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Annual Report 2010.


The Bell Shakespeare Company Limited. ACN 050 055 251. Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2010.

Registered Office and Principal Place of Business: Level 1, 33 Playfair Street The Rocks NSW 2000 Telephone: +61 2 8298 9000 Facsimile: +61 2 9241 4643 mail@bellshakespeare.com.au bellshakespeare.com.au


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Contents. Artistic Director’s Report........................ 6 Chairman’s Report......................................... 9 General Manager’s Report................11 Creative Development............................12 Learning..................................................................14 Marketing & Development.................19 Corporate Governance...........................20 Artistic Self-assessment......................22 Thank you to our Donors.....................25 Thank you to our Partners.................30 Financial Statements...............................32 Additional Information...........................56

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Artistic Director’s Report. 2010 was a very significant year for myself and the Company. It marked our twentieth anniversary and coincided with my seventieth birthday – a fact that did not go unnoticed by the publicists ... The Company decided that a blockbuster was called for and that a revival of King Lear might be the appropriate one. We undertook a tour of five capital cities: Sydney, Canberra, Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth – a fairly gruelling schedule with that particular play. Marion Potts’ austere, minimalist production was not to everyone’s liking, but despite reservations in the press, King Lear played to record audiences in practically every venue. The show also suffered more than its fair share of bad luck: Josh McConville (Edgar) was ill more than once and Yalin Ozucelik stepped into the role. In Melbourne we lost our Regan (Leah Purcell) just before opening night and were saved by Rachel Gordon going on at very short notice. Despite all difficulties we never lost a performance throughout the whole tour and cast morale remained remarkably buoyant. We were all thrilled that Peter Carroll’s compelling performance as The Fool was rewarded with a nomination for Best Male Actor in a Supporting Role at the Sydney Theatre Awards. “It is fair to describe John Bell as a Statesman of the Australian theatre. In this anniversary production, when Lear is referred to as having an air of authority in the first act, it is completely convincing. Bell is commanding on stage. His wide strides, cavalier flicks of his heavy fur coat and proudly erect jaw line make him every inch the King of Britain. His scenes with the Fool, played well by Peter Carroll, and his mental unraveling is compelling to watch. The vulnerability of Lear makes him so interesting and it is always present in Bell’s performance.” Sunday Herald Sun

“The Bell Shakespeare Company have again set the benchmark for their fluid and stylish work.” Arts Hub

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“… On Wednesday night every Lear I have seen or imagined was swept aside by an ensemble of performance and a production so profoundly, beautifully complex … For a company celebrating 20 years of performing the works of William Shakespeare, this is an inspirational and unforgettable night at the theatre. See it.” Stage Whispers “The Bell Shakespeare Company have again set the benchmark for their fluid and stylish work.” Arts Hub While King Lear was a large-scale production with superb lighting by Nick Schlieper and a live music score brilliantly performed by percussionist Bree Van Reyk, our next production was deliberately small in scale and simple in its staging. Lee Lewis approached me in 2009 and pitched the idea of a production of Twelfth Night referencing the devastating Victorian bushfires. I agreed with her that such a production would speak directly to our audiences in regional Australia. It would not only reflect their suffering but offer consolation and encouragement. Lee wanted to keep to a cast of seven actors who would play multiple roles, selecting costumes seemingly at random from a huge pile of clothes dumped in the middle of a community hall. As the seven dazed survivors of the fire entered into the spirit of the play a healing process was indeed experienced and audiences throughout the fire-stricken region appreciated the tribute that was being offered them. But the production’s impact was also felt in metropolitan venues where audiences easily empathised with the scenario. In five months of touring, Twelfth Night played twenty-nine venues from Hobart to Alice Springs; from Shepparton to Darwin. “Lewis’ trimmed script amplifies the knockabout and adds a measure of dry Aussie humour, but not at the expense of emotion or poetry – most of which is in the very capable hands of (Andrea) Demetriades’ perfectly pitched Viola. This is Bell Shakespeare at its best: clear, resonant, accessible to all.” Sydney Morning Herald. “…I’d rather see a lively, irreverent production of Shakespeare than a ‘traditional’ one that’s dead on stage, and this one is meticulously directed and brilliantly acted. It’s animated by a desperate, irrepressible humour.” Melbourne Metro

“Lee Lewis’ direction linked the themes of the play with current world events through original, if not risky, theatrical devices. Her daring interpretation gave room for the actors to really play and produce the kind of work that has made Bell Shakespeare so unique.” Canberra City News Another highlight of our 20th Anniversary was taking our successful family show Just Macbeth! to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, where it was voted Number One Family Show and won a Herald Angels Award (one of only fifteen given out in a Festival featuring over two thousand productions!). Andy Griffiths’ hilarious version of The Scottish Play re-assembled all but one of the original 2008 cast, with Justin Smith stepping effortlessly into Tim Richards’ role. Any fears we had of being lost in translation were quickly extinguished by the gales of laughter from our Scottish audiences who took even the atrocious Scottish accents in good part. We played two weeks in The Assembly Rooms – one of the Festival’s prime venues. To finish off what had been a busy and exciting year for me, I began rehearsals in September for Uncle Vanya, a production by the Sydney Theatre Company in association with Bell Shakespeare. My main motive for acting in this piece was to work with the renowned Hungarian director Tamás Ascher who brought his creative team from Budapest. It was also a privilege to tread the boards with prestigious cast-members Cate Blanchett, Richard Roxburgh, Hugo Weaving and Jacki Weaver. The production proved to be a Box Office hit and a very worthwhile learning experience for myself. I believe it also added something to Bell Shakespeare’s prestige and visibility in the marketplace. We had some major changes in the artistic personnel of the Company with Marion Potts leaving towards the end of the year to take up the position of Artistic Director of Malthouse Theatre in Melbourne. Marion’s time at Bell was well spent, especially in the setting-up of our Research and Development wing, Mind’s Eye. We were fortunate to recruit in her place, as my new Associate Artistic Director, Peter Evans, most recently the Associate Director of the Melbourne Theatre Company.

He directed our first regional touring production, Macbeth, in 1997 and followed it up with Two Gentlemen of Verona in 2005 and The Tempest in 2006. He makes a welcome return to Bell Shakespeare with many more runs on the board. Matt Edgerton also finished his time with us at the end of 2010 having made a brilliant fist of his job as Resident Artist in Education, excelling for the education arm of the Company with his workshops and residencies in indigenous communities. His replacement is James Evans, whose time with Bell has followed a similar trajectory to Matt’s – from Actors At Work to acting on the main stage to expertise in the Company’s education activities. 2010 saw us realise a long-term ambition to take on a Director in Residence – an internship for a promising young director. From the many applicants, we selected Jessica Tuckwell, who had a busy year assisting on King Lear, Twelfth Night and all three Actors At Work teams as well as directing two shows of her own for the Melbourne Fringe Festival and developing her Mind’s Eye project, a reworking of Shakespeare’s little-known historical play, King John. Jessica proved herself a valuable asset to the Company and will direct the Macbeth Intensive piece for our education team in 2011. Other Mind’s Eye projects developed during the year were Matt Lutton’s silent version of Hamlet and a commissioned work by Tom Holloway based on Romeo And Juliet. We aim for a big increase in Mind’s Eye activities in 2011.

John Bell AO

Peter had a history with Bell Shakespeare prior to his taking the position at the MTC. ANNUAL REPORT 2010 7


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Chairman’s Report.

Bell Shakespeare’s twentieth year was marked by celebration, achievement and change. John Bell’s grand ambition of twenty years ago, to make Shakespeare meaningful and accessible to all Australians, is now a firm reality. John took King Lear, directed by Marion Potts, on a national capital city tour, premiering with a gala event celebrating the Company’s 20th year at the Sydney Opera House. It was a successful tour in every respect – artistically and at the box office. The production was broadcast on the ABC, a first for the Company. The production of Twelfth Night, directed by Lee Lewis, toured 29 regional centres and capital cities, confirming Bell Shakespeare as Australia’s national touring Company. It referenced the Victorian bushfires and was particularly well-received in regional areas. This production has been nominated for seven Green Room awards. The year also saw the triumphant return season of Just Macbeth! to Sydney followed by an equally successful tour to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Our ever-growing education programme reached over 77,000 students in 2010, through Actors At Work performances in all states and territories, school matinees for mainstage shows, and tailored student masterclasses designed to meet the varying curriculum needs of our education community. Over 600 teachers engaged with over 30 professional learning events, including the prestigious Regional Teacher Scholarship. In keeping with Bell Shakespeare’s vision, learning opportunities, such as the Regional Performance Scholarship, the Regional Access Workshops and our Remote and Regional Residency Programme, continued our commitment to quality Shakespeare experiences for all, regardless of the demands of the country’s challenging geography.

Bell Shakespeare’s solid financial foundation is due to our many supporters and sponsors. Particular thanks go to long-term partners, including BHP Billiton, Wesfarmers Arts, AUSTAR, Sofitel Melbourne, The Yalumba Wine Company and Jansz Tasmania, the Ian Potter Foundation, the Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation, the Macquarie Group Foundation, the Besen Family Foundation and the many individuals who have supported the Company since its very early days. This year saw another successful Hearts In A Row campaign: donors supported our national education programmes and enabled 23 groups to attend Twelfth Night and Just Macbeth! There was significant change during the year. Congratulations to Marion Potts who left the Company to join Malthouse Theatre as Artistic Director. We are delighted to welcome Peter Evans as our new Associate Artistic Director. Peter’s most recent role was with the Melbourne Theatre Company. He is returning to Bell Shakespeare having directed productions over many years.

After ten years of dedicated service to the Company, Tim Cox decided to retire as Chairman. Having led the Company through thick and thin, it was fitting that Tim would leave the Company in such a positive position. On behalf of everyone associated with the Company, thank you Tim for your outstanding contribution. I am honoured to have been appointed Chairman and look forward to working with the Board and to building on Tim’s outstanding legacy. Thank you to my fellow Board members for their dedication. They share a passion for the Company and give freely of their time and experience. Thank you, also, to the outstanding management team led by our General Manager, Christopher Tooher. Their commitment and hard work has borne fruit in a wonderful twentieth year. Finally, thank you to John Bell. He has provided us with inspirational leadership in the twentieth year, just as he did in the first. Ilana Atlas Chairman

John Bell’s grand ambition of twenty years ago, to make Shakespeare meaningful and accessible to all Australians, is now a firm reality. ANNUAL REPORT 2010 9


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General Manager’s Report. With twenty years of successful operations the Company began 2010 with plenty to celebrate and celebrate we did – our triumphant capital city tour of King Lear, our critically acclaimed and awarded tour of Just Macbeth! to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, our very successful national tour of Twelfth Night to venues and their communities throughout the nation, alongside our ever expanding Learning programmes, led the way in the celebrations in what was a very successful year for the Company. The Company took the opportunity to reflect on its journey and was delighted to be able to celebrate its success with its many long-term partners and stakeholders. From individuals, to corporations, to Government, our success is only made possible by the shared belief in the importance and support of the Company’s work. In addition to celebrating the past and current success, the Company looked forward so as to ensure its next twenty years of success. A permanent home for the Company remains a priority and we were delighted with the State Government’s announcement in May that Pier 2/3 would be redeveloped under the control of Communities NSW for cultural purposes. The Company looks forward to realising a commitment from the State Government for a permanent home on Pier 2/3 as part of the redevelopment. Continued growth in the Learning programme required the organisation to rethink what and how we were delivering with these programmes to ensure that we continue to meet and exceed the requirements and expectations of students and teachers. As a result, for the first time,

the Company has engaged a full time ensemble of actors for 2011. ‘The Players’, a team of eight actors, have been cast and we look forward to supporting them as they work across the Learning programmes around the country, including our new, dedicated schools’ production of Romeo And Juliet. Under the leadership of John Bell and our newly appointed Associate Artistic Director Peter Evans, the Company continues to ensure the excellence of its theatre programme by working with the best creative talent from around the country. In 2011 the Company will rehearse and produce its national tour of Julius Caesar in Melbourne. Mind’s Eye, the Company’s research and development arm, continues to attract the best artists from around the country with their work driving innovation and artistic vibrancy throughout the organisation. The Company will expand this programme through additional partnerships in both the private and public sector. The Company’s success is built on relationships and it was with that in mind that we implemented for the first time our in-house Box Office operations. This new initiative enables direct contact with our major stakeholder (our audience) ensuring the highest standard of customer service. Operations will expand in coming years to include a national call centre for all the Company’s work. The digital world continues to offer the Company many opportunities and challenges in the creation, delivery and promotion of its work. The continued upgrading of our website and the planned streaming of live events in 2011 are some of the strategies being employed to ensure the Company is well positioned

to take full advantage of the National Broadband Network, using this new and exciting medium to bolster and enhance live performance. Alongside all this activity and planning, the Company enjoyed a strong financial operational surplus. This was further enhanced by a half a million dollar installment in the bequest from the estate of the late Tony Gilbert – the founding and major benefactor of the Company. Core Government funding provided through the Australia Council and Arts NSW remains the cornerstone of the Company’s operations and further thanks go to both bodies for their support of additional activities of the organisation throughout the period. As always, congratulations and thanks to our hard-working administration team, working tirelessly behind the scenes. Their commitment and enthusiasm for the Company and its work makes it a delight to walk into the office each morning. Of course, we couldn’t do what we do without the freelance artists and technicians we work with each year. It’s a privilege to be able to assemble the finest teams and enable them to share with an audience their telling of these timeless stories. Finally, on behalf of the entire Company, a big thank you and congratulations to our departing Chairman, Tim Cox AO. Tim’s remarkable tenure started as a short-term commitment in 1999 which evolved to see him leading the organisation through an incredible period of growth over the next decade. Tim’s leadership, wise counsel and support of me in my role was echoed in his dealings across the entire Company with boundless energy, commitment and good humour.

In addition to celebrating the past and current success the Company looked forward so as to ensure its next twenty years of success. ANNUAL REPORT 2010 11


Creative Development. Mind’s Eye & International Touring. 2010 marked Mind’s Eye’s second full year of creative development with several new projects being added to the existing suite of work currently in development. Mind’s Eye’s primary purpose is to develop new work that takes its inspiration from Shakespeare and the classics, providing opportunities for emerging arts practitioners and small to medium companies to experiment and refine their ideas within a supportive and safe environment. It is a way of sharing our resources as a major arts company and opening our doors to emerging and innovative artistic partners. Whilst it was sad to farewell Mind’s Eye founder and Artistic Director Marion Potts in May 2010, the Company was wellpositioned to roll out the 2010 Mind’s Eye programme and a number of exciting new pieces were explored and developed over the course of the year. We are delighted to welcome Peter Evans to the artistic leadership of the Company and he will take Mind’s Eye forward in 2011 and beyond. Night Songs, a new music theatre work aimed at a family audience, was brought to Mind’s Eye by Green Room Music. Composer and Artistic Director of Green Room Music, Andrée Greenwell, librettist Alison Croggon and dramatist/librettist Daniel Keene, seek to create a piece of theatre that draws on various traditions of storytelling: from Aesop’s Fables to Til Eulenspiegel, Gypsy folk tales, fairy tales and myths. In the tradition of Venus & Adonis for which Andrée was composer and musical director, sections of this new work in development will be sung, some will be spoken and some enacted. The first draft of Night Songs was commissioned and delivered in 2010 and work has begun on the composition toward a formal practical workshop in 2011. The Rest Is Silence, a ‘wordless’ response to Hamlet, was put into formal creative development in 2010 with the support of the Australia Council through their Interconnections Fund. A creative collaboration between Bell Shakespeare and Perth-based theatre Company ThinIce, this week-long workshop brought together an impressive team of artists and performers from all over Australia 12 annual REPORT 2010

who worked to find both a performance language and an appropriate rehearsal process for this large-scale and complex new work. Performers Humphrey Bower, John Gaden, Rita Kalnejais, Ewen Leslie, Belinda McClory, Chris Ryan and Steve Turner; creative collaborators Designer Alice Babidge, Writer Tom Holloway, Sound Designer Kingsley Reeve and Special Effects Supervisor David Trethewey, worked with Director Matthew Lutton and the production team to explore and examine ways of communicating a new, nonverbal response to Hamlet with a strong emphasis on physicality, use of textures and substances, sounds and special effects. The creative development workshop afforded us the opportunity to test a huge range of ideas and influences as well as understand more comprehensively how we might realise this piece in the future and what its key artistic starting points will be. Writer Tom Holloway’s new play under commission through Mind’s Eye, Love & Violence, took a significant change in direction in 2010. With the dramaturgical support and guidance of Sam Strong, Tom identified that in fact the central question at the heart of his new work is “how does love survive in a violent world?” With that top of mind he continues to develop this play which follows a relationship between two lovers from their teenage years, through adulthood and then to old age in a continually ‘decaying world’. During this relationship society breaks down, the environment falls apart and through all this the lovers struggle to stay together and keep their love going. Gull by Rick Viede, under commission through Mind’s Eye, was taken to second draft stage in 2010. Creating a neo-restoration comedy that also comments on modern sexual politics proved to be a considerable challenge and Rick grappled with how to effectively frame the past in a way that also resonated with audiences of today. Development will continue on this new play. As part of inaugural Director in Residence Jessica Tuckwell’s time with the Company, we were able to implement a practical directing and development opportunity for her through Mind’s Eye with the support of the Australia Council through their OYEA

programme. Jessica chose to research, explore and develop Shakespeare’s play King John – a piece that is deemed to be notoriously inadequate, rarely performed and poorly regarded. An explanation of why this is the case formed the impetus for identifying and then developing the work to a level that could potentially form the basis for a new play. Over the course of a week a practical creative development workshop was held for The King John Project. Working with Designer Andy McDonell and performers George Banders, Kate Box, Katharine Cullen, Gareth Davies, Nathan Lovejoy, Adele Querol, Scott Sheridan and Tim Walter, Jessica led a rigorous deconstruction of the text to identify the most potent and dramatically interesting elements in the play, bringing them to the centre of focus and excluding those elements she felt detracted from the main vision, drive and ultimate success of the play. At the conclusion of the week a reading was conducted of the adapted version of King John to an invited audience. The Shadow King, a wildly original new work took its first creative development steps in 2010. Re-uniting Malthouse Theatre Melbourne and Bell Shakespeare the aim is to re-envision Shakespeare’s King Lear. Performed in Indigenous languages coupled with original Elizabethan text, the inspiration for this new work is the accounts of Indigenous experience – lived or presented to us daily – and the questions they force upon the unsteady definition of ourselves as a contemporary Australia. Director Michael Kantor and Co-Director Marion Potts, under the guidance of Indigenous language trustees and in collaboration with Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, began a number of exploratory sessions in 2010 and a formal workshop will be held in 2011. Developed prior to the establishment of Mind’s Eye, but in the spirit of innovative new takes on classic works, we were thrilled to have the opportunity to take our acclaimed production Just Macbeth!, written by Andy Griffiths, to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2010. Participating in a festival that, in 2010, saw 2,453 productions and featured 21,000 performers from over 30 countries, was a daunting prospect. We wondered how we would cut through in that highly congested


environment, ensuring the Company’s presence was felt and that audiences attended our show. Accepting an offer from the Assembly Rooms to perform in their Ballroom, and engaging highly respected and enormously experienced publicist Liz Smith, helped contribute to our success. As one of the premier Fringe venues, Assembly afforded us a level of prestige and superior marketing, publicity and production support which many Fringe venues are unable to provide. Ably supported by Liz we also secured some terrific publicity opportunities to further bolster our profile. Just Macbeth! was very warmly received by both Scottish and National media, garnering 4 and 5 star reviews in many publications and receiving a Bank of Scotland Herald Angel Award for being an outstanding production and one of the funniest and cleverest shows at the Fringe. This is a highly prestigious award covering both the Fringe and the International Festival. “If only Bell Shakespeare could be sent out on loan to every primary and secondary school, learning about the Bard would be so much easier. The energetic Australian company knows exactly how to make Macbeth accessible to the uninitiated (and equally good fun for those in the know) without losing any of the play’s key strengths.” The Scotsman “Just Macbeth! succeeds on so many levels it is difficult to know where to start.” The Herald, Scotland “Fantastically silly, messy and high-energy adaptation of the Scottish play by young Australian company Bell Shakespeare, who have found the perfect vehicle to bring Shakespeare to children.” The Guardian We were equally delighted to be one of a large number of Australian companies and individual artists performing in Edinburgh. Our presence further strengthened the exposure of Australian arts to a global market, demonstrating the calibre and innovation of Australian arts practice more broadly. In welcoming all of these artists to the Company in 2010 we were proud to continue to support and develop these exciting and innovative new works drawing on our administrative, production and artistic resources to ensure the best possible creative development practice. This work breathes new life into our annual programme, expands our thinking and feeds the artistic ecology of the Company. The artists’ collective bravery, passion, vision and commitment is to be applauded.

The Rest Is Silence

“Just Macbeth! succeeds on so many levels it is difficult to know where to start.” The Herald, Scotland

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Learning.

Bell Shakespeare Learning Programmes, with the vital support of the Federal Government, corporate partners, philanthropic trusts and foundations, reached a total of 77,186 students and teachers in 2010 – slightly more than the 2009 audience for face-to-face Learning activities. Bell Shakespeare also engaged with 77,224 online users - the largest audience to date for online activities. Both figures are a strong indication that school audiences, wherever they may be in Australia, have come to rely on Bell Shakespeare to deliver a vibrant and popular learning programme. Once again, Bell Shakespeare extended its reach across the Australian landscape, delivering a wide variety of programmes to communities as isolated as Cape York, Groote Eylandt and Woomera; regional locations such as Port Hedland, Charleville and Tennant Creek, as well as delivering programmes in all Australian capital cities. In Theatres Bell Shakespeare’s production of Twelfth Night toured to 29 locations across Australia. Set in an Australian community facing bushfire, this production offered students a relevant context for appreciating the versatility of Shakespeare for today’s audiences. King Lear gave students the opportunity to appreciate one of Shakespeare’s classic plays and the return of Just Macbeth! offered students and young families in Sydney the chance to really engage with Shakespeare through this humorous and vibrant adaptation by Andy Griffiths. Across all three productions, 10,018 students attended matinee performances (a figure that does not include student attendance at evening performances). Bell Shakespeare’s Regional Access Student Workshops ran in regional centres in conjunction with the national tour of Twelfth Night. A total of 26 Regional Access Student Workshops reached 873 students in 28 schools across Australia.

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Actors At Work

STUDENT MASTERCLASSES

The unique and energetic Actors At Work programme was greatly enjoyed by 59,439 students from 297 schools. With 32 full days of travel, the teams undertook 9 more travel days than the previous year, over 51 touring weeks. Delivering a range of captivating one-hour interpretations of Shakespeare to schools nationwide, the three teams gave 485 performances – 40% of which were delivered in regional areas.

Student Masterclasses were conducted in various schools across Australia in 2010, reaching a total of 5,609 students. Over two hours, Arts Educators ignite students’ interest in Shakespeare’s language, characters and plots and inspire an appreciation and passion for his work through text-based practical activities on any of his plays.

In 2010, the performances brought to life key scenes from Macbeth, Romeo And Juliet, Othello, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Hamlet. Three Actors At Work teams, each comprising four energetic young actors, toured to schools in every state and territory from April to November.

Bell Shakespeare offered a new programme in 2010 specifically for HSC students. The Hamlet Seminar was a half-day forum held during the school holidays at the Everest Theatre at the Seymour Centre in Chippendale, Sydney. The seminar (offered twice on one day) blended live performance with interactive seminar sessions, and was attended by 597 students – 171 of whom travelled from regional areas.

Several visits to schools considered geographically remote or disadvantaged were enabled through the generosity of donors and sponsors, including a tour to Broken Hill, Wilcannia and Wilyama in the Far West of New South Wales. Performances were also enabled in retirement villages. I am sure I am yet another broken record teacher when I say that the Actors At Work performance (Romeo and Juliet) was fantastic! The four actors (Frankie, Sean, Alex and Aaron) employed the elements of drama convincingly and sustained an exciting, imaginative and engaging performance. The use of humour and intertextuality really resonated with the students and drew them into the performance. We will definitely book you again and Bell Shakespeare has certainly lived up to its reputation. Thank you very much and please pass on my congratulations to the actors on their achievements and I wish them every success in the future. Teacher, Cronulla High School, NSW

The Hamlet Seminar

Really well done, it provided a provocative insight into many controversial interpretations of Hamlet. It also expressed them simply but without dumbing it down. Student, Davidson High School, NSW Residencies Bell Shakespeare is committed to creating access to live theatre for Australian students regardless of the demands of the country’s challenging geography. In keeping with that vision, in 2010 Bell Shakespeare sent pairs of Arts Educators to schools in remote or regional locations of Australia for one- and two-week-long residency programmes. Residencies allow us to spend a longer period of time in one community, using multiple masterclasses to coach teachers and students in performing and understanding Shakespeare. The extended period enables us to build professional capacity in the teachers and positive selfesteem and confidence in the students. Residencies were conducted in Narrandera/The Rock/Balranald in NSW; Broome in WA, Coen; Cairns, Atheron and


Charleville in QLD; and in Tennant Creek, Alice Springs and Groote Eylandt in the NT. A residency was also held for students in Years 4, 5 and 6 at Darlington Public School in Sydney – a school recognised for its indigenous population. The programme went well beyond my expectations! It was fabulous. My students were enthralled and it re-invigorated my teaching of Shakespeare – we look forward to having a closer look at his plays in the classroom. Our students gained an incredible amount from the session – we laughed, enjoyed and had a ball. It was a splendid experience. Thank you! Ali Hood and Gemma O’Brien, Classroom Teachers, Ross Park Primary School, Alice Springs, NT Regional Performance Scholarship The Regional Performance Scholarship (RPS) celebrated its tenth year in 2010. Available to secondary school students aged at least 16 living in locations with limited access to live theatre, the scholarship continues to provide a unique opportunity for young people in regional areas interested in exploring the performing arts as a career choice. In 2010, 50 young people from around Australia auditioned for this unique opportunity, from places such as Alice Springs, Muswellbrook, Launceston and Streaky Bay. Teacher Professional Learning Professional Development for Teachers is a vital component of the Bell Shakespeare Learning Programmes, and each year we present a variety of opportunities around Australia, providing teachers with the innovative practical skills to encourage student engagement with Shakespeare. In 2010, 432 teachers participated in Bell Shakespeare Teacher Professional Learning programmes. Inspired by one 2009 participant’s reference to the ammunition that our Professional Learning activities provided him with, Bell Shakespeare used this theme for a series of teacher forums,

offered free of charge in all states and territories, titled Shakespeare Battleplan. A Teacher Masterclass also toured nationally titled Shakespeare Weaponry. Other teacher professional development included Demise and Destruction: Teaching Macbeth and Romeo And Juliet, presented in Canberra; A Teacher Forum for Victorian teachers on the setting for Twelfth Night; and Teaching Hamlet was presented in Sydney and Melbourne. Wow! I was so nervous/anxious/afraid before the session (Shakespeare Newbie) and I have come away feeling excited, inspired and motivated to run with Shakespeare into my classroom tomorrow! Danielle Enever, Centralian Senior College, NT Regional Teacher Scholarship Now in its fourth year, the Bell Shakespeare Regional Teacher Scholarship (RTS) is the only national professional learning opportunity specifically for remote and regional teachers. The RTS allows early career teachers in such areas to expand their awareness of how to teach Shakespeare, taking back to their communities practical skills and knowledge in teaching Drama and English.  Twelve recipient teachers from across the country travelled to Sydney for an intensive four days of exploration and training in Shakespeare in March 2010. All accommodation, flights and professional learning expenses are covered by the scholarship.

The Juniperina programme was incredibly successful, with wonderful responses from both staff and participants. For many of these girls this was the first time they’d seen Shakespeare. A similar programme will be conducted at Frank Baxter Juvenile Justice Centre for male offenders in 2011. Two young people again benefitted from the opportunity to spend a week behind the scenes at Bell Shakespeare, through AUSTAR’s Stage For Life. The programme is designed to provide young people who have an interest in theatre with a broad experience in all aspects of theatre production and management. Bell Shakespeare continued a four-year partnership with the Australian Catholic University and Mission Australia through the Clemente Catalyst programme, working with homeless and disadvantaged people. This unique programme provides adults who have become socially, economically and domestically disadvantaged through various circumstances, with the opportunity to undertake a course of study at an undergraduate level. Bell Shakespeare again participated in the Step Into The Limelight programme for schools in the ACT – a creative and performing arts showcase event for high school students. Online Bell Shakespeare engaged with 77,224 online users in 2010, through the Learning pages of the website, Optus Make A Scene, and through Online Learning Packs developed for each mainstage production and for each Actors At Work performance.

Special Projects With the financial assistance of the Juvenile Justice Department, Bell Shakespeare conducted a residency programme at Juniperina Juvenile Justice Centre for 12 female detainees. The programme included an Actors At Work performance, used as an introduction to a series of masterclasses conducted over a five week period, focussing on Romeo And Juliet.

Make A Scene invited students across Australia to interpret a Shakespeare quotation through drawing, photograph, illustration, animation, or movie, and then to submit their entry online. In its fourth year, Optus Make A Scene attracted its largest audience yet, with 342 entries.

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Marketing & Development. Marketing

Philanthropy

Corporate Partnerships

2010 marked our 20th anniversary and sales of Bell Packages more than doubled those of 2009 with record subscriber numbers.

Income from philanthropic trusts and foundations continued to rise, constituting an amount equal to half the income raised through sponsorships – the highest ever amount raised from this sector. 2010 was also notable as the first year when three grants from trusts and foundations – the Ian Potter Foundation, the Sidney Myer Fund and the James N Kirby Foundation – supported salaries alone, as opposed to funding specific projects. New support was received from the Trust Company ATF Archer for Regional Access Student Workshops and from the Tim Fairfax Family Foundation for one of our Northern Territory Learning Access programmes. They joined long-term supporters The Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation, Colonial Foundation, the Scully Fund, the Collier Charitable Fund, the Macquarie Group Foundation and the Danks Trust in helping us to achieve a formidable range of national Learning initiatives.

Whilst developing initiatives and activities for all our long-term partners in this 20th anniversary year, we also developed unique activations and content for our three new corporate partners in 2010 – Deutsche Bank, The Australian and ABC Local Radio.

The season commenced with the enormously successful production of King Lear – an unprecedented union of our artistic leaders. Sales for the production exceeded box office targets on every leg of its five-city tour, producing the Company’s best ever box office outcome, with net receipts in excess of $2.1 million. Just Macbeth!’s return Sydney season also exceeded box office targets and the show’s critically acclaimed tour to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe also met targets and provided an extraordinary international opportunity for the Company. Twelfth Night was critically well-received, exceeding its box office target in Sydney but falling below targets in Canberra and Melbourne, perhaps due to election coverage and the uncertainty of a hung parliament. The launch of the 2011 Season saw the realisation of our very own subscriptions box office. Bringing box office operations in-house opened up a new channel for direct and meaningful interaction with our customers and we have received wonderful feedback about the improved level of service. We completed the second phase of our website development project, integrating the website with our existing CRM system, Tessitura, and launching subscription sales online. This is the first time a multi-channel subscription service has been offered to our customers and the response has been overwhelmingly positive with more than a third of subscribers electing to purchase their subscription online. The implementation of the box office and an ongoing focus on customer relationship management resulted in a restructure, including an additional staff member for the marketing team. The existing Marketing Manager role was split to focus on two key channels – marketing communications and CRM & ticketing. And a full-time Ticketing Coordinator now sits within the team.

A privately hosted event at the home of our new Chairman Ilana Atlas and her husband Tony D’Aloisio launched another successful year for Hearts In A Row through which individuals, consortia and corporate supporters enabled VIP visits to Bell Shakespeare productions for groups from disadvantaged schools and charities. Over the year, 23 schools and charities enjoyed visits to Just Macbeth! and Twelfth Night.

A new partnership with Deutsche Bank focused on investing in people and the development of bespoke training solutions and events. By exploring issues and ideas in a practical and physical way, these programmes opened the door to exploring leadership behaviours and qualities through the works of William Shakespeare. With the introduction of two new media partners in 2010, our productions and events for this landmark year continued to be front of mind all year long. We combined marketing initiatives with The Australian and ABC Local Radio to develop unique content and engage stakeholders nationally. Thank you to all our partners for investing in us in 2010. Together we delivered a wide range of outstanding programmes and events, enabling us to help our partners meet their marketing and business objectives. For the full list of our corporate and community partners please see pages 30–31.

A special evening at the Rough Magic exhibition at the Arts Centre, Melbourne in April provided a fantastic opportunity to welcome and acknowledge our Melbourne supporters. Once again the revenue raised through donations from individual donors and private ancillary funds to both our Supporting Cast annual giving programme and our Young Artists Programme ensured the critical support for our ongoing annual activities relating to our theatre productions, our Learning programmes and our mentoring of young talent. Funds raised through the Young Artists Programme enabled the achievement of one of the Company’s long held aspirations – the engagement of our first Director in Residence, Jessica Tuckwell.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 19


Corporate Governance. 1. Lay Solid Foundations for management and oversight

3. Promote ethical and responsible Decision making

During 2010, the Board continued to operate in line with the principles and practices set out in the Company’s Corporate Governance Policy adopted in 2005. The focus of the six Board Meetings held in 2010 was the regular review and monitoring of progress towards achieving the goals and outcomes outlined in the Company’s 2010-2012 Business Plan as well as artistic programming, financial performance and risk management.

The Bell Shakespeare Company’s Governance Framework is broadly informed by the Company’s Constitution. Section 8 of that document sets out the Board’s powers of delegation to subcommittees and management. Each of the Board subcommittees has its own charter. Roles and responsibilities of all personnel are clearly defined and documented within position descriptions, letters of appointment and contracts. Decision-making also takes place within the context of the Company Risk Management Plan.

The Directors’ commitment to Board Meetings is reflected by a very high overall attendance rate of 72% with seven of the ten full-term directors attending four or more meetings. In addition, Board members committed to participate with senior management in the annual strategic planning process which culminated in the 2010-2012 Business Plan. Several Board committees and working groups complement the strategic role of the Board at an operational level. Bell Shakespeare is committed to an overhaul of the current committee structure in the context of a thorough review of Corporate Governance Policy during the first half of 2011. 2. Structure the Board to add value The Nominations Subcommittee is responsible for sourcing and recruiting new Directors. During 2010 the Board welcomed the appointments of former Wesfarmers CFO Gene Tilbrook and retired senior public servant Helen Williams. As well as bringing fresh talent and skills on board, these appointments expand our geographical representation into WA and the ACT respectively. During 2010, there were two retirements from the Board, including long-serving Chairman Tim Cox. Ilana Atlas, formerly Deputy Chairman, accepted the role of Chairman upon Tim’s retirement. Further information, including a brief biography of each director, is contained in the Directors’ Report.

20 annual REPORT 2010

The Company adheres to all legislative requirements to ensure that all decisions are made in an ethical and responsible manner. 4. Safeguard integrity in Financial Reporting A primary aim of the Board is to grow the financial reserves underpinning the Company’s future activities. Progress continued during 2010 with the Company exceeding its policy goal of accumulating reserves equivalent to 20% of annual operating costs. In fact, the ratio at 31 December 2010 was approximately 33% (2009 – 26%) but the increase over the previous year was primarily due to receipt of a substantial bequest with the Company posting only a modest operating surplus for the year ended 31 December 2010. The Executive Committee meets bimonthly in between Board meetings to review management accounts and to provide advice on any substantial financial or management issues as they arise but now has a stronger focus on artistic and personnel issues. The Audit and Finance Committee also meets regularly to review major financial issues such as the budget, annual audit and investment policy, as well as overseeing the format and content of all forms of financial reporting. This committee will take responsibility for overseeing the Company’s risk management processes from 2011 and will be renamed the Audit and Risk Committee to reflect this expanded role.

5. Risk Management Historically, a risk management working group comprised of Board members, management and a specialist consultant has assessed the Company’s risk profile and put forward a risk management plan for review by the full Board. This process was reinvigorated during 2010 with a refreshed risk management plan being finalised and integrated with the overall Company Business planning process in 2011. 6. Encourage enhanced Performance The Government Relations Subcommittee meets informally and continues to work towards increasing the Company’s profile in all political spheres. The Company has engaged a specialist consultancy to provide further assistance in this complex area. Outside of the Board and Subcommittee structure, the Company receives extensive advice and feedback from external reference groups in the areas of Artistic Vibrancy and the delivery of Education Programmes. 7. Remunerate fairly and responsibly The Chairman takes responsibility for regular performance and salary reviews for the General Manager and Artistic Director. Base salary levels and any increments are determined by reference to experience, skill sets, marketplace considerations and industry comparisons. This latter takes the form of discussion with other MPAB Chairmen regarding salary levels for similar positions and by reference to published industry surveys. The Chairman then makes recommendations to the Executive Committee regarding salary levels. The Executive Committee must then sign off on the Chairman’s recommendations before they can be implemented. The Board is kept informed of movements in senior executive salaries. Responsibility for other management salaries is delegated to the General Manager whose recommendations are reviewed by the Chairman.


8. Recognise the legitimate interests of stakeholders Recognising, and responding to, the interests and needs of internal and external stakeholders is a central tenet of the Company’s Annual three-year Business Plan. 2010 was the Company’s 20th anniversary from inception and the celebrations incorporated a wide range of initiatives to further engage with our dedicated and enthusiastic stakeholders. 2010 also saw a significant development for our loyal subscribers with the upgrade of the website to enable 2011 subscription season bookings to be secured online. The Company holds an Annual General Meeting of members as required by law. Sponsors and donors acknowledged throughout the year in all marketing materials, programmes and publications as well as in this Annual Report. In summary, the Board believes that Directors and management are well informed and equipped to deal decisively with structural, strategic or operational issues as they arise in the future. Ilana Atlas Chairman

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 21


Artistic Self-assessment. Bell Shakespeare has an established and active Artistic Advisory Panel comprising Bell Shakespeare artistic staff and external representatives from the broader community. This body meets biannually to appraise Bell Shakespeare’s annual programme of work across all areas of the Company’s operations. It looks at the artistic ambitions of the Company as a whole and of each production individually, together with the reach and impact of Bell Shakespeare nationally, educationally and within the community. The panel is comprised as follows: Jane Caro (Chair) Corporate audience members and sponsors Matt Brown Education Community and regional audiences Campion Decent Industry peers and theatre community Jo Litson Theatre criticism and media Hugh Mackay Broader social and cultural influences David Malouf Broader arts community Nick Marchand Industry peers and theatre community Brett Sheehy International touring and Festivals circuit John Bell Artistic Director Peter Evans Associate Artistic Director Matt Edgerton Resident Artist in Education (until 10/12/2010) Leigh Travers Executive Assistant Each panel member is asked to report from their areas of experience in relation to the stated artistic goals for the Company as a whole and for each production. These goals are circulated prior to each meeting and then discussed at length. The discussion and feedback from this meeting is minuted and forwarded to the senior management and Board for review which informs future programming decisions.

22 annual REPORT 2010


ANNUAL REPORT 2010 23


24 annual REPORT 2010


Thank you to our donors. We are deeply grateful to the following donors for their support during the 2010 calendar year.

ACTEW Corporation Heather Adie Robert Albert AO RFD RD & Libby Albert Mrs G Alderton Joy Aldred Elizabeth Aleksanian Matthew & Helen Allchurch The Hon Richard Alston Margaret Andersen Bill & Kate Anderson Dr A Anderson Jennifer Anderson Nanette Anderson & the late K W Anderson Hanne & Ian Angus Annamila Pty Ltd John & Robyn Armstrong Ilana Atlas & Tony D’Aloisio AUSTAR Entertainment Pty Ltd Australia-Britain Society, Southern Highlands Committee John & Helen Ayliffe Fiona Baker Janet Bamford Anonymous Mr & Mrs C D Bantick John Barker Ian Barnett Michael Barry Peter & Margaret Barry Dr Margaret Barter Helen Bauer & Helen Lynch Peter Baxter Merrilyn & Chris Beeny Dolores Belisario Annabelle Bennett Carol & Tony Berg Leah Bernstein Pamela Berriman Billo Peter Bishop Ivor & Eva Bitel Beverley Block Stephen Booth Lee Braden Graham & Charlene Bradley Brigitte Braun John Brennan Helen Bristow Lucie Brompton Laurel Brown Dr Catherine Brown-Watt Beth Brown & Tom Bruce AM Karon Buchanan Geraldine Bull Bill & Sandra Burdett Susan Burns Jan Burnswoods Rick Burrows

David & Diana Burt Barbara Burton John Calvert-Jones Jeffrey & Melissa Campbell Edmund Campion Jim & Diana Carlton Jane Caro Gabrielle Cash Ann Casimir Patrick Cavanagh Yola & Steve Center Fay Chambers Jenny & Stephen Charles Jillian M Cheek Rahoul & Jinnie Chowdry Louise Christie Phil & Leanne Chronican George Clark Clark Family Foundation Winifred Clark Ian Cochran Victor Cohen Cynthia Coleman Carol & Christopher Collin Christine & John Collingwood Meghan Connell Brian Connor AM Janet Coombs AM Professor & Mrs D W Cooper Dayn Cooper The Kevin Cosgrave Family Rae Cottle Mary Coupe Robert & Sheena Coupe Tim Cox AO & Bryony Cox Professor A T Craswell Susan Culverwell & Grace Farrugia Mary Curotta Susan Cutler Muriel Dale Daryl Daley Margaret Daley Joanne & Sue Dalton I & P Darian-Smith Beverley Davis OAM JP Antony de Jong & Belinda Plotkin Vivianne de Vahl Davis Francesca Deane Anastasia Delaporta Doreen Dempster Charlotte Denison Jane Diamond Michael S Diamond AM MBE Jennie Dibley Martin Dickson AM & Susie Dickson Mr & Mrs J T Dominguez Allan W Donald Alan & Nancy Donald

Margot Doust Ian Dunlop Diane & John Dunlop Michael & Roslyn Dunn Sandra Dureau Dr & Mrs B Dutta Ben Dutton Karen Dwarte Jacqueline Dwyer David Eager Joanne Edwards Hans & Gaby Eisen Eric Ellram Ann Eskens Saul Eslake & Linda Arenella Jennifer Evans Ralph & Maria Evans Elizabeth Evatt AC Matthew Faber Judy Fakes Garry Feeney Ross & Clare Feller Helen Fenbury Manuel Fernandez Barbara Fidyk Jean Finnegan Helen Fisher Malcolm Fisk Anna Maria Fitzpatrick Elizabeth Florek Anita Florin Helen Forrester Kathleen Forster Lyn Foster David & Jo Frecker Katie & Vic French Richard & Jane Freudenstein John & Diana Frew Margaret Frey Fergus Fricke Shirley Friedman Graham Froebel Colin Gageler F J Gale Wendy Gallagher Justin & Anne Gardener Gething-Sambrook Family Endowment Belinda Gibson Mr Tony Gilbert AM Jennifer Giles Alma Gill Joan Gilmer Elaine Gilmore Vicki Giorgini Michele Gladden Sarah Glass Colin & Sharon Goldschmidt Jan Gordon-Clark ANNUAL REPORT 2010 25


Thank you to our donors.

Leon Gorr Andrew Goss Dianne Goulding The Gourlay Charitable Trust Carole Grace Janet M Grace John & Philippa Graham Pamela Grant Peter Graves Maurice & Christina Green Richard & Anna Green Carolyn Griffin Pauline Griffin John Griffiths & Beth Jackson Fred & Alexandra Grimwade Rose Gunsberger Bill & Kate Guy Alison Hale Cecilie Hall Susan Hall Elizabeth Hamilton Jane Hansen Lesley Hardcastle Rodney Harden Dr Ian Hardingham QC Lesley Harland Barbara Harland Bruce C Hartnett & Louise Einfeld Vicki Harpur Ruth Hartnett Matilda Hartwell Steven Harvey Barbara Haverfield Thomas Hayes Jan Hayes Bill & Alison Hayward The Hon Peter Heerey QC Jane Hemstritch Angela Henningsen Graeme Henson Dr Michele Hersch Margaret Heuer Armon Hicks James & Barbara Higgins Andrew Hilton John & Rosanna Hindmarsh Bronwyn Hine Margaret Hobbs Rev Father William Hoekstra Julia & Nick Holder Amanda Holder Ken & Lilian Horler Maureen Horne Renata Howard Lynette Howard Reverend Bill & Mrs Rosemary Huff-Johnston Mike & Stephanie Hutchinson In Memory of Herta Imhof Ernest L Isles Gerald Iverson Geraldine James 26 annual REPORT 2010

Margaret Jamieson Danielle Jelinek Barbara Jenkins Leslie Jesudason Vincent Jewell John Colet School Julie Johnson Cam & Caroline Johnston Timothy Johnston Valerie Johnstone Gloria Jones & John Thacker Chris Jordan & Hayley Braban Robin Joyce & Bob McMullan Tom & Elisabeth Karplus Ilse Katz Katz Family Foundation Mathilde Kearny-Kibble Sharon Kelly Elizabeth L Kelly John & Lisa Kench Kennards Hire Steve Kennedy Alice Kennon Dr Sue Kesson Brendan Kevans Derek Kidley Eoin Killackey Dinah Kimbell Gordon & Jeannette King Angela Kirsner James Kissell A J Kitchin Joan Knowles Jeanette Knox Rosemary Kooy Mary Kostakidis & Ian Wilcox Jacqueline Kott F Kunc SC & F Rourke John & Dymphna Laurie Faye Lawrence Sarah Lawrence William and Anne-Marie Lawson Susan & David Leaver Margaret Lederman Jennifer Ledgar & Bob Lim Edda Leembruggen Ann Leembruggen Richard Leemen Lois Lemchens Owen Lennie Peter & Frances Lewin John Lewis Larraine Linkins Dawn Linklater Cyril Littrich C B Livingstone & MJ Satterthwaite Ardelle Lohan Michael Long AM Elizabeth & Richard Longes Sandra Lovel Dr Carolyn Lowry OAM & Mr Peter Lowry OAM

Yixu Lu Mary Ellen Lynch Sue Lyons Laudi Macdessi Robyn Macintosh Hugh & Sheila Mackay Carol & Rod Mackenzie Liz Maconachie Hon Ian Macphee AO Macquarie Group Foundation Gabriel Maddock Pamela Makey Margaret Malgo George Maltby AO & Mary Maltby Gilbert & Sarah Mane Prof and Mrs Bruce Mansfield Maple-Brown Abbott Mr & Mrs Robert Maple-Brown Veronica Marshan David Martin In Memory of the late Lloyd Martin AM Peter & Kate Mason Rosemary Massard Justice Jane Mathews AO Diane Matthews John May Stan May Julie McCrossin, Sophie Inwald & Friends (26) Chris McDiven Patricia McEnerny Brian & Helen McFadyen The McKendrick Family Paula McKenry Ann McLaren Marie McLeod Carolyn McVicar Fiona McWhinnie Mr D R Meagher QC & Mrs Meagher Linda Meech Michele Meehan Pamela Melvey Louise Melville Graeme & Emma Mendelsohn Richard Michell Frances Milat Nick & Caroline Minogue Joan Mitchell Holly Mitchell & Keith Bayliss Alana Mitchell Elaine Moon Shirley Morris Jill Morrison Lynne Mortensen Douglas Muecke Elizabeth Muir Dame Elisabeth Murdoch AC DBE Carolynn Murtagh Dr W B Muston Sidney Myer Fund Anne Myers Monica Naish


Barbara Neill Annabelle Neilson Peggy Nelson Susan Nicholas Denise Nicholls Grant Nichols Shirley & Jim Nield Dr Rosmary Nixon Michael Noonan J Norman Keiarn Norris Linda Notley The Hon Barry O’Keefe AM QC & Mrs Jan O’Keefe Tom & Ruth O’Dea Yvonne Odell John O’Heare Kathy Olsen & Bruce Flood Gertrude O’Neil Helen O’Neil Ruth & Steve Ormerod Anne Owens Roslyn Packer AO Clara Paganin Daphne Paris Janette Parkinson Catherine Parr & Paul Hattaway Kerrin Paterson Helen Paton Kristy Payne Joan Pearson Nigel Peck Denise Pedrotti Rebel Penfold-Russell Dr John Percy Leonie Philip Nola Pickett Malle Poole Nerelle Poroch & Phil Waite Andrew Porter Ronald Postle CMDR Warwick Potter RAN Kathleen Powrie Rosalie Pratt AM Jon & Krissy Preedy Beverley Price Trevor Pritchard Dr Susan Pugh & Dr Michael Bennett David & Jill Pumphrey Margo Radford Kenneth Raftery Jane Randell Margaret Rankin Donna Ravenscroft Kenneth Reed Mary & Michael Regan Krythia Reid John B Reid AO & Lynn Rainbow Reid Greg J Reinhardt Pamela Reisner Jan Reynolds

Marilyn Rob Stephen & Robbie Roberts Roslyn Robertson Christina Roche Ann Rodger John Roe David Rolph Margaret Roobol-Hill Josie Rothwell H M P Rundle PTY LTD Patricia Rushton Anne Ryan Bridget & Peter Sack Dr Elizabeth Sakker Pamela Sayers Kate Schober Mr & Mrs Max Schultz Kathy Scott Elisabeth & Doug Scott Seaborn Broughton & Walford Foundation Penelope Seidler AM Peter Sekules Julia Selby Zara Selby Dean Shannon Fiona Shearman Juliet Sheen Peter Sheldrake Sam Sheppard Janice Shier Sandy Shuetrim Nicole Shuttleworth Dr Agnes Sinclair Singtel Optus Ltd Andrew Sisson Janner Skinner Jim & Liz Sloman George & Sabrina Snow Maria Sola & Malcolm Douglas Mervyn Spencer Warren Stanfield Ada Stanton Sandy Starbuck Elizabeth Starkey Colin Stenning Philip & Leslie Stern Malcolm Stuart Diane Sturrock Helen Swift & Les Neulinger Robin Syme AM & Rosemary Syme Alan & Jenny Talbot Diana Taylor Keith Taylor Carmel Taylor Samuel Teed David & Jenny Templeman Diane Tennie The Limb Family Foundation Rob & Kyrenia Thomas Cassie Thornley Georgina & Darcy Tooher

Margareta Toohey Topfer Family Trust Trans-Tasman Business Circle Mary Tranter Douglas & Barbara Trengove Judith Tribe Sally Tribe John Tuckey Jennifer Turnbull Paul Turner Yvonne Turner Elva Tyrrell Suzanne & Ross Tzannes AM UBS Foundation Anne Udy Kevin Underwood Benson Waghorn Dr Sharon Wallace David Walsh Wang Shih-Chang John Ward Juliette Ward Greg Watson Deanne Weir & Jules Anderson Nevil Weller John Whaite Honourable Justice Anthony Whealy Philip Wheelwright Anthony Whiddon & Kim Ryan Alexander G White OAM Angus & Emma White Dr Bernadette White Elizabeth Whitecross & Ian French Brett Whiteway Margaret Whitlam AO Alison Whitney Kathleen Wilcox Rosemary Wildie George M Wilkins Elizabeth & Philip Williams Helen Williams Evan Williams AM Peter Willis & Eleneth Woolley Gordon & Diana Winch Alison Witcombe Adrianna Witkowski Penny Wolswinkel John Wood Joyce Woodroffe Carolyn Wright Capt W Graham Wright RAN ret Margie Yen Ronald Yuen Isobel & George Yuille Barry Zietsch Anonymous (24)

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 27


28 annual REPORT 2010


ANNUAL REPORT 2010 29


Thank you to our partners. LEADING PARTNERS

National Education & Youth Partner

Mainstage Arts Partner

Regional Communities Partner

MAJOR PARTNERS

Nsw Education Partner

Perth Season Partner King Lear

SUPPORTING PARTNERS

Supporting Local Communities

Official Wellbeing Partner

Leadership Partner

Supporting VIC Arts Education

COMPANY PARTNERS

Special Event Partner

Special Event Partner

Media Partner

Radio Partner

Accommodation Partner Melbourne

Legal Partner

Community Partner

Public Affairs Advisors

I

Sydney Restaurant Partner

30 annual REPORT 2010


Community PARTNERS The following organisations, trusts and foundations are supporting our national education initiatives:

The Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation Colonial Foundation The Ian Potter Foundation Scully Fund James N Kirby Foundation Tim Fairfax Family Foundation Trust Company ATF Archer Collier Charitable Fund Danks Trust Besen Family Foundation

GOVERNMENT PARTNERS

Bell Shakespeare is assisted by the NSW Government through Arts NSW.

Bell Shakespeare Learning is supported by the Australian Government through the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations under the Quality Outcomes Programme.

Bell Shakespeare is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

The Australian Government is proud to be associated with Bell Shakespeare through the national performing arts touring programme, Playing Australia, which gives Australians across the country the opportunity to see some of our best performing arts.

Bell Shakespeare Learning is assisted by the NSW Government through the NSW Department of Education and Training.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 31


Financial Statements.

32 annual REPORT 2010


ANNUAL REPORT 2010 33


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Your directors present this report on the entity for the financial year ended 31 December 2010.

The entity measures its performance (including any key performance indicators) by: • reference to Financial and Operating KPI’s developed within the framework of the Company’s annual 3 year business plan

Directors The names of each person who has been a director during the year and to the date of this report are: Timothy Kenneth Fabian Cox resigned (22/09/2010) Ilana Rachel Atlas John Anthony Bell Catherine Jane Caro Richard John Freudenstein Graham Charles Froebel Kathryn Therese Greiner Antony De Jong Christopher David Jordan James Leslie McLachlan resigned (21/04/2010) Margaret Hannah Osmond Gene Thomas Tilbrook appointed (19/05/2010) Helen Rodda Williams appointed (23/06/2010) Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated.

Company Secretary

A summary of the 2011-2103 Business Plan including financial and operating KPI’s are set out in the Additional Information section of this Annual Report.

Operating Results The profit of the Company amounted to $798,149. The income of the company is exempt from income tax under section 50-45 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997

Dividends Paid or Recommended The Constitution of Association of the company prohibits the distribution of income and property by way of dividend or bonus.

Review of Operations During the year, the company completed seasons in Sydney, Canberra, and Melbourne and also toured in various states and territories in Australia. Further details of operations are contained in the Chairman’s Report.

The following person held the position of Company secretary at the end of the financial year: Mark Ramsden – BComm (Accy) CPA

Significant Changes in State of Affairs

Principal Activities

No significant changes in the Company’s state of affairs occurred during the financial year.

The principal activity of the entity during the financial year was the presentation of theatrical productions and learning programs. No significant changes in the nature of the Company’s activity occurred during the financial year. The entity’s short term objectives are to: • build international profile • secure long term funding for delivery of key learning programmes • develop the organisational capacity and personnel to achieve the key strategies necessary to deliver theatre and learning programmes The entity’s long term objectives are to: • maintain and enhance position as Australia’s leading producer and presenter of Shakespeare and related theatre • maintain and enhance position as Australia’s leading provider of Shakespeare related learning activities • secure a suitable permanent home for Bell Shakespeare incorporating rehearsal, performance and office space To achieve these objectives, the entity has adopted the following strategies: • The strategies underpinning the achievement of the above objectives are detailed in the Company’s annual 3 year business plan • A summary of the 2011-2103 Business Plan including key strategies is set out in the Additional Information section of this Annual Report

34 annual REPORT 2010

After Balance Date Events No matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the Company, the results of those operations, or the state of affairs of the Company in future financial years.

Future Developments The Company expects to maintain the present status and level of operations and hence there are no likely developments in the Company’s operations.

Environmental Issues The Company’s operations are not regulated by any significant environmental regulation under a law of the Commonwealth or of a state or territory.

Options No options over issued shares or interests in the Company were granted during or since the end of the financial year and there were no options outstanding at the date of this report.


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Ilana Rachel Atlas Qualifications Experience

– Chairman, Director since January 2004 – Bjuris (Hons) LLB (Hons) LLM – Director, Suncorp Limited and Councillor Australian National University. Previously, Group Executive, People and prior to that, Group Secretary and General Counsel, Westpac Banking Corporation. Before her roles at Westpac, Ilana was a partner at national law firm Mallesons Stephen Jaques. Member of the Council of the Australian National University.

John Anthony Bell Qualifications Experience

– Artistic Director since inception July 1990 – AO BA (Hons) – Performed with the Old Tote Theatre Company from 1963 to 1964. British Council Scholarship to Bristol Old Vic Drama School, UK in 1964; Associate Artist at Royal Shakespeare Company from 1965 to 1969; Company Director of the Nimrod Theatre, 1970 to 1984; Head of Acting, NIDA, 1970; and freelance work as Director and Actor until 1991. In 1997 the National Trust of Australia named him as one of the 100 Australian National Living Treasures. In 2009 John was appointed as an Officer in the Order of Australia in recognition of his service to the performing arts.

Catherine Jane Caro Qualifications Experience

– Director since April 2009 – BA (Eng Lit) – Author, lecturer, mentor, social commentator, columnist, workshop facilitator, media broadcaster and award winning advertising writer. Runs her own communications consultancy and lectures in Advertising Creative at The School of Communication Arts at UWS. Also sits on the Board of the NSW Public Education Foundation.

Richard John Freudenstein Qualifications Experience

– Director since December 2006 – BEc LLB (Hons) – Worked for News Corporation and related companies since 1994. Currently the CEO of The Australian Newspaper and CEO of News Digital Media, the digital division of News Limited. Also Chairman of realestate.com.au Ltd, and a Director of News Limited, FOXTEL and ESPN Star Sports. Has served as Chairman of the Royal Television Society, Chairman of Nickelodeon UK and as a Director of the English National Ballet.

Graham Charles Froebel Qualifications Experience

– Director since April 1998 – BCom LLB CA – Group Taxation Manager of Boral Limited and previously a partner with the international accounting firm Arthur Andersen.

Kathryn Therese Greiner Qualifications Experience

– Director since October 2005 – AO BSocWk – Chairman of Biotech Capital Pty Ltd and Australian Hearing. Also a Member, Schools Funding Review Panel and an advisory council member of LEK Consulting.

Antony De Jong Qualifications Experience

– Director since February 2002 – BSc LLB (Hons) MBA, GAICD – Director – Strategy & Business Development, Telstra Enterprise & Government. Previously, Partner with Accenture, a global technology and information services company. President of The Duldig Gallery Inc, a public museum, gallery and arts resource centre in Melbourne.

Christopher David Jordan Qualifications Experience

– Director since March 2006 – AO BCom LLB LLM FCA – NSW Chairman of KPMG. He is the Deputy Chairman of the Board of Taxation, an advisory board to the Federal Treasurer. He is also a board member of the Sydney Children’s Hospital Foundation and for the Sydney 2009 World Masters Games Advisory Committee.

Margaret Hannah Osmond Experience

– Director since October 2005 – Chief Executive of the Australian National Retailers Association [ANRA], which was established in 2006 as a lobby and research organisation to be the voice of the Australia’s largest retailers. Chaired Sydney’s successful bid to secure the hosting rights for 2009 World Masters Games on behalf of the NSW Government and has been Chair of the Sydney Organising Committee for this international sporting event since 2004. Recently been appointed to the Australian Sports Commission and Boardmember of the Retail Employee’s Superannuation Trust [REST].

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 35


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Gene Thomas Tilbrook Qualifications Experience

– Director since May 2010 – BSc, Dip Comp, MBA (UWA); AMP (HBS) – Chair of Transpacific Industries; Director of GPT Group, QR National, Fletcher Building, NBN Co and Perth Festival. Council member of Curtin University and AICD (WA). From 1985-2009 held roles at Wesfarmers in strategy, m & a, finance and projects; exec director 2002-2009.

Helen Rodda Williams Qualifications Experience

– Director since June 2010 – AO BA(Hons) FAIM – Recently retired from the Australian Public Service where she headed five departments (Education, Tourism, Immigration, Communications and the Arts, and Human Services) and was Public Service Commissioner. Has served on a wide range of government boards and committees, including the National Library Council and the Australia Council for the Arts. Is Deputy Chair of the National Archives Advisory Council, and a member of the Origin Foundation Board.

36 annual REPORT 2010


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 DIRECTORS’ REPORT

The interests of the directors in the ordinary share capital of the company at the date of this report are:

Beneficial Interest in Ordinary Shares

Number of shares

Ilana Rachel Atlas

5,000

John Anthony Bell

5,001

Catherine Jane Caro

5,000

Richard John Freudenstein

5,000

Graham Charles Froebel

5,005

Kathryn Therese Greiner

5,000

Antony De Jong

5,000

Christopher David Jordan

5,000

Margaret Hannah Osmond

5,000

Gene Thomas Tilbrook

5,000

Helen Rodda Williams

5,000

The above shares are deemed to have no commercial value. The Constitution of the company prohibits the distribution of income and property by way of dividend or bonus. The Constitution also prohibits the return of capital or of any other distribution to members on winding up.

meetings of directors During the financial year, 6 meetings of directors were held. Attendances by each director were as follows:

Director Meetings Number eligible to attend Number attended

Timothy Kenneth Fabian Cox

5

5

Ilana Rachel Atlas

6

5

John Anthony Bell

6

3

Catherine Jane Caro

6

5

Richard John Freudenstein

6

4

Graham Charles Froebel

6

5

Kathryn Therese Greiner

6

4

Antony De Jong

6

3

Christopher David Jordan

6

4

James Leslie McLachlan

1

–

Margaret Hannah Osmond

6

4

Gene Thomas Tilbrook

4

4

Helen Rodda Williams

3

3

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 37


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Indemnifying Officers or Auditor No indemnities have been given or insurance premiums paid, during or since the end of the financial year, for any person who is or has been an officer or auditor of the Company with the exception of the following matter. During the financial year the company obtained insurance to indemnify directors and officers, as named in this report, for loss arising from any claims made against them by reason of any wrongful act. The premium paid was $3,960.

Proceedings on Behalf of the Company No person has applied for leave of Court to bring proceedings on behalf of the Company or intervene in any proceedings to which the Company is a party for the purpose of taking responsibility on behalf of the Company for all or any part of those proceedings. The Company was not a party to any such proceedings during the year.

Directors’ Benefits During or since the end of the previous financial year, no director has received or become entitled to receive a benefit because of a contract, other than benefits disclosed in the financial statements or the fixed salary of a full time employee of the company or a related corporation or with a firm of which a director is a member, or with a company in which a director has a substantial financial interest.

Office Bearers at the date of this report I R Atlas, Chairman J A Bell, Artistic Director M Ramsden, Company Secetary C M Tooher, General Manager

Auditor’s Independence Declaration The lead auditor’s independence declaration for the year ended 31 December 2010 has been received and can be found on page 39 of the financial report.

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Director Ilana Rachel Atlas Dated this 16th day of March, 2011

38 annual REPORT 2010


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION UNDER S 307C OF THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001 TO THE DIRECTORS OF THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 39


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Note 2010 $ Revenue

2

Other income

2 –

10,364,319

2009 $

9,083,862

Employee benefits expense

(4,087,384)

(3,925,160)

Depreciation and amortisation expense

(152,743)

(124,146)

Production expenses

(829,589)

(1,013,860)

Marketing expenses

(815,896)

(912,704)

Administration expense

(970,175)

(815,720)

Fundraising expense

(207,991)

(142,836)

Merchandise expense

(50,688)

(33,008)

Venue costs

(1,125,786)

(849,776)

Touring costs

(1,325,918)

(1,239,694)

Other expenses

Profit before income tax

798,149

26,958

798,149

26,958

(Decrease)/increase in fair value of available for sale financial assets

(16,649)

119,504

Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax

(16,649)

119,504

Total comprehensive income for the year

781,500

146,462

Income tax expense Profit after income tax for the year

Other comprehensive income after income tax:

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

40 annual REPORT 2010


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2010

Note 2010 2009 $ $ ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents

3

1,107,943

1,081,283

Trade and other receivables

4

166,619

716,175

Other assets

5

99,058

94,194

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

1,373,620

1,891,652

NON-CURRENT ASSETS Financial assets

6

3,526,122

2,268,097

Property, plant and equipment

7

60,263

78,674

Intangible assets

8

69,571

73,601

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

3,655,956

2,420,372

TOTAL ASSETS

5,029,576

4,312,024

LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables

9

1,692,018

1,778,121

Short term provisions

10

112,650

110,896

1,804,668

1,889,017

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Long term provisions

10

93,504

73,103

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

93,504

73,103

TOTAL LIABILITIES

1,898,172

1,962,120

NET ASSETS

3,131,404

2,349,904

EQUITY Retained earnings

3,038,079

2,239,930

Available-for-sale revaluation reserve

Issued Capital

96,041

96,041

TOTAL EQUITY

3,131,404

2,349,904

The above Statement of Financial Position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 41


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Issued Capital Available-for-sale Retained Earnings Total Revaluation Reserve $ $ $ $ Balance at 1 January 2009

96,041

(105,571)

2,212,972

2,203,442

Profit attributable to the entity

26,958

26,958

Total other comprehensive income for the year

Increase in fair value of available for sale financial assets Balance at 31 December 2009

96,041

119,504

119,504

13,933

2,239,930

2,349,904

Profit attributable to the entity

798,149

798,149

Total other comprehensive income for the year

Decrease in fair value of available for sale financial assets Balance at 31 December 2010

96,041

(16,649) (2,716)

The above Statement of Changes in Equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

42 annual REPORT 2010

3,038,079

(16,649) 3,131,404


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Note 2010 2009 $ $ CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipt of grants

2,514,741

2,619,931

Other receipts

28,737

55,207

Payments to suppliers and employees

(9,733,107)

(8,694,450)

Interest received

74,581

56,043

Dividends received

Receipts from sales

5,805,174

3,474,828

Receipts from fundraising

2,688,520

2,666,937

Investment income received

97,862

65,319

Net GST received

(44,872)

66,275

Net cash generated from operating activities

1,431,636

310,090

CASH FLOW FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment

Receipts from other financial assets

195,133

116,666

Payment for property, plant and equipment

(50,793)

(26,883)

Proceeds from sale of available-for-sale investments

Payment for available-for-sale investments

(1,107,607)

(152,734)

Payment for financial assets at fair value through profit and loss

(362,199)

(39,052)

Payment for intangible asset

(79,510)

(80,293)

Payment for held-to-maturity investments

Net cash used in investing activities

(1,404,976)

(182,296)

Net increase in cash held

26,660

127,794

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year

1,081,283

953,489

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

1,107,943

1,081,283

3

The above Statement of Cash Flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 43


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

The financial statements are for THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED as an individual entity, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. Note 1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Preparation THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED has elected to early adopt the pronouncements AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards and AASB 2010–2 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from Reduced Disclosure Requirements to the annual reporting period beginning 1 January 2010. The financial statements are general purpose financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board and the Corporations Act 2001. Australian Accounting Standards set out accounting policies that the AASB has concluded would result in financial statements containing relevant and reliable information about transactions, events and conditions. Material accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements are presented below and have been consistently applied unless otherwise stated. The financial statements have been prepared on an accruals basis and are based on historical costs, modified, where applicable by the measurement at fair value of selected non-current assets, financial assets and financial liabilities. Accounting Policies (a) Going Concern The financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates continuity of normal trading activities and the realisation of assets and settlement of liabilities in the normal course of business. The company’s continued existence is ultimately dependent upon the success of future productions, government support and fundraising. If the company is unable to continue as a going concern it may be required to realise its assets and extinguish its liabilities other than in the normal course of business and at amounts different from those stated in the financial statements. The company has in existence programmes for the development and continuation of both donations and corporate sponsorship and for government support. It is clear that these programmes are essential to the continued existence of the company. (b) Revenue Revenue from provision of theatrical and educational productions is recognised upon the provision of the service to customers. Revenue from the sale of programs and merchandise is recognised upon the delivery of goods to customers.

Government grants are recognised in revenue on a cash basis in accordance with AASB 1004 where this standard is applicable.

If conditions are attached to the grant which must be satisfied before it is eligible to receive the contribution, the recognition of the grant as revenue will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied.

When grant revenue is received whereby the entity incurs an obligation to deliver economic value directly back to the contributor, this is considered a reciprocal transaction and the grant revenue is recognised in the Statement of Financial Position as a liability until the service has been delivered to the contributor, otherwise the grant is recognised as income on receipt.

Interest and investment revenue is recognised on a proportional basis taking into account the interest rates applicable to the financial assets.

Fundraising income received for the support of activities is included as income in the Statement of Comprehensive Income. Income received in advance for the next year’s season is included in current liabilities as income received in advance since the company is required to spend funds according to the funding agreements and where this does not occur a refund of those funds is required.

(c) Productions in progress Where the company has theatrical productions in progress, the practice is for the running costs for the tour of each activity to be accumulated and reduced by box office income until completion, at which time the result is determined and the company’s share brought to account. All costs with respect to uncompleted seasons are carried forward at balance date on the basis that it is reasonably expected that future revenue sufficient to absorb the costs carried forward will be derived. Where this is not the case such costs are written off in the period in which they are incurred. (d) Property, Plant and Equipment Each class of property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or fair values as indicated, less, where applicable, accumulated depreciation and impairment losses.

Plant and equipment Plant and equipment are measured on the cost basis less depreciation and impairment losses.

The carrying amount of plant and equipment is reviewed annually by directors to ensure it is not in excess of the recoverable amount from these assets. The recoverable amount is assessed on the basis of the expected net cash flows that will be received from the assets employment and subsequent disposal. The expected net cash flows have been discounted to their present values in determining recoverable amounts.

Depreciation The depreciable amount of all fixed assets is depreciated on a straight-line basis over the asset’s useful life to the entity commencing from the time the asset is held ready for use. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of either the unexpired period of the lease or the estimated useful lives of the improvements.

44 annual REPORT 2010


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable assets are:

Class of Fixed Asset Office furniture and equipment Vehicles

The assets’ residual values and useful lives are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each Statement of Financial Position date.

Asset classes carrying amount is written down immediately to its recoverable amount if the asset’s carrying amount is greater than its estimated recoverable amount.

Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with the carrying amount. These gains or losses are included in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Depreciation Rate 33.3%, straight line 20%, straight line

(e) Leases Lease payments for operating leases, where substantially all the risks and benefits remain with the lessor, are charged as expenses on a straight-line basis over the lease term. (f) Financial Instruments

Initial Recognition and Measurement Financial instruments are initially measured at cost on trade date, which includes transaction costs, when the related contractual rights or obligations exist.

Classification and Subsequent Measurement Subsequent to initial recognition these instruments are measured as set out below.

(i) Available-for-sale financial assets Available-for-sale financial assets comprise investments in listed and unlisted entities and any non-derivatives that are not classified as any other category of financial assets, and are classified as non-current assets (unless management intends to dispose of the investment within 12 months of end of the reporting period). After initial recognition, these investments are measured at fair value with gains or losses recognised as a separate component of equity (available-for-sale investments revaluation reserve). Where there is a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of an available for sale financial asset (which constitutes objective evidence of impairment) the full amount including any amount previously charged to equity, is recognised in the net profit for the period. Purchases and sales of available for sale financial assets are recognised on settlement date with any change in fair value between trade date and settlement date being recognised in the available for sale reserve. On sale, the amount held in available for sale reserves associated with that asset is removed from equity and recognised in the net profit for the period.

(ii) Other financial assets Other financial assets are reflected at fair market value and largely represent cash balances, which are not available for use.

(iii) Financial liabilities Non-derivative financial liabilities are recognised at amortised cost, comprising original debt less principal payments and amortisation.

Fair value Fair value is determined based on current bid prices for all quoted investments. Valuation techniques are applied to determine the fair value for all unlisted securities, including recent arm’s length transactions, reference to similar instruments and option pricing models.

Impairment At each end of the reporting period, the entity assesses whether there is objective evidence that a financial instrument has been impaired. In the case of available-for-sale financial instruments, a prolonged decline in the value of the instrument is considered to determine whether an impairment has arisen. Impairment losses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

(g) Impairment of Assets At the end of each reporting period, the entity reviews the carrying values of its tangible and intangible assets to determine whether there is any indication that those assets have been impaired. If such an indication exists, the recoverable amount of the asset, being the higher of the asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use, is compared to the asset’s carrying value. Any excess of the asset’s carrying value over its recoverable amount is expensed to the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Where the future economic benefits of the asset are not primarily dependent upon on the asset’s ability to generate net cash inflows and when the entity would, if deprived of the asset, replace its remaining future economic benefits, value in use is determined as the depreciated replacement cost of an asset.

Where it is not possible to estimate the recoverable amount of an assets class, the entity estimates the recoverable amount of the cashgenerating unit to which the class of assets belong.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 45


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

(h) Employee Benefits Annual Leave Provision is made for the company’s liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to balance date. Employee benefits expected to be settled within one year have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled plus related on-costs. Long Service Leave Other employee benefits payable later than one year have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. Expected future payments are discounted using national government bond rates at Statement of Financial Position date with terms to maturity and currency that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows. (i) Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value, and bank overdrafts. Bank overdrafts are shown within borrowings in current liabilities on the Statement of Financial Position. (j) Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office. In these circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of expense. Receivables and payables in the Statement of Financial Position are shown inclusive of GST. (k) Income Tax No provision for income tax has been raised as the entity is exempt from income tax under Div 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. (l) Intangibles

Website upgrade Website upgrade is recorded at cost, has a finite life and is carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and impairment losses. It has an estimated useful life of two years. It is assessed annually for impairment.

(m) Provisions Provisions are recognised when the entity has a legal or constructive obligation, as a result of past events, for which it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will result and that outflow can be reliably measured. Provisions recognised represent the best estimate of the amounts required to settle the obligation at the end of the reporting period. (n) Foreign currency transactions and balances Foreign currency transactions during the year are converted to Australian currency at the rates of exchange applicable at the date of the transactions. Amounts receivable and payable in foreign currencies at Statement of Financial Position date are converted at the rates of exchange ruling at that date. The gains and losses from conversion of short-term assets and liabilities, whether realised or unrealised, are included in the Statement of Comprehensive Income as they arise. (o) Trade and other receivables Trade and other receivables are recognised at original invoice amounts less an allowance for uncollectible amounts and have repayment terms of 30 days. Collectability of trade receivables is assessed on an ongoing basis. Debts which are known to be uncollectible are written off. An allowance is made for doubtful debts where there is objective evidence that the company will not be able to collect all amounts due according to the original terms. (p) Trade and other payables Trade and other payables represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the company prior to the year-end and which are unpaid. These amounts are unsecured and have 30 day payment terms.

(q) Comparative Figures Where required by Accounting Standards comparative figures have been adjusted to conform with changes in presentation for the current financial year. (r) Critical accounting estimates and judgments The directors evaluate estimates and judgments incorporated into the financial statements based on historical knowledge and best available current information. Estimates assume a reasonable expectation of future events and are based on current trends and economic data, obtained both externally and within the company.

Key Estimates General Estimates and assumptions are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

Impairment The company assesses impairment at the end of each reporting period by evaluation of conditions and events specific to the company that may be indicative of impairment triggers. Recoverable amounts of relevant assets are reassessed using value-in-use calculations which incorporate various key assumptions. Key Judgements (a) Available-for-sale investments There are no critical judgements that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities. 46 annual REPORT 2010


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Note 2

Revenue and Other Income

Note 2010 2009 $ $ Revenue from government grants and other grants

—State/federal government grants

2,407,489

2,412,005

—Other government grants

10,000

2,417,489

2,412,005

Other Revenue

—Charitable income and fundraising

2,918,797

2,553,835

—Other revenue

28,737

55,207

—Performance revenue

4,765,277

3,855,443

—Programme and merchandise revenue

61,576

86,010

—Investment income

97,862

65,319

—Interest received

74,581

56,043

7,946,830

6,671,857

Total Revenue and Other Income

10,364,319

9,083,862

Note 3

Reconciliation of Cash and Cash Equivalents

For the purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows, cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value, and bank overdrafts. Bank overdrafts are shown within borrowings in current liabilities on the Statement of Financial Position. Cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the Statement of Financial Position is made up as follows:

2010 2009 $ $

CURRENT Cash at bank

705,343

700,452

Cash on hand

2,600

2,350

Cash on deposit

400,000

378,481

1,107,943

1,081,283

Note 4

Trade and Other Receivables

Note 2010 2009 $ $ CURRENT Trade receivables

166,619

712,265

Other receivables

3,910

Total current trade and other receivables

166,619

716,175

Note 5 Other Assets

2010 2009 $ $

CURRENT Prepayments

99,058

94,194

99,058

94,194

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 47


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Note 6

Financial Assets

Note

2010 2009 $ $

NON-CURRENT Available-for-sale financial assets

6(a)

2,919,731

1,985,846

Other financial assets

RIS - Bank Term Deposit

6(b)

103,767

Bank Deposit

6(c)

300,000

29,167

Managed cash on deposit

6(c)

206,391

49,317

Bank guarantee deposit

6(c)

100,000

100,000

3,526,122

2,268,097

(a) Available-for-sale financial assets comprise:

— Unlisted investments at fair value

Managed Fixed Interest Portfolio

6(d)

1,830,000

1,013,685

Balanced Investment Fund

151,919

149,639

RIS Investments - Units in Investment Trust

937,812

822,522

6(b)

2,919,731

1,985,846

(b) RIS Investments represent a part of the amount invested under the Reserve Incentive Scheme (‘RIS’), an initiative of the two core Funding Bodies, the Australia Council and the NSW Ministry for the Arts. In accordance with the RIS Agreement between the company and the Funding Bodies, these funds may only be accessed with the express agreement of the Funding Bodies and under prescribed circumstances until 12 June 2018, after which date they are freed from any restrictions. RIS Funds have not been used to secure any liabilities of the Company. (c) Other Bank deposits and managed cash are not considered accessible to the company for the purposes of this classification. (d) The Managed Fixed Interest Portfolio is an investment portfolio managed by Perpetual Trustees for the company. The investments are fixed interest securities and cash management funds with returns typically in the range 4% to 6%. Note 7

Property, Plant and Equipment

2010 2009 $ $

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Plant and equipment At cost

45,838

43,063

Less accumulated depreciation

(30,903)

(22,944)

Less accumulated impairment losses

14,935

20,119

222,635

222,592

Office furniture and equipment At cost (Accumulated depreciation)

(177,307)

(175,948)

45,328

46,644

107,844

107,844

Leasehold improvements At cost (Accumulated depreciation)

(107,844)

(95,933)

11,911

Motor vehicle At cost (Accumulated depreciation) Total plant and equipment 48 annual REPORT 2010

19,091 (19,091) – 60,263

19,091 (19,091) – 78,674


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Movements in Carrying Amounts Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: Leasehold Production & Improvements Theatre Equipment $ $

Office Furniture and Equipment $

Total $

2009 Balance at the beginning of the year Additions at cost Depreciation expense Carrying amount at end of year

43,311 3,899 (35,298)

16,602 15,579 (12,062)

109,332 7,405 (70,094)

169,245 26,883 (117,454)

11,912

20,119

46,643

78,674

11,912

20,119

46,643

78,674

2010 Balance at the beginning of the year Additions at cost Depreciation expense Carrying amount at end of year Note 8

– (11,912) –

8,512 (13,697) 14,934

42,281 (43,595) 45,329

50,793 (69,204) 60,263

Intangible Assets

2010 2009 $ $

Website Upgrade - at cost

159,803

80,293

Accumulated amortisation

(90,232)

(6,692)

Net carrying value

69,571

73,601

Website Upgrade $

2009 Balance at the beginning of the year

Additions

80,293

Amortisation charge

(6,692)

73,601

2010 Balance at the beginning of the year

73,601

Additions

79,510

Disposals Amortisation charge

(83,540)

Impairment losses

69,571

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 49


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Note 9 Trade and Other Payables Note

2010 2009 $ $

CURRENT Trade payables

247,754

634,461

Deferred income

1,444,264

1,143,660

1,692,018

1,778,121

9(a)

2010 $

2009 $

(a) Financial liabilities at amortised cost classified as trade and other payables

Trade and other payables

— Total current

1,692,018

1,778,121

— Total non-current

1,692,018

Less deferred income Financial liabilities as trade and other payables

(1,444,264)

247,754

1,778,121 (1,143,660) 634,461

Note 10 Provisions

2010 2009 $ $

CURRENT Employee Benefits

92,650

92,949

Unbilled touring costs

20,000

17,947

112,650

110,896

Employee Benefits

93,504

73,103

93,504

73,103

NON-CURRENT

2010 2009 $ $

Analysis of Total Provisions Current

112,650

110,896

Non-current

93,504

73,103

206,154

183,999

Provision for Long-term Employee Benefits A provision has been recognised for employee entitlements relating to long service leave. In calculating the present value of future cash flows in respect of long service leave, the probability of long service leave being taken is based on historical data. The measurement and recognition criteria relating to employee benefits has been included in Note 1 of financial statements. Note 11 Issued Capital

2010 2009 $ $

Issued Capital 96,041 ordinary shares of $1.00 each

96,041

96,041

The above shares are deemed to have no commercial value. The Constitution of the company prohibits the distribution of income and property by way of dividend or bonus. The Constitution also prohibits the return of capital or of any other distribution to members on winding up. 50 annual REPORT 2010


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Note 12 Capital and Leasing Commitments

(a) Operating Lease Commitments

Non-cancellable operating leases contracted for but not capitalised in the financial statements 2010 2009 $ $

Payable – minimum lease payments

— not later than 12 months

49,335

116,367

— later than 12 months but not later than 5 years

101,822

78,698

151,157

195,065

The major part of the lease commitments reported above relates to the lease of office equipment which expires in June 2015; this lease carries an escalation clause which is expected to be in line with economic conditions. Commitments for the rental of office and rehearsal premises for the company ceased in March 2010 when the leases expired. Rental of office and rehearsal premises continues on a month to month basis whilst new leases are negotiated. Note 13 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets 2010 2009 $ $

Estimates of the potential financial effect of contingent liabilities that may become payable: Bank guarantee - lease premises

70,000

70,000

Bank guarantees - autopay facility

30,000

30,000

100,000

100,000

Note 14 Events After the Reporting Period No events have occurred since balance date which would have a material impact on the financial statements. Note 15 Key Management Personnel Compensation Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the company, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity. Control is the power to govern the financial and operating policies of an entity so as to obtain benefits from its activities. Key Management Persons (KMP) has been taken to comprise the directors and members of the executive management responsible for the day to day financial and operational management of the entity. The aggregate compensation of Key Management Persons during the year comprising amounts paid or payable or provided for was as follows: Short-term benefits Post employment Other long-term benefits benefits $ $ $

Termination benefits $

Total $

2010 Total compensation

582,648

582,648

554,652

554,652

2009 Total compensation

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 51


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Note 16 Related Party Transactions Transactions between related parties are on normal commercial terms and conditions no more favourable than those available to other persons unless otherwise stated. During the year donations were received from certain Directors and Director-related parties and these are named amongst those private donors listed in the attachment to this report. Note 17 Finance Facilities

2010 2009 $

$

Standby arrangements with banks to provide funds and support facilities. Credit Card facility

30,000

30,000

Amount used

27,500

27,500

Unused credit facility

2,500

2,500

Security Details The credit card facility of $30,000 (2009: $30,000) is arranged with Westpac Banking Corporation with general terms and conditions being set and agreed to from time to time. A letter of set off has also been given by The Bell Shakespeare Company Limited to the bank over a term deposit of $70,000.

52 annual REPORT 2010


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 DIRECTORS’ DECLARATION

The directors of the entity declare that: 1. The financial statements and notes, as set out on pages 5 to 15, are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 and: (a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements; and (b) give a true and fair view of the financial position as at 31 December 2010 and of the performance for the year ended on that date of the entity. 2. In the directors’ opinion there are reasonable grounds to believe that the entity will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Director Ilana Rachel Atlas Dated this 16th day of March 2011

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 53


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED

54 annual REPORT 2010


THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED ABN: 87 050 055 251 INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF THE BELL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY LIMITED

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 55


Additional Information.

56 annual REPORT 2010


ANNUAL REPORT 2010 57


Fundraising.

The Bell Shakespeare Company undertakes fundraising appeals throughout the year; it holds an authority to fundraise under the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW). Additional information and declarations to be furnished under this Act are as follows: (a) Details of aggregate fundraising income and expense from fundraising appeals Note

2010 2009 $ $

Donations: Capital Fund Campaign

58,000

25,000

Young Artists Fund Campaign

120,120

74,000

Supporting Cast

435,150

482,024

Hearts In A Row

230,030

240,205

Bequests

500,000 250,000

Donations – Total

1,343,300

1,071,229

Sponsorships

1,046,302 1,042,586

Trusts & Foundations

529,195

440,020

Gross income raised by appeals

2,918,797

2,553,835

Less: direct costs of fundraising appeals:

207,991

142,836

Net surplus from fundraising appeals

2,710,806

2,410,999

(b) Application of funds Funds raised through the Capital Fund and bequests are designated for securing the future of the company. Funds raised through the Young Artists Fund are designated to subsidise a Creative Fellowship Program. All other funds raised support the current theatrical productions and educational work of the company. (c) Forms of appeal Appeals during the year included general appeals for sponsorship and donations. (d) Traders Bell Shakespeare employs professional staff to manage and coordinate its fundraising activities and consequently does not engage commercial fundraising traders in any capacity.

58 annual REPORT 2010


Fundraising (continued).

(e) Comparative figures and ratios 2010 2009 $ $

Overall breakdown of expenditure Production expenses

5,701,269

Marketing/Fundraising Administration Total Expenditure

5,421,644

482,357 549,971 3,347,141 3,085,289 9,530,767

9,056,904

Total costs of fundraising / Gross income from fundraising ($)

207,991/2,918,797

142,836 /2,553,835

Total costs of fundraising / Gross income from fundraising (%)

7%

6%

Net surplus from fundraising / Gross income from fundraising ($)

2,710,886/2,918,797

2,410,999/2,553,835

Net surplus from fundraising / Gross income from fundraising (%)

93%

94%

Fundraising Results

Total cost of services provided / Total expenditure ($)

5,701,269/9,530,767

5,421,644/9,056,904

Total cost of services provided / Total expenditure (%)

60%

60%

Total cost of services provided / Total income received ($)

5,701,269/10,364,319

5,421,644/ 9,083,862

Total cost of services provided / Total income received (%)

55%

60%

(f) Declaration by Chairman as required by the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW) I, Ilana Atlas, Chairman of The Bell Shakespeare Company Limited, declare that in my opinion: (i) the income statement for the year ended 31 December 2010 gives a true and fair view of all income and expenditure with respect to fundraising appeals; and (ii) the balance sheet as at 31 December 2010 gives a true and fair view of the state of affairs with respect to fundraising appeals; and (iii) the provisions of the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW) and the regulations under that Act and the conditions attached to the authority have been complied with; and (iv) the internal controls exercised by Bell Shakespeare are appropriate and effective in accounting for all income received and applied by Bell Shakespeare from any of its fundraising appeals. Signed

Ilana Atlas Chairman Dated:16 March 2011

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 59


Paid Attendances.

LOCATION

Mainstage Learning Productions Programmes

TOTAL TOTAL 2010 2009

NSW

55,667 30,048 85,715 73,731

VIC

20,306

9,975 30,281 26,047

ACT

14,015

2,558 16,573 13,422

QLD

14,141 6,389 20,530 16,717

SA

6,487

6,487

8,521

TAS

2,627 3,260 5,887 6,052

WA

7,680

6,177 13,857 10,147

NT

1,033

2,274

International Total

2,523 117,992

3,307

5,241

– 2,523 693

67,168 185,160 160,571

Metropolitan

84,348 40,406 124,754 115,713

Regional

31,121 26,762 57,883 44,165

International Total

2,523 117,992

– 2,523 693

67,168 185,160 160,571

Notes: Metropolitan: the capital city of the state Regional: other locations in that state Learning Programmes: excludes student attendance of Mainstage matinee performances and teacher participation OTHER ACCESS The company also engages in a number of other activities through which a wider audience reaches the Bell Shakespeare Company. These include ongoing website development, remote community residencies and pre-performance audience discussion panels. A performance from the King Lear season at the Victorian Arts Centre was broadcast nationally on ABC2 Television on Sunday, 1st of August 2010.

60 annual REPORT 2010


Government Support.

Analysis of Grants and Subsidies Core Touring Education Other TOTAL 2010 TOTAL 2009 Projects Rent subsidy Australia Council

595,072

595,072

582,832

Australia Council – Young and Emerging Artists

15,000

15,000

20,000

Australia Council – Creative Development (Mind’s Eye)

30,000

30,000

Australia Council – Professional Development

19,598

19,598

25,000

40,000

27,000

116,664

840,563

849,499

412,256

412,256

450,000

320,000

320,000

25,000

27,674

Australia Council – International Tour Arts NSW (note 1)

595,071

Playing Australia (note 2)

40,000 128,828

DEEWR Triennial

320,000

Juvenile Justice Dept NSW (note 3)

25,000

NSW Dept of Education

40,000

40,000

40,000

Arts SA - DPC

50,000

50,000

50,000

ACT DET

20,000

20,000

20,000

10,000

City of Sydney Effective Total Support

1,190,143 581,084

430,000

116,664

10,000 99,598

2,417,489 2,412,005

As disclosed in Note 2 to Financial Statements Note 1 - 2010 Touring grant of $151,593 under expended by $22,765 . Note 2 - 2010 Touring grant of $450,000 under expended by $37,744 Note 3 - $25,000 unexpended at 31/12/2010. Projected to be completed during 2011

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 61


Summary Financial Indicators & KPIs.

2010 2010 2009 2009 $000’s % $000’s %

Assets Net assets

3,131 62.2% 2,350 54.5%

Total assets

5,030 100.0%

Net assets /Total Expense (KPI)

4,312 100.0%

32.7%

25.9%

Income Performance

4,765

46.0%

3,855

42.4%

Private sector

2,919

28.2%

2,554

28.1%

263

2.5%

263

2.9%

6,672

73.4%

36.7%

38.3%

Other

Sub-total: Earned Income

7,947

Private Sector/Earned Income (KPI)

76.7%

Government support: Core

1,190 11.5% 1,165 12.8%

Touring

581 5.6% 627 6.9%

Education

430 4.1% 458 5.0%

Other

216 2.1% 162 1.9%

Sub-total government

2,417 23.3% 2,412 26.6%

Total Income

10,364 100.0%

9,084 100.0%

Surplus Earned income Expense

7,947

6,672

(9,566) (9,057)

Earned loss (1,619) (2,385) Government support

2,417

2,412

Net surplus 798 27

62 annual REPORT 2010


ANNUAL REPORT 2010 63


Business Plan Summary & KPIs.

Bus. Plan Ref.

Key Strategy

Primary Key Action

KPI

KS #1.

Ensure BSC is the pre-eminent producer and presenter of Shakespeare and related theatre in Australia

Initiate Develop or Produce 5 new works each year

No. of new works

Ensure BSC is the leading provider of Shakespeare related learning activities in Australia

Expansion of Actors At Work and Masterclass programmes to increase the geographical reach of learning activities

%age of total schools reached nationally

Ensure BSC has the organisational capacity and resources to achieve key strategies in terms of delivery of theatre and learning programmes

Restructure National touring model in order to enable BSC to achieve status as an “employer of choice� for artists and arts practitioners within the industry

Timelines/progress as set out for each year

Increase awareness, appeal and support for BSC to drive revenue

Increase BSC total audience numbers by leveraging off CRM System, Market Research, rebrand and website

Total audience numbers.

Maintain positive and mutually beneficial relationships with all BSC stakeholders with focus on Govt & Corporate sectors

Maintain Private Sector Income (Corporate and Private support) levels in line with other Earned Income

Ratio of Private Sector Income to Earned Income

Secure replacement funding for Education programme expansion project from 2011

Funding secured

Increase ratio of Accumulated Reserves/Annual Expenditure

Deliver budget operating surplus in each year under consideration

Ratio of Net Assets to Annual Expenditure >20%

Identify & manage exposure to risk:

Manage risk of not achieving main stage Box Office targets

% Box Office budget achieved

Delivery of Theatre Programme

KS #2. Delivery of Learning Activities

KS #3. Building Capability and Capacity (Resourcing)

KS #4. Strengthen the Brand and Build the Market

KS #5. Stakeholder relationships

KS #6. Financial sustainability & Risk management

64 annual REPORT 2010

(I/D/P)

(Refer to website for details of all current works in development)


Actual for 2009

Target for 2010

Actual for 2010

Target for 2011 As per 2011-13 Business Plan

9 The Wreath (D), Forever 7 (D) 2 x New written works (I) 5 x Other works (I)

7 2 x New written works (D) 5 x Other works (D)

6 Thin Ice (D) King John wshp (D) 2x written works (D) 2x written works (I)

5

24% - was significantly impacted by Swine ‘flu & floods

30%

27% - target modified due to increased focus on regional and remote access

30%

Board and Management engagement to develop alternative models and develop internal metrics

Optimum model selected and approved by Board and Artistic & Company management and incorporated into 2011 schedule

Develop alternative models and develop internal metrics

Optimum model selected and approved by Board and Artistic & Company management and incorporated into 2012 schedule

160,571

210,000

185,160 Target proved unrealistic due to economic factors and increased focus on regional and remote access

190,000

38.3%

40%

36.7%

38%

N/a

N/a

$320,000 secured for 2011

$350,000 (not yet secured for 2012)

25.9%

28.9%

32.7%

36%

95%

100%

111%

100%

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 65


66 annual REPORT 2010


Level 1, 33 Playfair Street The Rocks NSW 2000 Australia PO Box 10 Millers Point NSW 2000 Australia Telephone: +61 2 8298 9000 Facsimile: +61 2 9241 4643 Mail@bellshakespeare.com.au bellshakespeare.com.au

Bell Shakespeare Annual Report 2010  

Bell Shakespeare's twentieth year was marked by celebration, achievement and change.