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• VOX-POPS • COMICS • STARS RISING • DRAWINGS • PUZZLES • LIFE SKILLS

ISSUE 14 2015

FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRITY IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRICA

STAR

REMEMBERING

BETTER

RISING

PICTORIAL

LEAVING CHILD MARRIAGE IN THE PAST


Inside COVER STORY

CHILDREN SPEAK

LEAVING CHILD MARRIAGE IN THE PAST

ON CHILD RIGHTS ready?

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go, gloria, go!

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STARS RISING AMELU FRANK PAGE 38

brian, gloria, moses and june are out enjoying a game of football and showing off their skills...

goooooal!

COMIC

oops! the ball went over that wall!

MECHI KALI PAGE 16

oh, is this your ball? it landed over here and I started having fun with it!

MY VIEWS ON CHILD MARRIAGE COVER ILLUSTRATION BY: MOVIN WERE

wow!

you are so good at juggling!

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I wish I could do it like you!


www.bingwa.org THE TEAM Editorial Board Chairman Rino Solberg Finance Director Jean-Paul Deprins Email: jpd@bingwa.org Project Director Mundia Muchiri Email: mundia@bingwa.org Editorial Board Mundia Muchiri Eudiah Kamonjo Jean-Paul Deprins Julie Solberg Claudiah Gachimbi Managing Editor Eudiah Kamonjo Email: editor@bingwa.org Partnerships Coordinator Claudiah Gachimbi Email: claudiah@bingwa.org Design and Layout Centrepress Media Ltd Email: info@centrepressmedia.com Contributors Louis Aoko Ian Arunga Solomon Atah Joseph Barasa Paul Mbugua (KWS) Katana Michelle Badru Mulumba Christine Nderitu Kepha Nyanumba (AAR) Maurice Odede James Searles Rosemary Soyland Paddy Tumwesigye Movin Were

Dear Readers, Another great issue of the magazine is in your hands –mainly because of the continued love and dedication of the BINGWA champions across our great continent. You inspire us everyday -through your stories, drawings and poetry; all of which you will find within these pages. Our partners have also been instrumental in ensuring that your opinions and talents are shared the world over through BINGWA Magazine. This year, we believe that all BINGWA champions will recognize that they have the power within themselves to make Africa (and the world) what they want it to be; a corrupt-free place filled with a generation of people with integrity. This year’s theme on Day of the African Child led us to not only explore the culture of child marriage in Africa (Page 8) but other child right violations according to the feedback we received from you, our dear readers. As you dig into this term’s issue, think about how you will make a difference in your school, home, community or the world because ‘everywhere we go, we make a difference.’ This is our duty as champions. Enjoy!

BINGWA is published by Child Africa. Opinions here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publisher or any other participating partner. The publishers reserve the right to use photographs taken during events or activities. Any person appearing in photographs we publish cannot claim any compensation whatsoever. Editorial, Production and Advertising Child Africa. P.O. BOX 823 - 00606 Nairobi, Kenya +254 20 434 268/020 232 4374 +254 719 619 006 email: info@bingwa.org Uganda Office Email:julie@childafrica.org Tel: +256 752 896 205 Norway Office Email: rino@childafrica.org Tel: +47 46 44 76 06

THIS EDITION OF BINGWA HAS BEEN PUBLISHED WITH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF CHILD AFRIC A ISSUE 14

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Highlight BY PADDY TUMWESIGYE, CHILD AFRICA

Activities that marked the 2014 Day of African Child celebrations

T

he Day of the African Child (DAC) has been celebrated on June 16 every year since 1991 when it was first initiated by the Organisation of African Unity (now the African Union). It honors those who participated in the Soweto Uprising in 1976 on that day. It also raises awareness of the continuing need for improvement of the education provided to African children as well as their welfare in all spheres of life. Uganda and Kabale District in particular celebrate this day every year and Child Africa has always fully participated. In 2012, Child Africa joined the celebrations at

the Kabale Municipal Stadium and in Rubanda Village, Ikumba SubCounty in 2013. Due to the active participation of Child Africa in the previous celebrations as well as the many child advocacy activities the organization undertakes, Child Africa was chosen by the Kabale District Local Government as the leading organisation for the 2014 celebrations. The Charity Walk The celebrations started with a charity walk on the streets of Kabale Town on June 13. The walk was led by the Child Africa Brass Band, Child Africa

staff and representatives from other organisations who joined Child Africa in this noble cause. The Chief Walker was the Vice Chairperson Local Government Chairman (LC5) Kabale District Mrs. Mary Beberwa Juba. Management of Child Africa initiated this Idea with the aim of raising money and basic items as well as sensitizing the community on the need to support the sick children at the Kabale Regional Referral Hospital Children’s Ward. This had never happened in Kabale and it proved to be a great act of humanity.

Child Africa leading the march through the streets of Kabale

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A


As the Brass Band walked across town singing educative children’s songs, locals looked on and stopped what they were doing to show their support. Different items ranging from foodstuff, clothes, books, soap, and even money were collected. Child Africa topped these up and bought more items like basins, clothes, foodstuff, soap and Vaseline for them. The Child Africa Managing Director, Madam Julie Solberg and the Chairman Rino Solberg led the team in distributing these items at the hospital in the presence of more than thirty children and their care-givers. In her speech, Madam Julie said that the idea (supported by the District Administration) was to help the sick children so that they would recover and get quality education which is the key to holistic development. She also thanked the Kabale District Local Government and other organisations. With smiling faces and the shouts of joy, the caregivers and hospital administration showed their gratitude for the support. The Kabale Regional Hospital Medical Superintendent also thanked Child Africa and other organisations for supporting the work of the hospital. She requested others to

emulate them for the sake of the needy children of Africa.

would fight to live in a corruptionfree country.

June 16 2014 presentations At 9 a.m. on the day, the celebrations started with a huge number of schools, organisations and the locals gathering at the Bubaare Subcounty Playground. Some of the other guests and dignitaries in attendance were, the Guest of honor’s representative Nabimanya Robert, the LC5 chairperson Mr. Patrick Besigye Keihwa, the vice chairperson LC5 Kabale District Mrs. Mary Bebwajuba and many others.

2014 DAC THEME: A childfriendly, quality, free and compulsory education for all children in Africa.

Most of the local people had actually already started cultivating their gardens but the moment the Child Africa Brass Band started playing, you could see women and children, young and old coming down to see what was taking place eventually filling the venue to capacity. Child Africa and children from other organizations and schools also did various presentations. These were quite remarkable because besides the humour from the poems, songs and educative plays, the children from other rural schools also got to learn about their rights. Through these, children also emphasized, that they were fed up of corruption and

Different thematic speeches of the day were also given. In her speech, Madam Julie expressed her determination to put a smile on the needy children of Kabale and Africa as a whole by providing quality education and basic needs. Mr. Nabimanya thanked Child Africa, Kabale District Local Government and other organisations for taking part in the celebrations. He added that since he came to Kabale, Child Africa’s great work has always been an inspiration. The day was crowned by the sharing of drinks and meals (provided by Child Africa) among the children and other people in attendance. In his final remarks, Mr. Besigye declared the 2014 celebrations the first of its kind since the celebrations started in Kabale District. “It was very well organized and attracted a large number of people,” he added. The day was a successful one and will remain in our memories for a long time.

Child Africa Founder, Julie Solberg talking about Bingwa. Child Africa Junior School pupils performing.

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If you weigh yourself while at the Equator, you weigh about half your actual size.

Tanzania is famous for its African Blackwood tree (Mpingo), one of the most expensive hardwood trees in the world.

Female peafowls are called ’peahens’ while male peafowls are ‘peacocks’.

The Sitatunga (Africa’s only truly amphibious Antelope), spends most of its time in thick deep muddy swamps only occasionally moving to dry land at night.

The Great Zimbabwe (now a ruined city) took four hundred years to complete-from the 11th Century to the 15th Century.

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

The name Piggy bank came from a type of clay which was used to make jars for saving money in the old days even before real banks existed.

Chocolate melts in your mouth because its melting point is slightly below your body temperature.

Sharks are covered with tiny little teeth called dermal denticles, which is why their skin feels like sandpaper.


Its a Wild Wild Life BY PAUL MBUGUA, KENYA WILDLIFE SERVICE

FACTS ON THE

DUGONG • Dugongs are also known as sea cows. Their scientific name is Dugong dugon. • Dugongs are herbivores that feed on seaweed, marine algae and other aquatic vegetation. Dugongs closely resemble Manatees, Whales and Dolphins. In evolution, they are closely related to Elephants.

them easy targets for hunters. By plugging their nostrils with clay, the Aborigines of Australia suffocate them. This is because they cannot breathe using their mouths. They are hunted nearly to extinction for their tears, oil, bones, teeth and meat. They are hence classified as vulnerable. • The biggest threat to their conservation comes from loss of habitat because of siltation caused by human activities.

• Dugongs are found in shallow equatorial waters of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. • They have poor eye-sight but an excellent sense of hearing. They can live up to 70 years.

• Dugongs can stay under water for up to 10 minutes after which they come up to the surface to breathe. • When nursing their young, Dugongs float on their backs. • Dugongs have a pair of breasts located at shoulder level. This may have given rise to the legendary stories of mermaids encountered by sailors.

You can help conserve dugongs by discouraging people from killing them or informing KWS or another authority about any hunting by humans.

• Dugongs are mute and defenseless making

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Your Say

ON CHILD RIGHTS TEARS AND MISERY Early marriage in our community Destroying the future of the young Doom is at the door Tears and misery for all Early marriage in our community Why so cruel? Not knowing the poor or rich Tears and misery for all Early marriage in our community More school drop-outs, disease, death Pregnancies, abortions, surgeries-unwanted Tears and misery for all - Words by Atenge Sylvia, P.7, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda. - Art by Oketcho Patrick, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda.

BLOOD FOR A CAUSE

MY RIGHTS ARE VIOLATED Whenever I go home from boarding school, my siblings and I are mistreated by our real grandmother. Since my parents are far away working in another town, she treats us like a burden. On many occasions, she doesn’t give me foo. Other times, she locks me out and beats me mercilessly-Words by Steve, Uganda. - Art by Namilembe Nadrine, P.7, Child Africa Junior School, Equator, Uganda.

We are the new African generation Not frightened to be us Uniquely gifted, black and talented Gleaming like the stars we are Yes, we are the children of Africa For now, we are empowered and protected To pull you down and step on you For the young shall rejoice and celebrate For freedom and the rights of children For we have lived in your world of corruption And we have seen more Now we are no longer fooled by your excuses We won’t be what you want us to be For we are young and always hopeful At least we try and never give up At last we are the BINGWAs Yes, we are the champions!! (An excerpt from a Day of the African Child poetry performance by Child Africa Junior School, Equator, Uganda-BINGWA Club. Read the full poem on www bingwa.org) - Art by Blaise Makokha, Embakasi Garrison Primary School, Kenya.

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WHEN POVERTY TAKES PLACE

WHY

Poverty in Africa Has led to school drop-outs Child labour and early marriage The suffering of the young and old

Why are you destroying our lives? Causing us to drop-out of school Forcing us into unwanted marriages Why child marriage?

Poverty at home Has led to parent’s death Children lack education When poverty takes place

Have pity on the young generation Leave that little girl alone Don’t you see she’s too young for you Why child marriage?

- Words by Kesiime Rosette, P.6, Child Africa Junior School, Kabale, Uganda.

Hey young champions! Why don’t you take care of yourselves? For God and your country For you are the next generation of leaders

- Art by Fatuma Seera, P.4, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda.

- Words by Nabuduwa C.G, P.7, Oguti Primary School, Tororo, Uganda. - Art by Amelu Frank, P.7, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda.

BETTER READ THIS! A gift, packed from heaven Earth receives and celebrates Front seats given to elders To enjoy the beauty a child bring Into the home In a short while though They become Children’s terrorists Abusing their rights Destroying their lives Blood on their hands - Words by Nakaya Joyce P.5 & Nagendo Carol, P.7, Child Africa Junior School, Uganda. - Art by Gladness Rongo, Class 7, Assisi Primary School, Tanzania.

SOME RESPECT PLEASE

Dear parents, teachers and guardians, please remember that children are very important to the nation and the world in general. All their rights, from their basic needs to security, play and even participation should be respected without discrimination. Dear BINGWA’s, always remember to be responsible at home, school and the community. - Words by Ester Lucas, Class 6, Assisi Primary School, Tanzania. - Art by Maitri Umash, Class 6, Kisumu Junior Academy, Kenya.

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Special Feature

LEAVING CHILD MARRIAGE IN THE PAST OUTRAGEOUS AND DANGEROUS Following our 2014 call out for submissions on child rights violations, we received articles and drawings from readers detailing either their own experiences of child marriage or people they know. Most of these began with a story of poverty or pregnancy, dropping out of school, to marrying either the young father of the girls’ child or a much older man, followed by a life of abuse, abandonment or disease. In the stories, all the girls are under the age of 15. Some of them manage to run away and go back to school, while others attempt to go back to their parents’ houses, only to be forced to

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go back to their husbands. “I was left alone in an unknown land with a strange man. When I refused his advances that night, he beat me up. That night, I ran away and reported the matter to the chief. My father was arrested and had to return the dowry he had received. I am now in Class Seven and determined to work hard to become a doctor,” wrote one pupil. From the submissions, it was clear that child marriage (marriage before the age of 18) is a harsh reality for many children in Africa. In most cases, only

FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

one person is a child, usually the girl. This does not mean that boys are not affected, it just means that majority of the affected persons are girls. Though it is against the law in most countries around the world, the numbers are as outrageous as the practice itself.

• 15 out of the 20 countries with the highest rates of child marriage are in Africa. • 1 in 9 girls in the developing world are married by the age of 15 and 1 in 3 by age of 18. • 14 Million girls are married every year before age 18. • In the next decade, 100 Million girls will be married before age 18 if child marriage is not eliminated. • 700 Million women alive today were married as children.


THE CAUSES In the past, child marriage was a common cultural norm around the world, including Europe. Even boys married as teens. Today, the root cause of child marriage in Africa is culture and patriarchy (males holding authority over women and children). In such systems, they are considered second-class citizens and treated like property. Here, a girls’ virginity is very valuable and younger brides fetch more bride price/dowry than older ones. To ensure preservation of the same and avoid premarital sex and pregnancy, child marriage is seen as the best option. In other instances, it seems like the best way to avoid the social stigma associated with having an unmarried daughter over the age of 18. Areas with internal conflicts or humanitarian crises’ also rank high in the number of child marriages. A recent example being the kidnapping of the 219 boarding school girls by the Boko Haram in Nigeria. It is believed that they forcefully married the girls when their requests to the (then) government were not met. Others willingly marry off their children during such times believing that they will be better protected. Poverty is yet another reason for child marriage. Girls are married-off in exchange of dowry or bride price that helps to take care of the rest of the family. Other times, its used to pay off a debt, secure family ties or settle a feud. Parents who cannot afford school fees prefer marrying off their daughters so that the ‘family burden’ is eased and the girl is ‘secure’. Early pregnancy results in girls being forced to marry their child’s father even before they are ready. “Teenage pregnancies are very common due to lack of experience and information,” adds teacher Alex Munduga of Child Africa Junior School-Kabale, Uganda.

to provide basic needs as some of the other causes of child marriage,” wrote Clement Wangira. In March this year, a 10 year-old girl in Kericho, Kenya made news headlines when she gave birth. The question on everybody’s mind was ‘Who impregnated her?’ Much as this was a valid question, how about asking ‘how can we ensure she continues with her studies to ensure a better life for herself and her family?’ CONSEQUENCES OF CHILD MARRIAGE While marriage itself is considered a wonderful gift, child marriage is a traditional practice that brings about more harm than good. According to the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), it is one of the most glaring human rights violations. Infact, it is a form of violence against children. Education: First off, it often results in the end of a child’s education because they have to drop out of school to take on adult responsibilities (Even boys) such as taking care of their spouses and children, in-laws and the household in general. This lack of education means that they will not have the necessary skills or knowledge to lift themselves off the poverty they are already in. This means that they remain poor and don’t achieve their dreams or reach their full potential. “My elder sisters were pulled out of school and married off, but I was lucky that teachers intervened in my case. I was performing well, so teachers wanted to keep me in school”-Peris Tobiko, Kenya’s first Maasai woman elected to Parliament. Health: Because their bodies are not fully developed, girls below age eighteen are more likely to have pregnancy or fatal child-birth complications

Neglect and abuse: “During the launch of an ‘end child marriage’ campaign in Amuria District in Eastern Uganda (one of the areas with the most child brides in Uganda), You have a right to learn a World Vision and grow first so you can representative cited defilement, make your own future child neglect and decisions. failure of parents

such as fistula or even death. Kenya in particular has high cases of maternal deaths. Owing to lack of knowledge and skills to negotiate for what they want including safe sex, child brides are more likely to be infected with HIV and other STIs. Their children are also more likely to be premature or die within their first year because of low-birth weight, disability, weak immune systems and to suffer from malnutrition or other diseases such as HIV. Inequality: Because children have no say in decisions affecting them or their community, child marriage promotes inequality. Forced marriage is already a violation of the right to consensual marriage. Children with special needs: Even children with special needs such as those with disabilities are not spared from the practice as Rhoda of The Special Schools Heads Associations of Kenya (SSHAK) explains, “ We have rescued a number of such children from as far as Samburu and even Meru.” Sexual, physical and emotional abuse: Child brides are more likely to be abused by their husbands and in-laws. In some countries, brides are often kidnapped and raped before they are later claimed as wives. Social isolation and discrimination: Because of exclusion from their family and friends (to focus on the new family and sometimes even serving like domestic helps), these children are isolated and discriminated against. All the above issues lead to stress, depression and sometimes, even suicide negatively affecting not just the child, but her children and the community at large. ONGOING INTERVENTIONS “…Places where women and girls are treated as full and equal citizens tend to be more stable, tend to be more democratic. So this is not just a humanitarian issue. This is an economic issue, and it is a security issue. And that’s why it has to be a foreign policy priority”-U.S.A President Obama on child marriage.

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Special Feature There is no denying that the number of child marriages have gone down over the last few years. However, much more needs to be done to accelerate the elimination of child marriage. It is condemned in many international conventions, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). Over the years, many more states are amending their laws with the aim of ending child marriage. They are however not effectively enforced. In observations made to the Kenyan Government by the Committee on the Rights of the Child, there is a need to harmonize the minimum age for marriage of both boys and girls according to the definition of the child. This should be reflected in the Children Act which requires an urgent review. Though an obligation of the government, we can do something from where we are. Furthermore, changing the laws is not enough and multiple efforts are often required. These include governments working with affected people, stakeholders and other organizations. There is always strength in collective action. Interactions with other stakeholders such as community members, organisations, policy makers, parents, teachers, religious leaders, community elders (the custodians of the tradition), chiefs and children to implement laws, discuss issues and work together respectfully to change attitudes. Incentives to keep their children in school: In some cases, parents have been given Incentives such as cash, cattle or school fees to keep their children in school and unmarried. Others provide families with alternative ways of earning money rather than depending on child marriage. Safe houses or shelters for girls and women to flee to are a necessity as Judi’s story (by S. Modola) proves. Hailing from Samburu in Northern Kenya where rates of child marriages are high, Judi was to be married off at the age of 15. With the help of her step-mother, they escaped to a community center for women. The women undertake income-generating activities to support themselves and

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save for the future. They also go the extra mile and educate others about their rights. Programs/networks or clubs that guide or encourage, mentor and teach life skills to children. These skills include lessons on integrity, practical ways of negotiating and speaking up for themselves, human rights and reporting methods, entrepreneurship, reproductive health, and even family planning. Child-led initiatives such as Child Rights Clubs and BINGWA Clubs (who regularly write to us) are also transformative in their schools and communities as they highlight or discuss such issues. Morukatipe Primary School in Tororo, Uganda, (See page 38-39) who recently held a debate titled ‘Parents rather than children are responsible for early marriages,’ is one such example. Media and art to create awareness (whether written, performance or visual) also serve as a great way to pass the message across in a thoughtprovoking or appealing way. An example is ‘Too young to wed’, an organization that uses photographs to tell child marriage stories.

FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

A 2013 East Africa Regional Conference on Child Marriage cited engaging boys and men as one of the underexplored strategies. Since they have a huge role to play as potential husbands and fathers, why not change their views and attitudes on the practice so they can become champions of this change themselves? Sanctions, and naming and shaming of states not fulfilling their obligations to protect children are some of the other suggested strategies towards change. In conclusion, Teacher Munduga of Child Africa School advises parents, teachers and other stakeholders to form strong bonds with their children in-order to have open and positive dialogues about issues affecting them. “This will save children from a lot of unnecessary pain and suffering,” he said. “Children need to raise their voices and use the Children’s Assembly to reach policy makers. Schools and communities also need to come up with their own child protection or whistle-blower systems,” -Oscar Kadenge, an education specialist at UNICEF.


BOYS AND GIRLS ARE EQUAL by Smeet Raval, Kisumu Junior Academy, Kenya.

RIGHT TO GO ON SAFARI by Ramandeep Kaur, Kisumu Junior Academy, Kenya.

KAMBA TRADITIONAL DANCERS by Maingi Kilonzo, Kamweani primary School, Kenya.

CHILD ABUSES IN AFRICA by Mukasa Simon Peter, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda.

LIFE FULL OF COLOUR by Pooja Patel, Kisumu Junior Academy, Kenya.

CELEBRATE BY EATING GOOD FOOD by Oketcho Patrick & Amelu Frank, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda.

ANGELS IN HEAVEN by Jane John, Seventh Day Adventist Primary School, Juba, South Sudan.

DREAMS FOR MY COUNTRY by Yuri Sadia, Hill School-Eldoret, Kenya.

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readers A W G IN B d e We ask on child s w ie v ir e h t what it can w o h d n a e r marriage we d… be eliminate

Child marriage can result from situations where parents and communities place their children, sometimes leaving them with limited choices. Parents should shower children with love and care. Sex education and extra-curricular activities should also be introduced and encouraged in schools and homes. These will encourage sharing and build self-esteem thereby avoiding such outcomes. -Atuheire Kelvin, P.7, Child Africa Junior School-Kabale, Uganda.

We should teach children (even at home) that they have a right to finish their education before they marry. Some parents don’t have such conversations with their children, yet its very important. Daniel Filbreto, Age 15, Class 6, Juba One Primary School, South Sudan.

Parents are selling their children to the older men because they want money. Government must put children in school. We don’t want to see any girls loitering around. -Hellen Kakule Joy, Age 12, Church Missionary School (CMS), Juba, South Sudan.

Children should stay in school because child marriage destroys lives. Parents should love their children and never give up on them in any situation. Both parents and children should avoid the rush to get money and report abuses of child rights immediately. -Mujungu Elizabeth, P.7, Child Africa Junior School-Kabale, Uganda.

If parents provide for the needs of the child, child marriage will not happen. Many young girls are lured by the promise of marriage as well as phones and other gifts because the parents do not provide. -John Adhukwur, Age 14, Class 6, Juba One Primary School

I strongly condemn child marriage because it leads to the suffering of children as well as school drop-outs. Fellow children, please insist on staying in school. Parents also need to educate their own children about the dangers of early marriage. -Niwenyesiga Edmond, Age 11, Child Africa Junior School-Kabale, Uganda.

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It happens because some parents do not want children to go to school and instead want to marry them off. It happens because some of the parents don’t have money. It is very sad because had they studied, they would become leaders of this country. To stop early marriage, it must be compulsory that parents take all their children to school without discrimination. Parents should also not take girls to the villages. In the village, when a girl is older, they believe she is ready to marry, even if she’s still a child. -Rejoic Warsuk, Age 13, Class 7, Church Missionary School (CMS), South Sudan

It is not right for a child to be threatened or forced to marry. We all need to be strong in all difficult situations and be open to communication and advice to protect ourselves. Such cases should also be reported to local leaders. Parents need to respect our rights and support us everyday. -Nshemereirwe Angela, P.7, Child Africa Junior School-Kabale, Uganda.

Many girls are suffering because they are being kidnapped, raped and eventually forcefully married. If a child gets pregnant, they could very easily die. We need all girls to go to school but you find their families saying, ‘Hey, we need to give our girls to this man because we need money’. Then the girls will come from school and they will be told, ‘Today, someone is coming to take you’. The girl says she wants to go to school; she does not want the man. But because the man has already given the money to the parents, they force her to go with him. The girls do not want this to happen. Child marriage is not good because eventually, these girls end up on the streets. Some say they want to go back to school, but they can’t. The government has to stop men from taking children by force. Parents also need to stop selling their children for money. - Nada Rashid, Age 14, Church Missionary School (CMS) Primary School, South Sudan.

Child marriage does not give children a chance to exercise their rights and should be eliminated. Governments should strengthen laws against it. Parents should also consider their children’s lives and avoid accepting bride price. Sex talks should also be introduced in schools. NGOs and churches should also educate the community and fight for child rights. -Tumushabe Immaculate, P.7, Child Africa Junior School-Kabale, Uganda.

Child marriage is not good because marriage should happen when couples are 20 years and above (after university). Children need to go to school first so they can learn, be the best they can be and take the time to choose. Parents who allow it should be arrested and taken to court. Omar Kiarie Mboya, Age 9, St. Mary’s School, Nairobi, Kenya.

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Fiction BY CHRISTINE NDERITU

THE HYENAS RAINBOW WEDDING A

s the rain fell lightly past the sun rays, a rainbow appeared across the sky causing great excitement in the village playground. All the children ran around in circles screaming, “The hyenas are getting married!” This prompted Babu, the oldest man in the village, to hobble into the playground. On seeing Babu, the children stopped screaming and came to a screeching halt. “Good afternoon Babu!” saluted the children. “Good afternoon children,” he responded. “I see the rainbow is out today, do you know how the rainbow came to be?” “Yes!” said the children “the hyenas are getting married!”

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

“Well, that’s half the story,” chuckled Babu “do you want to hear the whole story?” “Yes Babu” responded the children.

Long ago in the great African Jungle, the animals lived in unity. They helped and encouraged each other, worked hard to keep the jungle clean and safe, they danced and played together, most importantly, they loved and respected each other. One day, the council of elders had to hold a meeting because the oldest hyena wanted to get married. The majestic Lion and the old Hyena were there on time, the wise Owl was perched on a tree, the graceful Giraffe was busy nibbling on the lofty leaves,


the steady Buffalo and handsome Elephant were at one corner grazing, the composed Rhino, the quick Cheetah and the stealthy leopard were having a chat while the relaxed Tortoise arrived last. As soon as everybody was settled, the meeting started. The animals waited patiently as the old Hyena limped up to the podium. He cleared his throat and went ahead to tell the council of elders that he intended to marry Vix – the youngest Fox in the jungle. This news caused a great uproar among the council of elders because the old Hyena was so old he would have been Vix’s great grandfather. This news was very troubling to most of the animals while a few did not see anything wrong with the proposal. This caused varied arguments among the animals leading to a great divide. The majestic Lion sought the council of the wise Owl. They decided it would be best to have all the animals of the jungle gathered for a meeting to settle this great dispute. The next day, all the animals of the jungle gathered for the great debate that would decide if indeed the old Hyena should marry Vix. When they had all settled, the great question was raised, ‘Was it right for the old hyena- the oldest animal in the jungle, to marry Vix- the youngest animal in the jungle?’ The animals discussed the issue for hours giving their views to the council of elders. Finally, when all opinions were collected and the information reviewed, the council of elders shared these with everybody. The Giraffe said that all the young animals in the jungle deserved a chance to enjoy their childhood and grow up to use their talents and pursue their dreams instead of giving up their young potential to marry someone who had already achieved theirs. The Elephant talked about how the animals should form a union that allows them to support each other during hard times instead of marrying off their children at such an early age. He talked about how this would destroy the balance of life in the jungle. “If all the young female animals were to get married to old animals, then the young male animals would have to travel far and wide to look for spouses when the time was right,” he quipped. An educated generation of young people is very important to the development of a community.

The Leopard talked about how important it was for the young female animals to stay in school as the future of the jungle was in their hands. The council went on and on as they aired their concerns regarding the proposed marriage. In the end, all the animals of the jungle were required to vote on the issue. After the votes were counted, the majestic Lion declared the results; the old hyena was to choose another female to marry as Vix was still a child and should be allowed to be fulfil her dreams. The old Hyena was so disappointed about the turn of events that he broke down and wept uncontrollably. Upon seeing this, the other hyenas proposed that the old Hyena marry one of the equally beautiful middleaged female hyenas. When he accepted, there was so much celebration that even the skies shed little tears of joy (in form of a drizzle) through the sunrays. This is what caused a rainbow to appear. All the animals of the jungle were very excited and danced until dusk. “Now children, I hope you have learned something from that story?” asked Babu. “I have learned that it is important to stay in school as my future depends on it,” said one of the boys. “I have learned that no one should force me into an early marriage,” said one of the girls. “Well done! Maybe you can share that story with your family and friends today and see what they think about the old Hyena,” Babu suggested. With that, the children went back into the playground to play and chase after the rainbow as they celebrated the Hyenas marriage and the saving of the young Fox from an early marriage.

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ready?

go, gloria, go!

brian, gloria, moses and june are out enjoying a game of football and showing off their skills...

goooooal!

oops! the ball went over that wall!

oh, is this your ball? it landed over here and I started having fun with it!

wow!

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

you are so good at juggling!

I wish I could do it like you!


don’t worry, we will help you pick them up.

well, I...

oops! I dropped my documents!

I was almost married off when I was twelve.

hey, What is this about child marriage?

One of them passed away during child-birth. She was 13.

that is very kind of you!

another one was beaten to death by her husband.

but I was rescued and taken to school. other friends of mine weren't so lucky...

I have been researching on how I can go back and help other girls who are at risk of the same.

that’s a good idea! I will get in touch with your headmaster about it!!

It sounds really bad!

how come many people don’t know that such a terrible thing still happens to young girls?

hey, I have an idea! how about you come to our school and speak to everyone about this?

but first, see if you can catch this...

the end. ISSUE 14

17


Life Skills BY RINO SOLBERG

How you can

r e b m e m Re Better

‌ MEMORY IS lling all the a c re r) te a (l Memory is from your ts e g in ra b r u impulses yo und, taste so , ll e sm t, h g five senses; si l in schoolfu ss e c c su e b to and touch. To ral, you need e n e g in fe li work and t you learn. a h w r e b m e rem

Everybody can learn how to do this if they want to, but like everything else, you have to learn how. Here are the main principles of remembering well: 1. You have to be interested in the subject you wish to remember. If you are interested, you will pay enough attention to learn what you need to. 2. You have to make associations in your mind. You have to see it visually in your mind because it is easier to remember something you see visually than just remembering a word, for example. 3.

You have to repeat it several times. The more times you repeat it, the better you remember.

DID YOU KNOW: You would not be able to read this if you did not remember the 26 letters in the English alphabet. 18

FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A


Life Skills THE LINK METHOD Here is a simple way for you to remember (without writing down) a list of 20 items by using what we call ‘the link method’. Here are the list of items to remember: Bread, soda, milk, tomato, toilet paper, toothpaste, sweet potato, pineapple, soap bar, chicken, eggs, butter, charcoal, basket, beans, rice, cooking oil, panga, text books, pencils. Try to remember these items for two minutes first. How many you can remember? TIPS When you are using ‘the link method’, there are three ways to help you remember:1. 2. 3.

Visualise everything as extraordinarily HUGE or extraordinarily plenty in number. Imagine it as RIDICULOUS or FUNNY. REPLACE one with the other visually.

of CHARCOAL, that jumps up into a flying BASKET, which crashes into two big suspends with BEANS and RICE and the COOKING OIL starts a terrible fire and all the teachers are carrying huge PANGAs and trying to put off the fire, but unfortunately, all the schools’ TEXT BOOKS and PENCILS catch fire and burn to ashes.

TRAIN YOURSELF I have done the above ‘linking’, but it would be better if you created your own link using your own imagination and creativity to make it work. Each time you do this, you will become better at it. Eventually, it will be much easier to mentally create such a link than to write it down. Good luck!

EXAMPLE Visualise a HUGE loaf of BREAD flying into the schoolyard and crashing into a BIG bottle of SODA, which explodes and a lot of MILK is splashing out of the bottle, and when it hits the ground, hundreds of TOMATOES start spilling all over the schoolyard, and all the children start wrapping them in TOILET PAPER, but it suddenly starts changing into big heaps of TOOTHPASTE, and everybody starts applying it on the ground, but when they do, it flows to become a HUGE SWEET POTATO that jumps high up in the air and when it lands, it breaks up into many big PINEAPPLES. You take a SOAP BAR and hit it but suddenly, the soap bar becomes a CHICKEN that runs around the schoolyard and lays hundreds of EGGS, which explode and it starts to rain BUTTER, which hit a HUGE sack

Try this method at least once a month and very soon, it will be a habit you cannot do without.

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A STEP AT A TIME Life is a walk of a thousand miles that starts with a single step. There will always be obstacles such as anger, pride, discouragement, betrayal among others. However, always remember the three things that (once gone) never come back; words, time and opportunity. - Words by Faith Wahu, Class 8, Moi Primary School, Nakuru, Kenya.

THE WAY TO GO Today, everybody wishes to be well educated in order to become successful and happy. Yet education isn’t how much one has committed to memory or how much one knows or doesn’t. It is learning, acquisition of knowledge and skills. However, it must be sought with great love, a positive attitude and undying dreams in order to attain true success and happiness. -Words by Uwera Alvera, P.4, Kabale Primary School, Uganda. -Art by Ann Eki Dor, Embakasi Garrison Primary School, Kenya.

A BAD HABIT Corruption! Corruption! A bad habit within us The police, teachers and others Are bribed for freedom Not fair! Not fair! Not fair! Money is wasted Poverty increases Services not properly rendered Begin by ending corruption in schools -Words by Ayebare Brendah, Child Africa Junior School, Kabale, Uganda. - Art by Amelu Frank, P.7, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda.

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

THIS MONSTER Fight this monster corruption Arrest this monster corruption Send him to prison For he is poison -Words by Adengoi George, P.8, Osukuru Primary School, Uganda. -Art by Child Africa Junoir School-Kabale, Uganda.


I AM A BINGWA MEANING:B-eautiful I-ntelligent N-atural G-irl W-ithin A-frica Words by Nankumba Flavia, P.6, Child Africa Junior School, Equator, Uganda. - Art by BINGWA Club, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda.

LIFE LESSONS My country of origin is the Democratic Republic of Congo. I have stayed in Uganda for the last six years. I would like people back home to remember that it’s very important to work hard and to welcome competition in everything. Children of Africa, please know that school is so important as it prepares us all for the future. Please remember to respect your parents and elders too. - Words by Becu Jeanne Lucie, P.6, Kampala Parents School, Uganda. - Art by Oketcho Patrick, P.7, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda.

A POEM OF YOUR OWN Make a poem As interesting as can be Long or short Think of one, as far as you can go Let your mind wander And you will know A poem of your own - Words by Salome Mungai, Age 10, Kenya - Art by Wesley Oloo, Baraka Primary School, Kenya.

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By Solomon Atah, Johannesburg, South Africa

e learnt how th e w , 14 0 2 a stand In Issue 12 Africa took th u o S f o tion n childre pired educa s n -i id e h rt a ap ica against the ar, South Afr e y t s a L . nd m syste f freedom a o rs a e -y ty n e celebrated tw ur born-frees (children Fo . y hildren’s democrac compared c ) 4 9 19 r e ft e past. born a with life in th y a d to s e v li

IN TERMS OF YOUR CHILD RIGHTS, HOW IS YOUR LIFE DIFFERENT TODAY COMPARED TO THE APARTHEID ERA?

NEO RAMARUMO In those days, very many children did not go to school. Today, we have this opportunity. Children were also separated according to their race or skin-colour and even gender. My grandmother did not go to school because she was a girl and only boys were allowed to go to school. My rights are also respected as I can play with other children anytime anywhere. Our teachers do not give us corporal punishment. Back then, children were always beaten in class. Today, children are disciplined through other means such as detention. My opinions are also listened to and not just dismissed by the adults.

KAMOGELO MOLEBATSI Today, our child rights are being respected as we have access to education and even social grants. Efforts are also made to protect us from danger or harm.

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

MMALETSATSI MHLOTSHAZANA Today, we are not restricted to go to certain places nor are we separated from other children for any reason. I think our rights are being respected because we have access to education, which is key for all children. I also feel that all my rights are protected because these rights are in the constitution.

SBONGISENI CHAMP Back then, ‘black’ children where not allowed into ‘white’ schools and they were also taught Mathematics in Afrikaans, which was difficult to understand. Today, we are taught Mathematics in English, which is easier to understand. ‘White’ people are also fair towards us now than was the case during apartheid. We are not being abused, as was the case in the apartheid days. As children, we are protected from all sorts of abuse such as rape, kidnap and physical or emotional abuse. I can also go anywhere I choose.


Celebtirty Profile BY LOUIS AOKO

FALLY IPUPA

on his messages of love and peace for Africa Fally Ipupa is a talented awardwinning Lingala and Rhumba musician and dancer from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Early life Born Faustin Ipupa Nsimba in1977, Fally began singing at an early age in the church choir. He attended a Catholic school in the Kinshasa District of Bandal. Fally was heavily influenced by the musical vibe in this area-known as the ‘playing ground for the mushrooming street bands’ and musicians such as Pepe Kalle (The elephant of Zaire). It was while in his teen years here that his musical interest was nurtured. In 1996, Fally had the privilege of joining Koffi Olomide’s Quartier Latin International Music Group where he served as a lead vocalist until 2006. Thereafter, he started his own solo career releasing his first album ‘Droit Chemi’ in 2006. This album has sold over 100,000 copies. Fally has performed in many countries around the world. Love, hope and peace in Africa Fally would love to see peace prevail in his beloved country DRC and in Africa in general, so he uses his art to promote peace. His third album ‘Power Kosa Leka’ has important

AWARDS & ACHIEVEMENTS: • 2007 Kora Award for Best Artist or Group from Central Africa. • 2010 MTVAfrica Music Award for Best Video • Signed onto Universal Records in France, • Joined Snoop Lion in the 2013 MTV Africa All Stars urban music extravaganza in South Africa. • Has three children, whom he now and again makes references to in his songs.

messages such as ‘Stop à la guerre’ which means ‘Stop War’ and is Fally’s call for peace in the DRC. “My music, dance and message of love, hope and peace is a way of giving back to Africa and DRC because they contributed to who I am today,” he said. Despite the conflicts in his country, he is very proud of his country and adds, “If I were a politician, I would do my best to maintain peace in the DRC.” Fally Ipupa continues to contribute (largely through his music performances) to the Anti-Malarial Campaign spearheaded by the Didier Drogba Foundation. Fally is an ambassador of African music and hopes that African music, and Lingala in particular will be appreciated all over the world. In order to succeed, Fally works hard and practices for his performances. “It takes time, even years, to produce a great show or album, so I am very patient,” he pointed out. His talent has seen him collaborate with other international artists like Olivia Longott (former member of G-Unit), Benji and Krys, a popular African artist in France.

I admire… Barrack Obama and Nelson Mandela for their wisdom and humility. I also have a lot of respect for Simon Kimbagu, a preacher from Congo. Favourite saying: The title of my first album Droit Chemin, which translates to ‘the straight and narrow path’ in English. Favourite subjects (back in school): Music and arts. During my free time i like; Playing video games with my friends and FIFA football. Role model and mentor: Mopao Mokonzi also known as Koffi Olomide-a famous Congolese musician. Favourite cartoon: Sponge Bob Advise to aspiring artists: Be professional, serious, hardworking and passionate. Love music first and success will come later. Do not desire to be a celebrity or star more than realizing your dream.

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BINGWA

CHA

WILL SAVE AFRICA FROM T

ATTRIBUTES OF A BINGWA CHAMPION 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

A champion is a learner A champion is honest A champion has a positive attitude A champion is trustworthy A champion is self-confident A champion is helpful A champion supports champions A champion is polite A champion loves hygiene and good health A champion is fair to everyone

www.bingwa.org

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A


AMPIONS

THE CORRUPTION MONSTER

ISSUE 14

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WINNER Challenge 1 In Issue 12 and 13 of BINGWA Magazine, we asked BINGWA readers to use pictures to tell us how they would like to celebrate the Day of the African Child. This was the winning entry from Uganda.

Obaraza Ezekiel, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A


WINNER Challenge 2 In Issue 12 and 13 of BINGWA Magazine, we asked BINGWA readers to tell us using words what they know about their child rights. This was the winning entry from Kenya.

The state of child rights in my country Words by Naomy Cherunoh, Embakasi Garrison Primary School, Nairobi, Kenya Rights are laws that spell out the legal privileges a human being is entitled to irrespective of race, gender, tribe or social status. Children have many rights including the right to healthcare, education, housing, protection from any harm such as slavery, torture and labour. Every child also has the right to self-expression and be free from discrimination too. Leaders in the Eastern part of Kenya recently decried the rampant cases of child labour in the region. In a report, leaders at an annual meeting expressed concern over increased child labour in the area. In Meru, child labour occurs in the form of harvesting Miraa (khat). Children are expected to work in huge plantations exposing them to lots of danger. Because of their age, they are easily exploited. Sand harvesting in Ukambani and herding animals in Isiolo and Marsabit, keep many children out of school. Many of them spend their time idling about, a habit

that leads to delinquency at their tender age. The trend is so worrying. The government should therefore take stern action against parents or guardians violating child rights by exposing them to harmful jobs instead of taking them to school. The above areas also have high school drop-out rates (about 70%). This is attributed to low incomes, cultural practices, early pregnancies and pressure for schools to maintain good academic standards. Weak pupils are forced to repeat classes, resulting in most of them dropping out of school due to shame. Others drop-out because of the pandemic of HIV/AIDS in the family, mainly taking up roles as bread winners or to undertake domestic chores. Data from the Ministry of Education indicate that over three million children under fourteen years are exposed to child labour. The end result is poor standards of living due to lack of education. This is one of the reasons, many people in Kenya live below the poverty line.

ISSUE 14

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Alex Robert, Samehill Primary school, Tanzania

In Issue 12 and 13 of BINGWA Magazine, we asked BINGWA readers to use pictures to tell us what they know about their child rights. This was the runners-up from Tanzania.


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PUZZLES

By Ian Arunga

Hey there Champion, Can you find 10 words related to the champion attributes in this fun wordsearch? The first one has been done for you.

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Answers:

1

Circle the objects on chart-1 that don’t appear on chart-2 CIRCLE THE OBJECTS ON CHART 1 THAT DON’T APPEAR ON CHART 2

CHART-1

CHART-2

ANSWER ON PAGE 46

Honest, Confident, Attitude, Trust, Learn, Support, Polite, Health, Fair, Help

ANSWER ON PAGE 46

2

My friend Rex and I are playing hide and seek but I need your help to find him. Something tells me he is not too far from here!

1. Blue 2. Yellow 3. Green 4. Orange 5. Brown 6. White

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5

4 4

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6 5

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

Help Alice get to the big red dot where Rex is. You can time yourself and your friends to see who got to Rex the fastest.


PUZZLES

SPOT THE DIFFERENCE!

CANyou YOUspt SPOT DIFFERENCES? Can 1010 differences?

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Success Story BY JAMES SEARLES FROM LONDON

My extra ordinary experience at Child Africa, Uganda

T

he first two weeks of March 2014 affected me profoundly. I was fortunate enough to undertake the residential section of my Gold level Duke of Edinburgh’s Award at the Child Africa International School in Equator, Uganda. Designed to be an adventure, the award challenges candidates to make a difference in other people’s lives and the global community, while enjoying new skills and experiences outside of their comfort zone. The opportunity to volunteer for Child Africa would tick all of those boxes. Little did I know that my time there would be far more enriching than I could have ever have imagined. Having travelled for close to two days to arrive at the school; first via a plane ride with Robin van Persie of Manchester United fame to Amsterdam, a second far bumpier plane ride to Entebbe via Kigali and then an interesting car ride along the Kabale road, I was blown away by the welcome we received. I did not know what to expect, but before this trip, I had no idea how beautiful Uganda was. Seeing so much lush vegetation was totally unexpected for eyes that are used to seeing concrete towers on a daily basis. The sun was shining (compared to London – which is usually cold and rainy) and everybody was smiling, singing and dancing. Although we were swept in to the staff room for some water and lunch, I could still hear the giggling and

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

laughter. It was great to hear so much happiness and love. Soon after my arrival, I was introduced to my first class as ‘Teacher James’ and left to my own devices. Standing in front of a room of hopeful and eager students having done no preparation whatsoever, I was extremely worried that I would let them down. I have a tendency to speak quickly when I am nervous and with the heat I was not sure whether the sweat trickling down my back was really due to the weather or just anxiety. Thankfully, the students were very forgiving and listened intently as I talked about England. They excitedly spoke about Uganda too. While our two countries are very different, we definitely have one thing in common – our love of football (Go Cranes!)! There were certainly some very heated discussions among staff and students about whether or not Manchester United are going to win the premier league. With the ice broken, I think my lessons started to flow more smoothly thereafter. It was clear the junior classes enjoyed the few books I had brought to read with them-all of which I could remember reading when I was at primary school. This really took me back to my childhood and I was glad they loved them. English was not the only thing I taught.  Jåttå Videregående skole  (College of further


Success Story education) in Norway had very kindly donated several bags of art equipment, so I got very messy painting, colouring and drawing with several classes. Among the pictures were some dragons, which had been inspired by the story of St George and the Dragon which I had told earlier in the week, so obviously my English lessons had not been too boring. As well as English and Art, I also got to take on some Physical Education lessonswhich I really enjoyed. My students became the teachers when we went out to play football as they knew much more than I did. I was also asked to teach ICT to the teachers and staff at the school. This was supposed to happen at the end of each day for one hour. With over ten members of staff and access to only a couple of computers and no Internet, this was quite a challenge. However, we all got so involved in the ICT lessons that we didn’t realize two hours had already gone by. I intend to return to the school to make sure the teachers remember what I taught them and remain as enthusiastic about practicing and retaining knowledge as their students. Ideas are very powerful things, but without the belief and support of the people they benefit, ideas can quickly disappear. This experience has taught me a lot about myself and the wider world. Seeing how everyone in the Child Africa family work so closely together, support and encourage each other was truly incredible and I think it’s something that many people around the world can learn from. That everyone at the school, from the youngest student to the oldest member of staff was constantly striving to learn and develop was truly inspiring. The strength, love and kindness shown by the teachers towards their students during those two weeks was an indication of what fantastic role models they are. It is impossible to guess how things will turn out, but when I think about the people I met during my time in Uganda, I know that, if people continue to take on Child Africa’s vision and install integrity to help fight corruption, a bright future awaits. The residential section of my Gold level Duke of Edinburgh’s Award at the Child Africa International School was an amazing and fulfilling experience thanks to all those I worked with, laughed with, played with, tried to teach and who taught me so much.

Time really does fly when you’re having fun!

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Sunday School Teacher: How many of you would like to go to heaven? (All the children raise their hands except Mary). Sunday School Teacher: Mary, why are you not raising your hand? Don’t you want to go to heaven? Mary: I want to, but my mother said I should go straight home after Sunday School. - By Sarah Sharon Agwaya, 8B, Migosi Primary School, Kenya.

Father: What did you learn in school today? Dora: We learnt all about keeping our environment clean. Father: I hope this means you will not litter our compound anymore… Dora: How can I litter the compound? The teacher said that a litter is a group of young kittens or piglets, you know? Father: That’s not all it means, dear. Dora: No Daddy! You don’t know… but I will ask the teacher tomorrow. Father: Why do you trust the teacher more than you trust me? Dora: If you were better than my teacher, you would not take me to school.

DO-IT-YOURSELF

Write your own original tongue twister! How? Begin by writing several senseless sentences whose words each start with the same sound or same letter. Just write down whatever comes to your head. Examples of the ones we came up with: ‘Fresh Fredy fears fleshy fish so he frequently fries dried flattened fish’, ‘Silly singers sing sad songs selectively shocking sorry singles, and ‘Slum Soccer stars starred after scoring sterling goals’ among others. Test your twister: Read the twister five times as fast as possible and then ask your classmates to do A good tongue the same. twister is one that is

- By Kur Jipur Biong, St.KIzito Primary School, Kampala, Uganda.

difficult to say aloud very fast.

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

OF AFRIC A


Sports BY KATAMI MICHELLE

VOLLEYBALL QUEEN

JANE WACU

Jane Wairimu Wacu wears her trademark dyed haircut and another thing - a beautiful smile. Wacu plays as a setter for the Kenya National Volleyball Team and the Kenya Prisons Volleyball Club. Playing for Kenya Prisons earned her the opportunity to work for Kenya Prisons, first as an officer and later as a Sergent.

She went to DEB Muslim Primary School and then Tetu High School in Nyeri. Her passion for the game dates back to her high school days. Upon completing high school, she shortly joined Kenya Pipeline’s Volleyball Club before moving to Kenya Prisons in 2006 where she still is today. It was in the same year that she was picked to play for Kenya’s National Volleyball team.

Favorite quote… No pain, no gain! Volleyball requires… Dedication and sacrifice. My main ambition is… To own a club or academy where I can train young children to become future professional volleyball players. I would also like to play professional volleyball in clubs outside of Africa. I enjoy working at Kenya Prisons because… I interact with inmates and encourage them whenever I have a chance. Tips for young athletes… Take sports seriously because you can make a career out of it. Parents should respect their children wishes and support their dreams. Get a mentor to give you career advice. Sports men and women should also give this much-needed advice. Advice to BINGWA readers… Take life positively, take your education seriously, uphold high moral standards, be good to others and respect the law.

ACHIEVEMENTS • Won Gold at the African Club Championships (2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013). • Won Bronze for Africa while at Kenya Pipeline Volleyball Club • 2012 Best Setter at the Continental Championships.

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good night, janet. make sure you wake up early for school!

good night mum. don’t worry. my alarm is all set.

in the morning...

wake up, madam president! it’s a big day for you!

you look good in that suit, don’t you think? yes, i do... but what about my school uniform?

madam president? mum, why are you wearing...?

your car is waiting for you outside!

my car?

i have security?

everyone stand by! madam president is walking to her car!

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A


here we are! our country kenya is celebrating fifty-two years of independence. everyone is excited, and they are eager to hear your speech, madam president!

what? so many people!

uhm... er...

er... hello everyone!

we are celebrating fifty-two years of independence... let us not forget the people who fought for our independence...

let us honor them by living in unity with our neighbours! let us not fight because of our different tribes, or discriminate against each other!

thank you all! and may god bless kenya!

we are all one!

we agree! yes!

we are all one, and we should love each other!

suddenly...

we have the best president ever! everyone loves her!

wake up, janet! you will be late for school! it was just a dream!

the end.

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Stars Rising

Amelu Frank’s art is his weapon of choice Since he was six years old, Amelu has been using art to pass the message of child rights and corruption to children, communities and the Government. His work has already been published in calendars and magazines (including this issue of BINGWA Magazine) and has seen him recently visit Kampala. During the 2014 Day of the African Child celebrations, he presented his work at the Tororo District office. He is also the chairperson of BINGWA Club in his school. A Primary Seven pupil at Morukatipe Primary School in Tororo, Uganda, he talks to us about his passions. What are some of your passions? I love studying, interacting with BINGWA club members, arts and crafts. What inspires you? My parents and teachers are always there to guide me so I can be a useful member of the community. BIngwa’s educative messages also inspire me. I like highlighting child rights because we all have an obligation to know about our rights and the abuses taking place. Where do you (regularly) display your work?

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My main target is children because they are the future. So, I display my work in schools to encourage the sharing of information on corruption and abuses in the community. What are you preparing for at the moment? A debate on child marriage in our community. I am also sensitizing the community about fighting corruption in Africa through drawing, poetry and music. How do you feel about your achievements at such a young age? I am very happy, especially when I

FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

travel because of my work or when I see my work published. I also like getting prizes such as books, sets, bags and coloured pencils. How much time do you spend doing art? We have an art and craft class in school, but sometimes I also work on my art during my free time. What are some of the challenges you have faced and how did you handle them? My parents struggle to ensure I get a good education-I am currently in a Government-aided school. I also have a hard time studying at home, getting good medical care and good nutrition. My parents and I have planted some oranges and mangoes to improve on these. What are your most memorable moments? Travelling to Kampala for the first time to meet and share a cake with Madam Julie Solberg of Child Africa in 2014, learning that my art work had excited the BINGWA team in Nairobi, Kenya and


Some of Frank’s work

community. I have also learnt that it begins with (us) children because we are the future. What are your future plans? To work hard in my studies and become an advocate and a leader with integrity now and in future, fight corruption and speak up for the needy. What is your advice to BINGWA readers? Love education, work hard, avoid bad peer groups and make a difference in your communities. My mentors are: My teachers, parents, opinion leaders and BINGWA readers. What it takes to excel in my field: Talent and passion for others. Favourite subjects in school: English, art and craft. Favourite colour: Blue (for love) and green (for life). Favourite music: Local educative songs like ‘Kaleke Kasome’ (Let her study) by Maurice Hasa.

receiving a letter that stated that I now had a sponsor from America called Madam Makena. Now I believe I have a very bright future ahead of me. What are your views on corruption and integrity? Corruption is too common in Africa and is mainly perpetrated by greedy government officials thereby hindering the development of children. Integrity is what makes all the difference in the world. If you have positive thinking and good morals, you are already on the path to greatness. What are your views on child marriage and what measures would you put in place to ensure it is eliminated?

It is very sad that it is still happening today, hence our debate on ‘parents rather than children are responsible for child marriage’. I would set up stronger laws, order the arrest of adults approving child marriages and ban all places where children watch pornographic videos. What can school children do to help eliminate child marriage? Abstaining from sex, joining guidance/counseling clubs and staying in school. What are some of the important lessons you have learnt so far? How to fight corruption in Africa while working and interacting with friends at school and the

Best advice ever received: To remain in school, work hard, fight corruption and make a difference. The BINGWA champion song also has a great message especially the words ‘Everywhere I go, I make a difference, everywhere I go, I fight corruption’. Favourite book/magazine: BINGWA Magazine and anything on fighting corruption. Favourite authors: BINGWA champions. Last words: Thank you my dear fellow children, parents, teachers, Madam Julie of Child Africa and the Foundation for Open Development, Tororo for the support and encouragement to ensure I succeed in future.

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Stars Rising

Innocent’s selfless care for her family in South Sudan By Badru Mulumba Since she was eleven years old, Innocent risked her health to lift, break and sell rocks to take care of her family. So extraordinary was her story that she was featured in the popular Humans of New York page in 2014. A Class 8 pupil at Church Missionary School (CMS) Primary School in Juba, South Sudan, she shares her incredible story with us. Why did you decide to do that kind of work? I was out of school for four years because we could not afford school fees. Since my brother’s children were too young (one year and the other three years old), I had to take care of them after their mother left. We are ten of us at home and there is no one to help us. May be God was with me because I was lifting up to fifty kilograms at a go. To manage, I had to continuously break the rocks into smaller sizes. Sometimes we had buyers, other times we didn’t. With the profits I made, I would buy milk, food and clothes. That kind of labour always caused me to have chest pains. If I did not work for two days, I would also feel sick.

person who can buy and sell across continents. So far, what lessons have you learnt about life? To be patient and to take whatever is good for me. There is pressure to get married but I always say that I will think about that after I start working.

What was your life changing moment? One day while I was busy at work, I met a lady called Katie. She asked about my life and I explained everything. She got me into this home and I returned to school last year. The home takes care of my school fees and helps my family with some milk and food. I called one of our Aunties to come and take care of my nieces. She did not refuse because she wants me to study so I can help her in future.

What is the best advice you have ever received? My friend in South Africa reminds me to always walk with God because he has seen me through everything over the years.

What are your future plans? I want to help orphans and the sick. I want to be a doctor as well as an economically-able business

What advice would you give to BINGWA readers in East Africa? Stay in school instead of getting married.

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

What are your views on early marriage? It is not good and won’t help any of us to grow. Go to school first, the rest will come later.


Stars Rising BY EUDIAH KAMONJO

MC Denno is using hip-hop to inspire change Dennis Kimatu aka MC Denno, was already rapping by the age of 7. At the age of 11, he was among the founding members of Dandora Music Group (most of whom are teenagers). They claim to be the youngest music group in Africa to be verified and published by world music publisher Vevo. MC Denno is a class eight pupil at Rosebella Preparatory Center in Dandora, Nairobi, Kenya.

lives and become an international artist five years from now. Advice to BINGWA readers: Be yourself, be patient and humble. Don’t take anything for granted. Concentrate in your education because it’s the key to any great future. Best advice ever received: My grandmother once told me, ‘If you change your ways, you change your heart and mind and become the best.’

What inspires you? I use music to get to the people in the community because music is the culture of love. I want to change our country by changing people’s mind-sets. What are you preparing for at the moment? We are organizing our own concert (‘Dandora is home’) for the first time in August 2015 to bring fans and Dandora artists together. We will also host a motivational workshop in June to share knowledge and inspire other artists. How do you juggle school-work and music? I manage my time well; I make time for music, school and even family. The group rehearses every Saturday and sometimes after school at the Mau Mau Camp Art Center. What are some of the challenges you have faced and how did you handle them? We have had problems getting studio time, transport and even airplay. Other times we performed and didn’t get paid. We’ve had issue with rogue promoters too. But we don’t give up because quitting is suicide. What are your views on corruption and integrity? Corruption is everywhere in this world but especially in Africa. It is the use of money or other material things to gain something. It can be stopped by you and me if we don’t encourage it. What are your views on child marriage and how can it eliminated? It is child abuse and slavery. Anyone allowing it should be jailed because it destroys (especially) girl’s futures. My future plans: To have a music school, change

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OUR WORLD

RUN RHINO, RUN!

UNBELIEVABLE!

RESPONSIBILITY TO THE ENVIRONMENT

Why do you throw away trash so carelessly? Disposing diapers in rivers Forgetting that its waste we drink Depositing waste in the sea Forgetting it is home to the fish we eat. - Words by Gabriel Mathenge, S.O.S Hermern Gmeiner Primary School, Mombasa, Kenya.

One of the things God wants you to do is care for our world. The land, oceans, lakes, rivers, animals, sea creatures, birds of the air and all the plants of the earth. Are you being responsible? Have you seen someone mishandling these gifts freely given to us? How did it make you feel? - Words by Tumushabe Kato, P.6, Child Africa SchoolKabale, Uganda.

Be fantastic, say no to plastic bags and make our world a better place.

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A


Health BY KEPHA NYANUMBA, AAR HEALTHCARE LTD

THE MAGIC

OF

P E E SL

Adequate sleep (age-appropriate and uninterrupted) sleep allows our bodies to rest for the next day, plus so much more:• Adequate sleep allows us to be physically relaxed. When we are relaxed, we have more (good) energy, are less irritable and moody. • It also contributes to healthy growth and development. Researchers believe that too little sleep can prevent healthy physical growth and even lead to unhealthy weight gain (less sleep=more hunger). • Inadequate sleep affects our immune systems, which are supposed to help fight diseases. This in turn means a shorter lifespan. • Sleep recharges the brain’s battery increasing our attention span, mental alertness and even memory. How? While we snooze, our brains sorts and stores information, replaces and solves problems. This allows us to be

at our personal best (and be creative) when we are awake. • When you rest enough, you are able to take in information, understand things clearly, follow directions and instructions. This is beneficial in academics because it means better grades and a better life in general. • Healthy sleep habits also mean less stress and depression because we are in a position to not only solve issues, but live healthier lives.

NOTE: The main reason behind unusual sleeping during the day is lack of adequate, restful sleep at night.

One way to ensure a proper sleep habit is by going to bed at the same time everynight.

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Career Choices BY EUDIAH KAMONJO

A CHILDREN’S BOOK AUTHOR

S

amuel Mbure is a children’s book author with eleven children’s books to his name. Having been introduced to poetry while in lower primary school, he made the extra effort of writing and reciting lots of poetry since then. He has been honoured by the Peace Museum in Samarkand, is a 2005 IFAW Animal Action Award recipient and is in the American Biographical Institute Who is Who 2002-2003. He was born in Kiambu, Kenya and recalls looking after his father’s goats and sheep, as well as loving drama and music. After completing high school, he joined the editorial department of an East African publishing house. Today, his way of giving back is gathering children from his village to tell them stories that enlighten them on how to survive in the world today.

Some of his books… ‘Lots of Wonders’ (First published in 1989), ‘Signs of Ageing’ and ‘The Childless Father’ (2000), ‘A for AIDS’ (2007), ‘What have we done!’(2008). A few lines of your best poem… Whenever I hear a child cry/I do not ask myself why/his needs are few and real/I won’t pretend not to know why/ There’s a cry that shouts for food/hunger is more painful than a wound/ there’s a cry that shouts for water/ as important as shelter.

influence. He was not a writer but he loved poetry. This early interest in writing afforded me plenty of time to practice. What I love about what I do now… I love making short animated films for children and visiting schools to teach writing skills.

Nick-names or labels resulting from what you do… Veteran/ teacher. Why poetry… my lower primary teacher, Douglas K. Mungai was a major

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

Most memorable moment… my tenure working as Publicity Manager at 20th Century-Fox. Lessons learnt (both career wise and life)… To be original and honest. Challenges faced and how you handled them… My major challenge (which I have since overcome) was to avoid being childish while writing for children. I try to see things from a child’s perspective. What does it take to be in this career… Dedication and selfdiscipline. What tips would you give aspiring writers or storytellers… To be truthful. Avoid lying or confusing children in your attempt to teach or narrate. Also ensure that each story teaches a moral lesson. Advice to BINGWA readers … BINGWA is an inspiring platform for children. Creativity starts here. Children should grab this opportunity and keep on writing. Favourite saying… The shape of a mountain depends on the direction you approach it from. Role model… Wole Soyinka. Favourite programme/ cartoon/movies… Dead Poets Society and It is a mad mad mad world.


CALL FOR

YOUR CONTRIBUTION BECAUSE YOUR VIEWS REALLY MATTER

Did you know? That all children have a right to express their opinions, have these listened to and where appropriate, acted upon? This is one of the rights enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). It requires that children’s rights are not only listened to but seriously taken into account especially in matters affecting their lives. Furthermore, processes or activities involving children’s participation must be transparent, voluntary, child-friendly, inclusive and should be followed up. We would love if you participated in BINGWA’s development by:

Using words and pictures to tell us what child rights issues you would like addressed in BINGWA Magazine.

Entries are welcome from BINGWA readers aged 9-13 (Class 4-8) going to school in Africa.

PLEASE NOTE: • Your submission must reach us by July 30th 2015. • At the back of your submission, do not forget to include your full name, age, class, school, and a mobile phone number (even your head teachers’) we can reach you on. • Your contribution could be published and read by millions of children in Africa. • Win a FREE Bingwa t-shirt for every published submission.

BINGWA Magazine

SEND YOUR ENTRIES TO: The Editor, BINGWA Magazine, ‘BINGWA SUBMISSIONS’ P.O. BOX 823-00606, Nairobi, Kenya. Or email: editor@bingwa.org

@BingwaMagazine

www.bingwa.org

ISSUE 14

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WINNERS & ANSWERS TSHIRT WINNERS • Blaise Makokha, Embakasi Garrison Primary School, Kenya (Pg 6) • Atenge Sylvia, P.7, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda (Pg 6) • Oketcho Patrick, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda (Pg 6 & 21) • Namilembe Nadrine, P.7, Child Africa Junior School, Equator, Uganda (Pg 6) • Nabuduwa C.G, P.7, Oguti Primary School, Tororo, Uganda (Pg 7) • Amelu Frank ,P.7, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda (Pg 7 & 20) • Nakaya Joyce P.5 & Nagendo Carol, P.7, Child Africa Junior School, Uganda (Pg 7) • Gladness Rongo, Class 7, Assisi Primary School, Tanzania (Pg 7) • Kesiime Rosette, P.6, Child Africa Junior School, Kabale, Uganda (Pg 7) • Fatuma Seera, P.4, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda (Pg 7) • Ester Lucas, Class 6, Assisi Primary School, Tanzania (Pg 7) • Maitri Umash, Class 6, Kisumu Junior Academy, Kenya (Pg 7) • Smeet Raval, Kisumu Junior Academy, Kenya (Pg 11) • Pooja Patel, Kisumu Junior Academy, Kenya (Pg 11) • Ramandeep Kaur, Kisumu Junior Academy, Kenya (Pg 11) • Oketcho Patrick & Amelu Frank, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda (Pg 11) • Maingi Kilonzo, Kamweani primary School, Kenya (Pg 11) • Jane John, Seventh Day Adventist Primary School, Juba, South Sudan (Pg 11) • Mukasa Simon Peter, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda (Pg 11). • Yuri Sadia, Hill School-Eldoret, Kenya (Pg 11)

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Uwera Alvera, P.4, Kabale Primary School, Uganda (Pg 20) Ann Eki Dor, Embakasi Garrison Primary School, Kenya (Pg 20) Adengoi George, P.8, Osukuru Primary School, Uganda (Pg 20) Faith Wahu, Class 8, Moi Primary School, Nakuru, Kenya (Pg 20) Ayebare Brendah, Child Africa Junior School, Kabale, Uganda (Pg 20) Becu Jeanne Lucie, P.6, Kampala Parents School, Uganda (Pg 21) Mujurizi Pascal, P.7, Child Africa Junior School, Kabale, Uganda (Pg 21) Salome Mungai, Age 10, Kenya (Pg 21) Wesley Oloo, Baraka Primary School, Kenya (Pg 21) Nankumba Flavia, P.6, Child Africa Junior School, Equator, Uganda (Pg 21) Sarah Sharon Agwaya, 8B, Migosi Primary School, Kenya. (Pg 34) Kur Jipur Biong, St.KIzito Primary School, Kampala, Uganda. (Pg 34) Ssekidde Joseph, St. Savio Junior SchoolKisubi, Kenya. (Pg 34) Hellen Wairimu, Moi Primary School, Nakuru, Kenya. (Pg 34) Niwagaba Stuart, P.6, Child Africa JUnoirSchool, Uganda. (Pg 34) Tony Moko Oyonji, Migosi Primary School, Kenya (Pg 42) Nahwera Leah, P.5, Kabale Universal Primary School, Uganda (Pg 42) Gabriel Mathenge, S.O.S Hermern Gmeiner Primary School, Mombasa, Kenya (Pg 42) Tumushabe Kato, P.6, Child Africa SchoolKabale, Uganda (Pg 42) Tukamushaba Favourite, Homecare Preparatory School- Kabale, Uganda (Pg 42).

By Ian Arunga

Hey there Champion, Can you find 10 words related to the champion attributes in this fun wordsearch? The first one has been done for you.

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Answers: Honest, Confident, Attitude, Trust, Learn, Support, Polite, Health, Fair, Help

COMPETITION WINNERS ISSUE 12 & 13 2014 • CHALLENGE 1 (Using pictures): Obaraza Ezekiel, Morukatipe Primary School, Tororo, Uganda (Pg 26) • CHALLENGE 2 (Using words): Naomy Cherunoh, Embakasi Garrison Primary School, Nairobi, Kenya (Pg 27) • RUNNERS-UP: Allex Robert, Samehill Primary School, Tanzania (Pg 28) COMPETITION DETAILS (PG 29) WIN amazing prizes by participating in the competition on Page 29. Send your entry to:THE EDITOR, BINGWA Magazine, BINGWA COMPETITION, P.O. BOX 823-00606, NAIROBI, KENYA. EMAIL: editor@bingwa.org PLEASE NOTE • Your entry must reach us by 30thJuly 2015. • At the back of your entry, do not forget to include your full name, age, class, school and a telephone or mobile phone number (even your teachers’) we can reach you on. • Winners will be chosen based on the creativity, good grammar and quality of work. • The winning entry will be published in the next issue of BINGWA Magazine. • Entries are welcome from BINGWA readers aged 9-13 going to school in Africa! STAR SCHOOLS • Morukatipe Primary School,Tororo, Uganda for the numerous thematic drawings we received from you. • Embakasi Garrison Primary School, Nairobi, Kenya for the competition entries we received from you.

Circle the objects on chart-1 that don’t appear on chart-2

CHART-1

CHART-2


Pictorial

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1. Aprons designed by a Child Africa employee (ADNO) and made at Child Africa Equator School now being sold. 2. Ubuntu fireplace artists entertain Malaika Kids with special needs during a visit. 3. The Child Africa brass band leading the national anthem on the Day of the African Child 2014 in Kabale, Uganda. 4. Child Africa Managing Director Julie Solberg upon receiving the Tumaini Award (first place education category). On her right is the Chief Guest, the Minister for Presidency Frank Tumwebaze. 5. Child Africa Managing Director Julie Solberg during a BINGWA anti-corruption campaign in Tororo District, Uganda. 6. Child Africa Managing Director Julie Solberg with P.7 2014 Child Africa Junior School-Kabale candidates before their final exams. 7. Sally Irving from England enjoys dancing with Child Africa pupils.

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One of Child Africa’s sponsored children Moses Murungi passed his Primary examinations with flying colours. May he continue to prove that disability is not inability. They were spotted at the annual music festivals in Nyeri County, Kenya. Child Africa pupils in Kabale, Uganda share a light moment with a visitor during a planting break. Students from Little Over Community School from Derby, England are joined by Child Africa pupils to make classroom desks. It’s planting time at Child Africa Junior School in Kabale, Uganda. Barbara Kyomugisha (pictured second from the left) joined Child Africa School as a 13 year-old. Here, Child Africa founders and her sponsors join in her wedding celebrations. Rosemary Soyland of Child Africa guides a Child Africa Junoir School-Equator pupil through her classwork during her visit. Child Africa pupils in Kabale, Uganda learning about fruits and vegetables before venturing out to plant. A nine-year-old BINGWA reader in Norway enjoys reading to her dog.

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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRIT Y IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRIC A

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CALL FOR

YOUR CONTRIBUTION BINGWA SCHOOL CLUBS BINGWA Magazine has received hundreds of requests to join the BINGWA SCHOOL CLUBS. Because of this, the BINGWA Magazine team, Child Africa and some of the partners will encourage and facilitate the development of these clubs, mainly by providing some kind of guidance. Since this is your club, we would like to know the following: • What should BINGWA SCHOOL CLUBS be all about? • What values should they nurture, promote or teach? • How will the BINGWA SCHOOL CLUB Captains (students) be selected? • How will the BINGWA SCHOOL CLUB Patrons (teachers) be selected? • What should members expect from BINGWA? • What can BINGWA expect from members? • How would people identify you as a BINGWA CLUB member?

PLEASE NOTE: • Your entry must reach us by 30thJuly 2015. • At the back of your entry, do not forget to include your full name, age, class, school and a telephone or mobile phone number (even your teachers’) we can reach you on. • Your contribution will go a long way in ensuring the BINGWA SCHOOL CLUB develops into a useful and relevant club for you.

S ARE E I R T M EN E FRO M O C S WEL ADER E R A ) BINGW 3 (Class 4-8 9-1 OL IN O AGED H C TO S GOING FRICA! A

SEND YOUR ENTRIES TO: THE EDITOR, BINGWA Magazine, BINGWA SCHOOL CLUBS, P.O. BOX 823-00606, NAIROBI, KENYA. EMAIL: editor@bingwa.org

THE BINGWA LEGEND Just like any other morning, the sun rose majestically over the Nguvu Hills, which were the source of River Uzima. This river was so sacred that only a high priest was allowed to drink from it. The people of Nguvu believed it was the meeting place of the gods. In fact, the five elements of the world - earth, heart, wind, water and fire - occasionally

met there to discuss matters involving the universe. That morning was one of those days. The five elements were troubled about the current degradation of the universe. They agreed that the only way they could save the universe was through the children, who were pure at heart and capable of the task. The elements had a problem though. They needed a leader to rally the children

for this mission. “This leader must be balanced in all ways possible,” they all agreed. They then created BINGWA! BINGWA is a careful blend of the earth’s nobility, the heart’s purity, the wind’s strength, the water’s tranquility and finally, the fire’s intensity. With this, BINGWA was sent forth to build integrity in the children of Africa and guide them in the fight against corruption.


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FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRITY IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRICA

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INTEGRITY YOU ARE OUR HOPE FOR A CLEAN FUTURE

yes. my father bought it for me, but i can’t ride. when i tried i fell into these bushes and i think i hurt my foot.

hey! brian! is that you? you have a new bicycle!

i will not give it to you! if i can’t ride it. no one will ride it! and besides, i don’t like you!

wow! it looks cool! can i borrow it for a few minutes?

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CHILDREN OF AFRICA

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help! somebody, help! that bag has my money, my identification card, and my baby’s photograph!

brian, i really need your bicycle now! i will teach you how to ride, i promise!

alright, take it...

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ISSUE: 1 FIGHTING CORRUPTION BY BUILDING INTEGRITY IN THE CHILDREN OF AFRICA

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Bingwa issue 14  

LEAVING CHILD MARRIAGE IN THE PAST

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