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Vol 16 September 15th 2017

28 December 7th, 20172021 Vol 48 April 27th 2018 Vol 194 February 12th

Your FREE online Eurobodalla weekend magazine.

Photo: New Batemans Bay Bridge— South Coast Pix Your Beagle Weekly Index Arts ……………………. 31 to 34 Cinema ……………….. 29,30 Community ………………4 to 20 Reading ……………………..21 to 25 Food………………………… 0 Sport and Fishing ………. 35 to 38 Editorial …………………..2,3 What’s On …………….... 26 to 28

FIND ALL YOUR DAILY NEWS @ www.beagleweekly.com.au

beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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editorial Welcome to this week’s editorial, When I was growing up in Papua New Guinea I learnt quickly of consequences. Most of the <me the consequences came immediately a=er and event... and they hurt. I remember being a li?le bare arsed boy wandering around village with the other kids and if any of us did anything wrong we were given a Vol 16 September 15ththe 2017 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 April 27th 2018 s<nging slap on the bum and, to ensure it was fair, if anyone in our gang did anything, we all received a whack. As I grew older the hand slap turned to a thong slap which then turned into a belt around the backside, a feather duster and finally a cloth wound jug cord. I learnt early in the piece that parents were the judge and jury and even if you hid out all day in a mango tree you couldn’t get away from “jus<ce”. At school we had the cane. I first encountered it at the age of twelve. It appeared to be a high-school instrument and its metering out was done by our over zealous and very sadis<c Maths master. Over the next four years I saw that cane become thicker and then morph into a long steel rule that flailed the fleshy palms of boys and turned girls rumps all manner of shades, from reds through to violets and blues. In hindsight this par<cular teacher should not have been allowed anywhere near children, but at the <me the corporal punishment of children was seen as a way of “encouraging them” to comply. Joyfully that teacher caned the wrong child one day and was deported from the country the next day before very serious, and possibly fatal, family payback ensued. The following years at school saw a so=er approach in dealing out consequences for poor behaviour. A system of demerits was introduced that accompanied a variety of deten<ons. These were seen as minor annoyances by most students leading to a more severe consequence of suspensions and finally expulsion. The pain was gone of the cane but a new pain was introduced. The worst that was threatened of me was to call in my father for a chat. I knew if that happened the ul<mate consequence of all would soon follow. The Consequence of Disappointment. My father le= school at an early age and had to toil for most of his life in jobs that required strength and hard slog rather than diplomas and degrees. His work was never easy and his hope for me was to do well at school to enable more opportunity. It wasn’t a big ask. He did all he could to help and encourage. But that look of Disappointment always cut to the bone when it was applied. Back then societal punishments were usually handed out as a consequence of going outside of the rules. Back then offenders understood consequences and were generally fearful of them. Break the rules and whack, break the law then gaol. It appeared a li?le more black and white and everyone stood equal. But more and more we learnt that there is no consistency in consequences. Those who have money or privilege are able to side step consequence and those in power do as they please. The powerful became more so. Recently we have heard much of rorts. Sports rorts and Pork rorts. Day a=er day we are learning that those we elected to best serve appear to be openly flaun<ng the rules with li?le, if any, beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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editorial consequence. The NSW Premier said, of the accusa<ons of wilful pork barrelling, "All governments and all opposi<ons make commitments to the community in order to curry favour. The term pork barrelling is common Vol 16 September 15th 2017 parlance. It 27th is not something that I know the community is comfortable with. If that's the accusa<on made 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 2018 on this occasion .... then I'm happy to accept that commentary. It's not an illegal prac<ce. Unfortunately, it does happen from <me to <me by every government." Next we hear of pork barrelling at a Federal level with Peter Du?on. Again there will be li?le, if any, consequence should he be found in viola<on of the rules. Rarely these days is there an admission or apology. The community have come to expect that there will be no consequences applied. The community have come to expect much less of our leaders. It is the new norm. BY example poli<cians appear to be bale to do and say as they please with impunity. The media, in the hands of the noble, once wielded significant indirect social influence. Once, having the truth exposed in the newspaper was enough of a threat to keep poli<cians on the straight and narrow. But that threat no longer seems to apply. If they are named and shamed they now decry that the news is Fake or from a le=ist, or righ<st, editor with an agenda. They also rely on the community, quite rightly so, in being disengaged and having li?le if any interest in poli<cs. Such disinterest on elec<on day results in votes based on promises at the polling booths or ni=y during last minute campaign slogans. There is an audacity building with poli<cians at all levels as they look at their rule books and discover there are no real consequences should they break them. Any revela<on of inappropriate spending or ac<on is water off a ducks back and poli<cians are learning that if they give themselves a good spray of Teflon then nothing should s<ck and if it does it will only be for one news cycle before we all see another shiny thing. The threat of the media exposure offers li?le threat against their self-belief they have that they are now unreachable, nearly God like, and so favoured but those they surround themselves with that they believe their own marke<ng hype and expect to be re-elected. And at a local level our own councillors have agreed to change the rules to ensure they also go unreported. The community is generally unaware that Codes of Conduct complaints are raised all too o=en against our Council and Councillors. Mostly it is for breaches of the Local Government Act or failures to comply with Council’s own policies. The Codes of Conduct complaints are raised by community members and sent on to the Office of Local Government, via an inves<gator, to determine what recourse should be put in place. But we as a community are never to learn of the findings or consequence. That is because they have rewri?en the rule book that says anyone other than the complainant is never to know the outcome and that the complainant is sworn to secrecy else suffer the consequences of never being told the outcome again. Over the last decade there have been many Codes of Conduct complaints against Council employees and Councillors where they have been found to have breached the rules. But what of the consequences? There is no cane, no steel rule, no thong, no bare-arsed slap, no cloth jug cord, demerit or deten<on. There is no fine, no public humilia<on, and by the rules there is no revela<on of their breach or the findings. That might be the very reason our Councillors, and the Council Execu<ve, in general, have become so cocky, so audacious and so blatant in their selec<ve interpreta<ons of the Local Government Act and Council policies as they know full well there are no consequences other than the Beagle editor saying how sorely Disappointed he is in their efforts. Un<l next—lei beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Just some of the stunning photos in the latest series of images captured by Rob and Kate of South Coast Pix. The Batemans Bay Bridge is well on its way to comple<on. Note that there is no Off-Ramp to the Batemans Bay foreshore. Access to the waterfront will now be via North Street at Kentucky Fried or via Beach Road turning into Perry Street and then into North street before arriving at Clyde Street. Exi<ng the CBD will be via the same route unless you are 8.8m where you will be required to exit via Orient Street. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Alert for REX flight ZL3468 Melbourne to Merimbula Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Feb 9th27th 2018 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 Were you or anyone you know on REX's Melbourne to Merimbula Flight No. ZL3468 flew out of Melbourne Airport's Terminal 4 from 10:40am on Tuesday the 9th of February. ABC South East NSW reports:

Photo: Merimbula Airport – Bega Valley Shire Council

#BREAKING: ALL OF VICTORIA TO GO INTO 5-DAY LOCK DOWN It comes a=er NSW health announced that anyone who was at Melbourne Airport at Terminal 4 on Tuesday the 9th of February must get tested immediately and isolate for 14 days regardless of the result. REX's Melbourne to Merimbula Flight No. ZL3468 flew out of Melbourne Airport's Terminal 4 from 10:40am on Tuesday the 9th of February. Premier Daniel Andrews has announced a state-wide Victorian lock down from 11:59 pm tonight un<l Wednesday, a=er two more coronavirus cases in Melbourne. “This is difficult but essen<al,” Mr Andrews said. "I am confident that this short, sharp circuit breaker will be effec<ve."

Ross River Fever And Barmah Forest Virus Cases Detected In Southern NSW The Southern New South Wales Local Health District (SNSWLHD) is aler<ng the community to take extra precau<ons to protect themselves against mosquito bites and mosquitoborne diseases such as Ross River Fever and Barmah Forest Virus, par<cularly in coastal areas. An increased number of suspected cases of Ross River Fever and Barmah Forest Virus infec<on have been reported to the Public Health Unit and are currently under inves<ga<on. Inves<ga<ons indicate that it is likely most of these infec<ons were acquired in the South Coast region of NSW. NSW Arbovirus Surveillance and Mosquito monitoring program has seen moderate number of mosquitoes in early February at a trapping in Narooma. Manager of Infec<ous Diseases, April RobertsWi?eveen, said that Ross River Fever and Barmah Forest Virus are both caused by mosquito bites. “The symptoms of both diseases are similar and include rash, fever, chills, headache, aches and pains which typically begin within three weeks of being bi?en. Tiredness and sore and swollen joints can also occur. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should see their doctor,” said Ms Roberts-Wi?eveen. Symptoms can subside a=er a few weeks but some people may experience them for weeks or even months. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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PUBLIC HEALTH ORDER NSW will not be closing its borders. However, NSW has <ghtened entry requirements for returning NSW residents with the signing Vol 16 September 15th 2017 of a new Public Health 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 Order, a=er27th the2018 announcement by the Victorian Government of a five-day ‘circuit-breaker’ lockdown. NSW residents in border communi<es will have different requirements, recognising the daily interac<on of residents with Victoria. Under the state-wide Order, anyone arriving in NSW from Victoria a=er 11.59pm on Friday 12 February 2021 must remain at their home or place of residence for the five-day period announced by the Victorian Government. The date previously advised has been updated following advice from the NSW Chief Health Officer. People arriving in NSW from Victoria by air, rail or road (with the excep<on of people living in the border area) will also be required to complete an online declara<on form. For NSW residents living along the Victorian border, the five-day stay-at-home requirement will only apply to people who have visited Greater Melbourne a=er 11.59pm on Friday 12 February. It will not apply to NSW border residents who travel into regional Victoria. The border community is defined by the map which was used for the large border ‘bubble’ arrangements at the end of the NSW-Victorian border closure last year. The Victorian restric<ons become effec<ve at midnight tonight, and under current arrangements will expire at 11.59pm on Wednesday 17 February. The NSW Order will ensure those affected by stay-at-home orders will have to abide by the same restric<ons. People will be permi?ed to leave their places of residence for the same four reasons allowed under the Victorian measures. These are: shopping for essen<al items, medical and other care and caregiving, exercise, and essen<al work. NSW strongly advises against all non-essen<al travel to Victoria at this <me. People who do choose to travel will be required to follow the stay-at-home requirement on their return. People subject to the restric<ons in Victoria should not be travelling to NSW unless they are permi?ed to do so.

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The Beagle is now listed with Google News Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th,its 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 Google launched News

Showcase App last Friday saying it was a be?er way to pay for news than the proposed News Media Bargaining Code. The bigger mastheads that have signed up will be paid monthly fees for three years. But not News Corp or Nine who both refuse. The first round of mastheads that have signed up and will receive the Google News Showcase funding include: Crikey, InDaily, New Daily, The Saturday Paper, The Conversa<on, the Newcastle Herald, Canberra Times and Illawarra Mercury. Google said it will add <tles that will receive payment to that list in the coming weeks and months. While The Beagle has declined the op<on to be paid for content we are more than excited and thankful to Google for allowing our humble news to be included in their stable. It means for anyone who follows a variety of main news sources can now find their favourites (except Nine and Newscorp) on the Google News App. Be sure to add The Beagle to your homescreen

www.iga.com.au/catalogue This week saw the Marine Rescue Batemans Bay rescue vessel BB 30 respond to an emergency call from a yacht with three people on board. The yacht had experienced mechanical failure with the vessel's gearbox off Burrewarra Point, just to the south of Batemans Bay, and needed help. The crew of David Murn, Peter Withington and Peter Bladewell were able to secure a tow to the yacht and assist it to port. Great work from our dedicated Batemans Bay volunteers. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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More free bushfire clean-up help More free help to clean up bushfire-impacted proper<es is available to Eurobodalla Vol 16 September 15th 2017 residents over the coming weeks. 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Disaster Relief Australia, comprising volunteer teams of exmilitary and emergency responders, will be assis<ng those in need for the next five weeks, four days each week. The help was arranged and funded by Eurobodalla Council’s Eurobodalla Bushfire Recovery Support Service in response to their clients' growing need. Recovery support service coordinator Jane Robertson said DRA’s presence had already made “a huge posi<ve impact” to those affected. "The ini<al clean-up by Laing O'Rourke and Public Works was vital and extremely helpful, but 12 months on, many residents are finding they need trees felled and stockpiled, fence lines cleared for new fencing, and burnt materials removed,” she said.

Above: Disaster Relief Australia volunteers were welcomed to the shire last week by “DRA have generously put up their hand and have already begun conduc<ng damage assessments for the more than 100 Eurobodalla Mayor Liz Innes, Bega MP Andrew Constance and Eurobodalla requests for assistance. Bushfire Recovery Support Service staff. “It’s making a big difference to people's feeling of wellbeing and control knowing they can now make repairs and improvements to their property.” DRA chief execu<ve officer Geoff Evans said their work would include chainsaw opera<ons, debris management and removal, fencing and small civil works. ”2020 was a challenging year, 2021 is about rebuilding and DRA is keen to get back into communi<es s<ll recovering from the Black Summer bushfires to assist in any way we can,” he said. “We’re extremely proud of being offered the opportunity to collaborate with Council working together to rebuild and support the local community in their <me of need.” Community members needing assistance can contact the Eurobodalla Bushfire Recovery Support Service on 4474 7434. Once contact is made DRA will conduct a damage assessment to confirm how they can assist.

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Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Don’t forget to have your say on the Milton Ulladulla bypass The community is reminded to have its say on the preferred strategic corridor for the Milton Ulladulla bypass by Sunday 14 February. Transport for NSW Regional Director South, Sam Knight thanked everyone who has already taken the <me to make a submission. “More than 2000 submissions have been received to date via the online survey, email, phone and post,” Ms Knight said. “The preferred strategic corridor broadly aligns with the loca<on of the exis<ng bypass corridor in the Shoalhaven Local Environmental Plan. “The type of connec<ons from the bypass to the exis<ng highway and local road network, including the northern and southern entry and exit points, are subject to further planning. “The community feedback will be considered and further inves<ga<ons will be carried out to inform the project, which has been designed with the community in mind.” Ms Knight said Transport for NSW carried out traffic data collec<on during the summer holidays to be?er understand how the network operates during this peak travel period. “As part of the Princes Highway upgrade program, addi<onal traffic data collec<on including monitoring of traffic volumes, intersec<on queue lengths and road use is being carried out on the Princes Highway to inform future planning for the Milton Ulladulla bypass and Burrill Lake to Batemans Bay upgrade projects,” Ms Knight said. For more informa<on about the preferred strategic corridor, the community can read the preferred strategic corridor op<on report via the project website: nswroads.work/miltonulladullabypass beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Will you step up to Clean Up? Registra<ons are open for Eurobodalla’s largest clean-up event, Clean on Sunday 7 March. VolUp 16 Australia SeptemberDay, 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

With a surge in use of disposable items over the past 12 months due to COVID, Clean Up Australia chairman Pip Kiernan said there had never been a be?er <me to step up to clean up. “This year has seen disrup<on to our lives, not least of all to our local environments which have been impacted by increased uptake of single-use, disposable items,” she said. “By planning ahead and signing up to a Clean Up event, you are making a pledge to help conserve the environment for the long-term future, and taking an important ac<on by stepping up for your community.” Local Clean Up coordinator Maree Cadman said that over the past 25 years Clean Up had been held in Eurobodalla, volunteers had removed tonnes of li?er from local streets, beaches, parks, bushland and waterways. “Clean Up Australia Day provides the perfect opportunity for residents and visitors to get together and help Eurobodalla’s wildlife and natural areas, which con<nue to recover and regenerate a=er the bushfires,” she said. “We can help you find a suitable site, promote a site, or connect you with a group nearby. Those who can’t make it on Sunday March 7 but s<ll want to par<cipate can also register to clean up a site on an alterna<ve day.” Last year Eurobodalla Clean Up Australia Day volunteers filled 196 hessian bags with rubbish and retrieved an addi<onal 16m³ of discarded furniture, household items, foam, tyres, building materials and more. Ms Cadman said the health and safety of volunteers was paramount, and precau<onary COVID measures were in place this year for par<cipa<ng volunteers. “Once registered, Clean Up Australia will send your clean up kit, equipped with gloves, bags, hand sani<ser and paperwork,” she said. “We can provide extra gloves and bags and facilitate collec<on and disposal of collected li?er.” For more informa<on or to register visit cleanup.org.au or contact Maree Cadman on 4474 1343 or email Maree.Cadman@esc.nsw.gov.au

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Special Nippers 2021, our season has begun! Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

What a beau<ful day to gather, learn beach safety and have fun with an inclusive, embracing community. Our Special Nippers Program provides facili<es, equipment and volunteers to assist kids and young adults with addi<onal needs and a disability to access the beach and enjoy the ocean. Our 10 week long program began on Saturday 7th February when we were lucky enough to be joined by the Raiders Under 21s who were on the coast for a training weekend. It was incredible to see the Raiders and our Special Nippers having a ball together on the beach. Our Special Nippers, their Families and our volunteers where all thrilled to be back together a=er a difficult 2020 where our season was cut short due to fires and Covid. Together and ready for some fun, we are so excited for our season ahead. Volunteers are integral to the successful running of our Special Nippers program and we are in need of addi<onal volunteers. We welcome anyone who is interested to join us! It really is the most beau<ful community. For more informa<on, please contact our Special Nippers coordinators: Mike Hallahan and Bridie & Carol Young—ph: 0404 299 494 Email: bridie_young@hotmail.com

Moruya Branch of the CWA of NSW is pleased to announce both their tearooms and Handicra= Shop are open on Thursdays & Saturdays from 10am to 2pm. “We are resuming Cra= mornings from 10am to 12noon except for the 1st Thursday of the month when our Branch mee<ng starts at 9:30am. Our Land Cookery Officer is holding a Cookery compe<<on on Saturday 20th February ,all entries must be in for judging by 10am & collected by 1pm. “This Compe<<on is open to non members of CWA and the Schedule & recipes are available from the Handicra= Shop on Thursdays and Saturdays. “There is also a Junior Sec<on which is open to 18yrs and under and 12yrs and under with age criteria applying. If you are unable to get to the shop the Schedule and Recipes are available on line at cwaofnsw.org.au then go to Commi?ees and then to Land Cookery. “We would like to see you all in our rooms soon and do enter our cookery compe<<on” beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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REX is offering $49 airfares SYD-MEL REX is September offering $49 SYDVol 16 15thairfares 2017 28This December 7th, Vol 48 April 27th 2018 MEL. comes as 2017 great news to the many South East residents who are planning on a visit south to Melbourne, now able to connect via Sydney. To celebrate the launch of Rex’s domes<c jet services between Sydney and Melbourne, Rex is offering never seen before business class fares for just $199 and economy fares at an unbelievable $49. The special fares are available for flights between Sydney and Melbourne in March and must be booked by the end of February. Rex Deputy Chairman, the Hon John Sharp AM, said, “Most taxi rides to the airport cost more than $49. This is a wonderful opportunity for travellers to get between Australia’s two biggest ci<es on a whim to get over the COVID blues.” “Importantly, all fares during this pandemic are covered by Rex’s COVID refund policy, which guarantees full refunds for any flights affected by COVID, even if Rex’s flights are not affected.” The $49 fares include free 23 kg check-in and 7 kg carry-on baggage and refreshments on board. All passengers on 1 March will receive a commemora<ve cer<ficate and a gi= pack. Rex’s Sydney to Melbourne services commence March 1. Queensland will be added to the Rex domes<c network a=er Easter. The launch fare is available on rex.com.au and is subject to condi<ons outlined on the website. Rex is Australia’s largest and oldest independent regional and domes<c airline, with its history da<ng back to 1953 with the forma<on of Hazelton Airlines, which together with Kendell Airlines were the component airlines of Rex. Rex operates a fleet of 60 Saab340 aircra= (pre-COVID) on 1,500 weekly flights to 59 des<na<ons throughout all states in Australia. Rex will begin its domes<c jet services with six 737-800NGs in March 2021. In addi<on to the airline Rex, the Rex Group comprises wholly owned subsidiaries Pel-Air Avia<on (air freight, aeromedical and charter operator) and the two pilot academies, Australian Airline Pilot Academy in Wagga Wagga and Ballarat. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Bushwalkers prepping for 2021 – Walks Program and a Paddle Program While most Batemans Bay Bushwalkers are taking a break over Vol 16 September 2017 January, there is15th work being done behind the scenes by some 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 dedicated members. With the first quarter walks beginning on 18 February 2021, some members have been out and about undertaking reccies of walks and areas that were affected by fires. Addi<onally Ian and Mary are working on a Paddle Program which is expected to be published soon. A couple of walks recently reviewed was the 6km Square Head walk which is to be one of the first on the program and a 14km walk in the Coila Creek area. Coila Creek was a delight for the walkers as there was quite a bit of water in the creek and it was par<cularly pleasant to be able to follow the creek along for some distance before heading up and out of the gully and back into the bush, which was pre?y thick. We sent Rob in first! A great walk and hopefully we will see this one on one of our walks program later in the year. Looking forward to catching up with all Club members soon – Happy Bushwalking!

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TAFE NSW Moruya Launches First Ever Diploma Of Youth Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017Work Vol 48 27th 2018 TAFE NSW Moruya has launched a Diploma of Youth Work for the first <me to cater to surging na<onal demand for workers in the youth sector. According to research by seek.com.au, the demand for youth workers is expected to climb by almost 30 per cent in the next five years. The diploma, which is currently open for enrolment at TAFE NSW Moruya, is targeted at those with experience working with young people and who are keen to build their skills and networks. TAFE NSW Head Teacher of Community Services Ashleigh Ellis urged locals to consider a career in youth work, saying it was richly rewarding and with plenty of opportunity for professional growth. “To be able to make a difference in a young person’s life is a privilege,” Ms Ellis said. “Youth is a challenging <me; you’re changing and developing fast, and your role in society is changing. “Today’s youth are working in an increasingly complex environment, especially when you throw social media into the mix. “Young people are trying to work out where they fit in while at the same <me being exposed to the superficial parts of a person’s life on social media and it can be very difficult.” According to the Australian Bureau of Sta<s<cs, one quarter of young people aged 16-24 have a mental health disorder. Ms Ellis said youth workers supported people aged between 12 and 24 facing welfare, behavioural, developmental, social and protec<on issues, and worked in youth-specific services, such as refuges, youth centres or mental health programs. Graduates could secure jobs such as case manager, case worker, youth services coordinator and youth worker, she said. The Diploma of Youth Work is a 12-month course individually tailored to students’ experience level and is delivered online via connected classroom. TAFE NSW Diploma of Youth Work graduate Mel Sass said a career in youth work offered both diversity and job sa<sfac<on. “It’s a career pathway that can take you anywhere around the country; there’s always a need to support young people in regional areas and in the ci<es,” she said. To find out more about studying youth work at TAFE NSW, phone 13 16 01 or visit www.tafensw.edu.au. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Yumaro Board Member The Yumaro Board is seeking to appoint 2 new board members to become part of our professional governance team. Yumaro is15th based Vol 16 September 2017in Moruya and Ulladulla and 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 April 27th 2018 supports over 220 people with a disability in our communi<es. If you would like to make a contribu<on to improving the lives of people with a disability in a growing and award winning charity we would love to hear from you. For info pack, email: mark@yumaro.com.au or ph 44743336. Deadline 8/3/2021

Charges laid over fatal crash – South Coast Friday, 12 February 2021 04:33:48 PM A woman has been charged following an inves<ga<on into a fatal crash on the South Coast last year. About 10am on Tuesday 22 September 2020, emergency services were called to Gerroa Road, between Berry and Shoalhaven Heads, following reports two a Kia Sportage and a Suzuki Vitara had collided head-on. Three female occupants from the Kia were treated at the scene. The rear passenger, a 97-year-old woman, died at the scene, while the 69-year-old driver and 76-year-old passenger were taken to hospital for treatment to internal injuries. The 32-year-old female driver and sole occupant of the Suzuki, who was trapped for a short period of <me, was taken to hospital with leg and internal injuries. Officers from South Coast Police District established a crime scene, which was examined by the Crash Inves<ga<on Unit. Following inquiries, earlier this week (Wednesday 10 February 2021), the 32-year-old woman was issued a Future Court A?endance No<ce for dangerous driving occasioning death, dangerous driving occasioning grievous bodily harm, negligent driving occasioning death and negligent driving occasioning grievous bodily harm. Her licence has been suspended. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Book workshop now for free compost kit, worm farm Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Vol 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 April 27th 2018

If you’ve been wan<ng to reduce your impact on the planet, Eurobodalla Council has the perfect place to start. Bookings are open for the Council’s popular worm farming and home compos<ng workshops in March – and they’re free. Residents can choose to learn how to successfully use a hot compos<ng machine, or how to keep a thriving worm farm.

Eurobodalla Council’s Shanna Provost will host Council’s popular compos-ng workshops in March.

Both turn kitchen waste into garden gold by transforming unwanted food scraps into a nutri<ous and natural fer<liser that improves garden soil and plant health. Par<cipants receive all they need to get started – either a compost bin kit or worm farm and live worms, depending on their chosen workshop. The compos<ng workshops will be held at the Moruya Waste Transfer Sta<on, on Yarragee Road on Friday 12 March, 9.30-11am, Saturday 13 March, 9.30-11am, Friday 19 March, 12-1.30pm and Saturday 20 March, 9.30-11am. The worm farming workshops will be held Friday 12 March, 12-1.30pm, Saturday 13 March, 12-1.30pm, Friday 19 March, 9.30-11am and Saturday 20 March, 12-1.30pm. To book your place phone Council's waste services 02 4474 1024.

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OUT NOW—your latest Beagle Abode : Eurobodalla’s leading real estate Vol 16 September 15thguide 2017 Vol 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 April 27th 2018

The beagle abode is an online weekly Eurobodalla real estate guide showcasing the current Eurobodalla market and our many realtors. The beagle abode is the new addi<on to the South Coast Beagle that owns The Beagle and the South Coast Travel Guide: The Nature Coast of NSW : from Durras to The Tilbas The Beagle Abode has been established to provide that service while also providing our readers with a glossy overview of latest proper<es on the market each week. You can find Beagle Abode on the Beagle website under REAL ESTATE The latest Beagle Abode lis<ngs are also available each week as a FlipBook on the website and also distributed to readers via our social media pages and our twice weekly mailouts.

The Beagle Trades and Business Directory provides local Trades and Businesses a free lis<ng in a hope that they might gain work from it, and con<nue to provide employment and economic benefit to their families and our communi<es. Adver<sing is usually outside the affordability of many smaller businesses and sole traders. The Beagle supports locals. These lis<ngs are FREE. If you are a local business and would like to be listed please contact us as we o=en turn over these lis<ngs to give everyone a fair go. Email beagleweeklynews@gmail.com Trades and Businesses can also list themselves on the Beagle Trades and Business Group in Facebook at h?ps://www.facebook.com/groups/1303512213142880/

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Get on board Bay skate sessions Vol 16 September 15th 2017

28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 2018 There’ll be 27th a skatestravaganza on the banks of the Clyde when Totem Collec<ve hits Batemans Bay for four days of free skateboarding demos and workshops this weekend.

Totem’s director Nigel Cameron has invited skaters of all levels – from rank beginner to prac<sed barley grinder – to visit the pop-up skate park off Clyde Street from Friday 12 to Monday 15 February.

Above: Nigel Cameron heads up a team of the Australia’s best coaches at a free, four-day skate workshop on the Bay foreshore this “Whether you’re learning to skate or weekend skilling up to your next burly move, we’ll have a safe, crea<ve environment with plenty of support,” Nige said. Friday and Monday a=ernoons will feature demos and open skate from 4-6pm. Saturday and Sunday are learn to skate sessions from 10am-12pm for all levels, with open ska<ng ’<l 4pm. Council’s strategic development manager Liz Rankin said the pop-up was a great opportunity for new and exis<ng skaters to learn from some of the best coaches in the country while providing input on how to best develop Batemans Bay’s waterfront. “The foreshore is an amazing asset and we are working at ways to bring the community into the heart of Batemans Bay,” Ms Rankin said. “Quite apart from being amazing skaters themselves, Nige and the team are great advocates for youth inclusion and empowerment. With skateboarding making its debut at the Tokyo Olympics, we’re sure the sport is only going to keep growing from here.” This is a COVID-safe event for par<cipants 10 years and older. Bookings essen<al at h?ps://thetotemcollec<ve.com The pop-up skate park is funded by the NSW Government as part of the Streets as Shared Spaces program.

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Narooma Mountain Bike Club Mountain Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 Bike Club Saddles Up For Next Stage Narooma Mountain Bike Club has been working hard over the past few months and has lodged its applica<on for grant funding from the Bushfire Local Economic Recovery Fund (BLER) to enable construc<on of the planned Stages 2 and 3 of the Narooma Mountain Bike Hub in the Bodalla State Forest behind Dalmeny to create over 100kms of mountain bike trails and associated infrastructure. It has been a busy but very successful past few months for the Club, which opened the first Stage of the trails on 27th November 2020 while working with leading trail designers World Trail, economic consultants Lucid Economics and regional tourism advisors and grant wri<ng firm Tilma Group to design the trails and present the business case and regional tourism benefits for the funding applica<on to BLER. The Club has already been successful in securing grant funding from the Founda<on for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR), BizRebuild and Club Narooma to help the Club pay for their BLER grant applica<on. President of the Club Georgie Staley said “The amount of support which we have received for this project is awesome and shows that we must be on the right track in developing a mountain bike hub in our region to provide year-round tourism and the physical and mental benefits for individual riders and families. "This is an important project for the Narooma district in so many ways and will help it bounce back a=er the 2020 bushfires and COVID-19.” Ms Staley said “We have le?ers of support from so many people and groups, including Federal Member for Eden-Monaro Kristy McBain MP, State Member for Bega Andrew Constance MP, Eurobodalla Shire Council and individual councillors, Bega Valley Shire Council, the leading cycling groups AusCycling and Bicycle NSW, the Chambers of Commerce in Narooma and Central Tilba, the major tourism bodies Des<na<on Southern NSW, Sapphire Coast Des<na<on Marke<ng and South Coast Tourism Industry Associa<on, Regional Development Far South Coast, Wagonga Local Aboriginal Land Corpora<on and many local businesses. "We even had a pe<<on signed by over 300 people who took the <me to give their support in the short <me that the pe<<on was available.” Ms Staley said “The trail design looks World class, the grant applica<on team have been so professional and passionate about our applica<on and people are flocking to the exis<ng trails in our beau<ful bush se_ng and coming away with big smiles.” Ms Staley was of the view that “The BLER funding is a wonderful ini<a<ve of the Federal and State Governments to kick start regional areas a=er the bushfires and get shovel-ready projects happening. We are ready to go. We have the design, a long-term land agreement with Forestry Corpora<on, a talented team who can deliver it and enthusias<c locals and visitors who want it to happen.” More informa<on at: hHps://www.mountainbikenarooma.com.au/ or hHps://www.facebook.com/mtbnarooma beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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community

Changed traffic condiKons on the Kings Highway at Currowan Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

Motorists are advised of changed traffic condi<ons from next week on the Kings Highway at Currowan, west of Nelligen. Transport for NSW is carrying out safety improvements on a 1.9 kilometre sec<on of the Kings Highway to create a safer environment for road users. Improvements will include shoulder widening and improved gu?ering, road resealing, widened centrelines and the installa<on of audio tac<le line marking. Work will start on Monday 15 February and finish on Friday 14 May, weather permi_ng, and will be carried out between 7am and 6pm on weekdays. Traffic control and a reduced speed limit of 40 km/h for a single lane closure will be in place during work hours for the safety of workers and road users. Motorists can expect an addi<onal travel <me of up to five minutes, and are advised to drive to the condi<ons and follow the direc<ons of signs and traffic control. Transport for NSW thanks road users for their pa<ence during this <me. For the latest traffic updates download the Live Traffic NSW App, visit livetraffic.com or call 132 701.

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Reading Gadfly 156 By Robert Macklin To anyone close to the Packer dynasty, the Crown casino misbehaviour (to put it mildly) exposed by Judge Patricia Bergin comes as no surprise. The Packer modus operandi was always Vol 16 September 15th 2017

28ofApril December 7th, 2017in humanity’s moral lexicon. The three generations who led the dynasty Vol 48 bereft the 27th better2018 angels

had one guiding star, the acquisition of material wealth; and their favoured weapon for its attainment was the pounding fist of the bully. I was privileged with a front row seat to its dealings last year when I accepted an invitation to write the biography of an old friend, Trevor Kennedy who also has a weekender at Tuross Head across the water from mine. Though I must admit that Trevor and Christina’s place is somewhat more extensive than ours. They inhabit the entirety of Horse Island, a beautifully constructed family compound within a glorious native garden, the product of Christina’s hard work and exquisite taste over almost three decades. The biography, Casting His Net is now complete. It was a genuine pleasure to research and write, tempered only by the ravages that his association with Packer Inc. had wrought on Trevor’s health and vigour. There’s no doubt there were occasions when he has looked back on the experience with some deep regrets. But at the time the barefoot kid from Albany at the arse end of WA who had turned a cadetship on the local rag into the editorship of The Bulletin, editor-inchief of The Women’s Weekly and all the other mags had made Managing Director of the entire Packer shebang. By then, however, he was desperate to leave and take a long hot shower; and seek the leadership of a very different organisation, the venerable John Fairfax & Co. And having followed the story at his Tuross and Sydney digs I can well understand why. For while he began his own climb to riches at Packer’s Consolidated Press the real money came later when he joined with the inventor of the pioneering internet company Ozemail, Sean Howard (and persuaded a young Malcolm Turnbull to take a share). But it was the company he kept in the Packer days – notably the ratbag share trader Rene Rivkin – who would bring him to his knees in a fight with the ATO and ASIC that was only resolved years later with the payment of a very large dollop of his savings into the government’s coffers. Those lost years provided him with an extraordinary opportunity to feed a family passion for collecting Australiana, everything from Governor Macquarie’s dinner service to rare miniature portraits of early colonial figures to every kind of Parliamentary china imaginable. And last year he donated and sold some $15 million worth of it to the National Museum of Australia…with more still to go in private sale. But the element of the story I found most troubling was the moral vacuum that was the hallmark of the Packer organisation under James’s father Kerry. His wealth, it seemed, entitled him to ignore all the constraints of civilised behaviour – to insult, to lie, to gratify every appetite whatever the cost to others, then to splurge it all in a dice for disaster at some exotic casino table. James learned at his father’s feet. And the Crown saga is redolent with familial irony for he knew from experience that the ‘house’ always wins, so he bought the casinos. But then he fell for the three-card trick of unrestrained immorality: one day your sins will find you out. The final irony is surely the most painful, for it was his father’s own creation, the money machine called the Nine Network – and its finest flower, the 60 Minutes program – that broke the story of shocking malfeasance finally confirmed in Judge Bergin’s findings. As the biog’s author I have to say, ‘You really couldn’t make that up.’ robert@robertmacklin.com beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Reading

The February-March 2021 issue of ‘RecollecKons’ is Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 OUT NOW Vol 48 27th 2018 The February-March 2021 issue of ‘Recollec<ons’ is OUT NOW. Recollec-ons Editor Peter Lacey says "We hope you enjoy reading it and discovering a li?le more about the absolutely fascina<ng history of the NSW South Coast. Paper copies should be available in the usual outlets. It’s also accessible at www.bit.ly/Recollec<ons26 so please let all your friends, neighbours, workmates know that it’s now available.

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Reading

Local Council – is it worth the Bother? As a Councillor, I am some<mes asked, "why do you bother?" On a number of key issues, I have o=en found myself in the minority. Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

And yes, it can be a tad frustra<ng. Yet, something important is alive here. And as many people have said, "democracy is a par<cipa<on event." Represen<ng an alternate view, speaking up on behalf of community members, and advoca<ng for greater transparency are founda<onal to local council. As an independent Councillor I believe it is important to engage in the debate. The other week a couple approached me concerned that tourists were blocking their elderly neighbours drive way. The area is very busy and parking a premium. I am pleased to see No Parking markings now out the front of these driveways. A small ma?er on the grand scale of things, yet a significant issue when an ambulance can't access an elderly residence. And some<mes you get to champion an issue and even win the day. Be it promo<ng a cat curfew, which 6 other Councils in NSW have now adopted, or playing a role in the single use plas<c ban, maybe the sa<sfac<on of ge_ng a lick of paint on Albert Ryan public loos, or having the opportunity to advocate for greater road safety at the Tuross and Princes Highway intersec<on; you can make a difference. And yes, it can be challenging, while also being worth the effort. For example, why bother with a recission mo<on to try and save the Batemans Bay Community Centre or table a pe<<on on behalf of the fishing community to save the boat ramp on the south west side of the Bay bridge? Well the Centre’s user groups won a longer transi<on and a period of free rent. And for now, the boat ramp has been put back into the Bay Foreshore Plan. Why put up a mo<on to save the live streaming of our Public Forum presenta<ons or put up a pe<<on to save community blocks of land being sold off at Broulee, Pre?y Point or Sth Durras? We used to have a lot of public presenta<ons and engagement in Council. Unfortunately, Council voted to walk back from best prac<ce and while we lost the debate on live streaming when our community presents, the issue is alive for the next elec<on. As for the sell-off regarding our community blocks; the Pre?y Point, Broulee and Sth Durras blocks are s<ll in community hands; for now. As a councillor I have been able to explore the issues and full impact of a Rural Lands Strategy and support a mo<on on a Climate Emergency. Alas our Council voted down the Climate Emergency months before the horrendous bush fires. In our submission to the Commission on the bushire, one of the hardest hit councils in NSW, we didn't refer to climate change once. As an elected councillor you are accountable for these decisions and it is important to raise the point and ask ques<ons during the debate; even if you once again find yourself in the minority. So clearly reference to "climate change" is a hot topic in our Council - such debate helps the community understand where their elected representa<ves stand on such an important issue. As a Councillor you also have the opportunity to work and indeed chair commi?ees. On one commi?ee we are looking at ways to promote road safety, while reducing wildlife road kill. I recently read an ar<cle regarding Sunshine Coast Council and its wonderful results trialling new technology to help reduce the road kill of the Eastern Grey kangaroo. I then shared this news with a Transport commi?ee, which takes in Councils in Vic, NSW and the ACT. While early days yet, a trial may be on the way for our wider region. It may work; who knows? Yet it is a privilege to be in a posi<on to try and reduce the road kill carnage, especially between Batemans Bay and the ACT. So why bother; well, because you can make a difference. Regardless of the outcome on any issue, democracy is served when people step forward with the desire to be transparent, open and engaging with our community to champion the best outcomes for our community. Duty First. Anthony Mayne

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Reading

100 Years Ago 12 Feb 1921 Adver<sement – THE ILLAWARRA & SOUTH COAST STEAM SHIP COMPANY CO., Ltd. The fine Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 new passenger and cargo Steamers “Benandra” AND “Bodalla” especially built for the MORUYA TRADE, will maintain a REGULAR WEEKLY SERVICE between SYDNEY and MORUYA and vice versa (weather and other circumstances permi_ng) as follows: From Moruya to Sydney EVERY SATURDAY AFTERNOON or SUNDAY MORNING as <de permits. From Sydney to Moruya – EVERY WEDNESDAY. The Passenger Steamers EDEN or BERMAGUI leaves SYDNEY for BATEMAN’S BAY as follows: From Bateman’s Bay to Sydney – EVERY SATURDAY. From Sydney to Batemans Bay – EVERY THURSDAY. DEATH. – Mrs. G. Murphy, widow of Mr. George Murphy, who resided at “West End” Gundary for many years, died at a private hospital at Manly recently. Deceased who was a member of the Stevens family of the Burra, was 81 years of age. Latest Telegrams. Qualifying Cer<ficates: Moruya Public School – Rubie Arne?, Alan Colefax, Bertna Colefax, Muriel Parbery, Edward Arne?, James Colle?, Stella Ison, Horace Luck, Neason, Wilfred White, Frank Walker, Thekla Waters, Roy Coppin. St. Mary’s Convent, Moruya – Kathleen Brogan (deceased), Bridget Donovan, Frances Kea<ng, Noel Kennedy, John Brogan, Olga Thomsen, Marjorie Turner. Eurobodalla Public School – Nellie Taylor, Leslie Cur<s, Wilbred Taylor, Frederick Taylor. EUROBODALLA SHIRE. CORRESPONDENCE. Amongst the budget of correspondence was a le?er from the Police Dept. refusing to appoint a police officer inspector of slaughter yards. From I.S.N. Co. re linking up of the two wharves at Moruya. The Company is to be informed that the whole of the foreshores were occupied by a public road. From S. Fitzpatrick, Batemans Bay, asking permission to transfer his ferry contract to A. J. La?a, and from the la?er no<fying his willingness to carry on the contract. Transfer approved of. From Moruya A. P. and H. Society asking for a public holiday on 10th March, second day of Show. Request granted. From Tilba District A. P. and H. Society with similar request for 3rd March. Granted. Engineer’s ac<on in having brush cut on Nelligen-Braidwood road and finger boards erected at Central Tilba was endorsed. The altering and fixing of new sprocket wheels and altera<on of drive on the B. Bay punt was le= in the Engineers hands. The Engineer was authorized to get two new machine cut cog wheels for Narooma punt and the Clerk was instructed to claim £7 10s from the Clyde S. and S. Co. for damage done by their steamer Wee Clyde to the punt. A resolu<on by Crs. J. and H. J. Bate that the Narooma ferryman be allowed from 1.15 to 1.45 p.m. off duty to have his dinner without interrup<on was lost. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Reading

A BEER WITH BAZ #4 by John Longhurst The out of tune tap dancing sound made Bazza spin round on his stool to find Mick in the full regalia of a champion cyclist all the way down to the riding cleats on his shoes, making his way towards him with two Vol 16 September 15th 2017 schooners and large packet of potato chips. 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th a 2018 Bazza’s neck s<ffened to take in the full sight. Mick was very much the Michelin man squeezed into Lycra and the mul< coloured adver<sements on is <ght fi_ng shirt really did make him look like an oversized liquorice all sort. Mick set the beers down, opened the large packet of chips, grabbed a handful and placed the packet in the middle of the table; well not quite in the middle of the table; more towards Mick with the open end facing him. Mick sat up on the stool and the Lycra stretched every which way to hold him in. He took a very generous drink of his beer and another helping of potato chips. ‘I’ve cycled from Moruya to Bodalla, Bazza. It’s a new me. The missus is a bit scep<cal. She reckons I’ve got all the gear but no idea but here I am.’ Mick rewarded himself with another long drink from his schooner and another handful of potato chips. Bazza raised and eyebrow and tried for a loose chip but se?led for a drink of his beer and leaned forward. ‘Good on you, Mick. You’ve certainly got all the clobber. I’ve seen a few of you old blokes up and down the highway of a morning but there is one thing I don’t get and that’s the shirt. I get the shoes because they click into the pedals, I get the cycling pants because they have padding for the seat but I just don’t get the shirts. They’re so flimsy and wouldn’t offer any protec<on if you fell off your bike.” Mick adjusted his man boobs and stretched the cycle top over his ample stomach. He leaned forward with a fresh mouthful of potato chips and took another sip of his schooner. ‘It’s all about the weight Bazza. Every gram counts when you are chasing your PB....... that’s your personal best.’ Bazza nodded and took a sip of his beer. ‘Right oh Mick, but what about these logos and adver<sements. I mean, I’ve never heard of some of these brand names and I just wonder why you would buy a shirt that offers free adver<sing for these companies.’ Mick leaned forward with a slight grin ‘Bazza it’s just a ma?er of <me before my poten<al as a cyclist is realised by these companies and they will pay my loyalty back in spades.’ ‘Good luck with that, Mick’ And they both finished their beers. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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What’s on

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

ROCKING DOWN THE HIGHWAY Saturday 13th March $27.50 per person at Tomakin Club

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What’s on

FRANKIE J HOLDEN AND HIS BEAUT UTES BAND will be on stage at the Quarterdeck Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th for 2018 Narooma a night of Rock n' Roll. Take one of Australia’s legends of Rock and Roll who also just happens to be a household name through his work on TV, stage, radio and film - put him on stage with a hot band, and you have the recipe for a superbly entertaining evening. FRANKIE J. HOLDEN was born in 1953, the same year as the FJ Holden was first manufactured and during the course of his diverse career he has become as much of an icon as his automo<ve namesake. In 2016 he was awarded an Order Of Australia Medal for his contribu<on to the performing arts and for services to the south coast of NSW. He began his show-business career with the legendary rock group “OL’ 55”, one of the most successful Australian recording acts of all <me. Frankie J. has created some of Australian television’s most memorable characters through leading roles in long-running serials, most recently “UNDERBELLY” and “A PLACE TO CALL HOME”. He was awarded a Silver Logie in 2019 for his work in A Place To Call Home. FRANKIE J. has appeared in over thirty films both here and overseas. His screen work has been recognized with two Best Actor Awards and two nomina<ons for Best Suppor<ng Actor from the Australian Film Ins<tute. FRANKIE J. is also a very experienced and successful television presenter., having hosted “THE GREAT OUTDOORS”, “IN MELBOURNE TONIGHT" and “WHAT’S UP DOWNUNDER”. Through all these years, Frankie J has con<nued to entertain audiences all over Australia with what remains his first love: singing rock and roll. And making people laugh. The Beaut Utes are three Sydney muso’s who have worked with Frankie J many <mes in various guises, and they are joined at The Quarterdeck by special guest Frankie J’s brother Tony Monaro (yes, that’s right, Tony Monaro). This gig will be pure entertainment, with great music and lots of laughs. Between them, these guys know every song ever wri?en, and are happy to take requests. Just write your request on the back of a $50 note and hand it to Frankie J. Then sing a long. DOORS OPEN AT 6PM TICKETS $25PP PURCHASES YOU A SEAT AT A SHARED TABLE - QUARTERDECK CAN BE CONTACTED ON 44762723 beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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What’s on

All the known gigs to date: Feb 13th - Robin Simpson at JJ's Marina Feb 13th - Vinyl Rain – Club Narooma (5pm) Feb1613th - Ethan Parlato Vol September 15th 2017 at Tilba Valley Winery & Ale House 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 April 27th 2018 12.30pm Feb 13th - Solo West at the Batemans Bay Soldiers Club Feb 14th - Country Pumpkins – Bodalla Dairy Shed (12.30pm) Feb 14th - Sam Stevenson – Club Narooma (2pm) Feb 14th - Rob Simpson – Tomakin Club (4pm) Feb 14th - Tony Jaggers at Club Catalina Feb 14th - Jakob Poyner at Tilba Valley Winery & Ale House Feb 14th - Soul Stories at The Dromedary Hotel, Central Tilba. 4pm-7pm Feb 19th - Frankie J and his Beaut Utes at The Quarterdeck Narooma Feb 20th - Jazz Duet with Vince Jones at JJ's Marina Feb 20th - Local band CHAD – Tomakin Club Feb 20th - Joe Driscoll – Tuross Club (8pm) Feb 21st - South Coast Music Society presents two of Australia's most engaging musicians. Brenda Jones (piano) and Satu Vanska (violin) Sunday 21 February, at 2pm Feb 27th - The Gadflys at the Quarterdeck Narooma Feb 27th - Dave Nolan at JJ's Marina

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cinema

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cinema

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

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arts

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

“…the single most remarkable accomplishment of this Iliad Out Loud is that the simple telling of it – by the actors, texts in hand, addressing us as readers as well as assuming character voices from <me to <me – remains mesmerising throughout.” Dianna Simmonds, Stage Noise Homer’s ageless masterpiece – about pride and greed, glory and horror – doesn’t need resuscita<ng, it is very much alive. We invite you to lean back in our natural bush amphitheatre as evening turns to night, gaze at the stars as our ancestors have done for aeons – and listen to the epic saga of this greatest of all ba?les. The Iliad was created to be listened to. William Zappa devoured dozens of transla<ons, sure that the live transac<on between orator and audience could be rekindled in our <mes. The extraordinary result, The Iliad – Out Loud, has met cri<cal acclaim at recent Sydney and Adelaide Fes<vals. Now, presented outdoors for the first <me here in our own amphitheatre, Zappa’s nine-hour performing version for four actors, percussion, Persian oud, and local community members, is an adventure not to be missed.

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arts Montague VisiKng ArKsts 2021 Anna Stephens, soprano & Benjamin Burton, piano 2:30 pm Sat Feb 20 St Paul’s Anglican Church, Narooma Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Music by Handel, Debussy & 28 April December 7th,Donize_, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 Strauss Tickets $23 from Mitre 10, Narooma (in the arcade behind Li?le Joe's Pizza) and Nested on Wallaga, Bermagui, or $25 from Trybooking here h?ps:// www.trybooking.com/BOLIT Very limited seats at the door More info: 0439 648414

South Coast Music Society presents Satu Vanska and Brenda Jones in recital Feb 21st in Batehaven LiS your spirits in 2021 with live music. South Coast Music Society present fine music in beauKful south coast venues so you can listen local! Sunday 21 February 2021 at 2pm Brenda Jones (piano) & Satu Vanska (violin) Join two of Australia’s most engaging musicians as they explore a dynamic range of beloved violin and piano works by Mozart, Beethoven, Sibelius and Brahms. Brenda and Satu enjoy a decades long friendship that brings a unique depth to their musical collabora<on. This recital promises to be a warm and exci<ng experience for our south coast audience. Book Here h?ps://www.trybooking.com/events/landing?eid=712038&

Ngaranggal Muruda Group exhibi<on Sat 20 February - Sun 28 March 2021 at The BAS, Moruya Ngaranggal Muruda (Women’s Footprints) is a Bas curated exhibi<on of artworks by female Aboriginal ar<sts from across Australia. This mixed media exhibi<on celebrates the strength and diversity of Aboriginal expression and culture from a female perspec<ve – at both a local and na<onal level, and includes prominent Eurobodalla ar<st, Cheryl Davison. This exhibi<on was made possible by the generosity of Chris<na Kennedy of Eurobodalla’s Horse Island. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Ukubebe Music is new to Batemans Bay: 'Free trial' Early Childhood Music classes are running next Thursday 18th February, at the Children and Family centre,1B Melaleuca Cres Catalina: at following <mes. 10.20am-11am toddlers class 1-3 years 11.10am-11.50am preschool class 3+years and/or siblings. 12.00pm-12.40pm babies class 0-18 months. This is the only day for a free trial class. All new families are welcome, however numbers are limited. Bookings are essen<al on the website, thank you. Looking forward to mee<ng you all, Jo Steel, Ukubebe teacher. h?ps://www.ukubebe.com.au

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Arts

SoArt Gallery Narooma presents Hayley King Come along to SoArt Gallery Narooma and view South Coast based ar<st Hayley Vol 16 September 15thKing's 2017 solo show Kiss the Dirt. 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

King (pictured) was awarded the landscape prize at Waverley Woollahra Art School 2018. Her works have hung in exhibi<ons including the Olive Co?on Award for Photographic Portraiture in 2013, Muswellbrook Photographic Award 2014, and the Myself Prize 2017. Spending two years in the Gibson desert working with Papunya Tula ar<sts in remote communi<es, she worked alongside notable Indigenous ar<sts including Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri and George Tjungurrayi. She formed a close bond with Yukultji Napanga< (Wynne prize winner 2018), who took a special interest in her work and became a close friend and mentor. Where: School of Arts Co?age, 92 Campbell Street, Narooma ExhibiKon dates: Now unKl 12 February 2021

Laurie Phillips featured arKst at The Gallery Mogo The Gallery Mogo is a Crea<ve Arts Batemans Bay (CABBI) venture that is open to local and regional visual art prac<<oners. Promo<ng pain<ngs, 2D and 3D artworks of their members, Laurie Phillips is excited to start the new year as the featured ar<st. Having exhibited in Canberra, Bermagui, Braidwood and Batemans Bay, Laurie is an accomplished painter, art teacher and the curator of The Gallery. Paint has always run in her veins and as a student at the School of Art Canberra a new world opened up for her. This exhibi<on explores the themes of place and family, using abstract forms of colour in a variety of techniques and mediums. Where: 2/52 Sydney Street, Mogo ExhibiKon dates: Daily 10am to 4pm - now unKl 29 March 2021

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MORUYA LADIES GOLF RESULTS Wednesday, 10th February Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Teeing off on a damp course a=er overnight 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018 rain made the start a li?le slow for some of the 40 Moruya Lady Golfer’s who turned out to play a 2BBB Stableford. Fortunately the sun came out & somewhat dried the course, ensuing in some good golf results.

Winner’s of the day were: 1st Barbara Swain & Dawn Davies with a score of 44 2nd Noelene Levi & Angie McMillan scored 41 on C/B 3rd Barbara Roberts & Marilyn Bingham also scored 41 A presenta<on was also made by Captain Barbara Roberts to recipient Vicki Goodwin for her magnificent, and very enviable, achievement of a “Hole in One” last November. Vicki’s magical ball is to be mounted on the trophy as proof of her success in obtaining every golfer’s dream. Congratula<ons again Vicki.

The Combined Hospital Charity Day has been in place for several years now, with golfers from both the Women's Club and the Veterans Club playing. The Clubs, together with hospital representa<ves were very pleased with the $2,032 raised considering the condi<ons experienced by the fires and then the Covid virus during 2020. Le7: the cheque handover on Monday 8th February 2021.

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sports Broulee Runners Wed 10th Feb. This evening we welcomed 22 actual runners and 13 virtual runners. We welcomed Greg Castle and David Bain to their first run with the group and had John Lighcoot join us for his first run since 2009. It is wonderful to see the Broulee Runners Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 April 27th 2018 con<nue to thrive and be a social ac<vity for all levels. The camaraderie that has built over the years with some of the regulars is one of the lovely things about the Broulee runners group. There is always a lot of support and encouragement shown between all of the group and they welcome any new a?endees with the same enthusiasm. The success of the Broulee Runners is also due to the volunteers that help out each week. The ever-faithful supporters are Deb Connaughton, Richard Fisher, Robyn, and Mike Kennedy. These four normally do their run earlier in the day so that they are on deck at the run. Deb is the starter, announcer, <mekeeper, and photographer. Richard puts out the cones and hands out the place <ckets. Robyn records the finishers place and with Deb puts the finishers <mes against their name. Mike stands around and tries to look important. It is a=er the event that a large amount of work is done. Robyn and Mike make an appropriate story and type up the results. These are forwarded to Deb to polish and load onto Facebook with the photo. Mike sends the copy to the Bay Post and the Beagle. Thanks must also go to our generous sponsors, Damien and Judy Kennedy for supplying the Broulee runners shirts and the Tomakin Sports and Social Club for dona<ng our Mul<<mer to make the recording a lot easier. The Bay Triathlon was held last Saturday 6 February and some of our regular Broulee runners par<cipated. A few of the standout performances were Daniel Lloyd Jones who placed first in the Sprint Solo with a finishing <me of 1.01.11. A=er comple<ng his swim and bike leg Dan ran a very impressive 17.37 for the 5km run leg. Gary Ashton (pictured), Stephen Phipps and Julie De Ernsted competed in the Standard Solo and all finished this gruelling event in outstanding <mes, all coming over the finish line just over the 3 hour mark. Well done to you all.

Coila sailing is back Batemans Bay Sailing Club report that Coila sailing was back last Sunday saying " It was a beau<ful a=ernoon with a gentle breeze. There are four Coila sailing days le= this season - Feb 21st and March 7th. 21st and 28th. The briefing is on at 12 noon, races start shortly a=erwards. The club has a Spiral dinghy available for anyone interested in joining the club to take out for a sail." beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Steve Collins takes the honours at Tuross Vets Golf Despite forecast15th showers Vol 16 September 2017 during the day a good 28 December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 April 27th 2018 field of 59 players registered for the Tuross Head Veterans Golf Par event on Wednesday 10 February 2021. Winner on the day with a magnificent score of +5 from a 10 handicap was Steve Collins. Runner up was Barry Hoban on +4 with David Williams and Terry Lunn rounding out the major prize winners at +3. Balls or chocolates went to Lee Ridgway on +2, Richard Wharton, Ron Hanlon, Frank Pomfret and Winner Steve Collins (R) with runner up Barry Hoban Bruce Mar<n on +1, Jeane?e Miller, Julie Barningham, Anne?e Manton and Mike Birks on square, and finally to Peter Frost and Solveig Olsson with scores of -1. Herb Muriwai won the Bradman award in a three way count back, and nearest the pins going to Steve Gardner on the 4th, Ian Manton on the 6th, and to Leonie Snodgrass and Herb Muriwai on the 7th. Solveig Olsson was this weeks lucky winner in the Accuracy drive stakes.

2021 Hotondo Bay To Breakers Ocean Swim Good news is that the 10th Hotondo Bay to Breakers Ocean swim is a happening event on 7 March 2021 subject to any changes to the NSW health guidelines affec<ng the Far South Coast NSW region leading up to the event. Organisers say "We have confidence in our NSW Government's handling of the pandemic but acknowledge that health regula<ons and advice can change very quickly.

"Under the COVID management plan for the event there are a few changes to our 10th event that par<cipants must note. Entries will close on Friday 26 February 2021 at 8pm. There will be no late or on the swim day entries.

beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Your UP TO DATE Fishing report courtesy of Tackle World Moruya Moruya River. Vol 16 September 15th 2017 Sorry the lack of2017 a fishing report last week guys. I was having a much needed week off. With the rain we 28for December 7th, Vol 48 April 27th 2018 had last weekend, the river has been running a bit on the fresh side this week. This has, as expected, pushed the majority of the fish in the system towards the river mouth in search of cleaner sal<er water. Try around the airport flats, Preddy’s wharf and hole in the wall for your best chance at success. Best baits will be your oiler op<ons, tuna fillet, mullet fillet and pilchards. We should be seeing a easing of the wet weather cycle as we move into the cooler months, once La Niña loosens it grip on us. Tuross River. Tuross has also been running a bit on the fresh side this week, again focusing much of the fishing ac<on towards the river mouth and potato point flats side of the system. There have been good numbers of flathead s<ll being caught around the above men<oned areas, on both live poddy mullet, oily baits and lures. With the dir<er water, lures with noise or vibra<on making poten<al and lots of flash, in par<cular gold colours proving the most effec<ve. In amongst the cleaner fresher salt water of a rising <de, a few salmon have been coming into the system, offering a lot of fun to a few anglers using light gear. Small so= plas<cs, or small hard body lures are a great way to tempt these marauding scrappers. Rock and Beach. Most of the ac<on this week has been focused on the beaches, with good numbers of salmon, tailor, bream and whi<ng being caught. Pilchards on gang hooks and paternoster beach rigs have accounted for a lot of the salmon and tailor, as have metals cast and retrieved. The bream and whi<ng have favoured live beach worms or pipi’s. Having said that, there has been more than the occasional horse bream around 45+cm that has been quite prepared to hit a whole ganged pilchard. So you never know what might find your bait in the surf! Offshore. With the swell being a bit on the sloppy side this last week, not a lot of boat ac<on has occurred. But for those who have been out, good bags of flathead in the 30-40m mark have been reported, with snapper holding in around the 50-60m mark. Further offshore, there have s<ll been good reports from the game crews chasing Marlin. Find the bait, and you will most likely find the fish. With a dark moon tonight, this weekend is looking like a good <me to go chase some prawns. We s<ll have good stock of both prawn lights and nets. Most of the local lakes are holding prawns, so there are plenty of op<ons available. Don’t forget, we also have ZipPay and A=erPay available in store on purchases over $100 to help you get ki?ed out this season. Just ask in store, for more details. We have also have returning from Diawa, the ever popular Presso Rollin Crank hardbody lures, now the Infeet Rollin Cranks in both mid and deep divers in all 10 colours. Stay safe everyone and remember, “every days a good day for fishing...” Team Tackle World Moruya. beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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classifieds

Vol 16 September 15th 2017 28 April December 7th, 2017 Vol 48 27th 2018

beagle weekly : Vol 194 February 12th 2021

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Beagle Weekender Vol 194 February 12th 2021  

Beagle Weekender Vol 194 February 12th 2021  

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