays) at our an amendment Wednesday, March 14, 2018. to the parcel tax roll must be received in writing office, from January 26th, 2015 until 10:00 a.m. the day of the Hearing; or please and received at the address below no later than 4:00 PM on Wednesday, contact us via any of the adjacent options. Douglas Director of Finance MarchRae, 14, 2018. Thompson-Nicola Regional District No representations will be received by the Board of Directors 300Douglas – 465 Victoria Street after the Public Rae, Director of Hearing Financehas been concluded. Kamloops BC V2A 2A9Regional District R. Sadilkova, Director of Development Services Thompson-Nicola Email: drae@tnrd.ca 300 – 465 Victoria Street

Kamloops BC V2A 2A9 Email: drae@tnrd.ca


ful e p o w e r cy h t r e e s v o o ra Page A12 Friday, March 2,a2018 Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News purp m o cSalmon chdog ➧ a w a t e s s e n t ia l t o d e c d e b a t e in g w it h y ll r e o t t y s r o li t le ➧ b ➧ s the who ory he truth m for pu ➧ t e ll in g t e d t o t e ll in g t c r e a t in g a f o r u g t h e w h o le s t h t it in u ➧ ll m r t e e t e ic ➧ com d e n t v o u b li c in t e r e s t ➧ e d t o t e ll in g t h t v o ic e n e p e d n ➧ a n in it t e d t o t h e p c o m m it t depende o c r a c y ➧ d e b a t e ➧ a n in t o d e m o c r a c y ➧ c o m m t ia l t o d e m#JOURNALISMIS JOURNALISMIS.ca ate t ia l b li c ➧ e s s e n a f o r u m f o r p u e t r u t h ➧ e s s e n f o r p u b li c d e b h m g t u a for c r e a t in t e d t o t e ll in g c r e a t in g Centre c o m m itParkland Dental

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Gwynne Dyer On Monday, the Chinese Communist Party’s Central Committee approved a proposal that the country’s president no longer be limited to two five-year terms of office. On Thursday, the National People’s Congress will rubber-stamp the change. That will mark the end of three decades of consensus-seeking collective leadership in the CCP. The god-king model is back. President Xi Jinping has spent his first fiveyear term eliminating all his powerful rivals (generally on corruption charges) and now his victory is being enshrined by a change in the constitution. The change does not mean “that the Chinese president will have a lifelong tenure,” said an editorial in the stateowned Global Times. But the paper also quoted Su Wei, a prominent Communist Party intellectual, who said China needed a “stable, strong and consistent leadership” from 2020 to 2035. No need to wonder who that might be, although Xi would be 82 by 2035. Shades of Robert Mugabe, I hear you thinking, although Xi commands a country about a thousand times richer than Zimbabwe. He is now effectively president-for-life, or at least until things get so bad

that the people around him decide they have to overthrow him, as Mugabe’s cronies eventually did. And, although Xi obviously thinks being president-for-life is a good idea, it is not. Being president-for-life certainly wasn’t a good idea for former Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, who was also effectively in power for life. In his case, that was 18 years. It became known as the “era of stagnation” and only seven years after Brezhnev died in 1982, the whole Communist empire in Eastern Europe collapsed. Alerted to the danger of leaving somebody in power too long by the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Chinese Communist Party has kept its leaders on a short leash since the early 1990s. They got two five-year terms, no more, and they had to keep the support of other members of the Central Committee or it might even be just one term. It has worked pretty well, as dictatorships go. There have been no more maniacs in power like Mao Zedong with his crazy Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution, which killed millions and cost the country two decades of economic growth. During the past quarter-century of

cautious, consensus-based politics, China’s economy has grown about tenfold. That pace of growth cannot continue no matter who is in power, but it is important for the party’s survival that the economy does continue to grow. There is certainly no evidence a one-man rule will provide that growth better than the existing system, so why (presuming that he is a loyal Communist) has Xi decided to overthrow it? Mere personal ambition is one obvious possibility, but there is probably more to it than that. Xi’s father was Communist royalty — one of the founders of the party and at one time its general secretary — and he himself was a “princeling’” who spent his early years in very comfortable circumstances. Then, in 1966, Mao launched the Cultural Revolution. Xi’s father was expelled from the party and publicly humiliated. He was sent to the countryside at the age of 15 to learn from the peasants and ended up in a work camp digging ditches. For some years, he actually lived in a cave (although it had a door). But he survived and was eventually to allowed to join the party, move back to the city and go to university. It all left a lasting impression on the young Xi. He knew that working hard, keeping your nose clean and even rising to high rank cannot protect

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you in an essentially lawless one-party state if party politics takes the wrong turn. So he really only had two choices: work to change the party into a law-abiding entity (which is probably impossible) or take control of the party and keep it forever. He has chosen the latter course and, in terms of protecting himself, it is probably the right choice. “I think he will become emperor for life and the Mao Zedong of the 21st century,” said Willy Lam, former Hong Kong democratic politician and now politics professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. And that is precisely the problem. Xi no doubt justifies his actions to himself by believing he is the indispensable man for China’s modernization, but the cemeteries are full of indispensable men. The longer you are in power, the more poor or at least sub-optimal decisions you make — and when the passage of time makes the mistakes obvious, you are obliged to defend them although a successor could just drop them and move on. Xi is not likely to emulate Mao and unleash chaos in China. He is intelligent and he works hard. But the mistakes will accumulate nevertheless — and stagnation awaits. -Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

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Community

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A13

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Over 40 pies were entered into the 2018 Best of the Shuswap Pie Baking Contest on Feb. 24 at the Mall at Piccadilly. The pies were judged by a panel of six tasters and winners of previous competitions auctioned off their champion pies, with proceeds going towards the R.J. Haney Heritage Village and Museum. (Jodi Brak/Salmon Arm Observer)

A sweet way to raise funds

Event scores more than $50,000 for RJ Haney Heritage Park. Jodi Brak Salmon Arm Observer

There was something delicious in the air at the Mall at Piccadilly this Saturday, Feb. 24 as the R.J. Haney Heritage Village and Museum put on their 22nd annual Best of the Shuswap Pie Baking Contest. Over 40 pies were entered under three categories, apple pies, cherry pies and berry pies. Each pie needed to be made 100% from scratch in order to be entered into the contest and it was clear just by looking at them that these were no off-the-shelf bits of baking! Spectators gathered in droves to make hungry eyes at the scrumptious morsels lining the tables in the mall’s centre court, waiting patiently, or perhaps not-so-patiently, for their chance at tasting a slice of whichever pie caught their eye. Tastings were not available until after the judging and auction had taken place. Three prizes were awarded to the top pie bakers in the Shuswap by the end of the judging ceremony. Bertha Norrish took home first prize for her apple

pie, Bonnie Peterson snagged second with her cherry pie and Mary Rollier walked away with third prize for her bumbleberry entry. Those who placed among the top three in previous year’s competitions were invited to submit pies for auction, with proceeds going toward the R.J. Haney Heritage Village and Museum. The 2018 pie auction brought in nearly $50,000 from generous members of the community who were

willing to pay extravagant prices knowing that their money was going towards a good cause. Spectators were able to taste any pie entered into the competition for $2.50 a slice, with proceeds also going to the Heritage Village. In addition to the pie contest, the Mall at Piccadilly hosted a silent auction and a number of booths where local collectors and museums could display artifacts from the past.

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Susan Mackie, general manager of the R.J. Haney Heritage Village and Museum, accepting entries for the 22nd annual Best of the Shuswap Pie Baking Contest. Held at the Mall at Piccadilly, this year’s competition received over 40 entries into three categories: berry pies, cherry pies and apple pies. (Jodi Brak/Salmon Arm Observer)

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A huge “thank you” to all the “Friends of NOSBIS” who supported us throughout 2017! Your generous contributions had a direct and positive impact on the brain injury survivors in our community and we are very grateful for your support. 4th Annual Art Show and Silent Auction - Artists: Ellen Blackburn, Greg Dunn, Sheila Macdonald, Gwen Martinuk, Melissa Matson, Adam Meikle (Meikle Studios social Art House), Mitch Milgram (Mitch’s Workshop), Debra Porteous (Deb’s Divine Designs), E.R.Scheil, Rebecca Shepherd, Janet Thorne, Diana Waller, Connie Whitford. Donors: Arthur’s Gem Set Studio, Bob and Marge Quinton, Carla du Toit (Shopper’s Drug Mart), Carlene Duczek, Caroline Miege, Deb’s Style Loft, Jeanne’s Printing & Graphics, John and Dela Bagshaw, Lindy’s Boutique, Little River Framing Studio, Marion Kilby, Mike and Pam Saul, Pat Lagimodiere, SASCU Downtown, Starbuck’s, Steamers Coffee Co., Tom Rice, Wyn Gittins Special thanks to Lori Cymbaluk and Lynda Stepura of Piccadilly Mall for donating the store front space for the Garage Sale and our annual Art Show and Silent Auction. Thanks also to the maintenance staff for their helpful assistance. SASCU Family Fun Day - Heather Turner (SASCU Uptown), Gerald MacQueen (Grimm’s Meats, Kamloops) Blueberry Plant Sale - SASCU Downtown, Gerry Roblesky (donated use of truck) A heartfelt THANK YOU to all the caring individuals in our communities for supporting NOSBIS with your kind donations and purchases from our various sales throughout the past year. The funds we raise through these initiatives support the programs and services we offer to the brain injury survivors who come through our doors. WE COULDN’T DO IT WITHOUT YOU!


Business

Page A14 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Columbia Shuswap Regional District CSRD ELECTORAL AREA E NEW BUILDING REGULATION INSPECTION SERVICE Building Permits will be required in Electoral Area E starting March 5, 2018. Starting March 5, 2018 most new construction, renovation, addition, or demolition in Electoral Area E requires that: • the property owner submit a complete building permit application to the CSRD; • the CSRD issue a building permit prior to construction beginning; and, • the CSRD Building Inspector complete six inspections during construction and prior to the granting of building occupancy. For more information please contact the CSRD Building Department at: 1.888.248.2773 or 250.832.8194 buildingpermit@csrd.bc.ca http://www.csrd.bc.ca/services/building-regulationinspection

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FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS Leah Blain Late night shopping on Thursdays downtown Salmon Arm just might become a reality this summer. Downtown Salmon Arm Membership Coordinator Jennifer Broadwell says they are asking downtown merchants to take part in a survey, and if there is enough interest, the stores may offer late-night shopping in June, July, August, and September. “It’s an ongoing survey and once we get the results we’ll decide how to proceed,” says Broadwell. They first broached the topic during the Oct 2017 Business Walk and found there was a lot of interest in remaining open late one night per week, either Thursday or Friday. A late night on Thursdays would complement other evening events such as Down-

town Live – Jazz Night at Ross St. Plaza from 7 to 9 p.m., as well as Shuswap Pie Company live music.

Seed to Soul in community

Seed to Soul is a new health wellness boutique located on Hudson Avenue in downtown Salmon Arm with a focus in cannabis education, service and support. “With the upcoming legalization of marijuana, we know that there are many people in our community that are looking to consume cannabis, but are unsure of its affects and how to consume. We’re here to help guide them and direct them to safe consumption,” says Jennifer Harper, store manager of Seed to Soul. Ashley Wilson, the store’s cannabis consultant, says they are

all about cultivating community through cannabis. “We want to do it properly with the community’s backing. It is our social responsibility to properly educate our community and provide safe access to quality cannabis. We invite everyone to come in for a visit,” says Ashley. They are located at 91 Hudson Street NE. They are open Monday to Saturday from 10am-6pm. For more information call 250-833-5250 or email info@seedtosoul.ca

Chamber Mixer rescheduled

Due to a scheduling conflict the last Chamber of Commerce Business Mixer was rescheduled. The new date is Wednesday, March 7, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. It takes place at the newly created Innovation Centre, the colourful building on Shuswap Street. RSVP at admin@sachamber. bc.ca or call 250-8326247.

BC Budget 2018

Shuswap MLA Greg Kyllo will be giving a presentation about the provincial budget on Friday, March 9, from 1 pm - 3 pm, at the Comfort Inn & Suites. Please RSVP due to limited seating. Reply to holly.cowan@leg. bc.ca before March 7.

Chamber AGM coming up

Wednesday, March 28 is the date of Salmon Arm Chamber’s annual general meeting. Val Litwin, President and CEO of the BC Chamber of Commerce is the guest speaker. Besides going over 2017 financial reports there will be the board elections for 2018/2019 as well as 2018/2019 projects. It all takes place at the Prestige Harbourfront Resort from 11:45 am - 1:30 pm. Chamber members receive a complimentary lunch. Please RSVP to admin@sachamber. bc.ca before March 20, or call 250-832-6247.

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Sports

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A15

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Players from both teams carefully track the ball as Daniel Wyss of the Golds’ shoots from the three point line during a Feb. 23 playoff game against the Rutland Voodoos at Salmon Arm Secondary School. The Golds’ lost their initial semi-final game to the Voodoos who would go on to win the 4A Okanagan Zone title the following day. (Jodi Brak/Salmon Arm Observer)

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Community can show support for Paralympic skier Natalie Wilkie Jodi Brak Salmon Arm Observer

The community has been invited to submit words of encouragement and support for Salmon Arm skier Natalie Wilkie, who will be representing Canada as a member of the Para Nordic Ski Team at the 2018 Paralympics in Pyoengchang, South Korea. Wilkie, who lost most of the fingers on her left hand in 2016 during an accident in wood shop class, nonetheless persevered in the face of her injury and has continued to hone her skills as an expert skier. Jennifer Henrie, who knows Wilkie through their time together in the Larch Hills Nordic Ski Club, is spear-

heading the initiative to gather support and words of encouragement for the outstanding local athlete. “When I saw that Natalie would be competing I got incredibly excited, and my first thought was that we needed to plan something,” Henrie says. Henrie, who works at the Arbor Lodge independent living community, asked the residents she works with for advice as to how they could get the community to show Wilkie how proud they are of her achievements. Their suggestion: a letter writing campaign aimed at organizing an outpouring of support and goodwill for the promising young skier

in advance of her journey to compete in Pyoengchang. “When I think about it, that kind of life changing accident that happened to a 14-year-old girl… that could easily cause her to spin in a downward direction, but she has done the opposite,” Henrie says. “She is really dedicated, kind and down to earth, she has so much hope and optimism. A lot of people remember the accident, and they remember her, but they might not know how far she has come. When they put two and two together I find people are so inspired.” Anyone interested in sending their support to Wilkie can bring

their words of encouragement to the Mall at Piccadilly between 2-5 p.m. on March 2 and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on March 3. The uptown Askew’s location will also be receiving notes on March 3 between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Letters may also be emailed to bestwishesnatalie@ gmail.com. “We’ve told Natalie that she needs to leave some room in her suitcase for all the letters she’ll be taking to Korea,” Henrie says. Henrie would like to add that she hopes to organize a viewing party for Wilkie’s event in Salmon Arm so that the community can gather and watch as she represents Salmon Arm in the Paralympics.

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Page A16 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Sports

www.saobserver.net

A ski touring trip through the Gaspé TRAIL TAILS Marcia Beckner Eat, sleep, ski! What a way to spend our six days on the Gaspé Peninsula late February. With all our accommodation needs, meals, and transport of luggage taken care of, all we had to do was avail ourselves of the wonderful food, the comfy

accommodation, and then ski every day. The Traversée De La Gaspesie is in its 16th year. The organizers have plenty of experience addressing all the logistics of moving 130 skiers and snowshoers through six days of activity, and from location to location.

We started in the Chic Choc Mountains for two days then bused to the Gaspé National Park for two then ended with two days skiing Forillon National Park. The terrain was challenging, given it was mountainous with many steep uphills and downhills. It was roughly tracked by snowmobile. But there were also many undulating sections for relief, and spectacular views to reward the adventurer.

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Canada and the U.S. Over the six days we skied just over 110 km. Day 4, in Gaspé National Park, which had promised freezing rain in the forecast, had its distance ski plan scrapped and shorter outings made available. Five of us chose to take in the two-hour snowshoe option along the river with Jacques, a very knowledgeable guide, well-versed in flora and fauna of the region. It was a welcome change to the somewhat strenuous skiing of the rest of the week. Greeting us every morning at breakfast was the accordion player Sylvie, who, when she found out that there were a number of singers in our group, called upon the “B.C. choir” to accompany her in “You Are My Sunshine” on many the occasion, then expanded it to include “When Irish Eyes Are Smiling.” She seemed pleased to have this gaggle of English-speaking singers join her in the few English songs she knew, among this predominantly French-speaking crowd. The eight of us were at a distinct disadvantage in that none of us is bilingual but we managed to get by

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on the little French we knew. And when the going got tough, there were many kind folks who came up to us and offered to translate the talks given at night and in the morning, mostly about the day’s ski route and schedule. It was humbling not to be able to speak both of Canada’s official languages Given the wonderful, mostly sunny weather, the fabulous food and accommodation, the wintertime introduction to the Gaspé Peninsula, the sometimes challenging skiing, and the terrific folks we met and got to know, and the amazing volunteers it was a most successful Traversée. Glad to have had the opportunity to explore this lovely part of Canada. The Larch Hills Junior Racers won the BC Championships for the fifth consecutive year last weekend. Next week 14 of the racers will head to Thunder Bay to compete in the national Championships. Best of luck to these LH skiers! As well, our very own Natalie Wilkie will head to PyeongChang, Korea, to compete in the Paralympics nordic skiing events March 9-18. We will be cheering on our homegrown Olympian! Keep skiing!


Arts & Events

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

A not-so-magic-kingdom JOANNE SARGENT Cinemaphile Orlando, Florida is home to Disney World, “the happiest place on earth”, and, mere blocks away, the Magic Castle Motel, a misnomer if ever there was one. This is the setting of The Florida Project. In a row of low-budget, rundown, garishly painted motels, the Magic Castle is home to the down and out – people barely getting by and struggling to keep a roof over their heads. Six-year-old Moonee and her mother, Halley, are month-to-month renters in the motel, which is managed by Bobby, a tough guy with a heart of gold, who’s barely holding on himself. Halley’s brash personality, foul mouth and edgy nature make employment difficult, but she does whatever it takes to scrape together the rent each month and raise her daughter as best she can. Meanwhile the rambunctious Moonee and her ragtag playmates, Scooty and Jancey, also from the “hood,” are generally unsupervised and re-

lentless in testing the limits of their summer freedom. They spend their days in perpetual motion, getting into mischief, dropping insults and obscenities, and pestering one and all including the neighbours and Bobby. It’s an existence both carefree and bordering on dangerous, where only a child can ignore the bleak realities and perils of their environment. To them, the Magic Castle and surrounding motels are a genuinely enchanted place. Although the kids torment him endlessly, motel manager Bobby tries to be a father figure, a protector and enforcer where they have none. On the one hand he scorns Moonee for her latest wrongdoing, but also quietly tries to keep her safe despite her circumstances. The wonderfully sympathetic and compassionate Bobby is a career-best role for Willem Dafoe for which he has garnered an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He is the lone profes-

mental career. He had already produced such immortal comedies as Il Barbiere di Siviglia and l’Italiana in Algeri but in the early 19th century he was celebrated above all else for his tragedies — none more so than Semiramide which had its world premiere in Venice at the Teatro La

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Columbia Shuswap Regional District NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Ranchero / Deep Creek Official Community Plan Amendment (CSRD) Bylaw No. 750-02 Ranchero / Deep Creek Zoning Bylaw No. 751 What is Ranchero / Deep Creek Official Community Plan Amendment (CSRD) Bylaw No. 750-02? Ranchero / Deep Creek Official Community Plan Amendment (CSRD) Bylaw No. 750-02 is a set of amendments to the objectives, policies, and designations in the current Official Community Plan (OCP). This amendment is required to ensure that the OCP is consistent with the proposed new zoning bylaw.

Willem Dafoe and Brooklynn Prince star in The Florida Project. (Photo contributed) sional in the film, as director Scott Baker likes to pair non-actors and unknowns with recognizable actors. Bria Vinaite, who plays Halley, was discovered by the director on Instagram and is superb, and Brooklynn Prince, who is stunning as Moonee, is a first time actress who is a natural scene-stealer. She won the Critics’ Choice Award for Best Young Performer for this role. The Florida Project received rave reviews at Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival. Called “near-perfect” by one reviewer, it is almost unanimously acclaimed by movie critics, but I have to relay that there were some audience reviews that didn’t share those opinions. They saw it as a bunch of bratty kids who keep getting into trouble and parents who don’t know how to set an ex-

ample for them. All true – it is authentically real, and the performances by the kids are indeed bratty, yet captivating and endearing. The movie is a child’s-eye-view of the world. Often the camera shots are low, reflecting what kids would see from their angle, and there are plenty of giggles and screeches. It is a moving and compelling look at childhood, about creating magic in the world you’re born into, even as the adults around you trudge on, simply trying to survive another day. Baker’s intent is to reveal what he refers to as “the hidden homeless,” the poignant reality of the underprivileged we don’t typically see on screen. The Florida Project shows at the Salmar Classic at 5:00 Saturday, March 3. It’s rated 14A.

A showcase for Rossini’s style Semiramide HD Live from the Met will be featured Saturday, March 10 at the Salmar Classic. Gioachino Rossini (1792 – 1868) was the world’s foremost opera composer of his day. Semiramide is the culmination of the Italian phase of his monu-

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A17

Fenice in1823. For decades this opera swept through the music capitals of Europe and beyond, enthralling audiences with its urgent, transcendentally beautiful use of melody, undeniably exhilarating drama, and most importantly, astonishing vocal displays.

The Met’s stellar cast features soprano Angela Meade as the Queen; mezzo Soprano Elizabeth De Shong in the trouser role of Arsace and baritone Ildar Abdrazakov as Assur Start time at the Salmar Classic is 9:55 a.m. -Submitted by Gabriele Klein

Amateur Radio Basic Qualification Course sponsored by

The Shuswap Amateur Radio Club March 10th and 11th Fees are $100

15-20 Hours of pre-study Required call 250-832-4872 for more information. or visit www.sarc.ca/blog

What is Ranchero / Deep Creek Zoning Bylaw No. 751? Ranchero / Deep Creek Zoning Bylaw No. 751 is a proposed new zoning bylaw that will provide land use regulations for the portion of Electoral Area D shown on the map below. This bylaw will repeal and replace the existing Ranchero / Deep Creek Land Use Bylaw No. 2100 which has been in place since 1987.

When? Tuesday, March 6, 2018 at 7:00 PM Where? Ranchero Elementary School – 6285 Ranchero Drive East Who should attend? Anyone who believes that their interest in property is affected by the proposed zoning bylaw and OCP amendment shall be afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard or to present written submissions respecting matters contained in the bylaws at the Public Hearing. How can I find A copy of the proposed bylaws and relevant out more about background documents may be inspected at this rezoning www.csrd.bc.ca/news-notices/news and at the amendment? Columbia Shuswap Regional District (CSRD), 555 Harbourfront Drive NE, Salmon Arm, BC between the hours of 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM, beginning Wednesday, February 21, 2018 and ending Tuesday, March 6, 2018 (excluding Saturdays, Sundays and Statutory holidays); or, contact the staff person listed below. How do I Written submissions will be accepted at the send a written CSRD office until 4:00 PM Tuesday, March 6, submission? 2018, or may be submitted until the close of the Public Hearing. The Board of the CSRD considers the author’s address relevant to the Board’s consideration of this matter; however the author’s phone number and email address are not relevant and should not be included in the written submission. Written submissions received will be available to the public. Please clearly write “Public Hearing Submission – Bylaw No. 750-02 and Bylaw No. 751” at the top of your submission. The Board of the CSRD will not consider any verbal or written representations or submissions after the public hearing has closed. Written submissions may be submitted to: plan@csrd.bc.ca or to the address above. Who can I speak Jan Thingsted, Planner to about this 250-833-5918 application? jthingsted@csrd.bc.ca

Visit our website at www.csrd.bc.ca

555 Harbourfront Dr. NE, Salmon Arm, BC | PO Box 978 V1E 4P1 | 250.832.8194 | Toll Free 1.888.248.2773


Page A18 Friday, March 2, 2018

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TICKETS & INFORMATION: Acorn Music & Choir Members or On-line at www.northernlightschamberchoir.ca

Fiddler ready to play in Mara The Mara Community Hall will host Kelli Trottier in concert on Sunday, March 11. As a triple threat, Trottier brings her crisp fiddling, angelic voice and fiery stepdance to all of her performances. Her talents carry her to stages across North America, Europe, the Middle East and the far North, making fans and friends at every venue along the way. Trottier has performed for Canadian soldiers in the Middle East and the Canadian Arctic. She has brought 20,000 NHL Ottawa Senators Fans to their feet many times as the featured mid-game entertainer. More highlights for Trottier include performing for Sir Sean Connery’s Dressed to Kilt several times in NYC and for his private 80th birthday party in the Bahamas. Her art was developed from deep and lasting Scottish and French roots, and together with other influences of contemporary and traditional music, Trottier shaped her performing and recording career. She has earned a dedicated

Canadian fiddler, step dancer and vocalist Kelli Trottier is set to play the Mara Community Hall on Sunday, March 11. (File photo) and growing following and glowing accolades from promoters, organizers and fans. In addition to her extensive performing experience, Trottier continues to be a highly sought-after instructor and judge of fiddle and stepdance events across Canada and parts of the U.S. S he has been nominated three times for Fiddle Player

ofthe Year by the Canadian Country Music Association and has performed live and in studio with George Fox, The Family Brown, Randall Prescott, Wayne Rostad, Lucille Starr and more. Most recently, Trottier was inducted into the Ottawa Valley Country Music Hall of Fame. For the upcoming Mara concert, Trottier will be ac-

companied by Don Dawson on piano, with an opening set by the Tappalachian String Band. Tickets, available at the door, are $15 for adults, $10 for teens and kids are free. Refreshments will be available. For more information, contact Di Forbes at 250-8380103.

open house Find out more about the proposed

Draft Development Cost Charges Bylaw Date: Time: Location:

March 15, 2018 4:30pm - 6:30pm 446 Main Street, Council Chambers

For more information contact Melinda Smyrl, Planner at msmyrl@sicamous.ca or call 250-836-2477 T: 250-836-2477 www.sicamous.ca

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Community

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A19

PUBLIC NOTICE

Thompson-Nicola Regional District PUBLIC NOTICE TNRD 2018-2022 Five Year Financial

TNRD 2018-2022 Five Year Financial Plan Public Consultation NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Plan Public Consultation

 When?

Thursday Feb. 26, 2015 Mail 10:00Victoria a.m. St #300-465 Kamloops, BC 2A9 & ForV2C info

submissions From left to right, Herman Halvorson, Randi Ostby, Suzy Beckner and Denis Delisle of the Larch Hills Nordic Society accept a cheque for $20,000 to go to towards expansions of the chalet facility. Construction on the chalet is expected to be finished by October of this year. (Photo contributed by Suzy Beckner)

Chalet project moves ahead Jodi Brak Salmon Arm Observer

The Larch Hills Nordic Society is happy to announce their Chalet Expansion project is well under way. The basement of the new chalet building is now a heated and useable space that has been en-

joyed by many already this ski season. On Feb. 20 the North Okanagan Regional District presented the Chalet Expansion Committee with a cheque for $20,000 from their community works fund to be used for the construction of

the upstairs phase of the building. Fundraising continues and construction will resume again once the current ski season is over. The Larch Hills Nordic Society hopes to fully complete the project by October 2018.

Auction benefits support society Jim Elliot Eagle Valley News

The Eagle Valley Community Support Society (EVCSS) are holding a charity auction to help continue their work responding quickly to help community members in crisis. The society’s goal is to raise $8,000. The auction is online and features items donated by local businesses. Items on the auction block include gift cards and merchandise from local businesses, an assortment of gift baskets and big ticket items such as house-

boat trips and passes to the Roots & Blues festival. Recreational opportunities including Eagle Valley Snowmobile Club trail passes and passes to the Crazy Creek hot pools and suspension bridge are also available Janet McClean Senft, the society’s executive director said the donations from the community have been very generous. The auction began on Feb. 14 and wraps up March 16; a total of $3,745 in bids have already been pledged. Money raised will serve to bolster a dis-

cretionary fund used to help some of the most vulnerable in the community when assistance is needed immediately. “A lot of it is around safety and being able to respond immediately to safety needs, to family protection needs, to health and mental health concerns,� McClean Senft said. McClean Senft said those in need can contact the society by calling 250-836-3440 or sending an email to evcrc@telus.net. Items up for auction can be viewed at www.32auctions.com/ organizations/39223/ auctions/47676?t=all.

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What is the Five Year Financial Plan about?

What is the Five Financial Plan about? The Board of Directors of theYear Thompson-Nicola Regional District gives notice that will hold a Public Hearing inDistrict the TNRD Boardroom, 4thmore Floorthan - 465 Victoria TheitThompson-Nicola Regional currently provides 120 The Thompson-Nicola Regional District currently provides more than 120 Street, Kamloops, BC, to consider proposed Bylawfire No.protection, 2497. local government services to taxpayers including 911, government services to taxpayers including fire protection, 911, lan land-use planning, solid sewer, regulatory What is Temporary Use waste Permitmanagement, 6 Bylaw No. water 2497, and 2015? planning, solid waste management, water and sewer, regulatory service services and invasive plant management as well as access for residents Bylaw No. 2497 will allow seasonal assembly use, for up to 5 events annually, invasive plant management as well as access for residents to librarie to libraries and recreation facilities. as an ancillary use to the existing rustic guest ranch at 4036 Campbell Range recreation facilities. Road (legally described as the Âźfinancial of Section 35, Township 18, Range 16, Regional Districts must have a 5SW year plan adopted by bylaw W6M, Kamloops Division Yale District), shown shaded in its bold outline the ann annually, by March 31st. The Board consider and adopt 5 year Regional Districts must havewill a 5as year financial plan adopted byon bylaw st map below, for a period of 3 years. The specific and limited permit conditions financial plan at its March 29th regular meeting. by March 31 . The Board will consider and adopt its 5 year financial plan are as stipulated in th the proposed permit which is a part of Bylaw 2497. 29attend regularthe meeting. Who March should Public Consultation Session?

The Regional District encourages all community members to attend and Who should attend the Public Consultation Session? discuss the budget with the Director of Finance.

The Regional District encourages all community members to attend and d

If you cannot attend the the session, please feel free to view the information the budget with Director of Finance. online and fill out an online input form.

If you cannot attend the session, please feel free to view the information o

Whenand is fill the Session? out an online input form. When: Time:

Phone Email (250) 377-8673 finance@tnrd.ca

 Email

planning@tnrd.ca admin@tnrd.ca Website www.tnrd.ca

Fax (250) 372-5048

Where:

10:00 AM - Noon

When: Thursday, March 8th 2018 TNRD Office

Board10:00 RoomAM located on the 4th Floor Time: - Noon 465 Victoria Street, Kamloops

Where: TNRD Office th All persons that their interest in property be affected by the How do Iwho getbelieve moreBoard information? Room located on the 4may Floor proposed Bylaw shall be465 afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard at the Victoria Street, Kamloops To view the Provisional TNRD 2018-2022 Five Year Financial Plan, go to

Public Hearing. Additionally, they may make written submissions on the matter TNRD2497 website at or visit the TNRD locatedatatour office ofthe Bylaw (viaI get thewww.tnrd.ca adjacent options) which must office be received How Street do more information? th floor, 465 Victoria onthe the 4th regular officeThe hours. prior to 4:30 p.m. on 25 day ofduring February, 2015. entire content of all submissions will be public and form2018-2022 the public recordYear for this matter. Plan, go t To information view themade Provisional Financial For more contact the TNRD Director of FinanceFive at 250-377-8673 TNRD website at www.tnrd.ca or visit the TNRD office located at 465 Vi How I get more information? or atdo finance@tnrd.ca.

the 4th Bylaw floor, during regular office hours. can be inspected A copy Street of the on proposed and supporting information from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday (except statutory holidays) at our For more information contact the Director of Finance at 250 377 8673 office, from January 26th, 2015 until 10:00 a.m. the day of the Hearing; or please contact finance@tnrd.ca. us via any of the adjacent options.

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No representations will be received by the Board of Directors after the Public Hearing has been concluded.

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Page A20 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Builder nets two golds, one silver award Copper Island Fine Homes Inc. won top accolades at the Canadian Home Builders’ Association Central Interior’s 13th Annual Keystone Home Builder Awards of Excellence held at Thompson Rivers University ballroom. Shuswap builder, Copper Island Fine homes Inc., based out of Blind Bay, captured the prestigious Gold Award for Customer Service and gold for

Best Renovation over $300,000. Additionally, they also won silver for Best Home and Best Home Design in the $500,000 - $750,000 categories. Greg Vistisen, owner and president of Copper Island Fine Homes said it was incredible to be recognized by their peers and customers with these honours, adding the key to excellent customer service is ‘simple and obvious.’ “It’s really about

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The winning team includes: Tammy Packer, Melody Thomson, Loree Mitchell-Banks, Kathy Moore, Jeremy Hanson, owners Tracy and Greg Vistisen and Rob Burt. Missing from the photo are Dean and Heidi Friesen, Chuck Beaton and Tim Lukashuk. (Photo contributed)

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Business

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A21

CEO talks change with patronage program SASCU’s Barry Delaney tells city money will be reinvested in credit union. Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

The patronage rebate is no more, but more mobile online services will be offered. SASCU CEO Barry Delaney came to city council to provide an update on the credit union’s plans for 2018. Removal of the patronage rebate this year is one of the big changes. “We had to take a hard look at it. The banking industry has changed and world economies have changed. We know it helps our membership to get a rebate, but does it help the credit union? So we will be reinvesting… It’s a tough one, it’s one of the programs that made us unique in the community.”

He says most financial institutions took a hard look at their programs in 2008 and 2009 and made changes. Delaney said SASCU employs 140 staff, has a payroll of $8.1 million and pays $310,000 in property taxes. It recently gave a $50,000 grant to the SPCA. “I feel it’s important to understand SASCU is a community-owned financial institution.” Ken Hawrys, SASCU’S vice-president of operations and strategy, told council SASCU plans to provide more online mobile banking services. He said that takes time and money, but will make the credit union more relevant. Mayor Nancy Coo-

per noted that SASCU has a 50 per cent market share. “I really appreciate what the credit union does, giving people a choice where they want $50,000 to go.” Coun. Alan Harrison addressed the patronage withdrawal. “I’m sure it was a very hard decision and well thought out… When I hear you say that, I think of my dad who is 86 and has been a member for 55 years. He liked getting that little cheque.” Harrison asked where the investment will go. “We want to certainly help members with transitions,” Delaney responded. “Those families relied on that cheque – many families

had it earmarked.” He said if a member had known, they would have taken a lower rate on a mortgage or a higher rate on a term. “So we’re going to give that to them now…” Investing in members’ digital experience is part of the plan, he said, but also investing in the credit union’s capital base, so “it can weather any storms.” Investments in training and infrastructure will be made, but the digital changes will be the most visible. Coun. Kevin Flynn acknowledged that patronage is something people are used to, but said he can attest to how 2008 changed a lot of the world.

SASCU CEO Barry Delaney reports to city council on plans for credit union in 2018. (Image contributed) “I said we are local, “I think if you put supporting the comback into the commu- munity.” the only institution Delaney said he was with its head office nity, like the $50,000 to the SPCA, I think dealing with some in the Shuswap. Our to people that’s the concerned members presence here, hopedifferentiation. We who wanted to know fully it makes an imare members and you what makes SASCU pact… That we think are in the community. different from other is a meaningful differSo long as you keep financial institutions. ence.”

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Dempsters’s bread and deer survival ShuSwap outDoorS Hank Shelley The effects of this winter are beginning to take a toll on our birds and wildlife. There’s very little food and forage, due mostly to deep snow and cold conditions. For one lucky Sicamous Steller’s jay, perched on the yellow line on the Trans-Canada Highway,(by the Husky truck stop) with approaching semi’s last Saturday, Gwenith

Stead, jumped from her vehicle grabbed the jay, wrapped it in warm blanket in the back seat and got it home. Warming the bird by the heater, she placed a small bowl of water in its box, buttered a slice of 12 -grain, then fed it tiny pieces. Once warmed up, it drank a lot of water as it was very dehydrated. Next day, out the door, letting it hop

onto a nearby cedar tree, three more Steller’s jays, showed up at the front door, in support of their buddy wanting a few buttered slices of 12-grain Dempster’s. Our deer are having it tough, and of course feeding hay or pellets to even local animals around silage pits or barns, residences, doesn’t bode well for the animals. Over winter, survival depends on build up fat stores from feeding on berries and leaves. Deer are well adapted to winter conditions, with a thick winter coat, Too, they reduce their metabolic

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Bart’s Muffler offers more than muffler

DAN EXCAVATING repair. DEGLAN For many years Bart’s has been a full service automotive Dan bringsmaintenance with him 40 & repair shop. You years can bring vehicles, trailers of experience and & RV’s of all types, new or used in for a knowledge when it comes range of the latest in servicing repair & operating machinery maintenance. Sixtohard-working employees andcustomers taking ideas andany of are happy to help with making them a reality their automotive needs. for you. He comes from “We strive to build & equipment relationships a longtrust line of with our customers.” says owner/manager Dave Bartman. operators, branching off from his fathers excavating company in automotive & to hisFor mid all 20’s.your The Deglan familyneeds boys have experience excellent customer service. Call been raised around and have ran all heavy Bart’s Minute Muffler & early Maintenance. equipment from an very age.

Whether it’s a small job, an extensive rock wall design, septic field or a building site preparation, his years of on site familiarity is a tremendous benefit to customers. His ideas, suggestions and the end result of his work is truly remarkable and invaluable. Dan always leaves the job clean, tidy and ready for your next step either it be to plant lawn, garden or pave a driveway.

DAN DEGLAN EXCAVATING Professionally Beautifying Properties for Over 27 Years. • Rock Walls • Utility Services • Site Prep • Terracing • Drainage • Pools

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Kelowna orchards, is a prime example. The animals are also there for protection from coyotes, wolves and cougars. Those folks working in the Ministry of Environment, and knowing we have high mortality in our deer herds from climate change conditions and large predator populations, have seen fit to reduce the provincial bag limit on deer to two from three. Let’s hope spring is just around the corner, not only for our fur and feathered friends, out there but our sore muscles from shoveling!

Mark Pennell owner

250-832-8947

Com mu n ity!

DISPOSAL

Winkler Ph. 250.832.6295 Disposal Systems 2014 info@winklerdisposal.com 4211 Auto Road SE Salmon Arm BC

locally owned and operated

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Refuse containers to 40 cu. yd. Water delivery - potable & bulk • Spray bar Compacting units • Firewood sales • Sea cans • Demolition

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producing an acid into the rumen, absorbed into the bloodstream. This causes acidosis, slowly killing the animal. Deer, have evolved to withstand harsh winters,which tend to remove the weak or sick from the herd. Even in winters of high mortality, the animals can rebound, due to their high reproductive and pregnancy rates. At present, the unfortunate aspect, is urban sprawl, housing, vineyards, orchards, development and dogs on what was crucial winter range. A news clip last week, showing mule deer in

H i re Lo c al • Support ou r

Profile of the week

1st Ave. SW

AT YOUR SERVICE

Sh op Lo c al

rate, reduce food consumption and make prolonged use of bed sites from wind and snow. Their digestive system adapts to a coarse diet, low in nutrients. Deer are ruminants, having a tummy with four compartments. The rumen is the largest, breaking down rough forage, containing bacteria, protozoa and components of vegetation etc. Feeding deer, alters the function of the rumen. Readily digestive food, such as grain or alfalfa can draw fluid into the rumen from the body,

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Page A22 Friday, March 2, 2018

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Community

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A23

Making the effort when you are well or ill NaN dickie Opening Our Eyes It is not uncommon for people who are deeply depressed to ask, “Why bother?” Why bother struggling to get healthy again when your illness is perhaps genetic? Why bother trying anything when you may well get depressed again in a few years because you’ve already had three or four episodes? A depressed person may come up with

several reasons to not bother. “I’ll get out of this darkness sooner or later, so I’ll just sit back and wait,” or “What I tried to do to help myself last time didn’t work,” or “I don’t have the energy to help myself now.” On the surface, these responses seem like very reasonable ones. However, if we closely look at them, we will uncover some real fal-

lacies. Your disorder may be in part genetic, but depression is usually multi-faceted, not caused by one single factor. There are new ways to work with depression that were not known even a few years ago, some of which require more quiet effort and patience than mental or physical energy. When we learn new strategies to deal with our down times, we can increase the pace of our healing. I have outlined many strategies in this series of articles, and will offer more in the future. When we try new strategies, we discover we can help

AT YOUR SERVICE

Sh op Lo c al

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ourselves out. We develop compassion for ourselves. As a result, our self-esteem improves. If you have already had more than one episode, it is likely that you will have another. This is the tough reality of living with a mental disorder. So, while you are healthy (that is, in remission from your symptoms), if you look after yourself well by leading a balanced life (eating well, getting sufficient rest, exercising moderately, socializing—even with just one other person), you may be able to extend that healthy period be-

tween episodes. If you work on turning your negative thoughts into constructive ones, you create new permanent neuropathways that will have a positive influence on your handling of a future episode. Consider joining the local depression support group (details below), where other people with your challenges share their strategies and explore new ones. When you are depressed is the perfect time to go to one of these meetings. You will be warmly welcomed, and you will quickly discover

that you are among similar people who share your difficulties. You participate fully by simply listening to others for one meeting, or many meetings. Sharing is totally voluntary. Many people leave a meeting saying, “I don’t need to explain myself here. Everyone understands what I am talking about.” And you can be assured that everything that is said at a meeting remains confidential. I’m not saying that experiencing an episode will be easy if you incorporate one or more of the ideas above; no one can promise you

H i re Lo c al • Support ou r

HEATING

PAINTING

that. However, if you bother to help yourself when you are healthy, and also when you are in the throes of an episode of depression, you will be saying “I am doing my best” to the inevitable challenges of life. You will gain a better sense of yourself. These are great reasons for bothering! -Nan Dickie is the facilitator of a peerled depression support group in Salmon Arm. Meetings are held the first and third Mondays at Askew’s Uptown community room at noon. Everyone welcome. Info: ndickie@ telus.net; 250 832-3733.

Com mu n ity!

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TAPPEN | SORRENTO | CHASE Gerry Thomson is the owner of Gerry’s Plumbing & Heating and has been in this business for over 40 years. His goal is to more than satisfy his customers’ expectations.

1. 100% Customer Satisfaction Guarantee 2. Phones staffed 24/7 3. Scheduled appointments 4. No invoice shock: Upfront price before the work starts 5. Fully stocked Truck 6. Very clean gentleman plumber Gerry Thomson

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Page A24 Friday, March 2, 2018

Your Health & Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Wellness

INFORMATION DESIGNED TO PROMOTE AND ENHANCE YOUR WELLBEING

Fix Your Gut – Part 2

Stay Healthy GET ADJUSTED!

FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC

New patients welcome.

Dr. Warren Gage

• Infants to Adults • On Site Digital X-Ray • Instrument Adjusting • Spinal Decompression Table • Custom Orthotics

#1 - 661 ROSS STREET, SALMON ARM, BC APPOINTMENTS

250.803.0224 www.wellnesschiro.net

Last week I was discussing the importance of maintaining a healthy gut, because when your digestive tract is overly permeable it allows proteins, bugs, and even healthy foods to enter the blood stream. This then results in chronic inflammation and immune problems. Chronic inflammation

SENIORS’ DAY Tuesday, March 6th, 2018

60+

is directly related to serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, type-2 diabetes, autism and other spectrum disorders in kids. Antioxidant foods and supplements have received a lot of attention to help these types of inflammatory issues and should be regularly consumed. However, if the gut is not providing an adequate barrier to the outside world, inflammation will continue to be a problem. Dr. Zach Bush was one of the presenters at our seminar in California and he has been specializing in helping patients with inflammation from leaky gut. His recommendations

obviously include consuming an organic diet in order to limit our exposure to glyphosate – the main cause of leaky gut. I would add that it is imperative for all of us to actively lobby our governments to eliminate this life threatening chemical. Next, he has developed a health product called Restore that strengthens the membranes that line the gut in order to close the “leaks” in the lining caused especially by Glyphosate. The description from Dr. Bush’s website is: “RESTORE is a new generation, soil-derived supplement that promotes an optimal gut environment. It is not a probiotic. It is not a prebiotic. Rather, it is a carbon-rich, alkaline liquid, comprised of Terrahydrite™, a proprietary formulation

Essential Meeting for all parents and students interested in Late French Immersion (Grade 6) Information & Registration

March 6, 2018 at 6 p.m. L’École Intermédiare Shuswap Middle School Principals, district staff, teachers, and students will present information about Late French Immersion and provide registration information. This meeting is for parents of students considering Late French Immersion. If there are between 22 and 28 (1 class) or between 44 and 56 (2 classes) interested students (including sibling registrants) at the March information session, all students will be automatically registered. If this is not the case, a process for registration will be outlined at this meeting. Therefore, it is essential to attend this meeting with your interested student. For further information please call L’École Intermédiare Shuswap Middle School at (250) 832-6031.

of Aqueous Humic Substances and trace mineral amino acid complexes. RESTORE has been shown in lab testing to increase and strengthen the tight junction proteins in the gut lining, our frontline of defense against environmental factors in our food, water, and even air, thereby impacting the immune system as much of the body’s immune system is in the gut lining. Additionally, a stronger gut lining keeps undigested food and environmental elements, such as herbicides and antibiotics used in farming from leaking out into the bloodstream from the intestines. The immune system then does not have to defend against these foreign “invaders,” which could also be as simple as undigested kale or broccoli.” I have personally or-

dered this product as well because research has shown that Glyphosate is so prevalent now that it is even found in the air and rainwater. His website is shop. restore4life.com but it also says it is available from retailers such as amazon.com and GNC. I am also in the process of investigating if Canadian healthcare professionals are able to get his product to sell in my office. If glyphosate wasn’t found in the all of the air, water and soil around the globe we wouldn’t have to take products such as this. But considering the facts, I think we all need to support the health of our gut lining. Dr. Warren Gage is a family wellness Chiropractor who can be reached at Harbourfront Family Chiropractic at (250) 803-0224.

JANNET Jannet started bowling with Special Olympics BC in 1986. In 2016 she moved from Chilliwack to the Shuswap and now she competes in snowshoeing and bocce, and is active in Club Fit. She enjoys the opportunity to play and learn, and one of her most favourite times at Special Olympics was participating in team soccer at Club Fit. She attends the Shuswap Association for Community Living HWLS day program. Her hobbies include going to the movies, wordsearch, crafts and playing with animals.


Page A8 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A25

Don Cherry’s & Sandbar Restaurant SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK

Wednesday All Day Wings $6.95

Chicken or Beef

3 for $5.95

Saturday Prime Rib

with Baked Potato, Yorkshire Pudding, and Salad

Thursday

Tuesday

Steak Sandwich

All Day Cheap Appies $7.95

Served 5 - 9 pm

$24.95

Sunday

7 oz

$13.95

Brunch $19.95

SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK

SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK

Monday

ALL DAY TACOS

1 - 11 $1.79/yr. 55+ $17.95

Bring this Advertisement in for 15% OFF SUNDAY BRUNCH 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. • One Per Person

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Located at Prestige Harbourfront Resort

WORD SCRAMBLE

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CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPES

CLUES ACROSS 1. Chop or cut 4. Green veggie 7. Bar bill 10. Doctors’ group 11. One who buys and sells securities (slang) 12. Be in debt 13. Lively ballroom dance 15. Singer Charles 16. Polish city 19. Former 21. Dismissing from employment 23. Minerals 24. Plotted 25. Consult 26. After a prayer 27. Agents of one’s downfall 30. Leaseholders 34. Supervises flying 35. Voodoo god 36. Alfalfa 41. Apply another coat to 45. Witnesses 46. Jai __, sport 47. Ones who proof 50. Recant 54. Small group with shared interests 55. Part of warming headgear 56. Woolen cloth 57. Snag 59. Central American fruit tree 60. Woman (French) 61. The 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet 62. Type of bed 63. Soviet Socialist Republic 64. Consume 65. Japanese freight company (abbr.)

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

Capricorn

Capricorn, you have enough sense to balance your imagination with reality. Take your clever ideas and figure out a practical way to make them work.

Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Aquarius, although the destination is in view, you have not yet developed a plan to get there. Be sure you include integrity in your decisions and skip shortcuts.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Pisces

ARIES

Apr. 21-May 21

TAURUS

Taurus

1. Czech monetary unit 2. Able to arouse intense feeling 3. Elk 4. Muscular weaknesses 5. Geological time 6. Depths of the ocean 7. Burns to the ground 8. Becomes cognizant of 9. Cause to shade 13. US political party 14. Refers to some of a thing 17. Single 18. Type of beer 20. Ancient Iranian people 22. Grocery chain 27. Gridiron league 28. English river 29. __ and cheese 31. Peyton’s younger brother 32. Long time 33. High schoolers’ test 37. Respects 38. Organize anew

39. Filippo __, Saint 40. Intrinsic nature of something 41. Cheese dish 42. Ancient Greek City 43. Patron saint of Ireland 44. Produced by moving aircraft or vehicle 47. Shock treatment 48. __ Jones 49. Things 51. Having wings 52. Panthers’ QB Newton 53. Third-party access 58. Satisfaction

May 22-June 21

GEMINI

Gemini

Gemini, everyday things seem magical to you this week. This may be because you’re looking at the world through the haze of happiness spurred on by new love.

June 22- July 22

CANCER

Cancer

LEO

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

VIRGO

Virgo

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

Libra

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

Scorpio

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

Sagittarius

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ROSSINI

Cancer, you have been biding your time, but the moment to take a calculated risk has finally arrived. Since you have done some thorough research, it should be smooth sailing.

July 23-Aug. 23

Leo

Saturday, March 10th, 9:55AM

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CRYPTO FUN

Aries, you are inspired and ready to take on the world. Make the time to thank the people who spurred your motivation, then get moving toward your goals. Taurus, your positive outlook can help not only you, but also others. Where some people only see problems, you see all the possibilities lying ahead of you.

Transparency is your middle name this week, Leo. Others know just what is going on in your life and in your head. This may encourage others to be more open. Virgo, since you don’t want to be misunderstood in any way, you need to be very careful in how you express your thoughts this week. Clarify details, if necessary.

Daily Features Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Come Celebrate our New Menu!

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Pisces, conformity is certainly not your thing. But at some point this week, you’ll need to go with the flow. Find a way to make it your own.

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

Aries

CLUES DOWN

CAPRICORN

WORD SEARCH

BEACH BIRDS BLUE BOARDWALK BOATING CONCH CORAL COVE CRUISE CULTURE DESTINATION DOCK DUNE EXPLORE FISH FOLIAGE GULL HUMIDITY

ISLAND LUSH OCEAN PALM PEBBLES PENINSULA SAND SCUBA SEASHELLS SHORELINE SNORKEL SUNSHINE SWIMSUIT TIDE TROPICS VACATION WARMTH WAVES

SUDOKU

LIBRA

Chances for success in all areas of your life are magnified by your innovative spirit, Libra. Keep the good ideas flowing and bring others into your future plans.

SCORPIO

Confidence is on the rise, Scorpio, and that may lead you to take a few risks. There may be great gains to be had, or not much change. However, it can be worthwhile to try.

SAGITTARIUS

Intentions aimed at distant goals may keep you busy in the long run, Sagittarius, but this week direct your focus to items that will provide the most immediate results.

WS183100

PUZZLE NO. SU183020


Chase

Page A26 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Chase Mountie meets the monarch Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

In his 28 years policing, most in general

duty, Sgt. Barry Kennedy has seen a lot. But the new officer in charge of the Chase

RCMP detachment has also experienced policing from a particularly unusual perspective –

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

CHASE

Jr. B Hockey

T hank yous, to the fanonsors volunteersy, esrps for a and pla 7-2018 good 201 n! Seaso

Michael Fidanza #14

Forward

Home Town: .................Kamloops, BC Favourite NHL Player: ..............................................Kyle Turris Favourite NHL Team: .................................. Ottawa Senators What do you pursue other than Hockey ..............................................All sports Favourite Music Artists: ................................................. All music Favourite Movie:.............. Lone Survivor Favourite Superpower: ....................................To be able to fly

Village of Chase NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED VILLAGE of CHASE ZONING AMENDMENT BYLAW NO. 847-2018 The Village of Chase Council will be holding a Public Hearing pursuant to Section 464 of the Local Government Act, to consider amendments to the Village of Chase Zoning Bylaw No. 683 consisting of inserting new definitions regarding recreational cannabis: That Section 2.1, Definitions, be amended by adding the following definitions: ”CANNABIS means cannabis as defined in the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and includes any products containing cannabis. CANNABIS RETAIL means premises where cannabis is sold, dispensed or otherwise provided to a person who attends at the premises. RETAIL means premises where goods, wares, merchandise, substances, articles or things are offered or kept for sale, including storage of limited quantities of such goods, wares, merchandise, substances, articles or things, sufficient only to service such store and includes but is not limited to: appliance stores, furniture stores, hardware stores, clothing stores, sporting goods, and second-hand stores. Retail does not include CANNABIS RETAIL.” The Council will consider amending the zoning bylaw to include these new definitions. If you feel your property interests may be affected by the proposed amendment and you wish to address Village Council on any matters pertaining to this bylaw, please attend the Public Hearing at the Village Office on: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 4:00 pm Your comments/concerns may also be submitted in writing more than 7 days in advance of the meeting by addressing them to the undersigned, or at the public hearing in person, by petition or by attorney. Please know that all submissions may become part of the public record. Sean O’Flaherty, RPP Corporate Officer Village of Chase

rived at Windsor Castle, they were informed of protocols. “Do not approach the queen, we were told. You can’t say, ‘Hey, Liz, come here, pleased to meet ya, I’m Barry,’ he quips. “You will see her walking around and, like the royal family, you can’t approach and call out to them. But you can speak if they speak to you. And there were places where you weren’t allowed to go.” Although they saw Queen Elizabeth every day, they didn’t see other royals. The 40 people with the musical ride stayed in a dormitory, which Kennedy says was more like a big hotel over top of the stables. “Everything was stone, oak, teak, all polished, just how you’d picture it would be – it wasn’t run down, it was beautiful.” He said the queen would ride with her groomsmen, and security would follow at a distance. She used stairs to mount her horse, a luxury that Kennedy and his fellow riders weren’t allowed. “Our bosses said, you will get on the old-fashioned way.” In the daytime the Musical Ride would do shows for the local schools who’d come to the castle and, at night, for the whole week they were there, the queen would host equestrian shows which the town would come to watch, and they were part of that.

Sgt. Barry Kennedy, now in charge of the Chase detachment, participated for four years in the RCMP’s Musical Ride where its travels took him to Windsor Palace in England. He was pictured on the front page of a May 2000 Horse & Hound magazine. (Photo contributed) “I thought we were very privileged to stay in Windsor Castle – it was really an exciting opportunity that others didn’t get, kind of behind the scenes at Windsor Castle.” And did he get to see the queen’s famous corgis? “I did not. We heard a lot about them though… from the bobbies who had to run all over the place and catch them.” As for mishaps with the Musical Ride, Kennedy says he fell off about once a year, as did others. One memorable fall was at Spruce Meadows in Calgary, a show that was going to be televised so he called his mom to let her know. At the end of the ride the horses line up and charge from one end of the arena to the other. “Away we go, except the horse in front of me doesn’t go.” His horse ran into it and he ended up almost at his horse’s ears. His horse then took off

with him hanging off the side, his boot spur dug into the saddle. “Down I go into the dirt, rolling, and I have to run down.” Everybody on the ride was laughing, but Kennedy had a comedic comeback. “Yeah, but does your mother know which one you are? You’re just a red coat out there, I’m the one rolling on the ground.” Despite all his travels, Kennedy says he and his spouse are happy to make Chase home. They’ve been eyeing the community for nine years, so when the position opened up, he took it. They have four children and the two youngest will be with them in Chase. “We liked it as it’s right on the lake and it looked like a nice community to live in. It’s also on the highway with quick access to bigger centres. We thought, “This will be a nice place to go.”

A call to prayer!

Thy Kingdom Come The Churches of Salmon Arm invite you to join us in prayer for our community.

Friday, March 16th 2018 @ 6:30 pm

Note: This is the first of two consecutive Public Notices. Dated this 1 day of March, 2018 at Chase, BC

chasebc.ca

atop a horse. His adventures have included talking horses with Queen Elizabeth at Windsor Castle as well as galloping down an arena in Calgary’s Spruce Meadows while hanging around the neck of his steed. Kennedy began his policing career in North Vancouver and his postings have included Ottawa, Vernon, Golden, McBride, Princeton and now Chase. His time in Ottawa was four years spent with the RCMP’s Musical Ride, a brand new vocation for him given that his knowledge of riding horses at the time didn’t go much beyond the words ‘giddy-up’ and ‘whoa.’ He applied because he’s from Ottawa, had seen the ride many times and thought he’d like to do it. “The next thing you know, here I was on the ride, riding six hours a day,” he says. A highlight for Kennedy was staying at Windsor Castle for more than a week in 2000 and performing for the queen. He describes her as sharp as a tack, very inquisitive and talkative. “Our horses were stabled with her horses and she rode every day… She would come in when her horse was ready to go, talk with us and ask us about our horses. She was a good rider and she loved it, and she had a very keen interest in our horses as well.” When the officers ar-

250-679-3238

Living Waters Church 180 Lakeshore Dr. N.W., Salmon Arm, BC (behind Boston Pizza)

sponsored by Salmon

Arm Ministerial Association

5 - 305 Brooke Drive Chase, BC

250-679-4440

www.HRBLOCK.CA At participating offices. Instant Refund™ valid only on the federal portion of tax returns filed in Quebec. Some restrictions apply. Not everyone gets a refund. Not everyone is eligible for Instant Refund™.


www.saobserver.net Lakeshore News Friday, March 2, 2018

Friday, March 2, 2018 PageA27 A27 www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Remembering Loved Ones

Place your condolences online. (Visit your local newspaper website, obituary page)

BOWLBY, Doris Belva

Laura Hawley Baird

November 10, 1917 – February 22, 2018 Doris passed away peacefully at Youville Home in St. Albert, AB. She will be remembered by her daughter, Judy Hrabinsky (Harry), son, Rick Bowlby (Agnes), 3 granddaughters and 4 great grandchildren. She was born in Regina, SK, came to Alberta as a child where she spent many years before moving to Salmon Arm, BC then returning to Alberta in 2015. Doris was predeceased by her husband, Roy Bowlby, and a grandson in 1977. Cremation has taken place and interment will take place at a later date in Salmon Arm, BC. The family would like to express their thanks to the Youville Home for their care and compassion during this time. In lieu of flowers a donation can be made to a charity of choice.

I found a picture of you One that I had not seen in awhile I held it gently in my hands Lost for a moment in your smile

You left us beautiful memories, Your love is still our guide, and though we cannot see you you’re always at our side.

Place a loved one’s Memoriam or Obituary

in one of our BC award winning newspapers. Call our Classified Centre at:

1.866.865.4460

I found a card from you Written in your own special way I held it gently in my hands Lost for a moment in that day Memories, sweet gifts from you To allow my heart a breath To let me be lost for a moment To remember life not just death

Are you living with a life changing illness? Are you a Caregiver?

WE CAN HELP We provide support: • for the terminally ill and their families • for living with Quality of Life to End of Life • for Grief and Bereavement • by teaching how to have the difficult conversations • through various educational workshops • for Caregivers through respite breaks • how to navigate the system

Honesty Makes a Difference

We accept all Memorial Society and Pre-Need Funeral Policies Making final arrangements for a loved one is not easy. That’s why compassion goes into everything we do. We are prepared to arrange any special request you may have. t5SBEJUJPOBM4FSWJDFT t$SFNBUJPO4FSWJDFT t1SFBSSBOHFNFOU1MBOOJOH t"MMJORVJSJFTXFMDPNFIST.

YOU CAN HELP

• become a member • become a volunteer • make a donation • leave a bequest #4-781 Marine Park Drive

Tammy & Vince Fischer

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www.shuswaphospice.ca

BROADWAY, Edwin (Ed) Lee

Rachel Olive Gibson

March 31, 1925 – February 9, 2018 Rachel Olive Gibson passed away peacefully at Shuswap Hospital on Feb. 9, 2018 at the age of 92. Born in London England on March 31, 1925 and married in 1945 to George R Gibson, they immigrated to Canada in 1957. Rachel led an eventful life, moving from the UK to New Liskeard Ontario in 1957; to Vancouver BC in 1964, then finally to Salmon Arm in 2006. She was Noble Grand of the Rebecca Concord Lodge in Port Coquitlam and one of the founders of the Presbyterian Church in Coquitlam. She is survived by husband George, now 94; sons Anthony and Alan , daughter in law Kathleen, grandchildren Jennifer (Grant) and Stephen; with great grandsons Jacob and Owen. She was an understanding and devoted wife for 73 years, a wonderful mother, and a proud grandmother. She always had a smile, a warm welcome and a nice cup of tea ready for all occasions; there was always; “Just Enough.� Her remains were Cremated. A service will be held at Saint Andrews Presbyterian Church: Saturday, March, 31 2018 promptly at 2:00 with “tea at 3�

Edwin (Ed) Lee Broadway was born January 21, 1927, at home near Golconda, Illinois. At age seventeen Ed joined the U.S. Navy and received the WW II Victory Medal for his navy service. After the war, Ed met and married Mary Erlean Collins, graduated from Prairie Bible Institute (1952), and started his lifelong ministry as a pastor in Alberta, Missouri, Tennessee, British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Ed and Erlean had seven children; Diane (Ron Sauer) Ablonczy, Leslie (Meredythe), Edwina (Daniel) Bobocel, Danita (Ed Onyebuchi) Senf, Mark (Melanie), Kerry Lee (Roxanna Sutcliffe) and Danice. In 1986 Ed married Edith (nee Dunn), bringing Edith’s daughter, Connie (Martin) Roberts and their son Clint into the family. During the last thirty-five years of his ministry, Ed started many new churches and he was still preaching “on call� until God took him into His presence. Ed passed away peacefully February 21, 2018 in Mayerthorpe, AB. Ed was predeceased by his first wife, Erlean; infant daughter, Danice; sons-in-law, Tom Ablonczy and Hal Senf; and sister, LaVerne. Visitation Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at Park Memorial Funeral Home, 5101 - 47 Avenue, Mayerthorpe. Memorial Service Thursday, March 1 at 2:30 p.m. at Mayerthorpe Diamond Centre, 4814 - 54 Street, Mayerthorpe. Reverend Ian Smith officiating. Edith, and Ed’s seven children, nine grandchildren and many great-grandchildren will miss Ed very much and they are joyful to know he is in the Presence of God. Ed would be honoured if friends made a contribution to Mayerthorpe Baptist Church, Box 397, Mayerthorpe, AB T0E 1N0 or e-transfers to mbchurch@xplornet.ca. Photos, memories and condolences may be shared through www.parkmemorial.com. Park Memorial Mayerthorpe 780-786-2533 Family Owned Funeral Home and Crematorium

Serving and caring for families in our community since 1947. Whether you’re considering pre-planning or have lost a loved one, you can trust our professional and friendly team to support you with meaningful grief services. We provide individualized funeral, memorial and celebration of life services, as well as grief counselling and an aftercare program.

Independently Owned and Operated

For more information and the answers to many frequently asked questions, visit us online at:

440 - 10th Street SW (PO Box 388) Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N5

www.bowersfuneralservice.com

250-832-2223


Page Friday, March 2, 2018 A28 A28 www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Friday, March 2, 2018 www.saobserver.net Lakeshore News

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

BCClassifieds.com

ONLINE bcclassifieds@blackpress.ca IN PRINT 1.866.865.4460

...in your community, online and in print

Friendly Frank says...

CLEAR THE CLUTTER!

It’s time to sell, call today!

Garage sales are the talk of town! Give your JUNK a new life!

Showcase your hidden treasures.

Sell any single item dirt cheap! INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS ..............1-8 COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS....9-57 TRAVEL .......................................61-76 CHILDREN ...................................80-98 EMPLOYMENT .........................102-198 BUSINESS SERVICES ...............203-387 PETS & LIVESTOCK .................453-483 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE........503-587 REAL ESTATE...........................603-969 RENTALS.................................703-757 AUTOMOTIVE...........................804-862 MARINE...................................902-920

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the newspaper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such an advertisement. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. cannot bcclassifieds.com be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. reserves bcclassifieds.com the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisement and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassifieds.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisement and box rental.

Pets

Pets

Pets

Rentals

Information

Career Opportunities

Feed & Hay

Pets

Pets

Apt/Condo for Rent

Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassifieds.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the Publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recouse in law.

ON THE WEB:

Journeyman Sheet Metal Worker/Gas Fitter

ALFALFA grass first crop, excellent horse hay. $7.00/bale (250)803-8298

Merchandise for Sale

Please attach a copy of relevant certiďŹ cation with your application.

Auctions

Help Wanted Care Worker

Part-time positions available, $18.00/hr to start, care experience preferred but can train the right candidate. Must be physically fit, non-smoking environment. Call Gwen 250-835-0145

F/T General Labourers North Timber is looking to hire general labourers for full-time employment. We offer competitive wages & a comprehensive benefit pkg. Please email resume to netimber@junction.net

MARCH 3RD RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT AUCTION

WE’RE BUSY! • Kitchen • Banquet

• Servers • Bartenders

Email resumes: wendy@aquaticobay.com or drop off: Don Cherry’s at Prestige Harbourfront Resort 251 Harbour Front Dr NE, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 2W7

Personals MAKE A Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat Call FREE! 250-220-1300 or 1-800-2101010. www.livelinks.com 18+0

Employment Business Opportunities HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT? Arthritic Conditions/COPD? Restrictions in Walking/Dressing? Disability Tax Credit $2,000 Tax Credit $20,000 Refund. Apply Today For Assistance: 1-844-4535372. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employertrusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

Services

Financial Services GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

Home Improvements

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rRenovation rRepair rMaintenance

rFencing rDecks rSheds

With Michelle

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Silver Creek

16.5 hp, auto shift, 42� Deck, 48� snow blade. $550

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Heavy Duty Machinery

for oversize scrap steel, cats, yarders, sawmill, farm or mine equipment. All insurance in place to work in your yard. Free Quote

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Garden & Lawn

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Stanley Bland 832-6615 or 833-2449

Storage

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AAA MINI-STORAGE-250.832.3558 • Personal & Business • Seasonal Toys & Tires • Covered RV Storage • Seniors Discount

• Micro-storage under $10 • Packing supplies • 24 hour access/securities • Friendly Service

www.aaaministorage.ca • 431 42nd St. SW, Salmon Arm

Misc. for Sale

Kelowna - exp’d hydro-vac & vac truck operators needed. Comp. wages & benefits. Resumes, tickets, abstract to: tom@dlenviro.ca

Price incls. Cloverdale High Performance Paint. NO PAYMENT, until job is completed!

2 Coats Any Colour (Ceiling & Trim extra)

or Email:

lionsdh@shaw.ca

Halls/Auditoriums GLENEDEN COMMUNITY HALL for rent. Banquets, meetings, weddings, reunions or ? 250-832-9806 www.glenedencommunity.com

Suites, Lower SOUTH CANOE 1 Bedroom suite, ground level, private entrance, adults only, car & references required, n/s & n/p. $580 / month + damage deposit, utilities & cable included.

Suites, Upper Salmon Arm LARGE 1 bedroom, Single working adult, 35+ NP, NS, utilities, wifi incl.,damage deposit & written refs req. $800/month 250-804-6123 /250-832-4827

Misc. Wanted

Transportation

00000000000000000000000 Numismatist buying coins, collections,paper money, gold, silver +. Todd 250)-864-3521

Boats B A K E RV I E W B OAT S . C O M Sale Now On! 10’ Aluminum RIB $3333. 5 hp Tohatsu propane motor $2269. Galvanized trailer $995. Package price: $4995. Financing available. Dealers Welcome. 1-800-5717697

01 Actual Coin Collector Buying Collections, Sets, Gold & Silver,Olympic Coins, Paper $ etc.Call Chad 1-250-863-3082

“litter-less�

Legal

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SAWMILLS from only $4,397 MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-5670404 Ext:400OT.

Painting & Decorating 3 Rooms For $299

Subsidized Independent Living for individuals 55 & older Manor is located in Sorrento with a view of the lake. 1 Bedroom - 1 Bath Includes: Stove, Fridge & Storage Room Water, sewer, garbage are paid. Common area room & laundry room Contact the Manor for more information:

250-832-3158

250-253-4663

Career Opportunities

SORRENTO & DISTRICT HOUSING SOCIETY (Sorrento Lions Manor)

Rental Suite Available

Appointments necessary.

Garden Equipment Craftsman Riding Lawn Mower

Monday to Friday

All Breeds including Cats & Large Dogs

10am Start - Live & Online www.KwikAuctions.com 7305 Meadow Ave, Burnaby, BC Shipping & Storage Available Featuring New & Used Food Equipment, Rental Returns, Cambro, Stainless Sinks, Tables, Shelving, True Refrigeration

Vernon/Kelowna/ Salmon Arm WILL PAY CASH

Hiring Restaurant Staff

PET GROOMING

Alfalfa Orchard Grass Hay, $5.00 per bale. Near Gardom Lake. 250-832-4488

Visit: www.sd27.bc.ca for full position details and how to apply.

Advertise in the 2018 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis largest Sportsman publication

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

COPYRIGHT

Call today to reserve your spot, space is limited!

Employment

Denied Long-Term Disability, CPP or other Insurance? If, YES. Call: 604.937.6354 or e-mail: jfisher@dbmlaw.ca

Advertisers are reminded that provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, age, and physical or mental disability, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

Spotlight your business with our business builder packages

Announcements

Donations and bequests are requested for equipment to help care for patients and residents of the Hospital and Bastion Place. Tax receipts will be issued. Mail to: Shuswap Hospital Foundation Box 265, Salmon Arm, BC 7&/r1I Donate Online (secure site): www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org

INDEX IN BRIEF

Are You The Best at What You Do?

‌show it!

www.pitch-in.ca

Š Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, 2017 | ™The heart and / Icon on its own or followed by another icon or words in English are trademarks of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

CRIMINAL RECORD? Why suffer Employment/Licensing loss? Travel/Business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US Entry Waiver. Record Purge. File Destruction. Free Consultation 1-800-347-2540. accesslegalmjf.com


www.saobserver.net Lakeshore News Friday, March 2, 2018

Employment

Employment

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Friday, March 2, 2018 PageA29 A29 www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

with Black Press (Interior South) Black Press is Canada’s leading private independent newspaper company with more than 170 community, daily and urban newspapers in Canada, Washington State, Hawaii, California and Ohio and has extensive digital and printing operations.

Multi-Media Journalist (Vernon) The Vernon Morning Star has an opening for a full-time, permanent position for a multimedia journalist with a focus on a full range of community features, sports, arts and hard news. The successful applicant joining our editorial team, which includes the editor and 6 reporters, will play a key role in contributing to our website, 3 time-weekly print product, special features & publications and robust social media interaction with our viewers. Advanced video, social media and photography skills will be fundamental attributes, along with working knowledge of Indesign, Photoshop and iMovie. Creative Designer (Kelowna) We are looking to fill a full time position within our Creative Services hub at our Kelowna Division which now services many Black Press Community Newspapers. You are proficient in Adobe InDesign CS6, Adobe Acrobat, and Adobe Photoshop in a Mac environment. You can also handle multiple deadlines at one time for our print and digital products. Multi-Media Editor (Vernon) This is an exciting career opportunity for the right individual. The successful candidate will be required to work as the lead of a very busy fast paced newsroom, while contributing to a larger regional news team. The successful applicant will possess exceptional writing and oral communication skills and a clear understanding of copy-editing, grammar and Canadian Press style. The Multi-Media Editor is responsible for a complete range of writing assignments, photography, and page layout. The successful candidate will also represent the newspaper in the community. Flexibility, attention to detail, and the ability to meet deadlines in a busy production environment are necessary.  Circulation Clerk (Vernon) Do you love working with kids? Do you know Vernon? Join our team at the Vernon Morning Star. Vernon Morning Star has an opening for a full time Circulation Clerk. The successful applicant will enjoy working in a fast-paced customer service oriented environment. In addition, this person must possess strong computer skills, be familiar with accounting practices, good communication skills (both verbal and non-verbal) and a pleasant telephone manner. Circulation Clerk (Kelowna) Do you love working with kids? Do you know Kelowna? Join our team at the Kelowna Capital News. Kelowna Capital News has an opening for a full time Circulation Clerk. The successful applicant will enjoy working in a fast-paced customer service oriented environment. In addition, this person must possess strong computer skills, be familiar with accounting practices, good communication skills (both verbal and non-verbal) and a pleasant telephone manner. Temporary Multi Media Sales Consultant (Vernon) Enjoy a creative environment? Understand the power of marketing on multiple platforms? The Vernon Morning Star is on the hunt for a full-time Multi-media Advertising Consultant on a temporary basis. We are looking for an exceptional sales person that’s as comfortable talking to tattoo artists as boardroom executives. You are creative, persuasive, fearless and have passion in everything you do. Every day you will take our incredible brand out into the Vernon market and convey the many benefits of advertising with the Morning Star both in print and through our digital options.

Fight Back.

Notice of Proposed Rogers Communication Inc. Telecommunications Facility Description: As part of the public consultation process required by Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED), formerly Industry Canada, Rogers Communication Inc. is inviting the public to comment on a proposed telecommunications facility consisting of a 60-metre self-support tower and ancillary radio equipment in order to provide dependable wireless data and voice communication services in the Salmon Arm area.

Volunteer your time, energy and skills today.

Location: 2200 20th Avenue SE, Salmon Arm, B.C. (PID: 007-263-899) Coordinates: 50.679362 ° N, 119.258343 ° W For More information: Contact Rogers Communications Inc. at: Tawny Verigin c/o Cypress Land Services Agents to Rogers Communications Inc. Suite 1051, 409 Granville Street Vancouver, BC V6C 1T2 Eel: 1.855.301.1520 Email: publicconsultation@cypresslandservices.com The public is welcome to comment on the proposal by the end of the business day on April 2, 2018 respect to this matter. Rogers File: W3067 – Salmon Arm

24/7 access to your local news wherever you are

LETHAL DRUGS ARE out there

Find out how you can save a life. Every day, people are losing their lives to overdoses in BC. These deaths are preventable. Many illegal drugs, including party drugs, have been found to contain deadly fentanyl. And even more toxic carfentanil is now being detected in BC. Not using drugs is the best defence — using alone is the greatest risk. If you use drugs or know someone who does, help is available. Learn about treatment, and where to find naloxone and overdose prevention sites in your area by calling 8-1-1 or visiting www.gov.bc.ca/overdose. Your knowledge, compassion and action can save a life.

Learn more at gov.bc.ca/overdose

Carry a Naloxone Kit

Call 9-1-1

#stopoverdose

For more information on these vacancies and other regions throughout B.C. visit:

www.blackpress.ca/careers

Visit your local community Black Press Media newspaper website & click on the E-EDITIONS button at the top of the page.

1-800-222-TIPS


Page A30 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Chase

www.saobserver.net

Wranglers burn the Heat out of playoffs

Scott Koch News Contributor

This past weekend found the 100 Mile House Wranglers visiting Chase to take on the Heat in first round playoff action. The results of the first two games at the Art Holding Memorial Arena were not what the local shinny fans wanted. Friday night saw Chase take a two-goal lead in the second minute of the opening period. Chase

goals by Seamus Collins from Brayden Haskell and Pat Brady, followed 14 seconds later from Zachary Fournier assisted by Kolten Moore. The visiting Cariboo boys stepped on the accelerator and tied the game up. The Heat had a one goal lead after 40 minutes of mayhem. The Wranglers scored three quick goals and rode out of town with a 5-3 win to erase the home ice advantage.

Saturday night found the same two teams in the same arena playing each other. Chase once again got things started with Nikiforuk doing the good deed helped by Brady and Fournier. Then in the second the Wranglers tied the dance up. In the third the Cariboo crew silenced the locals with a goal. Then the Heat scored a pair, Collins for the second night in a row assisted by Brady

Marzocco and Brady, then Nikiforuk on the man advantage for his second of the event With 50 seconds left, the Wranglers lassoed a tie. Two minutes in to OT, the visitors sent fans home with an empty feeling, a 4-3 OT win, seeing the Wranglers going up 2-0 in a best of 7 series. Game 3 was Monday the 26th, at the South Cariboo Rec Centre in 100 Mile House, home

of the Wranglers. This end to end madcap saw zero scoring in the first with both goaltenders performing heroic saves. In the second, 100 Mile got the only goal. In the third the complexion of the game turned ugly as the Officials called a lot of minors but were unable to blow the whistle on several serious infractions warranting majors and suspensions. The Cariboo crew popped in a pair

Looking to build on a 1-0 late in the first period of game two, Chase Heat’s Gavin Mattey looks to make a move and get the puck behind 100 mile house Wranglers goalie Jakob Severson. (Rick Koch Photo) prior to Evan Hughes pumping in a counter. 100 Mile added to their total making it 4-1. Nikiforuk scored a comeback tally on the power play from Brady and Michael Fidanza, but that was all on this night. With less than a minute to play an empty net goal secured the Wranglers a 3-0 strangle hold on the best of seven series. In the fourth game of the series on Feb. 27 the Heat were fighting for their playoff lives on the road. The game started with a flurry of three Wranglers goals in the opening period. Frustrations had boiled over by the end of the first. In the final minute of the period of the period Chase’s Ryan Okino was given a game misconduct for cross checking. The resulting scuffle saw

a minor dealt to each team. The Wranglers scored two more in the opening two-minutes of the second period. Chase got themselves on the scoreboard with a power-play marker from Kaden Black and followed up with another from Evan Hughes. The Wranglers denied the heat any momentum going into the final period with a sixth goal as the buzzer sounded to end the second period. Kolten Moore added another goal for Chase two minutes into the final period but it was too little too late as the Wranglers held them scoreless after that, making the final score 6-3. The fourth game concluded a Wranglers’ sweep of the series and knocked the Heat out of the playoffs. -With files from Jim Elliot

Newspaper Delivery Routes Available for

CONGRATULATIONS! 219 athletes from the Thompson - Okanagan competed at the 2018 BC Winter Games bringing home 89 medals. Thank you to the coaches, officials, volunteers, and families who support these growing champions. See photos, videos, and results at

BCGAMES.ORG

SALMON ARM

Route #

Paper Amount

166 234 258

44 67 100

5 Ave. SE & 5 St. SE 15 Ave. NE & 18 St. NE 4 Ave. SE & 17 St. NE Evergreen MHP (3350 10th Ave. NE) 6 Ave. SE & 28 St. SE 2 Ave. SE & 20 St. SE 15 Ave. NE & 30 St. NE

57 78

SICAMOUS Yew Ave. & Forset Park St. Martinson Ave. & Conn St.

106 130 134 145

500 508

69 59 119 150

Area Description

Deliver in your neighbourhood! Contact Circulation • 250-832-2131 circulation@saobserver.net


Around Town

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

FRIDAY, MARCH 2

THURSDAY, MARCH 8

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER - Event at 1:30 p.m. at the Crossroads Free Methodist Church, 121 Shuswap Street. For more information, contact 250-832-8068. DO A JIG - Enderby Old Time Dance Club will hold their St. Patrick’s Day dance at 7 p.m. at the Enderby Drill Hall. All ages welcome. For information, call Jim at 250 515-1176. FUNDRAISING DANCE - Dance to the Wilds to benefit the Shuswap Outdoor Learning Foundation from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. at the Elks Hall. Tickets available at Acorn Music. FORMATION INSPIRATION - multi-media works by students of the Fine Arts program at Thompson Rivers University, March 3 to April 14 at Salmon Arm Arts Centre. Opening reception, March 2, 7 p.m., gallery hours 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

SATURDAY, MARCH 3 CASINO ROYALE - A night of fun casino games, appies, prizes and a cash bar is a fundraiser for Salmon Arm Rotary at the Salmon Arm Curling Centre from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets available at the curling rink. Prizes for dressing in costume. GLENEDEN HALL DANCE - From 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Gleneden Hall. Music by Sierra. Regular monthly dances on the Saturday of each month from October to June. For more information contact Sharon at 250-832- 9806 or glenedencommunity.com BINGO - Play at the Seniors DropIn Centre at 31 Hudson Ave. Doors open at 4 p.m. and walk-ins welcome at 6 p.m. ST. DAVID’S DAY - Dinner at the Seniors Activity Centre at 170-5th Ave. SE starting at 5 p.m. Call 250832-8547 for more.

agricultural workers in Ontario.

SPRING JAZZ IN THE SHUSWAP -The Jordan Dick Quartet with guest vocalist Andrea Roberts, featuring Jordan Dick, Sandy Cameron, Bill Lockie and Gareth Says, at the Nexus at First, 450 Okanagan Ave. SE, doors open at 7 p.m., admission by donation. For more information, visit jazzsalmonarm.com. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY - Coffeehouse and celebration, 5 to 7 p.m. at the Shuswap Pie Company. Featuring live music my Making Do, interactive displays and presenters. ROBIN HOOD - a ballet production by Just For Kicks Dance Studio, March 8 at 6 p.m. and March 10 at 1 and 6 p.m., tickets available at Match Box in Centenoka Park Mall.

TUESDAY, MARCH 13

ARTIST TRADING CARDS - 3 p.m. at Salmon Arm Arts Centre

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14

SUFFERING CHRONIC PAIN? - Free six-week workshops to better self-manage pain. Wednesday mornings, April 4 to May 9, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Shuswap Lake Hospital Education Room. For info and to register: call UVIC’s Centre on Aging 1-866-902-3767 or online www.selfmanagementbc.ca.

THURSDAY, MARCH 15

COFFEE BREAK AND ARTIST TALK - 2 p.m. at Salmon Arm Arts Centre

FRIDAY, MARCH 9

FRIDAY, MARCH 16

VOICES IN SONG - Northern Lights Choir performs at 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Salmon

SHUSWAP JAMMERS – Take an instrument or your dancing shoes to the new school district building on Shuswap Street every Friday for music, dancing and singing, featuring door prizes, a 50/50 draw and lunch from 7 to includes 35 point Steering, 10 p.m. For more information, call Suspension and Brake inspecDean at 250-804-9219. tion, wheel alignment plus 4wheel balance. *Extra charge PRAYER SERVICE - The churchmay apply for additional alignes of Salmon Arm invite you to parment adjustments. ticipate in a corporate time of prayer Offer valid until March 31, 2018. on Friday, March 16th, 2018 at 6:30 pm to pray for our communities and churches. “Thy Kingdom Come” is Conventional held at Living Waters Community Oil Change Church, 180 Lakeshore Drive NW $ * (behind Boston Pizza). Everyone welcome. Light refreshments will *most vehicles. Filter, disposal be served. fees and taxes extra.

POTHOLE SPECIAL!!

179

$

95*

39.95

Pre-Road Trip Inspection: with 63 point check 95* +Oiltaxes Change.

SUNDAY, MARCH 4

VOICES IN SONG - Northern Lights Choir performs at 2:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church in Sorrento. Tickets at Acorn Music. BALLET ON THE BIG SCREEN - The Bolshoi Ballet’s The Flame of Paris will be shown at 1 p.m. at the Salmar Classic. JUST FOR KICKS - The dance studio presents the ballet version of the Little Mermaid at 6 p.m. Tickets at the Community Centre.

TUESDAY, MARCH 6

SHUSWAP NATURALISTS - Meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Salmon Arm Secondary Sullivan Campus in the library. Guest speaker will be Marijke Dake, who will share her research about trains and coal dust blowing off them as they pass through Salmon Arm. STORY SWAPPING - Shuswap Storytellers gather for a fun evening of telling and listening to stories at 7 p.m. at Askew’s Uptown Community Room in Salmon Arm. No charge. Info call Estelle at 250 546-6186. WATCH THE BIRDIE - Badminton at the Gleneden Community Hall at 9:30 on Tuesdays. For more, contact Roger at 250-832-1599.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7

Friday, March 2, 2018 Page A31

SHUSWAP WRITER’S GROUP, meets from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Mall at Piccadilly board room. Also, hear our Writing Out Loud, Sunday, March 4 at noon on Voice of the Shuswap CKVS radio.

SATURDAY, MARCH 17

Save 10%

MEET THE BREEDS - The Vernon & District Kennel Club will be on any Fluid Flush at Centenoka Park Mall from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., with an anticipated + taxes without (Transmission, Steering, Brake, 12 to 15 different dog breeds will be Offer valid until Engine, Differential or Cooling) Offer valid until March 15, 2018. set up for the pubic to meet, a mini Mar. 15, 2018. *most vehicles. dog show that will introduce each breed, a nose work demo and a trick dog demo. There will be treats and freebies. 1151 10th Ave. SW • The Mall at Piccadilly, Salmon Arm Auto Service hours: Monday to Saturday 8am-5pm CELEBRATE IRISH STYLE 250-832-5030 • Locally Owned & Operated A St. Patrick’s Day Ceilidh will be held at the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, located at 1981-9th Ave. NE, at 7 p.m. Sing along Arm. Tickets at Acorn Music. to rousing and romantic melodies, which will include the Shuswap Pipes N’ Drums, Shuswap Barbershop Project, SATURDAY, MARCH 10 OPERA - Rossini’s Semiramide Live from the Met will and many other singers. Admission is a donation to the Shuswap Lake Health Care Auxiliary Society. run at 9:55 a.m. at the Salmar Classic Theatre. FLEA MARKET - The Shuswap Society for the Arts CHILI AND COFFEEHOUSE - The Sunnybrae Seniors Hall hosts a supper with regular or vegetarian chili from and Culture hosts a monthly indoor flea market from 1 to 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. It is located at 3585 Sunnybrae 5 p.m. in the gymnasium at the Downtown Activity CenCanoe Pt. Rd. Come for the supper and stay for the tre, 451 Shuswap Street, S.W. Organizations are welcome as well as individual sellers. Admission by $2 donation. coffeehouse afterwards Table rental is $10. Call 250-832-2300 to reserve a space. SUNDAY, MARCH 11 LEGENDARY COUNTRY BREAKFAST - The SunCOME FOR PANCAKES - A breakfast will be held at nybrae Seniors Hall hosts a community family breakfast the Seniors Activity Centre from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. It is located at 3585 Sunnybrae 170-5th Ave. SE. Tickets at the door. Everyone welcome. Canoe Pt. Rd. VOICES IN SONG - Northern Lights Choir performs at STROLL LAKESIDE - Sorrento Beach Walkers walk 2:30 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Salmon on the foreshore on the third Saturday of the month. For Arm. Tickets at Acorn Music. information, call Dan McKerracher at 250-319-5121.

49 5995*

Canadian Tire

MONDAY, MARCH 12

RESISTANCE AND REVOLUTION - The festival continues at 5 p.m. at the Salmar Classic with Migrant Dreams, a powerful recent Canadian documentary exploring the exploitation and struggles of temporary foreign

MONDAY, MARCH 19

OKANAGAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY - Salmon Arm Branch meets the third Monday of the month in the board room at the Mall at Piccadilly at 7 p.m.

Call us at 250-832-2131, drop in to our office, or use our new, easy to use calendar online. You can now upload your own events on our website…AND IT’S EASY!! Simply go to www.saobserver.net, go to CALENDAR, and click on Add Your Event.


Page A32 Friday, March 2, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

SHUSWAP PERKS CHOCOLATES - MADE IN STORE WIDE SELECTION OF BULK FOOD • DAILY SPECIALS

READY TO ENJOY MEALS • COFFEE SHOP & BAKERY SURE CROP FEEDS • FREE WI-FI • LOTTERY

Hours: Monday-Thursday 8:30 am - 7 pm Friday 8:30 am - 8 pm Saturday 8:30 am - 6 pm Sunday & Holidays 9 am - 6 pm

250-679-3261 Chase, BC

SALE PRICES EFFECTIVE:

Mar. 2-8, 2018

W IT H

smart one card price

Big Savings!

Donut Shop

Coffee K-Cups

Sel. Var., 24 Pk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

YOU SAVE 4

Carol’s Bakery Picks: Garlic Bread ................................

2 for

Calabrese Buns 6 Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sourdough Rolls

5 28 2 98 1

00 each

6 Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

each

W IT H

Picked Fresh CARE

99

Family Orchard

Cranberry Drink

Sel. Var., 3.78 L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

YOU SAVE 2

99

Baker

Batch Cookies

Sel. Var., 283 mL . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

YOU SAVE 2

Bon Matin

Raspberry Jam

Sel. Var., 340 mL . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Jif

Peanut Butter

YOU SAVE 3 3 9

Robin Hood

Quick Oats

2.25 kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sel. Var., 529 mL . . . . . . . . . . .

YOU SAVE 2

1 98 1 98 4

Mexican

Asparagus

4.37/kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Organic

Gala Apples

3 lb. Bag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48 lb.

lb.

ea.

for

Sel. Var., 1 kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Soup

Honeycrisp Apples 3.27/kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

for

YOU SAVE 2 18 o n 2

Progresso

B.C.

+ Dep.

on 2

98

YOU SAVE 1 9 9

Colleen’s Produce Picks

12 500 00 5 00 5 500 400 00 4 00

98

Sel. Var., 425 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

YOU SAVE 3

95

Sel. Var., 782-888 g . . . . . . 2

5 00 10

5 for

00

on 5

for

YOU SAVE 5 o n 2 98

Bulk Foods

2 29 2 49 1

Dill Havarti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Freybe

Mild Capicolli Ham

..............

InStore Made!

Seafood Pasta Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29

100 g /100 g

100 g

100 g

W IT H

Cut Fresh CARE

on 2

Delissio

Frozen Pizza

Levi’s Deli Picks:

2 for

Libby’s

Canned Vegetables

Arla

Resse’s Pieces ....................

230

/100 g

YOU SAVE 40¢/kg

Brent’s Meat Picks Chicken Breasts

4 98 13 98 2

Boneles s, Skinles s, 10.98/kg . . . . . . . . .

Frozen Chicken Wings Western Family, 908 g . . . . . . . . . .

98 lb.

ea.

Pork Shoulder Steaks

6.57/kg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

lb.

At Safety Mart Foods Customers Are Really Everything!

EVERYTHING WE DO IS BAKED, PICKED, CUT & MADE WITH C.A.R.E. because

We reserve the right to limit quantities - Check our weekly flyer for more specials

Shuswap Market News, March 02, 2018  

March 02, 2018 edition of the Shuswap Market News

Shuswap Market News, March 02, 2018  

March 02, 2018 edition of the Shuswap Market News