Beagle Weekender Vol 237 December 10th 2021

Page 1

Vol 16 September 15th 2017

28 December 7th, 10th 2017 2021 Vol 237 December Vol 48 April 27th 2018

Your FREE online Eurobodalla weekend magazine.

Image by Brian Kinsela Your Beagle Weekly Index Arts ……………………. 31 to 34 Cinema ……………….. 22 Community ………………3 to 18 Reading ……………………..23 to 30 Food………………………… 14 Sport and Fishing ………. 35 to 39 Editorial …………………..2 What’s On …………….... 19 to 21

FIND ALL YOUR DAILY NEWS @ www.beagleweekly.com.au

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

1


editorial Welcome to this week’s editorial, When I was in my early teens I met a millionaire. He was a family acquaintance, newly arrived from Australia and now living in Port Moresby. Being a millionaire he built a millionaires house on Airvos Avenue overlooking the harbour. Being a millionaires house it could be seen by everyone in the town and presented an example of the sort of house you could aspire to if you were a millionaire who wanted millionaire views. Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

A visit to this house was an eye opener. It had views. Big views. It had a pool. A big pool. And it had a TV. The only TV in the town that picked up a Cairns TV sta=on via its millionaire antenna. As a kid I was impressed. I was also amused that the big house with all its rooms, its billiards room and its poolside bar were all for just one person. The millionaire. He appeared to have everything he wanted but there was no family and no love in the house. Just stuff. Lots and lots of very expensive stuff. The millionaire stayed around for a few years, made some good investments, found himself a wife and then leB. Being a millionaire in a millionaire’s house there were no buyers for his grand design so it was leB to slowly be consumed by the mould of the tropics. In =me it was demolished with only the memory, of those who recall, the first millionaire. When I leB PNG to come to Australia I announced I was going to make my fortune. And maybe I might become a millionaire. Everyone laughed. It was un=l many years later, siFng on my bed in a cramped hotel room in Saigon that I celebrated becoming a mul= millionaire. Around $200 US in Vietnamese Dong covered the bed in wads of various denomina=ons. “If only they could see me now”. But the reality was that I was not a millionaire. I was a typical Australian leading a typical life earning a typical wage and the idea of being a millionaire was s=ll well out of reach. But something has changed. Either we have all become rich overnight or the value of a million dollars has plunged drama=cally. We are now told that when we re=re we should have $1 million to cover our overheads as we grow old gracefully. That money should avail a moderate life in a moderate home un=l one needs to relocate to a moderate nursing home. If you have that along with moderate assets you might supplement it with a moderate pension that might moderately increase with CPI (or not). The next evidence of the devalua=on of the =tle “Millionaire” is the realisa=on that a crappy liMle fibro bungalow two streets back from the beach with the possibility of a view from the top floor (if one was added) is now worth more than $1 million dollars. Up un=l a year or so ago the same house would have been around $500,000 to $600,000 and would have been within reach of a young family buying their first home. It has arrived at a point where anyone with their own home on the South Coast could call nearly themselves a “millionaire”. But what of those who don’t yet own their own home. Council has just sold land in Dalmeny to a developer jus=fying the sale by saying that it is their role to make available land to meet demand. There is a property boom across the shire with more and more subdivisions opening up at Coila, Broulee, Rosedale, Malua Bay and north in Long Beach and Nelligen. More land for more houses for more people. By rights the cost of houses should plateau with an increase in supply, but most likely they won’t. SiFng side by side with these million dollar houses is the fact that we have the highest youth unemployment ever experienced, a massive problem with underemployment and liMle sign of any wage growth in the near future. Our newly elected councillors all included the catchphrase of a need for more affordable housing. The only way houses will be more affordable to rent, or buy, will be if we have wages that can meet the ever increasing mortgages. I remember my Aunt telling me that behind the doors of Millionaire’s Row in Maroubra in the 1970’s were families who could only afford Weetbix and sausages. Forty years on and it seems liMle has changed—we all now live in millionaire’s houses with sausage incomes. And did I become a millionaire with a million dollars laid out on my bed? No, unless I sell my house and move to the Back of Bourke. Meanwhile, think of those of in our own community who have found themselves homeless being offered tents to live in (if they can find somewhere to legally set up camp). And those in donated caravans now being moved on from holiday camping sites. I once heard this was a lucky country where an average person, working hard, could afford an average house in an average street and live a good life with an average wage. Now it seems we all need to be a millionaire, at the least, to get by. Un=l next—lei beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

2


community

George Bass Drive reopening nears Vol 16 September 15that2017 George Bass Drive Grandfathers Gully, 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 Lilli Pilli, is scheduled to reopen to traffic by Thursday 23 December.

Eurobodalla Council’s infrastructure services director Warren Sharpe OAM said the major project was moving rapidly toward comple=on, with sealing of the first two sec=ons completed this week. “The ongoing wet weather con=nues to be problema=c for road construc=on,” Mr Sharpe said. “Following the further heavy rain expected this week, we will prepare the central sec=on of the project and the Denise Drive intersec=on for sealing and line-marking, which we hope to be complete before the opening date.” Mr Sharpe said the finishing touches would be completed in the new year when the road is open to traffic. He thanked residents impacted by the closure for their pa=ence, including those on the temporary bypass road. “Once complete this major route upgrade will provide improved safety, resilience and capacity to service the northern growth corridor in Eurobodalla,” Mr Sharpe said. “While the road has been closed, we have also reused excess material from the central cut to widen the fill embankments along George Bass Drive near Carramar Drive and Lilli Pilli Road to make that sec=on of the road safer too.” More on Eurobodalla Council’s current works is at www.esc.nsw.gov.au/currentworks Images: A major project to realign a sec on of George Bass Drive at Lilli Pilli is nearing comple on, with sealing of the first two sec ons completed this week.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

3


community

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Photo supplied

Bunnings Group Limited, 34/32 Princess Hwy, Batemans Bay is hos=ng a Christmas Community Market on Wednesday 15th December 2021from 6 pm to 7.30pm +, indoors in the Trade Centre of the Bunnings Store. Join in the fes=vi=es whilst suppor=ng some of your favourite Community Not for Profit Groups… Moruya An=que Tractor & Machinery Associa=on (MATAMA), the RSPCA, Batemans Bay Lions Club & CWA, Marine Rescue, Hope House, Australian Army Cadets, Muddy Puddles, Banksia Village, the Lapidary Club, the RFS, Headspace plus more. You will find Special giBs to purchase for Christmas, Games for the Kids, Santa, Live entertainment, a sausage sizzle & each stall has its individual Raffle with great prizes generously donated by Bunnings. Everyone is welcome to come along & enjoy this ac=vity & swing into the Christmas Spirit. Their Community Market event on the 9th of December was a wonderful experience, so don’t miss this one! Support your local Community& thank you to Bunnings for their support of our local Community!

Photo supplied

Vo ng con nues on Monday to determine who will be mayor SOURCE: h(ps://vtr.elec+ons.nsw.gov.au/LG2101/eurobodalla/results beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

4


community ROAD CLOSURES Update Friday 10 December 7pm Emergency services predict we should see flood waters start to recede now the rivers have peaked, =des are going and rain eased. Vol 16 out September 15thhas 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 who’ve been out in these terrible condi=ons since early this morning keeping us Vol 48 Shoutout to27th the2018 workers safe. Legends. Next week they’ll back it up, assessing damage and star=ng repairs. We’ve already applied for NSW Government natural disaster relief - our ninth in two years. NEW Eurobodalla Road at Cemetery Bridge Silo Farm bridge, west of Bodalla Eurobodalla Road, west of Bodalla, closed at the turf farm North Head Drive, Moruya (closed, will be assessed first thing Photo supplied Saturday, detour highway and Broulee Road) Church Street, Mogo Clouts Road, Mogendoura Old Nelligen Rd, 3.5 km from Kings Highway River Road causeway, Nelligen Kiora Bridge, Moruya Wamban Bridge, Moruya Sunnyside Road causeway, Mystery Bay Tyrone Bridge, Eurobodalla Road Mt Wandera Road, landslip (new sec=on of Araluen Road now open at Knowles Creek for residents only.) Eurobodalla’s sportgrounds and ovals closed Narooma Library closed Friday arvo Moruya Pool closed - check Moruya War Memorial Swimming Pool for reopening details NEW OPEN Veitch Street, Mogo (single lane access) NEW OPEN Araluen Road at Knowles Creek, for residents only. This is the newly built sec=on opened a week ahead of schedule - more work to do before open to all traffic OPEN Potato Point Road east of industrial area OPEN Kings Highway OPEN Princes Hwy, Mogo OPEN McGregors Bridge, Araluen Road Please take extra care if you must drive. Lights on, slow down, extra distance from the car in front. Don’t cross barriers they’re in place for a reason! Follow Live Traffic NSW for updates.

Photo supplied

Our hearts go out to the Mogo community. Many businesses have been flooded. Thankfully everyone is safe. Our recovery support staff have been in the village to assist, visi=ng shop owners and residents to make sure they have what they need for now. Other recovery services will arrive once the emergency is over. Emergency services confirm livestock losses, although the extent is unknown. South East Local Land Services staff are following up.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

5


community

Moruya Rotary Scholarship recipients announced Congratula=ons to Amanda Emery and Thomas Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Derwent on27th being Rotary Scholarship 28 April December 7th,Moruya 2017 Vol 48 2018 recipients. Both will receive $4,000 each over the next two years which will assist with their expenses at ANU. Amanda will be studying Bachelor of Commerce and Thomas Bachelor of Interna=onal Rela=ons. Pictured with the recipients are President Chris Manahan and Youth Director Phil Smith.

Photo supplied

Move With Women exercise coming to the Bay Diabetes NSW & ACT are very excited to announce the launch of Move with Women, a FREE group exercise program for women (18+) of all fitness levels and backgrounds. Beginning on Friday 11th February 2022 at 8:00 am at Eurobodalla Exercise Physiology 38 Cranbrook Road, Batemans Bay The program involves a one-hour group exercise session every week for nine weeks, with an addi=onal 30 minute health educa=on session every fortnight. This fun, social and mo=va=ng program incorporates many of the factors that contribute to women’s health – exercise sessions, =ps to ea=ng healthy, techniques to relieve stress and anxiety, and an opportunity to connect with other women. The program is delivered in a safe, non-judgemental and comfortable seFng, by qualified Exercise Physiologists who have experience working with groups of women in all different stages of life. Par=cipants that register for Move with Women receive: · 1:1 consulta=on and goal seFng with an Exercise Physiologist · Nine one-hour group exercise classes suitable to their fitness level · Move with Women Par=cipant Booklet which includes fun ac=vi=es and health informa=on for women · Resistance band to use during the program and on the exercise journey aBerwards · Final assessment, wrap up and plans for the future catch up with an Exercise Physiologist · The opportunity to meet new people, create friendships and connect with other women This ini=a=ve is aimed at all women in the community – unlike many of their other programs, you do not need to be diagnosed with diabetes to join. Registering for the program is easy, you can visit movewithwomen.com.au/classes or call 1800 328 951.

Photo supplied

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

6


community

Narooma Rotary launches Prostate Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27thSupport 2018 Cancer Group A new Prostate Cancer Support Group for the far south coast was launched by Member for Eden-Monaro Kristy McBain last Tuesday (7 December) in front of a gathering of 20 men and women.

Above: Narooma Prostate Cancer Support Group was recently by Member for Eden-Monaro Kristy McBain. Rotary President Andrew Lawson, left, Kristy McBain, Muller-Grotjan of Braveheart Healthcare, and Narooma Julie Hartley and Mike Young.

Ms McBain saluted Narooma Rotary’s ini=a=ve in star=ng the group, acknowledging the high number of prostate cancer sufferers in the region due to its age demographic.

launched Narooma Dr Gundi Rotarians

“Every family has someone who has experienced cancer in some form, including my own, and I fully appreciate the importance of the support this group will offer individuals and their families impacted by prostate cancer,” she said. Narooma Rotary President Andrew Lawson was delighted with the response of those present, the interac=ons and the feedback they gave. “It really exceeded my expecta=ons. Many said they were so grateful such a group had formed and they will be encouraging others they know to come along,” he said. It is a Narooma Rotary ini=a=ve to support people from Batemans Bay to Eden and is affiliated with the Prostate Cancer Founda=on of Australia. The Group will meet on the first Tuesday each month 6.30-8.30pm at Narooma Men’s Shed (41A Barker Parade, Narooma). The next mee=ng is Tuesday 4 January at 6.30pm. Braveheart Healthcare (Lighthouse Surgery and Bermagui Medical Centre) has aligned with the new Support Group. “Generally aBer diagnosis and ini=al treatment there has been liMle follow up and support for pa=ents, their partners and families,” said Braveheart’s Dr Gundi Muller-Grotjan. “This group will go a long way to assist.”

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

7


community

26th St Cecilia Youth Scholarships ABer not being held last year because of covid, the 26th St Cecilia Youth Scholarships Annual Finalists' Concert was held last Sunday/Sunday 5 December in the beau=ful Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Church at Batehaven. From 34 entries in the audi=ons, twelve surrounds of St 2018 Bernards Vol 48 27th finalists were selected by the adjudicator for the awards and they performed to great acclaim in front of a very apprecia=ve audience of well over one hundred and fiBy. "The standard of music performed at the concert by the young musicians was certainly as high as ever", said the commiMee president, Mr Chris Heazlewood. "And we are very apprecia=ve of the generous dona=ons by Moruya CWA, Batemans Bay Rotary, Eurobodalla Shire Council, South Coast Music Society, PerFex and generous individual donors which allows such a worthwhile organisa=on to help such wonderful young musicians", said Chris. ST CECILIA YOUTH SCHOLARSHIPS 2021 AWARDS Senior Classical Chantelle BenneM (Violin) Tathra $1000 Damia O'Loughlin (Clarinet) Broulee $750 Kalani Scognamiglio (Recorder) Catalina $400 Senior Contemporary Sam Peate (Guitar/vocal) Tuross $1000 Joshua VanzeF (Piano) Longbeach $750 Darcy Coppin (Vocal) Moruya $400 Junior Classical Amelie Ziino (Violin) Merimbula $500 Alyssa Gould (Violin) Bega $300 O'Shea Clohesy (Piano) Broulee $200 Junior Contemporary Amelie Ziino (Violin) Merimbula $500 Maxine Wilson (Piano) Surf Beach $300. Kaitlyn Lenihan (Vocal) (Kianga) $200

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

8


Community

School’s out – +me to party Under 18s can let their hair down at two free events on Friday 17 December at Batehaven and Narooma. Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017Council’s youth services on the Vol 48 27th 2018 Hosted by Eurobodalla official last day of the school term, the two School’s Out Youth Par=es will be held at Corrigans Beach Reserve and the Narooma Youth Café, from 3.30pm to 8pm. Council’s youth development officer Sophie Scobie said 2021 had been a wild ride for Eurobodalla’s younger folk, and it was =me to let loose. “This year has been so hec=c with lockdowns preven=ng many celebra=ons from going ahead, so we want to get everyone together to relax, have a good =me and say so long to 2021,” she said. “We’ll party on the beach at Batehaven, with some cool ac=vi=es like cricket and hula hoops, as well as DJ, food trucks on site, and there’ll be prizes to be won. Plus, the first 50 people through the gate eat free. “At Narooma we’ll fill the youth café with good vibes and pumping tunes from a DJ. There’ll be free food, prizes, we’ll have dance and chill zones, as well as pool, basketball, Xbox and more.” Both events are drug and alcohol free for people aged 12-18. To aMend just rock up on the day, or for more informa=on phone Council’s youth development officer Sophie Scobie on 4474 1302. You can also follow @Eurobodalla_Youth on Instagram.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

9


community

Landcare and OceanWatch recovery plan for bushfire-damaged mangroves Two years aBer the catastrophic 2019/2020 Black Summer bushfires, an environmental group is working with Vol 16 September to 15th 2017 and regenerate mangrove forests which were severely impacted along the NSW the community monitor 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 South Coast. This environmental challenge was something the OceanWatch team hadn’t seen before as mangroves don’t usually burn. But with those extreme fires, they did. OceanWatch and a team of ci=zen scien=sts are now monitoring the mangroves to start the process of nursing them back to health, with the help of a $63,000 grant from the Landcare Led Bushfire Recovery Grants Program. Mangroves serve as a habitat for thousands of species of marine and land creatures, and are essen=al for a balanced aqua=c ecosystem. During the bushfires, sec=ons of mangrove forest around Batemans Bay, a coastal town 285 km from Sydney, were effec=vely cooked by the heat of the intense fires, killing off trees and destroying habitat. Where healthy mangroves had once thrived, all that remained were skeleton trees that caused bait fish to move offshore, and sediment leading to poor water quality for local oysters. Seeing the damage first hand, oyster grower Kevin McAsh invited OceanWatch to view the burned landscape for themselves, and put together a plan to regenerate the mangroves. Dr Claudia Santori, OceanWatch spa=al project officer, visited the area early in 2021 to inspect the trees damaged by the bushfires along the Clyde River and at Mogendoura Creek. “Even a year aBer bushfires had torn through the landscape, sec=ons were not regenera=ng naturally. This is because of the =dal nature of mangroves, and though the trees produce many seeds, they don’t always land somewhere they can fix onto, or the seeds aren’t viable,” she said. “The first part of our program was to observe the impacted sites to understand how mangroves regenerate. Part of this observa=on is the training of on-ground ci=zen scien=sts who can monitor progress. This data will be used to shape an ac=on plan catered for each sec=on of the mangroves. We need to show the extent of the damage and the limited ability of the mangroves to regenerate on their own, so we can get the permits we need to revive the mangroves as they are on public land,” she added. Once permits and data are in hand, Dr Santori said there are several ways the group can aid the mangroves. “Some ac=ons are passive, like signage and talking to landowners to keep them off the mangroves as they regenerate, while others are more ac=ve, requiring hand plan=ng of seedlings or even dropping them from a modified drone,” she said. An issue was the difficulty in managing regenera=on when mangroves varied and don’t respond to the same techniques. “The challenge with mangroves is there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Some mangroves are muddy; others sandy, so the data we collect will guide us for the best approach for the sec=on being regenerated,” Dr Santori said. OceanWatch expects to complete their observa=on work by the end of the year, with regenera=on work to be completed by April 2022. The hope is by training locals in mangrove monitoring they can con=nue to care for the mangroves for years to come. The $14 million Landcare Led Bushfire Recovery Grants Program is suppor=ng projects in regions impacted by the Black Summer bushfires of 2019-20, and has been funded by the Australian Government’s Bushfire Recovery Program for Wildlife and their Habitat. beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

10


community

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

11


community

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

12


community

EcoCrews launches into Eurobodalla, to16 grow Vol September careers 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 and strengthen local community EcoCrews alongside key project host and partner, Eurobodalla Shire Council hosted their official launch event on 8 December 2021 at the Eurobodalla Regional Botanic Gardens A social enterprise of Campbell Page, funded by the NSW Bushfire Local Economic Recovery (BLER) fund, EcoCrews is an exci=ng new ini=a=ve that will provide paid jobs with accredited training in the environment sector, for locals living in the Eurobodalla.

Above: some of the members of the first round of EcoCrew with Campbell Page CEO, Natalie Turmine and Federal member for Gilmore, Fiona Phillips.

Run as 6-monthly projects, crew members will get paid while working on a range of projects learning valuable environmental skills in land management and conserva=on. The Eurobodalla Shire Council project will include seed collec=on and plan=ng na=ve seedlings, repairing public spaces, clearing damaged landscapes, erosion control and preven=on. Campbell Page CEO, Natalie Turmine, said she was excited for the launch and the opportuni=es EcoCrews brings saying “This partnership is crea=ng real prospects and sustainable jobs for locals. They’re geFng fantas=c hands-on experience and skills working on these council projects while geFng paid”. Eurobodalla Council’s coordinator of sustainability Heidi Thomson said the team could look forward to an exci=ng work schedule. “They’ll get plenty of learning opportuni=es gaining valuable skills not found in textbooks or lecture halls, with great conserva=on outcomes for the shire,” Ms Thomson said “Interes=ngly, several of Council’s natural resources staff started out in programs just like this many moons ago.” " EcoCrews is funded via federal and state funding under the Bushfire Local Economic Recovery Fund, managed through Campbell Page and community partners Eurobodalla Shire Council, The SAGE Project Stepping Stone Farm and more. Well done to all involved. I can’t wait to hear your experiences and journey." AMending the launch the Federal member for Gilmore, Fiona Phillips said "I am absolutely thrilled to see the launch of EcoCrews Eurobodalla, which trains young people as part of bushfire recovery. It was terrific talking with the first EcoCrew members finding out their background and how they are excited to be learning new skills." To find out more about EcoCrews, or to get involved, visit www.ecocrews.org.au or call the team on 1300 291 003. beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

13


Community

Narooma Rocks Van makes a star Vol 16 September 15th 2017 appearance at 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 Sydney Markets The liMle South Coast oyster van with a big story to tell received a boost this week with the launch of a smart, black Toyota Hilux at Sydney Fish Markets. The van, and now a vehicle to tow it, are an ini=a=ve of Narooma Rocks, the not-forprofit company that delivers the Narooma Oyster Fes=val on the shores of Wagonga Inlet each year in May. Narooma Rocks will now be able to ac=vate their plans to deliver the unique flavors of south coast rock oysters to food and wine events around Australia, raising the profile of Narooma and Eurobodalla as a year round des=na=on. It has all been made possible with thanks to a $60,000 grant from Business Council Australia's bushfire recovery charity BizRebuild, and follows their $55,000 grant earlier this year which funded the purchase and fit out of the van. BizRebuild chair Sir Peter Cosgrove and Business Council chief execu=ve Jennifer WestacoM were on hand to celebrate the occasion. "Australians have faced a challenging 18 months with fires, floods and travel restric=ons - but we must try to avoid disaster fa=gue and remember many businesses s=ll need our support," Sir Peter said. "We're hearing incredible stories of resilience from communi=es all across the country and Narooma Rocks are one of the many businesses who have sought assistance through BizRebuild,' Sir Peter said. "When disaster strikes - local businesses owners simply want to get back on their feet as quickly as possible to recover and that's why our direct and immediate assistance is so cri=cal in suppor=ng local communi=es to rebuild aBer floods and fires." Ms WestacoM said: "Businesses are the glue that keeps communi=es together, so suppor=ng them through tough =mes is cri=cal. "BizRebuild will con=nue to work across the country to ensure disaster struck small businesses and communi=es can bounce back even stronger," Ms WestacoM said. The launch was the maiden voyage for the Narooma Rocks entourage, who were thrilled to receive waves and smiles as they drove along George Street in Sydney's CBD on Wednesday aBernoon. "We felt a liMle bit like rock stars, if you'll pardon the pun," said Cath Peachey, chair of Narooma Rocks. "I can't overstate the importance of this support and investment from BizRebuild," she said. "Recovery is a slow process but BizRebuild was there immediately to provide prac=cal and on the ground assistance to small, local businesses who were suffering." beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

14


Community Projects include a pop-up mall at Mogo which allowed businesses to support their community and generate an income aBer the main street was devastated by fires, along with grants across the region for infrastructure and assets and personnel to assist with planning and delivery of projects. Vol Narooma 16 September 15th 2017 For Rocks, the funding has already created one job and Mrs Peachey said more jobs will come as 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 food and wine events quickly return to calendars.

"It gave our community and businesses =me to catch our breaths, confidence in our future and comfort that organisa=ons like the BCA were there to help." "It was a dreadful, dreadful =me and the effects on our community, country and wildlife will be felt for a very long =me," Mrs Peachey said. "Now we are well on our way to recovery and ready to celebrate the remarkable resilience and charm of Rock Oyster Country and its people." Rock oysters are indigenous to New South Wales, with each estuary, season and even each farmer imbuing a unique blend of flavors found nowhere else in Australia or indeed the world. The Narooma Oyster Fes=val will be held on the water in the heart of Rock Oyster Country on May 6 & 7, 2022. For more informa=on go to www.naroomarocks.com or www.naroomaoysterfes=val.com

Above: The van, and now a vehicle to tow it, are an ini a ve of Narooma Rocks, the not-for-profit company that delivers the Narooma Oyster Fes val on the shores of Wagonga Inlet each year in May beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

15


classifieds

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

16


real estate

OUT NOW—your latest Beagle Abode : Eurobodalla’s Vol 16 September 15th 2017 leading real 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 estate guide The beagle abode is an online weekly Eurobodalla real estate guide showcasing the current Eurobodalla market and our many realtors. The beagle abode is the new addi=on to the South Coast Beagle that owns The Beagle and the South Coast Travel Guide: The Nature Coast of NSW : from Durras to The Tilbas The Beagle Abode has been established to provide that service while also providing our readers with a glossy overview of latest proper=es on the market each week. You can find Beagle Abode on the Beagle website under REAL ESTATE The latest Beagle Abode lis=ngs are also available each week as a FlipBook on the website and also distributed to readers via our social media pages and our twice weekly mailouts. CLICK HERE: hMps://www.beagleweekly.com.au/real-estate

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

17


real estate South Coast Property Specialists (Carlene Franzen) Tips #1074:

Not Everyone Agrees with the Banks Last week we reported how the major banks are predicting a likely Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, prices 2017 in 2023. Just as a quick recap, the ANZ Vol 48 2018 reduction in27th house predicted 4% reduction, Westpac 5% reduction and CBA 10% reduction (with 12% reductions in Sydney and Hobart). But no sooner had these predictions been made we are now starting to see other analysts differ from these opinions, with one analyst describing the bank’s predictions as “nonsensical”. The reason for the different opinions is based on the questioning of two key assumptions both of which have the ability to change the market quite significantly: 

An increase in interest rates with the Reserve Bank progressively lifting the cash rate to around 1.25% by the second half of 2023.

A lowering of demand (a key component in the “supply and demand” equation)

Dr Andrew Wilson from Bluestone Home Loans questions both of these assumptions stating that the RBA itself had outlined expectations for the cash rate to remain at the current level until 2024, based on the central bank’s wage rise requirements and inflation targeting. Now obviously the RBA can change their mind, but he did go on to say that “For wages growth to meet the RBA requirements for a rate rise by November 2022 – the date predicted by those forecasting record price falls in 2023 – would require an unprecedented surge in incomes over coming months.” (Wouldn’t it be nice to get an “unprecedented surge in comes”?) On the second issue of a lowering of demand, he agrees with the comment we made in last week’s “tips” that opening international borders will lead to high migration levels which is set to “again place upward pressure on home prices in our still undersupplied housing markets”. I guess both these factors (and probably others) will certainly impact the housing market but at this stage it is evident that jury is still out on just how big or small that impact will be. Dr Wilson did note that “since 1987, Australia’s capital city housing market has experienced only three years where home prices have fallen – 2008, 2011 and 2018. And the price declines were clearly modest, falling by just 4.0 per cent, 4.1 per cent and 5.1 per cent, respectively”. So, if the CBA is correct at 10% (12% for Sydney and Hobart), that would certainly be a correction in the order not seen for many, many years. Obviously, time will tell.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

18


What’s on

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Dec 10th - Richard Lawson – Tomakin Club (7.30pm) Dec 10th - Intensity Duo – Batemans Bay Soldiers Club Dec 11th - Intensity Duo – Batemans Bay Soldiers Club Dec 11th - Joe Driscoll – Tomakin Club (7.30pm) Dec 11th - Waikama – Waterfront Hotel (8pm) Dec 11th - Affinity Quartet - 2:30 pm St Paul’s Anglican Church, Narooma Dec 11th - ScoM Stone at Club Catalina Dec 12th - Rob Simpson – Tomakin Club (1pm) Beer Garden Sunday Sessions Dec 12th - Intensity – Club Narooma (3pm)

Dec 17th - Guy Turk at Tomakin Social Club Dec 17th - Mick McGrath at the Batemans Bay Soldiers Club Dec 17th - Daniel Champagne will be returning to Smokey Dan's Dec 17th - Nine Lessons and Carols service at 7 pm - All Saints' Anglican Church, Bodalla

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

19


What’s on Affinity Quartet - 2:30 pm Saturday Dec 11 St Paul’s Anglican Church, Narooma Music by Schubert & Debussy Tickets $23 from Mitre 10 GiBs, Narooma & Nested on Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Wallaga, Bermagui; $25 at the door 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Kindly supported by Helen Ryan & Elizabeth OliverHawkey Since winning the ANAM Chamber Music Compe==on in their inaugural year, Affinity Quartet has established itself as one of Australia’s leading string quartets. Their interna=onal touring has included cri=cally acclaimed performances in Europe at the Amsterdam String Quartet Biennale, Fes=val Les Voix In=mes Belgium, Fondazione Cini Venice, Mirabell Palace Salzburg; and in the UK at St Mar=n-in-the-Fields, Southbank Centre, City Music Society, and Prussia Cove Interna=onal Musicians Seminar.

Photo supplied

The quartet is known for innova=ve programs traversing the string quartet’s diverse history, including Australian commissions, world premières by Jack Symonds, MaM Laing and Darrin Archer (AU), and Australian premières of the complete string quartets of Leos Janáček and Pavel Haas; Benjamin BriMen and Sir Andrzej Panufnik. Affinity has been a featured ensemble in Melbourne’s underground classical series Play On Music, and ensemble-in-residence at Shepparton Fes=val, Kennedy Nolan Architects, and 75 On Reid. In 2021-22 Affinity Quartet are Melbourne Recital Centre Local Heroes.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

20


What’s on –coming up

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

21


What’s on—cinema

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

22


Reading

Gadfly 208

By Robert Macklin

It was gratifying to read the recent news that support is building for the development of an Indigenous Cultural Precinct in Canberra to fill the obvious Vol 16in September 15th 2017 ‘hole the heart’7th, of the capital’s cultural heritage. It would join the National 28 April December Vol 48 27th 20182017 Gallery, Archives, Library, Museum, AWM, and Old Parliament House’s Museum of Australian Democracy. The support, we’re told, is coming from both sides of the political fence for, ‘The National Resting Place’ of Aboriginal relics returned from British museums and quasi-scientific institutions. Moreover, the new site would incorporate AIATSIS, the marvelous repository of Aboriginal scholarship currently in the National Museum complex. All well and good. The great danger, however, is the temptation to see it as a memorial to the past when it’s real purpose should be the next big step towards the proud incorporation of the 60,000 years of Aboriginal cultural heritage into the unique Australian identity. We’ve had the painful colonial era; followed by the successful multi-cultural era. The great opportunity now is to open our minds to reconciliation, the one concept that will complete our maturing – a spiritual homecoming that honours the values that sustained the country throughout those sixty millennia. And given the ravages of climate change we have visited upon the place in only 240 years since the invasion, it could hardly be more urgent. Here I must declare an interest. I am currently researching and writing the biography of a rare white Australian who gave his life to the Aboriginal cause. His name is Donald Thomson, zoologist, anthropologist, war hero, world renown photographer and journalist. His fellow professors at Melbourne University dubbed him, ‘Australia’s Lawrence of Arabia’. He was born in Melbourne in 1901, the year of Federation, and died in 1970, wracked with frustration from his dealings with the Australian establishment and physically exhausted from expeditions to some of the roughest country of Australia - Cape York, Arnhem Land and the Great Stoney Desert. But his great work with the First Nations revealed the extraordinarily complex and sophisticated culture and linguistic skills of a people that white Australia disparaged and demeaned. Only last month, Justice Debra Mortimer in the Federal Court ruled that 2,188 square kilometres of land on Queensland’s Cape York Peninsula would be handed back to the Aboriginal people. Central to land claim was Donald Thomson’s anthropological work on Cape York in the 1920s and 30s. It is his work, and the support of those who have drawn upon it, that has helped to fuel the great movement of the Uluru Statement of the Heart. Reconciliation can become the great national reform movement of the 21st century. And the indigenous devotion to ‘country’ – in our struggle with bushfires, cyclones, droughts and sea-rise - give it the kind of relevance that cannot be denied, even by politicians who ‘don’t hole the hose’. Already the Aboriginal story is part of the nightly news and commentary in programs like The Drum; music from Paul Kelly, Archie Roach and many more; TV drama like the stunning Total Control. The universities are producing a cohort of young Aboriginal women and men in the professions and in the articulation of their cause. The momentum seems unstoppable. So while the Aboriginal precinct might get it’s funding as a ‘National Resting Place’ I suspect there will be no rest among those who want our nation to embrace its past, and celebrate a genuine Australian identity as we set forth on the next 60,000 years of our story. www.robertmacklin.com beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

23


Reading

Why bother vo+ng and having a Council? Following the debacle around the old Coopers Island Road caMle grid and a cow allegedly jumping over it the Council agreed to allow the farmer to instead erect a Public Gate. The old caMle grid has now been removed, the Public Gate made official and the public duly no=fied that it is an offence to leave the gate open. Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

But somewhere along the way an odd thing happened. The Councillors were convinced that the old grid, that had been in place for over forty years without a single instance of a cow wandering onto the highway, was no longer able to contain a leaping cow. They were encouraged to believe that the only way to stop a wayward beast was to erect a gate across the Public Road, to formally endorse the gate and make it a punishable crime to leave the gate open. Along the way to this end-game it was iden=fied that Council actually didn't have a CaMle Grid Policy and, as such, were not in a posi=on to determine if any of the exis=ng grids on public roads across the shire met any standard. It was agreed that such a policy would be draBed. You might then expect that, given the direc=on to draB such a policy, as requested by Council, to then be placed on public exhibi=on before being adopted, that Council staff would hold back any applica=on for a new caMle grid un=l they had a policy in place. But not Eurobodalla Council. A caMle grid of unknown specifica=ons has been allowed to be installed on Coopers Island Above: Council staff indicate that if "issues arise with the grid which has Road in conjunc=on with the now been installed on Coopers Island Road then those issues will be dealt newly legalised Public Gate. It with in accord with the adopted Policy. One wonders at whose expense? appears that the farmer didn't trust the public closing the gate and has decided the best way to ensure his caMle don't go onto the highway is to install ... a caMle grid. Fortunately, while the Council was in caretaker mode as the elec=on was underway, the staff took it upon themselves to grant permission for the new caMle grid to be installed on the public road. Having no policy or standard the grid had no guidelines to comply with. When asked how such a decision could be made the staff responded, in wri=ng, "The Grids and Gates Policy is being developed by Council. This Policy will be submiMed to the new Council when it is formed in the new year, for review and endorsement. If issues arise with the grid which has now been installed on Coopers Island Road then those issues will be dealt with in accord with the adopted Policy." The ques+ons to be asked by new councillors will be 1. "Does the new caMle grid meet the standards that Council will adopt". 2. "Do these standards ensure that a caMle grid will prevent any escape of a cow and therefore remove any risk of liability from Council?" 3. "If the standards indicate there is no risk, especially if the farmer complies with the requirement that caMle shall be supervised at all =me whilst traversing the public road to go between paddocks, why is there a need to retain a Public Gate?" 4. "Is it standard prac=ce for staff to provide permission for the installa=on of gates and grids on Public Roads without the authority of the Councillors who are the ones vested with the Authority to issue such permissions under the Roads Act?"

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

24


Moruya Books—Monique’s pick

Fromage Written by Sally Scott

Journalist Alex Grant is enjoying the last days of her summer holiday in Croa=a when she is accosted by an old school friend, Marie Puharich, and her odious brother, Brian, both there to aMend the funeral of their fearsome grandfather’s two loyal retainers.

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

The only upside of the whole sorry business is mee=ng Marco, the family’s resident Adonis. An incorrigible foodie, Alex is unable to resist Brian’s invita=on to visit the family creamery in Australia’s south-west to snoop around for stories and eat her body weight in brie. But trouble has a way of finding Alex, not least because her curiosity is the size of a giant goudawheel. What begins as a country jaunt in search of a juicy story will end in death, disaster and the destruc=on of mul=ple pairs of shoes. The Incredible Life of Hubert Wilkins: Australia's greatest explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins is one of the most remarkable Australians who ever lived. The son of pioneer pastoralists in South Australia, Hubert studied engineering before moving on to photography, then sailing for England and a job producing films with the Gaumont Film Co. Brave and bold, he became a polar expedi=oner, a brilliant war photographer, a spy in the Soviet Union, a pioneering aviator-navigator, a death-defying submariner all while being an explorer and chronicler of the planet and its life forms that would do Vasco da Gama and Sir David AMenborough proud. As a WW1 photographer he was twice awarded the Military Cross for bravery under fire, the only Australian photographer in any war to be decorated.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

25


Reading—A beer with Baz “Shhhh…. Mick…your schooner is there. I want to listen to Beryl’s speech farewelling old Bob. She told me to listen for the good dig at him at the end.” Mick himself at the bar table, took a sip and scanned Vol 16seated September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 the gathering. “That miserable old bastard. Crikey Bazza, they had to dig deep if Beryl is farewelling him. She’s the union delegate and hates his guts. I doubt if anyone is going to miss him.” As always, Bob stood perfectly upright, his =ghtly knoMed =e noosed his throat and his =ght lips buMonholed a face chiselled from Moruya granite. Beryl tapped the microphone a couple of =mes for silence. “As you know we are all gathered to wish our boss a happy re rement. Well, I’m not going to wish him a happy re rement.” Beryl paused and Mick screwed his eyes and put his hand over his mouth. “No… I’m not going to wish him a happy re rement because I know he will have a happy re rement.” Mick let out a breath of relief. “I know Bob will have a happier re rement than me because he has saved for this moment.” Mick leaned into Bazza. “I reckon he will too, Bazza. He’s a bloody =ght arse as well as the crankiest bloke I know. The young ones call him LOL Bob.” “In fact, I would say Bob will have a happier re rement than anyone in this room.” There were odd nods of agreement amongst the gathered throng and the granite head =lted slightly. “She’s got that right, Bazza. He wouldn’t give you the dribbles off his nose, even if he had a cold.” “Now Bob, your serious approach to life is…. ahhhhh…admired by all, and I might even say exemplary. We remember the me you mistakenly brought your five year old’s lunch to work and we thought it was hilarious. You sat there in your suit and e and ate the fairy bread, the Freddo frogs and the Musk S cks. You even sipped the raspberry cordial from the Spider-Man drink bo,le. All without a smile.” There was a slight chuckle amongst the audience and Bob almost unknoMed an eyebrow. Beryl con=nued on with a few more anecdotes that were funny to the audience but Bob remained unmoved, like a Sydney Harbour Bridge pylon. “I truly believe that it is this discipline that has ensured you will have a happy re rement, Bob. In fact, many of you probably don’t know that Bob will have a happier re rement than the richest person in the whole of the Eurobodalla Shire.” Con nues…. beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

26


Reading—A beer with Baz “Geez, Bazza. I knew he had a quid, but even I’m a bit surprised.” “In fact, I would safely say that Bob will have a happier re rement than James Packer, Twiggy Forrest or even Gina Rhinehart.” Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Vol 28 December 7th, 2017

Vol 48 were April 27th 2018 of coughs and even the granite face allowed an eyebrow to move. There a couple

“She’s gone a bit far now, Bazza. Beryl must be aBer a promo=on.” “So Bob, where all of us humble souls have been saving our superannuation and the rich amongst our population building casinos or digging stuff out of the ground for a happy retirement, you have been focused on saving up your smiles. I don’t think you have spent one since working with us. We can only assume you are now going to spend them. It should well and truly guarantee a happy retirement.” Have a beer with Baz at john.longhurst59@gmail.com

Pork-Barrel Us, Please The State Government’s support for the arts for 2021-2022 was recently announced. It totalled $9,317,000 with $1,119,000 granted to Aboriginal Arts and Culture (nothing of this to Aboriginal history or heritage), $1,465,00 to Theatre, $1,014,000 to the Visual Arts, $1,098,000 to Contemporary Music. Museums and History were thrown a few crumbs - just $258,000 (or 2.7% of all funding). And $135,000 of this was awarded to the running of the History Council of NSW, which seemingly has done liMle to directly benefit the NSW South Coast. So, very liMle was available for grass-roots museums or history. Absolutely none of the money found its way to benefit the South Coast. With a State by-elec=on not far away, it would now be appropriate for local history and local museums to be the recipients of some generous pork-barreling. There are 15 history socie=es/museums between Batemans Bay and Eden, all deserving of support, all with their hands out perpetually looking for support. South Coast History Society can immediately iden=fy several millions of dollars of worthy South Coast history/museums projects that would benefit from some significant pork-barreling. And it can supply hundreds of tes=monials from voters in the area aMes=ng to the value they place on local history and local museums. So, local museums and history socie=es now look forward to announcements that pre-by-elec=on cheques are in the mail. Peter Lacey President, South Coast History Society

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

27


Reading – history

100 Years Ago—10-12-1921 WANTED. – A load of gravel at the entrance gate to Bateman’s Bay Post Office where the boys were sailing their toy boats on Saturday last. What? Vol 16 September 15th 2017

28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 HEAVY VEALER. – Mr. M. Kea=ng had hanging in his shambles this week a six-month old vealer, reared on an up-the-mountain cow, which weighed 270 lbs [122kg]. We saw it weighed.

BIG CABBAGE. – Bateman’s Bay is noted for doing big things, two cabbages, presented to a friend in Moruya by the grower, Mr. D. Forbes Mackay, turning the scales at over 11 lbs [5kg] each. THE PLAGUE. – Sydney has been proclaimed a plague infected area, and all shipping will be under supervision; there will be a medical inspec=on of all travellers, and a strict inspec=on during the transhipping of all cargo. NEGLECT. – The neglect of the Shire Council in not levelling down the unsightly and dangerous rise at the corner of Vulcan and Queen Streets, where the Court House fence was moved back a panel, is a discredit to it. Where is our once progressive local representa=ve? DISAPPOINTMENT. – Our proprietor and “occasional” editor was grievously disappointed on his return from Bateman’s Bay on Saturday night last to find that our town ligh=ng proposal had been turned down. “Old and Truthful” has received hundreds of similar grievous disappointments, so he is hopeful of surviving this one. SHIRE PRESIDENT. – At the mee=ng of the Eurobodalla Shire on Wednesday the elec=on of President for the ensuring 12 months took place. Cr. D. Hutchison, who has been President for four and a half years, declined nomina=on, Cr. T. Flood was nominated and unanimously elected. PROGRESS ASSOCIATION. – General Business… It was decided to ask the Park Trustees to have a gate erected in the Mantle Hill side of Park for the convenience of the public; also decided that the Shire Council be asked to place danger signals along the roads of the Eurobodalla Shire. It was thought perhaps the Automobile Society would supply these signals free of cost if applied for. It was also suggested that the Council be wriMen to sugges=ng that all owners of straying stock found in streets aBer sunset and before sunrise be prosecuted. Duly moved and seconded that the Shire Council be asked to put a strong bell at the Nelligen Ferry on the North Side. It was also decided to ask to have the war trophy (Machine Gun) placed in a posi=on open to the public view and sugges=ng that the gun be placed in front of the Court House within the fence. ADVERTISMENT. – During the Summer Months MY MOTOR LORRY will ply for beach MORUYA HEADS every Sunday and Holiday, Leaving Moruya at 10.30 a.m. J. HANSEN, Proprietor. beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

28


Reading

Punt Road Boat Ramp progressing by Batemans Bay Boaters Associa=on Again this is not fake news neither is it some poli=cal spin but just progress by John Holland to finish the new bridge contract.15th 2017 Vol 16 September 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

The ques=ons to be asked is will the new boa=ng environment along the northern shore of the Clyde River be beMer than we had before this concrete four pile in the river monstrosity was built? Short answer no but why? In the old days we had a boat ramp paid for by Boa=ng Now funds taken from the boat licences for NSW boaters and fishers. It was “upgraded” a few years before the bridge construc=on was started by the local Eurobodalla Council and the car park was resurfaced, a BBQ shelter and sea=ng was installed and new shiny stainless steel steps were added so the infirmed could access the beach. The fish cleaning table stayed the same as did the boatramp itself. The boatramp had one major advantage in that is was adjacent to a beach so people could launch their vessels and secure it to the beach when they parked their trainers. It had one major disadvantage in that due to its loca=on the sand from the river built up on the surface and surrounds so it was not safe for non-fourwheel drive vehicles to launch at low =de. But in general it was an easy facility to use when smaller vessel from north of the bridge wanted to traverse the upper reaches of the Clyde. That all changed during the construc=on of the bridge. Firstly Transport for NSW intermiMently closed the boat ramp to all vessels during the construc=on phase – s=ll closed today. Secondly they put forward a civil roads design which must have come from someone who has never towed a boat trailer or even observed how a boatramp works. It is a complete mess with two sets of round-abouts and a boat parking area unusable by anyone but a competent reversing experience. Did they consult with the community? - No. Did they receive well thought out submissions? - Yes a number, even one on the back of cardboard container from a slab of beer. One came from an urban designer in close consulta=on with the boa=ng community – see photo. BUT did they listen and take note – well, we will have to see but the current indica=ons are they bulldozed ahead with their original design put forward in the Batemans Bay project Urban Design and Landscape Plan 12 August 2019. The Foreshore Advisory CommiMee was led up the garden path and told this whole area would be upgraded and we would get improved facili=es. We received a visit from the State Labour Minister who came to see the proposals and to talk about what they could do behind the scenes to rec=fy the situa=on… What did the boa=ng and fishing community propose as a solu=on to this urban design. The north flowing off -ramp come down from the highway parallel to the new bridge and meet the Punt Road at a T-intersec=on so that the vehicles and trailers could cross this and enter the prepara=on area. Here the boats could remove beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

29


Reading the =e-down and fit their rods and oars ready to launch. Then move forward to a special area and reverse down the upgraded wider boat ramp right into the water. Adjacent to the ramp would be a walk-on and a floa=ng pontoon to secure the vessel and permit less able crew to get on board while the driver parked the trailer in the designated spots. Vol 16 September 15th 2017

28 April December 7th, 2017 Volreturning 48 27th On to2018 the boatramp the master would secure the vessel to the boatramp and then retrieve the trailer to pull the vessel out of the water. They would then stop at the wash-down area to rinse out the engines and wash off any harmful weeds picked up while on the water so as not to transferred disease and contaminants to another waterway which may even ruin the local oyster industry.

SO what does it appear will be delivered? Well for a start there will be no change to the actual boat ramp. It is s=ll narrow and will sand up. There will be no addi=on of a floa=ng pontoon for the safety of boaters. There will be no wash -down area with available water because in Eurobodalla we s=ll have water restric=ons that forbids us washing our vessels in situ. There will be a torturous route to get to the boatramp with the likelihood vessel trailers will be damaged by curbs and finally there will be less parking spots than we originally had and we will now have to put on our hiking boots just to reach the new “improved” toilet block sited even further away than the original. You may ask have the boa=ng and fishing community benefited by the new bridge and the Foreshore upgrade plan? In a word NO.

www.iga.com.au/catalogue

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

30


art

Have you discovered the ar+st in you? Inspira=on and imagina=on abound all around us. What tales could you paint and sculpt? What arrangements of colour would excite you? Every one of us has an idea to explore, a mistake that is the beginning of a masterpiece, a shape that needs Vol 16 September 15tha 2017 texture and form, moment captured forever. 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Many of us have dabbled during lockdown and now that life is opening out again we at CABBI would like to invite you to our 37th ANNUAL ART EXHIBITION which will run from Tues 21st Dec 2021 – 6th Jan 2022. Hours are from 10 - 4pm, with Christmas Day closed. Our exhibi=on will be held at: Batemans Bay High School on George Bass Drive, Batehaven, 2536, with entry a gold coin dona=on. There will be finger food, alcoholic beverages and fruit juice available, with wheelchair access and level ground. The exhibi=on will be COVID compliant. For further informa=on please email: secretary@cabbi.com.au. The Exhibi=on will be opened on Monday 20th December at 6pm with Guest Speaker, Ms Di Jay, Deputy Chair, River of Art. Ms Jay has been an ac=ve member and convenor of various art events, with a par=cular interest in community involvement with the support of councils and business chambers. Her personal journey has been varied, with interest ranging from the visual and performing arts to urban design and architecture. Di’s most recent venture into a different medium, silversmithing and jewellery design, has opened up more opportuni=es for her to explore. CABBI is very fortunate in having Di to open our exhibi=on and we would like to thank her for her =me and accep=ng our invita=on to speak. Judging any compe==on requires knowledge and apprecia=on of the entries -we are pleased to announce our judges this year being Ms Margaret Ainscow (Fine Art), and Ms Mirabel Fitzgerald (Sculpture and Ar=san). Mirabel runs her own studio, and has many years experience teaching and research at university and college level and exhibited interna=onally in China, Thailand and Paris, as well as local and interstate. Mirabel is now specialising in lithography, etching and prin=ng and has a keen interest and knowledge of conserva=on and the natural world, being ac=ve in various groups and socie=es around the local district. Margaret also has her own studio, has been curator in various exhibi=ons, lectured with Tasmanian Ins=tute of Technology, exhibited interna=onally in Poland, in West Australia and has artwork acquired by Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane. Margaret has been Chair on various Boards and Advisory Panels as well as invita=onal exhibi=ons in Western Australia, Japan, Victoria and Sydney and now enjoys crea=ng sculptural works using found objects of fibre and fabric to make social commentary on our environment and it’s fading influence on our lives. CABBI would like to thank Margaret and Mirabel for taking =me out of their busy schedules to judge what will surely be a rather difficult job! CABBI’s history began with Ken Taber and an enthusias=c band of ar=sts in 1984, with a gallery in the Bay. ABer many changes we now run “The Gallery”, Sydney Road, Mogo, where we offer an opportunity for members to exhibit their works for sale, and select a Featured Ar=st every 2 months, as well as enjoying the out of doors with our En Plein Air group on Tuesdays and a social art group every Saturday. We are suppor=ve of our new members and encourage all efforts no maMer how inexperienced you are believing everyone brings something different to our society. Our exhibi=ons showcase many different styles and abili=es of our art and craBsmen and women including photography, ar=san, fine arts, sculpture across all medium with our members being a varied group who are always interested in exploring new methods and experiences. These exhibi=ons are a welcome chance to put our works into the public arena, gaining knowledge and experience along the way with our hardworking commiMee members having varied tasks with hanging, ligh=ng, sponsorship and myriad other jobs that go into running such an interes=ng event. We will be encouraging our visitors to vote for their favourite exhibit, the People’s Choice Award, vo=ng cards will be available at the entrance from our friendly volunteers. Enquiries always welcome. For further informa=on please email: secretary@cabbi.com.au. beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

31


arts

The Basil Sellers Exhibi+on Centre presents Eurobodalla Art Prize Winner Raewyn Lawrence.

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

The main event image features The 2020 Basil Sellers Art Prize, Eurobodalla prize winner; Raewyn Lawrence, Smoke, 2020, oil on canvas, 76 x 91cm.

Please join us for the opening night of Eurobodalla Art Prize Winner Raewyn Lawrence's exhibi=on on Friday 17 December, 2021 from 5:30 - 7:30pm. Drinks and nibbles will be provided. Opening speeches will commence at approximately 6pm.

Moruya-based ar=st Raewyn will be in aMendance at The Basil Sellers Exhibi=on Centre, which features from Saturday 18 December to Sunday 30 January, 2022. In 2020, Raewyn was awarded Eurobodalla Shire Council’s acquisi=ve Eurobodalla Ar=st Prize for her work Smoke, which was captured as a moment of quiet aBer the horror and devasta=on of the bushfire season. The coveted prize also awarded Raewyn the opportunity to have her solo exhibi=on featured in the Basil Sellers Exhibi=on Centre program for 2021. Most of Raewyn's art is presented through the medium of paint and her subjects range from landscape to figura=ve works. Raewyn has said: "Living on the New South Wales south coast, I find it impossible not to feel in awe of the beauty of the natural world. The light and colours that are constantly changing are an endless source of inspira=on. Another rich resource is our local history and folklore, both indigenous and colonial. I have also been enjoying transla=ng to canvas some more personal work that explores emo=ons and events from my own life and family history. I enjoy pain=ng from the solitude of the studio, a place where produc=vity can blend with cups of tea and contempla=on." For more informa=on about this exhibi=on, the Basil Sellers Exhibi=on Centre and upcoming exhibi=ons please visit: hMps://thebas.com.au/

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

32


arts

Congo CraJs, is holding its 36th Annual Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Exhibi=on, showcasing a diverse range of func=onal and decora=ve stoneware ceramics and pain=ngs on canvas. Congo CraBs Gallery opened in 1980, and has been con=nuously exhibi=ng works ever since. All the ceramics and pain=ngs have been created by Jim Simms in his Congo studio, and he has been working in the arts for over forty years.

Strongly influenced by Japanese, Korean and Chinese ceramics, Jim con=nues to produce a range of beau=ful pieces, and is noted for the quality of his glazes. Each year he experiments with new maM and gloss finishes, resul=ng in a varied and stunning paleMe of rich and more subtle colourings. Each wood-fired piece is uniquely burnished by the ash and flames of the firing. Jim has many happy local, na=onal and interna=onal clients who have admired and collected his work over a number of years. The gallery will con=nue to be open six days per week (closed Tuesday) un=l January 31, 2022, 11am to 5pm.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

33


arts

An Explora+on in Pastels and Mixed Media Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Vol 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 April 27th 2018

South Coast Pastel Society’s summer art exhibi=on will be held from 21 to 30 January 2022. Members of the society have been busy crea=ng a broad range of pain=ngs throughout the lockdown and enthusias=cally embraced the opportunity to get out and paint following the easing of restric=ons. This years’ exhibi=on promises to deliver stunning landscapes, majes=c seascapes and thought-provoking s=lllife works that will hang in pride of place on any wall. Whilst there will be lots of pastel works, the exhibi=on will also include acrylic, oil, watercolor and mixed media pieces to suit all tastes. All works will be for sale and range in price to suit most budgets. The exhibi=on will be at the Batemans Bay Surf Club, George Bass Drive, Malua Bay and opens from 10am to 4pm each day. Entry is by gold coin dona=on with the proceeds going to the Surf Club. The South Coast Pastel Society is a vibrant group of local and regional ar=sts working mainly in pastel – a pure pigment media with centuries of tradi=on that is just as fresh and relevant today. The SCPS has been organising quality exhibi=ons and ac=vi=es since the 1980’s and offers regular, world class workshops with renowned local, na=onal and interna=onal pastel ar=sts. More informa=on about the society, workshops and pain=ng ac=vi=es can be found on the society’s web site at www.southcoastpastelsociety.com There is also a gallery featuring society member’s works that highlight both the versa=lity of the medium and the high quality work that can be achieved with pastels. Follow the society on Facebook at hMps://www.facebook.com/SouthCoastPastelSocietyInc/

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

34


sports

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

35


sports

Moruya Womens Golf Results Wednesday 8TH15th December Vol 16 September 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Fun was the theme of the day when 30 player’s par=cipated in a 9 Hole 3 Ball Aggregate Stableford armed with only 3 clubs and a puMer, golf aFre replaced by Santa suits, flashing lights and =nsel and peels of laughter ringing across the fairways during the finale event for the year. Robyn Hawkins, Val Moore and Marilyn Bingham combined prowess and skill to win the day with a score of 47 points, with Robyn scoring 5 Pars in the 9 holes. Balls were won by the following teams: S Knight, V Goodwin, J Dixon (46) B Swain, P Reid, J Love (44) J Ellis, L Gibbs, N Levi (42C/B) B Kennedy, L Doolan, J Hebbard (42) M Muriwai, J Hay, J LouFt (38) 2021 Hamper Round Winners A Grade Winner: Marie Muriwai 1st Runner-up Jan Lumsden 2nd Runner-up Robyn Hawkins 3rd Runner-up Margaret Douglas B Grade Winner: Dawn Davies 1st Runner-up Dianne Smith 2nd Runner-up Val Moore 3rd Runner-up Vicki Goodwin

Broulee Runners December 8th 2021 Tonight, we had 26 starters in cloudy and overcast condi=ons. It was a course for mud runners. Some handled the condi=ons very well. Others like David McCann, who did his virtual run earlier came to grief down the rough hilly path. However, like a true runner, he managed to ignore the pain and con=nue running. We were fortunate to have 4 young men on a surfing holiday, who no=ced the ac=vity around the star=ng line and decided to join in. They were on a holiday from Newcastle aBer finishing their final year of university. Their names are Tyler Hobson, James Campbell, Zac Morgan and Nathaniel Elginn. They each ran the 5 kilometres and Tyler pushed Daniel Beby all the way to the finish. Tori Hennig came along proudly wearing her medal for winning her age group in the 30-kilometre Coastal Classic last weekend. She was joined in the event by three Broulee runners Gillian Stapleton and Ren Lefevre. Gill managed 4th place in her group. We welcomed Rachel Cootes to her first run with the group.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

36


sports

Club Malua Women's Bowls Report Last Friday the Final of Club Minor Singles Vol 16 September 15th 2017 was played between Sonia Frey and Gayl 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 Vidgen and what a fantas=c game to watch. Sonia started well with Gayl slowly catching up at 14/10 then winning four ends in a row but Sonia rallied and won the match 25/19, well done to both ladies. Thanks to Umpire Robyn Butcher, Marker Sue Beavan and the spectators who came to cheer them on. Tuesday was Christmas Party Day so everyone dressed for the occasion. ABer a morning of bowls we all returned to our clubhouse where all tables were beau=fully decorated thanks to Club Manager Manuela and her many helpers. It was wonderful to see several of our past bowlers present as always. This year we had our very own Santa but never forgeFng that Sue Palmer had taken on this role for over 30 years and was thanked by President Sue Beavan and presented with a giB of apprecia=on. Winners on Rink 3, Joan Fitzroy, Judy Davis and Karen Signor. Runners-up on Rink 5, Lynn Gowans, Bev McKague and Alison Innes. Money club winners, Lyn Hardy, Judy Davis and Gwen Ware, also five lucky number winners as well . ABer lunch the fun and games began with everyone receiving a Secret Santa giB and lots of photos with Santa. Thanks to Kim Giannasca for the beau=ful Christmas Cake she made and decorated. Next week will be a special Ham Day so make sure your names are on the list. Above: Gathered on the green in front of soon to be completed new club. Below: Minor Singles Winner Sonia Frey . Runner-up Gayl Vidgen.

Tori Hennig brings home gold Four of the Broulee Runners contested the 30-kilometre Coastal Classic last Saturday. The course is along the expansive coastal fringe of the Royal Na=onal Park south of Sydney. The adventurous four were Tori, Gill, Mirella, and Ren. They have been training hard and are part of Tori’s Hennig’s regular Sunday training group. Organisers say "Despite the change in event date this year from September to December you couldn’t have scripted a beMer day for fast =mes. The southerly tailwind was just the icing on the cake! It seemed that every second runner set a PB!" The overall first placed Male runner was Brodie Nankervis who set out on a mission and didn’t let up all the way up the coast, finishing in 2:12:47, second place was Josef Mcgrath in 2:17:01 with James Nipperess in third in 2:18:00. All three podium geMers were quicker than the 2020 winner showing how fast the course was. It was a =ght tussle among among the top Female runners, Greta TruscoM (2:45:20) in 2nd with Ka=e Mahoney (2:46:30) in 3rd. They both followed home the overall Female winner Stephanie Auston who finished in 2:42:57. beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

37


sports

Moruya men's golf results Moruya Men's Open The 2001 Moruya Open was held over 36 holes on the first weekend in December. A large field entered and our local champion Gavin Fitzgerald won by 5 shots from another fine player, Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Jarred Hunt Goulburn. Gavin had two par rounds of 71 and promising local junior Bailey PearsonVol 48 27thof2018 Perryman fired 76 and 72. Overall results: Open Champion : Gavin Fitzgerald 142 A grade winner : Jarred Hunt 147 A grade runner-up : Bailey Pearson-Perryman 148 B grade winner : Derek Brown B grade runner-up : Ryan Staunton C grade winner : Rod Berry C grade runner-up : Aaron Millikin

Low Scores In Tuross Vets 4 Person Ambrose Event Despite the threat of showers during the day, a good field of 61 players registered for the Tuross Head Veterans Golf 4 Person Ambrose event on 8 December, players appropriately aFred for the annual Christmas Party that followed. Winning combina=on on the day was the team of JeaneMe Winners on the day, Ian and JeaneEe Miller, Julie Barningham and Ian Miller, Julie Barningham and Steve Swanbury and Steve Swanbury with a neM score of 27.75 for the nine holes played. Runners up were Rob Nash, Ross Davidson and brothers Paul and Peter Coffey scoring 29.25. Other major prize winners were Leonie Snodgrass, Enid BesantRyan-Ryan, Bruce Mar=n and Steve Johnston on 29.50, and then the team of Richard Kelly, Rick Brake, Richard Wharton, Bruce Harding and Neil Mather with 30.0. Minor prizes went to Allen Lee, Peter McRae, David Williams and Des Jackson on 30.12, Steve Gardner, Robert McKirdy, Jane Egli=s and Warren Hodder with 30.87, and finally Gail and Len Rogers partnering Robin and Paul Green on 31.0. Margaret and Ray Downey paired with Shirley and Ted Quinlan won the Bradman award, whilst nearest the pins went to David Williams on the 4th, Bruce Harding on the 6th, and to Gail Rogers and Allen Lee on the 7th. Neal Watson took out the Accuracy drive compe==on.

hMps://monaropost.com.au/features beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

38


sports

Tackle World Fishing Report December 10th 2021 Vol 16 September 15th 2017

28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 Moruya River. At =me of wri=ng this, there are currently flood warnings in place for the Moruya river. Having just seen the state, and height of the river with another few hours to high =de to, cau=on is the best idea at the moment.

Stay out of flood waters, if it’s flooded forget. There is so much chocolate brown water and debris coming down the river, that a weekend learning a few knots,restocking the tackle box, or buying that new shiny rod and reel combo, will probably be the best op=on. If you are s=ll going to go for a fish, head to the airport flats on a rising =de with some oily baits or lures with lots of vibra=on poten=al to have the best chance of finding a flathead or two. There will be plenty of fish displaced and pushed down the river with the inunda=on of flood waters, so there is poten=al to find a fish. Tuross River. Tuross will be facing exactly the same water condi=ons as Moruya today and for the weekend. Stay out of flood waters. Any fishing op=ons for Tuross will be concentrated around the main boat ramp at the front of the systems this weekend. Oily baits, and again lures with lots of vibra=ons will be your best op=ons. Rock and beach. This will probably be your best chance of weFng a line over the next few days, as any beach that is away from the major river mouths will have cleaner water, and will be holding Bream, whi=ng, salmon and tailor this weekend. Several of the beaches south of Tuross have been holding good numbers of big tailor this last week, while wind sock north of Moruya has had a few big salmon, and numbers of both bream and whi=ng. Offshore. There have been snapper a plenty offshore this week, with fish being found in as liMle as 10m of water all the way out to 50m of water. SoB plas=cs and baits have all accounted for good catches of fish. The massive amounts of fresh dirty water pushing out of both Moruya, Tuross and the Clyde rivers will see the fishing go quiet for a week or so, but once the water starts to clear, you can expect good fish to turn up aBer the weather has eased up. If you are chasing a Xmas bargain, we are clearing out all Tackle World fishing shirts at $30 in store, while stocks last! We at Tackle World Moruya would like to congratulate Ronny and Gayle at Tackle World Merimbula on the upcoming reopening, of their newly rebuilt shop, back where it belongs on Market Street Merimbula. I would highly recommended stopping in to pay them a visit if you are down that way. I have seen the videos of the new shop, and it looks amazing!! Stay safe everyone and remember, “every days a good day for fishing…” Team Tackle World Moruya.

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

39


Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 50 April May 11th

Your FREE online Eurobodalla weekend magazine.

Accounting

Air Conditioning

Automotive

Bathrooms

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

40


The Beagle business and trades Directory a to z Builders

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Carpenters

Carpet Cleaners

Computers/ IT

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

41


The Beagle business and trades Directory a to z Concretors

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Dogs

Electrical

Excavation

Framers

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

42


The Beagle business and trades Directory a to z Garden Landscaping

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Home Maintenance

Locksmith

Massage

Mowing and Gardening

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

43


The Beagle business and trades Directory a to z Painters

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Pest Control

Plumbers

Roofing

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

44


The Beagle business and trades Directory a to z Solar Electrical

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Tiling

TV Antenna

Trees

beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

45


The Beagle business and trades Directory a to z Vets

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Waste Management

Late entries

The Beagle Trades and Business Directory provides local Trades and Businesses a free lis=ng in a hope that they might gain work from it, and con=nue to provide employment and economic benefit to their families and our communi=es. Adver=sing is usually outside the affordability of many smaller businesses and sole traders. The Beagle supports locals. These lis=ngs are FREE. If you are a local business and would like to be listed please contact us as we oBen turn over these lis=ngs to give everyone a fair go. Email beagleweeklynews@gmail.com Trades and Businesses can also list themselves on the Beagle Trades and Business Group in Facebook at hMps://www.facebook.com/groups/1303512213142880/ beagle weekly : Vol 237 December 10th 2021

46


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.