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MichiganChefs THE

MAY 2012

4.................. ACF Central Regional Conference Report

8.................. The Foley Fishmonger: The Cod Problem Revisited

10................ The Wine Counselor® The Big Six of Grapes, Part 3: Chardonnay

12................ Chapter News and Events

17................ From Edible WOWTM Magazine: Café Cortina

20................ From The Executive Director

22................ Upcoming Events

23................ From The Research Department Challenge: Meringue Topping

26................ Curt Archambault The End is Near!

38................ Eric Stein MS RD, Wellness Chef The Many Benefits of Beans on the Menu

Newsletter of the American Culinary Federation • Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association, Inc.

President’s Letter I could not be more proud of our Chapter, the MotorCity Casino Hotel and everyone that worked so hard at putting together a successful ACF Central Regional Conference. This year’s conference was viewed as one of the all time best, and had over 550 chef attendees. The chefs from across our entire region, raved about the location, food, and seminars that took place the entire weekend. The conference success was due to the hard work and dedication of many talented individuals, that came together to make a strong team. The MotorCity Casino Hotel management staff under the leadership of Lucio Arancibia, CEC, AAC, and the leadership of our Conference Chairman Randy Smith, CEC, of Walnut Creek Country Club, paved the way for a smooth sailing conference. They spent countless hours planning making volunteer lists, and organizing transportation for judges and other out of town guests. There were many predinner tasting sessions that myself and other chefs attended to insure our guests would enjoy great tasting meals. Friday night’s Ice Breakers Reception was held at Comerica Park and we enjoyed a great strolling dinner prepared by some of our best local restaurants. The food and venue were both amazing. What a great view of the ball park! Saturday night we traveled to the GM Headquarters building in the Renaissance Center to enjoy the many creative food stations prepared by the chefs at Coach Insignia on the 72nd floor for our Chapter Event, the Michigan Chefs Harvest Detroit Party. The view from Coach Insignia has to be one of the best, if not the best, in the city. This event raised funds for both Gleaners Food Bank and Haven. Between all of the great wines, the outstanding food, and the Thornetta Davis Band’s live entertainment, we sure did throw a great party and really made the Chapter proud. Sunday night, a group of chefs headed to the Detroit Athletic Club for the American Academy of Chefs reception. It is an honor to be chosen to host an AAC dinner, and Executive Chef Kevin Brennan, CEC, AAC and his professional staff showed off their culinary expertise. I knew it would be a special night when the team of over 30 wait staff marched into the room with the first course. They were all wearing white gloves and looked pressed and polished. The entire evening looked like something out of a movie. The food was outstanding and I have never experienced a more professional well orchestrated wait staff show in my life. Such a beautiful club with a matching culinary and wait staff. Great job, Chef Kevin! One of the things that really put the night over the top was (Continued on page 2)


President’s Letter (Continued from page 1) the American Academy of Chefs special recognition of the Michigan Chefs de Cuisine founding fathers and long time mentors. Chefs Leopold Schaeli, CMC, AAC, John Vanderwouw, AAC, and Milos Cihelka, CMC, AAC were all recognized for their lifetime achievements to the MCCA, ACF and the AAC. Additionally, Chef Milos received a Presidential Medallion in recognition of his accomplishments as one of the first CMC’s in the first ever test and the chef with the highest overall score as well as his efforts with past Culinary Olympic Teams and the establishment of our Chapter. Monday night was the Vice Presidents Gala, and the closing ceremony which was held in the at the MotorCity Casino Hotel. Over 300 guests gathered in the Sound Board and joined the MotorCity Casino Hotel for this special event. The announcer for the evening was our Vice President of the Central Region Kyle Richardson, CEC, CCE, AAC, CHE. Chef Kyle announced all the Central Region Conference winners while we enjoyed a great meal prepared by Executive Chef Don Yamauchi. Our very own Chef Brian Beland, CMC captured the Central Region Chef of the Year honor and will travel to the National convention to represent the Country Club of Detroit, the MCCA and the Central Region in competition for the ACF National Chef of the Year Award. The evening ended with a presentation of Detroit on the big screen and a choir singing a song dedicated to Detroit. It gave the entire crowd goose bumps and will leave a lasting memory of a great weekend. The final show of the evening was held at Iridescence on the top floor of the Hotel. MotorCity Casino Hotel’s Executive Pastry Chef Patricia Nash, CEPC showed off her tremendous culinary skills with a knock down incredible pastry table. There were large vases of cotton candy, huge suckers, candies mini pastries and more. What a show, and an incredible, well done job. I left feeling proud to be an ACF member and glad to be a part of Detroit and this conference. The Chef and Pastry Chef of the year along with all the Student Culinary competitions were held at Schoolcraft Community College. Culinary Competition Chair Chef Randy Emert CEC and the talented staff at Schoolcraft did an excellent job hosting all of the weekend’s competitions. Many of Schoolcraft’s students donated their time to make sure all the events ran flawlessly. I The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

heard rave reviews about how organized the weekend’s events were planned and executed. Our conference competitors were treated like celebrity chefs at a World Class Culinary School. Congratulations to Schoolcraft’s very own team, for winning a gold medal and an impressive second place overall finish, just behind the team from St. Louis. Great job Schoolcraft and thank you for handling the exhausting job of hosting a weekend’s worth of festivities. I would like to commend the following for going above and beyond the call of duty during the conference. Chef Randy Smith, CEC our Conference Chair did a flawless job of organizing this entire event. Our Executive Director Brian Lorge helped in so many ways to make things run organized and smoothly. John Gouin our Newsletter Editor helped advertise all of the weekend events and assisted in putting together our Michigan display booth. John McCormick, CEC, CCE, AAC donated the display booth to the Michigan Chefs de Cuisine, and helped work the information booth. Charles Laurencelle (A.K.A. the list master) helped organize all the volunteers and manned the Michigan Chef’s information center the entire weekend. John Aldini led us in the Pledge Allegiance during the opening ceremony and assisted with the information booth. The students of The Culinary Studies Institute of Oakland Community College for donating their time to work as seminar Apprentices. Doug St. Souver agreed to assist me in presenting the weekend’s first seminar. We joined forces with Clinton Rich of Oakland Community College to teach two separate fruit and ice carving classes. Brian Beland, CMC Page 2


and Chris Hessler, CEC, both MCCA board members, donated their time to present seminars. Congratulations to the entire staff at the MotorCity Casino Hotel and to the membership of the Michigan Chefs de Cuisine for a fantastic well attended conference.

of a cold food culinary salon. The Michigan Olympic Team will be updating our members on their progress towards the Olympic Gold. The salon is open to our entire membership and anyone interested can contact myself at 248-522-3704. Hope to see you there!

Please join me next month at the MGM Grand Detroit for another great meeting. The meeting will consist

Doug Ganhs, CEC

The MCCA would like to thank the following volunteers that assisted with making the ACF Central Region Conference a huge success: John Aldini Sam Anderson Noelle Anderson Margarite Anderson Matthew Ashley Supansa Banker Kimberly Barker Marcelle Barlage Siena Bautista Brian Beland Luciana Benavides Bob Bennett Kari Bingham Norris Bouler Harold Brakhage Kevin Brennan Kyle Broderick Michelle Buttler Jerry Campbell Timothy Cannon Don Cary Lisa Clark Dawn Claybrooks Jenea Conley Mark Cope Mary Cope Gordon Danorra Anne Davis Lisa Debastos Donyale Dupree Kevin Enright Donorra Farmer Adam Francuch Gerneil Franklin

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

David Gallagher Doug Gansh Billy Genterola Tracy George Mary Gisslander Erika Goodman Danorra Gordon John Gouin Joan Graham Anthony Grant Jasmine Gray Walter Gray Jason Gunn Freeman Gunnell Pam Gustairs Perjackie Gutierrez Brian Hanson Amy Hatfield Lynnette Hawkins Cathy Heppler Chris Hessler Adnanet Iskias Malenia Jackson Xaviar Jaramillo Jim Johnson Twanna Jones Friederike Kappe Gary Kelly James Kokenyesdi Robert Kroll Jennie Kurth Pam Lagarde Charles Laurencelle Mary Laurencelle

Brian Lorge Terry Louzon Joe Maddox Mike Malley Francine Mays Marci McComas Brennan McNulty John Miller Michael Mitchell Christopher Moore Abby Moss Joe Nader James Niewolak Austin O’Dell Gary Ostrolencki Tara Owens John Piazza Dave Poirier Kathe Ray Clinton Rich Maryse Richards Nick Risinger Kelly Rodgers Michael Rooney Sarah Rougeau Vanessa Sally Ann Shallol Melissa Shamoon Eleanor Shepherd Rachel Shooshanian Stacy Sloan Jason Smith Randy Smith Julie Sousan

Steve Spinicchiu Erik Steele Evelyn Stokes Terance Tarver Tamy Tate Jeffrey Tatum Teia Tennilk Jessica Terrel-Hyde Brandon Thomas Tracy Trombley Peter Veach Eric Voigt Michael Ward Zachary Webster Brent Wellman Michael Weurth Arron Whitten Taylor Williams Jacob Williams Shannon Williams Tiarah Wilston Edward Winkler Jeffrey Wolf Thony Yang Sao Yia We have made every effort to include everyone that assisted on this list. If by chance we have missed you, please let us know. Thanks again for all of your help.

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2012 ACF Central Regional Conference Report More than 550 chefs and foodservice professionals descended on Detroit, Mich., April 14–16, for the 2012 ACF Central Regional Conference, hosted by ACF Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association, at the luxurious MotorCity Casino Hotel, which recently received AAA’s prestigious Four-Diamond rating for hospitality industry excellence.

Doug St. Souver, three-time “Food Network Challenge” champion, and Doug Ganhs, CEC, two-time “Food Network Challenge” champion, begin the conference April 13 with an incredible hands-on fruit-and-icecarving workshop. Following that was chapter leadership training. Rounding out the day and officially kicking off the conference was the icebreaker reception, hosted by MotorCity Casino Hotel, at Comerica Park, home to the Detroit Tigers. Attendees were treated to a special tour of the ballpark followed by an incredible reception featuring the taste of Motown from some of the area’s best restaurants. General session started the activities April 14. ACF Central Region Vice President Kyle Richardson CEC, CCE, CHE, AAC, welcomed everyone and provided pertinent ACF updates, along with other committee chairs and ACF National President Michael Ty, CEC, AAC. A special surprise was in store for ACF Culinary Team USA when Chefs de Cuisine Association of St. Louis presented a $15,000 donation to support the teams in their quest for gold at the Internationale Kochkunst Ausstellung, commonly known as the “culinary Olympics,” in Erfurt, Germany, Oct. 5–10, bringing the chapter’s total donation to $30,000. The excitement continued when accomplished chef and restaurateur Celina Tio, featured on Food Network’s “The Next Iron Chef” and Bravo’s “Top Chef Masters,” took the stage. She not only shared her kitchen philosophies, but showed attendees through an interactive demonstration the benefits of using social media to drive business and how she has successfully uses Twitter and Facebook to do just that. She was even tweeting and posting on Facebook during her presentation. That afternoon attendees had the opportunity to meet with exhibitors at the trade show and watch the What’s in The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

your Wok fried rice competition and Mozzarella Caprese Challenge. Meanwhile, the other competitors were hard at work vying for ACF Central Region titles. In the evening the host chapter and the Matt Prentice Restaurant Group held the Michigan Chefs Harvest Detroit Party at Coach Insignia to benefit the Gleaners Cooking Matters Program and Haven, two local nonprofits. It was an entertaining evening with Michigan’s best foods, a special selection of premium wines and craft beers, music and a scenic view of Detroit and Canada in the background. The next two days provided attendees with numerous opportunities to advance their professional development and enhance their culinary skills through seminars and culinary demonstrations featuring the latest trends and techniques. April 15, members had the option of attending the American Academy Chefs dinner at the prestigious Detroit Athletic Club, hosted by Executive Chef Kevin Brennan, CEC, AAC, or experiencing one of Detroit’s top places to eat. The Vice President’s Gala completed the conference April 16, where the regional competition winners were announced. A sincere thank-you to our sponsors and exhibitors, whose support was instrumental to our success, and to the AAC for donating $1,000 to the ACF Central Region Student Team winner to assist with national convention travel expenses. Congratulations to all the award recipients and honorees for their outstanding contributions and goodwill, and to all the competitors for a job well done. Visit the ACF website at http://www.acfchefs.org/ Content/NavigationMenu2/Events/Regional/Central/ default.htm for competition results and photos.

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Proudly serving Detroit for 5 decades... Bill Gerencer Tel: 207.761.0818 n 800.225.9995 Cell: 207.252.1115 n Email: gmorhua@aol.com

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

M.F. Foley Company, Inc. 24 West Howell Street, Boston, MA 02125 http://www.foleyfish.com

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Executive Chef Wanted Garage Grill and Fuel Bar in downtown Northville is looking for an Executive Chef to manage kitchen operation. Total seating of 250 including a dining room, bar, banquet facility, outdoor patios, and a designated carry-out. Minimum 5 years experience as Executive Chef required. We are looking for a creative Chef to present dynamic, upscale casual food for an American grill menu. Salary negotiable based on qualifications. Send resumé to Michael Bageris, Managing Partner at garagegrill202@aol.com

At Red Goose Spice Company, all of our products are carefully selected for color, flavor, aroma, and are sourced from the finest growing regions in the world.

Banquet Chef/Sauté Cook Wanted Birmingham Country Club is seeking staff to fill Banquet Chef and p.m. Sauté Cook positions. Employees must possess a minimum of 3 years experience and have a solid employment background. Must submit to drug testing. Please contact Chef Louai Sharkas via email at chef@bhamcc.com.

Harper Associates

A.M. Line Cook Wanted

Hospitality and Culinary Recruitment Specialists since 1968 for: Hotel, Restaurants, Estate/Private Service, Country Clubs, Food Service

Line cooks work as members of the Oakland Hills Culinary Team to prepare food “Ala Minute” for the clubs restaurants.

Let Harper Associates represent you in confidence to our various client companies. Please email your resumé as a Microsoft Word® attachment to ben@harperjobs.com Ben Schwartz • President Harper Associates 31000 Northwestern Hwy, Ste 240 Farmington Hills, MI 48334

248.932.1170 http://www.harperjobs.com The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Cooks should be detail oriented, work well in a team environment and enjoy serving members in a positive, friendly and courteous manner. Line cook is require to have experience in high-volume, small quantity cooking. They must have the ability to create production sheets and follow recipes accurately. It is essential that they maintain a clean and sanitary work environment, and be able to use a variety of equipment and utensils. If you enjoy working in a 90% scratch kitchen where learning is an everyday occurence, please apply. Hourly wages based on experience. Full company benefits, excellent hours. Email resumé to: dvallone@oakland-hills.com, or FAX to 248-644-2683, attention Chef Daniel.

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Personal Chef Wanted High profile Executive seeks Private Chef who enjoys traveling. Position requires excellent culinary credentials, stable work history in fine dining establishments, exposure to private estates (as a Chef or freelance catering), and complete flexibility to travel. For a complete job description and application requirements, click HERE.

Thank You! CO R P O R AT I O N

Our sincere thanks to these premier sponsors for support of the MCCA during the ACF Central Region Conference at the Michigan Chefs Harvest Party at Coach Insignia Restaurant. CO R P O R AT I O N

速 CO R P O R AT I O N

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

CO R P O R AT I O N

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Notes from the Foley Fishmonger

The Cod Problem Revisited The word “oyster” is derived from the Latin “ostrea” following the Greek root “ost” or “bone.”“Why then the world’s mine Oyster, which I, with sword will open.” Shakespeare, “The Merry Wives of Windsor” If you were healthy and living a healthy lifestyle would you refer to you self as “not sick and not engaging in unhealthy behavior?” Sounds negative doesn’t it? That’s just the way National Marine Fisheries Service describes healthy fish populations. There are four classifications for the state of a fish stock and the best is “Not overfished, and overfishing is not occurring!” Somehow we’ve managed to make a good situation sound bad. That’s just the situation Gulf of Maine cod stocks were thought to be rapidly headed towards in the 2008 stock assessment: “Not overfished and overfishing was not occurring.” Fish were very easy to find and catch for both commercial and recreational fishermen and all seemed well. In 2009 landings were a bit higher than they should have been, but in 2010 and 2011, they were below what could be fished sustainably (“Fished sustainably,” hmmm, now doesn’t that sound better?). But at the end of 2011 a routine assessment of the stock produced a stunning result. Not only was overfishing occurring, it was massive overfishing, and the stocks were drastically over fished! How did this happen in just three short years? The new assessment made 8 changes to data used to fit the mathematical model that generated the stock assessment. These included weights of the fish at a given age, commercial landings and discards, recreational landings and discards, and a re-estimation of the survey indices. The new assessment not only produced a current estimate of the number of fish stock, it also changed the estimates of the stock size going back in time suggesting that the stock has not been very healthy for at least 20 years! Let’s take a moment to understand how we go about deciding how much fish to harvest sustainably. The theory is called “Maximum Sustainable Yield.” Simply put, Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) proposes that if you have a given population of fish – say 100,000 metric tons, you can take a percentage of that – i.e. 17% or 17,000 metric tons per year and the stock should replace itself and keep up with your harvest. This is called fishing sustainably. What the new assessment says according to MSY is that for

20 years, combined commercial and recreational catches have equaled anywhere from 55% to 129% annually of the mature population of Gulf of Maine Codfish. In theory this stock should have collapsed years ago, yet it continues to produce at a high rate. The average take over the past 20 years has been over 70% of the adult population – much higher that a 17% mortality rate. According to MSY, it should not have been possible to maintain this level of fishing. This calls into question either MSY, or the assessment itself. The Administration chose to ask for not only a new assessment, but a complete overhaul of how the assessment will be done going forward – a new “Benchmark Assessment.” This is significant because to simply accept the updated assessment and follow the letter of the law means a cut in the number of cod allowed to be caught that will be so drastic as to possibly shut down most other ground-fishing for several years. And given the good health of many other stocks, this will represent a great failure by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to responsibly harvest fish stocks in the National best interest. The Administration finds themselves in a box however because the Sustainable Fisheries Act (SFA) has evolved to become very inflexible over time. There is very little (Continued on page 9)

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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Notes from the Foley Fishmonger

The Cod Problem Revisited

Ask the Foley Fishmonger

(Continued from page 8)

Got a question about all things seafood, from storage and handling to sustainability?

opportunity to think outside the box once a negative assessment is delivered. Either drastic cuts kick in, or the lawsuits begin. The solution came in the form of a modest cut to landings in the new fishing year in order to give the benchmark process time to occur. If the Fishmonger were a betting man (He’s not) he’d be putting his money on a new estimate that shows the stocks weren’t as healthy as the 2008 assessment, but aren’t nearly as bad as the latest one. Note: These kinds of whipsaw assessment results are not new and have in fact occurred several times with different species since 2001. There are many reasons for this but perhaps the best way to understand the difficulty is to take a drive to any ocean or one of the Great Lakes, stand on the shore, and see if you can figure out how many fish are out there. The task for the NMFS North East Fisheries Science Center actually goes beyond a new benchmark for Gulf of Maine Codfish. The real goal here is to figure out how to move away from the process that has brought us several assessments

Ask the Fishmonger. Send your questions to Gmorhua@aol.com, subject line “Ask the Fishmonger.” If your question is chosen, we’ll publish the answer in next month’s newsletter and send you a piece of Foley Swag (hat, or apron, or ???). Please include your name, job title and location.

that produce such surprising results and move towards a situation that more accurately estimates fish populations and produces assessments that, when completed, motivate the commercial and recreational fishing industry to manage the fish stocks instead of questioning (and perhaps rightly so) the assessments. Best Fishes! The Foley Fishmonger

ACF/MCCA Certification Practical Exam Friday, May 18, 2012 at Oakland Community College To sign up for the ACF/MCCA Certification Practical you will need to sign up with the ACF and with Chef Kevin Enright for the MCCA. Click to download each of the following forms:

to use a credit card, or you want a receipt, then use also use the MCCA form. To reserve a spot, you need to send the ACF and the MCCA( Kevin Enright ) an application and monies to secure your spot.

1. TEST INFORMATION SHEET

I have scheduled a meeting on Monday May 14, 2012. at 2:00 p.m. to view the kitchen and ask questions. At a later date, I will send out a schedule for the test day.

2. ACF EXAM CANDIDATE SIGN UP 3. MCCA APPLICATION FOR SIGN UP 4. MCCA INVOICE Please sign up for the Practical Test at www. mccachef.org. The information sheet attachment has some testing details. There are two sign-up forms: one for the ACF and one for the MCCA. If you choose

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

If you have any questions please contact: Chef Kevin Enright CEC, CCE, AAC Culinary Department Chair person Culinary Studies Institute of OCC 248-522-3710 or kmenrigh@oaklandcc.edu

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The Big Six of Grapes:

By Michael Schafer, Esq., Sommelier, CSW (Certified Specialist of Wine)

A crash course on the most popular varietals in six installments There are six grapes that you really need to know about. Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay are the white grapes. The reds are Pinot Noir, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. These grape varietals are known and produced around the world. We’ll learn a bit about each grape, its aromas and flavors, and potential food pairings.

PART THREE: Chardonnay Grape number three in our crash course is Chardonnay (Shar doh NAY), the most popular white wine grape on the planet. It’s also one of the most malleable grapes used to make white wine. Chardonnay is grown just about everywhere. Just about anyone who drinks wine has had a bottle of this wine. There are some wine drinkers who order “ABC”, anything but Chardonnay, because they are “burnt out” on this extremely popular wine! Like Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay is thought to originate in France, specifically from the Burgundy region in northeastern France. Two subregions of Burgundy are home to what many experts consider the finest Chardonnays. The Côte de Beaune (koht duh Bohn) is a very small area but it produces some of the greatest wines in the world. Mersault (mehr-SO), Puligny-Montrachet (poo-lee-NYEE mohn-rah-SHAY), and Chassagne-Montrachet (shah-SAHN-nyah mohnrah-SHAY) are vineyard names commanding some of the highest prices in the world. The other stellar subregion in Burgundy is Chablis (shahBLEE). This is definitely not the jug-wine Chablis found in the value section of your local market! Chablis is delicate, dry, with aromas of citrus and mineral qualities. It’s usually unoaked and is a pure expression of the Chardonnay grape.

New World (essentially anywhere but Europe) Chardonnays run the gamut from medium-bodied and mellow to rich and voluptuous. California, Australia and Chile are the best-known producers of this ubiquitous wine. Aussie Chardonnays usually have tropical fruit aromas of pineapple and mango followed by big buttery flavors. Chilean wines are a bit leaner and reflect their terroir (tehr-WHAR) more than Australian Chardonnays. California Chardonnay-how many are on your wine list? This wine is a “must-have” for virtually any restaurant, country club or nightclub. Your guests expect you to have a glass pour of “house” Chardonnay plus some bottle offerings. Choose wisely. Chardonnays from the “Golden State” are frequently very fruity and full-bodied. In 1976 the Chateau Montelena Napa Valley Chardonnay beat French wines to win the famous “Judgment of Paris”. (Continued on page 11)

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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The Big Six of Grapes: Chardonnay (Continued from page 10) This event truly put the world on notice that California makes world-class wines. The Chardonnay grape is frequently referred to as the painter’s “blank canvas” and the writer’s “tabula rasa” or blank slate. As a chef, think of it as a boneless breast of chicken. What?! Are you kidding? Just as a boneless breast of chicken is your blank canvas, so too is Chardonnay for winemakers. How do you want to prepare that breast of chicken? Poached in court bouillon, sous vide, in a Picatta or Marsala sauce, deep fried, grilled with a chipotle-maple glaze? As you know, the possibilities are virtually endless. This is the world’s most adaptable grape. It can be so very many different wines. Winemakers love to “play” with this grape. If the winemaker doesn’t manipulate the juice much, the wine will frequently smell of apples, pears and citrus if from a cool climate. If from warmer environs, pineapple, mango and banana are usually apparent. If s/ he does decide to leave their signature in the wine, it will be very noticeable.

Aging in oak, whether French or American, is a primary factor in how the wine is made. The length of time the wine spends in that oak, the level of barrel-toasting and whether the wine is aged sur-lie all play important roles in determining what the wine will be. Many New World Chardonnays go through malolactic fermentation (MLF), a technique that converts malic acid into lactic acid, softening the wine and imparting added color and flavors. Keeping on course with our previous pairing styling, lighter style Chardonnays pair best with lighter foods while richer, more voluptuous wines complement heavier, luxurious dishes. The “Chablis style” Chardonnay pairs well with many vegetarian dishes, poultry, fin fish and shellfish. The “Burgundian style” enhances richer, fattier fish, cream-based sauces and soups and fullflavored dishes. What pairings do you promote in your establishment? © 2012 Wine Counselor

Education • Development Training • Enjoyment Michael Schafer, Esq., Sommelier, CSW (Certified Specialist of Wine) 248.219.7301 • wc@winecounselor.net

http://www.winecounselor.net

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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Michigan Chefs de Cuisine

Chapter News & Events Chef Brian Beland Named American Culinary Federation Central Region Chef of the Year Brian Beland of Sterling Heights, Mich., executive chef/director of food and beverage at Country Club of Detroit, Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich., was named Central Region Chef of the Year by the American Culinary Federation earlier this week after winning a competition sponsored by Unilever Food Solutions during the organization’s ACF Central Regional Conference at MotorCity Casino Hotel, Detroit, April 14–16. “It’s a true honor to be selected to represent the Central Region at the national competition in July,” said Beland. “It is an opportunity that I never thought I would have in my career, and I am excited to be a part of such an event. “As important as competition is to continually hone our craft and to push our individual skills, it is the knowledge and friendships that are gained by being in these arenas and at such gatherings with great professional chefs that really makes the experience.” The Central Region Chef of the Year award recognizes an outstanding culinarian who works and cooks in a full-service dining facility. This person demonstrates the highest standard of culinary skills, advances the cuisine of America and gives back to the profession through the development of students and apprentices. At the competition, four chefs had 1 hour to cook four portions of their dish, which was required to incorporate arctic char. A panel of judges selected the winner based on cooking skills, taste and professionalism. Beland won for his dish, “Horseradish-Crusted Pavé of Arctic Char.” As the regional award recipient, he will compete for the national title and $5,000 at the 2012 ACF National Convention in Orlando, Fla., in July. In addition to working as executive chef/director of food and beverage at Country Club of Detroit, The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Beland is an adjunct faculty instructor at Culinary Studies Institute of Oakland Community College, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. He began his culinary career working in a small family-owned restaurant. After high school graduation, he earned a bachelor’s degree from the School of Hospitality Business at Michigan State University (MSU), East Lansing, Mich. He continued his education at The Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park, N.Y. After graduation he returned to Country Club of Detroit, where he had worked while attending MSU, as chef de cuisine. Beland has participated in numerous culinary and ice-carving competitions. His greatest accomplishments include earning the title of certified master chef in October 2010; being named ACF Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association’s 2011 Chef of the Year; and becoming a member of the Michigan “culinary Olympics” team that will compete in the 2012 Internationale Kochkunst Ausstellung, or “Culinary Olympics,” in Erfurt, Germany. He is a member of ACF Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association.

Maple Leaf Farms Duck Sliders Recipe by Michael Garbin, CEC, AAC, ACE, HGT, Executive Chef, Union League Club of Chicago 90% Lean Duck Breast Meat.........16 each 2 ounce Patties Salt and Pepper................................................................To Taste On a grill, cook the duck burgers to medium. Let rest for a few minutes before serving. Roll, 2 ounce roll of Choice.......................................... 16 each Butter the buns lightly and toast before assembling. Suggested Garnishes: Balsamic Mushrooms, Caramelized Onion, Blue Cheese Crumble, Tomato Mango Relish, BBQ Sauce, Cucumber Yogurt Sauce, Favorite Mustards

Chicago’s Austin Yancey Wins Riviana Foods’ Fried Rice Competition, Advances to Nationals St. Augustine, Fla., April 18, 2012—Austin Yancey of Chicago recently won Riviana Foods’ What’s in your Wok? Fried Rice Competition, held during the 2012 American Culinary Federation (ACF) Central Regional Conference at Page 12


MotorCity Casino Hotel, Detroit, April 14–16. Yancey is a culinary instructor at Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Chicago, and is a member of ACF Windy City Professional Culinarians Inc. “This was a fun, challenging and exciting competition,” Yancey said. “I wanted to demonstrate various cooking methods while still using only one pan. I utilized dry-heat charring, pickling, deep frying and sauteing in various stages to develop flavor and show different techniques. The wok provides a great medium for these methods with its heat distribution and versatility. “This was the first ACF conference I have attended, and I am thrilled to have the opportunity to attend the national convention in July.” In the regional competition, Yancey and three other contestants had 20 minutes to create four servings of an original fried-rice dish that featured Minute Rice, white or brown. They were judged on originality, clarity and format, ingredients and cooking methods, main-dish tableside cooking techniques and creative presentation. Yancey won $250 for his dish, “Duck Duck Rice.” He will advance to the national finals taking place during the 2012 ACF National Convention in Orlando, Fla., in July for a shot at $1,000.

Kendall College School Of Culinary Arts Chef-Instructor & Alumna Win Inaugural Culinology Competition The team of Eric Stein, MS, RD, a chef-instructor at the Kendall College School of Culinary Arts, and Jaime Mestan, CSC, a Kendall College culinary alum (‘08) and research chef at Ed Miniat, Inc., in South Holland, Ill., took first place in the inaugural Professional Culinology® Competition, March 23 in San Antonio, Texas, held in conjunction with the Research Chefs Association’s (RCA) Annual Conference and Culinology® Expo. Stein and Mestan beat two other teams, winning a gold medal and a $5,000 cash award with their entry of lobster paella bites, chicken and white-bean empanadillas and loaded patatas bravas (a cherished white-potato tapa of Spain). The competition, which was sanctioned by the The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

American Culinary Federation (ACF), called for entries to consist of three frozen heat-and-serve tapas suitable for serving in a casual restaurant chain. Prior to the competition, each team shipped its frozen products to San Antonio. On competition day, each team created the fresh versions of its commercialized concepts and was judged in part against how well the plated, commercialized products matched up against the fresh gold standards. Entries were judged by a panel of culinary R&D experts against criteria that included originality of concept, nutritional profile, manufacturing feasibility, flavor, aroma, texture, presentation and safety standards. The team of Stein and Mestan was announced as the winner at the RCA’s Awards Luncheon on March 24. Following the announcement, Stein expressed a newfound appreciation for the role of chefs who work and create within two worlds—culinary arts and food science—the perfect melding of which results in satisfied diners and successful foodservice operators. “Participating in this competition and attending the RCA conference really gave me a better understanding of the diversity within the field of Culinology®,” he said. The discipline of Culinology® was pioneered by the Research Chefs Association with the organization’s founding in 1996. The RCA represents more than 2,000 members including chefs, food scientists, technologists, writers, nutritionists, academicians, researchers, consultants, sales and marketing professionals, suppliers, co-packers, distributors and students. RCA is the premier source of culinary and technical information for the food industry and is committed to the advancement of Culinology®—the blending of the culinary arts and food science. For more information, visit www.culinology.com.

Kendall College Student Team Named ACF Central Region Knowledge Bowl Champions for Third Consecutive Year The smartest culinary students in the region— for the third consecutive year—according to the American Culinary Federation (ACF), are from Kendall College, Chicago, and are members of ACF Windy City Professional Page 13


Culinarians Inc. The team took home a gold medal and won the Central Region Baron H. Galand Culinary Knowledge Bowl, sponsored by American Technical Publishers in the “Jeopardy”-style competition that took place during the 2012 ACF Central Regional Conference at MotorCity Casino Hotel, Detroit, April 14–16. Kendall College, Central Region Baron H. Galand Culinary Knowledge Bowl Champions, pictured left to right: Jacob Clara, Paige Meagher, Brenda Martinez, Robert Baki, coach Dina Altieri, CEC, CCE, and Gabriele Ausraite. “We are honored to represent the Central Region and want to acknowledge each of the coaches and players who have spent countless hours preparing for this tournament,” said Altieri. “It was exhilarating to see the level of expertise and commitment demonstrated by these ACF junior members and their mentors. Team Kendall will continue to study in preparation for Orlando’s national tournament.” The Baron H. Galand Culinary Knowledge Bowl is named in honor of past ACF National President Baron H. Galand, CEC, AAC, HOF, who championed junior members and encouraged them to get involved in their profession outside the kitchen. ACF knowledge bowls are open to junior culinary teams from ACF chapters, apprenticeship programs and accredited schools. Competition questions are drawn from five nationally published textbooks for culinary professionals that cover topics such as nutrition, safety and sanitation, and the art of modern cooking. Ten student teams from Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, Texas and Wisconsin went head-to-head for the Central Region title. As regional champions, the Kendall College team will compete for the national title against three other winning regional teams at the 2012 ACF National Convention in Orlando, Fla., in July. The highest scorer will be named the national winner and compete for the national title against three other winning regional teams at the 2012 ACF National Convention in Orlando, Fla., in July. The highest scorer will be named the national winner.

Award. Nominated by Chicagobased Testa Produce, Inc., Kramer won in the Business in Industry & Colleges category. The awards program, created by the United Fresh Produce Association and sponsored by PRO*ACT, honors chefs and their companies for innovative and influential use of produce in the culinary arts. The winners were selected from nearly 120 nominations submitted by produce companies and foodservice operations across North America. A panel of produce and foodservice industry leaders reviewed each nominee’s demonstrated incorporation of fresh produce into menu development, use of protocols for correct storage and handling of produce, leadership in produce-related community service, and special events and recognition by their company and industry peers. Kramer, a College of DuPage instructor for the past 10 years, maintains a strong focus on seasonality in the classroom, demo kitchens and on-campus restaurants, utilizing a wide array of local and organic produce. He teaches the importance of food safety and sustainability, of knowing where food comes from and of cultivating close relationships with reputable vendors. He strives to give students real-world experience, creating opportunities to operate on-campus restaurants and to venture beyond campus to the farms and distributors that supply the school. He teaches tight inventory control to minimize produce waste and has partnered with the college’s biology department to create and maintain an organic rooftop garden that students tend to gain real “farm to fork” experience.

College Of DuPage Culinary Instructor Wins 2012 Produce Excellence Award

A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., Kramer has previously been honored with the Presidential Medallion from both the local and national chapters of the American Culinary Federation. He received the Silver Plate Award from Meals on Wheels as a result of his ongoing involvement in that organization and has worked as a consultant within the local restaurant community, helping to mentor individuals interested in opening a restaurant.

Chef David Kramer, Associate Professor of Culinary Arts at the College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn, Ill., is one of six chefs and foodservice professionals nationwide to win a 2012 United Fresh Produce Excellence in Foodservice

“We’re thrilled to see David receive this national recognition for his work as a culinarian, in general, and for his innovation and commitment to fresh produce, in particular,” says Peter Testa, president of Testa Produce,

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Inc. “He understands both the fantastic opportunities and rigorous challenges that the produce category presents and finds innovative ways to ensure that his students leave well prepared on both ends of that spectrum.”

of Trump International Towers and Hotel; Maggie Schmidt of Treasure Island Foods; Jessica Weiss of Union League Club of Chicago; and Kady Yon of Pump Room at Public Chicago.

Kramer will receive his award and appear on a Top Chefs panel at the United Fresh 2012 Produce Show in Dallas in May.

After an hour of tasting and evaluating, the judges were ready to announce the winners. Schcondala Parsons won first prize, a KitchenAid Stand Mixer, with her Mulled Spice Scones studded with Whiskey-Soaked Raisins. Stefani Sandow’s Pumpkin Raisin Ginger Scones took home second prize. Laurie Mohlman, the third place winner, took the meaning of “breakfast pastry” to the next level by incorporating gourmet cereal milk into her scone dough and topping it off with Captain Crunch streusel. Jodi Wellman, who placed in last year’s brownie competition, won fourth place with what she called The Zesty Ginger Scone with California Raisins and Orange Glaze. Fifth place was awarded to current pastry student, Hanna Sheinin, and her spiced scones with Lady Grey Tea-soaked raisins.

Second Annual Scone Contest Kicks-Off the Spring Competition Season Each of the twenty-five scones that were entered into the Second Annual Amateur Scone Competition had to contain delicious California Raisins and spices from The Spice House; it was a combination that sparked the contestants’ creativity. The interpretations ranged from classics that would go well with a morning cup of tea to savory versions that would satisfy any afternoon craving. In the state-of-the-art kitchens of The French Pastry School of Kennedy-King College of City Colleges of Chicago where the competition was held, Chef Instructor Della Gossett demonstrated her own unique recipe for tropical-scented scones to the contestants and spectators. In another kitchen, expert judges were tasked with selecting the five top recipes to win prizes from KitchenAid and California Raisin. After being greeted by the California Raisin Mascot, the attendees where guided on a tour of The French Pastry School’s facilities by current students of their full-time programs. For the over 60 amateur bakers and food enthusiasts who attended, the tour of the impeccablystocked kitchens was an eye-opening glimpse into the world of professional pastry. In one of The French Pastry School’s recently renovated demonstration kitchens, Chef Della Gossett, 2011 National Pastry Champion and Chef Instructor at the school, taught Pastry Chicago’s guests how to make Raisin Granola Scones with Lemon and Cardamom. When it came time to sample them, everyone agreed that the bright flavors and crunch of a homemade coconut granola topping made it unlike any scone they had ever tasted before. Meanwhile, the professional chef judges deliberated in a closed teaching-kitchen: the most important aspect of this scone competition was taste, followed by texture and professionalism. No scone was alike and the chefs knew they had a difficult decision ahead of them. The panel included Brady Braden of B True Bakery; Sarah Kosikowski The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Pastry Chicago’s next competition will be the First Annual Amateur Nut Brittle Competition. Amateur and student contestants will get a chance to see a demonstration by a chef instructor from The French Pastry School and to submit their unique nut brittle recipes for a chance to win great prizes. For recipes from this month’s winners and more information on future Pastry Chicago events, please visit www.pastrychicago.org.

2012 World Wide Mustard Competition Winners Announced Nearly 300 mustards from around the world competed in eighteen categories at the 17th annual World-Wide Mustard Competition, conducted under the direction of Barry Levenson, Curator of the National Mustard Museum in Middleton, Wisconsin. From the Gold Medal winners, a panel of chefs from the Windy City (Chicago) chapter of the American Culinary Federation selected as Grand Champion Three Monkeys Sweet & Spicy Mustard, a butter-laced sweet-hot mustard made by Dan Collins of Lawrenceville, PA. According to Levenson, the winning mustard reflects both the quality and diversity of the mustard industry. “It doesn’t matter if it’s a well-established large producer or, as is the case this year, a small boutique mustard maker, this competition attracts the finest mustards in the world. The judging is blind, giving each mustard the same chance Page 15


to win. The judges were certainly challenged by the high quality of the entries.” For the second year in a row, top Dijon honors went to the French mustard maker, Europeenne des Condiments, with another French moutardier, Clovis, capturing the Silver. Grey Poupon, made in the United States, showed that it can go toe-to-toe with the French, earning the Bronze, along with two additional medals. “The venerable French mustard maker Maille, with its three-hundred year tradition, took home three medals, while Beaverton Foods of Beaverton, Oregon, led all mustard makers – as it has done several times in the past – with six medals. The competition affords the mustard industry an opportunity to showcase the variety of flavors and styles available to consumers. “We are way beyond just yellow and brown deli mustards,” says Levenson, “although those styles continue to be important in the mustard world, as they have their own categories in the competition. But herb mustards, fruit mustards, garlic mustards, spirit mustards, mustard-based sauces and dressings, organic mustards, whole seed mustards, and exotic mustards are what adventurous food lovers want these days. Several new mustards won medals this year, including Clovis Cucumber Garlic Dill (France), LissElla Blueberry (Sweden), Minokyu Yuzu Honey (Japan), and Beaver Hickory Smoke Bacon (USA).

than 5,400 mustards from 79 countries in its permanent collection, in addition to hundreds of items of mustard history. The Museum became a nonprofit museum in early 2011. Levenson, who founded the museum in 1986, coordinated the World-Wide Mustard Competition since its inception in 1995. Download the list of winners HERE.

Be a Member of ACF Culinary Team USA For A Day Six culinary students will have the opportunity of a lifetime to work alongside and learn from an ACF Culinary National Team USA member at a special fundraising reception July 14 during ACF’s national convention in Orlando, Fla. Culinary students will be paired with one of the following: Team Captain Joseph Leonardi, CEC; Timothy Bucci, CEC, CCE, CHE; Ben Grupe; Jennifer Kopp, CEPC; Kevin Storm, CEC, CCA, AAC; and Eddie Tancredi. Five teams of one culinary student and one chef will prepare a savory dish, while one team of one student and one chef will create a sweet delight for attendees to enjoy. The reception is to raise funds for and to wish all teams the best of luck on their journey to win gold at the Internationale Kochkunst Ausstellung (IKA) International Culinary Art Competition, also known as the “culinary Olympics,” Oct. 5-10, in Erfurt, Germany. Download the application HERE.

The National Mustard Museum also demonstrates the breadth and depth of the mustard industry. It holds more

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The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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ed id b f ov ob o e pr f R er i n le y o rp az tic es Ha ag Ar urt ate M co d K OW W a n le ib Ed

in the kitchen

Café Cortina Sit down at an Old World Italian table By Nicole Rupersburg l Photographs By Lisa Dunlap

C

afé Cortina has been open since 1976 and is easily one of the most celebrated restaurants in metro detroit, having been recognized by both local and national publications numerous times for excellence on all levels. One entire wall of the corridor leading to the stunning stone courtyard is adorned with various newspaper and magazine clippings

with glowing reviews proclaiming Restaurant of the Year and Best of Detroit—as well as recognition from Zagat, Wine Spectator and the Food Network— along with shots of various celebrities who have dined there over the years. But director of Operations Adrian Tonon, son of owner Rina, remains quite humble about all the attention. “The national

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There is no such thing as success; there are only moments of success and then we strive for the next one, to supersede our last performance. accolades and awards are an honor to receive,” he says. “We’ve been applauded by media all over the world, but at Café Cortina there is no such thing as success; there are only moments of success and then we strive for the next one, to supersede our last performance.” Situated in a somewhat far-flung location in Farmington Hills on 10 Mile just east of Orchard Lake, Café Cortina takes a bit of effort to find. In the original plans for the construction of I-696, the highway was supposed to run along 10 Mile, which would have made Café Cortina an easy exit from the freeway. But due to some financing issues I-696 was moved north to 12 Mile. “My parents put their life savings into it,” Tonon explains. “They had no choice but to move forward with it.” Now, 30 years later, it is clear they made the right choice. “We would not be a culinary destination if it wasn’t for where our location is,” says Tonon. “you have to do something special for people to come this way. We’re a destination restaurant like so many in Italy.” They have expanded continuously over the past three decades, adding more dining space and a beautiful outdoor courtyard made of stone and covered in crawling ivy. It is a favorite location for weddings and parties and continues to offer the same excellent food and service that has made it such a major player in detroit’s dining scene for so long. “We never rest on our laurels. We were gardening in 1976 when we were made fun of for having an herb and tomato garden out back.” What a difference 30 years makes. Café Cortina continues to stay relevant by keeping the restaurant experience boutique and artisanal. Executive Chef Jeffrey Hoffman, known as “Hoffa,” has worked at the restaurant for 14 years. The Tonons have sent him to Italy—where they still retain their strong connections to friends and family—to work in different kitchens and train in traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine. “Hoffa’s the kind of chef who just wants to cook,” says Tonon. “We’ve had some great times and done some incredible things together. He’s really simple and all about food; he doesn’t need the accolades.” That same sense of modesty and humility permeates all aspects of Café Cortina, from the servers who have worked there 10 and 20 years to Tonon himself. The staff truly cares about the customer experience above all else. “We take serving others very seriously,” Tonon explains. “We feel very fortunate in life to be able to create

moments of happiness in other people’s lives. Hospitality is very important to us.” The cuisine is very simple, hearty, traditional Italian food exquisitely done. “We are very true to what Italian cooking is,” says Tonon. “We’re not reinventing anything here. We have a modernday presentation but this is still what you would get on the table in Italy 150 years ago.” The menu is heavily influenced by the seasons. In the summer about 70% of their produce comes from their own garden and the rest is sourced from Michigan farms; this is especially noteworthy considering they’ve been doing it this way for 30 years now. As a traditional Italian restaurant, they also bring in prosciutto from Parma, mozzarella from Campania and tomatoes grown in Italian lava rock. “We source where the best products in the world come from. If it’s not from Italy it’s usually from Michigan or California.” Everything is made in-house from scratch, including pastas that are made with a special flour from Italy and pastries made by their own pastry chef. Equally as important as the food itself is the café’s commitment to the community. “We’re very community-based and outreachbased,” Tonon says. “Giving back is very important to us.” Tonon is involved with local philanthropic organizations and takes his social responsibility and that of the restaurant very seriously. The Adrian Tonon Project is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and an extension of Café Cortina that seeks to find would-be philanthropists who might not have the financial ability to donate funds but can donate specialized skills and connect them with organizations in need of those skills. This past June, Café Cortina also hosted the first yelp Helps event in Michigan, where 16 nonprofit organizations were brought under one roof. “How do we start a movement to help others and for others to help others?” Tonon asks. “We as chefs, restaurateurs and foodies need to create that awareness of ‘we can help.’ Food brings people together. Breaking bread is one of the most powerful things in life.” eW Café Cortina: 30715 W. 10 Mile, Farmington Hills; 248-474-3033; cafecortina.com

Nicole Rupersburg is a frequent contributor to edibleWOW. EDIBLE WOW WINTER 2012

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From the Executive Director Congratulations to the ACF Greater Indianapolis Chapter, named ACF Central Region Chapter of the Year. The ACF Windy City Professional Culinarians received one of the ACF Central Region Chapter Recognition awards.

2008 <$419,100> 2009 <$149,500> 2010 $454,000 2011 $200,000*

During the President’s Meeting and Chapter Leadership Seminar at the ACF Central Region Conference, some interesting stats were shared. The Central region was last year’s region of the year at the National Conference and continues to be strong and we are well positioned to repeat. Here is a breakdown of the Central Region membership and number of Chapters.

*This includes a <$141,000> write-off to get out of a bad contract for a future National convention, which is expected to be recouped and then readjusted after this year’s National.)

State Members Chapters Michigan 946 10 Texas 917 6 Illinois 663 6 Missouri 498 4 Indiana 365 6 Kansas 290 1 Louisiana 268 3 Minnesota 253 3 Wisconsin 223 6 Oklahoma 161 2 Arkansas 135 2 Iowa 122 2 Nebraska 113 2 South Dakota 26 1 North Dakota 3 0 ____ __ 4993 54 Of the 54 chapters in the Central Region, 35 have met all of the compliance requirements. 19 are non-compliant and this year that will be addressed in order to insure that members are getting the value in their membership that they expect and deserve. The MCCA and the Windy City Chefs are both in full compliance. Chapter membership in the MCCA is now 482 making it the largest chapter in the region and one of the largest in the nation. The Windy City Professional Culinarians membership is at 219. Central Region Vice President Kyle Richardson has proposed establishing a statewide representative as a communication conduit between the vice president’s office and each state. He is seeking ideal candidates for each state and has already identified about half of the people to initiate this program. ACF National has grown in 1.5% in membership from 2010 to 2011. 2011 20,597 2010 20,270 Additionally, ACF National has substantially turned around a negative financial situation that existed several years ago and done so while maintaining or increasing member’s services without raising member dues. As you can see, the Balance Sheet has improved dramatically.

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Borrowing for operating capital on the part of ACF National has also decreased substantially. 2008 2009 2010 2011

$600,000 $750,000 $100,000 $0

Certifications have climbed 4.3% in the last year with a total of 11742 members certified at some level. Member recertification also increased 3.4%. The biggest jump was experienced in initial certifications with a growth of 13.4%. The results of the recent NRA/ ACF Salary Survey shows that Certification Matters. On average, Certified Executive Chefs earn 18% more than non-certified chefs in comparable positions or on average, $13,250 per year. Certified Educators earn 20% more than their non-certified counterparts. Overall, certified chefs and culinarians at all levels earn 7% more than non-certified people holding similar positions. 2012 is the 25th anniversary of the ACF Accreditation Program. There are 403 Accredited Programs at 218 Institutions. This is also the 25th anniversary of the ACF Student Team Championship, sponsored by R. L. Schreiber, Inc. The 2012 National Conference will be in Orlando, FL at the Orlando World Center Marriott Resort and featured Speakers will include Robert Irvine and Paul Prudhomme. Future National Conferences will be: 2013 2014 2015 2016

Las Vegas, Cosmopolitan Kansas City Orlando, FL Scottsdale, AZ

There are many great things going on with the ACF. Just like doctors, lawyers, and accountants all belong to professional associations, ACF membership is a mentality we need to culture and develop in our profession. To promote the ACF, we should focus on the benefits of participation, continuing education, professional development, certification, competition, networking, job opportunities and of course the camaraderie and long term friendships that have helped all of our really active members throughout their careers. Please send your feedback and let us know your thoughts. How can we help you? Brian F. Lorge, Executive Director ACF Michigan Chefs de Cuisine ACF Windy City Professional Culinarians Page 20


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Michigan Chefs de Cuisine

2012 Golf Outing and Chef of the Year Awards Gala Monday, August 27, 2012 Country Club of Detroit Hosted & Presented by

Brian Beland, CMC

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Michigan Chefs de Cuisine

Calendar of Upcoming Events Date/Time Event and Place

Host

Guest / Topic / Registration

May 21

ACF Certification Practical Exam Oakland Community College

Chef Kevin Enright, CEC, CCE, AAC kmenright@oaklandcc.edu

See page 9 of newsletter or http://www.mccachef.org/certification.html

May 21

MCCA Chapter Meeting MGM Grand Detroit Casino

Chef Gabriel Vera and the staff at MGM Grand Detroit Casino

Michigan Culinary Olympic Team Question and Answer Panel

June 5

Tiger Game and Tailgate Chef Kevin Brennan, CEC, AAC DAC/Comerica Park

$50.00 per person Register at http://www.mccachef.org

July 22

Family Caribbean Pig Roast and Michigan Culinary Olympic Team Fundraiser for the MCOT Metro Beach Metro Park

$30 adults, $10 for kids 11 and under, FREE for kids 3 and under Registration TBA

August 27

2012 Golf Outing and Chef of Chef Brian Beland, CMC the Year Awards Gala Country Club of Detroit

Register HERE

edibleWOW Magazine is your guide to the local foodshed in Southeastern Michigan.

We tell the story behind the food you want to eat. Subscribe today to receive the information you need to make informed food choices. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re guaranteed to WOW you. phone: 248-731-7578 l www.ediblewow.com The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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FROM THE RESEARCH DEPARTMENT:

Challenge: Meringue Topping By Matt Jost, CEC, R&D Chef

This month’s challenge: make scratch-made pie with a meringue topping on your dessert menu for a high volume, multi-unit restaurant. Seems easy, right? I mean, we all made meringue when we trained, I’m sure we could whip one up on a moment’s notice. The fine print: This meringue, however, will be replicated daily by kitchen staff, so it needs to be simple and error-proof. Plus, it will go on a pie that will be cut into serving pieces that (although we all hope for it) probably will not sell every single piece during a service period. Therefore, our meringue cannot slump, weep or just plain disintegrate after just a few hours. To get started, we first have to decide what type of meringue we will need: Swiss, Italian or French.

Choice 1: Go French The French meringue is by far the simplest; cooks of almost all skill levels can produce it. French meringue is made by beating room temperature egg whites with fine sugar (and some cream of tartar, if desired) until all the sugar is dissolved and the egg proteins become denatured by mechanical shear, allowing the mix to form stiff peaks. It is quick to make, but definitely the most unstable and often prone to deflating into a puddle of egg whites and sugar on top of a pie. In addition, the top will “weep” in any kind of humid environment (walk-in cooler, anyone?) and form odd spots dotting the nice, clean top. The verdict: N’est pas bien! Try again.

Choice 2: Try Italian The Italian meringue is made by whipping room temperature egg whites to a frothy stage and then slowly streaming in sugar syrup while whipping on a medium-high speed. By using dissolved sugar in a syrup form, you will avoid the spots on the pie top. The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Once the sugar is added, whip until the mixture cools and stiff peaks form, about 20 minutes. This method also sterilizes the egg whites from the heat of the sugar syrup (pasteurized or not, I wear a belt and suspenders when it comes to sanitation). A drawback of this technique is that it is very prone to user error. The sugar needs to be cooked to softball stage (238 F) for it to work. Any more or less and your cooks will have a big, sticky mess. Also, when you are whipping it using an electric mixer, as most of your cooks will, the sugar syrup tends to become whipped to the sides of the bowl and solidify there, instead of becoming incorporated into the egg whites. Now you lost some of your sugar and your measurements will be off. The verdict: Non va bene! Won’t work for us.

Choice 3: Opt for Swiss This leaves us with the Swiss meringue. This meringue is made by dissolving sugar into the egg whites over a double boiler until the sugar dissolves. You then whip the mixture at high speed until it is cooled and thickens with stiff peaks forming. This seems like a winner for a few reasons:

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1. The sugar is dissolved thoroughly, so no weeping spots form on the top 2. The heat of the double boiler pasteurizes the eggs 3. No sugar is lost during the whipping process The verdict: Succé! We have a winner Stop. Wait. Swiss meringue will dissolve and deflate in the cooler. How do you fix that?

The Secret to Keeping the Peaks The answer to a very stable, high peak pie topping is utilizing the Swiss meringue technique and dissolving bloomed gelatin into the mix while you are dissolving the sugar in the double boiler. Now, you have a cake that can: • Stay as high and spiky as Guy Fieri’s hair • Last into the next service period •C  ut with an edge so sharp you would think it was just made! Apply meringue to a cake that is completely cooled or the residual heat from the pie could melt the meringue before it sets completely. Torch this meringue during pick-up for a great effect.

Please feel free to include your menu challenges that you would like to see the Research Department tackle in the next column. Send your inquiries, questions and challenges to executivedirector@ acfwindycitychefs.org Matthew Jost began his culinary career at Kendall College before completing an internship at the Michelin-one star restaurant Everest under Chef Jean Joho. From there, he trained under Chef Francois Kwaku-Dongo at Spago Chicago and ventured to San Francisco to work at another landmark Wolfgang Puck restaurant, Postrio. Returning to Chicago in 2000, Jost worked again with Chef Joho as sous chef at Everest before being asked to head the kitchen at Joho’s second Chicago outpost, Brassiere Jo, as chef de cuisine. He continued to expand his culinary perspective as chef de cuisine at Bistrot Zinc before joining Hyatt Hotels as chef de cuisine in 2006. Most recently, Jost traveled to the east coast to join the culinary team at the celebrated Blue Duck Tavern at the Park Hyatt Washington, D.C., named one of the “10 Great Hotel Restaurants in the World” by Hotels Magazine. The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

No-Fail Meringue Topping Liquid egg whites.....................................................3 cup Gelatin, bloomed in cold water.................... 7 sheets Granulated sugar....................................................3 cups Cream of Tartar .......................................................... 2 tsp 1) Place the egg whites, sugar, bloomed gelatin in a mixing bowl and stir this together to dissolve the sugar. Use a spatula, not a whisk, so you can see when the chunks of gelatin are dissolved. 2) Put the bowl of egg mix onto a double boiler to heat up. Watch the flame on the side of the pot, it can burn the bowl. 3) Stir this often while it is heating up to dissolve the gelatin and sugar. 4) When the mix has reached 110 F, remove it from the heat and scrape it into the electric mixer. 5) Whip this on a medium speed for 1 minute, add the cream of tartar, then mix this on high speed for 25 more minutes. Set a timer. It takes a while for the mix to cool down. As it cools down and whips, you will see it increase in volume. 6) Divide the meringue as you desire to top each pie. 7) Use a rubber spatula to spread the meringue out into a dome shape, then “touch” the meringue with your spatula to create peaks and curls all over the top. 8) Store in the pastry cart (with the cover closed to keep it from absorbing other flavors from the cooler) so the gelatin can set up. At least 2 hours before using. Note: Wait for the cake to fully set up before cutting. You need to let it chill for at least 2 hours Page 24


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t, d ul an og ba ple ies ro Bl am eo teg nd ch ch , P ra sa ar Ar nt St es Se rt ide ce Al y D’ alit Cu es an Pr m ph it se sp ce or Vi Perf Jo Ho by gic ed te ar tra Sh e S th om Fr

The End is Near! Are You Prepared for the Staffing Crisis?

Insights for the hospitality field from a leading human resource development agency Not talking about the Aztec calendar here, but the end of abundant candidates to fill the entry-level positions in restaurants, hotels and resorts. The employment market is changing and the years of hundreds of qualified applicants to fill each position are going to become rarer with each passing month. Not too many years ago, the hospitality industry was struggling to find employees just to fill all the open positions (let alone find quality employees). According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, in April of 2005 the industry hit a peak of 683,000 job openings in the industry. That was followed by the next three years of over 600,000. This dropped dramatically starting in May of 2008 when the number of openings began to slide. Many Companies chose to decrease benefits and salary without focusing on employee engagement. Applicants were beating down the doors for jobs…they went from being the hunted to the hunter. So why the alarmist headline? The data we are seeing now is going to spark celebrations when comparing revenue performance over prior year. The challenge is to not get too complacent because as this economy heats up…staffing is going to get tough.

the number of openings in Jan 2012 at over 100K more than the three preceding years. Add to that the recent information about the current job market and you will come to the same conclusion…it is going to get tough, sooner rather than later.

If you look back you will find many Internet postings like these two talking about the challenging labor market the industry faced just a few short years ago:

The workforce pool is becoming depleted, resulting in a more competitive environment for employees. What are you doing to create a competitive advantage with it comes to employee engagement? Are you prepared for the end of easy hiring and staffing, as we know it? If not now, when? You have been warned…

Staffing to become herculean task: as the service sector’s largest employer, foodservice finds itself influenced by thinning labor ranks to eye new recruitment methods Top Ten Issues in the Hospitality Industry for 2007 International Society of Hospitality Consultants These articles reflect the serious staffing crisis and CEO’s viewed staffing as either a # 1 or #2 priority. The challenge was we had great demand for products and services, but nobody to help deliver those products and services. That leads to declining top line results. Today’s smart companies project out the next few years and understand that today’s great staffing environment is going to change quickly. The most recent job opening statistics show The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

About People and Performance Strategies: People and Performance Strategies is a hands-on consultancy offering a full suite of human resource assessment and development services. Clients include emerging and mid-size organizations seeking the right talent selection, training and HR practices to achieve the next level of growth. Services offered are practical solutions based on extensive experience in all aspects of the HR and training functions inside multi-unit organizations. For more information, please visit the company’s web site at www.ppstrat.com.

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Ask the Master Chef:

Healthier Cooking By Leopold K. Schaeli, CMC. (Reprinted with permission from Cooking For Profit)

Healthful dishes are lower in fat and include less salt and sugar. By keeping in mind a few basic principles, you can start immediately to cook healthier foods that contribute to a nutritionally balanced diet for your customersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one that is widely varied in nutrients, offers adequate protein, is higher in complex carbohydrates and fiber, and lower in fat and cholesterol. You can offer foods prepared by low-fat cooking methods, such as poaching, steaming, grilling or roasting. Fresh or dried herbs, spices, vinegars, wines and citrus fruit juices used in proper balance will enhance flavors without adding sodium or excess sugar. Many cuts of meat and poultry can be prepared without added fat or oil. Nonstick skillets and vegetable oil sprays afford endless possibilities. Limit portion sizes of well-trimmed, lean meat, poultry or fish to three to four ounces. Fill the plates with creative low-fat potatoes, grains, beans or pasta, and fresh vegetables or fruits. Buy cuts of meat that are naturally lower in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol. Remove the skin from poultry before cooking, and trim all visible fat from meat, fish or poultry.

Make the Right Fat Choices Rather than cooking with butter or other animal fat, use unsaturated vegetable oil which does not increase blood cholesterol levels. Monounsaturated oils, such as olive, canola or peanut oil, have, in fact, been proven to help lower blood cholesterol. Pour, skim or scrape off excess fats after cooking and before serving. After browning meat, pour off any fat from the pan. Skim fat from stocks and sauces while cooking. When sauces or stocks are cold remove any fat congealed on the surface.

Choosing Pastas, Grains and Beans In recent years, grains, including whole-grain pastas, legumes, beans, peas and lentils have gained favor. Healthconscious chefs realize these inexpensive ingredients yield satisfying main dishes that are high in protein and dietary fiber and low in fat. Like all plant food, grains and legumes contain no cholesterol.

Unlike all animal proteins, however, no single plant source contains all nine of the essential amino acids that are necessary for good nutrition. For this reason, grains and legumes should be eaten in complementary combinations, such as the classic pairing of rice and beans to form a complete protein.

Fish and Shellfish Seafood offers some of the healthiest options for main dishes. It is lower in overall fat than meat or poultry, but has the same general levels of cholesterol and low saturated fat. Many fish species, particularly fattier varieties, such as salmon, tuna, mackerel and sardines, contain a healthy bonus, omega-3 fatty acids. Studies have found omega-3 to play a role in preventing heart disease.

Add Herbs Fresh and dried herbs enhance the flavor of healthy dishes without adding fat, calories or sodium. In general, fresh herbs are added towards the end of cooking as their flavor dissipates with long exposure to heat. (Continued on page 28)

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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Ask the Master Chef:

Healthier Cooking (Continued from page 23) Measure fresh herbs two to one dry. Dried herbs need longer cooking and are usually added early in the cooking process.

Types of Fats Fats have nine calories per gram, while carbohydrates and proteins have only four calories. Foods contain a combination of the three different types of fats, saturated, polyunsaturated, and monounsaturated. Saturated fats are found in all food sources of fat, but in large quantities in meat, cheese, eggs, butter, and other dairy products, and in tropical oils, such as coconut, palm and palm-kernel oils. Saturated fats are solid at room temperature. Polyunsaturated fats are also found in all sources of fat. In vegetable oil they are liquid at room temperature. Monounsaturated fats are also found in every source of fat in nature â&#x20AC;&#x201C; almonds and olives are rich sources. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fats are subclassified into omega-3, cold water fish and golden flaxseeds. Omega-6 fatty acids are found in whole grains and cereals.

About Sodium Sodium is a mineral that occurs naturally in many foods. Most of the sodium in the American diet comes from table salt and the sodium in processed foods and beverages. It is added for flavor and as a preservative. It may be called sodium citrate, sodium nitrate or sodium phosphate. Excess consumption of sodium can contribute to hypertension. Daily intake should be no more than 2400 to 3000 milligrams of sodium, so use it sparingly.

Where is Cholesterol? Cholesterol is a substance that is produced by the body and used in body tissues. We also get cholesterol from foods that contain cholesterol. When the body is fed more cholesterol than it can handle, it stores the excess cholesterol in the arteries. This stored cholesterol is suspected of being a major factor in the development of heart disease.

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Cholesterol is only found in animal foods, such as poultry, seafood, meat, dairy products, egg yolks and animal fats (butter, chicken fat and lard). There are a number of plant foods, however, like nuts, nut-butters, olives, coconuts, avocados, margarine and vegetable oils that are high in fat, but are cholesterol free.

Oh So Sweet The average American consumes about 130 pounds of sugar annually. That is a shocking 600 calories of sweetening a day. Sugar is the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular food additive and salt is a distant second. Sugar (sucrose) is a carbohydrate found in many fruits and some vegetables. It is most concentrated in sugar cane and in the sugar beet.

Page 28


AN

DR

ACF Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association, Inc.

Nomination for Chef of the Year Award 2012

PLE E T BY UR ASE MO N N COM ND OM PL AY, IN ET MA ATIO E Y2 N 1, FOR 20 MS 12

It is time to once again nominate candidates for our prestigious “Chef of the Year Award.” Please complete the attached form to nominate your candidate. The guidelines for nomination are: •

Individuals cannot have received this award within the last five years.

Must be an active MCCA member, and an ACF member for at least 1 year.

Must be a paid member in good standing within the organization.

Must participate in a mystery basket cooking competition with other nominees.

Should have contributed greatly to furthering the culinary profession.

Should exemplify the Culinarian’s Code.

These most recent recipients from the last five years are not eligible: Randy Smith, Scott Ryan, Joseph Nader, Mark Dixon and Brian Beland. This year’s award dinner will be held August 27, 2012 at the Country Club of Detroit, hosted and presented by 2011 Chef of the Year Brian Beland, CMC. We have many outstanding chefs within the organization. This is your chance to see that a deserving recipient receives due recognition. GET INVOLVED NOW!

The Culinarian’s Code As a proud member of the American Culinary Federation, I pledge to share my professional knowledge and skill with all culinarians. I will place honor, fairness, cooperation and consideration first when dealing with my colleagues. I will keep all comments professional and respectful when dealing with my colleagues. I will protect all members from the use of unfair means, unnecessary risks and unethical behavior when used against them for another’s personal gain. I will support the success, growth, and future of my colleagues and this great federation. Adopted at Board of Governors, August 3, 2010

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Page 29


Nomination for Chef of the Year Award 2012 Submit forms to Brian Lorge at: 227 E. Irving Park Road, Wood Dale, IL 60191 OR fax to (206) 203-4510 OR scan and email to bflorge@comcast.net

S E RM LET FO MP ON 12 CO NATI , 20 ASE MI 21 PLE N NO , MAY R Y ETU DA D R ON AN BY M

ACF Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association, Inc.

Name of Nominee:______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City:___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ State:__________________________________________________

Zip Code:___________________________________________________

Home Phone:___________________________________________

Business Phone:_____________________________________________

Place of Employment:____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City:___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ State:__________________________________________________

Zip Code:___________________________________________________

ACF Certificatcation_______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Is he/she a member of the Academy of Chefs?

m Yes

m No

Nomineeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s qualifications are as follows: (Attach additional information if necessary.) What has the nominee accomplished professionally?_________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ How has the nominee contributed to the MCCA?____________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What committees has the nominee served on?______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What has the nominee done to improve the chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s image in the public eye?____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name of person nominating: (Please Print)__________________________________________________________________________________ Signature of person nominating:___________________________________________________________________________________________ The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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AN BY

ACF Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association, Inc.

DR

P ETU LEAS MO RN N E COM ND OM PL AY, IN ET MA ATIO E Y2 N 1, FOR 20 MS 12

Nomination for Pastry C ­ hef of the Year Award 2012

It is time to once again nominate candidates for our new “Pastry Chef of the Year Award.” Please complete the attached form to nominate your candidate. The guidelines for nomination are: •

Individuals cannot have received this award within the last five years.

Must be an active MCCA member, and an ACF member for at least 1 year.

Must be a paid member in good standing within the organization.

• Should have contributed greatly to furthering the culinary profession and demonstrate exemplary skills in pastry arts. •

Should exemplify the Culinarian’s Code.

These most recent recipients from the last five years are not eligible: Roger Holden. This year’s award dinner will be held August 27, 2012 at the Country Club of Detroit, hosted and presented by 2011 Chef of the Year Brian Beland, CMC.. We have many outstanding chefs within the organization. This is your chance to see that a deserving recipient receives due recognition. GET INVOLVED NOW!

The Culinarian’s Code As a proud member of the American Culinary Federation, I pledge to share my professional knowledge and skill with all culinarians. I will place honor, fairness, cooperation and consideration first when dealing with my colleagues. I will keep all comments professional and respectful when dealing with my colleagues. I will protect all members from the use of unfair means, unnecessary risks and unethical behavior when used against them for another’s personal gain. I will support the success, growth, and future of my colleagues and this great federation. Adopted at Board of Governors, August 3, 2010

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Page 31


Nomination for Pastry C ­ hef of the Year Award 2012 Submit forms to Brian Lorge at: 227 E. Irving Park Road, Wood Dale, IL 60191 OR fax to (206) 203-4510 OR scan and email to bflorge@comcast.net

S E RM LET FO MP ON 12 CO NATI , 20 ASE MI 21 PLE N NO , MAY R Y ETU DA D R ON AN BY M

ACF Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association, Inc.

Name of Nominee:______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City:___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ State:__________________________________________________

Zip Code:___________________________________________________

Home Phone:___________________________________________

Business Phone:_____________________________________________

Place of Employment:____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City:___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ State:__________________________________________________

Zip Code:___________________________________________________

ACF Certificatcation_______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Is he/she a member of the Academy of Chefs?

m Yes

m No

Nominee’s qualifications are as follows: (Attach additional information if necessary.) What has the nominee accomplished professionally?_________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ How has the nominee contributed to the MCCA?____________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What committees has the nominee served on?______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What has the nominee done to improve the chef’s image in the public eye?____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name of person nominating: (Please Print)__________________________________________________________________________________ Signature of person nominating:___________________________________________________________________________________________

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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Michigan Chefs de Cuisine and American Culinary Federation Membership Dues Category

Description and Amount

Professional Culinarian

Professional/chef with 3 years plus experience. $225

Culinarian

New professional, minimum of 6 months experience. $125

Student Culinarian  Student/apprentice in the post-secondary culinary education program, less than 2 years of experience. $85 Junior Culinarian

High School student, 16â&#x20AC;&#x201C;18 years old. $70

Associate membership  Any group, corporation or company that provides products or services to the culinary profession. $290 Allied membership Related culinary professions, such as a nutritionist, dietician, bartender, waiter, restaurant manager or owner. $220 Culinary Enthusiast

Non-Culinary Professionals. $150

Property membership Allows companies or educational institutions to purchase ACF memberships for culinarians at a reduced rate. For more info go to http://www.acfchefs.org/Source/ Membership/Property.cfm New members will be billed each year on the anniversary of the date they joined. All other members will continue to be billed on the first of the year. You can join or renew your membership online by visiting our website, www. mccachef.org. The MCCA organization number is MI012. You can also join by visiting either www.acfchefs.org or the ACF Central Region website at www.acfcenreg.com When renewing by mail, please send to: American Culinary Federation, Inc., 180 Center Place Way, St. Augustine, FL 32095 â&#x20AC;˘ 800-624-9458

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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UPDATE YOUR MENU AND

VITALIZE YOUR

MARKETING

# Menu analysis, engineering & design # Marketing plans & programs # Advertising & promotions # Graphic design & print management # E-mail & direct mail marketing # Web design, hosting & management # Integrated social media # Customer loyalty programs # Organizational analysis & staff training # Facility analysis & design

Graphikitchen, LLC, and Lorge Marketing Services, LLC comprise an award winning full service resource for professional foodservice marketing, advertising, creative, design, management and consulting. We feature a comprehensive array of high quality one-stopshop services and products designed to help businesses and associations operate more efficiently, grow, succeed and increase profitability with quantifiable, measurable results.

www.graphikitchen.com | 630.422.1997 | 248.318.7801

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Page 34


Job Hunting in Today’s Economy ACF is here to help you in your job search. Visit our Career Center to view available jobs, post your résumé, create job alerts and more. MORE.

Take the CEPC® Exam Millions of people go on a diet each year, whether to lose weight or for health reasons such as allergies or diabetes, but a recent study of 31 long-term diet plans conducted by the American Psychological Association found that up to two-thirds of participants ended up heavier than when they started. MORE

Differentiate Yourself With thousands of chefs competing in the job market, it is essential to prove your culinary competency. Certification through the American Culinary Federation demonstrates skill, knowledge and professionalism to the food service industry. MORE

ACF on Facebook Be sure to “Like” the ACF on Facebook and get all the latest news. MORE.

MCCA on Facebook Be sure to “Like” the MCCA on Facebook, too! MORE.

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Grants for Chefs Participating in Chefs Move to Schools ACF is offering $250 grants to chefs participating in the national Chefs Move to Schools program. Applicants are not required to be ACF members. Apply by May 15. MORE.

Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of fiber, protein and monounsaturated fats beneficial to the body. Read more in April’s Ingredient of the Month provided through a partnership between ACFEF Chef & Child Foundation and Clemson University. MORE.

2011 ACF Salary Study and Calculator The 2011 ACF Salary Study, conducted by Industry Insights, Inc., revealed that certified culinarians earn 7% more, the gender pay gap is significant, where you live affects how much you make and more. MORE.

Be a Member of ACF Culinary Team USA for a Day Six culinary students/apprentices will have the opportunity of a lifetime to work alongside and learn from an ACF Culinary National Team USA member at a special fundraising reception July 14 during the 2012 ACF National Convention in Orlando, Fla. Five teams of one culinary student and one chef will prepare a savory dish, while one team of one student and one chef will create a sweet delight for attendees to enjoy. Winners will receive roundtrip airfare within the continental U.S. to Orlando, accommodations, based on double occupancy, at the Orlando World Center Marriott, July 13–18, and convention registration. REGISTER HERE.

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The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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The Many Benefits of Beans on the Menu By Eric Stein, MS, RD

As more and more Americans are trying to balance their diets, they are looking towards beans and an alternative protein source. In addition to being a great source of low-fat protein, beans also contain a large amount of fiber, as well as vitamins and minerals. Beans are also easy on the wallet, as their protein source cost a considerable amount less than animal proteins. Beans are delicious and nutritious, but the consequence of eating them can sometimes be embarrassing. With all the healthful, and not to mention delicious benefits beans possess, there has to be a secret to being able to consume them, and prepare them for your guests, without the uncomfortable gas. While it has been a common belief that soaking beans can reduce the flatulence factor, the only tried and true way is to eat more beans. Beans contain a high amount of carbohydrates in addition to their protein content. The specific type of carbohydrates in beans that cause bloating are called oligosaccharides, a form of sugar. Unfortunately our bodies don’t have the enzyme necessary to break down these types of sugars. This results in uncomfortable gas and bloating. This is similar to the absence of the enzyme to digest milk in people who are lactose intolerant. Beans are easily one of the most nutrient rich foods on earth and according to the medical specialist, Dr. Nicholas Perricone – a super food amongst all the so called ‘healthy foods’. Beans are naturally gluten free and cholesterol free, and are loaded with heart healthy fiber. The fiber content of beans is substantial, containing both soluble and insoluble forms of fiber. Fiber plays a meaningful role in keeping the digestive tract healthy and lowering cholesterol. Since beans are such a substantial source of fiber, they also help keep you full longer since they take longer to digest. Beans are a great source of protein for vegetarian and vegans. Many vegans need to consider the iron content of their diet. Beans are a very rich source of iron, particularly black beans. While beans are a great source of protein for vegetarian diets, it is necessary to pair them with either nuts or grains in order to provide a complete vegetarian protein source. A simple ways to provide these complimentary proteins is to add beans to pasta and rice dishes. Including beans onto menus can also be much more inventive. Beans make a great addition to soups and stews, The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

as well as green salads. On their own, beans can even be the main ingredient in salads. Try mixing a variety of cooked beans with a flavorful vinaigrette and some roasted vegetables for an outstanding entrée salad. Heirloom beans have definitely been gaining in popularity in recent years as new, but really old, varieties are coming to the market place. A recent trend with beans has been, the bigger the better. Bean varieties such as Christmas Limas and Gigante beans really add visual appeal to a dish, as well as their deliciously unique flavors. If it has been a while since you last visited the benefits of using beans on the menu, now is the time to check out what you have been missing. An expert in the field of food and nutrition, Wellness Chef Eric Stein, MS, RD, is the owner of Enlightened Flavors, LLC, a food and nutrition consulting company that brings together the combination of culinary arts and nutrition expertise. Wellness Chef Eric Stein applies the use of global flavors, seasonal ingredients, and nutrient rich foods to spread the awareness that food can be both delicious and nourishing. Chef Stein’s mission is to help others in the food, nutrition, and wellness industries bridge the components of a healthy lifestyle. Please visit www.wellnesschef.com or email him at estein@ wellnesschef.com to learn more.

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Board of Directors & Committee Directory Published and edited by the Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association, founded in 1970. The MCCA is a member of the American Culinary Federation and Academy of Chefs of America. This non-profit publication is dedicated to the future education, training, and advancement of chefs and cooks for restaurants, institutions, and the hotel industry. The following are all Chapter Officers, Board Members, Committee Chairpersons and Special Events Chairpersons of the Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association, Inc.: Chairman of the Board ACF Conference Chair Mich. Culinary Team Manager Randy Smith, CEC (248) 437-7337 x254 rsmith@walnutcreekcc.net President Doug Ganhs, CEC (248) 522-3704 drganhs@oaklandcc.edu First Vice President Education co-足chairperson Stacy Sloan, CEPC (248) 541-1414, ext. 640 stacysloan@holiday-market.com Second Vice President Education co-足chairperson Brian Beland, CMC (313) 881-8000 bbeland@ccdetroit.org Treasurer Brian Henson (248) 914-0171 bhenson@bigrockchophouse.com足 Secretary Membership Chairperson Chris Hessler, CEC (810) 538-0137 chefmeister@charter.net President Emeritus Advisor to the Board Milos Cihelka, CMC, AAC Sergeant at Arms John Aldini, CC (586) 790-2095 johnmaldini@aol.com Note: Business casual dress is acceptable at meetings. Please no jeans

The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

Executive Offices at: 227 E. Irving Park Road Wood Dale, IL 60191 (734) 320-8738 (206) 203-4510 Fax Executive Director Newsletter Executive Editor Brian F. Lorge (734) 320-8738 Cell (206) 203-4510 Fax bflorge@comcast.net Trustee Scholarship Chairperson Kevin Brennan, CEC, AAC (313) 963-9200 kevinbr@thedac.com Trustee / Certification Chair Kevin Enright, CEC, CCE, AAC (248) 689-6529 kmenrigh@oaklandcc.edu Trustee Apprenticeship Chairperson John McCormack, CEC, CCE, AAC (248) 377-9032 (248) 377-0674 Fax john@gatewayfood.com Culinary Competition Salon Chair Randy Emert, CEC chef@greatoakscc.com Associate Member Committee Chair Roger Kreager 734.564.7994 Cell roger@chef-source.com Website / Newsletter Editor John Gouin (248) 318-7801 Cell john@graphikitchen.com

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The Michigan Chefs | May 2012

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The Michigan Chefs Newsletter

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Michigan Chefs de Cuisine Association • (734) 320-8738 • 227 E. Irving Park Rd. • Wood Dale, IL 60191 • www.mccachef.org


The Michigan Chefs May, 2012 Newsletter