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W I N T E R / S P R I N G 2 014 -2 015 VOLUME 32 , NO. 2

Magazine

$4.95

PRICELESS IN TELLURIDE

THE NEXT BIG THING • BRIDAL VEIL ASCENT SWEET DEALS IN TELLURIDE • ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH


D

2 • TELLURIDE FACES

1

A

iversify your Portfolio...

33

2

...

4

5

1

nd enrich your Life!

2

6

3

4 6

5

1 • Laughing Dog Ranch, Specie Mesa 4 bedroom residence, 4 stall horse barn on 104 spectacular acres, green house and a caretakers residence. $2,750,000

2 • See Forever Village #4133, Mountain Village Sophisticated 3-bed, ridge line Penthouse with incredible views and exquisite mahogany finish. $2,300,000

1 • Lot P-13, Idarado Legacy Enjoy front row views of Bridal Veil falls with unrivaled proximity to the Town of Telluride. $1,895,000

2 • 145 W. Pacific 1E, Telluride Superb corner location, currently 2 office spaces, additional workstation plus bathroom and shower. $518,000

3 • Lots 7 & 11A Gregory Avenue, Telluride These unique contiguous lots afford commanding views from an exceptional vantage point. $1,950,000

4 • 209 Aldasoro Blvd, Aldasoro Ranch Unobstructed views from one of Aldasoro’s finest lots, this 5-bed, 5-bath residence radiates quality. $2,250,000

3 • Little Cone Ranch, Specie Mesa 74 spectacular acres, adjacent to National Forest with superb Wilson Range views plus tranquil pond. $1,250,000

4 • 538 Benchmark, Mountain Village 5.2 acres provide effortless ski access for this cozy log and stone home in a great neighborhood. $3,400,000

5 • 128 Victoria Dr, Mountain Village This rustic 4-bed 7-bath square log and stone home exudes comfort and elegance amongst 7,740 S.F. $4,995,000

6 • Plunge Landing, Telluride Two contemporary styled 2&4 bedroom Penthouse units, plus two level commercial space. $3,950,000

5 • 133 Victoria Dr, Mountain Village Refined 7-bed home, luxurious interior, exquisite views, mature landscaping, private drive & ski trail. $7,950,000

6 • R&R Ranch, Ridgway 13,067 s.f. of remarkable craftsmanship situated on 28 private acres with 180° Sneffels range views. $7,650,000

Stephen Cieciuch (Chet-chu), Director | stevec@tellurideproperties.com | 970.369.5322, Direct | 970.708.2338, Cell 237 South Oak Street | Telluride, Colorado 81435 | www.TellurideAreaRealEstate.com

Stephen Cieciuch (Chet-chu), Director | stevec@tellurideproperties.com | 970.369.5322, Direct | 970.708.2338, Cell 237 South Oak Street | Telluride, Colorado 81435 | www.TellurideAreaRealEstate.com


D

2 • TELLURIDE FACES

1

A

iversify your Portfolio...

33

2

...

4

5

1

nd enrich your Life!

2

6

3

4 6

5

1 • Laughing Dog Ranch, Specie Mesa 4 bedroom residence, 4 stall horse barn on 104 spectacular acres, green house and a caretakers residence. $2,750,000

2 • See Forever Village #4133, Mountain Village Sophisticated 3-bed, ridge line Penthouse with incredible views and exquisite mahogany finish. $2,300,000

1 • Lot P-13, Idarado Legacy Enjoy front row views of Bridal Veil falls with unrivaled proximity to the Town of Telluride. $1,895,000

2 • 145 W. Pacific 1E, Telluride Superb corner location, currently 2 office spaces, additional workstation plus bathroom and shower. $518,000

3 • Lots 7 & 11A Gregory Avenue, Telluride These unique contiguous lots afford commanding views from an exceptional vantage point. $1,950,000

4 • 209 Aldasoro Blvd, Aldasoro Ranch Unobstructed views from one of Aldasoro’s finest lots, this 5-bed, 5-bath residence radiates quality. $2,250,000

3 • Little Cone Ranch, Specie Mesa 74 spectacular acres, adjacent to National Forest with superb Wilson Range views plus tranquil pond. $1,250,000

4 • 538 Benchmark, Mountain Village 5.2 acres provide effortless ski access for this cozy log and stone home in a great neighborhood. $3,400,000

5 • 128 Victoria Dr, Mountain Village This rustic 4-bed 7-bath square log and stone home exudes comfort and elegance amongst 7,740 S.F. $4,995,000

6 • Plunge Landing, Telluride Two contemporary styled 2&4 bedroom Penthouse units, plus two level commercial space. $3,950,000

5 • 133 Victoria Dr, Mountain Village Refined 7-bed home, luxurious interior, exquisite views, mature landscaping, private drive & ski trail. $7,950,000

6 • R&R Ranch, Ridgway 13,067 s.f. of remarkable craftsmanship situated on 28 private acres with 180° Sneffels range views. $7,650,000

Stephen Cieciuch (Chet-chu), Director | stevec@tellurideproperties.com | 970.369.5322, Direct | 970.708.2338, Cell 237 South Oak Street | Telluride, Colorado 81435 | www.TellurideAreaRealEstate.com

Stephen Cieciuch (Chet-chu), Director | stevec@tellurideproperties.com | 970.369.5322, Direct | 970.708.2338, Cell 237 South Oak Street | Telluride, Colorado 81435 | www.TellurideAreaRealEstate.com


4 • TELLURIDE FACES SERVICE

I

CONVENIENCE

I

LUXURY

“If you don’t do it this year, you will be one year older when you do.” -Warren Miller-

1

Exuding a distinguished level of finish and ski-in/out location that is u n m a t c h e d i n t h e To w n o f Te l l u r i d e , t h e A u b e r g e R e s i d e n c e s a t E l e m e n t 5 2 offer two to five bedroom residences within an intimate community setting. Distinctive luxuries and services include a private ski funicular, full service concierge, spa, heated outdoor soaking pools, private club room, and expansive mountain and town views. Simply the best. Prices starting at $1,450,000 Photos & Info: element52.aubergeresorts.com Schedule a Showing: 970.708.5367

Owners enjoy reciprocity with 4 fabulous home exchange programs: Auberge, Inspirato, Elite Alliance, and 3rd Home.

#1 Hotel Brand 2012

O’Neill Stetina Group

Brian O’Neill, Director | brian@oneillstetina.com | 970.708.5367 Marty Stetina, Broker I marty@oneillstetina.com I 970.369.5368 237 South Oak Street @ the Telluride Gondola | Telluride, Colorado 81435 I tellurideproperties.com/brianoneill

2

3

1 • Headwater Ranch - Trout Lake Rarely do you find a private valley surrounded by USFS and 13,000’+ peaks with a wild trout stream meandering the length of the property. This 153-acre ranch embraces an 8,000 sqft log home with room for 3 additional private and stunning home sites. Only 20 minutes from the Telluride Ski Resort. $19,995,000 www.HeadwaterRanch.com

2 • Lorian 16, Mountain Village Enjoy tremendous views, ski access, beautiful finishes & amenities with this 4-bed condo. $1,425,000 3• 605 West Colorado Avenue - Creekside C, Telluride On Cornet Creek, this superbly finished 3-bed residence marries luxury & convenience. $2,495,000

Search all Telluride area properties from your phone. Photos, information, directions & more. Scan the QR code at the left or go to ...

Brian O’Neill

Marty Stetina

Brian.SearchTellurideRealEstate.com

O’Neill Stetina Group

Brian O’Neill, Director | brian@oneillstetina.com | 970.708.5367 Marty Stetina, Broker I marty@oneillstetina.com I 970.369.5368 237 South Oak Street @ the Telluride Gondola | Telluride, Colorado 81435 I tellurideproperties.com/brianoneill


4 • TELLURIDE FACES SERVICE

I

CONVENIENCE

I

LUXURY

“If you don’t do it this year, you will be one year older when you do.” -Warren Miller-

1

Exuding a distinguished level of finish and ski-in/out location that is u n m a t c h e d i n t h e To w n o f Te l l u r i d e , t h e A u b e r g e R e s i d e n c e s a t E l e m e n t 5 2 offer two to five bedroom residences within an intimate community setting. Distinctive luxuries and services include a private ski funicular, full service concierge, spa, heated outdoor soaking pools, private club room, and expansive mountain and town views. Simply the best. Prices starting at $1,450,000 Photos & Info: element52.aubergeresorts.com Schedule a Showing: 970.708.5367

Owners enjoy reciprocity with 4 fabulous home exchange programs: Auberge, Inspirato, Elite Alliance, and 3rd Home.

#1 Hotel Brand 2012

O’Neill Stetina Group

Brian O’Neill, Director | brian@oneillstetina.com | 970.708.5367 Marty Stetina, Broker I marty@oneillstetina.com I 970.369.5368 237 South Oak Street @ the Telluride Gondola | Telluride, Colorado 81435 I tellurideproperties.com/brianoneill

2

3

1 • Headwater Ranch - Trout Lake Rarely do you find a private valley surrounded by USFS and 13,000’+ peaks with a wild trout stream meandering the length of the property. This 153-acre ranch embraces an 8,000 sqft log home with room for 3 additional private and stunning home sites. Only 20 minutes from the Telluride Ski Resort. $19,995,000 www.HeadwaterRanch.com

2 • Lorian 16, Mountain Village Enjoy tremendous views, ski access, beautiful finishes & amenities with this 4-bed condo. $1,425,000 3• 605 West Colorado Avenue - Creekside C, Telluride On Cornet Creek, this superbly finished 3-bed residence marries luxury & convenience. $2,495,000

Search all Telluride area properties from your phone. Photos, information, directions & more. Scan the QR code at the left or go to ...

Brian O’Neill

Marty Stetina

Brian.SearchTellurideRealEstate.com

O’Neill Stetina Group

Brian O’Neill, Director | brian@oneillstetina.com | 970.708.5367 Marty Stetina, Broker I marty@oneillstetina.com I 970.369.5368 237 South Oak Street @ the Telluride Gondola | Telluride, Colorado 81435 I tellurideproperties.com/brianoneill


Prospect_W14-15_half_Layout 1 10/22/14 8:18 AM Page 1

Whether You Are BuYing or Selling we are your local contact for all your telluride real estate needs

YOURS TO OWN

last dollar condominiums $399,000 - $485,000

At Prospect Realty buyers and sellers receive individualized attention from owner/broker Todd Creel who has over 27 years of experience in the Telluride Region’s Real Estate Market.

town of telluride condo $895,000

To dd Cre el

76 to 381 acre ranches $595,000 - $3,350,000

owner / Broker •

slopeside mtn. village condo $895,000

970-728-6400

or

970-729-2222

134 e. Colorado Avenue, downtown Telluride • Todd@Telluriderealestate.net View all properties in the region on our website: telluriderealestate.net

An ideal location. Unparalleled services & amenities.

A F I R S T- O F - I T S - K I N D O P P O R T U N I T Y I N T E L L U R I D E

A limited number of fully furnished, ski-in/ski-out residences will soon be available for sale at Madeline, Telluride’s only 4-star, full service property.

Contact J.J. Ossola for more information. 970.708.5626 | madelineresidences.com

July 11-12, 2015 telluride colorado a limited number of early bird tickets go on sale december 1, 2014 www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

ridefestival.com


Prospect_W14-15_half_Layout 1 10/22/14 8:18 AM Page 1

Whether You Are BuYing or Selling we are your local contact for all your telluride real estate needs

YOURS TO OWN

last dollar condominiums $399,000 - $485,000

At Prospect Realty buyers and sellers receive individualized attention from owner/broker Todd Creel who has over 27 years of experience in the Telluride Region’s Real Estate Market.

town of telluride condo $895,000

To dd Cre el

76 to 381 acre ranches $595,000 - $3,350,000

owner / Broker •

slopeside mtn. village condo $895,000

970-728-6400

or

970-729-2222

134 e. Colorado Avenue, downtown Telluride • Todd@Telluriderealestate.net View all properties in the region on our website: telluriderealestate.net

An ideal location. Unparalleled services & amenities.

A F I R S T- O F - I T S - K I N D O P P O R T U N I T Y I N T E L L U R I D E

A limited number of fully furnished, ski-in/ski-out residences will soon be available for sale at Madeline, Telluride’s only 4-star, full service property.

Contact J.J. Ossola for more information. 970.708.5626 | madelineresidences.com

July 11-12, 2015 telluride colorado a limited number of early bird tickets go on sale december 1, 2014 www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

ridefestival.com


8 • TELLURIDE FACES

ONE OF THE FINEST VALUES IN THE TELLURIDE REGION.

522 BENCHMARK DRIVE Welcome to the Trinity Residence. This beautifully built home was designed to maximize the three essential needs for every mountain home - spectacular views, ski access and privacy. A highly desired open floor plan was designed to entertain family and friends. Special features include a wellness center (Sauna/Steam/Massage/Oxygen), one of Mountain Village’s finest ski rooms, an 8-person bunkroom, wine cellar and game room. The antique beams and siding came from a Sears and Roebuck warehouse where craftsman kit homes were stored in the early 1900s. The planks were the subfloor of the warehouse and buried under a layer of sand. The timbers are reclaimed fir timbers from trestle bridges near the Great Salt Lake. The balance of the wood used throughout the residence consists of cypress, fir and knotty alder. The stone found throughout the residence is a mix of sandstones from Oklahoma and Arkansas. For those looking for one the best values for a high-end home, this property should be on your list. $7,600,00 - MLS #29834

KEVIN HOLBROOK PHONE: (970) 729.1601 EMAIL: kevin.holbrook@sothebysrealty.com


8 • TELLURIDE FACES

ONE OF THE FINEST VALUES IN THE TELLURIDE REGION.

522 BENCHMARK DRIVE Welcome to the Trinity Residence. This beautifully built home was designed to maximize the three essential needs for every mountain home - spectacular views, ski access and privacy. A highly desired open floor plan was designed to entertain family and friends. Special features include a wellness center (Sauna/Steam/Massage/Oxygen), one of Mountain Village’s finest ski rooms, an 8-person bunkroom, wine cellar and game room. The antique beams and siding came from a Sears and Roebuck warehouse where craftsman kit homes were stored in the early 1900s. The planks were the subfloor of the warehouse and buried under a layer of sand. The timbers are reclaimed fir timbers from trestle bridges near the Great Salt Lake. The balance of the wood used throughout the residence consists of cypress, fir and knotty alder. The stone found throughout the residence is a mix of sandstones from Oklahoma and Arkansas. For those looking for one the best values for a high-end home, this property should be on your list. $7,600,00 - MLS #29834

KEVIN HOLBROOK PHONE: (970) 729.1601 EMAIL: kevin.holbrook@sothebysrealty.com


TELLURIDE HELITRAX

E

10 • TELLURIDE FACES

COLORADO’S ULTIMATE HELI-SKI EXPERIENCE

veryone has a good time when they come to Telluride.

The view from the helicopter reveals pristine, untouched powder. You feel the smile on your face grow as the pilot steers the bird toward the landing zone at the top of the ridge. When you click in you feel like you are on top of the world, your breath is taken away. The guide points to your canvas of white and you let ‘em rip.

The people who are smiling the most are the ones who never left.

Telluride Helitrax is Colorado’s most professional and experienced helicopter ski company, and has been in continuous operation since 1982. Located in the heart of the San Juan Mountains, Helitrax has exclusive heli access to over 200 square miles of high alpine basins, cirques and summits. A combination of small groups, spectacular terrain, knowledgeable staff and high safety standards combine to deliver a truly unforgettable experience. The new Helitrax Eurocopter AS350 B3e was built for high altitude mountain flying and outperforms in demanding weather conditions. Almost all of the terrain is above tree line and the views are stunning. Life isn’t quite complete without a day with Telluride Helitrax. The last run has you hooting and hollering as the helicopter flies overhead. It’s been the day you always dreamed of plus so much more. Flying home has you fantasizing about next time, but now it’s time for a cold beer. This has been the experience of a lifetime!

1

2

3

4

1 • Lot AR 613 C-1, Mountain Village 2 • Telemark G, Mountain Village HUGE 360° views, all day sun & amazing sunsets from this golf Convenient 4-bed ski-in/out condo, steps to the gondola, yet course lot. Build a home up to 10,000 sqft. $450,000 private feel with great outdoor space & views. $1,295,000 3  • Palmyra 4B, Mountain Village Spacious 1-bed in the heart of the MV Core with great Wilson views, private deck, & ski locker. $435,000

www.helitrax.com

powder@helitrax.com

970.728.8377

4  • Mountain Lodge 2-Bed Units, Mountain Village Ski-in/out. Excellent rental income. Enjoy full hotel services: concierge & front desk, shuttle service, pool & gym. (3014/16) $599,000 (3015/17) $525,000 (2317) $315,000

Eric Saunders, Broker | saunders@tellurideproperties.com | 970.369.5326, Direct | 970.708.2447, Cell 237 South Oak Street @ the Telluride Gondola | Telluride, Colorado 81435 | saunders.searchtelluriderealestate.com


TELLURIDE HELITRAX

E

10 • TELLURIDE FACES

COLORADO’S ULTIMATE HELI-SKI EXPERIENCE

veryone has a good time when they come to Telluride.

The view from the helicopter reveals pristine, untouched powder. You feel the smile on your face grow as the pilot steers the bird toward the landing zone at the top of the ridge. When you click in you feel like you are on top of the world, your breath is taken away. The guide points to your canvas of white and you let ‘em rip.

The people who are smiling the most are the ones who never left.

Telluride Helitrax is Colorado’s most professional and experienced helicopter ski company, and has been in continuous operation since 1982. Located in the heart of the San Juan Mountains, Helitrax has exclusive heli access to over 200 square miles of high alpine basins, cirques and summits. A combination of small groups, spectacular terrain, knowledgeable staff and high safety standards combine to deliver a truly unforgettable experience. The new Helitrax Eurocopter AS350 B3e was built for high altitude mountain flying and outperforms in demanding weather conditions. Almost all of the terrain is above tree line and the views are stunning. Life isn’t quite complete without a day with Telluride Helitrax. The last run has you hooting and hollering as the helicopter flies overhead. It’s been the day you always dreamed of plus so much more. Flying home has you fantasizing about next time, but now it’s time for a cold beer. This has been the experience of a lifetime!

1

2

3

4

1 • Lot AR 613 C-1, Mountain Village 2 • Telemark G, Mountain Village HUGE 360° views, all day sun & amazing sunsets from this golf Convenient 4-bed ski-in/out condo, steps to the gondola, yet course lot. Build a home up to 10,000 sqft. $450,000 private feel with great outdoor space & views. $1,295,000 3  • Palmyra 4B, Mountain Village Spacious 1-bed in the heart of the MV Core with great Wilson views, private deck, & ski locker. $435,000

www.helitrax.com

powder@helitrax.com

970.728.8377

4  • Mountain Lodge 2-Bed Units, Mountain Village Ski-in/out. Excellent rental income. Enjoy full hotel services: concierge & front desk, shuttle service, pool & gym. (3014/16) $599,000 (3015/17) $525,000 (2317) $315,000

Eric Saunders, Broker | saunders@tellurideproperties.com | 970.369.5326, Direct | 970.708.2447, Cell 237 South Oak Street @ the Telluride Gondola | Telluride, Colorado 81435 | saunders.searchtelluriderealestate.com


12 • WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

This is your wake up call.

CONTENTS

DEPARTMENTS

15

62

34

WITHIN From the Editor

16

CALENDAR A peek at this season’s events

22

TELLURIDE TURNS Headlines from the local news

32

24

44

ENVIRONMENT Mountain Village helps you “Do the Right Thing”

28

42

MOUNTAIN HEALTH Rub it in: Topical medicinal marijuana

38

30

ASK JOCK Athletic advice from our mountain guru

FEATURES

32

John Denver’s Moral Victory

34

The Next Big Thing

Rob Story’s essay ponders the meaning behind “Rocky Mountain High.”

Sean O’Neill’s Historic Telluride Ascent

42

Sweet Deals in Telluride

TELLURIDE FACES Meet Kristin Holbrook, Tor Anderson, and Rosie Cusack

56

A paraplegic ice climber tackles the highest waterfall in Colorado.

SAN JUAN SCRIBES The best local books to curl up with this winter

W I N T E R / S P R I N G 2 014 -2 015

ON THE COVER

21 exquisite new condominium residences in Telluride’s Mountain Village from $850,000 to $5,495,000

60

A community Facebook page becomes an online forum and an overnight sensation.

VOLUME 32 , NO. 2

Answer it.

50

Telluride Sessions captures up-and-coming bands off the stage, and in the mountains.

38

44

HISTORY Mightier than the sword: Newspapers join in mining labor battles

more than half sold!

Magazine

LOCAL FLAVOR The fondant fairy behind Peace of Cake

62

INSIDE ART Fire art: The Wheels of Zoroaster

Photographer Ryan Bonneau captures the simple life: a tent, some skis, and the seemingly endless landscape of the Lizard Head Wilderness. A little cold for camping, but the views outside the orange flaps are stunning.

Presented by:

Daniel E. Dockray 970-708-0666 dan.dockray@sothebysrealty.com

66

A LAST LOOK Homecoming for Gus Kenworthy

ELKSTONE21.COM

$4.95

PRICELESS IN TELLURIDE

THE NEXT BIG THING • BRIDAL VEIL ASCENT SWEET DEALS IN TELLURIDE • ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH

www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

each office is independently owned & operated.

Availability and prices subject to change without notice.


12 • WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

This is your wake up call.

CONTENTS

DEPARTMENTS

15

62

34

WITHIN From the Editor

16

CALENDAR A peek at this season’s events

22

TELLURIDE TURNS Headlines from the local news

32

24

44

ENVIRONMENT Mountain Village helps you “Do the Right Thing”

28

42

MOUNTAIN HEALTH Rub it in: Topical medicinal marijuana

38

30

ASK JOCK Athletic advice from our mountain guru

FEATURES

32

John Denver’s Moral Victory

34

The Next Big Thing

Rob Story’s essay ponders the meaning behind “Rocky Mountain High.”

Sean O’Neill’s Historic Telluride Ascent

42

Sweet Deals in Telluride

TELLURIDE FACES Meet Kristin Holbrook, Tor Anderson, and Rosie Cusack

56

A paraplegic ice climber tackles the highest waterfall in Colorado.

SAN JUAN SCRIBES The best local books to curl up with this winter

W I N T E R / S P R I N G 2 014 -2 015

ON THE COVER

21 exquisite new condominium residences in Telluride’s Mountain Village from $850,000 to $5,495,000

60

A community Facebook page becomes an online forum and an overnight sensation.

VOLUME 32 , NO. 2

Answer it.

50

Telluride Sessions captures up-and-coming bands off the stage, and in the mountains.

38

44

HISTORY Mightier than the sword: Newspapers join in mining labor battles

more than half sold!

Magazine

LOCAL FLAVOR The fondant fairy behind Peace of Cake

62

INSIDE ART Fire art: The Wheels of Zoroaster

Photographer Ryan Bonneau captures the simple life: a tent, some skis, and the seemingly endless landscape of the Lizard Head Wilderness. A little cold for camping, but the views outside the orange flaps are stunning.

Presented by:

Daniel E. Dockray 970-708-0666 dan.dockray@sothebysrealty.com

66

A LAST LOOK Homecoming for Gus Kenworthy

ELKSTONE21.COM

$4.95

PRICELESS IN TELLURIDE

THE NEXT BIG THING • BRIDAL VEIL ASCENT SWEET DEALS IN TELLURIDE • ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH

www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

each office is independently owned & operated.

Availability and prices subject to change without notice.


14 • WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

WITHIN PUBLISHER DAVID W. OSKIN

Contributors

Magazine GEOFF HANSON Geoff Hanson (“The Next Big Thing,” p. 34) moved to Telluride in 1990, where he wrote for the Telluride Times Journal and produced news for KOTO radio. In 1996, he wrote, produced, and acted in the Telluride film Scrapple, which still enjoys a cult following today. He met his wife Alison in Telluride and they moved to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, so she could go to veterinary school at LSU. They started a family and moved to Wilmington, North Carolina, before returning to Telluride in 2013. Geoff is pleased beyond belief to be in living in Telluride again, the place he has always considered home.

RYAN BONNEAU For the past fifteen years Ryan Bonneau (Cover p. 1, Last Look p. 66) has been wandering the San Juan Mountains, camera in hand, attempting to capture the endless beauty of these mountains and finding inspiration in the mountain landscapes. He says Telluride is a unique place filled with amazing people, and that he’s lucky to be among those who call this place home. Currently he is seeking out less explored areas to showcase the diversity of light patterns and their dramatic effects. After an immense amount of peer pressure, Ryan has finally given in and started an Instagram account. He has all of 22 followers—please help him out.

~~~

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DEB DION ~~~

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JENNY PAGE ~~~

CREATIVE DIRECTOR KRISTAL RHODES ~~~

COPY EDITOR / PROOFREADER JENNIFER OLSON ~~~

WEB DIRECTOR SUSAN HAYSE ~~~

DISTRIBUTION TELLURIDE DELIVERS ~~~

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Christina Callicott Martinique Davis Olivia Exstrum Elizabeth Guest Geoff Hanson Katie Klingsporn Paul O’Rourke Emily Shoff Rob Story ~~~

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ryan Bonneau Brenda Colwell Ken Conte Kane Scheidegger Brett Schreckengost Kevin Ziechmann ~~~

CHRISTINA CALLICOTT Christina Callicott was once a fearless explorer of the San Juan Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, keeping company with ne’er-do-wells like Timmy O’Neill and his ilk. (Callicott wrote about Sean and Timmy O’Neill in “Sean O’Neill’s Historic Telluride Ascent,” p. 38.) She has since given up a life of excitement, glamour, and other nefarious adventures for the bone-crushing, mind-numbing pursuit of a PhD in Anthropology and Tropical Conservation and Development at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Go Gators.

WWW.TELLURIDEMAGAZINE.COM Telluride Publishing produces the San Juan Skyway Visitor Guide and Telluride Magazine. Current and past issues are available on our website.. For correspondence, subscriptions, and advertising email editor@telluridemagazine.com or call 970.728.4245. The annual subscription rate is $11.95. © 2014 Telluride Publishing is a division of Big Earth Publishing, Inc. Cover and contents are fully protected and must not be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher. ~~~

COVER PHOTO Ryan Bonneau www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

{

Tesla Today

}

“The energy of a single thought may determine the motion of a universe.”

A

lthough Nikola Tesla is best known today for the electric Tesla Roadster car that is named for him and his patented motor technology, the eccentric inventor did some of his best work here in this region. His pioneering AC hydroelectric power generation that first electrified Telluride is still operating today in the Ames Valley, more than a century later. But did you know that he also laid the groundwork for your smartphone? In 1901—during the race to develop transatlantic radio—Tesla described to his investing partner J.P. Morgan his idea for instant communication, gathering stock quotes and telegram messages and assigning them a new frequency that would be broadcast wirelessly to a device that would fit in your hand. He even holds three patents for wireless energy and data transmission. In other words, he was the first to envision a crude form of today’s smartphone and wireless Internet technology. So even if you can’t afford a Tesla electric car (“Do the Right Thing,” p. 26), you are still using Tesla technology in your everyday life. You can catch up with the latest music acts performing here in Telluride on Vimeo (“The Next Big Thing,” pp. 34–36) or see the trailer for Prevail, the first paraplegic ice climbing attempt of Bridal Veil Falls (“Sean O’Neill Makes Historic Telluride Ascent,” pp. 38–39). And no longer do

—Nikola Tesla

you need to cruise by a yard sale to find used gear or furniture, search the classified ads for a rental unit or a roommate, or meet up with a coffee klatch to discuss life: Now there’s a Facebook page that lets you do all of that instantly (“Sweet Deals in Telluride,” pp. 42–43). Even things that are still done the old-fashioned way, like baking a cake, benefit from modern conveniences like Pinterest pages and YouTube how-to vid-

eos (“Peace of Cake,” p. 60). And if you’re curious about Gus Kenworthy and his medal-worthy Olympic performance (“Parting Shot,” p. 66), it’s OK that you didn’t buy a plane ticket to Sochi last year. All you have to do is Google him, and you’ll have the full highlight reel at your fingertips. Maybe all this technology is not your thing. Maybe you’re nostalgic for the time when there was real human connection, people talking and touching, instead of texting and tapping an iPad. Take heart: In all of Tesla’s ingenuity and visionary innovation, he was proven wrong about one thing. Tesla scoffed at the theory that Einstein proposed about matter having energy, that even human beings are composed of atoms that have electromagnetic properties, a theory that was ultimately verified by quantum physics. So even if today we are transmitting messages electronically with bandwidth frequencies and handheld devices, we are only able to do this because of the actual human energy we generate. And without that, the real life and real experiences, we would have nothing to share in the virtual world—and perhaps nothing at all. Enjoy the issue,

Deb Dion

Deb Dion, Telluride Magazine Editor

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

15


14 • WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

WITHIN PUBLISHER DAVID W. OSKIN

Contributors

Magazine GEOFF HANSON Geoff Hanson (“The Next Big Thing,” p. 34) moved to Telluride in 1990, where he wrote for the Telluride Times Journal and produced news for KOTO radio. In 1996, he wrote, produced, and acted in the Telluride film Scrapple, which still enjoys a cult following today. He met his wife Alison in Telluride and they moved to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, so she could go to veterinary school at LSU. They started a family and moved to Wilmington, North Carolina, before returning to Telluride in 2013. Geoff is pleased beyond belief to be in living in Telluride again, the place he has always considered home.

RYAN BONNEAU For the past fifteen years Ryan Bonneau (Cover p. 1, Last Look p. 66) has been wandering the San Juan Mountains, camera in hand, attempting to capture the endless beauty of these mountains and finding inspiration in the mountain landscapes. He says Telluride is a unique place filled with amazing people, and that he’s lucky to be among those who call this place home. Currently he is seeking out less explored areas to showcase the diversity of light patterns and their dramatic effects. After an immense amount of peer pressure, Ryan has finally given in and started an Instagram account. He has all of 22 followers—please help him out.

~~~

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DEB DION ~~~

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JENNY PAGE ~~~

CREATIVE DIRECTOR KRISTAL RHODES ~~~

COPY EDITOR / PROOFREADER JENNIFER OLSON ~~~

WEB DIRECTOR SUSAN HAYSE ~~~

DISTRIBUTION TELLURIDE DELIVERS ~~~

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Christina Callicott Martinique Davis Olivia Exstrum Elizabeth Guest Geoff Hanson Katie Klingsporn Paul O’Rourke Emily Shoff Rob Story ~~~

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ryan Bonneau Brenda Colwell Ken Conte Kane Scheidegger Brett Schreckengost Kevin Ziechmann ~~~

CHRISTINA CALLICOTT Christina Callicott was once a fearless explorer of the San Juan Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, keeping company with ne’er-do-wells like Timmy O’Neill and his ilk. (Callicott wrote about Sean and Timmy O’Neill in “Sean O’Neill’s Historic Telluride Ascent,” p. 38.) She has since given up a life of excitement, glamour, and other nefarious adventures for the bone-crushing, mind-numbing pursuit of a PhD in Anthropology and Tropical Conservation and Development at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Go Gators.

WWW.TELLURIDEMAGAZINE.COM Telluride Publishing produces the San Juan Skyway Visitor Guide and Telluride Magazine. Current and past issues are available on our website.. For correspondence, subscriptions, and advertising email editor@telluridemagazine.com or call 970.728.4245. The annual subscription rate is $11.95. © 2014 Telluride Publishing is a division of Big Earth Publishing, Inc. Cover and contents are fully protected and must not be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher. ~~~

COVER PHOTO Ryan Bonneau www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

{

Tesla Today

}

“The energy of a single thought may determine the motion of a universe.”

A

lthough Nikola Tesla is best known today for the electric Tesla Roadster car that is named for him and his patented motor technology, the eccentric inventor did some of his best work here in this region. His pioneering AC hydroelectric power generation that first electrified Telluride is still operating today in the Ames Valley, more than a century later. But did you know that he also laid the groundwork for your smartphone? In 1901—during the race to develop transatlantic radio—Tesla described to his investing partner J.P. Morgan his idea for instant communication, gathering stock quotes and telegram messages and assigning them a new frequency that would be broadcast wirelessly to a device that would fit in your hand. He even holds three patents for wireless energy and data transmission. In other words, he was the first to envision a crude form of today’s smartphone and wireless Internet technology. So even if you can’t afford a Tesla electric car (“Do the Right Thing,” p. 26), you are still using Tesla technology in your everyday life. You can catch up with the latest music acts performing here in Telluride on Vimeo (“The Next Big Thing,” pp. 34–36) or see the trailer for Prevail, the first paraplegic ice climbing attempt of Bridal Veil Falls (“Sean O’Neill Makes Historic Telluride Ascent,” pp. 38–39). And no longer do

—Nikola Tesla

you need to cruise by a yard sale to find used gear or furniture, search the classified ads for a rental unit or a roommate, or meet up with a coffee klatch to discuss life: Now there’s a Facebook page that lets you do all of that instantly (“Sweet Deals in Telluride,” pp. 42–43). Even things that are still done the old-fashioned way, like baking a cake, benefit from modern conveniences like Pinterest pages and YouTube how-to vid-

eos (“Peace of Cake,” p. 60). And if you’re curious about Gus Kenworthy and his medal-worthy Olympic performance (“Parting Shot,” p. 66), it’s OK that you didn’t buy a plane ticket to Sochi last year. All you have to do is Google him, and you’ll have the full highlight reel at your fingertips. Maybe all this technology is not your thing. Maybe you’re nostalgic for the time when there was real human connection, people talking and touching, instead of texting and tapping an iPad. Take heart: In all of Tesla’s ingenuity and visionary innovation, he was proven wrong about one thing. Tesla scoffed at the theory that Einstein proposed about matter having energy, that even human beings are composed of atoms that have electromagnetic properties, a theory that was ultimately verified by quantum physics. So even if today we are transmitting messages electronically with bandwidth frequencies and handheld devices, we are only able to do this because of the actual human energy we generate. And without that, the real life and real experiences, we would have nothing to share in the virtual world—and perhaps nothing at all. Enjoy the issue,

Deb Dion

Deb Dion, Telluride Magazine Editor

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

15


16 • EVENTS CALENDAR

NOVEMBER 21

GONDOLA OPENS T he gondola opens for the 2014-15 winter season. The chondola between the Meadows and Mountain Village center starts running Nov. 26.

26

OPENING DAY Telluride Ski Resort opens for the 2014-15 ski season.

29

RAPUNZEL Rapunzel is a tongue-in-cheek, one-hour musical retelling of the perennial favorite, with a possessive mother who is a witch, a tentative young prince, and a naïve young girl with extremely long hair. The performance is at the Palm Theatre. telluridepalm.com

DECEMBER NOEL NIGHT 3

S hop early and partake of the holiday caroling, discounts, and cheer in Telluride’s retail stores.

5

TWENTY(BY)TELLURIDE Join Telluride Arts for these presentations by local artists to get an intimate glimpse of their work. Artists show twenty slides, each for a twenty-second interval, at the Historic Sheridan Bar. telluridearts.org

5-7

THE UGLY DUCKLING Sheridan Arts Foundation Young People’s Theatre middle school actors perform The Ugly Duckling at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

5-7

HOLIDAY ARTS BAZAAR Local artisans and artists vend unique handmade goods like jewelry, sewn and knitted clothing and accessories, toys, local foods, housewares, candles, and more at the Telluride High School. telluridearts.org

6

AN OLD FASHIONED CHRISTMAS AT SCHMID RANCH The Telluride Historical Museum presents its annual Christmas celebration at Schmid Ranch on Wilson Mesa. Bring the kids and find your Christmas tree, make a wreath, enjoy homemade hot cocoa, meet Santa, and more. telluridemuseum.org

13

ROCK AND ROLL ACADEMY WINTER CONCERT Telluride’s Rock & Roll Academy students play their 11th annual concert at the Sheridan Opera House. Eleven allkid bands perform at this free, all ages community event. rockandrollacademy.com

FILMS AT THE LIBRARY Wilkinson Public Library hosts two film series. On the first Monday of each month, Telluride Film Festival Cinematheque presents a series of films from Australia and New Zealand. On the last Thursday of each month, enjoy video excerpts from the 2013 Bioneers Conference, presented by locals from Telluride who speak and host discussions. All films screen at 6 p.m. and are free to the public. telluridelibrary.org

14

PALM ARTS DANCE RECITAL Children and young adults in the Palm Arts dance programs take the stage to perform at the Palm Theatre. telluridepalm.com

17-21

PLAYING SANTA Sheridan Arts Foundation and Telluride Theatre present an original holiday play, performed at the Sheridan Opera House. telluridetheatre.org

22

TELLURIDOL Watch local singers compete in this contest, hosted by YoungLife. sheridanoperahouse.com

TELLURIDE ART WALK On the first Thursday of each month, the Telluride Art Walk celebrates art at the local galleries from 5–8 p.m., with a self-guided tour of the exhibits in downtown Telluride. Nineteen venues open their doors to showcase new exhibits and artists, and restaurants feature art walk specials. Maps are available from local businesses and Telluride Arts. telluridearts.org

23

SKI FILM Catch the latest Warren Miller ski film, showing at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

24-25

TORCHLIGHT PARADES Skiers descend into Telluride and Mountain Village, carrying torches and forming a bright string of lights.

26

MOUNTAINFILM FRIEND-RAISER Mountainfilm in Telluride hosts its annual “friend-raiser,” an event and screening to benefit the film festival and its programs, at the Sheridan Opera House. mountainfilm.org

CALENDAR ONGOING EVENTS:

NOVEMBER 2014

AVALANCHE AWARENESS FORUMS AND RESCUE CLINICS Sponsored by the San Juan Field School, the San Juan Outdoor School/Telluride Alpinism, and Telluride Ski Patrol, the free series takes place on select Monday nights starting in December and educates backcountry travelers about avalanche safety. Free avalanche beacon rescue clinics are offered throughout the season, starting in January. Multi-day avalanche safety courses with field sessions and ice climbing trips are also available. tellurideadventures.com

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TEEN COOKING PROGRAMS AT THE LIBRARY The Wilkinson Public Library hosts a special teen cooking club at 330 p.m. every Wednesday and Thursday. telluridelibrary.org

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www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Melissa Plantz

Winter/Spring 2014-2015

Art for Home and Self Desert Rose, Bonnie Teitelbaum 970 728 3355

171 S Pine Street

Telluride, CO

lustregallery.com


16 • EVENTS CALENDAR

NOVEMBER 21

GONDOLA OPENS T he gondola opens for the 2014-15 winter season. The chondola between the Meadows and Mountain Village center starts running Nov. 26.

26

OPENING DAY Telluride Ski Resort opens for the 2014-15 ski season.

29

RAPUNZEL Rapunzel is a tongue-in-cheek, one-hour musical retelling of the perennial favorite, with a possessive mother who is a witch, a tentative young prince, and a naïve young girl with extremely long hair. The performance is at the Palm Theatre. telluridepalm.com

DECEMBER NOEL NIGHT 3

S hop early and partake of the holiday caroling, discounts, and cheer in Telluride’s retail stores.

5

TWENTY(BY)TELLURIDE Join Telluride Arts for these presentations by local artists to get an intimate glimpse of their work. Artists show twenty slides, each for a twenty-second interval, at the Historic Sheridan Bar. telluridearts.org

5-7

THE UGLY DUCKLING Sheridan Arts Foundation Young People’s Theatre middle school actors perform The Ugly Duckling at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

5-7

HOLIDAY ARTS BAZAAR Local artisans and artists vend unique handmade goods like jewelry, sewn and knitted clothing and accessories, toys, local foods, housewares, candles, and more at the Telluride High School. telluridearts.org

6

AN OLD FASHIONED CHRISTMAS AT SCHMID RANCH The Telluride Historical Museum presents its annual Christmas celebration at Schmid Ranch on Wilson Mesa. Bring the kids and find your Christmas tree, make a wreath, enjoy homemade hot cocoa, meet Santa, and more. telluridemuseum.org

13

ROCK AND ROLL ACADEMY WINTER CONCERT Telluride’s Rock & Roll Academy students play their 11th annual concert at the Sheridan Opera House. Eleven allkid bands perform at this free, all ages community event. rockandrollacademy.com

FILMS AT THE LIBRARY Wilkinson Public Library hosts two film series. On the first Monday of each month, Telluride Film Festival Cinematheque presents a series of films from Australia and New Zealand. On the last Thursday of each month, enjoy video excerpts from the 2013 Bioneers Conference, presented by locals from Telluride who speak and host discussions. All films screen at 6 p.m. and are free to the public. telluridelibrary.org

14

PALM ARTS DANCE RECITAL Children and young adults in the Palm Arts dance programs take the stage to perform at the Palm Theatre. telluridepalm.com

17-21

PLAYING SANTA Sheridan Arts Foundation and Telluride Theatre present an original holiday play, performed at the Sheridan Opera House. telluridetheatre.org

22

TELLURIDOL Watch local singers compete in this contest, hosted by YoungLife. sheridanoperahouse.com

TELLURIDE ART WALK On the first Thursday of each month, the Telluride Art Walk celebrates art at the local galleries from 5–8 p.m., with a self-guided tour of the exhibits in downtown Telluride. Nineteen venues open their doors to showcase new exhibits and artists, and restaurants feature art walk specials. Maps are available from local businesses and Telluride Arts. telluridearts.org

23

SKI FILM Catch the latest Warren Miller ski film, showing at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

24-25

TORCHLIGHT PARADES Skiers descend into Telluride and Mountain Village, carrying torches and forming a bright string of lights.

26

MOUNTAINFILM FRIEND-RAISER Mountainfilm in Telluride hosts its annual “friend-raiser,” an event and screening to benefit the film festival and its programs, at the Sheridan Opera House. mountainfilm.org

CALENDAR ONGOING EVENTS:

NOVEMBER 2014

AVALANCHE AWARENESS FORUMS AND RESCUE CLINICS Sponsored by the San Juan Field School, the San Juan Outdoor School/Telluride Alpinism, and Telluride Ski Patrol, the free series takes place on select Monday nights starting in December and educates backcountry travelers about avalanche safety. Free avalanche beacon rescue clinics are offered throughout the season, starting in January. Multi-day avalanche safety courses with field sessions and ice climbing trips are also available. tellurideadventures.com

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Ryan Bonneau

TEEN COOKING PROGRAMS AT THE LIBRARY The Wilkinson Public Library hosts a special teen cooking club at 330 p.m. every Wednesday and Thursday. telluridelibrary.org

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www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Melissa Plantz

Winter/Spring 2014-2015

Art for Home and Self Desert Rose, Bonnie Teitelbaum 970 728 3355

171 S Pine Street

Telluride, CO

lustregallery.com


18 • EVENTS CALENDAR

27-2

HOLIDAY CONCERT SERIES Catch these performances by Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenure (Dec. 27), Seryn Live in Concert (Dec. 28), An Evening With Shawn Colvin (Dec. 29), and Wynonna & The Big Noise (Dec. 31) at the historic Sheridan Opera House, as well as a special show with The Chris Robinson Brotherhood at the Telluride Conference Center (Jan. 2). sheridanoperahouse.com

30

GEORGE WINSTON Famed pianist George Winston performs live at the Palm Theatre. telluridepalm.com

31

TORCHLIGHT PARADE Celebrate New Year’s Eve with a parade of lights down the ski slopes and fireworks in Mountain Village.

31

AH HAA SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS Ah Haa hosts its annual New Year’s Eve Gala Fundraiser, featuring artists Sally Simpson and Michael Stasiuk, with fine art, a champagne reception, a four-course dinner, entertainment, and a wine auction. ahhaa.org

JANUARY 2015

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FITNESS AND MEDITATION AT THE LIBRARY Get moving for free at the Wilkinson Public Library’s yoga classes Mondays at 9 a.m., Tuesdays (prenatal yoga) at 9 a.m., noon (in Spanish) and 7:30 p.m., and Wednesdays and Fridays at 8:30 a.m. Zumba is offered on Tuesdays at 6 p.m. and Saturdays at 10 a.m. Pound classes are Monday at 5:30 p.m. and pilates is Thursdays at 8:30 a.m. There is also a dharma talk and meditation program offered on the third Wednesday of every month, and a guided meditation on Mondays at 12:15 p.m. telluridelibrary.org STORYTIME AND POETRY Celebrate the written word at 6 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at the Arroyo Wine Bar with the Talking Gourd’s free poetry readings, writing circle, and performances by a featured poet. Kids will enjoy Storytime at the Library, where stories are read aloud at 11 a.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and at 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays. A special bilingual Storytime has stories in English and Spanish on Thursday at 12:15 p.m.. telluridelibrary.org OPEN RECREATION The Telluride Parks and Recreation department offers open hockey and ice skating at the Hanley Ice Rink and Pavilion in Telluride Town Park and drop-in basketball, volleyball, and indoor soccer at the high school gym. telluride-co.gov RELIVING HISTORY Telluride Historical Museum hosts three snowshoe tours (Jan. 17, Feb. 21 and March 21) as well as historic ski tours every Friday with Ashley Boling, leaving at 10 a.m. in the Mountain Village Center—$10 for museum members, $15 for non-members. telluridemuseum.org TELLURIDE FILM FESTIVAL PRESENTS On the third Thursday of each month at the Nugget Theatre, catch one of the recently released films selected by the festival directors of the Telluride Film Festival. nuggettheatre.org

www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Melissa Plantz

4

Indulge or Eat Lean and Green All in One Hip Spot on Main Street

b bu ur rg g ee r r b ba ar r

JANUARY TONY FURTADO BAND 10

 on’t miss the banjo and slide guitar virtuoso Tony Furtado D and his ensemble, playing at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

15-19

TELLURIDE FIRE FESTIVAL  A free, public, interactive experience of fire arts: fire performances, art cars, fire dancers, fire-emitting sculptures, and burn barrels. Displays will be in the central pedestrian plazas of Mountain Village and the main street in Telluride. telluridefirefestival.org

16

MARCH FOURTH The March Fourth marching band performs at the Telluride Conference Center in Mountain Village. tellurideconference.com

16-17

JEFF AUSTIN AND FRIENDS LIVE IN CONCERT The mandolin player from Yonder Mountain String Band has started his solo career, playing music with an ensemble (Danny Barnes, Eric Thorin, and Ross Martin) at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

844-THE-BUNS

VIEW OUR MENU ORDER TO GO

ONLINE

We Steam Our BurgerS and VeggieS BecauSe it’S Better FOr yOu and FOr the enVirOnment. thiS iS FOOd yOu can Feel gOOd aBOut eating. Steam iS the next Big thing. cOme See What all the Buzz iS aBOut.

21

THE WAILERS  The preeminent reggae group The Wailers take the stage at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

24

KOTO LIP SYNC  Locals perform hilarious lip sync routines in costume on the Palm Theatre stage, in a benefit event for local community radio station KOTO. koto.org

3-31 & 2 THE DROWSY CHAPERONE

 Young People’s Theatre high school actors perform the play The Drowsy Chaperone at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

FEBRUARY FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN 6

 Telluride Historical Museum hosts a screening of Fire on the Mountain, a documentary on the 10th Mountain Division. There will also be an auction of 10th Mountain Division memorabilia. telluridemuseum.org

7

CHOCOLATE LOVERS’ FLING  Sample chocolate confections made by local chefs, dress in theme costumes and dance at this annual benefit for the San Miguel Resource Center, held at the Telluride Conference Center. sanmiguelresource.org

12-15

COMEDY FEST  The 16th annual Telluride Comedy Fest features famous comedians from films and shows like The Daily Show, Saturday Night Live and 30 Rock performing skits and improv. sheridanoperahouse.com

The Newest, Hottest, Steamiest Place in Town. OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK FOR LUNCH & DINNER | 11:00AM - 10:00PM | www.steamiesburgers.com 300 West Colorado Ave, Telluride CO | Elks Building, Across from the Courthouse, Main Street


18 • EVENTS CALENDAR

27-2

HOLIDAY CONCERT SERIES Catch these performances by Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenure (Dec. 27), Seryn Live in Concert (Dec. 28), An Evening With Shawn Colvin (Dec. 29), and Wynonna & The Big Noise (Dec. 31) at the historic Sheridan Opera House, as well as a special show with The Chris Robinson Brotherhood at the Telluride Conference Center (Jan. 2). sheridanoperahouse.com

30

GEORGE WINSTON Famed pianist George Winston performs live at the Palm Theatre. telluridepalm.com

31

TORCHLIGHT PARADE Celebrate New Year’s Eve with a parade of lights down the ski slopes and fireworks in Mountain Village.

31

AH HAA SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS Ah Haa hosts its annual New Year’s Eve Gala Fundraiser, featuring artists Sally Simpson and Michael Stasiuk, with fine art, a champagne reception, a four-course dinner, entertainment, and a wine auction. ahhaa.org

JANUARY 2015

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FITNESS AND MEDITATION AT THE LIBRARY Get moving for free at the Wilkinson Public Library’s yoga classes Mondays at 9 a.m., Tuesdays (prenatal yoga) at 9 a.m., noon (in Spanish) and 7:30 p.m., and Wednesdays and Fridays at 8:30 a.m. Zumba is offered on Tuesdays at 6 p.m. and Saturdays at 10 a.m. Pound classes are Monday at 5:30 p.m. and pilates is Thursdays at 8:30 a.m. There is also a dharma talk and meditation program offered on the third Wednesday of every month, and a guided meditation on Mondays at 12:15 p.m. telluridelibrary.org STORYTIME AND POETRY Celebrate the written word at 6 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at the Arroyo Wine Bar with the Talking Gourd’s free poetry readings, writing circle, and performances by a featured poet. Kids will enjoy Storytime at the Library, where stories are read aloud at 11 a.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and at 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays. A special bilingual Storytime has stories in English and Spanish on Thursday at 12:15 p.m.. telluridelibrary.org OPEN RECREATION The Telluride Parks and Recreation department offers open hockey and ice skating at the Hanley Ice Rink and Pavilion in Telluride Town Park and drop-in basketball, volleyball, and indoor soccer at the high school gym. telluride-co.gov RELIVING HISTORY Telluride Historical Museum hosts three snowshoe tours (Jan. 17, Feb. 21 and March 21) as well as historic ski tours every Friday with Ashley Boling, leaving at 10 a.m. in the Mountain Village Center—$10 for museum members, $15 for non-members. telluridemuseum.org TELLURIDE FILM FESTIVAL PRESENTS On the third Thursday of each month at the Nugget Theatre, catch one of the recently released films selected by the festival directors of the Telluride Film Festival. nuggettheatre.org

www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Melissa Plantz

4

Indulge or Eat Lean and Green All in One Hip Spot on Main Street

b bu ur rg g ee r r b ba ar r

JANUARY TONY FURTADO BAND 10

 on’t miss the banjo and slide guitar virtuoso Tony Furtado D and his ensemble, playing at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

15-19

TELLURIDE FIRE FESTIVAL  A free, public, interactive experience of fire arts: fire performances, art cars, fire dancers, fire-emitting sculptures, and burn barrels. Displays will be in the central pedestrian plazas of Mountain Village and the main street in Telluride. telluridefirefestival.org

16

MARCH FOURTH The March Fourth marching band performs at the Telluride Conference Center in Mountain Village. tellurideconference.com

16-17

JEFF AUSTIN AND FRIENDS LIVE IN CONCERT The mandolin player from Yonder Mountain String Band has started his solo career, playing music with an ensemble (Danny Barnes, Eric Thorin, and Ross Martin) at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

844-THE-BUNS

VIEW OUR MENU ORDER TO GO

ONLINE

We Steam Our BurgerS and VeggieS BecauSe it’S Better FOr yOu and FOr the enVirOnment. thiS iS FOOd yOu can Feel gOOd aBOut eating. Steam iS the next Big thing. cOme See What all the Buzz iS aBOut.

21

THE WAILERS  The preeminent reggae group The Wailers take the stage at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

24

KOTO LIP SYNC  Locals perform hilarious lip sync routines in costume on the Palm Theatre stage, in a benefit event for local community radio station KOTO. koto.org

3-31 & 2 THE DROWSY CHAPERONE

 Young People’s Theatre high school actors perform the play The Drowsy Chaperone at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

FEBRUARY FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN 6

 Telluride Historical Museum hosts a screening of Fire on the Mountain, a documentary on the 10th Mountain Division. There will also be an auction of 10th Mountain Division memorabilia. telluridemuseum.org

7

CHOCOLATE LOVERS’ FLING  Sample chocolate confections made by local chefs, dress in theme costumes and dance at this annual benefit for the San Miguel Resource Center, held at the Telluride Conference Center. sanmiguelresource.org

12-15

COMEDY FEST  The 16th annual Telluride Comedy Fest features famous comedians from films and shows like The Daily Show, Saturday Night Live and 30 Rock performing skits and improv. sheridanoperahouse.com

The Newest, Hottest, Steamiest Place in Town. OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK FOR LUNCH & DINNER | 11:00AM - 10:00PM | www.steamiesburgers.com 300 West Colorado Ave, Telluride CO | Elks Building, Across from the Courthouse, Main Street


20 • EVENTS CALENDAR

19-20

LEFTOVER SALMON  Leftover Salmon performs its blend of “polyethnic Cajun slamgrass” on the stage at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

22-1

GAY SKI WEEK  Come out and ski at this annual event produced by Straight Out Media & Marketing in conjunction with the Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association in support of Telluride AIDS Benefit.

26-2

TELLURIDE AIDS BENEFIT  A multi-day event for HIV/AIDS prevention and education, the benefit includes a signature fashion show, art and clothing auctions and a trunk show. aidsbenefit.org

MARCH ROCKIN’ AT THE OPERA 6

MARCH 2015

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TECH PROGRAM AT THE LIBRARY The WPL Tech Guy is a program which offers free technology consultations on Thursdays from 2–3 p.m. telluridelibrary.org

SUNDAY AT THE PALM Telluride Film Festival, Telluride Foundation, and Telluride’s R-1 School District present family-friendly films on the first Sunday of each month at 4 p.m. at the Palm Theatre. telluridepalm.com

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www.TellurideMagazine.com

OPEN CLASSES AT THE AH HAA SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS The Ah Haa School offers Open Figure Studio on Tuesdays from 5:30–7:30 p.m., Painting From Within on Wednesdays in early December from 5:30–8 p.m. and Thursdays in January from 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Leaping: How to Wildly Advance Your Writing on Thursdays from Jan. 15–Feb. 12 from 6–8 p.m., and an Open Clay Studio for $75/month plus clay and firing fees. For a complete schedule of classes and events, visit the school’s website. ahhaa.org UNIVERSITY CENTERS OF THE SAN MIGUEL UCSM offers a host of classes and seminars, some with college credit available. Topics include computers, business, Spanish, French, literature, and sustainability. Check out the full schedule and register online at ucsanmiguel.org.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

2-8

PHENOMENAL WOMEN’S WEEK  San Miguel Resource Center presents film, arts and educational events to celebrate women. sanmiguelresourcecenter.org

10-15 LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS  Telluride’s theatre company performs the classic Little Shop of Horrors musical at the Palm Theatre. telluridetheatre.org 19-21

TELLURIDE TRIBUTE FEST  Back by popular demand, check out these tribute bands as they play some of your old favorites from decades past. sheridanoperahouse.com

Telluride’s friendliest lodging team. A seamless vacation rental experience for owners & guests.

327 North Oak Street - Town of Telluride Warm & inviting 4-bed residence features Ajax & ski area views, private outdoor spaces, plus convenience to Main St. & skiing. $3,600,000

888.998.6471 LodgingInTelluride.com

Jesse DiFiore, Broker I 970.708.9672 jesse@tellurideproperties.com I difiore@searchtelluriderealestate.com

22

TAJ MAHAL  Grammy Award-winning blues and world music artist Taj Mahal returns to Telluride to perform at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

Real estate affiliates

METROPOLITAN OPERA AT THE PALM The Palm Theatre presents opera performances on a large HD screen throughout the winter. This winter’s schedule includes Metropolitan Opera performances of Il Barbiere di Siviglia (Nov. 22, Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg (Dec. 13), The Merry Widow (Jan. 17 & Feb. 1), Les Contes d’Hoffman (Jan. 31 & March 1), Iolanta/ Duke Bluebeard’s Castle (Feb. 14), La Donna del Lago (March 14), and Cavalleria Rusticana/Pagliacci (April 25). telluridepalm.com

 Telluride Adaptive Sports Program holds its annual fundraiser, with live music, food, drinks, and an auction, at the Sheridan Opera House. tasp.org Ryan Bonneau

1

25, 27, 28 BURLESQUE

 Don’t miss Telluride Theatre’s annual risqué fundraiser, a vaudeville-style, strip-tease performance at the Sheridan Opera House. March 25 is the “cheap thrills” dress rehearsal and March 27–28 is the performance. telluridetheatre.org

APRIL AN EVENING WITH LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III 1

 Enjoy the folk rock performance at the Sheridan Opera House by the Grammy Award winning artist Loudon Wainwright III, who you might also recognize from acting stints in The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up, and Parks and Recreation. sheridanoperahouse.com

1

STREET DANCE  KOTO hosts the annual block party in front of the county courthouse to celebrate the end of the ski season. Prizes are awarded for the best pink flamingo costumes/attire. (Snow date is April 4.)

5

CLOSING DAY Telluride Ski Resort closes for the 2014-15 ski season.

5

GONDOLA CLOSES Gondola closes after the 2014-15 ski season.

MAY 22-25

37TH ANNUAL MOUNTAINFILM IN TELLURIDE  Mountainfilm in Telluride is a film festival that screens documentaries, and hosts symposiums, breakfast talks, and other events about mountain culture, the environment, and our global community. mountainfilm.org

235 North oak Street towN of telluride

320 w. Colorado ave. towN of telluride

96 SteveNS drive MouNtaiN village

• Double lot; best address in town, amazing box canyon views

• Historic 828-sq. foot building on 3,125 sq. ft. lot

• Well-maintained 4-bedroom, 4-bath home

• Comfortable existing historic 3-bedroom, 3-bath home

• Prime Main Street location with great Ski Area views

• Walking distance to the gondola and skiing

• Enjoy as-is or remodel to create the ultimate Telluride residence

• Excellent development opportunity with potential for over 7,000 sq. ft.

• Centrally located in the heart of Mountain Village

Offered at $4,250,000

Offered at $1,890,000

Offered at $2,250,000

JAMES F. LUCARELLI Providing Expert Representation for Buyers and Sellers

970.728.0213 • 970.708.2255 mobile Jim@TellurideAffiliates.com • 657 West Colorado Ave. (in front of Hotel Telluride)

Search all regional properties:

www.TellurideAffiliates.com WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

21


20 • EVENTS CALENDAR

19-20

LEFTOVER SALMON  Leftover Salmon performs its blend of “polyethnic Cajun slamgrass” on the stage at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

22-1

GAY SKI WEEK  Come out and ski at this annual event produced by Straight Out Media & Marketing in conjunction with the Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association in support of Telluride AIDS Benefit.

26-2

TELLURIDE AIDS BENEFIT  A multi-day event for HIV/AIDS prevention and education, the benefit includes a signature fashion show, art and clothing auctions and a trunk show. aidsbenefit.org

MARCH ROCKIN’ AT THE OPERA 6

MARCH 2015

APRIL 2015 1

2

3

4

5

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7

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25

26

27

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29

30

31

TECH PROGRAM AT THE LIBRARY The WPL Tech Guy is a program which offers free technology consultations on Thursdays from 2–3 p.m. telluridelibrary.org

SUNDAY AT THE PALM Telluride Film Festival, Telluride Foundation, and Telluride’s R-1 School District present family-friendly films on the first Sunday of each month at 4 p.m. at the Palm Theatre. telluridepalm.com

MAY 2015 1

2

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11

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16

17

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26

27

28

29

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www.TellurideMagazine.com

OPEN CLASSES AT THE AH HAA SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS The Ah Haa School offers Open Figure Studio on Tuesdays from 5:30–7:30 p.m., Painting From Within on Wednesdays in early December from 5:30–8 p.m. and Thursdays in January from 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Leaping: How to Wildly Advance Your Writing on Thursdays from Jan. 15–Feb. 12 from 6–8 p.m., and an Open Clay Studio for $75/month plus clay and firing fees. For a complete schedule of classes and events, visit the school’s website. ahhaa.org UNIVERSITY CENTERS OF THE SAN MIGUEL UCSM offers a host of classes and seminars, some with college credit available. Topics include computers, business, Spanish, French, literature, and sustainability. Check out the full schedule and register online at ucsanmiguel.org.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

2-8

PHENOMENAL WOMEN’S WEEK  San Miguel Resource Center presents film, arts and educational events to celebrate women. sanmiguelresourcecenter.org

10-15 LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS  Telluride’s theatre company performs the classic Little Shop of Horrors musical at the Palm Theatre. telluridetheatre.org 19-21

TELLURIDE TRIBUTE FEST  Back by popular demand, check out these tribute bands as they play some of your old favorites from decades past. sheridanoperahouse.com

Telluride’s friendliest lodging team. A seamless vacation rental experience for owners & guests.

327 North Oak Street - Town of Telluride Warm & inviting 4-bed residence features Ajax & ski area views, private outdoor spaces, plus convenience to Main St. & skiing. $3,600,000

888.998.6471 LodgingInTelluride.com

Jesse DiFiore, Broker I 970.708.9672 jesse@tellurideproperties.com I difiore@searchtelluriderealestate.com

22

TAJ MAHAL  Grammy Award-winning blues and world music artist Taj Mahal returns to Telluride to perform at the Sheridan Opera House. sheridanoperahouse.com

Real estate affiliates

METROPOLITAN OPERA AT THE PALM The Palm Theatre presents opera performances on a large HD screen throughout the winter. This winter’s schedule includes Metropolitan Opera performances of Il Barbiere di Siviglia (Nov. 22, Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg (Dec. 13), The Merry Widow (Jan. 17 & Feb. 1), Les Contes d’Hoffman (Jan. 31 & March 1), Iolanta/ Duke Bluebeard’s Castle (Feb. 14), La Donna del Lago (March 14), and Cavalleria Rusticana/Pagliacci (April 25). telluridepalm.com

 Telluride Adaptive Sports Program holds its annual fundraiser, with live music, food, drinks, and an auction, at the Sheridan Opera House. tasp.org Ryan Bonneau

1

25, 27, 28 BURLESQUE

 Don’t miss Telluride Theatre’s annual risqué fundraiser, a vaudeville-style, strip-tease performance at the Sheridan Opera House. March 25 is the “cheap thrills” dress rehearsal and March 27–28 is the performance. telluridetheatre.org

APRIL AN EVENING WITH LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III 1

 Enjoy the folk rock performance at the Sheridan Opera House by the Grammy Award winning artist Loudon Wainwright III, who you might also recognize from acting stints in The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up, and Parks and Recreation. sheridanoperahouse.com

1

STREET DANCE  KOTO hosts the annual block party in front of the county courthouse to celebrate the end of the ski season. Prizes are awarded for the best pink flamingo costumes/attire. (Snow date is April 4.)

5

CLOSING DAY Telluride Ski Resort closes for the 2014-15 ski season.

5

GONDOLA CLOSES Gondola closes after the 2014-15 ski season.

MAY 22-25

37TH ANNUAL MOUNTAINFILM IN TELLURIDE  Mountainfilm in Telluride is a film festival that screens documentaries, and hosts symposiums, breakfast talks, and other events about mountain culture, the environment, and our global community. mountainfilm.org

235 North oak Street towN of telluride

320 w. Colorado ave. towN of telluride

96 SteveNS drive MouNtaiN village

• Double lot; best address in town, amazing box canyon views

• Historic 828-sq. foot building on 3,125 sq. ft. lot

• Well-maintained 4-bedroom, 4-bath home

• Comfortable existing historic 3-bedroom, 3-bath home

• Prime Main Street location with great Ski Area views

• Walking distance to the gondola and skiing

• Enjoy as-is or remodel to create the ultimate Telluride residence

• Excellent development opportunity with potential for over 7,000 sq. ft.

• Centrally located in the heart of Mountain Village

Offered at $4,250,000

Offered at $1,890,000

Offered at $2,250,000

JAMES F. LUCARELLI Providing Expert Representation for Buyers and Sellers

970.728.0213 • 970.708.2255 mobile Jim@TellurideAffiliates.com • 657 West Colorado Ave. (in front of Hotel Telluride)

Search all regional properties:

www.TellurideAffiliates.com WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

21


22 • TELLURIDE TURNS

Headlines & Highlights FR OM THE LOC AL NE W S

Cougar Country M O U N TA I N L I ON S TA L K S LO C AL RESIDENT

W

By Olivia Exstrum

hen Kyra Kopenstonsky found herself the target of a mountain lion stalking in early August while hiking the Coltrains Trail in San Miguel County, the incident made headlines. The lion followed the Placerville resident for approximately 20 minutes, and only receded after Kopenstonsky made herself appear bigger and even sang. This recent episode, although an exceedingly rare occurrence, begs the question: Are mountain lion attacks and stalking increasing? And if so, what can we do about it? Joe Lewandowski, a spokesperson for Colorado Parks and Wildlife, says no. “A sighting of a mountain lion in the wild in Colorado is quite rare,” Lewandowski says. “Certainly, this incident is no reason for any sort of alarm or any indication that there are more or fewer mountain lions in the area.” In fact, says San Miguel County Sheriff Bill Masters, this is only the second mountain lion stalking incident officially reported in the area in his nearly 40 years in law www.TellurideMagazine.com

enforcement. Masters says he once received a report of a fisherman spotting a lion across the river. The fisherman moved downriver, only to have the lion follow from across the stream. However, Masters says he does believe mountain lion activity and sightings have grown in recent years, and says it was rumored that there was another

{

the seemingly increasing encounter rate between lions and people. “The most important thing to convey is that people who live and recreate in San Miguel County are in cougar habitat,” Logan says. “It’s cougar habitat year-round. The probability for any individual to encounter a cougar is extremely low, but when you have a lot of people, the number

“The most important thing to convey is that people who live and recreate in San Miguel County are in cougar habitat.”

stalking on the Jud Wiebe Trail in Telluride this summer. “I’ve seen a few mountain lions over the years, but it does seem to be growing a little bit,” Masters says. He mentions a friend’s encounter with a lion while walking down the street and reported sightings in the Ilium Valley and the San Miguel Canyon. Ken Logan, a researcher at Colorado Parks and Wildlife, points to the swell in people in the woods to

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

}

of people that encounter them may increase in time. The Placerville area is very high-quality cougar habitat. We expect them to live there.” In the case of the August incident, Masters and Lewandowski says Kopenstonsky did all the right things. “She stood up and made herself look big; she tried to do something to scare the cat off; and she didn’t run,” Lewandowski says. Because mountain lions are so elusive, Masters

explained, the report was unusual. “Mountain lions usually tend to run away,” he says. “They’ll watch people and won’t move, but in this case she reported that the lion followed her even after she started making loud noises and making herself look bigger. But she’s a small woman, and the lion probably thought she could be some form of prey.” He advises not turning and running, which is a “natural prey reaction.” By nature, mountain lions are solitary creatures. Cubs will only stay with their mothers for the first 12 to 18 months before they’re on their own, and Lewandowski says it’s because of this that younger lions are more likely to get into trouble. “The younger lions don’t have as much knowledge, and they’re curious like any other cat,” he says. “They get into an area and take a domestic pet, and if they see a human, there could be some curiosity. We look very odd to them. We’re on two legs, we have weird-colored clothing, we talk, and we make noise.” Lewandowski estimates there are between six- and nine-thousand lions in Colorado. Although that may seem like a huge figure, to put it into perspective, there are approximately 400,000 deer in the state. As a result of their relatively small number, biologists classify mountain lions as a low-density species, and Lewandowski says they are difficult to study. “There are just very few of them spread across a huge landscape.” Although there’s currently little information on mountain lion populations, Logan is conducting a study on the effects of sport hunting on cougar populations on the Uncompahgre Plateau. Logan says the ten-year study won’t be completed for another year, but in his study area, the mountain lion population has actually declined in recent years. “I have been studying cougars in the West for the last 34 years,” he says. “The number of times I have encountered a cougar by accident while I’ve been studying them is about six, and I’m in the field practically every day. But when you have lots of people, and that probability is compounded by lots of people in the woods, then somebody’s going to spot a cougar.” \

Step Outside this Winter

explore. express. evolve.

Snowshoe Tours Jan., Feb. & March

Ski into History with Ashley Boling

Call or visit our website for details

OPEN Tues.-Sat. 11am-5pm

Open until 7pm on Thursdays

– Open for the season Nov. 24th –

201 W. Gregory Ave. · 728.3344 · telluridemuseum.org

300 south townsend | 970.728.3886 | www.ahhaa.org

THE SECRET STAIRS BETWEEN PATAGONIA & ELINOFF

OPEN LATE 204 West Colorado Ave • 970.728.5028

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

23


22 • TELLURIDE TURNS

Headlines & Highlights FR OM THE LOC AL NE W S

Cougar Country M O U N TA I N L I ON S TA L K S LO C AL RESIDENT

W

By Olivia Exstrum

hen Kyra Kopenstonsky found herself the target of a mountain lion stalking in early August while hiking the Coltrains Trail in San Miguel County, the incident made headlines. The lion followed the Placerville resident for approximately 20 minutes, and only receded after Kopenstonsky made herself appear bigger and even sang. This recent episode, although an exceedingly rare occurrence, begs the question: Are mountain lion attacks and stalking increasing? And if so, what can we do about it? Joe Lewandowski, a spokesperson for Colorado Parks and Wildlife, says no. “A sighting of a mountain lion in the wild in Colorado is quite rare,” Lewandowski says. “Certainly, this incident is no reason for any sort of alarm or any indication that there are more or fewer mountain lions in the area.” In fact, says San Miguel County Sheriff Bill Masters, this is only the second mountain lion stalking incident officially reported in the area in his nearly 40 years in law www.TellurideMagazine.com

enforcement. Masters says he once received a report of a fisherman spotting a lion across the river. The fisherman moved downriver, only to have the lion follow from across the stream. However, Masters says he does believe mountain lion activity and sightings have grown in recent years, and says it was rumored that there was another

{

the seemingly increasing encounter rate between lions and people. “The most important thing to convey is that people who live and recreate in San Miguel County are in cougar habitat,” Logan says. “It’s cougar habitat year-round. The probability for any individual to encounter a cougar is extremely low, but when you have a lot of people, the number

“The most important thing to convey is that people who live and recreate in San Miguel County are in cougar habitat.”

stalking on the Jud Wiebe Trail in Telluride this summer. “I’ve seen a few mountain lions over the years, but it does seem to be growing a little bit,” Masters says. He mentions a friend’s encounter with a lion while walking down the street and reported sightings in the Ilium Valley and the San Miguel Canyon. Ken Logan, a researcher at Colorado Parks and Wildlife, points to the swell in people in the woods to

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

}

of people that encounter them may increase in time. The Placerville area is very high-quality cougar habitat. We expect them to live there.” In the case of the August incident, Masters and Lewandowski says Kopenstonsky did all the right things. “She stood up and made herself look big; she tried to do something to scare the cat off; and she didn’t run,” Lewandowski says. Because mountain lions are so elusive, Masters

explained, the report was unusual. “Mountain lions usually tend to run away,” he says. “They’ll watch people and won’t move, but in this case she reported that the lion followed her even after she started making loud noises and making herself look bigger. But she’s a small woman, and the lion probably thought she could be some form of prey.” He advises not turning and running, which is a “natural prey reaction.” By nature, mountain lions are solitary creatures. Cubs will only stay with their mothers for the first 12 to 18 months before they’re on their own, and Lewandowski says it’s because of this that younger lions are more likely to get into trouble. “The younger lions don’t have as much knowledge, and they’re curious like any other cat,” he says. “They get into an area and take a domestic pet, and if they see a human, there could be some curiosity. We look very odd to them. We’re on two legs, we have weird-colored clothing, we talk, and we make noise.” Lewandowski estimates there are between six- and nine-thousand lions in Colorado. Although that may seem like a huge figure, to put it into perspective, there are approximately 400,000 deer in the state. As a result of their relatively small number, biologists classify mountain lions as a low-density species, and Lewandowski says they are difficult to study. “There are just very few of them spread across a huge landscape.” Although there’s currently little information on mountain lion populations, Logan is conducting a study on the effects of sport hunting on cougar populations on the Uncompahgre Plateau. Logan says the ten-year study won’t be completed for another year, but in his study area, the mountain lion population has actually declined in recent years. “I have been studying cougars in the West for the last 34 years,” he says. “The number of times I have encountered a cougar by accident while I’ve been studying them is about six, and I’m in the field practically every day. But when you have lots of people, and that probability is compounded by lots of people in the woods, then somebody’s going to spot a cougar.” \

Step Outside this Winter

explore. express. evolve.

Snowshoe Tours Jan., Feb. & March

Ski into History with Ashley Boling

Call or visit our website for details

OPEN Tues.-Sat. 11am-5pm

Open until 7pm on Thursdays

– Open for the season Nov. 24th –

201 W. Gregory Ave. · 728.3344 · telluridemuseum.org

300 south townsend | 970.728.3886 | www.ahhaa.org

THE SECRET STAIRS BETWEEN PATAGONIA & ELINOFF

OPEN LATE 204 West Colorado Ave • 970.728.5028

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

23


{

24 • TELLURIDE TURNS

Headlines & Highlights

“The town recognized the importance of its historic integrity and preserving what was rough and natural ... which was really different from what Aspen was doing.”

FR OM THE LOC AL NE W S

King of the Mountain STERBIE WINS LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD F O R SN O W S A F ET Y W OR K

P

almyra Peak rises nearly 2,000 feet from the upper ridgelines of the Telluride Ski Resort, topping out at an awe-inspiring elevation of 13,320 feet. Flanking this behemoth is Gold Hill to the north and Bald Mountain to the west, together creating a trifecta of inbounds hike-to ski terrain that rivals ski country’s steepest and deepest. Thanks to these hiking-accessible slopes, the Telluride Ski Area has garnered a reputation as home to some of the industry’s most astounding and extreme skiable terrain. Yet with that illustrious reputation comes a grave responsibility: Keeping those who venture into that terrain safe. The threat of avalanches is an ever-present and sobering reality of life in the San Juan Mountains, notorious for having some of the most unstable snow conditions in the world. Yet the Telluride Ski Resort employs a veritable army of avalanche professionals trained in the art and science of avalanche mitigation, led by one of the avalanche world’s most touted names. Craig “Sterbie” Sterbenz has long been the commanding officer of Telluride’s avalanche-eradicating legion, leading the ski area’s charge to uphold safe ski conditions throughout the resort’s territory for nearly four decades. His efforts to expand Telluride’s skiable terrain while keeping its workers and guests safe has gained the respect of the collective snow science world, as evidenced by his recent receipt of a lifetime achievement award. The American Avalanche Association, the country’s preeminent group of avalanche researchers and www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Private-flights directly into Telluride airport for about the same cost as the airlines in only about two-hours door to door.

}

By Martinique Davis

professionals, acknowledged Sterbenz’ contributions to the snow science sphere by awarding him the Bernie Kingery Award for Dedicated Professional Practice. The award, created in honor of the Alpine Meadows Mountain Manager who died in 1982 in an on-area avalanche, recognizes sustained career contributions by dedicated avalanche field professionals. “This award is for the boots-on-the-ground people who are out there every day making sure the slopes are safe, and Sterbie’s been doing that a long time,” explains Ethan Greene, Director of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center and one of the five avalanche professionals who nominated Sterbenz for the 2013 award. Sterbenz began his ski patrol career at Aspen Highlands, later moving to Telluride and becoming the resort’s Snow Safety Director. His long tenure in Telluride has put Sterbenz at the forefront of avalanche mitigation, as Sterbenz helped pave the way for the ski area’s 2001 expansion into Prospect Bowl and later expansions into Black Iron Bowl, Palmyra Peak, and the Gold Hill ridge. Sterbenz was the lead proponent in bringing a military weapons program to the Telluride Ski Area in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service—a triumph nearly 20 years in the making, which utilizes howitzers to mitigate avalanche hazard on some of the Telluride Ski Area’s steepest and most remote avalanche-prone terrain. He has also shared his extensive expertise throughout many different avenues across the industry, authoring numerous papers for the AAA’s Avalanche Review publication and for the International Snow Science Workshop (ISSW), consulting on snow safety plan development at other ski areas, and working as an instructor for various avalanche schools. “Sterbie has contributed on a lot of levels over a lot of years,” the CAIC’s Greene attests. “His is an impressive legacy.” \

Airlines

Wide Open Spaces THE LEGAC Y OF CONSER VATION IST GARY HIC KCOX

P

By Corinne Platt

icture downtown Telluride. It’s 1979 and the town park is a big flat lot covered in dirt and tall grass. One softball diamond with a very rocky infield sits where the Bear Creek field is now. No more than six cottonwoods shade the entire park. Now imagine that because it’s the late 70s, the town is newly taken over by ski bums and hippies. One of them is twenty-something Gary Hickcox, newly hired as the head of the Parks and Rec department. Riding the crest of the wave that writer Hunter Thompson described as “a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning…that our energy would simply prevail,” Hickcox and his buddy and co-worker Dave-O Whitelaw, head of the town’s softball and basketball league (that’s all there was back then), decided to build a better park. Not having much money to do this, Hickcox and Whitelaw took turns driving the town truck piled high with sod and a keg of beer down main street and luring their friends out of bars to help. “We laid all the fields down there and planted all the trees with volunteers,” Hickcox says. The town park was just the beginning of a legacy of conservation projects Hickcox helped spearhead in the coming decades, projects including the preser-

vation of Bear Creek, the preservation of the Valley Floor, the preservation of the high country around Telluride and Ophir, and the retirement of development rights on many of the region’s ranches and mining claims. Hickcox says he didn’t do any of this work on his own, that he was only part of a perfect storm of events that happened to come together: a community of people willing to say “yes” to preservation, a town government that valued preservation of open space, a very devoted and generous land conservationist named Rich Salem, and many families including Steve and Grace Herndon and John and Victoria Irwin and other landowners that donated their development rights—which could have made big money—to conservation. Hickcox realizes that the late 70s and early 80s was a magical time for Telluride. There wasn’t a lot of development pressure and the town council was made up of some visionary people who took the time to ask what they wanted the town to look and be like, and how they were going to shape the future of the town. “The town recognized the importance of its historic integrity and preserving what was rough and natural,” says Hickcox, “which was really different from what Aspen was doing.” By the mid-90s the town had been trying to buy Bear Creek for

quite a while, with no luck. And then a knight in shining armor came to town. Rich Salem discovered Telluride, and like so many newcomers was not only gobsmacked by Telluride’s beauty, but also—as happens so often here—felt embraced by the kindness and generosity of its citizens. In exchange, his family chose to give the town a gift: Bear Creek. As a mechanism to transfer the Bear Creek parcel to the town, Salem founded the San Miguel Conservation Foundation (SMCF) in 1994, and several years after Bear Creek was officially in the town’s hands Hickcox took the helm, where he worked preserving land until his retirement last summer. In this story of serendipity, Hickcox cites another example of good fortune—the county commissioners created their own open space protection program. SMCF began working with the county to help landowners put conservation easements on their properties and ranches, as well as purchasing the development rights on the Schmid Ranch. One of Hickcox’s favorite stories is the partnership that SMCF developed with Telluride and Ophir, resulting in the preservation of hundreds of acres of land surrounding both towns. “It could have been so difficult. But for SMCF to have the ability to strike a deal with a landowner to buy all that land and flip it to the town was just an amazing experience.” In the same fashion, SMCF helped preserve the Crystal Millsite at the top of Bear Creek Road, another 230 acres of mining claims in lower Bear Creek, and an additional 250 acres of land in Waterfall Canyon above the Town of Ophir. “I feel fortunate to live in a community that values the protection and preservation of its heritage and its landscape.” Hickcox pauses, choking up. “You look at a lot of communities around the West and they must look back and think, ‘we blew it. We didn’t preserve this canyon or this valley or our entrance to town.’ They didn’t do it and they lost the game to development. I feel so lucky to be a part of what shaped who we are and what we’ve become.” The work he has done has made this region more precious, but also more coveted. “There definitely are some negative things about who we’ve become. It’s ridiculous that working class people can’t afford to buy a house here anymore. But you have to keep up the good fight as long as you can, and that’s what we’ve been doing in Telluride. And it feels really good.” \

Direct flights to Telluride airport. 1/4 the travel time. About the same cost as the airlines.*

Don’t waste your weekend getaway flying and driving or needing to take four days off for only two days on the slopes. You can trust Sawyer Aviation to get you, your family and even the family pet to Telluride safely and on your schedule. When you fly with Sawyer Aviation - security lines, hour+ check-in lines, additional luggage fees, cramped seats, car parking fees, bad airport food and connecting flight delays all become a thing of the past. Sawyer Aviation serves 5,000 airports nationwide (10x more than scheduled airlines) and can fly you directly into Telluride airport. Contact us for a free custom-flight quote. • Speed -1/4 the total travel of the airlines time door to door as 2hrs vs 8hrs fly directly into Telluride airport • Safety – Wyvern & ARGUS safety rated approved aircraft & pilots • Convenience – Skip the lines, travel on your schedule, fly when you want, ski all you want

Fly the whole family &, Fido too!

• Cost – round-trip family of four (plus Fido or Felix) can fly round-trip for the same cost as the typical airline flight.

877-FLY-SAWYER | 877-359-7299 | sawyeraviation.com/charter *Based on round-trip flight for four or more passengers. Travel time and cost varies based on departure point. Additional conditions and restrictions may apply. Contact Sawyer Aviation charter-sales agent for details. Sawyer Aviation is an FAA certified on-demand air carrier and utilizes FAA approved network aircraft.

iz atham, CMT

T H E R A P E U T I C

M A S S A G E

Ser ving Telluride since 1988

specializing in therapeutic massage for all ages

{

neuromuscular swedish acupressure

970.728.6804 • 970.626.5773 226 west colorado avenue, 2nd floor WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

25


{

24 • TELLURIDE TURNS

Headlines & Highlights

“The town recognized the importance of its historic integrity and preserving what was rough and natural ... which was really different from what Aspen was doing.”

FR OM THE LOC AL NE W S

King of the Mountain STERBIE WINS LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD F O R SN O W S A F ET Y W OR K

P

almyra Peak rises nearly 2,000 feet from the upper ridgelines of the Telluride Ski Resort, topping out at an awe-inspiring elevation of 13,320 feet. Flanking this behemoth is Gold Hill to the north and Bald Mountain to the west, together creating a trifecta of inbounds hike-to ski terrain that rivals ski country’s steepest and deepest. Thanks to these hiking-accessible slopes, the Telluride Ski Area has garnered a reputation as home to some of the industry’s most astounding and extreme skiable terrain. Yet with that illustrious reputation comes a grave responsibility: Keeping those who venture into that terrain safe. The threat of avalanches is an ever-present and sobering reality of life in the San Juan Mountains, notorious for having some of the most unstable snow conditions in the world. Yet the Telluride Ski Resort employs a veritable army of avalanche professionals trained in the art and science of avalanche mitigation, led by one of the avalanche world’s most touted names. Craig “Sterbie” Sterbenz has long been the commanding officer of Telluride’s avalanche-eradicating legion, leading the ski area’s charge to uphold safe ski conditions throughout the resort’s territory for nearly four decades. His efforts to expand Telluride’s skiable terrain while keeping its workers and guests safe has gained the respect of the collective snow science world, as evidenced by his recent receipt of a lifetime achievement award. The American Avalanche Association, the country’s preeminent group of avalanche researchers and www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Private-flights directly into Telluride airport for about the same cost as the airlines in only about two-hours door to door.

}

By Martinique Davis

professionals, acknowledged Sterbenz’ contributions to the snow science sphere by awarding him the Bernie Kingery Award for Dedicated Professional Practice. The award, created in honor of the Alpine Meadows Mountain Manager who died in 1982 in an on-area avalanche, recognizes sustained career contributions by dedicated avalanche field professionals. “This award is for the boots-on-the-ground people who are out there every day making sure the slopes are safe, and Sterbie’s been doing that a long time,” explains Ethan Greene, Director of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center and one of the five avalanche professionals who nominated Sterbenz for the 2013 award. Sterbenz began his ski patrol career at Aspen Highlands, later moving to Telluride and becoming the resort’s Snow Safety Director. His long tenure in Telluride has put Sterbenz at the forefront of avalanche mitigation, as Sterbenz helped pave the way for the ski area’s 2001 expansion into Prospect Bowl and later expansions into Black Iron Bowl, Palmyra Peak, and the Gold Hill ridge. Sterbenz was the lead proponent in bringing a military weapons program to the Telluride Ski Area in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service—a triumph nearly 20 years in the making, which utilizes howitzers to mitigate avalanche hazard on some of the Telluride Ski Area’s steepest and most remote avalanche-prone terrain. He has also shared his extensive expertise throughout many different avenues across the industry, authoring numerous papers for the AAA’s Avalanche Review publication and for the International Snow Science Workshop (ISSW), consulting on snow safety plan development at other ski areas, and working as an instructor for various avalanche schools. “Sterbie has contributed on a lot of levels over a lot of years,” the CAIC’s Greene attests. “His is an impressive legacy.” \

Airlines

Wide Open Spaces THE LEGAC Y OF CONSER VATION IST GARY HIC KCOX

P

By Corinne Platt

icture downtown Telluride. It’s 1979 and the town park is a big flat lot covered in dirt and tall grass. One softball diamond with a very rocky infield sits where the Bear Creek field is now. No more than six cottonwoods shade the entire park. Now imagine that because it’s the late 70s, the town is newly taken over by ski bums and hippies. One of them is twenty-something Gary Hickcox, newly hired as the head of the Parks and Rec department. Riding the crest of the wave that writer Hunter Thompson described as “a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning…that our energy would simply prevail,” Hickcox and his buddy and co-worker Dave-O Whitelaw, head of the town’s softball and basketball league (that’s all there was back then), decided to build a better park. Not having much money to do this, Hickcox and Whitelaw took turns driving the town truck piled high with sod and a keg of beer down main street and luring their friends out of bars to help. “We laid all the fields down there and planted all the trees with volunteers,” Hickcox says. The town park was just the beginning of a legacy of conservation projects Hickcox helped spearhead in the coming decades, projects including the preser-

vation of Bear Creek, the preservation of the Valley Floor, the preservation of the high country around Telluride and Ophir, and the retirement of development rights on many of the region’s ranches and mining claims. Hickcox says he didn’t do any of this work on his own, that he was only part of a perfect storm of events that happened to come together: a community of people willing to say “yes” to preservation, a town government that valued preservation of open space, a very devoted and generous land conservationist named Rich Salem, and many families including Steve and Grace Herndon and John and Victoria Irwin and other landowners that donated their development rights—which could have made big money—to conservation. Hickcox realizes that the late 70s and early 80s was a magical time for Telluride. There wasn’t a lot of development pressure and the town council was made up of some visionary people who took the time to ask what they wanted the town to look and be like, and how they were going to shape the future of the town. “The town recognized the importance of its historic integrity and preserving what was rough and natural,” says Hickcox, “which was really different from what Aspen was doing.” By the mid-90s the town had been trying to buy Bear Creek for

quite a while, with no luck. And then a knight in shining armor came to town. Rich Salem discovered Telluride, and like so many newcomers was not only gobsmacked by Telluride’s beauty, but also—as happens so often here—felt embraced by the kindness and generosity of its citizens. In exchange, his family chose to give the town a gift: Bear Creek. As a mechanism to transfer the Bear Creek parcel to the town, Salem founded the San Miguel Conservation Foundation (SMCF) in 1994, and several years after Bear Creek was officially in the town’s hands Hickcox took the helm, where he worked preserving land until his retirement last summer. In this story of serendipity, Hickcox cites another example of good fortune—the county commissioners created their own open space protection program. SMCF began working with the county to help landowners put conservation easements on their properties and ranches, as well as purchasing the development rights on the Schmid Ranch. One of Hickcox’s favorite stories is the partnership that SMCF developed with Telluride and Ophir, resulting in the preservation of hundreds of acres of land surrounding both towns. “It could have been so difficult. But for SMCF to have the ability to strike a deal with a landowner to buy all that land and flip it to the town was just an amazing experience.” In the same fashion, SMCF helped preserve the Crystal Millsite at the top of Bear Creek Road, another 230 acres of mining claims in lower Bear Creek, and an additional 250 acres of land in Waterfall Canyon above the Town of Ophir. “I feel fortunate to live in a community that values the protection and preservation of its heritage and its landscape.” Hickcox pauses, choking up. “You look at a lot of communities around the West and they must look back and think, ‘we blew it. We didn’t preserve this canyon or this valley or our entrance to town.’ They didn’t do it and they lost the game to development. I feel so lucky to be a part of what shaped who we are and what we’ve become.” The work he has done has made this region more precious, but also more coveted. “There definitely are some negative things about who we’ve become. It’s ridiculous that working class people can’t afford to buy a house here anymore. But you have to keep up the good fight as long as you can, and that’s what we’ve been doing in Telluride. And it feels really good.” \

Direct flights to Telluride airport. 1/4 the travel time. About the same cost as the airlines.*

Don’t waste your weekend getaway flying and driving or needing to take four days off for only two days on the slopes. You can trust Sawyer Aviation to get you, your family and even the family pet to Telluride safely and on your schedule. When you fly with Sawyer Aviation - security lines, hour+ check-in lines, additional luggage fees, cramped seats, car parking fees, bad airport food and connecting flight delays all become a thing of the past. Sawyer Aviation serves 5,000 airports nationwide (10x more than scheduled airlines) and can fly you directly into Telluride airport. Contact us for a free custom-flight quote. • Speed -1/4 the total travel of the airlines time door to door as 2hrs vs 8hrs fly directly into Telluride airport • Safety – Wyvern & ARGUS safety rated approved aircraft & pilots • Convenience – Skip the lines, travel on your schedule, fly when you want, ski all you want

Fly the whole family &, Fido too!

• Cost – round-trip family of four (plus Fido or Felix) can fly round-trip for the same cost as the typical airline flight.

877-FLY-SAWYER | 877-359-7299 | sawyeraviation.com/charter *Based on round-trip flight for four or more passengers. Travel time and cost varies based on departure point. Additional conditions and restrictions may apply. Contact Sawyer Aviation charter-sales agent for details. Sawyer Aviation is an FAA certified on-demand air carrier and utilizes FAA approved network aircraft.

iz atham, CMT

T H E R A P E U T I C

M A S S A G E

Ser ving Telluride since 1988

specializing in therapeutic massage for all ages

{

neuromuscular swedish acupressure

970.728.6804 • 970.626.5773 226 west colorado avenue, 2nd floor WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

25


26 • ENVIRONMENT

Do the Right Thing MOU N TA I N VI L L AGE OF F ER S F R EE ELEC TRIC C AR C HAR GING, A N D L ED /S OL A R P O WER REBATES

“It’s the chicken and egg. We live way out here, but if there are a few stations, you’ll be covered.”

}

www.TellurideMagazine.com

{

I

t’s easier to spend the money for a new Tesla electric car in a place like California, where the charging stations are ubiquitous. But in remote places like southwestern Colorado, it’s a little more daunting—what if there are no places to charge your vehicle, and you get stranded? That’s the reason that Mountain Village installed a new electric car charging station, where both the electricity and the parking are free. The town wants to make it easier to do the right thing, by giving incentives to people who are cutting down on carbon emissions that are harmful to the environment. Charging stations seem to spring up where there are lots of electric cars on the road, but if there are few places to charge an electric car, there won’t be as many electric cars being sold. Mountain Village officials took advantage of some partial grant funding and installed the station to help break that cycle of which comes first, the cars or the stations. “It’s the chicken and egg,” says Mayor Dan Jansen. “We live way out here, but if there are a few stations, you’ll be covered.”

Mountain Village’s municipal government is on a mission, it seems. They budgeted $350,000 last year toward some progressive environmental initiatives, in response to the federal call to action to meet the Climate Action Plan goals for reducing carbon emissions. The first step was to make the existing town buildings and infrastructure more efficient, by putting in LED

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

lights, improving weatherization, upgrading HVAC and plaza snowmelt systems, and installing energy-efficient appliances and programmable thermostats. Jansen says it was important to start with the municipal buildings and infrastructure before they tried to reach out to town residents, who account for the vast majority (95 percent) of the town’s energy use. “We’re trying to get efficient first. We believe the government leads by example. We can’t tell our residents to do something if we’re not doing it ourselves.” The second step is getting residents to follow suit, starting with replacing lightbulbs. Traditional rebate programs, offering money back after people purchase LED lights, don’t work that well—the time and effort to get the rebate are not enough incentive to replace all the lights in a home. So Mountain Village opted for a “prebate” program instead, partnering with a private company to create a website where residents could buy the bulbs in bulk at a discount online. San Miguel Power Association

offers significant rebates for LEDs, and the town added more, while applying the subsidy at the time of purchase as an incentive. It worked—120 residents and businesses took part in the program— and town officials plan to run the program again next year. “It makes it easy and fast. It’s a no-brainer. I bought about 50 bulbs, and I’m going to have payback on the investment in a third of a year.” Once a Mountain Village residence or business becomes energy efficient, the town also offers similar “pre-bate” programs for solar panels purchased at the SMPA community solar array and for rooftop solar arrays in the alpine resort community, which basks in more than 300 days of sunshine a year. The financial payback on investing in more efficient technology and green energy helps to motivate Mountain Village Town Council, says Jansen. He says the council is made up of “pragmatic environmentalists,” who want to meet their environmental goals and their fiduciary responsibility at the same time. The investments the council made in energy efficiency projects will see a financial return in about two or three years. “That is a smart decision,” says Jansen. “It’s a win-win.” Mountain Village also shepherds the popular “Green Gondola” program, where donors have generated enough money to purchase a second 10-kilowatt solar array for the free transportation system. The additional array will bring solar production up to 2 percent of the gondola’s total electricity use. The program’s goal is to produce 20 percent through solar, and there will be a crowdfunding site (http://igg.me/ at/GreenGondolaProject) launched this winter with Clean Energy Collective, which operates the community solar array, to raise additional money for more solar panels. The council is also contemplating two micro-hydroelectric generators as a part of an upcoming major water project, as well as a “smart building” program that lowers building fees as an incentive for more efficient structures that use less energy. Jansen says that the town is only built to about half its capacity, and that these incremental steps to produce green energy and be more energy efficient are crucial. “We think of this as not just one silver bullet. If we do a bunch of things right, it adds up to a pretty good result.” \

✴ Free rental delivery ✴ Overnight tuning ✴ Complimentary slope-side overnight storage ✴ Best selection of ski and snowboard rental gear ✴ Great selection of apparel, shoes and more ✴ 7 convenient locations

Go to telluridesports.com for more information

20%

off Your Ski or Snowboard Rental

970-728-0364 or telluridesports.com for more info and locations Make advance reservations at rentskis.com/telluridesports

FURNITURE LIGHTING RUGS ACCENTS & ACCESSORIES BEDDING BATH & BODY GIFTS

135 W. Pacific Ave (across from the library) Telluride, CO 970-369-5003 www.customshouseonline.com i ntwww.hookonawall.com e r i o r d e s i gn

Must present coupon at time of purchase to redeem. Offer valid for the 2014-2015 ski season. Cannot be used on the following dates: Dec 20Jan 4, Jan 16-19, Feb 13-22, and March 6-April 5. See store for details.

*72515082 2 1 *

7251508221

Furniture Lighting rugs Accents & Accessories Bedding BAth & Body giFts

Ski Town Connect Scenic Flights Air Taxi

135 W. Pacific Ave (across from the library) Telluride, CO 970-369-5003 www.customshouseonline.com

Vail Telluride Taos Aspen Crested Butte

9 7 0 7 2 9 1 9 9 8

BigFootAAC.com WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

27


26 • ENVIRONMENT

Do the Right Thing MOU N TA I N VI L L AGE OF F ER S F R EE ELEC TRIC C AR C HAR GING, A N D L ED /S OL A R P O WER REBATES

“It’s the chicken and egg. We live way out here, but if there are a few stations, you’ll be covered.”

}

www.TellurideMagazine.com

{

I

t’s easier to spend the money for a new Tesla electric car in a place like California, where the charging stations are ubiquitous. But in remote places like southwestern Colorado, it’s a little more daunting—what if there are no places to charge your vehicle, and you get stranded? That’s the reason that Mountain Village installed a new electric car charging station, where both the electricity and the parking are free. The town wants to make it easier to do the right thing, by giving incentives to people who are cutting down on carbon emissions that are harmful to the environment. Charging stations seem to spring up where there are lots of electric cars on the road, but if there are few places to charge an electric car, there won’t be as many electric cars being sold. Mountain Village officials took advantage of some partial grant funding and installed the station to help break that cycle of which comes first, the cars or the stations. “It’s the chicken and egg,” says Mayor Dan Jansen. “We live way out here, but if there are a few stations, you’ll be covered.”

Mountain Village’s municipal government is on a mission, it seems. They budgeted $350,000 last year toward some progressive environmental initiatives, in response to the federal call to action to meet the Climate Action Plan goals for reducing carbon emissions. The first step was to make the existing town buildings and infrastructure more efficient, by putting in LED

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

lights, improving weatherization, upgrading HVAC and plaza snowmelt systems, and installing energy-efficient appliances and programmable thermostats. Jansen says it was important to start with the municipal buildings and infrastructure before they tried to reach out to town residents, who account for the vast majority (95 percent) of the town’s energy use. “We’re trying to get efficient first. We believe the government leads by example. We can’t tell our residents to do something if we’re not doing it ourselves.” The second step is getting residents to follow suit, starting with replacing lightbulbs. Traditional rebate programs, offering money back after people purchase LED lights, don’t work that well—the time and effort to get the rebate are not enough incentive to replace all the lights in a home. So Mountain Village opted for a “prebate” program instead, partnering with a private company to create a website where residents could buy the bulbs in bulk at a discount online. San Miguel Power Association

offers significant rebates for LEDs, and the town added more, while applying the subsidy at the time of purchase as an incentive. It worked—120 residents and businesses took part in the program— and town officials plan to run the program again next year. “It makes it easy and fast. It’s a no-brainer. I bought about 50 bulbs, and I’m going to have payback on the investment in a third of a year.” Once a Mountain Village residence or business becomes energy efficient, the town also offers similar “pre-bate” programs for solar panels purchased at the SMPA community solar array and for rooftop solar arrays in the alpine resort community, which basks in more than 300 days of sunshine a year. The financial payback on investing in more efficient technology and green energy helps to motivate Mountain Village Town Council, says Jansen. He says the council is made up of “pragmatic environmentalists,” who want to meet their environmental goals and their fiduciary responsibility at the same time. The investments the council made in energy efficiency projects will see a financial return in about two or three years. “That is a smart decision,” says Jansen. “It’s a win-win.” Mountain Village also shepherds the popular “Green Gondola” program, where donors have generated enough money to purchase a second 10-kilowatt solar array for the free transportation system. The additional array will bring solar production up to 2 percent of the gondola’s total electricity use. The program’s goal is to produce 20 percent through solar, and there will be a crowdfunding site (http://igg.me/ at/GreenGondolaProject) launched this winter with Clean Energy Collective, which operates the community solar array, to raise additional money for more solar panels. The council is also contemplating two micro-hydroelectric generators as a part of an upcoming major water project, as well as a “smart building” program that lowers building fees as an incentive for more efficient structures that use less energy. Jansen says that the town is only built to about half its capacity, and that these incremental steps to produce green energy and be more energy efficient are crucial. “We think of this as not just one silver bullet. If we do a bunch of things right, it adds up to a pretty good result.” \

✴ Free rental delivery ✴ Overnight tuning ✴ Complimentary slope-side overnight storage ✴ Best selection of ski and snowboard rental gear ✴ Great selection of apparel, shoes and more ✴ 7 convenient locations

Go to telluridesports.com for more information

20%

off Your Ski or Snowboard Rental

970-728-0364 or telluridesports.com for more info and locations Make advance reservations at rentskis.com/telluridesports

FURNITURE LIGHTING RUGS ACCENTS & ACCESSORIES BEDDING BATH & BODY GIFTS

135 W. Pacific Ave (across from the library) Telluride, CO 970-369-5003 www.customshouseonline.com i ntwww.hookonawall.com e r i o r d e s i gn

Must present coupon at time of purchase to redeem. Offer valid for the 2014-2015 ski season. Cannot be used on the following dates: Dec 20Jan 4, Jan 16-19, Feb 13-22, and March 6-April 5. See store for details.

*72515082 2 1 *

7251508221

Furniture Lighting rugs Accents & Accessories Bedding BAth & Body giFts

Ski Town Connect Scenic Flights Air Taxi

135 W. Pacific Ave (across from the library) Telluride, CO 970-369-5003 www.customshouseonline.com

Vail Telluride Taos Aspen Crested Butte

9 7 0 7 2 9 1 9 9 8

BigFootAAC.com WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

27


28 • MOUNTAIN HEALTH IT’S A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN TELLURIDE,

See it clearly.

Marijuana as Medicine M A RY JA N E ’S M E D I CI N A L S TO PIC AL PR O DUC TS STO RM THE MARKET

Dr. Valerie Sharpe & Dr. Kimberly Parr

395 E Colorado Ave. | 970.728.4140 | tellurideeyecare.com Proudly serving the Telluride region for all your eyecare needs.

By D. Dion

Y

ou don’t need Dr. Oz to tell you that marijuana is medicine—that idea has been around a lot longer than TV and Western physicians who preach from that pulpit. Marijuana was first used as a medicine in 2700 BC in China, and subsequently all over the world, up until the 1930s when its use was banned in the United States. But since recreational marijuana was made legal in this state last year, you no longer need physician’s approval in Colorado to test its medicinal value for yourself. And if you want the pain relief without the high, the local business Mary Jane’s Medicinals has great topical products to try. I tested the salve, the most popular product in the line, myself. Trail running injuries have beleaguered me for the past couple of seasons, so I dipped in—skeptically—and was surprised to get some relief. The salve soothed my sore calves and Achilles tendons, and it also worked magic on a pulled muscle in my upper abdomen. I’ve used other ointments, ice, stretching, soaking, the works—but nothing gave www.TellurideMagazine.com

{

“It’s so rewarding… I am so happy that I fell into this and that it’s helping so many people.”

me such immediate and profound results. I’m a believer. I’m not the only one, according to Mary Jane’s founder Dahlia Mertens. She gets a steady stream of calls and emails from grateful clients. There was the paraplegic shooting victim who had undergone multiple surgeries and didn’t like how the other pain medications made him feel. The salve reduced his pain dramatically, he says. A patient who had a shunt put in his leg after a heart attack, and a nerve was nicked in the process, leaving him unable to sleep because of the severe pain— Mary Jane’s helped the burning sensation go away. A breast cancer survivor had radiation burns in her chest, scarring, and nerve damage after multiple surgeries that left her with an open wound that wouldn’t heal. The salve helped to soothe her pain and close up the wound.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

}

People suffering from migraines, a man with facial burns from fracking chemicals, the list goes on. “I’ve been getting all kinds of really wonderful testimonials,” says Mertens. “It’s so rewarding. I cried on the phone with the paraplegic guy. I am so happy that I fell into this and that it’s helping so many people.” She came up with her business idea in 2009, and spent a year developing and testing the products before she started marketing them to the medical marijuana dispensaries around the state. She says at that time it was about educating people—many people didn’t know about topical marijuana, the salves, balms, tinctures, massage oils, and bath salts that have medicinal value but that don’t make you high. The products use select strains of potent marijuana with high levels of CBD, CBN and other cannabinoids—when used

topically, there is not enough THC entering the bloodstream for any psychoactive effect. Now about 200 stores statewide carry Mary Jane’s Medicinals. “It was a lot of banging on doors in the beginning, but now the word is really getting out. It’s kind of getting to critical mass right now. There’s a buzz. Phone calls coming in, stores calling to carry my products. It’s starting to pay off.” Although she’d never owned a business, the marketing came naturally to Mertens, who has a background in acting—she is comfortable talking to people, and addressing audiences like those at pot shows and symposiums, and she even has a handmade costume, a green nurse’s outfit, that she wears to promote the line. She was a fulltime massage therapist before starting the business, and she likes that she’s still helping people to heal and feel better. In some ways, Mary Jane’s has been a synthesis of her interests and experience. “I’ve always been into helping people, and it makes me really happy. I feel lucky and fortunate. But I never thought I’d be a cannabis entrepreneur.” \

Invoking the Healing Power of Nature

How NaturopatHic MediciNe works Treat the cause of disease & illness Promote healing in body, mind & spirit Individualized treatment specific for your needs Safe, compassionate healthcare

Treatments Nutritional Therapy • Supplements • Herbal Medicine Homeopathy • Lifestyle Counseling & Support

Free 15-Minute Consultations NaNcy utter

Naturopathic Doctor

Durango Natural Medicine 970-247-0737 117 CR 250 • Durango, CO 81301 www.durangonaturalmedicine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

29


28 • MOUNTAIN HEALTH IT’S A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN TELLURIDE,

See it clearly.

Marijuana as Medicine M A RY JA N E ’S M E D I CI N A L S TO PIC AL PR O DUC TS STO RM THE MARKET

Dr. Valerie Sharpe & Dr. Kimberly Parr

395 E Colorado Ave. | 970.728.4140 | tellurideeyecare.com Proudly serving the Telluride region for all your eyecare needs.

By D. Dion

Y

ou don’t need Dr. Oz to tell you that marijuana is medicine—that idea has been around a lot longer than TV and Western physicians who preach from that pulpit. Marijuana was first used as a medicine in 2700 BC in China, and subsequently all over the world, up until the 1930s when its use was banned in the United States. But since recreational marijuana was made legal in this state last year, you no longer need physician’s approval in Colorado to test its medicinal value for yourself. And if you want the pain relief without the high, the local business Mary Jane’s Medicinals has great topical products to try. I tested the salve, the most popular product in the line, myself. Trail running injuries have beleaguered me for the past couple of seasons, so I dipped in—skeptically—and was surprised to get some relief. The salve soothed my sore calves and Achilles tendons, and it also worked magic on a pulled muscle in my upper abdomen. I’ve used other ointments, ice, stretching, soaking, the works—but nothing gave www.TellurideMagazine.com

{

“It’s so rewarding… I am so happy that I fell into this and that it’s helping so many people.”

me such immediate and profound results. I’m a believer. I’m not the only one, according to Mary Jane’s founder Dahlia Mertens. She gets a steady stream of calls and emails from grateful clients. There was the paraplegic shooting victim who had undergone multiple surgeries and didn’t like how the other pain medications made him feel. The salve reduced his pain dramatically, he says. A patient who had a shunt put in his leg after a heart attack, and a nerve was nicked in the process, leaving him unable to sleep because of the severe pain— Mary Jane’s helped the burning sensation go away. A breast cancer survivor had radiation burns in her chest, scarring, and nerve damage after multiple surgeries that left her with an open wound that wouldn’t heal. The salve helped to soothe her pain and close up the wound.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

}

People suffering from migraines, a man with facial burns from fracking chemicals, the list goes on. “I’ve been getting all kinds of really wonderful testimonials,” says Mertens. “It’s so rewarding. I cried on the phone with the paraplegic guy. I am so happy that I fell into this and that it’s helping so many people.” She came up with her business idea in 2009, and spent a year developing and testing the products before she started marketing them to the medical marijuana dispensaries around the state. She says at that time it was about educating people—many people didn’t know about topical marijuana, the salves, balms, tinctures, massage oils, and bath salts that have medicinal value but that don’t make you high. The products use select strains of potent marijuana with high levels of CBD, CBN and other cannabinoids—when used

topically, there is not enough THC entering the bloodstream for any psychoactive effect. Now about 200 stores statewide carry Mary Jane’s Medicinals. “It was a lot of banging on doors in the beginning, but now the word is really getting out. It’s kind of getting to critical mass right now. There’s a buzz. Phone calls coming in, stores calling to carry my products. It’s starting to pay off.” Although she’d never owned a business, the marketing came naturally to Mertens, who has a background in acting—she is comfortable talking to people, and addressing audiences like those at pot shows and symposiums, and she even has a handmade costume, a green nurse’s outfit, that she wears to promote the line. She was a fulltime massage therapist before starting the business, and she likes that she’s still helping people to heal and feel better. In some ways, Mary Jane’s has been a synthesis of her interests and experience. “I’ve always been into helping people, and it makes me really happy. I feel lucky and fortunate. But I never thought I’d be a cannabis entrepreneur.” \

Invoking the Healing Power of Nature

How NaturopatHic MediciNe works Treat the cause of disease & illness Promote healing in body, mind & spirit Individualized treatment specific for your needs Safe, compassionate healthcare

Treatments Nutritional Therapy • Supplements • Herbal Medicine Homeopathy • Lifestyle Counseling & Support

Free 15-Minute Consultations NaNcy utter

Naturopathic Doctor

Durango Natural Medicine 970-247-0737 117 CR 250 • Durango, CO 81301 www.durangonaturalmedicine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

29


30 • ADVICE

Ask Jock ATHL ETI C A D VI CE F R OM OUR LO C AL MO UNTAIN GURU

Leashes for Kids? Dear Jock, My husband and I want to take our firstborn skiing. At what age should we start? Are Edgie Wedgie ski trainers useful? What about the harness set-ups? Is there anything else you can recommend for us to get our little one up on the hill? —New Parents in Snow Country Dear Snow Country Parents, If your child is old enough to walk, he or she is probably ready to try sliding on snow. The first step to success is acquiring warm, comfortable clothing. The second is to find gear with similar attributes. Start out with an indoor practice session with the skis on carpet. Then go outside and tour the backyard. Eventually, find a gentle hill, and then you’ll be ready for a trip to the ski area to ride the magic carpet. Choose a warm day for that adventure. Edgie Wedgies keep ski tips together so kids don’t face plant, but they also prevent natural walking movement in the flats. Think of them like a pacifier: Useful at a certain stage of development, but not something to use any longer than necessary. As your youngster begins to ski steeper terrain, consider a tethering system. A harness/leash combination may work, but it can tangle during a fall. Some parents and kids prefer the control and security of a rigid hula-hoop. Avoid the inclination to ski with your child between your legs—the position is awkward and strenuous. But if you find yourself at the top of a steep pitch without a tether, you can put your tyke between your legs and hold your ski pole in front as a safety bar to navigate the section of intimidating terrain with control. In a few years, you’ll be following Junior down that intimidating terrain. Hopefully you won’t need a safety pole. Enjoy your family time together in the mountains, — Jock

Q

Brett Schreckengost

A

Two Wheels, Two Boards Dear Jock, I want to be more eco-conscious and ride my bike to the ski hill, but I can’t figure out how to carry my skis. I’ve seen the Telluride TV sticker with the dude carrying his boards on his shoulder, but riding one-handed in the winter seems hazardous. Do really I have to risk life and limb, or is there a better way? —Winter Rider Wannabe Dear Wannabe, For many years, I’ve employed the skis-on-the-shoulder technique—and almost every winter, I hit an icy patch and hold an ugly yard sale. I’ve escaped serious injury so far, but there are better ways to transport skis on a bicycle. One method is to simply strap skis to a backpack. This may take a few minutes to rig and de-rig, but it doesn’t require purchasing or building anything. If you have a sturdy bike rack, you can use hose clamps to attach a short section of wide-diameter PVC pipe vertically to one side of the rack and carry your skis upright. Unfortunately, the weight is imbalanced while pedaling. To center the load, try anchoring a rectangular piece of plywood to the rack with slots cut to accept the tails of your skis on either side of the rear wheel. (Max Cooper at The Boot Doctors swears by this elegant system.) Another solution comes in the form of a pair of padded U-shaped bars that clamp to the bicycle frame. The system is designed to carry a surfboard lengthwise, but it will also fit skis or a snowboard. You can purchase one or (much cooler) go online to korduroy.tv/shows/surf-sufficient/diy-surfboardbike-rack/ to learn how to build your own. Ok, that’s it. No more dangerous winter riding for Jock! I’m building a ski rack for my bike. You do the same, and I’ll see you at the base of the gondola to compare designs. Thanks for the inspiration, — Jock

Q

A

www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Old School X-C Skis Dear Jock, I found a vintage cross-country ski set-up in the Free Box—skis, boots, and poles! The skis are made of a beautiful shiny wood, and the poles are bamboo. The boots are leather and fit perfectly. My friend says this gear is too old and that I should buy new stuff. What do you say? —Nordic Newbie Dear Newbie, The answer depends upon how much time you want to spend prepping. Wooden skis require waxing for conditions every time you go out, and wooden skis don’t slide as well as modern ones with bases made of P-Tex. So you won’t be winning any Olympic medals. You will, however, win a medal for style, especially if you can find some wool knickers, tall socks, and a bulky Norwegian sweater in the Free Box. I suggest swinging by the Nordic Center in Town Park to ask for a primer in wooden ski maintenance. While you’re there, you can also rent modern equipment for a day to decide for yourself if it’s worth spending money on new gear. Enjoy the kick and glide, — Jock

Best n o i t c e l Se

Highe Qualit st y

Q

A

Gourmet, Local & Organic Cannabis Products, Concentrates, Edibles, Vaporizers & Accessories

250 SOUTH FIR ST. 728-7999 Open 11am to 7pm ONE BLOC K EAST OF TH E TE LLURI DE GONDOLA STATION

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

31


30 • ADVICE

Ask Jock ATHL ETI C A D VI CE F R OM OUR LO C AL MO UNTAIN GURU

Leashes for Kids? Dear Jock, My husband and I want to take our firstborn skiing. At what age should we start? Are Edgie Wedgie ski trainers useful? What about the harness set-ups? Is there anything else you can recommend for us to get our little one up on the hill? —New Parents in Snow Country Dear Snow Country Parents, If your child is old enough to walk, he or she is probably ready to try sliding on snow. The first step to success is acquiring warm, comfortable clothing. The second is to find gear with similar attributes. Start out with an indoor practice session with the skis on carpet. Then go outside and tour the backyard. Eventually, find a gentle hill, and then you’ll be ready for a trip to the ski area to ride the magic carpet. Choose a warm day for that adventure. Edgie Wedgies keep ski tips together so kids don’t face plant, but they also prevent natural walking movement in the flats. Think of them like a pacifier: Useful at a certain stage of development, but not something to use any longer than necessary. As your youngster begins to ski steeper terrain, consider a tethering system. A harness/leash combination may work, but it can tangle during a fall. Some parents and kids prefer the control and security of a rigid hula-hoop. Avoid the inclination to ski with your child between your legs—the position is awkward and strenuous. But if you find yourself at the top of a steep pitch without a tether, you can put your tyke between your legs and hold your ski pole in front as a safety bar to navigate the section of intimidating terrain with control. In a few years, you’ll be following Junior down that intimidating terrain. Hopefully you won’t need a safety pole. Enjoy your family time together in the mountains, — Jock

Q

Brett Schreckengost

A

Two Wheels, Two Boards Dear Jock, I want to be more eco-conscious and ride my bike to the ski hill, but I can’t figure out how to carry my skis. I’ve seen the Telluride TV sticker with the dude carrying his boards on his shoulder, but riding one-handed in the winter seems hazardous. Do really I have to risk life and limb, or is there a better way? —Winter Rider Wannabe Dear Wannabe, For many years, I’ve employed the skis-on-the-shoulder technique—and almost every winter, I hit an icy patch and hold an ugly yard sale. I’ve escaped serious injury so far, but there are better ways to transport skis on a bicycle. One method is to simply strap skis to a backpack. This may take a few minutes to rig and de-rig, but it doesn’t require purchasing or building anything. If you have a sturdy bike rack, you can use hose clamps to attach a short section of wide-diameter PVC pipe vertically to one side of the rack and carry your skis upright. Unfortunately, the weight is imbalanced while pedaling. To center the load, try anchoring a rectangular piece of plywood to the rack with slots cut to accept the tails of your skis on either side of the rear wheel. (Max Cooper at The Boot Doctors swears by this elegant system.) Another solution comes in the form of a pair of padded U-shaped bars that clamp to the bicycle frame. The system is designed to carry a surfboard lengthwise, but it will also fit skis or a snowboard. You can purchase one or (much cooler) go online to korduroy.tv/shows/surf-sufficient/diy-surfboardbike-rack/ to learn how to build your own. Ok, that’s it. No more dangerous winter riding for Jock! I’m building a ski rack for my bike. You do the same, and I’ll see you at the base of the gondola to compare designs. Thanks for the inspiration, — Jock

Q

A

www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Old School X-C Skis Dear Jock, I found a vintage cross-country ski set-up in the Free Box—skis, boots, and poles! The skis are made of a beautiful shiny wood, and the poles are bamboo. The boots are leather and fit perfectly. My friend says this gear is too old and that I should buy new stuff. What do you say? —Nordic Newbie Dear Newbie, The answer depends upon how much time you want to spend prepping. Wooden skis require waxing for conditions every time you go out, and wooden skis don’t slide as well as modern ones with bases made of P-Tex. So you won’t be winning any Olympic medals. You will, however, win a medal for style, especially if you can find some wool knickers, tall socks, and a bulky Norwegian sweater in the Free Box. I suggest swinging by the Nordic Center in Town Park to ask for a primer in wooden ski maintenance. While you’re there, you can also rent modern equipment for a day to decide for yourself if it’s worth spending money on new gear. Enjoy the kick and glide, — Jock

Best n o i t c e l Se

Highe Qualit st y

Q

A

Gourmet, Local & Organic Cannabis Products, Concentrates, Edibles, Vaporizers & Accessories

250 SOUTH FIR ST. 728-7999 Open 11am to 7pm ONE BLOC K EAST OF TH E TE LLURI DE GONDOLA STATION

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

31


32 • ESSAY

John Denver’s Moral Victory A F E W P E R SON A L D I S GR ACES AND ONE UNNEC ESSARY DEATH ASIDE, H E ’ S U LT I MATE LY B E EN P R OVED RIGHT ABO UT THE R O C KY MO UNTAINS’ HIG H S. By Rob Story

r

TELLURIDE LUXURY

RENTALS & REAL ESTATE, INC.

luxury vacation rentals. luxury real estate. luxury lifestyle.

I

Kane Scheidegger

t’s not as if John Denver’s my favorite singer or anything. In fact, I mostly agree with the critics who called his music “bland and saccharine.” I’m well aware that Denver was fond of hanging out with Muppets and driving while intoxicated (though never at the same time). The thing is, have you listened to “Rocky Mountain High” lately? I happened to before last winter, while watching a vivid half moon soar above Ajax Peak. The San Miguel River provided melodic accompaniment while Denver warbled about “cathedral mountains” and “shadow from the starlight.” And I experienced something FM radio listeners in the 70s often did: John Denver turning mountains into goosebumps. At that moment, Colorado seemed primed for a new Golden Age of Skiing—one to rival its earlier, John-Denver-era Golden Age. It’s about time. Skiing has, for too long, focused on its coastal mountains, the literal fringe of the sport. Granted, there’s nothing like the thrill of shredding a gigantic spine in Alaska. British Columbia largely deserves the praise it gets for its progressive resorts and superb heli-skiing. We can’t help but marvel at Washington’s world record, 1,000-inches-andthen-some accumulation during the winter of 1998-99. Yet for the last decade or so, skiing has gone overboard celebrating the Sierra, the Chugach, the Cascades, and the coast mountains. These ranges starred in movies and magazine layouts, and all but

www.TellurideMagazine.com

implied that the Rockies were “flyover country.” Then came last season, when drought wreaked havoc on West Coast ski areas. The 2013-14 ski season saw many Colorado resorts notch historically great snowfalls. Colorado as a whole welcomed 12.6 million skier visits—its best year ever. Colorado grabbed an incredible 22 percent of the national skier market. Take that, California. Skiers from all over the country buckled up here last season. And why not? When you ski Telluride, you need never worry about precipitation turning to rain, much less rain’s hideous consequence: skiing around in a garbage bag. The powder promises to be light and dry. I reckon the geography gods created the perfect region for skiing when they came up with the Southern Rockies. Nowhere else in the world can match Colorado’s combination of warm, sunny latitudes, dry snow, and big peaks. Ski areas in coastal zones tend to have base villages between 2,000 and 5,000 feet. Here in Colorado, they’re often above 8,000 feet—you know, in the mountains. If you want to take it literally, Colorado really is the highest state, with a greater average elevation than any other chunk of man-

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

made boundary in America. After Telluride closed last season, I took a road trip to the Elk Mountains, where I tracked down the shrine to John Denver erected on Aspen Mountain. The shrine decorates a sublime, woodsy clearing. On the bark of fir trees, fans have mounted photos of Denver skiing—pretty fast, by the looks of things. Plastic-covered newspaper clippings shower him with kind eulogies. Pictures of his blond head, bearing his trademark round, wireframe granny glasses, beaming down on pilgrims. Wind chimes clink and bells ring. There’s an old jacket for his early vinyl album Poems, Prayers and Promises. A copy of Denver’s gold record for “Country Roads” dangles from a branch. The singer born as Henry John Deutschendorf in New Mexico on New Year’s Eve 1943 moved to Aspen in the early 70s, not long after naming himself after Colorado’s capital. Several of his most famous songs were penned while he stayed at a mountain hut on Castle Creek above Aspen. No entertainer has preached the gospel of mountain living better than John Denver. He put the Rockies on gobs and gobs of turntables: According to the Recording Industry Association of America, Denver has sold 33 million albums in the U.S., just behind James Taylor (and still more than Jay Z). Before I-70 was even completed, he featured Colorado on national TV with his special “Rocky Mountain Christmas.” Several environmental groups recognized his advocacy of Colorado wilderness

and he was named the state’s Poet Laureate in 1974. The John Denver Celebrity Pro-Am Ski Tournaments brought skiing to America’s attention from 1975 through 1984. He was a commentator for the 1984 Sarajevo Winter Olympics, and composed and sang its theme song, “The Gold and Beyond.” Yet human nature’s urge to cut down tall poppies makes us forget Denver’s triumphs and focus on his failures. Cynics note that “Annie’s Song,” Denver’s best-selling ode to his wife, couldn’t keep them from a divorce so ugly that he fired up a chain saw and cut all his kitchen cabinets in half because he was so angry about how things were being split. He made news in 1993 with a driving under the influence charge, then got another DUI when he ran his Porsche off the road in Aspen in 1994. Denver perished in 1997, which is why there’s a shrine on Aspen Mountain and an impressive John Denver Sanctuary downtown. The former Henry Deutschendorf died after an experimental, single-person aircraft he was piloting ran out of fuel and crashed into the Pacific Ocean near Monterey, California. Divers recovered most of the body, but not the head. Given that the Pacific is a cold ocean, pieces of John Denver might still be feeding the evaporation process that forms the clouds that travel a thousand miles or so over intervening ranges and desert basins, losing moisture all the way, until finally dumping light, dry fluff on his beloved Rocky Mountain highs. \

Just give us a call. We will handle the entire situation.

Rosie Cusack, owner & broker rosie@rosiecusack.com | 970.728.0461

telluriderentals.net | tellurideluxury.co

220 East Colorado Avenue, Telluride, CO


32 • ESSAY

John Denver’s Moral Victory A F E W P E R SON A L D I S GR ACES AND ONE UNNEC ESSARY DEATH ASIDE, H E ’ S U LT I MATE LY B E EN P R OVED RIGHT ABO UT THE R O C KY MO UNTAINS’ HIG H S. By Rob Story

r

TELLURIDE LUXURY

RENTALS & REAL ESTATE, INC.

luxury vacation rentals. luxury real estate. luxury lifestyle.

I

Kane Scheidegger

t’s not as if John Denver’s my favorite singer or anything. In fact, I mostly agree with the critics who called his music “bland and saccharine.” I’m well aware that Denver was fond of hanging out with Muppets and driving while intoxicated (though never at the same time). The thing is, have you listened to “Rocky Mountain High” lately? I happened to before last winter, while watching a vivid half moon soar above Ajax Peak. The San Miguel River provided melodic accompaniment while Denver warbled about “cathedral mountains” and “shadow from the starlight.” And I experienced something FM radio listeners in the 70s often did: John Denver turning mountains into goosebumps. At that moment, Colorado seemed primed for a new Golden Age of Skiing—one to rival its earlier, John-Denver-era Golden Age. It’s about time. Skiing has, for too long, focused on its coastal mountains, the literal fringe of the sport. Granted, there’s nothing like the thrill of shredding a gigantic spine in Alaska. British Columbia largely deserves the praise it gets for its progressive resorts and superb heli-skiing. We can’t help but marvel at Washington’s world record, 1,000-inches-andthen-some accumulation during the winter of 1998-99. Yet for the last decade or so, skiing has gone overboard celebrating the Sierra, the Chugach, the Cascades, and the coast mountains. These ranges starred in movies and magazine layouts, and all but

www.TellurideMagazine.com

implied that the Rockies were “flyover country.” Then came last season, when drought wreaked havoc on West Coast ski areas. The 2013-14 ski season saw many Colorado resorts notch historically great snowfalls. Colorado as a whole welcomed 12.6 million skier visits—its best year ever. Colorado grabbed an incredible 22 percent of the national skier market. Take that, California. Skiers from all over the country buckled up here last season. And why not? When you ski Telluride, you need never worry about precipitation turning to rain, much less rain’s hideous consequence: skiing around in a garbage bag. The powder promises to be light and dry. I reckon the geography gods created the perfect region for skiing when they came up with the Southern Rockies. Nowhere else in the world can match Colorado’s combination of warm, sunny latitudes, dry snow, and big peaks. Ski areas in coastal zones tend to have base villages between 2,000 and 5,000 feet. Here in Colorado, they’re often above 8,000 feet—you know, in the mountains. If you want to take it literally, Colorado really is the highest state, with a greater average elevation than any other chunk of man-

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

made boundary in America. After Telluride closed last season, I took a road trip to the Elk Mountains, where I tracked down the shrine to John Denver erected on Aspen Mountain. The shrine decorates a sublime, woodsy clearing. On the bark of fir trees, fans have mounted photos of Denver skiing—pretty fast, by the looks of things. Plastic-covered newspaper clippings shower him with kind eulogies. Pictures of his blond head, bearing his trademark round, wireframe granny glasses, beaming down on pilgrims. Wind chimes clink and bells ring. There’s an old jacket for his early vinyl album Poems, Prayers and Promises. A copy of Denver’s gold record for “Country Roads” dangles from a branch. The singer born as Henry John Deutschendorf in New Mexico on New Year’s Eve 1943 moved to Aspen in the early 70s, not long after naming himself after Colorado’s capital. Several of his most famous songs were penned while he stayed at a mountain hut on Castle Creek above Aspen. No entertainer has preached the gospel of mountain living better than John Denver. He put the Rockies on gobs and gobs of turntables: According to the Recording Industry Association of America, Denver has sold 33 million albums in the U.S., just behind James Taylor (and still more than Jay Z). Before I-70 was even completed, he featured Colorado on national TV with his special “Rocky Mountain Christmas.” Several environmental groups recognized his advocacy of Colorado wilderness

and he was named the state’s Poet Laureate in 1974. The John Denver Celebrity Pro-Am Ski Tournaments brought skiing to America’s attention from 1975 through 1984. He was a commentator for the 1984 Sarajevo Winter Olympics, and composed and sang its theme song, “The Gold and Beyond.” Yet human nature’s urge to cut down tall poppies makes us forget Denver’s triumphs and focus on his failures. Cynics note that “Annie’s Song,” Denver’s best-selling ode to his wife, couldn’t keep them from a divorce so ugly that he fired up a chain saw and cut all his kitchen cabinets in half because he was so angry about how things were being split. He made news in 1993 with a driving under the influence charge, then got another DUI when he ran his Porsche off the road in Aspen in 1994. Denver perished in 1997, which is why there’s a shrine on Aspen Mountain and an impressive John Denver Sanctuary downtown. The former Henry Deutschendorf died after an experimental, single-person aircraft he was piloting ran out of fuel and crashed into the Pacific Ocean near Monterey, California. Divers recovered most of the body, but not the head. Given that the Pacific is a cold ocean, pieces of John Denver might still be feeding the evaporation process that forms the clouds that travel a thousand miles or so over intervening ranges and desert basins, losing moisture all the way, until finally dumping light, dry fluff on his beloved Rocky Mountain highs. \

Just give us a call. We will handle the entire situation.

Rosie Cusack, owner & broker rosie@rosiecusack.com | 970.728.0461

telluriderentals.net | tellurideluxury.co

220 East Colorado Avenue, Telluride, CO


34 • FEATURE

THE NEXT BIG THING TELLURIDE SESSIONS CAPTURES UP-AND-COMING MUSIC ACTS

back in London, so we were all just digging it. It’s rare that we actually get to enjoy our surroundings rather than the usual routine of travel, set up, play, go to a new town, and repeat. And we hold Telluride very dear to our hearts.” An experience with the English folk rock band Mumford & Sons inspired The Telluride Sessions. The band came to the Telluride Bluegrass Festival as an unknown quantity in 2011, and Schreckengost met the musicians while shooting pool at the New Sheridan Bar. He was already knocked out by their music, and bonded with the members of the band. A year later Mumford & Sons returned to Telluride, but this time as Grammy Award-winning stars. Schreckengost was hired by Rolling Stone magazine to scout locations for a photo shoot during the bluegrass festival. The crew decided to shoot at Alta Lakes. “The band played four songs while we photographed them,” Schreckengost recalls. “But the band was so big by then that the record label wouldn’t let us use the music. I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be great to shoot bands in places like Alta Lakes and be able to record the songs.’ And I also thought, ‘Man, I wish I had done this last year…before they were stars.’” A few seasons passed and Schreckengost’s own star had risen as well. His video work was starting to gain recognition on Vimeo and other social channels, and he had better equipment and superior microphones. He decided to duplicate the Mumford & Sons experience with other bands; and thus The

“It’s not a music video. We shoot live music performances. That spontaneity, the music itself, and the imagery are a powerful combination.”

O

By Geoff Hanson Photos by Telluride Sessions/Brett Schreckengost

ver the last 23 years, Brett Schreckengost has earned a reputation as one of the finest photographers/videographers in Telluride. He’s a master of light, exposure, and composition, but perhaps most importantly he has a unique skill for being in the right place at the right time. Schreckengost worked almost exclusively in still photography for his first 15 years in Telluride, but began shooting video in earnest in www.TellurideMagazine.com

2010. These days he says he shoots more video than film. And while skiers, sunsets, and the unique flow of everyday life in Telluride have been his primary subject matter, in the last few years he has turned his lens toward banjos, bass, and guitars. This year, he launched a web series entitled “The Telluride Sessions” in which he records musicians performing amid the natural splendor that is Telluride. “The idea behind The Telluride Sessions is to get artists away from the venue

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

or the festival and change their perspective a bit,” Schreckengost says. “Most artists don’t really get to experience Telluride. They get here, they are whisked from their hotel to the venue, they play, and they leave. The idea is to get them into the outdoors and explore the effect that the place has on the music. Does it inspire them a little bit more? We want to glean something special out of the musicians.” The effect is profound, according to James Dillard, lead guitarist of the

British rock band Brother and Bones. Schreckengost filmed the band performing acoustic (unplugged) while sitting on the roof of the New Sheridan Bar. “We loved the Telluride sessions,” Dillard said. “It was definitely the highlight of our last stateside trip. The view from the top of the bar up there is just insane. My feet were literally dangling off the roof. The mountains behind us looked like something on a green screen or an amazing painting. It’s the complete opposite of anything we’d ever see

Telluride Sessions were born. Since January, Schreckengost and his team have shot Elephant Revival, Birds of Chicago, Front Country (winner of the Telluride Bluegrass Festival Band Contest), Brother and Bones, Amy Helm and the Handsome Strangers, The Wood Brothers, and Headed for the Hills. And while you may not have heard of some of those bands, that is part of the strategy. The videos give the bands some exposure as they ascend to fame, and the bands and their existing fans give some exposure to Telluride and its thriving music scene. “The Mumford experience crystallized the fact that Telluride gets a lot of bands before they get big,” Schreckengost says. “All of these bands are incredibly talented and having these relationships can be really helpful, particularly when it comes to licensing songs for my own work.” The action sports camera company GoPro was so impressed by Schreckengost’s concept that they formed a partnership with him that provided him with an arsenal of twenty GoPro Cameras. Schreckengost put the cameras to work Memorial Day weekend when he shot the Telluride Brews and Blues Festival “Blues Train,” that traveled from Durango to Silverton with twelve blues bands performing on board. He also shot several acts at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, including Béla Fleck and the Colorado Symphony. When asked what makes the Telluride Sessions so special, Schreckengost said, “We work with a small crew and try and work quickly. I couldn’t do it without Barrett Miller (sound), Don Hannah (second camera) and Mark Steele (production assistant). It’s not a music video. We shoot live music performances. That spontaneity, the music itself, and the imagery are a powerful combination. The content is both good for the band and good for Telluride.” The Telluride Sessions can be seen on Schreckengost’s Vimeo page: vimeo.com/brettschreck. Make sure you have ample time because the music, the mountains, and the magic of Schreckengost’s work is an experience for the eyes and the ears. \ WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

35


34 • FEATURE

THE NEXT BIG THING TELLURIDE SESSIONS CAPTURES UP-AND-COMING MUSIC ACTS

back in London, so we were all just digging it. It’s rare that we actually get to enjoy our surroundings rather than the usual routine of travel, set up, play, go to a new town, and repeat. And we hold Telluride very dear to our hearts.” An experience with the English folk rock band Mumford & Sons inspired The Telluride Sessions. The band came to the Telluride Bluegrass Festival as an unknown quantity in 2011, and Schreckengost met the musicians while shooting pool at the New Sheridan Bar. He was already knocked out by their music, and bonded with the members of the band. A year later Mumford & Sons returned to Telluride, but this time as Grammy Award-winning stars. Schreckengost was hired by Rolling Stone magazine to scout locations for a photo shoot during the bluegrass festival. The crew decided to shoot at Alta Lakes. “The band played four songs while we photographed them,” Schreckengost recalls. “But the band was so big by then that the record label wouldn’t let us use the music. I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be great to shoot bands in places like Alta Lakes and be able to record the songs.’ And I also thought, ‘Man, I wish I had done this last year…before they were stars.’” A few seasons passed and Schreckengost’s own star had risen as well. His video work was starting to gain recognition on Vimeo and other social channels, and he had better equipment and superior microphones. He decided to duplicate the Mumford & Sons experience with other bands; and thus The

“It’s not a music video. We shoot live music performances. That spontaneity, the music itself, and the imagery are a powerful combination.”

O

By Geoff Hanson Photos by Telluride Sessions/Brett Schreckengost

ver the last 23 years, Brett Schreckengost has earned a reputation as one of the finest photographers/videographers in Telluride. He’s a master of light, exposure, and composition, but perhaps most importantly he has a unique skill for being in the right place at the right time. Schreckengost worked almost exclusively in still photography for his first 15 years in Telluride, but began shooting video in earnest in www.TellurideMagazine.com

2010. These days he says he shoots more video than film. And while skiers, sunsets, and the unique flow of everyday life in Telluride have been his primary subject matter, in the last few years he has turned his lens toward banjos, bass, and guitars. This year, he launched a web series entitled “The Telluride Sessions” in which he records musicians performing amid the natural splendor that is Telluride. “The idea behind The Telluride Sessions is to get artists away from the venue

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

or the festival and change their perspective a bit,” Schreckengost says. “Most artists don’t really get to experience Telluride. They get here, they are whisked from their hotel to the venue, they play, and they leave. The idea is to get them into the outdoors and explore the effect that the place has on the music. Does it inspire them a little bit more? We want to glean something special out of the musicians.” The effect is profound, according to James Dillard, lead guitarist of the

British rock band Brother and Bones. Schreckengost filmed the band performing acoustic (unplugged) while sitting on the roof of the New Sheridan Bar. “We loved the Telluride sessions,” Dillard said. “It was definitely the highlight of our last stateside trip. The view from the top of the bar up there is just insane. My feet were literally dangling off the roof. The mountains behind us looked like something on a green screen or an amazing painting. It’s the complete opposite of anything we’d ever see

Telluride Sessions were born. Since January, Schreckengost and his team have shot Elephant Revival, Birds of Chicago, Front Country (winner of the Telluride Bluegrass Festival Band Contest), Brother and Bones, Amy Helm and the Handsome Strangers, The Wood Brothers, and Headed for the Hills. And while you may not have heard of some of those bands, that is part of the strategy. The videos give the bands some exposure as they ascend to fame, and the bands and their existing fans give some exposure to Telluride and its thriving music scene. “The Mumford experience crystallized the fact that Telluride gets a lot of bands before they get big,” Schreckengost says. “All of these bands are incredibly talented and having these relationships can be really helpful, particularly when it comes to licensing songs for my own work.” The action sports camera company GoPro was so impressed by Schreckengost’s concept that they formed a partnership with him that provided him with an arsenal of twenty GoPro Cameras. Schreckengost put the cameras to work Memorial Day weekend when he shot the Telluride Brews and Blues Festival “Blues Train,” that traveled from Durango to Silverton with twelve blues bands performing on board. He also shot several acts at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, including Béla Fleck and the Colorado Symphony. When asked what makes the Telluride Sessions so special, Schreckengost said, “We work with a small crew and try and work quickly. I couldn’t do it without Barrett Miller (sound), Don Hannah (second camera) and Mark Steele (production assistant). It’s not a music video. We shoot live music performances. That spontaneity, the music itself, and the imagery are a powerful combination. The content is both good for the band and good for Telluride.” The Telluride Sessions can be seen on Schreckengost’s Vimeo page: vimeo.com/brettschreck. Make sure you have ample time because the music, the mountains, and the magic of Schreckengost’s work is an experience for the eyes and the ears. \ WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

35


36 • TELLURIDE FACES

TELLURIDE: MAKE MEMORIES NOT CONNECTIONS

The only line should be the one you carve down the slopes.

Encouraging you to use your OUTSIDE voice.

Photo credit: Telluride Ski Resort

PAX – the Personal Airline Exchange – combines the comfort and efficiency of private jet travel with the convenience of per-seat fares. You understand how difficult it is to get to Telluride. PAX solves your problem. Travelers from Denver, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York can now enjoy direct, non-stop private flights to Telluride.

1-866-754-8772 WWW.VACATIONTELLURIDE.COM

PAX lets you focus on your time in Telluride – not your travel arrangements.

Book a flight today: 1.877.230.8189

http://www.PAX.Aero

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

37


36 • TELLURIDE FACES

TELLURIDE: MAKE MEMORIES NOT CONNECTIONS

The only line should be the one you carve down the slopes.

Encouraging you to use your OUTSIDE voice.

Photo credit: Telluride Ski Resort

PAX – the Personal Airline Exchange – combines the comfort and efficiency of private jet travel with the convenience of per-seat fares. You understand how difficult it is to get to Telluride. PAX solves your problem. Travelers from Denver, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York can now enjoy direct, non-stop private flights to Telluride.

1-866-754-8772 WWW.VACATIONTELLURIDE.COM

PAX lets you focus on your time in Telluride – not your travel arrangements.

Book a flight today: 1.877.230.8189

http://www.PAX.Aero

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

37


38 • FEATURE

’ Sean O Neill MAKESFIRSTHISTORIC TELLURIDE ASCENT PARAPLEGIC ICE CLIMB OF BRIDAL VEIL FALLS

t was a clear February morning just past dawn. The dark walls of the canyon, bound in snow and ice, rose around Sean O’Neill like a frozen fortress, its summits untouched by the first light of day. He looked up and saw Bridal Veil Falls for the first time. “Oh my God, this is gigantic,” he said. And then it was go time. O’Neill and his driver boarded a snowmobile and began climbing the steep switchbacks that led to the route. Avalanches had buried the road in places, creating a steep double fall-line that threatened to topple the machine and pin O’Neill who, paralyzed from the waist down, would have been unable to jump to safety. As they ascended, the full length of the waterfall came into view: a hundred-foot ice cone, topped by almost 300 feet of steep pillars and overhanging chandeliers of ice. The low-angle ice cone that greeted him at the base of the route proved to be the crux of the climb. As soon as the rope was fixed, O’Neill attached a pulley and an ascender to the rope and began inching his way up the frozen waterfall. With his knees jutting out in front of him, O’Neill wrestled and rolled his lower half over and around the awkward, couch-sized lumps of cauliflower ice. “I was cursing and muttering my way up, dealing with all these wrestling matches,” O’Neill recalls. “And all of a sudden I thought, ‘I should make this more of a celebration.’” So he started singing to himself. One of the support crew below had a mic on O’Neill and was listening in on his progress. Over the radio waves came a familiar song. “It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood, a beautiful day for a neighbor, would you be mine? Could you be mine?”

I

www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

“The ice was as hard or harder than anything I’ve ever swung into, but it was pretty super duper to get the tools going and dance around on them in such a supreme location. It might be slow and it might look odd, but it’s exhilarating.” A paraplegic climber—a “sit-climber,” he calls himself—O’Neill had come to Telluride to make the first paraplegic ascent of Bridal Veil Falls. The tallest waterfall in the state, its 365 feet of swollen ice, steep pillars, and overhanging curtains were once considered the hardest ice climb in the world. Facilitated by a team of climbers, filmmakers, journalists, and assorted helpers, the climb became the subject of widespread media attention as well as a short film, Prevail, directed by O’Neill’s brother, renowned climber and former Tellurider Timmy O’Neill. Timmy called us from a press conference on the rim of the Grand Canyon overlooking Badger Creek Rapids, the day before launching a 21-day kayaking trip with blind athlete Erik Weihenmayer. “Prevail was born out of our work with Paradox Sports, and wanting to share the programming and mission of Paradox,” Timmy explains. Paradox Sports was founded when disabled Army officer DJ Skelton heard about the O’Neill brothers’ escapades—their climbing feats have drawn lots of media attention. Skelton contacted Timmy to see about doing programming for veterans, and a movement was born. Today, Paradox facilitates adventures on rock and ice, on the water and in the wilderness, for adventurers of various abilities—Paradox is located in Boulder, but its mission is similar to

pitch of Jam Crack, a Yosemite classic. “Sean is an adventurer,” says his brother Timmy. “He’s developing his own systems; he’s a real innovator. No one else is doing what he’s doing.” “Now Sean, he’s the one who teaches the other paraplegic folks how to ice climb,” says Marin. “It’s cool for me to see his progress. When I started working with him, he was the one who was learning; now he’s the person who’s teaching this thing.” As an ambassador for Paradox Sports and the poster child for adaptive extreme sports (the brothers were recently featured on the Katie Couric Show), O’Neill receives a steady stream of emails from other adaptive athletes, asking

in the rope,” Marin says. “‘This is weird,’ I said. ‘I know he’s not on the ground yet.’” They radioed down to O’Neill to find out what was wrong. “At first he wasn’t responding, and we started getting nervous,” Andres said. “Then he came back, ‘I’m in a hole. You need to raise me three feet—but don’t raise me too far or you’ll break my neck.’” With limited maneuverability, O’Neill had been lowered through a hole between the ice and the rock and would have to be hoisted back out. “Timmy got a little bit stressed at that point,” Marin laughed. “He said, ‘If we kill Sean, my mom is going to kill me!’”

for advice or technical information, or thanking him for the inspiration. Sidelined since the Mountainfilm Prevail premiere with a bad case of pressure sores, O’Neill is glad that other disabled people have taken up the torch. “These people become a part of your circle, and their victories are part of mine. It gets you beyond yourself and your own little pile of problems.” The ability to inspire others is almost a greater reward, he says. “For me to get my chance to climb is all well and good, but to have another paraplegic tell me that they want to do it, now that’s a real compliment.”

With a little guidance from the ground crew and from O’Neill himself, however, Marin re-rigged the line for hauling, carefully lifted O’Neill out of the hole, and proceeded to lower him the rest of the way to the ground. “It was kind of an epic descent, but everything turned out to be okay,” says Marin. They got O’Neill back to the car before dark, and the whole team made it back to town just in time for last call at Smuggler’s Brew Pub. What did they order? French fries. “At one point we were getting kind of cold and I said, ‘You know what sounds good right now? French fries!’” Marin says. “After that, we were talking about french fries all day long.” Sean O’Neill is not done dreaming. Up next: He wants to lead part of the Salathé Wall on El Cap, and perhaps solo a multi-pitch aid route on Cathedral Ledge in North Conway, New Hampshire. “It’s all about learning to get beyond yourself,” O’Neill says. “Once you have that humility to ask for help, it gets you through a lot of your troubles. Paradox Sports is the group that puts all these social interactions together. People have ideas of what they want to do but they think it’s impossible. But lo and behold, your wildest dreams can become possibilities.” \

ONE FATEFUL DAY

BY CHRISTINA CALLICOTT | PHOTOS BY KEVIN ZIECHMANN

YOU DON’T SEE THE BRIDE UNTIL THE WEDDING

O’Neill has also developed a special aid-climbing technique which, when outfitted with ice tools, allows him to ascend the ice itself, rather than doing pull-ups on a fixed rope. He was eager to try out the new technique on Bridal Veil. Watching the clock closely, his guides gave him a half hour to try it out. For him, the experience was the highlight of an already peak experience. “The ice was as hard or harder than anything I’ve ever swung into,” O’Neill said, “but it was pretty super duper to get the tools going and dance around on them in such a supreme location. It might be slow and it might look odd, but it’s exhilarating.” It is this exhilaration that bonds the two O’Neill brothers. “Sean’s perspective is so unique and so beautiful,” Timmy says. “I love connecting with him in a world that is really important for me, this world of intense risk management, where there is an immediacy in living and a deep immersion in the wilderness. Sharing that with him is phenomenal. I look for those unique experiences in life. Those experiences are the colors on your palate that you paint the pictures of your world with.”

that of the local organization Telluride Adaptive Sports. Paradox hosts over a dozen programs a year, and just completed a 165-page guide to adaptive rock climbing. “All this was born out of my brother’s disability,” Timmy says. “From great crisis can come great opportunity.” If Timmy O’Neill was the captain of the team for the Bridal Veil climb, then Ouray-based mountain guide Andres Marin was the quarterback. Marin and Sean O’Neill made their first acquaintance at the Ouray Ice Park during an annual ice-climbing event sponsored by Paradox Sports. “I was muttering under my breath and cursing at the ice quality,” O’Neill recalls. Marin came over to check on him. “Andres taught me that in ice climbing, every placement is a ‘maybe,’” O’Neill says. “He had this way of getting me laughing, and I laughed my way up the rest of the climb.” A few years later, when O’Neill was ready to push the envelope, Marin was his partner of choice. “I asked Andres to do some kind of backcountry climb with me. He said ‘Well, let’s do Bridal Veil Falls.’ I didn’t really know what that was, but I said, ‘Sure, that would be great.’” “I chose Bridal Veil because of the access, but also because of how steep it is,” Marin explains. “For a paraplegic climber, the steeper the better, basically.” The conditions for the climb were perfect: decent weather, good ice, and an all-around beautiful formation. “This year the upper pitches had this clear blue ice, like glass, and you could see the water running behind it. It was really cool.” With his regular climbing partner Leon Hiro Davis belaying him, Marin led the pitches and fixed the ropes with which O’Neill ascended most of the route. O’Neill had devised a special ascender-pulley system with a 3:1 mechanical advantage for climbing the ice cone on the first pitch. It worked so well, he used it for the whole climb. “It ended up being the ticket,” O’Neill said.

“Once I was walking barefoot toward a bridge and a bee stung me on the foot. I had cleatless bicycle shoes in my hand figuring they’d be good to have on my feet in case I had to run from the police when I got out of the water.” from “Wheelchair,” by Sean O’Neill, hiddensomewhere.blogspot.com In 1991 Sean O’Neill, 25 and a former student at the National Ornamental Metal Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, walked out onto a bridge over the Mississippi River, climbed over the rail, and jumped. He knew as soon as he hit the water that he’d made a big mistake. “When I came up for air, my legs were all pins and needles,” he recounts. A nearby boat saw him bobbing in the water and threw him a life preserver. He made his way to a barge moored at the edge of the river. From there, a Coast Guard ambulance ferried him upriver to the Port of Memphis, and he was rushed to the hospital. “They told me in rehab that I was statistically old for that kind of injury,” he says. “That’s a nice way of saying you’re a dumbass.” The 100-foot fall may have broken Sean’s back, but clearly not his spirit. Together he and Timmy have climbed Castleton Tower in Utah, Devil’s Tower in Wyoming, and Yosemite’s El Capitan—three times. Their next stop was the Ruth Gorge in Alaska, where they filmed Brothers Wild with National Geographic. Then, they made it six pitches up the Regular Northwest Face of Half Dome before turning around. “It was excellent for us to fail finally,” says Timmy. In 2013, Sean made a huge leap forward in paraplegic rock climbing when he led the second

TOPPING OUT AND DESCENDING

“It ain’t over’til it’s over” —Yogi Berra Having cleared one last crux near the top, O’Neill pulled himself over the final bulge and lay on his back in the snow to rest while the rest of the party cheered. After a short celebration, it was time to descend. It had been a long day, everyone was cold and tired, and sunset was close on their heels. They decided to lower O’Neill to the bottom. They tied two 70-meter ropes together, O’Neill tied into the end, and Marin started lowering him. “Everything was going good, we passed the knot, and all of a sudden I feel slack

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

39


38 • FEATURE

’ Sean O Neill MAKESFIRSTHISTORIC TELLURIDE ASCENT PARAPLEGIC ICE CLIMB OF BRIDAL VEIL FALLS

t was a clear February morning just past dawn. The dark walls of the canyon, bound in snow and ice, rose around Sean O’Neill like a frozen fortress, its summits untouched by the first light of day. He looked up and saw Bridal Veil Falls for the first time. “Oh my God, this is gigantic,” he said. And then it was go time. O’Neill and his driver boarded a snowmobile and began climbing the steep switchbacks that led to the route. Avalanches had buried the road in places, creating a steep double fall-line that threatened to topple the machine and pin O’Neill who, paralyzed from the waist down, would have been unable to jump to safety. As they ascended, the full length of the waterfall came into view: a hundred-foot ice cone, topped by almost 300 feet of steep pillars and overhanging chandeliers of ice. The low-angle ice cone that greeted him at the base of the route proved to be the crux of the climb. As soon as the rope was fixed, O’Neill attached a pulley and an ascender to the rope and began inching his way up the frozen waterfall. With his knees jutting out in front of him, O’Neill wrestled and rolled his lower half over and around the awkward, couch-sized lumps of cauliflower ice. “I was cursing and muttering my way up, dealing with all these wrestling matches,” O’Neill recalls. “And all of a sudden I thought, ‘I should make this more of a celebration.’” So he started singing to himself. One of the support crew below had a mic on O’Neill and was listening in on his progress. Over the radio waves came a familiar song. “It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood, a beautiful day for a neighbor, would you be mine? Could you be mine?”

I

www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

“The ice was as hard or harder than anything I’ve ever swung into, but it was pretty super duper to get the tools going and dance around on them in such a supreme location. It might be slow and it might look odd, but it’s exhilarating.” A paraplegic climber—a “sit-climber,” he calls himself—O’Neill had come to Telluride to make the first paraplegic ascent of Bridal Veil Falls. The tallest waterfall in the state, its 365 feet of swollen ice, steep pillars, and overhanging curtains were once considered the hardest ice climb in the world. Facilitated by a team of climbers, filmmakers, journalists, and assorted helpers, the climb became the subject of widespread media attention as well as a short film, Prevail, directed by O’Neill’s brother, renowned climber and former Tellurider Timmy O’Neill. Timmy called us from a press conference on the rim of the Grand Canyon overlooking Badger Creek Rapids, the day before launching a 21-day kayaking trip with blind athlete Erik Weihenmayer. “Prevail was born out of our work with Paradox Sports, and wanting to share the programming and mission of Paradox,” Timmy explains. Paradox Sports was founded when disabled Army officer DJ Skelton heard about the O’Neill brothers’ escapades—their climbing feats have drawn lots of media attention. Skelton contacted Timmy to see about doing programming for veterans, and a movement was born. Today, Paradox facilitates adventures on rock and ice, on the water and in the wilderness, for adventurers of various abilities—Paradox is located in Boulder, but its mission is similar to

pitch of Jam Crack, a Yosemite classic. “Sean is an adventurer,” says his brother Timmy. “He’s developing his own systems; he’s a real innovator. No one else is doing what he’s doing.” “Now Sean, he’s the one who teaches the other paraplegic folks how to ice climb,” says Marin. “It’s cool for me to see his progress. When I started working with him, he was the one who was learning; now he’s the person who’s teaching this thing.” As an ambassador for Paradox Sports and the poster child for adaptive extreme sports (the brothers were recently featured on the Katie Couric Show), O’Neill receives a steady stream of emails from other adaptive athletes, asking

in the rope,” Marin says. “‘This is weird,’ I said. ‘I know he’s not on the ground yet.’” They radioed down to O’Neill to find out what was wrong. “At first he wasn’t responding, and we started getting nervous,” Andres said. “Then he came back, ‘I’m in a hole. You need to raise me three feet—but don’t raise me too far or you’ll break my neck.’” With limited maneuverability, O’Neill had been lowered through a hole between the ice and the rock and would have to be hoisted back out. “Timmy got a little bit stressed at that point,” Marin laughed. “He said, ‘If we kill Sean, my mom is going to kill me!’”

for advice or technical information, or thanking him for the inspiration. Sidelined since the Mountainfilm Prevail premiere with a bad case of pressure sores, O’Neill is glad that other disabled people have taken up the torch. “These people become a part of your circle, and their victories are part of mine. It gets you beyond yourself and your own little pile of problems.” The ability to inspire others is almost a greater reward, he says. “For me to get my chance to climb is all well and good, but to have another paraplegic tell me that they want to do it, now that’s a real compliment.”

With a little guidance from the ground crew and from O’Neill himself, however, Marin re-rigged the line for hauling, carefully lifted O’Neill out of the hole, and proceeded to lower him the rest of the way to the ground. “It was kind of an epic descent, but everything turned out to be okay,” says Marin. They got O’Neill back to the car before dark, and the whole team made it back to town just in time for last call at Smuggler’s Brew Pub. What did they order? French fries. “At one point we were getting kind of cold and I said, ‘You know what sounds good right now? French fries!’” Marin says. “After that, we were talking about french fries all day long.” Sean O’Neill is not done dreaming. Up next: He wants to lead part of the Salathé Wall on El Cap, and perhaps solo a multi-pitch aid route on Cathedral Ledge in North Conway, New Hampshire. “It’s all about learning to get beyond yourself,” O’Neill says. “Once you have that humility to ask for help, it gets you through a lot of your troubles. Paradox Sports is the group that puts all these social interactions together. People have ideas of what they want to do but they think it’s impossible. But lo and behold, your wildest dreams can become possibilities.” \

ONE FATEFUL DAY

BY CHRISTINA CALLICOTT | PHOTOS BY KEVIN ZIECHMANN

YOU DON’T SEE THE BRIDE UNTIL THE WEDDING

O’Neill has also developed a special aid-climbing technique which, when outfitted with ice tools, allows him to ascend the ice itself, rather than doing pull-ups on a fixed rope. He was eager to try out the new technique on Bridal Veil. Watching the clock closely, his guides gave him a half hour to try it out. For him, the experience was the highlight of an already peak experience. “The ice was as hard or harder than anything I’ve ever swung into,” O’Neill said, “but it was pretty super duper to get the tools going and dance around on them in such a supreme location. It might be slow and it might look odd, but it’s exhilarating.” It is this exhilaration that bonds the two O’Neill brothers. “Sean’s perspective is so unique and so beautiful,” Timmy says. “I love connecting with him in a world that is really important for me, this world of intense risk management, where there is an immediacy in living and a deep immersion in the wilderness. Sharing that with him is phenomenal. I look for those unique experiences in life. Those experiences are the colors on your palate that you paint the pictures of your world with.”

that of the local organization Telluride Adaptive Sports. Paradox hosts over a dozen programs a year, and just completed a 165-page guide to adaptive rock climbing. “All this was born out of my brother’s disability,” Timmy says. “From great crisis can come great opportunity.” If Timmy O’Neill was the captain of the team for the Bridal Veil climb, then Ouray-based mountain guide Andres Marin was the quarterback. Marin and Sean O’Neill made their first acquaintance at the Ouray Ice Park during an annual ice-climbing event sponsored by Paradox Sports. “I was muttering under my breath and cursing at the ice quality,” O’Neill recalls. Marin came over to check on him. “Andres taught me that in ice climbing, every placement is a ‘maybe,’” O’Neill says. “He had this way of getting me laughing, and I laughed my way up the rest of the climb.” A few years later, when O’Neill was ready to push the envelope, Marin was his partner of choice. “I asked Andres to do some kind of backcountry climb with me. He said ‘Well, let’s do Bridal Veil Falls.’ I didn’t really know what that was, but I said, ‘Sure, that would be great.’” “I chose Bridal Veil because of the access, but also because of how steep it is,” Marin explains. “For a paraplegic climber, the steeper the better, basically.” The conditions for the climb were perfect: decent weather, good ice, and an all-around beautiful formation. “This year the upper pitches had this clear blue ice, like glass, and you could see the water running behind it. It was really cool.” With his regular climbing partner Leon Hiro Davis belaying him, Marin led the pitches and fixed the ropes with which O’Neill ascended most of the route. O’Neill had devised a special ascender-pulley system with a 3:1 mechanical advantage for climbing the ice cone on the first pitch. It worked so well, he used it for the whole climb. “It ended up being the ticket,” O’Neill said.

“Once I was walking barefoot toward a bridge and a bee stung me on the foot. I had cleatless bicycle shoes in my hand figuring they’d be good to have on my feet in case I had to run from the police when I got out of the water.” from “Wheelchair,” by Sean O’Neill, hiddensomewhere.blogspot.com In 1991 Sean O’Neill, 25 and a former student at the National Ornamental Metal Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, walked out onto a bridge over the Mississippi River, climbed over the rail, and jumped. He knew as soon as he hit the water that he’d made a big mistake. “When I came up for air, my legs were all pins and needles,” he recounts. A nearby boat saw him bobbing in the water and threw him a life preserver. He made his way to a barge moored at the edge of the river. From there, a Coast Guard ambulance ferried him upriver to the Port of Memphis, and he was rushed to the hospital. “They told me in rehab that I was statistically old for that kind of injury,” he says. “That’s a nice way of saying you’re a dumbass.” The 100-foot fall may have broken Sean’s back, but clearly not his spirit. Together he and Timmy have climbed Castleton Tower in Utah, Devil’s Tower in Wyoming, and Yosemite’s El Capitan—three times. Their next stop was the Ruth Gorge in Alaska, where they filmed Brothers Wild with National Geographic. Then, they made it six pitches up the Regular Northwest Face of Half Dome before turning around. “It was excellent for us to fail finally,” says Timmy. In 2013, Sean made a huge leap forward in paraplegic rock climbing when he led the second

TOPPING OUT AND DESCENDING

“It ain’t over’til it’s over” —Yogi Berra Having cleared one last crux near the top, O’Neill pulled himself over the final bulge and lay on his back in the snow to rest while the rest of the party cheered. After a short celebration, it was time to descend. It had been a long day, everyone was cold and tired, and sunset was close on their heels. They decided to lower O’Neill to the bottom. They tied two 70-meter ropes together, O’Neill tied into the end, and Marin started lowering him. “Everything was going good, we passed the knot, and all of a sudden I feel slack

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

39


40 • FEATURE

Picaya

many cultures...one source

Step into Picaya’s diverse world of international, Fair Trade, eco-friendly, and local treasures. Explore our furniture, home décor, textiles, jewelry and beads.

NEW LOCATION

Picaya is the ideal environment to furnish any home or find the perfect gift for every occasion.

Sweet Deals

in

101 W. Colorado Ave • Telluride • 970.728.0954 • picaya.com

Telluride

T

www.TellurideMagazine.com

audience. If you want to post about something relevant to the Telluride region, this is the place to do it. It’s part cyber-kiosk, part community forum, and it’s become a sensation in the region in the past year or so.

The Scene

Telluride Sweet Deals is a member-only page on Facebook, so you might feel pretty cool when you become a member. Only the membership gauntlet is about as simple as joining Facebook: you ask to join, and someone makes you a member. And it’s free, for you and for your 6,400-plus new “friends.”

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

And for the record, that’s about three times as many people as the number of people who live in Telluride—so take that, Zuckerberg. For this members-only club, there are a few rules. Give a price and location for anything you’re trying to sell, make a photo album on a single post if you’re selling multiple items, and there’s no selling dogs or cats (but you can put them up for adoption). But the most important rule? The old “golden rule” you should have learned in kindergarten—be nice to each other. Even though the page has also become sort of a de facto sounding board for

local discussion, if your comments are too vitriolic, you should probably join the spin-off page, Telluride Sweet Rants and Bitching, Yes, it is really a thing. And if the Internet world finally comes up with a sarcastic font, this is probably where it will take root.

The Lingo

Now that you’re a member, you’d better learn the lingo. It’s pretty basic, and it borrows heavily from its real-world counterpart, classified newspaper ads. But if you’re a millennial or one of the very wealthy people in Telluride who have never had to peruse the classifieds looking for someone else’s junk or a new job, here are a few of the terms: ISO: In Search Of. As in you don’t have it, but you want it. And you’re hoping that the Facebook Fairy is going to magically grant your request. More on this magic later.

“Facebook Car” by Nopple. Licensed under Creative Commons Zero, Public Domain Dedication via Wikimedia Commons.

By Deb Dion

“The site seems to have an almost supernatural intuition. If you wish hard enough for something, it’s like you can manifest it on the page.”

333WEST COLORADO AVE.UNIT 2 (970)728-9592 TELLURIDEMUSIC.COM

Front Range to Telluride

A Network for the New Age

he whole world changed the day Mark Zuckerberg and his friends launched Facebook from his dorm room at Harvard. A decade later, the site has more than a billion users— that’s one out of every seven people who live on this earth. Facebook revolutionized social media, and it also changed the way we relate to each other. If you have Facebook friends, or a profile, or a page, then you understand what a powerful tool for communication it is. In a small place like Telluride, you might not think Facebook would be of much use. Unless, of course, you are a member of Telluride Sweet Deals. Telluride Sweet Deals is a microcosm within the Facebook world. It’s an online trading site where you can sell an old couch, pick up some used gear, find a new roommate, catch a ride somewhere, or otherwise connect with a local

NEW, USED & VINTAGE STRINGED INSTRUMENTS C.F. MARTIN, COLLINGS, GODIN, BOSS & ROLAND PRODUCTS MUSIC BOOKS, INSTRUCTION MATERIAL & ACCESSORIES MUSIC CDS & DVDS LESSONS & STRINGED INSTRUMENT REPAIR

in 45 Minutes

THE FASTER, MORE AFFORDABLE CHARTER

Time is precious, spend it wisely.

Charter your flight today! • 800.610.2940 • eclipseprivatejet.com WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

41


40 • FEATURE

Picaya

many cultures...one source

Step into Picaya’s diverse world of international, Fair Trade, eco-friendly, and local treasures. Explore our furniture, home décor, textiles, jewelry and beads.

NEW LOCATION

Picaya is the ideal environment to furnish any home or find the perfect gift for every occasion.

Sweet Deals

in

101 W. Colorado Ave • Telluride • 970.728.0954 • picaya.com

Telluride

T

www.TellurideMagazine.com

audience. If you want to post about something relevant to the Telluride region, this is the place to do it. It’s part cyber-kiosk, part community forum, and it’s become a sensation in the region in the past year or so.

The Scene

Telluride Sweet Deals is a member-only page on Facebook, so you might feel pretty cool when you become a member. Only the membership gauntlet is about as simple as joining Facebook: you ask to join, and someone makes you a member. And it’s free, for you and for your 6,400-plus new “friends.”

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

And for the record, that’s about three times as many people as the number of people who live in Telluride—so take that, Zuckerberg. For this members-only club, there are a few rules. Give a price and location for anything you’re trying to sell, make a photo album on a single post if you’re selling multiple items, and there’s no selling dogs or cats (but you can put them up for adoption). But the most important rule? The old “golden rule” you should have learned in kindergarten—be nice to each other. Even though the page has also become sort of a de facto sounding board for

local discussion, if your comments are too vitriolic, you should probably join the spin-off page, Telluride Sweet Rants and Bitching, Yes, it is really a thing. And if the Internet world finally comes up with a sarcastic font, this is probably where it will take root.

The Lingo

Now that you’re a member, you’d better learn the lingo. It’s pretty basic, and it borrows heavily from its real-world counterpart, classified newspaper ads. But if you’re a millennial or one of the very wealthy people in Telluride who have never had to peruse the classifieds looking for someone else’s junk or a new job, here are a few of the terms: ISO: In Search Of. As in you don’t have it, but you want it. And you’re hoping that the Facebook Fairy is going to magically grant your request. More on this magic later.

“Facebook Car” by Nopple. Licensed under Creative Commons Zero, Public Domain Dedication via Wikimedia Commons.

By Deb Dion

“The site seems to have an almost supernatural intuition. If you wish hard enough for something, it’s like you can manifest it on the page.”

333WEST COLORADO AVE.UNIT 2 (970)728-9592 TELLURIDEMUSIC.COM

Front Range to Telluride

A Network for the New Age

he whole world changed the day Mark Zuckerberg and his friends launched Facebook from his dorm room at Harvard. A decade later, the site has more than a billion users— that’s one out of every seven people who live on this earth. Facebook revolutionized social media, and it also changed the way we relate to each other. If you have Facebook friends, or a profile, or a page, then you understand what a powerful tool for communication it is. In a small place like Telluride, you might not think Facebook would be of much use. Unless, of course, you are a member of Telluride Sweet Deals. Telluride Sweet Deals is a microcosm within the Facebook world. It’s an online trading site where you can sell an old couch, pick up some used gear, find a new roommate, catch a ride somewhere, or otherwise connect with a local

NEW, USED & VINTAGE STRINGED INSTRUMENTS C.F. MARTIN, COLLINGS, GODIN, BOSS & ROLAND PRODUCTS MUSIC BOOKS, INSTRUCTION MATERIAL & ACCESSORIES MUSIC CDS & DVDS LESSONS & STRINGED INSTRUMENT REPAIR

in 45 Minutes

THE FASTER, MORE AFFORDABLE CHARTER

Time is precious, spend it wisely.

Charter your flight today! • 800.610.2940 • eclipseprivatejet.com WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

41


42 • FEATURE Sweet Deals in Telluride

OBO: Or Best Offer. Which means you’d like to get X amount of money for it, but hey, this is real life. Or the cyber version of real life. And you’d like to get at least some amount of money for it. Bump: Nobody has bought what you’re selling. Either the responses never panned out, or your timing was off and nobody bit, but either way, you’ve got to get rid of this. Now. So typing “bump”

If your comments are too vitriolic, you should probably join the spin-off page, Telluride Sweet Rants and Bitching, Yes, it is really a thing. And if the Internet world finally comes up with a sarcastic font, this is probablywhere it will take root. is the signal that moves your post back up to the top of the page. Like: This works the same on Facebook—it’s just a thumbs-up for a post that resonates with you. But it can niggle some members: If you like it, why don’t you just buy it? What do you mean by “like?” However, as the page evolves into a place where people like to wax poetic about Telluride-related topics, the “like” button can come in handy. The woman who was ISO a worthwhile man who wasn’t obsessed with sports or partying got a lot of “likes.” Tagging someone else: This perplexes some people at first, but it’s actually a handy tool. When someone sees a post that they know their friend would like to see, they tag that friend. (Tagging is just typing their name in the comments, so that the name comes up highlighted in bold blue.) That ensures www.TellurideMagazine.com

that the friend gets alerted to the post on his/her own Facebook feed. PM: This has nothing to do with the evening hours; it stands for “personal message,” as in you’d rather have someone communicate directly and privately with you rather than just typing in the comments below your post. LOL, LMAO, LMBO: These all hail from the digital age of texting and Internet. “Laugh Out Loud, Laugh My Ass Off, Laugh My Butt Off.” Not likely that anyone has ever seen anything so funny that they actually lost their posterior end, but this is just hyperbole for finding something humorous.

The Magic

Telluride Sweet Deals has its own sort of magic. There used to be a similar phenomenon with Telluride’s Free Box—you would be looking for some particular or obscure item, and presto! It would show up in the Free Box. The mantras were “the Free Box provides,” or “ask and you shall receive,” and the booty was known as a “Free Box score.” This kismet was the topic of a Free Box book and even an article in the Smithsonian Magazine. But Telluride Sweet Deals is like the Free Box 2.0, the same magic in a new millennium. Now you don’t even have to cruise by the Free Box and rummage through to find something you need or like. Sweet Deals has it all neatly arranged for you on a page, with a search tool. And you can do your “shopping” online, from the comfort of your own home. Sweet Deals didn’t set out with grand intentions. It was a page started by a local, Andrea Pfefer Solow, who was trying to get rid of the detritus as she moved to a new home. She invited 80 of her friends to check out the items, and it snowballed from there. Today she is the lone, unpaid administrator of the site. She never imagined it would evolve into what it is now, or that she

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

would become the volunteer superintendent of such an unwieldy URL. Today, the site seems to have an almost supernatural intuition. If you wish hard enough for something, it’s like you can manifest it on the page. I have witnessed someone lamenting that all of his motocross gear was stolen, and boom, seconds later on the page was someone who was offering a sweet deal on a used motocross setup. There was a woman who was desperate to find a green, linen dress suit for a costume to wear that night. Not something most people have hanging around in their closet, right? Minutes later she got a positive response. A green, linen dress suit. The right size. For free. It was also amazing to see the dozens of responses to the post asking about borrowing or buying a tutu—every color, every style appeared almost immediately below the ISO post. (I think everyone in Telluride has a tutu and a wig in their closet. I suppose that is part of the peculiar charm of this town and its passion for playing dress-up.) I’ve been the recipient of said magic. Before I even knew that my

daughter had lost her backpack, an anonymous Sweet Deals angel posted the picture of the pack and its location on the site. A friend recognized it and tagged me, and we retrieved the pack minutes later. This type of communication has likewise reunited so many people with lost bikes, skis, jewelry, pets, jackets. It has connected people who might never have otherwise met, as they trade kids’ clothes and toys, old couches, used mattresses. Sweet Deals has also been the savior of lost souls trying to navigate the challenge of finding a place to rent for the winter, making roommates of people who were strangers and matching renters with homes. In this cold, digital world of cyber-communication, Telluride Sweet Deals is a warm and fuzzy spot. A lot of people eschew Facebook and other social media because they feel like it’s too impersonal, and that it has replaced real human contact. But Sweet Deals has done the opposite—it is a network of the new age, a virtual congregation of the widespread community of people who care about Telluride, and it brings people together in a way that no one could have foreseen before the digital age. And that is the sweetest part of the deal. \


42 • FEATURE Sweet Deals in Telluride

OBO: Or Best Offer. Which means you’d like to get X amount of money for it, but hey, this is real life. Or the cyber version of real life. And you’d like to get at least some amount of money for it. Bump: Nobody has bought what you’re selling. Either the responses never panned out, or your timing was off and nobody bit, but either way, you’ve got to get rid of this. Now. So typing “bump”

If your comments are too vitriolic, you should probably join the spin-off page, Telluride Sweet Rants and Bitching, Yes, it is really a thing. And if the Internet world finally comes up with a sarcastic font, this is probablywhere it will take root. is the signal that moves your post back up to the top of the page. Like: This works the same on Facebook—it’s just a thumbs-up for a post that resonates with you. But it can niggle some members: If you like it, why don’t you just buy it? What do you mean by “like?” However, as the page evolves into a place where people like to wax poetic about Telluride-related topics, the “like” button can come in handy. The woman who was ISO a worthwhile man who wasn’t obsessed with sports or partying got a lot of “likes.” Tagging someone else: This perplexes some people at first, but it’s actually a handy tool. When someone sees a post that they know their friend would like to see, they tag that friend. (Tagging is just typing their name in the comments, so that the name comes up highlighted in bold blue.) That ensures www.TellurideMagazine.com

that the friend gets alerted to the post on his/her own Facebook feed. PM: This has nothing to do with the evening hours; it stands for “personal message,” as in you’d rather have someone communicate directly and privately with you rather than just typing in the comments below your post. LOL, LMAO, LMBO: These all hail from the digital age of texting and Internet. “Laugh Out Loud, Laugh My Ass Off, Laugh My Butt Off.” Not likely that anyone has ever seen anything so funny that they actually lost their posterior end, but this is just hyperbole for finding something humorous.

The Magic

Telluride Sweet Deals has its own sort of magic. There used to be a similar phenomenon with Telluride’s Free Box—you would be looking for some particular or obscure item, and presto! It would show up in the Free Box. The mantras were “the Free Box provides,” or “ask and you shall receive,” and the booty was known as a “Free Box score.” This kismet was the topic of a Free Box book and even an article in the Smithsonian Magazine. But Telluride Sweet Deals is like the Free Box 2.0, the same magic in a new millennium. Now you don’t even have to cruise by the Free Box and rummage through to find something you need or like. Sweet Deals has it all neatly arranged for you on a page, with a search tool. And you can do your “shopping” online, from the comfort of your own home. Sweet Deals didn’t set out with grand intentions. It was a page started by a local, Andrea Pfefer Solow, who was trying to get rid of the detritus as she moved to a new home. She invited 80 of her friends to check out the items, and it snowballed from there. Today she is the lone, unpaid administrator of the site. She never imagined it would evolve into what it is now, or that she

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

would become the volunteer superintendent of such an unwieldy URL. Today, the site seems to have an almost supernatural intuition. If you wish hard enough for something, it’s like you can manifest it on the page. I have witnessed someone lamenting that all of his motocross gear was stolen, and boom, seconds later on the page was someone who was offering a sweet deal on a used motocross setup. There was a woman who was desperate to find a green, linen dress suit for a costume to wear that night. Not something most people have hanging around in their closet, right? Minutes later she got a positive response. A green, linen dress suit. The right size. For free. It was also amazing to see the dozens of responses to the post asking about borrowing or buying a tutu—every color, every style appeared almost immediately below the ISO post. (I think everyone in Telluride has a tutu and a wig in their closet. I suppose that is part of the peculiar charm of this town and its passion for playing dress-up.) I’ve been the recipient of said magic. Before I even knew that my

daughter had lost her backpack, an anonymous Sweet Deals angel posted the picture of the pack and its location on the site. A friend recognized it and tagged me, and we retrieved the pack minutes later. This type of communication has likewise reunited so many people with lost bikes, skis, jewelry, pets, jackets. It has connected people who might never have otherwise met, as they trade kids’ clothes and toys, old couches, used mattresses. Sweet Deals has also been the savior of lost souls trying to navigate the challenge of finding a place to rent for the winter, making roommates of people who were strangers and matching renters with homes. In this cold, digital world of cyber-communication, Telluride Sweet Deals is a warm and fuzzy spot. A lot of people eschew Facebook and other social media because they feel like it’s too impersonal, and that it has replaced real human contact. But Sweet Deals has done the opposite—it is a network of the new age, a virtual congregation of the widespread community of people who care about Telluride, and it brings people together in a way that no one could have foreseen before the digital age. And that is the sweetest part of the deal. \


44 • HISTORY

mightier than the sword The War of the Words That Accompanied Telluride’s Mining Labor Battles By Paul O’Rourke

Charles G. Sumner, as his photo appeared in the San Miguel Examiner on July 11, 1903, his last official day at the newspaper.

C

harles Sumner tried to keep his mind free of anger and his feet warm. He rubbed clear a small circle on the frosted pane of the railroad passenger car and gazed out absently as darkness slowly gave way to a cold December morning, two days before Christmas, in 1903. He’d spent the previous night in the Telluride jail, insufficient accommodations for the nearly two-dozen men who’d been rounded up earlier that day and www.TellurideMagazine.com

charged with the curious crime of intimidating non-union miners at a local mine. Sumner couldn’t recall any such interference but suspected his arrest had more to do with his being the managing editor of the district’s union-owned newspaper. And now he and ten other men, under armed guard, were being taken to jail in Montrose. What would happen to him was unclear, but what was abundantly apparent was that union men and those who supported the West-

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

ern Federation of Miners were being literally thrown out of Telluride and told to never return. Sumner shook his head in disbelief and wondered how in the world it had come to this. Sumner seemed destined to a life in journalism. He began at sixteen, as a printer’s apprentice, mixing ink and fetching type at his hometown paper, the Grand Junction News. At 21 and recently married, Charles was hired on as editor at the Ophir Mail, and then teamed up with Charles A.

Woodmansee, owner of the Sawpit Hummer, when the two acquired the San Miguel Democrat in Telluride on July 20, 1897. By August they’d changed the name of the paper to the San Miguel Examiner and set up shop for their weekly publication at 236 West Colorado Avenue, one door east of the other, more established newspaper in town, The Daily Journal. The Daily Journal was owned by a man who many in Telluride called “Dad.” Charles F. Painter was a pioneer—the town’s first mayor and the county’s first clerk—a prominent businessman, and it could be said Dad Painter believed, as many did, that Telluride was his town. The paper’s editor, Francis E. Curry, had first published The Journal in San Miguel with his brother John in July 1881, and then, after bringing the paper to nearby Telluride, sold the business to Painter in 1884. After washing his ink-stained hands of the business for a few years, Curry returned to Telluride as editor of The Journal at just about the same time the San Miguel Examiner began publication in the summer of 1897. The turn of the century was a fine time to be in the newspaper business; Telluride was prospering like at no other time in its brief history, and there seemed to be more than enough printing work and good news to keep both The Journal and the Examiner busy. But then, not everything is as it seems. Telluride’s “official” population had jumped to 2,446 in 1900, up from just 766 in 1890. A good percentage of the newcomers were miners, most of whom were recently arrived immigrants: Italians, Austrians, Swedes, Finns, and Swede-Finns. They’d come because they knew they’d find work, work made available due to the rapid expansion at the district’s mining properties. Not all in Telluride were pleased with the rapid influx of laboring men, but, as most agreed, new residents were new customers, and business was business, after all. But there were some rumblings among the workingmen and in the local press about how some of that

The Governor Peabody “law and order” medal presented to national guardsmen and citizens’ alliance members for their dubious role in quelling strike disturbances in Cripple Creek, Trinidad, and Telluride. The medal was a conspicuous adornment on Bulkeley Wells’ lapel for many years.

business—especially at the mines— was being conducted. For Curry and The Journal, mine owners had every right to run their businesses any way they saw fit. Sumner and his new publisher, Charles L. Fluke (who’d acquired Woodmansee’s stake on July 18, 1900), stated unequivocally, “Labor rights must be maintained.” By spring 1901, what had com-

menced as benign editorial sparring began to resemble something decidedly more belligerent. The Western Federation of Miners (WFM) Local No. 63 called a strike against Telluride’s Smuggler-Union Company on May 1, 1901, demanding a guaranteed $3 per 8-hour day for its miners. Arthur Collins, manager at the Smuggler-Union, refused to negotiate with the miners’ union. Until, that is, a bloody confrontation on July 3 between strikers and company-hired “scabs” forced him to capitulate. Telluride’s union men celebrated their apparent triumph. While peace was restored and work resumed at the mine, the bitter polemics engendered during the two-month long strike continued to find expression in Telluride’s two newspapers. When miners union President, Vincent St. John, ran for county sheriff on the Democratic Party ticket that fall, The Journal and Curry proclaimed, “…there is a very large element of the more conservative and substantial citizens who contemplate his (St. John’s) possible election with serious apprehension… and that should he be elected to the chief office in the county it will seriously hinder the prosperity and development of the community.” St. John lost his bid to become county sheriff by a very small margin, and while he’d been roundly deprecated personally in The Journal, that paper’s harangues against the miners union backfired. On January 1, 1902,

St. John—and the local WFM executive committee—decided to fight back, requesting that all friends of organized labor “withdraw patronage” from Curry’s newspaper. The boycott appeared to shock Francis Curry; he denied, at least initially, ever antagonizing the cause of organized labor, and even tried to invoke Charles Painter’s civic status as he scrambled to sway opinion in The Journal’s favor, “He has given the best years of his life to the development of Telluride and San Miguel County. Compare the record with that of those who seek to ruin his business.” By “those” Curry meant not only St. John and the WFM but also the Examiner. Sumner responded on January 4, “the fault (for the boycott) lies entirely with our neighbor. Those who have been steady readers of The Journal are aware of the fact that from time to time it has covertly and openly criticized labor unions and the Telluride Union in particular.” Curry and Painter and a crew of their allies in commercial circles—the newly formed Telluride Businessmen’s Association (TBA)—stepped up their accusations against Sumner and the WFM during the spring of 1902 and went so far as to call a boycott of their own against the Examiner. Sumner, once measured in his responses to his next door neighbor’s slurs, began to lose his patience: “Suffice it to say that the parties who have given the reports circulation are

known to us, and a conservative estimate of the diminutive mental caliber of the small tribe of gossip experts is so far below a conservative figure that we cannot find justification in laying any accusations at the door of our neighbor.” Of Sumner and the Examiner—the “boycotter’s organ”— Curry fired back, “These people do not want peace and prosperity. They thrive best on turmoil and unrest.” As if turmoil and unrest weren’t in sufficient supply, on the night of November 19, 1902, a shotgun blast tore through a parlor window at his residence in Pandora and took Arthur Collins’ life. The mine manager’s stance against the WFM during the 1901 strike was well documented; the motive for murder—some called it an assassination—was as plain as day, many believed in their rush to judgment. Both newspapers and their editors condemned the killing and stopped short of laying blame, at first. But as days turned to weeks, then months without an arrest, suspicion and animosity were leveled at the union. In January 1903, a county grand jury handed down 22 indictments against numerous union men for their “complicity” in the July 3, 1901, “riot” in Marshall Basin. That Judge Theron Stevens later dismissed all counts due to a lack of hard evidence didn’t forestall Telluride’s battle between labor and management and its accompanying war of words. If anything it served

“Do not, oh do not indulge such a wild idea that a newspaper might err!” —Lewis Carroll

The Daily Journal and San Miguel Examiner buildings on the southeast corner of Colorado Avenue and Oak Street at the turn of the century—obviously close enough to one another that the printing going on in one could no doubt be heard in the other. The two editors, never on good terms, could only imagine what sort of “slander” was being conjured up next door.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

45


44 • HISTORY

mightier than the sword The War of the Words That Accompanied Telluride’s Mining Labor Battles By Paul O’Rourke

Charles G. Sumner, as his photo appeared in the San Miguel Examiner on July 11, 1903, his last official day at the newspaper.

C

harles Sumner tried to keep his mind free of anger and his feet warm. He rubbed clear a small circle on the frosted pane of the railroad passenger car and gazed out absently as darkness slowly gave way to a cold December morning, two days before Christmas, in 1903. He’d spent the previous night in the Telluride jail, insufficient accommodations for the nearly two-dozen men who’d been rounded up earlier that day and www.TellurideMagazine.com

charged with the curious crime of intimidating non-union miners at a local mine. Sumner couldn’t recall any such interference but suspected his arrest had more to do with his being the managing editor of the district’s union-owned newspaper. And now he and ten other men, under armed guard, were being taken to jail in Montrose. What would happen to him was unclear, but what was abundantly apparent was that union men and those who supported the West-

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

ern Federation of Miners were being literally thrown out of Telluride and told to never return. Sumner shook his head in disbelief and wondered how in the world it had come to this. Sumner seemed destined to a life in journalism. He began at sixteen, as a printer’s apprentice, mixing ink and fetching type at his hometown paper, the Grand Junction News. At 21 and recently married, Charles was hired on as editor at the Ophir Mail, and then teamed up with Charles A.

Woodmansee, owner of the Sawpit Hummer, when the two acquired the San Miguel Democrat in Telluride on July 20, 1897. By August they’d changed the name of the paper to the San Miguel Examiner and set up shop for their weekly publication at 236 West Colorado Avenue, one door east of the other, more established newspaper in town, The Daily Journal. The Daily Journal was owned by a man who many in Telluride called “Dad.” Charles F. Painter was a pioneer—the town’s first mayor and the county’s first clerk—a prominent businessman, and it could be said Dad Painter believed, as many did, that Telluride was his town. The paper’s editor, Francis E. Curry, had first published The Journal in San Miguel with his brother John in July 1881, and then, after bringing the paper to nearby Telluride, sold the business to Painter in 1884. After washing his ink-stained hands of the business for a few years, Curry returned to Telluride as editor of The Journal at just about the same time the San Miguel Examiner began publication in the summer of 1897. The turn of the century was a fine time to be in the newspaper business; Telluride was prospering like at no other time in its brief history, and there seemed to be more than enough printing work and good news to keep both The Journal and the Examiner busy. But then, not everything is as it seems. Telluride’s “official” population had jumped to 2,446 in 1900, up from just 766 in 1890. A good percentage of the newcomers were miners, most of whom were recently arrived immigrants: Italians, Austrians, Swedes, Finns, and Swede-Finns. They’d come because they knew they’d find work, work made available due to the rapid expansion at the district’s mining properties. Not all in Telluride were pleased with the rapid influx of laboring men, but, as most agreed, new residents were new customers, and business was business, after all. But there were some rumblings among the workingmen and in the local press about how some of that

The Governor Peabody “law and order” medal presented to national guardsmen and citizens’ alliance members for their dubious role in quelling strike disturbances in Cripple Creek, Trinidad, and Telluride. The medal was a conspicuous adornment on Bulkeley Wells’ lapel for many years.

business—especially at the mines— was being conducted. For Curry and The Journal, mine owners had every right to run their businesses any way they saw fit. Sumner and his new publisher, Charles L. Fluke (who’d acquired Woodmansee’s stake on July 18, 1900), stated unequivocally, “Labor rights must be maintained.” By spring 1901, what had com-

menced as benign editorial sparring began to resemble something decidedly more belligerent. The Western Federation of Miners (WFM) Local No. 63 called a strike against Telluride’s Smuggler-Union Company on May 1, 1901, demanding a guaranteed $3 per 8-hour day for its miners. Arthur Collins, manager at the Smuggler-Union, refused to negotiate with the miners’ union. Until, that is, a bloody confrontation on July 3 between strikers and company-hired “scabs” forced him to capitulate. Telluride’s union men celebrated their apparent triumph. While peace was restored and work resumed at the mine, the bitter polemics engendered during the two-month long strike continued to find expression in Telluride’s two newspapers. When miners union President, Vincent St. John, ran for county sheriff on the Democratic Party ticket that fall, The Journal and Curry proclaimed, “…there is a very large element of the more conservative and substantial citizens who contemplate his (St. John’s) possible election with serious apprehension… and that should he be elected to the chief office in the county it will seriously hinder the prosperity and development of the community.” St. John lost his bid to become county sheriff by a very small margin, and while he’d been roundly deprecated personally in The Journal, that paper’s harangues against the miners union backfired. On January 1, 1902,

St. John—and the local WFM executive committee—decided to fight back, requesting that all friends of organized labor “withdraw patronage” from Curry’s newspaper. The boycott appeared to shock Francis Curry; he denied, at least initially, ever antagonizing the cause of organized labor, and even tried to invoke Charles Painter’s civic status as he scrambled to sway opinion in The Journal’s favor, “He has given the best years of his life to the development of Telluride and San Miguel County. Compare the record with that of those who seek to ruin his business.” By “those” Curry meant not only St. John and the WFM but also the Examiner. Sumner responded on January 4, “the fault (for the boycott) lies entirely with our neighbor. Those who have been steady readers of The Journal are aware of the fact that from time to time it has covertly and openly criticized labor unions and the Telluride Union in particular.” Curry and Painter and a crew of their allies in commercial circles—the newly formed Telluride Businessmen’s Association (TBA)—stepped up their accusations against Sumner and the WFM during the spring of 1902 and went so far as to call a boycott of their own against the Examiner. Sumner, once measured in his responses to his next door neighbor’s slurs, began to lose his patience: “Suffice it to say that the parties who have given the reports circulation are

known to us, and a conservative estimate of the diminutive mental caliber of the small tribe of gossip experts is so far below a conservative figure that we cannot find justification in laying any accusations at the door of our neighbor.” Of Sumner and the Examiner—the “boycotter’s organ”— Curry fired back, “These people do not want peace and prosperity. They thrive best on turmoil and unrest.” As if turmoil and unrest weren’t in sufficient supply, on the night of November 19, 1902, a shotgun blast tore through a parlor window at his residence in Pandora and took Arthur Collins’ life. The mine manager’s stance against the WFM during the 1901 strike was well documented; the motive for murder—some called it an assassination—was as plain as day, many believed in their rush to judgment. Both newspapers and their editors condemned the killing and stopped short of laying blame, at first. But as days turned to weeks, then months without an arrest, suspicion and animosity were leveled at the union. In January 1903, a county grand jury handed down 22 indictments against numerous union men for their “complicity” in the July 3, 1901, “riot” in Marshall Basin. That Judge Theron Stevens later dismissed all counts due to a lack of hard evidence didn’t forestall Telluride’s battle between labor and management and its accompanying war of words. If anything it served

“Do not, oh do not indulge such a wild idea that a newspaper might err!” —Lewis Carroll

The Daily Journal and San Miguel Examiner buildings on the southeast corner of Colorado Avenue and Oak Street at the turn of the century—obviously close enough to one another that the printing going on in one could no doubt be heard in the other. The two editors, never on good terms, could only imagine what sort of “slander” was being conjured up next door.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

45


46 • HISTORY

Both Francis Curry and Charles Sumner were members of the Republican Party, though it’s certain they adhered to its platform for entirely different reasons. They did share, however, one view in common: The two journalists held no particular affection for Williams Jennings Bryan and their respective columns alluded to such after the “Great Commoner” addressed a crowd estimated at 1,500 in front of the New Sheridan Hotel on October 27, 1902.

to heighten the conflict. Sumner had long sensed trouble and had forewarned in late December 1902, “The mine owners are taking advantage of the lawless acts of a few men to damn the Union…If the issue is forced by the mine owners, it is not too much to say that there will be hell to pay in the San Juan.” Editorial barbs from The Journal persisted. On February 16, 1903, Curry falsely accused the Examiner of paying “below-scale” wages in its printing department. But Sumner had more to worry over than the mindless rants from his next-door neighbor. During the previous fall, his partner and comrade, Charles Fluke, relinquished his share of the business and moved his family to Grand Junction in the hope of finding a cure for his ailing son. The boy passed away the following March. In early February 1903, The Journal revealed, “Mrs. Naomi Sumner was granted a divorce www.TellurideMagazine.com

from Chas. G. Sumner, with $12 per week alimony, until such time as the defendent (sic) shall pay her $500 in a lump sum in full of all claims.” A few days later a “for sale” ad appeared in The Journal announcing the pending liquidation of the Sumner household’s goods and furniture. Naomi moved to California in March. And in late May Sumner’s physical safety looked to be in jeopardy. Dismissal of the grand jury’s indictments against the union men didn’t stop the businessmen’s association and their new ally, Bulkeley Wells, the recently appointed manager at the Smuggler-Union Company. With new charges—including the murder of Arthur Collins—filed against the union’s leaders, Wells and the TBA took it upon themselves to authorize a $400 reward to bring union president, Vincent St. John, into custody. Who had put up the money—it was more like a bounty—

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

was not publicly divulged; commenced were the first Sumner knew that no steps toward martial law civil authority had sancand the ultimate destructioned it. His editorial tion of not just the WFM inquiry, when published in the San Juans, but also in the June 6 edition of the ruin of many lives the Examiner, resulted in and livelihoods in Tellua menacing letter: “Do ride, not the least of these not worry about ‘who is being Charles Sumner’s. paying the price.’ When For his outspoken supthe murderer of Arthur port of workingmen and Collins is swinging from their unions Sumner the scaffold in your town, found himself in Monand his accomplices and trose on Christmas Eve, associates are in the pendeprived of his rights, itentiary you will know due process, and even ‘who is paying the price.’ access to his property in Look out for yourself.” Telluride. Sumner replied, Francis Curry kept “Many had hoped that track of his onetime the grand jury fiasco adversary. At about the ‘might be the be-all and same time martial law end-all here,’ but the was winding down in persecution, the threats, Telluride, in June 1904, the fight, is continued Curry took one last shot from the same sources at his former next-door which incubate anonymous letters and pro- The membership ribbon for Telluride Local #63 of the mote vicious ideas, and Western Federation of Miners, worn proudly at all union events, parades, and at the funerals for union if such a sentiment is members. kept alive, the community will eventually be ‘paying the price.’” neighbor. “Charles G. Sumner is Sumner and Telluride did pay the now employed on the Grand Juncprice. Beleaguered on more fronts tion Sentinel and it is possible that than even a steel-willed man might the conservative, law-respecting endure, Sumner sold the San Miguel influence of his present surroundExaminer to county judge, John ings may have a beneficial and reforWardlaw, on June 24, 1903. Curry, matory effect.” reveling in his perceived victory, chorCurry appeared to have the last tled, “The Journal joins in the general laugh. Or did he? rejoicing at the very marked improvePostscript…the first one ment in its next door neighbor.” On July 11, Sumner wrote his final now will later be last If Charles Sumner ever returned editorial for the Examiner, explaining, “I am retiring because I want to… to Telluride he didn’t stay long. The and to our enemies—forgiveness and year 1905 found the newspaperman forgetfulness—that’s all.” Ironically, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, where he’d Sumner’s farewell coincided with started up the Daily Post, a progresthe beginning of the union’s effort to sive, pro-labor publication that, not obtain the 8-hour workday for its mill surprisingly, endeavored each day workers. And into this new struggle to challenge “the establishment.” Charles Sumner threw his heart and Sumner’s prediction that the miners soul, signing on as managing edi- union, its leaders, and its principles tor of The San Juan District Miner, a would be vindicated did come true. newly organized newspaper owned And as for Curry, Painter, Bulkeley and published by the federation com- Wells…well, the truth of their heavyprised of twelve local unions. On handed dealings with the miners September 1, a strike was called, and union came to light in 2003 with the as Sumner had predicted, “there was publication of The Corpse on Boomerang Road, by Maryjoy Martin, hell to pay.” On November 24, 1903, four by far the most scholarly and well-rehundred National Guardsmen under searched authority on this dark and the command of Major Zeph Hill yet, in some ways, heroic period in arrived in Telluride, initiating what Telluride’s history. Read this book the major imprudently called “the and you will agree: the pen can be dawn of a better day.” What actually mightier than the sword. \

A Silver Past

A Golden Future

Yoga inspired adventure retreats in beautiful mountain locations around the world.

The h b bookk off Telluride ll id Hard cover • 144 pages • Full color throughout Size 9.4’’ x 12.4’’ An extra: Inside you will find 18 postcards to pull out, send to friends, or share with family.

Sold at Bet ween the Covers, Jagged Edge, Telluride Historical Museum and Telluride Naturals Telluride, Colorado • 970.729.8108 • www.elevatedretreat.com

w w w.editionsdusigne.fr/telluride.html

Specializing in Telluride mesas, ranches, log cabins, land, commercial, residential and unique properties since 1982! Call Ed Andrews for a personal tour of the special properties in the Telluride region.

Ed Andrews - Owner/Broker, GRI, CRS,EMS (970) 728-3144 • Cell: www.ewandrews.com • ed@ewandrews.com

(970) 729-3145

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

47


46 • HISTORY

Both Francis Curry and Charles Sumner were members of the Republican Party, though it’s certain they adhered to its platform for entirely different reasons. They did share, however, one view in common: The two journalists held no particular affection for Williams Jennings Bryan and their respective columns alluded to such after the “Great Commoner” addressed a crowd estimated at 1,500 in front of the New Sheridan Hotel on October 27, 1902.

to heighten the conflict. Sumner had long sensed trouble and had forewarned in late December 1902, “The mine owners are taking advantage of the lawless acts of a few men to damn the Union…If the issue is forced by the mine owners, it is not too much to say that there will be hell to pay in the San Juan.” Editorial barbs from The Journal persisted. On February 16, 1903, Curry falsely accused the Examiner of paying “below-scale” wages in its printing department. But Sumner had more to worry over than the mindless rants from his next-door neighbor. During the previous fall, his partner and comrade, Charles Fluke, relinquished his share of the business and moved his family to Grand Junction in the hope of finding a cure for his ailing son. The boy passed away the following March. In early February 1903, The Journal revealed, “Mrs. Naomi Sumner was granted a divorce www.TellurideMagazine.com

from Chas. G. Sumner, with $12 per week alimony, until such time as the defendent (sic) shall pay her $500 in a lump sum in full of all claims.” A few days later a “for sale” ad appeared in The Journal announcing the pending liquidation of the Sumner household’s goods and furniture. Naomi moved to California in March. And in late May Sumner’s physical safety looked to be in jeopardy. Dismissal of the grand jury’s indictments against the union men didn’t stop the businessmen’s association and their new ally, Bulkeley Wells, the recently appointed manager at the Smuggler-Union Company. With new charges—including the murder of Arthur Collins—filed against the union’s leaders, Wells and the TBA took it upon themselves to authorize a $400 reward to bring union president, Vincent St. John, into custody. Who had put up the money—it was more like a bounty—

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

was not publicly divulged; commenced were the first Sumner knew that no steps toward martial law civil authority had sancand the ultimate destructioned it. His editorial tion of not just the WFM inquiry, when published in the San Juans, but also in the June 6 edition of the ruin of many lives the Examiner, resulted in and livelihoods in Tellua menacing letter: “Do ride, not the least of these not worry about ‘who is being Charles Sumner’s. paying the price.’ When For his outspoken supthe murderer of Arthur port of workingmen and Collins is swinging from their unions Sumner the scaffold in your town, found himself in Monand his accomplices and trose on Christmas Eve, associates are in the pendeprived of his rights, itentiary you will know due process, and even ‘who is paying the price.’ access to his property in Look out for yourself.” Telluride. Sumner replied, Francis Curry kept “Many had hoped that track of his onetime the grand jury fiasco adversary. At about the ‘might be the be-all and same time martial law end-all here,’ but the was winding down in persecution, the threats, Telluride, in June 1904, the fight, is continued Curry took one last shot from the same sources at his former next-door which incubate anonymous letters and pro- The membership ribbon for Telluride Local #63 of the mote vicious ideas, and Western Federation of Miners, worn proudly at all union events, parades, and at the funerals for union if such a sentiment is members. kept alive, the community will eventually be ‘paying the price.’” neighbor. “Charles G. Sumner is Sumner and Telluride did pay the now employed on the Grand Juncprice. Beleaguered on more fronts tion Sentinel and it is possible that than even a steel-willed man might the conservative, law-respecting endure, Sumner sold the San Miguel influence of his present surroundExaminer to county judge, John ings may have a beneficial and reforWardlaw, on June 24, 1903. Curry, matory effect.” reveling in his perceived victory, chorCurry appeared to have the last tled, “The Journal joins in the general laugh. Or did he? rejoicing at the very marked improvePostscript…the first one ment in its next door neighbor.” On July 11, Sumner wrote his final now will later be last If Charles Sumner ever returned editorial for the Examiner, explaining, “I am retiring because I want to… to Telluride he didn’t stay long. The and to our enemies—forgiveness and year 1905 found the newspaperman forgetfulness—that’s all.” Ironically, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, where he’d Sumner’s farewell coincided with started up the Daily Post, a progresthe beginning of the union’s effort to sive, pro-labor publication that, not obtain the 8-hour workday for its mill surprisingly, endeavored each day workers. And into this new struggle to challenge “the establishment.” Charles Sumner threw his heart and Sumner’s prediction that the miners soul, signing on as managing edi- union, its leaders, and its principles tor of The San Juan District Miner, a would be vindicated did come true. newly organized newspaper owned And as for Curry, Painter, Bulkeley and published by the federation com- Wells…well, the truth of their heavyprised of twelve local unions. On handed dealings with the miners September 1, a strike was called, and union came to light in 2003 with the as Sumner had predicted, “there was publication of The Corpse on Boomerang Road, by Maryjoy Martin, hell to pay.” On November 24, 1903, four by far the most scholarly and well-rehundred National Guardsmen under searched authority on this dark and the command of Major Zeph Hill yet, in some ways, heroic period in arrived in Telluride, initiating what Telluride’s history. Read this book the major imprudently called “the and you will agree: the pen can be dawn of a better day.” What actually mightier than the sword. \

A Silver Past

A Golden Future

Yoga inspired adventure retreats in beautiful mountain locations around the world.

The h b bookk off Telluride ll id Hard cover • 144 pages • Full color throughout Size 9.4’’ x 12.4’’ An extra: Inside you will find 18 postcards to pull out, send to friends, or share with family.

Sold at Bet ween the Covers, Jagged Edge, Telluride Historical Museum and Telluride Naturals Telluride, Colorado • 970.729.8108 • www.elevatedretreat.com

w w w.editionsdusigne.fr/telluride.html

Specializing in Telluride mesas, ranches, log cabins, land, commercial, residential and unique properties since 1982! Call Ed Andrews for a personal tour of the special properties in the Telluride region.

Ed Andrews - Owner/Broker, GRI, CRS,EMS (970) 728-3144 • Cell: www.ewandrews.com • ed@ewandrews.com

(970) 729-3145

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

47


48 • TELLURIDE FACES

PURE LANDSCAPE Shaun Horne, Wilson Peak in Autumn, 30” x 44” oil

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SHAUN HORNE and a handful of outstanding painters:

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selling original landscape paintings of the mountain west and Telluride

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333 West Colorado Avenue, Unit 1 Telluride, CO | 81435 (970) 728-6868

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49


48 • TELLURIDE FACES

PURE LANDSCAPE Shaun Horne, Wilson Peak in Autumn, 30” x 44” oil

PROUDLY REPRESENTING

SHAUN HORNE and a handful of outstanding painters:

Ralph Oberg, Walt Gonkse, Jay Moore, Ray Roberts, Shirley Novak, Kenn Backhaus, Stephen C. Datz, Gregory Packard, Jim Wodark, Jill Carver, Don Sahli, Bill Gallen,Nicholas Reti, Dave Santillanes, Dawn Cohen, Stacey Peterson, Bryan Mark Taylor, Dan Schultz, Eric Merrell, Meredith Nemirov, Cheryl St. John, Susiehyer, Kelly Kotary, Chad Smith

est. 2007

selling original landscape paintings of the mountain west and Telluride

TELLURIDE:

333 West Colorado Avenue, Unit 1 Telluride, CO | 81435 (970) 728-6868

CRESTED BUTTE

409 Third Street Crested Butte, CO | 81224 (970) 349-5936

www.ohbejoyfulgallery.com ohbejoyfulgallery@mac.com WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

49


50 • TELLURIDE FACES

Kristin Holbrook

www.TellurideMagazine.com

}

unteers at numerous nonprofits around town. But she hasn’t been to yoga in quite some time—“I think it’s been

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

over a year,” she admits. Instead, she dedicates almost all of her free time to volunteering. Her contributions are so significant that she

won Telluride Foundation’s Outstanding Citizen of the Year award. Her volunteerism was something she learned at home, she says. “I grew up with parents who were always involved in the community. My mom, a former teacher, was always helping out in the schools and with fundraisers. My dad, who worked near home, coached all of our sports teams as kids. My mom taught me that there’s always more time in a day than I think, and to

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ou’d never guess that Kristin Holbrook is so busy by the looks of her. A striking blonde mother of two, usually dressed in a hip outfit fresh from her store, Kristin has the calm demeanor and repose of someone who’s just stepped out of a yoga class rather than the harried look you might expect from someone who runs Two Skirts—one of Telluride’s top women’s boutiques—and vol-

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always lend a helping hand.” Still, it wasn’t until Kristin moved to Telluride in 1999 that she felt like she really incorporated giving back into her daily life. “Telluride inspired me,” she says. “I had always given back on a small scale—reading to inner city kids, teaching Sunday school, coaching softball. Yet, when I saw the level with which people gave back in Telluride, I was inspired to do more.” It wasn’t long until she got that opportunity. In 2002, the San Miguel Resource Center, Telluride’s sexual assault and domestic violence crisis center, reached out to Kristin and invited her to be on the board. They wanted fresh energy, someone young who could invigorate their annual Chocolate Lovers’ Fling fundraiser and raise SMRC’s visibility in town. Kristin had just opened Two Skirts the year before. It would have been easy to say she didn’t have room in her schedule. “But,” she says, “I have a hard time saying no when people need me.” So, she dove full bore in the center, transforming the Fling from a modest, small-scale affair at the Peaks to the dance party of the year at the Conference Center every February. People who have been on the receiving end of Kristin’s efforts speak adoringly of her. Melanie Montoya, co-director of the San Miguel Resource Center and the one who nominated Kristin for the Outstanding Citizen of the Year award, describes her as an invaluable resource to the center. “Kristin has helped the SMRC in every way possible. She served on our board of directors for a number of years, including two years as Board President. She took our volunteer advocate training to assist survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. She was chair of our Chocolate Lovers’ Fling fundraising committee. If all of that wasn’t enough, she created a new fundraiser through her store Two Skirts called “Clutch for a Cause” to raise funds for child victims. She continues to donate to the SMRC, both personally and through her business.” Montoya recounts the time when Kristin reached out to a woman who had been horribly abused and had come to SMRC for help. The woman was struggling to get back on her feet—she needed everything all at once— money, clothes, a job. Yet, she was having a hard time finding the self-assurance to go to the grocery store, let alone apply for a job. Kristin wanted to provide her with some new clothing to help boost her confidence, and knowing it might be intimidating for the woman to come to Two Skirts, asked for her size and brought half the store to the woman’s apartment. Montoya says, “She ended up giving this woman two full outfits, head to toe. It was so amazing to see what it did for this woman’s confidence to go for interviews dressed so nicely.” Kristin recently stepped down from SMRC’s board, but that doesn’t mean she’s slowed down her commitment to the organization or to the community at large. In addition to creating Clutch for a Cause for SMRC, a fun shopping event where women can buy recycled purses and shop for new ones and where 100 percent of the proceeds to go the center, Kristin volunteers extensively in her sons’ activities. In recent years, she’s worked in Brady and Leighton’s classrooms, assisting on field trips and teaching Kindergarten Physical Education. Outside of the school, she coaches t-ball and helps to lead the kids’ cub scouts group. In addition to all of that, last year, Kristin organized a mother-son bike dash to raise money for Telluride We R-1, a joint venture of Telluride Foundation and the Parent Teacher Student Foundation that provides educational resources for the community. “I was asked by We R-1 to organize a mother-son event similar to the father-daughter dance. We came up with a scavenger hunt-style bike ride. I thought it would be a great way to raise money for an indispensable organization.” Kristin has no plans of slowing down her activism since winning the award. She says humbly, “I was flattered to receive it, but I felt like I was too young to get it. There’s still so much I want to do.” She says that if anything, the award has inspired her to do more for Telluride. “This town is great because the people who live in it believe in giving back. We make Telluride what it is today.” \

Operating as a fully insured USDA Forest Service permitted outfitter.

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51


50 • TELLURIDE FACES

Kristin Holbrook

www.TellurideMagazine.com

}

unteers at numerous nonprofits around town. But she hasn’t been to yoga in quite some time—“I think it’s been

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

over a year,” she admits. Instead, she dedicates almost all of her free time to volunteering. Her contributions are so significant that she

won Telluride Foundation’s Outstanding Citizen of the Year award. Her volunteerism was something she learned at home, she says. “I grew up with parents who were always involved in the community. My mom, a former teacher, was always helping out in the schools and with fundraisers. My dad, who worked near home, coached all of our sports teams as kids. My mom taught me that there’s always more time in a day than I think, and to

MODERN

DESIGN / BUILD SERVICES

MARMOL RADZINER

Independently distributed by:

Majestic Peaks Custom Homes & Sunrooms Call for Info or to schedule a Home Tour 970-240-9250 Info@MajesticPeaks.com View 4 planbooks on-line at www.Lindal.com/YourLindalFolder/Register.cfm?DLR=2324

www.MajesticPeaks.com

Offering trips for all ages and skill levels

Tell that focus on safety and fun. uri de ’ Ice Climbing

Snowshoeing

Nordic Skiing

Source for Mount a i n A

{

“I grew up with parents who were always involved in the community … My mom taught me that there’s always more time in a day than I think, and to always lend a helping hand.”

CLASSIC

TOP USA DEALER

r mie re sP

Y

ou’d never guess that Kristin Holbrook is so busy by the looks of her. A striking blonde mother of two, usually dressed in a hip outfit fresh from her store, Kristin has the calm demeanor and repose of someone who’s just stepped out of a yoga class rather than the harried look you might expect from someone who runs Two Skirts—one of Telluride’s top women’s boutiques—and vol-

By Emily Brendler Shoff

LOTS OF PEOPLE CAN DESIGN YOUR HOME, LINDAL DELIVERS IT TOO!

Rock Climbing

Mountaineering

Avalance Education Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding Peak Ascents Via Ferratta Hut Trips

es tur en dv

Citizen of the Year

always lend a helping hand.” Still, it wasn’t until Kristin moved to Telluride in 1999 that she felt like she really incorporated giving back into her daily life. “Telluride inspired me,” she says. “I had always given back on a small scale—reading to inner city kids, teaching Sunday school, coaching softball. Yet, when I saw the level with which people gave back in Telluride, I was inspired to do more.” It wasn’t long until she got that opportunity. In 2002, the San Miguel Resource Center, Telluride’s sexual assault and domestic violence crisis center, reached out to Kristin and invited her to be on the board. They wanted fresh energy, someone young who could invigorate their annual Chocolate Lovers’ Fling fundraiser and raise SMRC’s visibility in town. Kristin had just opened Two Skirts the year before. It would have been easy to say she didn’t have room in her schedule. “But,” she says, “I have a hard time saying no when people need me.” So, she dove full bore in the center, transforming the Fling from a modest, small-scale affair at the Peaks to the dance party of the year at the Conference Center every February. People who have been on the receiving end of Kristin’s efforts speak adoringly of her. Melanie Montoya, co-director of the San Miguel Resource Center and the one who nominated Kristin for the Outstanding Citizen of the Year award, describes her as an invaluable resource to the center. “Kristin has helped the SMRC in every way possible. She served on our board of directors for a number of years, including two years as Board President. She took our volunteer advocate training to assist survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. She was chair of our Chocolate Lovers’ Fling fundraising committee. If all of that wasn’t enough, she created a new fundraiser through her store Two Skirts called “Clutch for a Cause” to raise funds for child victims. She continues to donate to the SMRC, both personally and through her business.” Montoya recounts the time when Kristin reached out to a woman who had been horribly abused and had come to SMRC for help. The woman was struggling to get back on her feet—she needed everything all at once— money, clothes, a job. Yet, she was having a hard time finding the self-assurance to go to the grocery store, let alone apply for a job. Kristin wanted to provide her with some new clothing to help boost her confidence, and knowing it might be intimidating for the woman to come to Two Skirts, asked for her size and brought half the store to the woman’s apartment. Montoya says, “She ended up giving this woman two full outfits, head to toe. It was so amazing to see what it did for this woman’s confidence to go for interviews dressed so nicely.” Kristin recently stepped down from SMRC’s board, but that doesn’t mean she’s slowed down her commitment to the organization or to the community at large. In addition to creating Clutch for a Cause for SMRC, a fun shopping event where women can buy recycled purses and shop for new ones and where 100 percent of the proceeds to go the center, Kristin volunteers extensively in her sons’ activities. In recent years, she’s worked in Brady and Leighton’s classrooms, assisting on field trips and teaching Kindergarten Physical Education. Outside of the school, she coaches t-ball and helps to lead the kids’ cub scouts group. In addition to all of that, last year, Kristin organized a mother-son bike dash to raise money for Telluride We R-1, a joint venture of Telluride Foundation and the Parent Teacher Student Foundation that provides educational resources for the community. “I was asked by We R-1 to organize a mother-son event similar to the father-daughter dance. We came up with a scavenger hunt-style bike ride. I thought it would be a great way to raise money for an indispensable organization.” Kristin has no plans of slowing down her activism since winning the award. She says humbly, “I was flattered to receive it, but I felt like I was too young to get it. There’s still so much I want to do.” She says that if anything, the award has inspired her to do more for Telluride. “This town is great because the people who live in it believe in giving back. We make Telluride what it is today.” \

Operating as a fully insured USDA Forest Service permitted outfitter.

970-728-4101 • www.tellurideadventures.com

223 E. Colorado Ave (located inside Jagged Edge Equipment) WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

51


52 • TELLURIDE FACES

Public Access Watchdog

Tor Anderson

I

By Katie Klingsporn

t’s easy to see Telluride as a recreational smorgasbord, a big outdoor playground where hiking trails, climbing crags, mountain biking singletrack, and backcountry ski zones are endlessly accessible. But look a little closer, and you’ll find that many popular backcountry ski runs, bike trails and access paths cross private property. So while it may seem wide open out there, there’s no guarantee that it’ll always be that way. “Pick your favorite trail. If it’s not a Forest Service system trail www.TellurideMagazine.com

{

“Trails are really the common denominator in all activities. It all boils down to the trails.”

or has an access easement, it could get closed,” says Tor Anderson. “It’s so easy to take that for granted when you are not aware of it, but the more you look into it, the scarier it gets.” Anderson would know; he’s the longtime president of the Telluride Mountain Club. The nonprofit organization has been advocating

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

}

for public access and helping to educate the region’s backcountry users since the 80s—fighting to reinstate access to Wilson Peak, becoming involved in the Upper Bear Creek backcountry ski gates closure and, most recently, chipping away at a plan to create a more cohesive regional trail system.

Under Anderson’s leadership, the club has not only made progress in several local access issues, but it has also evolved from a ragtag group of climbers and backcountry skiers to a legit nonprofit with board, budget, and growing membership base. And instead of the reactive approach employed in the early days, Anderson says, the club has become more proactive by attempting to identify potential issues in this increasingly popular area. The club, in other words, has grown up. And Anderson, an unas-

suming skater-punk turned graphic-designer dad, has learned from experience that when concerned citizens get organized, they can be a potent force. “We play a pretty good advocate,” he says. “TMC has always been underground group, and we’re trying to change that. We’re finally getting noticed.” Long before the TMC was even a speck on his radar, long before he fully appreciated the value of access, Anderson had a love of the outdoors. He grew up in Salt Lake City, where his mom took his family on frequent camping trips and excursions to southern Utah’s national parks. Pretty soon he got into skateboarding, snowboarding, and climbing. He was also into computers, and discovered a love of merging technology and art when he was a teenager, sharpening those skills with punk zines he launched with friends. After graduating from high school, he got his first graphic design job creating yellow pages ads, and carved out a pretty happy existence in Salt Lake. So he wasn’t exactly looking for a place to relocate in August of 1992 when he and a friend set out on a skateboarding beach trip that eventually led to Telluride. They arrived in town just as construction on the wooden skate park in Town Park was wrapping up; they actually helped finish it. Making friends with some fellow skaters, they stayed a couple days. And that was that. “I moved to Telluride about three weeks later with everything strapped to the roof of my car,” Anderson says. “My friends and family thought I was crazy.” Initially, Anderson camped out in Bear Creek and worked some odd jobs. But within a couple of weeks, he landed a room in a place known as “The Shack” and was hired at Telluride Publishing—a job he would keep for about 15 years before striking out on his own with his company True North Designworks. Anderson, who has explored the region’s climbing areas and backcountry ski zones extensively, became part of the Mountain Club somewhere along the way too. It’s hard to pin down the exact date, he says, because back then, if you were a climber or backcountry skier, you were pretty much a member by default. The club’s former president, Josh Borof, was one of Anderson’s roommates at The Shack and a climbing buddy. By Anderson’s telling, Borof basically thrust the club presidency crown onto his head one day. “He walked up to me and said, ‘Hey man, you are the president of the Mountain Club now,’” Anderson says. “I think that was around 2002.” At the time, Anderson and fellow former TMC president Steve Johnson were basically the sole members, he says. “We didn’t have a membership, website, or nonprofit status,” he says. “We just had some T-shirts and some history.” What really galvanized the club to organize was a big threat to recreation in the form of a landowner who shut down access to Wilson Peak through Silver Pick Basin. Faced with the prospect of losing a precious local destination, the club went to work on a long process of assisting the Trust for Public Land (TPL) and U.S. Forest Service fight in getting access to the area back open. Years later, after much work from all parties, access was re-established through a rerouting on a new trail, Elk Creek. Over time, TMC has collaborated with local agencies to, among other things, create an ice climbing management plan for Bridal Veil Falls, help the Access Fund manage the popular Society Turn climbing area, successfully fight to re-open the ski area’s Gold Hill backcountry access gates, and most recently, work with the U.S. Forest Service on a trails plan in the Alta Lakes area. And, says Anderson, the club has expanded its scope to trails of all kinds. “Trails are really the common denominator in all activities,” he says. “It all boils down to the trails.” Today, Anderson is the father of six-year-old Wilder, and along with his wife, Sharon Grundy, they go on hikes, explore the woods, ski, and snowboard. And Anderson, who admits that he came to the position a little reluctantly, says today that he values public access like he never did before. “I never imagined that I would be involved with TMC for this long and to this extent,” he says. “But I really am passionate about the work that we do and how we can help guide our region’s recreational growth.” \

SNOWMOBILE TELLURIDE

#1 Tour Operator to Dunton Hot Springs, Barlow Creek, Alta Lakes Ghost Town Since 1988

Contact us today to book your tour! TellurideOutfitters.com VISIT US AT OUR NEW BASE LOCATION:

Telluride Outfitters Steaming Bean AT MOUNTAIN VILLAGE TOWN HALL PLAZA NEXT TO THE GONDOLA.

970-728-4475 WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

PERMITTEE

www.TellurideMagazine.com

53


52 • TELLURIDE FACES

Public Access Watchdog

Tor Anderson

I

By Katie Klingsporn

t’s easy to see Telluride as a recreational smorgasbord, a big outdoor playground where hiking trails, climbing crags, mountain biking singletrack, and backcountry ski zones are endlessly accessible. But look a little closer, and you’ll find that many popular backcountry ski runs, bike trails and access paths cross private property. So while it may seem wide open out there, there’s no guarantee that it’ll always be that way. “Pick your favorite trail. If it’s not a Forest Service system trail www.TellurideMagazine.com

{

“Trails are really the common denominator in all activities. It all boils down to the trails.”

or has an access easement, it could get closed,” says Tor Anderson. “It’s so easy to take that for granted when you are not aware of it, but the more you look into it, the scarier it gets.” Anderson would know; he’s the longtime president of the Telluride Mountain Club. The nonprofit organization has been advocating

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

}

for public access and helping to educate the region’s backcountry users since the 80s—fighting to reinstate access to Wilson Peak, becoming involved in the Upper Bear Creek backcountry ski gates closure and, most recently, chipping away at a plan to create a more cohesive regional trail system.

Under Anderson’s leadership, the club has not only made progress in several local access issues, but it has also evolved from a ragtag group of climbers and backcountry skiers to a legit nonprofit with board, budget, and growing membership base. And instead of the reactive approach employed in the early days, Anderson says, the club has become more proactive by attempting to identify potential issues in this increasingly popular area. The club, in other words, has grown up. And Anderson, an unas-

suming skater-punk turned graphic-designer dad, has learned from experience that when concerned citizens get organized, they can be a potent force. “We play a pretty good advocate,” he says. “TMC has always been underground group, and we’re trying to change that. We’re finally getting noticed.” Long before the TMC was even a speck on his radar, long before he fully appreciated the value of access, Anderson had a love of the outdoors. He grew up in Salt Lake City, where his mom took his family on frequent camping trips and excursions to southern Utah’s national parks. Pretty soon he got into skateboarding, snowboarding, and climbing. He was also into computers, and discovered a love of merging technology and art when he was a teenager, sharpening those skills with punk zines he launched with friends. After graduating from high school, he got his first graphic design job creating yellow pages ads, and carved out a pretty happy existence in Salt Lake. So he wasn’t exactly looking for a place to relocate in August of 1992 when he and a friend set out on a skateboarding beach trip that eventually led to Telluride. They arrived in town just as construction on the wooden skate park in Town Park was wrapping up; they actually helped finish it. Making friends with some fellow skaters, they stayed a couple days. And that was that. “I moved to Telluride about three weeks later with everything strapped to the roof of my car,” Anderson says. “My friends and family thought I was crazy.” Initially, Anderson camped out in Bear Creek and worked some odd jobs. But within a couple of weeks, he landed a room in a place known as “The Shack” and was hired at Telluride Publishing—a job he would keep for about 15 years before striking out on his own with his company True North Designworks. Anderson, who has explored the region’s climbing areas and backcountry ski zones extensively, became part of the Mountain Club somewhere along the way too. It’s hard to pin down the exact date, he says, because back then, if you were a climber or backcountry skier, you were pretty much a member by default. The club’s former president, Josh Borof, was one of Anderson’s roommates at The Shack and a climbing buddy. By Anderson’s telling, Borof basically thrust the club presidency crown onto his head one day. “He walked up to me and said, ‘Hey man, you are the president of the Mountain Club now,’” Anderson says. “I think that was around 2002.” At the time, Anderson and fellow former TMC president Steve Johnson were basically the sole members, he says. “We didn’t have a membership, website, or nonprofit status,” he says. “We just had some T-shirts and some history.” What really galvanized the club to organize was a big threat to recreation in the form of a landowner who shut down access to Wilson Peak through Silver Pick Basin. Faced with the prospect of losing a precious local destination, the club went to work on a long process of assisting the Trust for Public Land (TPL) and U.S. Forest Service fight in getting access to the area back open. Years later, after much work from all parties, access was re-established through a rerouting on a new trail, Elk Creek. Over time, TMC has collaborated with local agencies to, among other things, create an ice climbing management plan for Bridal Veil Falls, help the Access Fund manage the popular Society Turn climbing area, successfully fight to re-open the ski area’s Gold Hill backcountry access gates, and most recently, work with the U.S. Forest Service on a trails plan in the Alta Lakes area. And, says Anderson, the club has expanded its scope to trails of all kinds. “Trails are really the common denominator in all activities,” he says. “It all boils down to the trails.” Today, Anderson is the father of six-year-old Wilder, and along with his wife, Sharon Grundy, they go on hikes, explore the woods, ski, and snowboard. And Anderson, who admits that he came to the position a little reluctantly, says today that he values public access like he never did before. “I never imagined that I would be involved with TMC for this long and to this extent,” he says. “But I really am passionate about the work that we do and how we can help guide our region’s recreational growth.” \

SNOWMOBILE TELLURIDE

#1 Tour Operator to Dunton Hot Springs, Barlow Creek, Alta Lakes Ghost Town Since 1988

Contact us today to book your tour! TellurideOutfitters.com VISIT US AT OUR NEW BASE LOCATION:

Telluride Outfitters Steaming Bean AT MOUNTAIN VILLAGE TOWN HALL PLAZA NEXT TO THE GONDOLA.

970-728-4475 WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

PERMITTEE

www.TellurideMagazine.com

53


54 • TELLURIDE FACES

Game Changer

Rosie Cusack

W

{

hat’s in a name? As Shakespeare famously wrote, “That which we call a rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet.” Yet in a small and familiar town like this, where everyone knows everyone else, a name often takes on much more meaning. And as far as

www.TellurideMagazine.com

By Martinique Davis

}

“It’s about supporting those who need assistance, and creating avenues of overall betterment for this community. It’s important to build a community that’s sustainable for everybody who wants to live here.”

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

names go in Telluride, there’s only one “Rosie.” Rosie Cusack has been one of Telluride’s quintessential locals for close to three decades, known for her quick wit and magnetic charisma, and readily identifiable by her halo of curly hair and the bright-red “r” that has become the iconic calling card for her business.

On any given day her Telluride Luxury Rentals and Real Estate office, located in downtown Telluride, ushers in a near-constant rotation of visitors—many of whom have come to know Telluride because they’ve come to know Rosie. “I grew up in a very big family, and that’s sort of what I live in now,” she says of Telluride, a community that has wholly captured her heart. Cusack first arrived in Telluride in 1985, brought here by the developers of the Doral Telluride Hotel (now the Peaks) to help market that soon-to-be-built property. Toting a degree in Economics and Corporate Recreation and a real estate license from her home state of Michigan, Cusack was soon on a path to opening her own real estate office. Telluride Luxury Rentals and Real Estate opened in 1992, at a time when Telluride was still just a burgeoning name in the resort destination realm. In the time since, Cusack didn’t just witness the changes that have helped Telluride evolve from a tiny ski town to a true community—Cusack has played a significant role in that evolution. She’s been a game changer as a common denominator among many of Telluride’s nonprofit groups and community boards, bringing her humor as well as her critical analysis to some of the town’s fundamental organizations. Cusack says it’s the lifestyle in particular that has kept her in Telluride these many years, “and the simple fact that it is one of the most beautiful places in the entire world. But I also love knowing that I can be helpful in making this a better place for others to live in as well.” Cusack is quick to convey her adoration for this place and its people, but as anyone who knows her can attest, Rosie doesn’t just talk the talk. She has been a member of the Telluride Medical Center Foundation Board since 2010, and a longtime volunteer for the Telluride Aids Benefit working in both the design realm and on the auction team. She has also been a staunch promoter for the One to One Mentoring program and is a perennial supporter of various arts events in the region. But she is perhaps best recognized as one of the hosts for the weekly talk show “Mosher Exposure” on Telluride’s radio station KOTO. Cusack hosts along with Erick and Audrey Mosher, and the program is community radio at its best: a call-in show about local events and issues with lively, entertaining banter that makes Wednesday mornings fun. Cusack and the Moshers volunteer their time for this, and have been recognized for their fundraising efforts for the station. “Frankly, anything anyone asks me to do, I’ll do,” Cusack says, admitting that she is happy to be a workhorse for these organizations because, simply put, they are what help make this community a community. “It’s about supporting those who need assistance, and creating avenues of overall betterment for this community. It’s important to build a community that’s sustainable for everybody who wants to live here.” When she isn’t devoting time to her community betterment interests, Cusack throws herself into her real estate work—a profession that has kept her busy virtually seven days a week since she opened her company 22 years ago—specializing in concierge services, property management, destination management services, luxury rentals, and real estate sales. “I love real estate, and specifically design and what makes a home a home.” Perhaps most fulfilling is her ability to match people with places, she says, and the role she plays in helping her clients make Telluride their home. “I am fortunate to live here,” she continues, noting that it is this deep sense of gratitude that keeps her motivated to maintain a feverish pace operating her business and volunteering in the community. It is also this sense of gratitude that keeps this one-and-only Telluride name humble. “I really enjoy being surrounded by greatness; the greatness of a person, place, or thing, and I am blessed to have this in my life and it’s something I do not take lightly or for granted.” \

TELLURIDE TRAPPINGS &

TOGGERY FINE CLOTHES FOR MOUNTAIN FOLK SINCE 1972

We are the source for

Retro Vintage Telluride Apparel T-shirts, Hoodies, Hats and More!

WOMEN’S Brands

free people • lucky brand • michael stars • johnny was levi’s jeans • lole • hobo leather bags • latico • frye boots smartwool • sorel • wooden ships • pendleton • ugg • 3 dot

MEN’S brands

mod-o-doc • carhartt • columbia sportswear • robert graham jeremiah • gramicci • true grit • lucky brand • royal robbins tommy bahama • born shoes • Kuhl

KIDS

Featuring Tea Collection and Appaman

109 East Colorado Ave., Downtown Telluride • 970-728-3338 TheTellurideToggery.com • Open 7 days a week 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

55


54 • TELLURIDE FACES

Game Changer

Rosie Cusack

W

{

hat’s in a name? As Shakespeare famously wrote, “That which we call a rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet.” Yet in a small and familiar town like this, where everyone knows everyone else, a name often takes on much more meaning. And as far as

www.TellurideMagazine.com

By Martinique Davis

}

“It’s about supporting those who need assistance, and creating avenues of overall betterment for this community. It’s important to build a community that’s sustainable for everybody who wants to live here.”

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

names go in Telluride, there’s only one “Rosie.” Rosie Cusack has been one of Telluride’s quintessential locals for close to three decades, known for her quick wit and magnetic charisma, and readily identifiable by her halo of curly hair and the bright-red “r” that has become the iconic calling card for her business.

On any given day her Telluride Luxury Rentals and Real Estate office, located in downtown Telluride, ushers in a near-constant rotation of visitors—many of whom have come to know Telluride because they’ve come to know Rosie. “I grew up in a very big family, and that’s sort of what I live in now,” she says of Telluride, a community that has wholly captured her heart. Cusack first arrived in Telluride in 1985, brought here by the developers of the Doral Telluride Hotel (now the Peaks) to help market that soon-to-be-built property. Toting a degree in Economics and Corporate Recreation and a real estate license from her home state of Michigan, Cusack was soon on a path to opening her own real estate office. Telluride Luxury Rentals and Real Estate opened in 1992, at a time when Telluride was still just a burgeoning name in the resort destination realm. In the time since, Cusack didn’t just witness the changes that have helped Telluride evolve from a tiny ski town to a true community—Cusack has played a significant role in that evolution. She’s been a game changer as a common denominator among many of Telluride’s nonprofit groups and community boards, bringing her humor as well as her critical analysis to some of the town’s fundamental organizations. Cusack says it’s the lifestyle in particular that has kept her in Telluride these many years, “and the simple fact that it is one of the most beautiful places in the entire world. But I also love knowing that I can be helpful in making this a better place for others to live in as well.” Cusack is quick to convey her adoration for this place and its people, but as anyone who knows her can attest, Rosie doesn’t just talk the talk. She has been a member of the Telluride Medical Center Foundation Board since 2010, and a longtime volunteer for the Telluride Aids Benefit working in both the design realm and on the auction team. She has also been a staunch promoter for the One to One Mentoring program and is a perennial supporter of various arts events in the region. But she is perhaps best recognized as one of the hosts for the weekly talk show “Mosher Exposure” on Telluride’s radio station KOTO. Cusack hosts along with Erick and Audrey Mosher, and the program is community radio at its best: a call-in show about local events and issues with lively, entertaining banter that makes Wednesday mornings fun. Cusack and the Moshers volunteer their time for this, and have been recognized for their fundraising efforts for the station. “Frankly, anything anyone asks me to do, I’ll do,” Cusack says, admitting that she is happy to be a workhorse for these organizations because, simply put, they are what help make this community a community. “It’s about supporting those who need assistance, and creating avenues of overall betterment for this community. It’s important to build a community that’s sustainable for everybody who wants to live here.” When she isn’t devoting time to her community betterment interests, Cusack throws herself into her real estate work—a profession that has kept her busy virtually seven days a week since she opened her company 22 years ago—specializing in concierge services, property management, destination management services, luxury rentals, and real estate sales. “I love real estate, and specifically design and what makes a home a home.” Perhaps most fulfilling is her ability to match people with places, she says, and the role she plays in helping her clients make Telluride their home. “I am fortunate to live here,” she continues, noting that it is this deep sense of gratitude that keeps her motivated to maintain a feverish pace operating her business and volunteering in the community. It is also this sense of gratitude that keeps this one-and-only Telluride name humble. “I really enjoy being surrounded by greatness; the greatness of a person, place, or thing, and I am blessed to have this in my life and it’s something I do not take lightly or for granted.” \

TELLURIDE TRAPPINGS &

TOGGERY FINE CLOTHES FOR MOUNTAIN FOLK SINCE 1972

We are the source for

Retro Vintage Telluride Apparel T-shirts, Hoodies, Hats and More!

WOMEN’S Brands

free people • lucky brand • michael stars • johnny was levi’s jeans • lole • hobo leather bags • latico • frye boots smartwool • sorel • wooden ships • pendleton • ugg • 3 dot

MEN’S brands

mod-o-doc • carhartt • columbia sportswear • robert graham jeremiah • gramicci • true grit • lucky brand • royal robbins tommy bahama • born shoes • Kuhl

KIDS

Featuring Tea Collection and Appaman

109 East Colorado Ave., Downtown Telluride • 970-728-3338 TheTellurideToggery.com • Open 7 days a week 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

55


56 • BOOK REVIEWS

San Juan

July 9 - 12, 2015

Scribes

Telluride Properties has brought buyers & sellers together since 1986 with their adept market knowledge & dedication to client satisfaction.

SearchTellurideRealEstate.com Rethink Food: 100+ Doctors Can’t Be Wrong BY SHUSHANA CASTLE AND AMY-LEE GOODMAN TWO SKIRTS PRODUCTIONS, LLC $27.95 ISBN 978-0-9913588-0-9

Funny Once

Put down that burger, especially if it has cheese on it, right now. This book will forever change the way you eat. And that’s a good thing.

ANTONYA NELSON ISBN 978-1620408612 Bloomsbury, $26 ISBN 978-1620408612 No doubt the friends and acquaintances of a famous writer like Antonya Nelson are a little anxious each time she publishes a new book or story. Will they recognize themselves in one of her characters? Some flaw or tic or part of their personae that has made its way into her work? If you have spent time in Telluride, you’ll get that same uneasy feeling when reading Funny Once. Some of the fictional stories are set here, and the characters are so vivid that they seem like an old friend, a neighbor— or maybe even a little like you. That is Nelson’s gift, her ability to sculpt a character that stays with you even after the story ends. She is a master of the short story, although she has also written several novels, and this collection of short stories includes a novella. Within this abridged format she uses tiny brush strokes to paint a bigger picture, like pointillism with words: the flowered apron and perfume of Lois Mercer, the smeared makeup of Crystal Hurd as she uses her fingers to load a fork with scrambled eggs, the kidney-shaped pool in the yard of the cursing, naked, and unforgettable Bergeron Love. Nelson, a part-time Telluride resident, is equally adept at setting the scene, and from the wheezing porch doors of a small house in Kansas, to the city streets in Houston, and especially the old mining shacks and gentrified homes of Telluride, readers will get the same déjà vu from the settings that they have with her characters. All of the stories resonate in a way that is familiar and yet deliciously uncomfortable at the same time, because even as we recognize the people and places in Nelson’s work, we are not used to examining them in such a focused and revelatory light. www.TellurideMagazine.com

T ellur id eYo g a F es tiv a l.co m

Telluride: A Silver Past, A Golden Future BY SUSAN DALTON EDITIONS DU SIGNE, $50 ISBN 978-2-7468-3092-9

This book is an absolute treasure, and it belongs on every coffee table in Telluride. While there have been countless books devoted to the heritage of the region, each focused on a particular historical aspect, there is none that encompasses its entire history in as comprehensive a manner as Telluride: A Silver Past, A Golden Future. The author starts with the area’s first inhabitants, the Utes who first used this valley as a sacred seasonal hunting ground, and moves on through the trappers, the explorers, the sheep ranchers, the miners, the counter-culture of hippies, and ultimately the skiers, adventurers, and festival-goers who make Telluride what it is today. Telluride, the word for a tellurium compound with gold or silver, is not just the perfect moniker for the town—where both gold and silver were once mined— but also for the book and its narrative about the town’s economic prosperity. Telluride: A Silver Past, A Golden Future is also a collectible. The assemblage of striking historical photos, gorgeous modern photos, and vintage artwork and postcards was beautifully done. The postcards pull out from pockets artfully constructed on the pages, and each one is a treasure itself. It is hard to imagine the diligence that went into the compilation—the research, the gathering, and the carefully wrought design—but it is something for every household in town to cherish.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Tough Men in Hard Places: A Photographic Collection BY ESTHER GREENFIELD WESTWINDS PRESS, $19.99 ISBN 978-1-941821-12-1

Late in the nineteenth century, electrical power was needed to operate the struggling mining outposts in southwestern Colorado. That was the impetus for sweeping technological innovations, but it was also brutal, rugged work to pioneer infrastructure across the dangerous mountain terrain—men were electrocuted, their bodies were crushed, they suffocated in avalanches, and drowned in rushing flumes. Tough Men in Hard Places is a collection of rare historic photos of those early days, where electricity was slowly and painstakingly delivered to unimaginable places. The collection also includes stories and cutlines that put the images into a historical context—from Lucien Lucius Nunn and Nikola Tesla’s introduction here in Ames of the world’s first hydroelectric plant and AC technology, to the revolutionary 1916 illumination of the streets in Telluride, to the incredibly difficult task of bringing electricity to the remote, high-altitude mines. Tough Men will make you appreciate the innovation, grit, and backbreaking labor that brought power to these mountain communities and helped them to survive.

Remember that food pyramid you studied in health class when you were younger? Well, it’s all wrong. The meat-and-dairy diets embraced by our culture account for the chronic health problems and disease. Heart disease, diabetes, cancers, obesity, and numerous autoimmune and degenerative diseases are not just caused by genetics we’ve inherited from our parents, say the authors (part-time Telluride resident Shushana Castle and AmyLee Goodman)—it’s the eating habits we inherited that “hold the most profound but overlooked influence on our health.” But don’t just take their word for it. Peruse the 400-plus pages of accounts from physicians, distinguished scientists, and nutritionists that extol the virtues of a plant-based diet. They cite studies, present cases, and share such detailed information that the verdict is certain: a plant-based diet is the key to good health. And consuming meat and dairy is not.

tellurideyogacenter Be sure to visit the

bindu • boutique

located in the studio

201 W. Colorado Ave. Ste. 200 Upstairs in the Nugget Bldg., Corner of Main St. & Fir View schedule online at: tellurideyoga.com, (970) 729-1673 Drop-ins Welcome • We offer many styles anD levels

Consumers in the U.S. have an almost whimsical obsession with each new diet fad: Paleo. The Whole 30. Clean. Eating for your blood type. Each new trend comes with a unified theory about eating, and usually some statistical evidence that seems to corroborate the idea. Not this book, not this trend—this one is so thoroughly and convincingly researched, supported by so many studies and such overwhelming evidence, that it is nearly impossible to digest it all. (Pun intended.) Even—maybe especially—the most staunch meat-eaters and dairy fanatics need to pick this book up. It may not completely alter your eating habits, but it will convince you to at least make better food choices for you and for the family and friends you feed. It’s not easy to walk back a century’s worth of food culture and food-pyramid obeisance, but this book is a powerful first step.

June 2015 An event that brings together world-class presenters, instructors and athletes to Telluride to lecture and hold classes on the latest health, fitness, wellness, nutrition and medical trends.

Te ll uri d eWo w. c o m

970.728.0808 I tellurideproperties.com 237 South Oak Street @ the Telluride Gondola


56 • BOOK REVIEWS

San Juan

July 9 - 12, 2015

Scribes

Telluride Properties has brought buyers & sellers together since 1986 with their adept market knowledge & dedication to client satisfaction.

SearchTellurideRealEstate.com Rethink Food: 100+ Doctors Can’t Be Wrong BY SHUSHANA CASTLE AND AMY-LEE GOODMAN TWO SKIRTS PRODUCTIONS, LLC $27.95 ISBN 978-0-9913588-0-9

Funny Once

Put down that burger, especially if it has cheese on it, right now. This book will forever change the way you eat. And that’s a good thing.

ANTONYA NELSON ISBN 978-1620408612 Bloomsbury, $26 ISBN 978-1620408612 No doubt the friends and acquaintances of a famous writer like Antonya Nelson are a little anxious each time she publishes a new book or story. Will they recognize themselves in one of her characters? Some flaw or tic or part of their personae that has made its way into her work? If you have spent time in Telluride, you’ll get that same uneasy feeling when reading Funny Once. Some of the fictional stories are set here, and the characters are so vivid that they seem like an old friend, a neighbor— or maybe even a little like you. That is Nelson’s gift, her ability to sculpt a character that stays with you even after the story ends. She is a master of the short story, although she has also written several novels, and this collection of short stories includes a novella. Within this abridged format she uses tiny brush strokes to paint a bigger picture, like pointillism with words: the flowered apron and perfume of Lois Mercer, the smeared makeup of Crystal Hurd as she uses her fingers to load a fork with scrambled eggs, the kidney-shaped pool in the yard of the cursing, naked, and unforgettable Bergeron Love. Nelson, a part-time Telluride resident, is equally adept at setting the scene, and from the wheezing porch doors of a small house in Kansas, to the city streets in Houston, and especially the old mining shacks and gentrified homes of Telluride, readers will get the same déjà vu from the settings that they have with her characters. All of the stories resonate in a way that is familiar and yet deliciously uncomfortable at the same time, because even as we recognize the people and places in Nelson’s work, we are not used to examining them in such a focused and revelatory light. www.TellurideMagazine.com

T ellur id eYo g a F es tiv a l.co m

Telluride: A Silver Past, A Golden Future BY SUSAN DALTON EDITIONS DU SIGNE, $50 ISBN 978-2-7468-3092-9

This book is an absolute treasure, and it belongs on every coffee table in Telluride. While there have been countless books devoted to the heritage of the region, each focused on a particular historical aspect, there is none that encompasses its entire history in as comprehensive a manner as Telluride: A Silver Past, A Golden Future. The author starts with the area’s first inhabitants, the Utes who first used this valley as a sacred seasonal hunting ground, and moves on through the trappers, the explorers, the sheep ranchers, the miners, the counter-culture of hippies, and ultimately the skiers, adventurers, and festival-goers who make Telluride what it is today. Telluride, the word for a tellurium compound with gold or silver, is not just the perfect moniker for the town—where both gold and silver were once mined— but also for the book and its narrative about the town’s economic prosperity. Telluride: A Silver Past, A Golden Future is also a collectible. The assemblage of striking historical photos, gorgeous modern photos, and vintage artwork and postcards was beautifully done. The postcards pull out from pockets artfully constructed on the pages, and each one is a treasure itself. It is hard to imagine the diligence that went into the compilation—the research, the gathering, and the carefully wrought design—but it is something for every household in town to cherish.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

Tough Men in Hard Places: A Photographic Collection BY ESTHER GREENFIELD WESTWINDS PRESS, $19.99 ISBN 978-1-941821-12-1

Late in the nineteenth century, electrical power was needed to operate the struggling mining outposts in southwestern Colorado. That was the impetus for sweeping technological innovations, but it was also brutal, rugged work to pioneer infrastructure across the dangerous mountain terrain—men were electrocuted, their bodies were crushed, they suffocated in avalanches, and drowned in rushing flumes. Tough Men in Hard Places is a collection of rare historic photos of those early days, where electricity was slowly and painstakingly delivered to unimaginable places. The collection also includes stories and cutlines that put the images into a historical context—from Lucien Lucius Nunn and Nikola Tesla’s introduction here in Ames of the world’s first hydroelectric plant and AC technology, to the revolutionary 1916 illumination of the streets in Telluride, to the incredibly difficult task of bringing electricity to the remote, high-altitude mines. Tough Men will make you appreciate the innovation, grit, and backbreaking labor that brought power to these mountain communities and helped them to survive.

Remember that food pyramid you studied in health class when you were younger? Well, it’s all wrong. The meat-and-dairy diets embraced by our culture account for the chronic health problems and disease. Heart disease, diabetes, cancers, obesity, and numerous autoimmune and degenerative diseases are not just caused by genetics we’ve inherited from our parents, say the authors (part-time Telluride resident Shushana Castle and AmyLee Goodman)—it’s the eating habits we inherited that “hold the most profound but overlooked influence on our health.” But don’t just take their word for it. Peruse the 400-plus pages of accounts from physicians, distinguished scientists, and nutritionists that extol the virtues of a plant-based diet. They cite studies, present cases, and share such detailed information that the verdict is certain: a plant-based diet is the key to good health. And consuming meat and dairy is not.

tellurideyogacenter Be sure to visit the

bindu • boutique

located in the studio

201 W. Colorado Ave. Ste. 200 Upstairs in the Nugget Bldg., Corner of Main St. & Fir View schedule online at: tellurideyoga.com, (970) 729-1673 Drop-ins Welcome • We offer many styles anD levels

Consumers in the U.S. have an almost whimsical obsession with each new diet fad: Paleo. The Whole 30. Clean. Eating for your blood type. Each new trend comes with a unified theory about eating, and usually some statistical evidence that seems to corroborate the idea. Not this book, not this trend—this one is so thoroughly and convincingly researched, supported by so many studies and such overwhelming evidence, that it is nearly impossible to digest it all. (Pun intended.) Even—maybe especially—the most staunch meat-eaters and dairy fanatics need to pick this book up. It may not completely alter your eating habits, but it will convince you to at least make better food choices for you and for the family and friends you feed. It’s not easy to walk back a century’s worth of food culture and food-pyramid obeisance, but this book is a powerful first step.

June 2015 An event that brings together world-class presenters, instructors and athletes to Telluride to lecture and hold classes on the latest health, fitness, wellness, nutrition and medical trends.

Te ll uri d eWo w. c o m

970.728.0808 I tellurideproperties.com 237 South Oak Street @ the Telluride Gondola


58 • BOOK REVIEWS

am salvage Barnwood and Reclaimed Lumber is Our Specialty

Sales & Installation • Licensed & Insured Since 1985

Colorado Mountain Dogs

Telluride Bluegrass Festival: Forty Years of Festivation

BY PLANET BLUEGRASS/DAN SADOWSKY (A.K.A. PASTOR MUSTARD) Impress Inc., $60 ISBN 978-1-4951-1254-6 When people recognize Telluride, it’s generally for one of two things: the skiing, or the Bluegrass Festival. Telluride Bluegrass Festival has become synonymous with the town itself over its 40-plus year reign, and it has also become an integral part of the town’s culture. From its humble beginnings in 1974, to its grand reputation today as the premier event for the musical genre, Telluride Bluegrass Festival has taken on a life and a character of its own. This fine art book does a terrific job of capturing the essence of that character, with essays from artists including Sam Bush, Chris Thile, Béla Fleck, Emmylou Harris, Jerry Douglas, and Winston Marshall (of Mumford & Sons), gorgeous photos and full-page reproductions of each year’s poster, and most colorful of all, a play-byplay of each festival written by the inimitable Pastor Mustard—the stage name for Dan Sadowsky, who emceed the festival in his unique style for decades. Pastor Mustard, despite all of the years that he purportedly dropped acid while entertaining the crowds between sets with pithy humor and goofy jokes as he announced each act, seems to have a very vivid recollection of each year’s event. His accounts are both historically and hysterically accurate—from the weather (snow, rain, sun), to which artist/band stole the show, to the backstory about the bands, music scene, and festival. His introduction is titled “View From the Pulpit,” and his narrative woven throughout the book gives us the same perspective: equal parts enamored fan and festival insider, the passages give us a glimpse of what happened both out in the crowd as well as backstage. Forty Years of Festivation is a funny, insightful, and beautifully crafted hardbound look at four decades of bluegrass in Telluride—a perfect gift for the festivarian among your family and friends. www.TellurideMagazine.com

Carpet & Upholstery • Tile, Stone & Grout Oriental & Fine Rugs • Pet Odor Control Fast Drying Time • Janitorial Teflon Fiber Protection • Vinyl & Laminate Carpet Repairs & Restretching

Emergency Water Extraction & Restoration

BY M. JOHN FAYHEE WESTWINDS PRESS, $16.99 ISBN 978-0-87108-310-4

Eagle’s View of San Juan Mountains BY WOJTEK RYCHLIK MOTHER’S HOUSE PUBLISHING, $65 ISBN 978-1-61888-085-7

It’s hard to really take in the scale and grandeur of the San Juan Mountains when they are hovering above you, but with an aerial view, you can get a clear picture of how they are oriented and how massive they really are. That is precisely what photographer Wotjek Rychlik has done—he commissioned flights and took aerial photographs of the peaks in all their majesty to compile this book. Rychlik has also thoroughly catalogued all of the elevations of the most prominent peaks, and has included other geographic elements and trivia. The book will certainly whet the appetites of mountaineers hungry to bag the peaks and looking for information about the lay of the land. Eagle’s View of San Juan Mountains is not cheap—Between the Covers bookstore owner Daiva Chesonis likes to say that “jet fuel is expensive”—but this collection is something that will hold its value for years to come.

San Juan

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

To say that people in the mountains of Colorado love dogs is an understatement. As M. John Fayhee quotes his art director in the introduction to this book, “It’s like buying a Subaru Outback … as soon as people move to the mountains, they think they must have a dog. It’s like an accessory.” But as Fayhee goes on to illuminate in Colorado Mountain Dogs, the relationship between mountain folk and their four-legged companions goes much deeper than that. It’s easy enough to leave an accessory in the closet, but when you are hiking, biking, skiing, paddling, canyoneering, even getting married, your best friend is always invited. Fayhee, the longtime editor of Mountain Gazette and author of several books, infuses this collection of dog photos and essays with his signature wit and colorful prose. The most entertaining chapter is the one he devotes to the naming of dogs, including laugh-out-loud anecdotes about the aging hippie outside of the natural grocery store who scared him with her shouts of “Bad Karma! Bad Karma!” (her dog’s name was Karma) and the boyfriend trying to retrieve his girlfriend’s peripatetic Weimaraner, yelling “Groovy! Groovy!” at the top of his lungs, drawing perplexed stares. A few Telluride dogs and local scenes make an appearance in the book, hiking Tomboy Road, outside the Steaming Bean, and up by Lizard Head Pass. But even if your pooch didn’t make the cut, there’s still plenty for you to enjoy with Colorado Mountain Dogs, from the strident advice about how to train your pet, to the heartfelt stories about the human-canine bond, to the beautiful shots of the mountain terrain and the dogs that bound and play therein, the book is full of humor, wisdom, and great writing that everyone will appreciate—even if they are not a “dog person.”

Scribes

The largest selection of reclaimed lumber in Colorado!

Telluride: The Outlaw Spirit of a Colorado Town

Since 1975 Historic Telluride’s Victorian Pharmacy aaaaa

BY INGRID LUNDAHL INGRIDLUNDAHL.COM, $90 ISBN 978-0-578-13679-0

Have you ever felt nostalgic for a time and place you haven’t experienced? Telluride photographer Ingrid Lundahl’s book will evoke just that type of longing, that deep Telluride-back-in-the-day envy that people who relocate here are susceptible to. The Outlaw Spirit of a Colorado Town is a colorful scrapbook/yearbook chronicling the coming of age of the town, starting in 1978 (the so-called YX era) and commencing through the decades that followed. Ingrid Lundahl was the first paying guest to stay at the restored New Sheridan Hotel on Christmas Eve in 1978, and went on to become a respected local photographer. She documented friends, events, festivals, and the beauty of the town for decades, and this year she finally compiled the best of her work and some of her great stories in this art book. The result is like an unauthorized bio of the town, filled with rollicking tales of lawless revelry, a spirited place that gave new meaning to the term Wild West. The book is divided into sections: Outlaws (the colorful characters from this notorious era), Bluegrass, Fourth of July, Jazz, Film, Wild Weekends, Saloons, Performances, Benefits & Bashes (a collection of memorable festive events, celebrities, and musicians in town), KOTO-FM (a nod to the long-standing cultural institution), Wild Women (because women were outlaws, too), Miscellany (a wonderful assortment of random lifestyle shots), The Mountain (historical and informal photos), and The Big Picture (gorgeous landscape photography of the region). The book doesn’t just showcase the spirit of the town, it also showcases Ingrid Lundahl’s work—she is a talented photographer with a great eye, and a gifted storyteller. Prints of the photographs appearing in the book are available to order online at IngridLundahl.com. \

Cleaning 970-729-0332 Installation 970-729-1911 PO Box 1731 Telluride, CO 81435 7291911@gmail.com

970.596.2407

Prescriptions Natural/Organic Products Drug & Health Aids Homeopathic Remedies Greeting Cards T-shirts & Hats Unique Souvenirs

100 Industrial Park Rd., Gunnison, CO 81230 barnwoodamsalvage.com greenbldr@gmail.com

aaaaa

970.728.3601

236 West Colorado Avenue

Thinking Green? ...

It’s Not New

TMA ARCHITECTS TIM MONTGOMERY

SEE HOW WE HELP PEOPLE LIVE GREEN

970.708.8438 | www.tmaarchitects.org Office in Telluride area at 22 Redcliffe Rd PO Box 0454 Placerville, Colorado 81430

• Sustainable Architecture • Leed AP • Passive House - Certified • Residential + Commercial Design • Rehab + Additions • Eco-Community Design • Award-Winning LEED Platinum Design

Photography by Brenda Colwell

970.728.9268 brendacolwellphoto.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

59


58 • BOOK REVIEWS

am salvage Barnwood and Reclaimed Lumber is Our Specialty

Sales & Installation • Licensed & Insured Since 1985

Colorado Mountain Dogs

Telluride Bluegrass Festival: Forty Years of Festivation

BY PLANET BLUEGRASS/DAN SADOWSKY (A.K.A. PASTOR MUSTARD) Impress Inc., $60 ISBN 978-1-4951-1254-6 When people recognize Telluride, it’s generally for one of two things: the skiing, or the Bluegrass Festival. Telluride Bluegrass Festival has become synonymous with the town itself over its 40-plus year reign, and it has also become an integral part of the town’s culture. From its humble beginnings in 1974, to its grand reputation today as the premier event for the musical genre, Telluride Bluegrass Festival has taken on a life and a character of its own. This fine art book does a terrific job of capturing the essence of that character, with essays from artists including Sam Bush, Chris Thile, Béla Fleck, Emmylou Harris, Jerry Douglas, and Winston Marshall (of Mumford & Sons), gorgeous photos and full-page reproductions of each year’s poster, and most colorful of all, a play-byplay of each festival written by the inimitable Pastor Mustard—the stage name for Dan Sadowsky, who emceed the festival in his unique style for decades. Pastor Mustard, despite all of the years that he purportedly dropped acid while entertaining the crowds between sets with pithy humor and goofy jokes as he announced each act, seems to have a very vivid recollection of each year’s event. His accounts are both historically and hysterically accurate—from the weather (snow, rain, sun), to which artist/band stole the show, to the backstory about the bands, music scene, and festival. His introduction is titled “View From the Pulpit,” and his narrative woven throughout the book gives us the same perspective: equal parts enamored fan and festival insider, the passages give us a glimpse of what happened both out in the crowd as well as backstage. Forty Years of Festivation is a funny, insightful, and beautifully crafted hardbound look at four decades of bluegrass in Telluride—a perfect gift for the festivarian among your family and friends. www.TellurideMagazine.com

Carpet & Upholstery • Tile, Stone & Grout Oriental & Fine Rugs • Pet Odor Control Fast Drying Time • Janitorial Teflon Fiber Protection • Vinyl & Laminate Carpet Repairs & Restretching

Emergency Water Extraction & Restoration

BY M. JOHN FAYHEE WESTWINDS PRESS, $16.99 ISBN 978-0-87108-310-4

Eagle’s View of San Juan Mountains BY WOJTEK RYCHLIK MOTHER’S HOUSE PUBLISHING, $65 ISBN 978-1-61888-085-7

It’s hard to really take in the scale and grandeur of the San Juan Mountains when they are hovering above you, but with an aerial view, you can get a clear picture of how they are oriented and how massive they really are. That is precisely what photographer Wotjek Rychlik has done—he commissioned flights and took aerial photographs of the peaks in all their majesty to compile this book. Rychlik has also thoroughly catalogued all of the elevations of the most prominent peaks, and has included other geographic elements and trivia. The book will certainly whet the appetites of mountaineers hungry to bag the peaks and looking for information about the lay of the land. Eagle’s View of San Juan Mountains is not cheap—Between the Covers bookstore owner Daiva Chesonis likes to say that “jet fuel is expensive”—but this collection is something that will hold its value for years to come.

San Juan

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

To say that people in the mountains of Colorado love dogs is an understatement. As M. John Fayhee quotes his art director in the introduction to this book, “It’s like buying a Subaru Outback … as soon as people move to the mountains, they think they must have a dog. It’s like an accessory.” But as Fayhee goes on to illuminate in Colorado Mountain Dogs, the relationship between mountain folk and their four-legged companions goes much deeper than that. It’s easy enough to leave an accessory in the closet, but when you are hiking, biking, skiing, paddling, canyoneering, even getting married, your best friend is always invited. Fayhee, the longtime editor of Mountain Gazette and author of several books, infuses this collection of dog photos and essays with his signature wit and colorful prose. The most entertaining chapter is the one he devotes to the naming of dogs, including laugh-out-loud anecdotes about the aging hippie outside of the natural grocery store who scared him with her shouts of “Bad Karma! Bad Karma!” (her dog’s name was Karma) and the boyfriend trying to retrieve his girlfriend’s peripatetic Weimaraner, yelling “Groovy! Groovy!” at the top of his lungs, drawing perplexed stares. A few Telluride dogs and local scenes make an appearance in the book, hiking Tomboy Road, outside the Steaming Bean, and up by Lizard Head Pass. But even if your pooch didn’t make the cut, there’s still plenty for you to enjoy with Colorado Mountain Dogs, from the strident advice about how to train your pet, to the heartfelt stories about the human-canine bond, to the beautiful shots of the mountain terrain and the dogs that bound and play therein, the book is full of humor, wisdom, and great writing that everyone will appreciate—even if they are not a “dog person.”

Scribes

The largest selection of reclaimed lumber in Colorado!

Telluride: The Outlaw Spirit of a Colorado Town

Since 1975 Historic Telluride’s Victorian Pharmacy aaaaa

BY INGRID LUNDAHL INGRIDLUNDAHL.COM, $90 ISBN 978-0-578-13679-0

Have you ever felt nostalgic for a time and place you haven’t experienced? Telluride photographer Ingrid Lundahl’s book will evoke just that type of longing, that deep Telluride-back-in-the-day envy that people who relocate here are susceptible to. The Outlaw Spirit of a Colorado Town is a colorful scrapbook/yearbook chronicling the coming of age of the town, starting in 1978 (the so-called YX era) and commencing through the decades that followed. Ingrid Lundahl was the first paying guest to stay at the restored New Sheridan Hotel on Christmas Eve in 1978, and went on to become a respected local photographer. She documented friends, events, festivals, and the beauty of the town for decades, and this year she finally compiled the best of her work and some of her great stories in this art book. The result is like an unauthorized bio of the town, filled with rollicking tales of lawless revelry, a spirited place that gave new meaning to the term Wild West. The book is divided into sections: Outlaws (the colorful characters from this notorious era), Bluegrass, Fourth of July, Jazz, Film, Wild Weekends, Saloons, Performances, Benefits & Bashes (a collection of memorable festive events, celebrities, and musicians in town), KOTO-FM (a nod to the long-standing cultural institution), Wild Women (because women were outlaws, too), Miscellany (a wonderful assortment of random lifestyle shots), The Mountain (historical and informal photos), and The Big Picture (gorgeous landscape photography of the region). The book doesn’t just showcase the spirit of the town, it also showcases Ingrid Lundahl’s work—she is a talented photographer with a great eye, and a gifted storyteller. Prints of the photographs appearing in the book are available to order online at IngridLundahl.com. \

Cleaning 970-729-0332 Installation 970-729-1911 PO Box 1731 Telluride, CO 81435 7291911@gmail.com

970.596.2407

Prescriptions Natural/Organic Products Drug & Health Aids Homeopathic Remedies Greeting Cards T-shirts & Hats Unique Souvenirs

100 Industrial Park Rd., Gunnison, CO 81230 barnwoodamsalvage.com greenbldr@gmail.com

aaaaa

970.728.3601

236 West Colorado Avenue

Thinking Green? ...

It’s Not New

TMA ARCHITECTS TIM MONTGOMERY

SEE HOW WE HELP PEOPLE LIVE GREEN

970.708.8438 | www.tmaarchitects.org Office in Telluride area at 22 Redcliffe Rd PO Box 0454 Placerville, Colorado 81430

• Sustainable Architecture • Leed AP • Passive House - Certified • Residential + Commercial Design • Rehab + Additions • Eco-Community Design • Award-Winning LEED Platinum Design

Photography by Brenda Colwell

970.728.9268 brendacolwellphoto.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

59


Fa m

60 • LOCAL FLAVOR

y l d n e i r F li y Sportsbar

Sit. Eat. Drink. Good Dog!

Come in and try what everyone is talking about! It’s Hip to be Square! Award Winning Detroit Style Pizza. 1st Place International Pizza Challenge 2013 - Las Vegas, NV

970-728-8046 • browndogpizza.com 110 East Colorado Ave.

Peace of Cake C R E AT I VE LOC A L CON F ECTI O NER HELPS C ELEBR ATE SPEC IAL OCC ASIONS By D. Dion

M

ost people can make a basic birthday cake, but when your 5-year-old requests something special like a Star Wars character or a Disney princess, you’re going to need some professional help. In Telluride, the secret’s out: the fondant fairy is Cheryl Loebe, who runs a business from her home called “Peace of Cake.” Loebe started out her baking career the way most people do, learning to craft special treats from her mother and her grandmother. But those were simpler times, just a pumpkin cake for Halloween or ice-cream-cone cupcakes. “It was something they handed down, just different creative things they did on a holiday,” says Loebe. www.TellurideMagazine.com

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}

“It’s those little treasures in life, that special, cool cake you get, that make you feel really good.”

That was before Pinterest. Now, crafty homemakers can pin and post their elaborate creations, raising the bar on what is expected from the average mom and dad on a birthday or from the maid of honor at a bachelorette party. So long, sheet cake. See you later, chocolate frosting from a can. This is the Internet era, and you’re going to need to Google a recipe and use your imagination. Or you can just call Peace of Cake and order the cake of your dreams.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

“I have a cake craft page on Pinterest, where people follow me, and I follow them back for ideas. That was definitely something Grandma didn’t have,” says Loebe. “Now you can YouTube anything, and I haven’t run into anything that I haven’t been able to do.” Loebe took her chef skills to the next level—literally—five years ago, as a stay-at-home mom baking at altitude here in Telluride. There is a special chemistry involved with bak-

ing at high elevation, adjusting the leavening agents, amount of sugar or flour, and the baking time or temperature; and most online tips only account for 3,500 feet of elevation, less than half of the altitude here. “I totally had to alter the recipe living at 10,000 feet, and that took probably a year of trial and error. I had lived here for 15 years, cooking and baking, before I delved in, so I kind of knew my own recipes.” The real challenge wasn’t just the cake; it was the frosting. Popular now are the 3-D scenes topping a cake or cupcake, requiring a special type of artistry and skill. Loebe says she does most of the cakes freehand, and that it’s inspiring to make special designs. “You can look at the Internet for ideas,

and I get a lot of photos. And I’m lucky in the sense that I can mimic the photos, but I really love it when I don’t get a photo. That’s the creative side of it.” The creations she makes are magical: a VW bus, a monster, a stormtrooper’s helmet, a giraffe, a gondola car, lots of Minecraft-inspired designs, even B.B. King’s birthday cake—a life-size reproduction of his guitar “Lucille.” Basically, any whimsical idea you can think of, she can bring to life. Or at least to icing. Loebe’s Peace of Cake business first started to take shape when she made some special confections, chocolate truffles colored like the red and white polka-dotted amanita mushrooms, for the holiday bazaar. She was helping a friend with her fairy-themed booth. Peace of Cake sprouted from there, and now she has her own booth at the bazaar, selling more than 500 truffles and premade cupcake toppers. She also makes two to five cakes a week these days, and likes that her

business is still small and manageable, and that her only advertising is by word of mouth. Loebe gets most of her orders with frantic, last-minute phone calls and texts. “I really rely on locals, and that’s mostly who I service. Birthday cakes and baby showers. I do wedding cakes too, but you have to catch me on the right day,” she laughs. “Weddings are stressful.” Loebe says that people really like that she delivers the cakes for free, but secretly, that’s one of her favorite parts of the endeavor. Presenting the cake, seeing the surprise on the face of the person receiving it. She has sons, an 8- and a 14-year-old, so she particularly likes making the little girls cakes, the “cutesy fairy” things, she says. Her last drop-off was to a 3-yearold girl, who was so excited that she stomped her feet and shook her hands to see the magical dress cake. “It was awesome. It’s those little treasures in life, that special, cool cake you get, that make you feel really good. You remember those birthdays.” \

Telluride’s Independent School and Ski Academy Small Class Sizes, Challenging Academics, Nurturing School Culture, Comprehensive Arts & Language Programs, Rock and Roll Academy Music Program, Experiential & Service Learning

Visitors Warmly Welcomed Tel: 970.728.1969 www.telluridemtnschool.org Financial Aid Available

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

61


Fa m

60 • LOCAL FLAVOR

y l d n e i r F li y Sportsbar

Sit. Eat. Drink. Good Dog!

Come in and try what everyone is talking about! It’s Hip to be Square! Award Winning Detroit Style Pizza. 1st Place International Pizza Challenge 2013 - Las Vegas, NV

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Peace of Cake C R E AT I VE LOC A L CON F ECTI O NER HELPS C ELEBR ATE SPEC IAL OCC ASIONS By D. Dion

M

ost people can make a basic birthday cake, but when your 5-year-old requests something special like a Star Wars character or a Disney princess, you’re going to need some professional help. In Telluride, the secret’s out: the fondant fairy is Cheryl Loebe, who runs a business from her home called “Peace of Cake.” Loebe started out her baking career the way most people do, learning to craft special treats from her mother and her grandmother. But those were simpler times, just a pumpkin cake for Halloween or ice-cream-cone cupcakes. “It was something they handed down, just different creative things they did on a holiday,” says Loebe. www.TellurideMagazine.com

{

}

“It’s those little treasures in life, that special, cool cake you get, that make you feel really good.”

That was before Pinterest. Now, crafty homemakers can pin and post their elaborate creations, raising the bar on what is expected from the average mom and dad on a birthday or from the maid of honor at a bachelorette party. So long, sheet cake. See you later, chocolate frosting from a can. This is the Internet era, and you’re going to need to Google a recipe and use your imagination. Or you can just call Peace of Cake and order the cake of your dreams.

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

“I have a cake craft page on Pinterest, where people follow me, and I follow them back for ideas. That was definitely something Grandma didn’t have,” says Loebe. “Now you can YouTube anything, and I haven’t run into anything that I haven’t been able to do.” Loebe took her chef skills to the next level—literally—five years ago, as a stay-at-home mom baking at altitude here in Telluride. There is a special chemistry involved with bak-

ing at high elevation, adjusting the leavening agents, amount of sugar or flour, and the baking time or temperature; and most online tips only account for 3,500 feet of elevation, less than half of the altitude here. “I totally had to alter the recipe living at 10,000 feet, and that took probably a year of trial and error. I had lived here for 15 years, cooking and baking, before I delved in, so I kind of knew my own recipes.” The real challenge wasn’t just the cake; it was the frosting. Popular now are the 3-D scenes topping a cake or cupcake, requiring a special type of artistry and skill. Loebe says she does most of the cakes freehand, and that it’s inspiring to make special designs. “You can look at the Internet for ideas,

and I get a lot of photos. And I’m lucky in the sense that I can mimic the photos, but I really love it when I don’t get a photo. That’s the creative side of it.” The creations she makes are magical: a VW bus, a monster, a stormtrooper’s helmet, a giraffe, a gondola car, lots of Minecraft-inspired designs, even B.B. King’s birthday cake—a life-size reproduction of his guitar “Lucille.” Basically, any whimsical idea you can think of, she can bring to life. Or at least to icing. Loebe’s Peace of Cake business first started to take shape when she made some special confections, chocolate truffles colored like the red and white polka-dotted amanita mushrooms, for the holiday bazaar. She was helping a friend with her fairy-themed booth. Peace of Cake sprouted from there, and now she has her own booth at the bazaar, selling more than 500 truffles and premade cupcake toppers. She also makes two to five cakes a week these days, and likes that her

business is still small and manageable, and that her only advertising is by word of mouth. Loebe gets most of her orders with frantic, last-minute phone calls and texts. “I really rely on locals, and that’s mostly who I service. Birthday cakes and baby showers. I do wedding cakes too, but you have to catch me on the right day,” she laughs. “Weddings are stressful.” Loebe says that people really like that she delivers the cakes for free, but secretly, that’s one of her favorite parts of the endeavor. Presenting the cake, seeing the surprise on the face of the person receiving it. She has sons, an 8- and a 14-year-old, so she particularly likes making the little girls cakes, the “cutesy fairy” things, she says. Her last drop-off was to a 3-yearold girl, who was so excited that she stomped her feet and shook her hands to see the magical dress cake. “It was awesome. It’s those little treasures in life, that special, cool cake you get, that make you feel really good. You remember those birthdays.” \

Telluride’s Independent School and Ski Academy Small Class Sizes, Challenging Academics, Nurturing School Culture, Comprehensive Arts & Language Programs, Rock and Roll Academy Music Program, Experiential & Service Learning

Visitors Warmly Welcomed Tel: 970.728.1969 www.telluridemtnschool.org Financial Aid Available

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

www.TellurideMagazine.com

61


62 • INSIDE ART

Fire Art MEET WH E E L S OF ZO R OAST ER C R E ATO R A N TO N V I DI T Z - WA R D By Elizabeth Guest

www.TellurideMagazine.com

loaded with wood, set on fire, and spun into rotation. The result is a revolving display of sparks dancing in the darkness matched by the grand spectacle of burning wood logs tumbling within the shifting wheels. The piece celebrates fire at its extreme, which explains its namesake sixth century BC prophet and visionary Zoroaster and the ancient religion Zoroastrianism that used fire as a form of worship. “I just like doing fire art, and I’d still do it even if there wasn’t Burning Man,” says Viditz-Ward. “At this point, I know how much energy and materials are involved, so it’s more about seeing the end product, sharing it with other people, and hearing the response you get back.” Burning Man has been a welcoming venue for Viditz-Ward’s art. He has contributed many pyrotechnic displays to the festival, including Fire Spinner (2007), The Wheel of Thwarted Ambition (2008), Palindrome (2009), Towering Inferno (2010) and Bapteme Du Feu (2012). “Every time I do a piece, there is something I see that I want to do in the next piece,” he says. “Scale is a big draw, but there is also the draw of fire to begin with—and to see it in motion with a constant burn going is kind of mesmerizing.” Art often prompts a personal connection between the viewer and the piece of work. Fire art, however,

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

“You can spend your life hating what you do and fail, or you can spend your life loving what you do and still fail. You’ve just got to do what you want to do.”

}

t took several attempts to pin down local artist Anton Viditz-Ward for an interview. He’s not like the ubiquitous plein air painters that you see on Telluride’s main street coloring pretty canvases of cascading waterfalls and cumulus-clouded skies. After a week of phone tag, he made it clear—he was extremely busy with metal work, on the side of a cliff, for 13 hours a day, in snow or shine. It wasn’t until the Daily Planet printed a front-page photograph of Viditz-Ward’s team of Access in Motion workers, installing pipe in harnesses and hanging from a rope on the side of a cliff, that it registered how completely serious Viditz-Ward is about what he does. Metal work like that comes first, for the practical purposes of paying bills, but what Viditz-Ward’s also completely serious about is his art. With a background in architecture and welding, he creates massive, dynamic fire art pieces that blaze and spark patterns like a Jackson Pollack in the night sky. Viditz-Ward completed his current project, the Wheels of Zoroaster, in August 2014 for its premiere at Burning Man in Nevada—a regular event for Viditz-Ward and his fire art installations. Comprised of two metal wheels, one 15 feet in diameter, another 13 feet in diameter, the Wheels of Zoroaster gets

{

I

Ken Conte

almost forces an immediate, visceral reaction from the intensity of the heat, the trailing of ash, and the hypnotic back-and-forth motion of the flames. There is just something in the human DNA that draws us to fire, so much so that there are even TV shows like “Yule Log” that broadcast a single shot of a burning fireplace for hours. Viditz-Ward’s fire art goes far beyond the confines of a square fireplace or a TV screen. His kinetic pieces are painstakingly devised: Prior to construction, he spends several months on design, including drawings and cardboard models. The construction takes around four months and requires a team of

volunteers. Since 2006, Viditz-Ward has worked at his studio at the Deep Creek Mine, which is stripped of vegetation, the perfect worry-free zone for fire art exploration. When it’s time to show a finished piece, he’ll dismantle and pack it on a trailer for the 1,000-mile journey on narrow desert roads to its Burning Man destination. Each night at Burning Man, he and his team lit up the Wheels for a unique and inspiring fire show. He credits the efforts of his volunteer crew with both set-up as well as cleanup—there’s lots of ash involved in fire art, and Burning Man operates on a leave-no-trace policy. Viditz-Ward is afforded few opportunities to show his work in Telluride due to permits, fire danger, and space issues, but local crowds have seen his art at memorable occasions around town. Early last winter, he constructed a ski tree installation from recycled skis for a winter welcoming ceremony as an offering to Ullr, the patron saint of skiers. This winter, he will show the Wheels of Zoroaster in conjunction with Telluride’s newest event, the Telluride Fire Festival, January 15-19. He will present various pieces at a highly anticipated gala at the Deep Creek Mine that promises an explosive array of fire festivities. Viditz-Ward delights in the communal spirit of fire. Crowd interaction is an important part of his pieces, evident in the hand cranks that keep the Wheels of Zoroaster in motion. His artistic expressions are larger-than-life and explosive, but in person Viditz-Ward is a low-key, focused, straightforward individual. “I’ve got pages of things that I want to work with,” he says. “It’s a lot of time and money and I drain my bank account to zero each time, then start all over.” He doesn’t mind starting back at zero, and just sees at it as a sustainable cycle of being an artist in the mountains. It’s the same lifestyle he’s enjoyed since he moved to Telluride in 1992, to snowboard, climb, bike, and focus on his art. He embraces the technical challenges and the mechanical engineering required of his complicated creations. He deals with the lack of heavy machinery to help in the moving and maneuvering of his works. “I recently read a quote about how you can spend your life hating what you do and fail, or you can spend your life loving what you do and still fail,” he explains. “You’ve just got to do what you want to do.” \

Jump... i nto ou r ` Ski Apres

lunch & dinner kids’ menu full bar

970.728.9515

Relax@myAromaSpa.com 307 East Colorado Ave SERVICES

MASSAGE

IN SPA & MOBILE

SKIN CARE

HAIR

NAILS

5 min. FREE @ our OXYGEN BAR for an “Altitude Adjustment”

Skea Ski Wear available @ AromaSpa 307 East Coloado Ave

ONE STOP SHOPPING

RELAXATION • FASHION • BEAUTY

outdoor patio

open every day • 728-3985 www.oaktelluride.com

Available Exclusively at

970-728-5566

204 W. COLORADO AVENUE, TELLURIDE

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

WWW.ELINOFF.COM

www.TellurideMagazine.com

63


62 • INSIDE ART

Fire Art MEET WH E E L S OF ZO R OAST ER C R E ATO R A N TO N V I DI T Z - WA R D By Elizabeth Guest

www.TellurideMagazine.com

loaded with wood, set on fire, and spun into rotation. The result is a revolving display of sparks dancing in the darkness matched by the grand spectacle of burning wood logs tumbling within the shifting wheels. The piece celebrates fire at its extreme, which explains its namesake sixth century BC prophet and visionary Zoroaster and the ancient religion Zoroastrianism that used fire as a form of worship. “I just like doing fire art, and I’d still do it even if there wasn’t Burning Man,” says Viditz-Ward. “At this point, I know how much energy and materials are involved, so it’s more about seeing the end product, sharing it with other people, and hearing the response you get back.” Burning Man has been a welcoming venue for Viditz-Ward’s art. He has contributed many pyrotechnic displays to the festival, including Fire Spinner (2007), The Wheel of Thwarted Ambition (2008), Palindrome (2009), Towering Inferno (2010) and Bapteme Du Feu (2012). “Every time I do a piece, there is something I see that I want to do in the next piece,” he says. “Scale is a big draw, but there is also the draw of fire to begin with—and to see it in motion with a constant burn going is kind of mesmerizing.” Art often prompts a personal connection between the viewer and the piece of work. Fire art, however,

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

“You can spend your life hating what you do and fail, or you can spend your life loving what you do and still fail. You’ve just got to do what you want to do.”

}

t took several attempts to pin down local artist Anton Viditz-Ward for an interview. He’s not like the ubiquitous plein air painters that you see on Telluride’s main street coloring pretty canvases of cascading waterfalls and cumulus-clouded skies. After a week of phone tag, he made it clear—he was extremely busy with metal work, on the side of a cliff, for 13 hours a day, in snow or shine. It wasn’t until the Daily Planet printed a front-page photograph of Viditz-Ward’s team of Access in Motion workers, installing pipe in harnesses and hanging from a rope on the side of a cliff, that it registered how completely serious Viditz-Ward is about what he does. Metal work like that comes first, for the practical purposes of paying bills, but what Viditz-Ward’s also completely serious about is his art. With a background in architecture and welding, he creates massive, dynamic fire art pieces that blaze and spark patterns like a Jackson Pollack in the night sky. Viditz-Ward completed his current project, the Wheels of Zoroaster, in August 2014 for its premiere at Burning Man in Nevada—a regular event for Viditz-Ward and his fire art installations. Comprised of two metal wheels, one 15 feet in diameter, another 13 feet in diameter, the Wheels of Zoroaster gets

{

I

Ken Conte

almost forces an immediate, visceral reaction from the intensity of the heat, the trailing of ash, and the hypnotic back-and-forth motion of the flames. There is just something in the human DNA that draws us to fire, so much so that there are even TV shows like “Yule Log” that broadcast a single shot of a burning fireplace for hours. Viditz-Ward’s fire art goes far beyond the confines of a square fireplace or a TV screen. His kinetic pieces are painstakingly devised: Prior to construction, he spends several months on design, including drawings and cardboard models. The construction takes around four months and requires a team of

volunteers. Since 2006, Viditz-Ward has worked at his studio at the Deep Creek Mine, which is stripped of vegetation, the perfect worry-free zone for fire art exploration. When it’s time to show a finished piece, he’ll dismantle and pack it on a trailer for the 1,000-mile journey on narrow desert roads to its Burning Man destination. Each night at Burning Man, he and his team lit up the Wheels for a unique and inspiring fire show. He credits the efforts of his volunteer crew with both set-up as well as cleanup—there’s lots of ash involved in fire art, and Burning Man operates on a leave-no-trace policy. Viditz-Ward is afforded few opportunities to show his work in Telluride due to permits, fire danger, and space issues, but local crowds have seen his art at memorable occasions around town. Early last winter, he constructed a ski tree installation from recycled skis for a winter welcoming ceremony as an offering to Ullr, the patron saint of skiers. This winter, he will show the Wheels of Zoroaster in conjunction with Telluride’s newest event, the Telluride Fire Festival, January 15-19. He will present various pieces at a highly anticipated gala at the Deep Creek Mine that promises an explosive array of fire festivities. Viditz-Ward delights in the communal spirit of fire. Crowd interaction is an important part of his pieces, evident in the hand cranks that keep the Wheels of Zoroaster in motion. His artistic expressions are larger-than-life and explosive, but in person Viditz-Ward is a low-key, focused, straightforward individual. “I’ve got pages of things that I want to work with,” he says. “It’s a lot of time and money and I drain my bank account to zero each time, then start all over.” He doesn’t mind starting back at zero, and just sees at it as a sustainable cycle of being an artist in the mountains. It’s the same lifestyle he’s enjoyed since he moved to Telluride in 1992, to snowboard, climb, bike, and focus on his art. He embraces the technical challenges and the mechanical engineering required of his complicated creations. He deals with the lack of heavy machinery to help in the moving and maneuvering of his works. “I recently read a quote about how you can spend your life hating what you do and fail, or you can spend your life loving what you do and still fail,” he explains. “You’ve just got to do what you want to do.” \

Jump... i nto ou r ` Ski Apres

lunch & dinner kids’ menu full bar

970.728.9515

Relax@myAromaSpa.com 307 East Colorado Ave SERVICES

MASSAGE

IN SPA & MOBILE

SKIN CARE

HAIR

NAILS

5 min. FREE @ our OXYGEN BAR for an “Altitude Adjustment”

Skea Ski Wear available @ AromaSpa 307 East Coloado Ave

ONE STOP SHOPPING

RELAXATION • FASHION • BEAUTY

outdoor patio

open every day • 728-3985 www.oaktelluride.com

Available Exclusively at

970-728-5566

204 W. COLORADO AVENUE, TELLURIDE

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015

WWW.ELINOFF.COM

www.TellurideMagazine.com

63


NEW EXPANDED RETAIL STORE Come See Us on Main Street: 327 East Colorado Ave

970.728.8238 www.LuxWest.com info@LuxWest.com


NEW EXPANDED RETAIL STORE Come See Us on Main Street: 327 East Colorado Ave

970.728.8238 www.LuxWest.com info@LuxWest.com


66 • TELLURIDE FACES

SAVOR THE

A Last Look

UNPARALLELED CUISINE

WHATEVER YOUR PALATE MAY BE, and delight in some of the best cuisine in the West. Dine in style at our signature restaurant, the Chop House – world renowned for its dry aged USDA Black Angus. Chef Erich Owen creates our delicious fare using only organic free range a scrumptious meal for an unforgettable experience.

FAVORITES FROM BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER CLASSIC EGGS BENEDICT 14

MAC & CHEESE 9 Three Cheeses, Bacon Lardons

Hollandaise Sauce. Served with Roasted New Potatoes

RACK OF LAMB 39 Quinoa Custard, Fresh Figs, Mint Syrup

HOUSEMADE WAFFLES 10 Fresh Berries, Whipped Cream, Maple Syrup BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP 10 Crème Fraîche, Pear Chutney PAN SEARED PISTACHIO ENCRUSTED TROUT SPINACH SALAD 15 Warm Bacon, Sherry & Mustard Vinaigrette, Grilled Bread & Poached Egg CAESAR SALAD 9 Parmigiano Reggiano, White Anchovy, Orange Zest & Crostini AHI TUNA TARTARE 16 Avocado, Spicy Aioli, Fried Wonton

Home Sweet Home A crowd of thousands turned out to welcome hometown hero Gus Kenworthy after he returned with a silver medal in Freeskiing from the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. Telluride didn’t give him a key to the city (most of us still don’t lock our doors, except during bear season), but they are naming a street and a gondola plaza after him and giving him a lifetime ski and golf membership. Kenworthy also garnered instant fame after the win, with his photo on a cereal box and interviews on all the major networks, and he was dubbed the “Sweetheart of Sochi” for his campaign to rescue the stray dogs in the Olympic village. It was puppy love for women all over the Internet (including pop idol Miley Cyrus) who swooned over the rock star skier with a penchant for orphaned pooches. PHOTO BY RYAN BONNEAU

STEAMED PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND MUSSELS 16 Grilled Baguette, Coconut Milk, Lemon Grass, Ginger & Thai Chili

CHOP HOUSE BURGER 22 Toasted Fresh Baked Bun, Quick Pickles, Ancho Chili Ketchup, French Mustard & Cheese (Blue, Aged White Cheddar, Gruyère) LASAGNA 21 Butternut Squash, Wild Mushrooms, Fried Spinach ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK SHORTLOIN 38 Duck Confit, Sweet Potato Hash, Quince, Wild Mushrooms, Red Wine Reduction ORGANIC SALMON 29 Roasted Cauliflower, Truffle Gnocchi, Chive Butter Sauce 30 DAY DRY AGED BISON RIBEYE 52 14oz – Grass Fed “Prairie Harvest,” SD PRIME FILET MIGNON 48 10oz – Corn Fed “Stock Yards,” Chicago

Seasonal menu. Items and pricing subject to change.

THE NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL amenities paired with historic ambiance, the New Sheridan invites you to experience a new level of old world service.

NEWSHERIDAN.COM PHONE 1.800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351 ADDRESS 231 W. Colorado Ave, Telluride, CO 81435 www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015


66 • TELLURIDE FACES

SAVOR THE

A Last Look

UNPARALLELED CUISINE

WHATEVER YOUR PALATE MAY BE, and delight in some of the best cuisine in the West. Dine in style at our signature restaurant, the Chop House – world renowned for its dry aged USDA Black Angus. Chef Erich Owen creates our delicious fare using only organic free range a scrumptious meal for an unforgettable experience.

FAVORITES FROM BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER CLASSIC EGGS BENEDICT 14

MAC & CHEESE 9 Three Cheeses, Bacon Lardons

Hollandaise Sauce. Served with Roasted New Potatoes

RACK OF LAMB 39 Quinoa Custard, Fresh Figs, Mint Syrup

HOUSEMADE WAFFLES 10 Fresh Berries, Whipped Cream, Maple Syrup BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP 10 Crème Fraîche, Pear Chutney PAN SEARED PISTACHIO ENCRUSTED TROUT SPINACH SALAD 15 Warm Bacon, Sherry & Mustard Vinaigrette, Grilled Bread & Poached Egg CAESAR SALAD 9 Parmigiano Reggiano, White Anchovy, Orange Zest & Crostini AHI TUNA TARTARE 16 Avocado, Spicy Aioli, Fried Wonton

Home Sweet Home A crowd of thousands turned out to welcome hometown hero Gus Kenworthy after he returned with a silver medal in Freeskiing from the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. Telluride didn’t give him a key to the city (most of us still don’t lock our doors, except during bear season), but they are naming a street and a gondola plaza after him and giving him a lifetime ski and golf membership. Kenworthy also garnered instant fame after the win, with his photo on a cereal box and interviews on all the major networks, and he was dubbed the “Sweetheart of Sochi” for his campaign to rescue the stray dogs in the Olympic village. It was puppy love for women all over the Internet (including pop idol Miley Cyrus) who swooned over the rock star skier with a penchant for orphaned pooches. PHOTO BY RYAN BONNEAU

STEAMED PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND MUSSELS 16 Grilled Baguette, Coconut Milk, Lemon Grass, Ginger & Thai Chili

CHOP HOUSE BURGER 22 Toasted Fresh Baked Bun, Quick Pickles, Ancho Chili Ketchup, French Mustard & Cheese (Blue, Aged White Cheddar, Gruyère) LASAGNA 21 Butternut Squash, Wild Mushrooms, Fried Spinach ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK SHORTLOIN 38 Duck Confit, Sweet Potato Hash, Quince, Wild Mushrooms, Red Wine Reduction ORGANIC SALMON 29 Roasted Cauliflower, Truffle Gnocchi, Chive Butter Sauce 30 DAY DRY AGED BISON RIBEYE 52 14oz – Grass Fed “Prairie Harvest,” SD PRIME FILET MIGNON 48 10oz – Corn Fed “Stock Yards,” Chicago

Seasonal menu. Items and pricing subject to change.

THE NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL amenities paired with historic ambiance, the New Sheridan invites you to experience a new level of old world service.

NEWSHERIDAN.COM PHONE 1.800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351 ADDRESS 231 W. Colorado Ave, Telluride, CO 81435 www.TellurideMagazine.com

WINTER/SPRING 2014-2015


68 • TELLURIDE FACES

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Telluride Magazine Winter/Spring 2014-15  

Sweet Deals in Telluride, John Denver's Moral Victory, Sean O’Neill’s Historic Telluride Ascent, Topical Medicinal Marjuana

Telluride Magazine Winter/Spring 2014-15  

Sweet Deals in Telluride, John Denver's Moral Victory, Sean O’Neill’s Historic Telluride Ascent, Topical Medicinal Marjuana

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