Issuu on Google+

Environmental Statement Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary, September 2012

North Sprowston and Old Catton Beyond Green Developments


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY This document is the third volume of the Environmental Statement (ES) that accompanies the outline planning application submitted on behalf of Beyond Green Developments Ltd. (the 'applicant') for the development of a residential-led, mixed-use urban extension on land in Broadland, north of Norwich (the ‘proposed development’). This document is a non-technical summary of the comprehensive main technical assessment and appendices found in Volumes 1 and 2 of the ES, respectively.

THE SITE The site consists of 207.4 hectares (ha) of land within the administrative boundaries of Broadland District Council located between the parishes of Old Catton, Sprowston, Rackheath and Thorpe St Andrew (the ‘application site’). Figure 1.1 is a site location plan showing the context of the application site, which is bound to the south by Old Catton and Sprowston, to the east by Sprowston Manor Golf Club, and to the west by St Faith’s Lane. To the north runs the proposed route of the Norwich Northern Distributor Road (NDR), beyond which lies the village of Spixworth.

WHAT IS PLANNED FOR THE SITE? The applicant seeks to develop the application site as an integrated, mixed use urban extension to the north of Norwich that would be brought forward in phases over 15-20 years. The proposed development comprises: 

Residential development of up to 3,520 dwellings;

Commercial office space and individual retail and/or service units;

Up to two small hotels;

Two two-form entry primary schools, two community halls, a library, a health centre, and up to five nurseries/crèches;

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

1


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

An energy centre;

82.5ha of green space including up to 20.1ha of play and recreational space and at least 31.3ha of new and retained natural and semi-natural space, and the dedication of Beeston Park as a major new public park; and

Four accesses to the highway network.

HOW HAS THE SCHEME BEEN DESIGNED? Full details of how the proposed development has been designed and the principles that have been followed are given in the Design and Access Statement and the Master Plan produced by the design team, which accompany this planning application. The proposed development has evolved in the context of the local and national planning policy background including the Joint Core Strategy for Broadland, Norwich and South Norfolk and the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF). Key themes found within both national and local policy include: 

Conserve the natural and built environment;

Support the principles of sustainable development;

Conserve resources and minimise the impacts of development;

Ensure the adequate provision of infrastructure, services and amenities made necessary by the development and seek related opportunities for securing environmental enhancements; and

Give appropriate weight to environmental, economic and social issues.

As such, the proposed development is being brought forward in accordance with key social, economic and environmental sustainable development principles, including bringing forward a mix of uses on the site to ensure a balanced and cohesive community, energy and water efficiency, low carbon and renewable technologies, extensive green infrastructure, provision of community services and facilities, and an emphasis on green transport methods e.g. walking, cycling and public transport.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

2


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

WHAT PLANNING PERMISSIONS ARE BEING APPLIED FOR? The applicant is seeking to obtain outline planning permission for the proposed development of on the application site, known as North Sprowston and Old Catton. As a large-scale, masterplanned development which would come forward in phases over a period of between 15 and 20 years depending on market conditions, the outline planning application will establish maximum and minimum parameters for key design features and will confirm these features precisely only where it is necessary or possible to do so at the outline stage.. Further details of the design will then be dealt with in reserved matters applications following approval of the outline planning application.

WHAT ARE THE ALTERNATIVES OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT? In accordance with good practice, alternative scenarios have been considered as follows: 

‘Do Nothing’ scenario – nothing is brought forward on the site;

Alternative locations – other sites are considered as a location; and

Alternative designs – the site and proposed uses remain but design variations are considered.

‘Do Nothing’ Scenario The ‘Do Nothing’ scenario assumes that no development is carried out and so the application site would remain unchanged. Excluding development entirely from the site would prevent the policy on the growth triangle from being delivered. It would likely mean that development would have to take place at unacceptable densities on other sites, and/or that constrained sites deemed to have low or negligible development potential would need to be brought forward. Additionally, delivery would rely on a multitude of piecemeal land ownerships rather than utilising a united consortium with a comprehensive development plan.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

3


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

Alternative Locations Guidance on the review of alternative locations acknowledges that the 'consideration of alternative locations or sites will not always be available to the developer, for example, the developer may own the site and the proposal may be a means of satisfying the objective of maximising the asset of the land.' As detailed within this guidance, the consideration of alternative locations with regard to the mix of proposed uses is not feasible due to the ownership of the site by the applicant.

Alternative Designs The development proposals have required careful consideration of the characteristics of the application site and its adjacent areas. During the planning stages of this application, alternative designs of the proposed development have been evolved by the design team, which are provided in further detail within the accompanying Design & Access Statement and Master Plan that are being submitted with the planning application.

WHAT WILL ACCOMPANY THE PLANNING APPLICATIONS? The ES is submitted in support of the planning application for the proposed development. In addition to the ES and the necessary forms, plans, and drawings, the planning application is also accompanied by a number technical study reports including amongst others the following: 

Planning Statement;

Design & Access Statement;

Sustainability Statement;

Health Impact Assessment; and

Transport Assessment.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

4


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

What is an EIA? An EIA is a legal requirement for the proposed development primarily due to its size but also due to its proximity to potentially sensitive areas. The EIA process and the ES identify the potential significant environmental effects likely to be caused by the construction and operation of the development, so that the Council and third parties (including the public) can consider the measures proposed to remove, or minimise, any significant negative impacts and how positive impacts will be maximised. The ES comprises a series of studies, surveys and consultations that enable the scheme to be designed to minimise its environmental impacts. Where necessary the ES identifies measures to ensure that the scheme is built and ‘operated’ in a sustainable way. The results of these studies are detailed in Volume 1: Main Text & Figures and Volume 2: Technical Appendices of this ES. Volume 3 of the ES is the Non-Technical Summary. The Non-Technical Summary is intended to provide members of the public, and any other interested parties, without specialist technical knowledge, with information to understand the proposals and the principal findings of the EIA, as presented in the ES.

HOW IS CONSTRUCTION MANAGED TO MINIMISE ANY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS? The EIA has identified where environmental impacts from the construction phase may occur. Although these are generally temporary in nature, it is still important that these are controlled (‘mitigated’) properly to avoid any nuisance or environmental damage. The Principal Contractor will undertake construction site activities in accordance with best practice and general construction policies and in line with the Construction Method Plans (CMP) and Environmental Management Plans (EMP) that were prepared and approved by the Council as part of the extant planning permission for the North Sprowston and Old Catton Masterplan. These contain site-based systems for the effective management of health, safety and environmental matters, an outline all of the controls that need to be in place. The contractor will seek to minimise disturbance to sensitive receptors, including local residents, schools, and flora (plant species) and fauna (animal species) where appropriate, and pursuant to this, good construction site practices will be employed to reduce noise and dust disturbance. Construction of the proposed development will be carried out in accordance with health and safety legislation, applicable standards and design codes. The requirements of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulation, the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations and the Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations will be adhered to.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

5


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

TRANSPORT A review of the transport assessment has been carried out to review any impacts resulting from the construction and operation of the proposed development in context of the approved Masterplan development on the local transport environment. This was undertaken in accordance with guidance given by the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment guidelines, Environmental Assessment of Road Traffic. The assessment considers the effect of the predicted level of traffic generated by the proposed development in the context of existing traffic flows on the adjoining network. The impact of the total number of vehicles and trips per mode is assessed throughout the working day with consideration of the effects during the typical weekday peak hours. Over the construction phase of the proposed development, a negligible impact to traffic flows was identified in the wider area, although there Wroxham Road will experience a Moderate impact during some construction times. The type and number of vehicles generated during the construction period will be dependent on the type and intensity of work undertaken in the different construction phases; however, any impacts associated with the construction of the wider area, is considered to be short-term and temporary. Furthermore, a Construction Traffic Management Plan will be implemented to manage and monitor the construction traffic to prevent any temporary spikes in construction traffic as embedded mitigation. The operation of the completed development is considered in relation to the impact of the proposed Norwich Northern Distributor Road (NNDR). The implementation of the strategic distributor to the north east of Norwich has a significant impact on the distribution of traffic within the agreed study area. The development impacts will therefore differ when the NNDR is open. The only significant traffic impacts when considering the development impacts on future 2017 baseline, prior to the construction of the NNDR is the North Walsham Road/A1042 junction. Therefore, it should be noted that North Walsham Road/A1042 junction is considered congested in 2012 baseline and the situation worsens in the forecasted 2017 baseline before the traffic impact of the 2017 development is considered. The NNDR will be constructed before the completion of the proposed development and therefore is considered as embedded mitigation when assessing the future 2032 baseline. There are no significant traffic impacts when considering the traffic impacts of the complete development in 2032 when compared with the forecasted 2032 future baseline.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

6


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

NOISE & VIBRATION The noise and vibration assessment has considered the noise and vibration effects of the development; specifically the effects of existing conditions on the development and the effects of noise and vibration generated by the proposed development on surrounding properties, during construction and during the operation/occupation of the proposed development. A review has been undertaken of current planning guidance, British Standards and other relevant guidance and policy documents, relevant to the assessment of noise and vibration from the construction and operational phases of the type of development proposed. The assessment has been based on a series of environmental noise measurements undertaken at the site and noise predictions in February and April 2012, to identify any noise impacts that are likely as a result of the construction and operation of the development. Noise and vibration during the construction phase will be monitored taking into consideration the advice provided in the British Standard for Noise & Vibration Control. The assessment has found that during the construction works the existing noise-sensitive receptors at the perimeter of the application site will experience some moderately increased levels of noise although these will be restricted to periods when construction works are located within the areas immediately adjacent to the receptors and, consequently, will be temporary in nature. Furthermore, the use of standard good construction practices and adoption of mitigation measures on when and how to carry out these construction activities will reduce this impact significantly. During the operational phase of the development, existing noise-sensitive properties adjacent to the road network, the increase in noise levels, as a result of this worst-case cumulative assessment, is potentially inaudible and therefore the effect is therefore considered negligible. The inclusion of appropriate measures to control noise from the proposed energy centres and faรงade treatments on the proposed noise-sensitive development have been suggested and, although not specifically required to mitigate potential noise impacts, could be included as a measure to ameliorate the potential effects from the proposed commercial noise sources at the development site. Overall, the existing and potential future noise levels indicate that noise need not be a constraining factor in the development of the site with the appropriate mitigation measures in place during both the construction and operational stage of the development.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

7


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

AIR QUALITY The assessment of the possible impacts from the proposed development on local air quality has been undertaken. The assessment looked at potential impacts during both the construction and operational phases. With regard to the construction phase, the assessment looked into the potential air quality impacts from vehicle emissions, dust, and earth moving techniques. For the operational phase of the proposed development a computer screening model was used to predict concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particles (referred to as PM10) at locations sensitive to changes in air quality resulting from changes in traffic flows. Potential impacts on air quality due to NOx emissions from the proposed CHP have been predicted using the ADMS 4 dispersion model. The impacts to air quality during the construction phase of the proposed development are likely to be limited to impacts from dust from construction activity and emissions from construction traffic. Predicted impacts associated with the construction phase of the proposed development are considered to be negligible as a result of the mitigation measures proposed specifically for the proposed development. The Construction Method Statement and Environmental Management Plan that will be prepared for the site will include measures to control dust emissions and will pay particular attention to prevailing wind direction, weather conditions, proximity of potential receptors and the type of construction activity taking place. Assessment of the operational phase has identified that air quality impacts arising from traffic and the energy centre are also considered to be negligible and that air quality does not pose a constraint to the proposed development.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

8


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

LANDSCAPE & VISUAL Landscape is defined in the European Landscape Convention as ‘...an area, as perceived by people, whose character is the result of the action and 1

interaction of natural and/or human factors’. The landscape and visual assessment of the proposed development evaluated the impact of the changes as a result of the development on the surrounding landscape character and on visual amenity. The landscape and visual assessment of the proposed development evaluated the impact of the changes as a result of the development on the surrounding landscape character and on visual amenity. The main part of the Proposed Development site is currently in use for arable cultivation and there is a strong network of hedgerows and blocks of trees. The Masterplan proposes to retain and enhance many of the existing landscape features within the site, and provide new contemporary landscapes to help create overall benefit to the landscape. The most sensitive receptor is the Parish Church of St Mary and St Margaret and this reflects its national importance as a Grade I listed structure. However, the impact on this is Negligible as it is currently well screened from the Proposed Development site and in addition an area of green open space is proposed where Church Lane enters the site. High sensitive receptors include the locally designated Historic Parkland, Areas of Landscape Value and the Grade II listings. The effect of the Proposed Development on these receptors is generally insignificant apart from Oak Lodge Farm which although the impact is considered Moderate/Minor, the change of character will be Slight Adverse reducing to Neutral. One of the most significant landscape impacts is that on hedgerows. This is considered to be Moderate Adverse reducing to Slight Adverse and over time to Neutral. The design team has taken a conscious decision that where the hedges are of less visual or ecological importance that they will be removed where they do not fit into the constraints of the evolving design. However, to balance this, a new green infrastructure will be developed throughout the Proposed Development and the hedgerows will be replaced with a network of green infrastructure that is, whilst different, not less valuable. There will be a large beneficial impact to Beeston Park and Red Hall parkland for the benefit of the community at large.

1

Council of Europe, (2000); European Landscape Convention, Council of Europe.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

9


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

SOIL CONDITIONS, GROUNDWATER & CONTAMINATION The ground conditions of the application site reviewed by means of desk-top study to assess the current geological strata that underlie the site and potential influences on it from current and historical land use. A visual site inspection and an intrusive ground investigation were undertaken to establish the current status if the application site and its immediate surrounds. The desk based information indicates the site is underlain by Superficial Deposits overlying the Crag Group Deposits which in turn overly the White Chalk. Superficial deposits are all typically variable in composition with both predominantly coarse and fine grained horizons. Crag Group Deposits (including the Wroxham Crag Formation) comprise gravels inter-bedded with sands, silts and clays. The deposits are glacial in origin with highly variable lithology. The underlying White Chalk comprises chalk with flints. The area is not known for metastabilty within the chalk and the BGS National Geoscience Information Service have the classed the site as having a very low collapsible stability hazard potential. Risks associated with both the existing site conditions and the construction and operation of the proposed development have been identified and assessed. Relevant receptors are identified as: future site users (including construction and maintenance workers), the underlying minor aquifer and nearby and on-site surface waters. There is potential for local, short to medium term impacts of moderate negative significance to occur during the construction phase as a result of disturbance to any existing contamination and the resultant effect on soils, groundwater and surface water. Prior to commencing works, therefore, a comprehensive geo-environmental investigation will be carried out in order to determine possible areas of contamination on-site. The results of the intrusive investigation will be used to devise a remedial strategy (if necessary) that should be agreed with the EA and implemented at the commencement of the construction phase. It is considered that following implementation of the mitigation measures, construction phase impacts will be reduced to negligible. The geo-environmental investigation will identify any possible areas of contamination on-site and further remediation measures will be considered if necessary. This will ensure there is no potential for residential end-users to be exposed to contamination during the operation of the proposed development. Building materials will be chosen and placed in accordance with normal good practice depending on the ground conditions, thus reducing the potential impact on ground contamination to negligible. The Sustainable Drainage System (SUDS) proposed for the site will also mitigate against the potential impact of a reduction in recharge to the underlying groundwater.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

10


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

Providing all remediation measures are implemented, therefore, it is considered that the proposed development will have a positive impact on the adjacent environment with regards to contamination and ground conditions. The proposed development would remove and/or remediate any sources of contamination that could exist in areas of fill, and mitigate any risks posed by any presence of ground gas from the landfills within the area. By implementing the remediation techniques detailed above, any elevated concentrations of contamination in the soil and groundwater should be reduced. The proposed development would also partly remove any potential pathways to end users, compared to the existing conditions, by providing a clean cover material.

WATER RESOURCES A study of the hydrology and hydrogeology has been undertaken to identify potential environmental constraints to existing and nearby water resources that might be at risk of pollution from sediment run-off or spillages associated with the proposed development in line with up-to-date planning and legislative guidance. As part of this study, the effects of construction and operational activities associated with the proposed development on the surrounding water environment were considered. Where appropriate, suitable mitigation measures have been suggested to address where potential impacts could arise in addition to those that have been identified and approved by the Council for the extant planning permission of the North Sprowston and Old Catton Masterplan. There are no formal surface water sewer networks, ditches or watercourses currently on the site and therefore the site discharges all surface water by infiltration and evapotranspiration. The application site is within an area where the water environment can be regarded as having some sensitivity; due to a minor aquifer underlying Park Hall Farm, which is not used as a potable water supply, and the ponds at Rackheath Springs. The application site lies within Flood Zone 1, which defined by the Environment Agency, is located in an area of Low Probability of flooding. As the site currently has no impermeable surfacing, with all surface water run-off either being infiltrated or flowing overland into the nearest water courses, the post development run-off rates will increase. It is intended to limit the development flows to a greenfield run-off rate. Effective SUDS techniques and the proposed surface water drainage scheme will introduce methods to meet this objective.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

11


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

During the construction phase, the Principle Contractor will abide by the measures set out within the CMP and EMP to ensure standard good practice will mitigate against those possible impacts. Although no negative impacts are predicted as a result of the proposed development, best practice measures will be followed and risks associated with the proposed development will be identified and minimised to avoid risk to water courses during construction. In addition, all operations on-site will take place in accordance with the Environment Agency’s Pollution Prevention Guidelines and good practice to ensure that ground and surface water quality is not adversely affected.

ECOLOGY The impact of the proposed development on the ecological value of the application site and on the wider area of ecological zones of influence has been assessed, using guidance provided by the Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (IEEM). An Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey of the application site was carried out, identifying all dominant habitats considered to be potentially ecologically important or have the potential to support any ecologically important and/or legally protected floral or faunal species. In addition, a number of protected species surveys were carried out for bats, dormouse, great crested newts, reptiles, breeding birds, water voles, badgers and invertebrates. This was augmented with a review of readily available ecological information, relevant environmental databases and site-specific direct consultation with a number of organisations including the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, Natural England, and Norfolk Biodiversity Information Service. Following this consultation an assessment of the site’s ecological value and likelihood of supporting protected species was made. The Survey Area largely comprises arable farmland with fields separated by hedgerows and areas of other habitats including broadleaved woodland and parkland. Much of the Survey and Proposed Developments are within Entry Level Stewardship Agreements. The woodlands associated with Beeston Park are listed on the National Inventory of Woodland and Trees, as is the Millennium Woodland planted adjacent to the Development Boundary off Church Lane. There are three blocks of ancient woodland, either ‘ancient and semi-natural’ or ‘ancient replanted’, close to the eastern end of the Proposed Development: parts of Ladies Wood, Church Carr & Springs, Tollshill Wood and Sprowston Wood (north of the Wroxham Road, between the other ancient woodlands). The Survey Area is approximately 360ha and is predominantly arable (78%). Other habitats are minor components: amenity grassland (6%), seminatural broadleaved woodland (5%), parkland and scattered trees (4%) and improved grassland (4%). Planted woodland of all types together represents 3% of the survey area, and semi-improved neutral grassland and tall ruderal both cover less than 1 ha. The Proposed Development

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

12


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

supports twelve main Phase 1 habitats. The principal habitat is arable cropland which is separated by frequent hedgerows, with the other habitats forming minor components. The impacts of the proposed development on the local designated sites, the habitats on-site and the potential protected species will mostly be negligible and low. At both the construction and operational stage there will be some minor negative impacts in relation to the removal of habitat suitable for nesting birds, invertebrates and foraging bats. However, mitigation measures will be implemented by the contractor (e.g. timing construction works outside of bird breeding season) to minimise and manage these impacts appropriately. After implementing the recommended mitigation measures, for example, the wildflower/grasses seed mix; the residual impact on designated sites, habitats and protected species will be negligible and even minor positive in some cases.

SOCIO-ECONOMIC A range of socio-economic factors were assessed to determine how the proposed development would affect the immediate and wider community through the provision of a range of employment opportunities as a result of the construction of the proposed. It is clear that a high priority of the overall proposed development is to deliver improvements to contribute to the aims and objectives of the various development plan objectives set by the Council. In creating construction and operational job opportunities, the proposed development accords with policies at both the national, regional, and local level that seek to ensure the continued economic development of the local area supporting wider regional growth. During the construction phase, positive socio-economic impacts will result in a net increase in employment. The proposed development represents the provision of considerable housing and employment benefits inherently targeted at the local communities present in north Norwich and Broadland. The proposed development seeks to bring forward a sustainability ethos that is embedded across the design and will see considerable open space, play space and allotment provisions, in addition to a range of sports pitches, courts and changing facilities. The proposed development will also bring forward two primary schools, up to five nurseries,

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

13


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

two community halls, a library, and a health centre to meet not just the needs of the new development’s community but to also serve the existing communities in the local area. The proposed development is also considered to reduce crime rates over the long-term. The proposed development will have Minor Negative impacts on the existing tenants of the County Council land and Wroxham Farm but these are limited to the need to find new land to rent and thus, it is considered that these can be sufficiently remedied in time. It is further considered that the total benefits of the proposed development outweigh, the short-term to medium-term Minor Negative impacts that will be experienced by these agricultural tenants.

ARCHAEOLOGY & CULTURAL HERITAGE Examination of relevant archaeological databases, including Norfolk Historical Environment Record (NHER), supplemented by other sources and site inspections indicate the archaeological potential of the proposed development area would appear to be slightly lower than that of other locations on the periphery of Norwich. The proposed development area contains no Scheduled sites or other known sites of considerable archaeological significance and there is no clear evidence to suggest that settlement foci of medieval or earlier date once lay within its bounds. There are however a number of locations where the presence of archaeologically significant remains has been demonstrated. These features mainly consist of cropmarks. Mitigation for the archaeology on the site includes a programme of archaeological works; initially by geophysical survey and evaluation by trial trenching, possibly followed by targeted open area excavation. It is considered that a strategy of ‘preservation by record’ of any significant archaeological remains identified through the evaluation will adequately mitigate the likely impacts of the proposals. The preservation by record should also include historic building recording of any existing structures that are likely to be affected by the proposals. It is considered that the proposed development will result in an minimal impact at both the construction and operational phases. Nonetheless, this Chapter has summarised a range of mitigation measures that have been and will be put in place for the construction of the proposed development, which is considered sufficient to mitigate against any potential impacts.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

14


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

WASTE The assessment into waste determined the environmental impacts of waste management from the proposed development in terms of the expected quantities and composition of waste produced, as well as the local and regional capacity to treat waste. The proposed measures for the reduction reuse and recycling was set out. With regard to the construction stage waste impacts, it is not expected that the construction of the proposed development will not generate any significant levels of demolition waste due to the greenfield nature of the site. Waste however is anticipated to be generated as a result of the infrastructure, building construction and site preparation works. However, where materials are identified as being suitable, in the first instance, in order to minimise the amount of materials leaving the application site, the construction methods look to reuse the site as part of the site preparation works, as far as practicable. The assessment recognised that a number of steps and best practice measures will be undertaken at the design and construction stages to minimise potential impacts. Therefore measures have been considered to prevent and minimise waste including efficient procurement of materials in order to minimise unnecessary waste arisings. In addition the team are committed to using assessment tools such as BREEAM to achieve high standards of site waste management at the construction stage. At the operational phase, measures will be incorporated into the commercial elements of the proposed development to ensure that waste generation can be appropriately re-used and recycled as feasible. This will include the appropriate space for waste recycling storage areas for all operator generated waste and the provision of a designated area for a compactor/baler, where required so that the packaging waste generated may be appropriately compacted and bound before being sent for recycling.

CUMULATIVE IMPACTS The residual impact of the proposed development in combination with the residual impacts of other major developments within the vicinity of the application site was assessed. In particular, the assessment considered effects that are: 

Spatial: giving rise to effects over a large area or giving rise to effects on areas of special environmental sensitivity;



Temporal: giving rise to effects over a longer period of time; or

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

15


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton



Incremental: increasing the significance of predicted effects due to interactions with other development under review.

When construction phases of one or more projects coincide with one another, the significant of the cumulative residual impacts depends on the characteristics of the overlapping projects and the duration of the overlap. A few major developments have been identified within the immediate vicinity of the application site that may result in cumulative impacts on the environment during the construction phase of the proposed development, assuming a worst-case scenario. Many of these impacts, such as nuisance and disturbance impacts, construction noise and vibration, air quality will be controlled and minimised through the implementation of construction best practices that can be effectively delivered by means of the CMP and EMP by the principal contractor. It was concluded that the potential cumulative construction impacts will be temporary in nature and of negligible significance overall with some minor negative impacts associated with construction noise and vibration. During the operation of the proposed development, the long-term cumulative impacts from transportation, air quality and noise were considered negligible, with significant positive impacts arising from the wide range of employment opportunities brought forward as a result of the proposed development. It should be noted that the cumulative assessment presents a worst-case scenario. In reality, the construction phases are not likely to all coincide but potentially overlap for relatively short periods, thus reducing the significant of the cumulative residual impacts.

CONCLUSION The ES concludes that the mitigation measures proposed for the environmental impacts of the proposed development will be acceptable in any event. Where the proposed development has the potential to generate some environmental impacts, a range of mitigation measures have been recommended to address any significant negative impacts that may occur during both the construction and operation phases of the proposed development.

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

16


Beyond Green Developments North Sprowston & Old Catton

FURTHER INFORMATION The ES is available for viewing by the public during normal working hours at the Planning Department of Broadland Council. Comments on the planning application should be forwarded to Broadland District Council at the address below: Planning Services Broadland District Council Thorpe Lodge 1 Yarmouth Road Thorpe St Andrew Norwich NR7 0DU Additional copies of the Non-Technical Summary are available free of charge and copies of the full ES can be purchased at a charge of £100 (for Volumes I & Volume II) available from: Greengage Environmental LLP 64 Great Suffolk Street London SE1 0BL.

– END –

ES Volume 3: Non-Technical Summary

17


NS&OC OPA EIA Non-technical Summary