Issuu on Google+

The Student Newspaper of Palm Beach Atlantic University Volume 8, Issue 4

Monday, October 10, 2011

In the name of love ‘

By Christina Cernik for the Beacon

Madison Baczweski: “We will be a voice for those whose rights have been taken away and who can no longer fight for equality, worth and freedom... I want

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit...

Matthew 28:19

to feel what they feel and be able to cry out to God to get me through it.” See this week’s Looks for pictures from Missions Emphasis Week.

Voices for freedom Some prominent female figures in the missions field spoke to PBA students at a dinner hosted by Campus Ministries

By Jessica Wharton Staff Writer Last week Palm Beach Atlantic University celebrated mission emphasis week. Speaking on a variety of issues in chapel, from speaking out for the oppressed to human trafficking, various missionaries and mission oriented leaders shared their experiences with students. Highlighting some prominent


women in the mission field, there was a question and answer dinner hosted by campus ministries with Sura Scholtz, Madison Baczweski and Shaunessy McNeely. Scholtz is married and the mother of 16 children. Baczweski is 18 years old and duel enrolled at Palm Beach Atlantic University. However, their passion to serve God has brought them together for the Freedom Climb in January of 2012. They, along with 40 other women, will be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in an effort to raise awareness for human trafficking and working to raise a goal

of $ 1.4 million. This money will save approximately 10,000 women from human trafficking and sex slavery. Baczweski said, “we will be a voice for those whose rights have been taken away and who can no longer fight for equality, worth and freedom. Every step we take up the mountain will be a day in the life of one of these women… I want to feel what they feel and be able to cry out to God to get me through it.” When asked at the question and answer style dinner what breaks their hearts and makes

Where will you go? Spring Break 2012

Summer 2012

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

Bolivia Brazil, Rio Brazil, Amazon Caribbean D.R. I D.R. II Haiti Honduras Jamaica

Refugees Asia S. Africa Trek UK Olympic Fest Sweden Cambodia Thailand Swaziland South Asia Great Lakes

See Freedom, page 6 By Rocky DeCell for the Beacon

Student entrepreneurs share goals

Google + users grow rapidly

Let the games begin

PBA students balance their lives of owning a business and attending classes.

Are Facebook’s new layout changes a response to the growing popularity of Google +?

This week, playoffs begin for intramural volleyball. Which team will you root for?

Features 4

News 3

Sports 7

2 news / editorial

The Beacon

Monday, October 10, 2011

Seen and Heard

PBA Students surf at local beaches

Chris Hernandez Managing Editor


Cash Lambert

any students have noticed that the weather in West Palm Beach has grown cooler. It’s not only because fall is approaching; a cold front pushed through the east coast of Florida, giving surfers waves to drop in, carve and throw airs on. Even though there is not an established surf club yet, many PBA students surf at Clarke beach, minutes from campus. According to swell charts, the swell will produce waves to surf until Tuesday. So grab a board, camera, and a friend and head to the beach!

nEws Editor

Charlotte Rakestraw FEaturEs Editor

Joshua Reid Sports Editor

Rocky DeCell graphic arts Editor

Jenny Hendriksen Web Editor

Meghan Gilmore Video Coordinator

John Sizemore ExEcutivE Editor

By Cash Lambert for the Beacon

Duane Meeks Publisher No part of the Beacon may be reproduced without permission. The opinions expressed in the Beacon are not necessarily those of the Palm Beach Atlantic University administration, staff or faculty.

Corrections for 10/03:

In who will you vote for?, Barack Obama was misspelled. In PBA Intramurals generating excitement, the name of the website is See something that needs to be in next week’s Corrections? Contact the editor of the section.

New stores taking food stamps By Megan Gilmore Staff Writer

By Rocky DeCell for the Beacon

By Amy Smith Staff Writer HPV vaccine not offered at PBA, but other testing done at Health and Wellness Center One of the most controversial topics in young adult’s health today could easily be awarded to the debate surrounding the human papilloma virus and its vaccine. HPV, a virus that can lead to a number of cancers including cervical cancer, is the number-one sexually transmitted disease in the country. Since it’s release in 2006, the vaccine is now making headline news by presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann. At the Republican debate in Tampa, Fla. on Sept. 12, Bachmann reprimanded Texas Gov. Rick Perry who, in 2007, ordered all sixth grade girls in the state to receive the HPV vaccine. Calling Perry’s actions a “violation of a liberty interest,” Bachmann also made a charge that in one case the vaccine was the cause of a mental retardation in a

Florida woman’s young daughter. While many pediatricians and researchers have spoken out against Bachmann’s claims, it has nevertheless brought the issue of the vaccine into the spotlight. Ilene Wallmueller, nurse practitioner at Palm Beach Atlantic University Health and Wellness Center, is aware of the issue of sensitivity when it comes to the vaccine. When asked if Health and Wellness offered the HPV vaccine to students, Wallmueller replied, “No, primarily because of the controversy surrounding the vaccine, as well as the parental concern.” According to Wallmueller, PBA has “no policy concerning the HPV vaccine,” however Health and Wellness can provide help when it comes to the matter of STDs. If students are concerned that they have contracted an STD, they should “first, come in (to Health and Wellness) and get tested,” said Wallmueller. “We offer every type of STD testing; we can review the results and treat them,” she said. “We

also do referrals.” A confidentiality code is enforced, assuring students complete anonymity and privacy when it comes to their testing and results. With so much publicity surrounding the HPV virus and it’s vaccine, there is an equal amount of information available to the public concerning both. Organizations like Center for Disease Control and HPV quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil, both distribute information pertaining to the characteristics of the virus, the symptoms to look for and the possible side effects from the vaccine. Gardasil, a very popular HPV vaccine in the country, lists some of its possible side effects as “headache, fever, nausea, dizziness and vomiting.” Gardasil’s website also informs that HPV is not only a risk for women, but for men as well, who may also be treated with the vaccine. The CDC further explains the signs and symptoms of HPV, stating, “Most people with HPV do

see HPV, page 6

A few years ago, food stamps were only accepted at grocery stores, but with today’s economy down, other business establishments have joined the list of retailers accepting food stamps to help Americans. In fact, the number of businesses that accept food stamps grew by a third from 2005 to 2010. This correlates to the number of people receiving food stamps. In April 2009, the number of people receiving food stamps, now known as electronic benefit transfers, increased 20 percent from the previous year with 39 million Americans receiving the benefits. No longer were food stamps only accepted at grocery stores, but now they are also being taken at convenience stores, dollar stores, gas stations, and even pharmacies. Some examples of establishments taking food stamps are Costco, 7-Eleven, and Target. Many retailers have reported increased sales after accepting the program. Family Dollar just cited EBT as the main reason for its recent increase in sales in a failing economy. CEO Howard Levine said food stamps are “a significant opportunity for us.” Food and beverages sales increased the total sales of the company by 18 percentage over the past year. One huge restaurant brand has just signed onto the program that would completely change the choices of what food stamp participants could purchase. This company is Louisville-based Yum! Brands, which owns a slew of fast food restaurants including

Taco Bell, KFC, Long John Silver’s, and Pizza Hut. This is great news for advocates who want to solve the problem of the millions of financially burdened Americans. But health advocates don’t know if making fast food an option is the smartest proposal. In fact, USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) has a rule that food stamps cannot be used for prepared foods. But there is a loop hole: There is a revision which was made in the 1970’s that allows restaurants to serve food to homeless, disabled or elderly people, said Jean Daniel USDA spokeswoman. One reason why this has become such a hot topic is because of the amount of money surrounding food stamps right now. Perhaps because of the United States’ failing economy, food stamp benefits have swelled from $28.5 billion to $64.7 billion between 2005 and 2010. Those late night Taco Bell Runs may be even cheaper for Palm Beach Atlantic Students soon if they qualify for food stamps because the law has just been accepted in Florida. Florida is the fourth state in the nation to jump on the food stamp bandwagon. They are now in the company of the state of California, Arizona, and Michigan. Yum! Spokesman Jonathon Blum said,” It makes perfect sense to expand a program that’s working so well in the other states, it enables the homeless, elderly, and disabled to purchase prepared meals with benefits

see Stamps, page 6

The Beacon

news / editorial 3

Monday, October 10, 2011

Google+ users growing rapidly By Brianna Dungan Staff Writer The new invention of Google+ has created a chaos in the world of social networking. People already involved with Facebook want to know what makes Google+ different. Why should they switch or not switch to this new hype? Google+ is striving to make social networking more personal and relatable. The company is trying to fill the gap between real and digital. According to Google+’s website, the motto is “Google+ makes sharing online more like sharing in real life.” One of the ways the company is doing this is by creating video hangouts that allow the user to talk with up to nine people on video chat at one time.

The company said this is the equivalent of “bumping into someone when you’re out.” One more way Google+ is different from Facebook is that Google+ automatically makes the users put their friends into circles. A circle is a group of friends sorted by how the user knows them (family, work etc). Through these circles, the user must decide what information can and cannot be shared with each circle. This information can be a variety of things including status updates and pictures. Google+ also offers interactive game rooms and a personalized search engine. Stephanie Bennett, associate professor of communication and media studies, is the author of “Communicating Love: Staying Close in a 24/7 Media-Saturated Society.”

“Google+ does seem to be catching on,” said Bennett, “however, if it isn’t Google+, it will be another networking site that becomes the most popular.” Bennett seems to be correct about Google+ catching on. According to CBS NEWS, since its debut this summer, Google+ has already generated 43 million members. Over the past few years, Facebook has skyrocketed. No other social networking site has been much competition for Facebook, until now. Even though Facebook still has a big lead over Google+ with 800 million active users compared to 43 million, Facebook is already trying to change things to keep ahead. According to CBS NEWS article “Facebook vs Google+: The

Ultimate Feature Faceoff,” Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg explained Facebook’s profile evolution. “The original Facebook profile contained just the basic facts -name, school, work -- the first five minutes of conversation. When Facebook added its news stream it was the equivalent of ‘what have you been doing lately?’ the next 15 minutes. The upcoming profile represents ‘the next few hours of deep conversation.’” The Facebook profile has become the Timeline. This Timeline is one of the main changes Facebook plans on initiating. The idea is to have a photo documentation timeline of users’ lives so all of their friends can learn more about them; Therefore, making Facebook deeper and more personal, just

like Google+. However, in this attempt to stay in the game, Facebook may be doing the exact opposite. Many students at Palm Beach Atlantic University have expressed their dislike of the new Facebook changes and have even talked about discontinuing use if these changes persist. However, other students like freshman Rachel Bartolotta have a different opinion. Bartolotta says that it’s a mild inconvenience for a free service that she’s in no way obligated to use. Whether users are inconvenienced or ambivalent, Facebook is changing and Google+ is growing. Users will be the determining factor in deciding who will reign supreme in social media.

see Google, page 6

Student Gov. impacting PBA By Heisy Padilla Staff Writer

Hour chemical reactions: Dr. Aleman observes as students conduct an experiment.

multiple one credit, and even zero credit, courses to satisfy the needs of the degree. Although there is less homework on a daily basis, these courses often demand the same amount of classroom time from a students schedule that any other course would. Many one credit courses in the arts are so critical to the student’s success that they are designed to not only meet the requirements of a one-credit course, but to also be repeatable. According to Matt Stegall, a PBA admission counselor, especially in the field of the arts, such courses are made to help students “to perfect their craft” or skills as they pursue their studies. “A lot of courses in the arts are pretty much considered practical courses; they

There are many clubs and groups at Palm Beach Atlantic University of which students can choose to be a part, one of which is the student government. Gregory Bromley, president of the student government, talked about the function of the PBA student government, how it has changed, and some of its upcoming plans. Student government serves as a main intermediary between students and administration. According to Bromley, “When students have a problem, I am usually the one they go to, and then I will be a voice for them to the administration. Likewise, when something is going on in the administration...I am usually told about that and then the student government tries to disseminate the information.” The student government plays an important role representing PBA students. For that reason the requirements to get involved have significantly changed. Bromley believes that in order to be part of the student government “there needs to be a sense of belonging.” In the past, to be a part of student government, one only needed twenty-five signatures from friends, three from professors, and attendance at the meetings. This year the criteria and process became more complex. “We had students approach us, and sign that they were interested in joining,” said Bromley. “We ran a background check on them to make sure that their grades were acceptable, then we talked to their RAs and then RDs; so we really brought them into the group, and not just anybody, people who showed a real interest.” The student government also shows diversity, bring in “two representatives from each of the resident dorms, two from athletics, two from commuters, one from multicultural and international.” Bromley, who has been participating in

see Credits, page 6

see Student, page 6

By Christina Cernik for the Beacon

One hour credit courses challenge students By Andrea Preciado Staff Writer One hour credit courses are crucial to a student’s degree and needed to graduate How many classes are you taking this semester? How many credits are you taking? As one pursues a degree at college many different courses will be taken, but not all are created equal in terms of credits. On average, completing a college course will earn a student three hours of credit, which makes it easy to stay full-time status, as four classes are required to meet the minimum requirement of twelve hours. But what if several of the classes needed for a degree do not have a credit hour value of three? What about those pesky one credit hour courses? How do they fit into the picture?

“It has to do with the way education was set up in the 1940’s,” said Dean of Fine Arts Lloyd Mims. “Credit hours were assigned to courses based on the preparation you were supposed to put into a course outside of class.” Generally the mind set behind a three credit hour course was that a student would spend about three hours preparing for the course for each hour in the classroom. This would include the time one would use for studying, reading materials, composing projects and papers, and homework. The fewer hours that the course has credit for, the workload outside the classroom gets smaller, generally. “It has to do with the amount of preparation you are supposed to do prior to going to class rather than the time you spend in the class,” Mims said. Several majors require students to take

4 features

The Beacon

Monday, October 10, 2011

Student entrepreneurs share future goals Palm Beach Atlantic University students discuss finding a balance between school work and running a business. By Amisha Shockency Staff Writer Erik Thebeau, a senior marketing major at Palm Beach Atlantic University, has always loved sneakers. “I started wearing Jordans when I was in the sixth grade, and began collecting them in my freshman year of high school,” says Thebeau. That passion for shoes is still part of Thebeau’s life; it has driven him to begin a business. He is the owner of GotSole?, a company that caters to sneaker collectors of such major brands as Nike and Air Jordan in Palm Beach County. GotSole? allows them to buy, sell and trade shoes online. Another student who has began a business in college is Eugene Blakely, a psychology major and founder of E.A. Blakely Ministries. According to Blakely, the goal of E.A. Blakely Ministries is to reach out to high school and college students, teaching them the importance of “Being true to the leading man and lady that God has called [them] to be.” For Blakely, there is a sense of responsibility when it comes to owning a business. “Being the president and founder, everything comes through me,” says Blakely. “I remember at 19 everyone was worried about prom and college; I was worried about not being taxed. You definitely have to have the heart of commitment.” Jelani Dixon, an entrepreneurship major and founder of the urban style clothing brand, SWAG17, or Start with Asking God 17, sees his business as an active learning experience for life after college.

“This position has given me the opportunity to develop good work ethic that I will need to continue to take my business to higher levels,” says Dixon. For these men, the purpose and sole drive of owning a business is not completely about the monetary reward. “I want to bring awareness to organizations that help people in need,” says Dixon, who has a line of clothing under SWAG17 that goes to support missions and disaster relief victims. “I’ve always had an uncompromising drive,” says Thebeau, who hopes to expand his business one day. Dixon shares Thebeau’s future goals. “I want to continue to work hard, in hopes of one day running a billion dollar company,” says Dixon. Blakely has recently signed a contract with the television network ABC Family for a talk show expected to air in 2014. Thebeau continues campaigning GotSole?, which, has grown to over 1,700 members since its launch four months ago, and Jelani actively runs SWAG17 , working on new projects and ideas. Finding the balance between school work and business may become overwhelming for some, but Thebeau encourages those wanting to take part in a business. “It takes a lot of energy and motivation to launch a successful business,” says Thebeau, “but continue to press forward and seek guidance and strength from God to help you in your journey.” Christian Rosario contributed to this story.

By Becca Wendt for the Beacon

Pumped up Kicks: Erik Thebeau shows off his exclusive shoe collection.

Early classes keep students sober

By Meghan Gilmore Staff Writer

If you know you have to wake up early in the morning, then you go to sleep earlier, right? And if you had the option of studying for class or going to a party when you don’t have to wake up really early the next morning, then you will most likely choose the party, right? That may be typical college student behavior, but this decision to party late at night and postpone school to the afternoon hours has some negative affects, according to researchers at St. Lawrence University. A study by St. Lawrence psychologists shows that students who choose to take later classes

do, indeed, get more sleep, but the trade-off is that they consume more alcohol and thus focus less on class work, resulting in lower grades. The study, by psychology professors Serge Onyper and Pamela Thacher, found that students who didn’t sign up for early morning classes did for the most part get more shut-eye, but at the same time those students went out and partied more. Researchers believed this was due to the fact that when students know they have an early class, they may tend to avoid nights out on the town. Although the difference in GPA’s between the early birds and the alarm snoozers is not huge, there is a huge difference in the

amount of alcohol consumed. Not only is excessive alcohol consumption terrible for the body in many ways, but it is also the number one negative influence on poor academic performance. “The effects of later class-start times might include more sleep,” Thacher said. “But this might be offset by lower quality sleep, which in turn might affect students’ ability to engage, intellectually, with their coursework.” Some students make the claim that drinking alcohol makes them drowsy and sleepy at night, but scientists say this is inaccurate. Alcohol raises blood sugar and thus creates an energy boost and a “high” in the body; therefore it makes it nearly impossible to

fall asleep after consuming large amounts of alcohol, unless you pass out, which is even more dangerous. The psychology professors surveyed 253 college students who completed cognitive tasks and a one-week retrospective sleep diary, as well as questionnaires about sleep, class schedules, substance use and mood. Thatcher is the author of a 2007 study showing that college students who pull “all-nighters” get lower grades. She said after seeing the results of this study that it changed her mind about how to schedule classes. “Prior to this study, I advocated having classes start later in the morning, so that students could get more sleep,”

she said, noting that in that respect, the results are similar to those conducted on high school and junior high students. “But now, I would say that 8 or 8:30 a.m. classes are probably, for some students, going to be a much better choice.” So having shuffled through all the information and study results, there seems to be a common thread. If alcohol is not a part of a student’s life, then the time of that student’s classes are not at optimum importance. But if alcohol is a part of a student’s life, then it may be smarter for students to schedule early classes, so they will not feel the luxury of getting to sleep in because they don’t have early classes.

The Beacon

Monday, October 10, 2011

features 5

On set with Parker

Filming of upcoming action thriller movie in Palm Beach County sparks interest from the community.

Local filming for the movie Parker brought Jennifer Lopez and Jason Statham to Palm Beach Island and West Palm Beach. During one of the scenes, all three bridges were closed to traffic to allow aerial shots from helicopters. PBA students swarmed to the bridge hoping to get their front-row glimpse of celebrities.

Photos by Greg Halmos for the Beacon

Still Jenny from the beach: Jennifer Lopez takes a moment for herself behind the scenes.

6 Continued

The Beacon

Monday, October 10, 2011


From page 1

By Rocky DeCell for the Beacon

Freedom From page 1

them pound their fists, McNeely was quick to respond with her feelings on female genital circumcision. In her first job in missions work after graduation with her degree in nursing, McNeely served in Sudan where “100% of the women were circumcised who were part of the tribe.” “We saw so many girls and women die from infection caused by this that it just pulled at my heart strings and I had a hard time wrestling with their culture and what is biblical. “I was able to one day, at exactly 6 months with this tribe, share the love of God with these women and that if they come to know Him, they will for the first time know their worth,” she said.

By Christina Cernik for the Beacon

Fast Food Stamps: Louisville-based Yum! Brands, which includes fast food chains like Taco Bell, just signed on to a program that will include its restaurants among the options for Food Stamps.


From page 2 in a restaurant environment.” Although Yum! Brands is all for the new law and program, others are totally against the new program and what it promotes. For instance, Kelly Brownell,

director of Yale’s Center for Food Policy and Obesity says, “It’s preposterous that a company like Yum! Brands would even be considered for inclusion in a program meant for supplemental nutrition.” Edward Cooney of the Congressional Hunger Center responded to Brownells words with: “They think hungry is better?” “I’m solidly behind what Yum! is doing.”

To this, Scholtz added, “so many horrible practices overseas have been stopped because of brave Christians spoke up at the right time.”


From page 3 student government since grade school has extensive experience regarding student government. The student governments leaders hope to see the student center renovated. According to Bromely,


From page 2 not develop symptoms or health problems from it. In 90 percent of cases, the body’s immune system clears HPV naturally within two years. But there is no way to know which people get HPV will go on to develop cancer or other health


From page 3 are laboratory courses,” said Mims. All fine arts, from music to theater to dance, have such requirements in their programs. Although practice makes perfect, what about the other end of the spectrum where courses are worth more than three credit hours? Many academic courses such as chem-

Baczewski said about her heart that “everything hurts us because we are still so young and are still looking for God to show us where our hearts of serving will be.” Scholtz, the mother of 16 children, some biological and some adopted, also spoke at Chapel on Thursday, October 6 on the passage of Luke 10:25-37; the parable of the Good Samaritan. The main verse she worked to emphasize was Luke 10: 29, “But he wanted to justify himself, so he asked Jesus, ‘And who is my neighbor?’” Telling of 4 girls who have been sexually abused back in Zambia, of the trafficked victims around the world, an approximated 27 million, and of the mail order bride business, she told of the Christian’s neighbors and that we cannot stand for this injustice to continue. Scholtz also linked the Great Commission to go and make disciples to the Great Commandment and concluded by saying, “we cannot just be readers of the word, we need to be doers of the word.” the chairman of the board of trustees is on board with this plan. Another student government plan this year is to form a student judiciary “to alleviate some of the problems they have been having with disciplinary actions. So instead of going to professors and adults in administration, the students will be able to regulate each other,” Bromley said. problems.” There is much more information regarding HPV and the vaccine at the Center for Disease Control website at Despite it’s controversy, information and opinion about the HPV vaccine is not leaving our society anytime soon. Whether you are in favor of it or against it, there is plenty of information out there to educate yourself with; all you have to do is dig a little. istry and math are at times listed as having four or even five credit hours. Stegall said that this is because of additional requirements such as the fact that many science courses “have a lab component” or “additional class time” requirements that can increase the credit hour value, and workload, of a course. With spring schedules coming, students need to be wise when picking credits, whether three hours or one.

Sports 7

The Beacon Monday, October 10, 2011

Sailfish weekly report

Hogg continues scoring streak By Joshua Reid Sports Editor On Oct. 1 the men’s soccer team won its third consecutive game, defeating Francis Marion University 4-1. Junior Kenny Hogg continued his dominance by scoring his tenth goal of the season in the match. The team then had a match against Saint Leo University on Oct. 4. Hogg scored his 11th goal of the season to tie the game at 2, but the momentum wouldn’t last long as the team gave up two more goals before losing the match 2-4. The Sailfish conclude their five-game road trip on Oct. 12 when they play Barry University before coming back home to play Southeastern University on Oct. 15. By Christina Cernik for the Beacon

Let the games begin Spike This: Aaron Milton (top left) and Meagan Searle (top right) of Spike-Adellic compete in a recent match. The team sets up a play for Milton. Playoffs for intramural volleyball and basketball begin all of this week. The championship matches for both sports are on Friday, Oct. 14. To see the results of the regular season, go to

Gilmore injured; Warren steps up By Shannon O’Shea Staff Writer NCAA Division II All-American Meghan Gilmore did not compete in the Florida Runners Invitational on Sept. 30 due to an foot injury. Gilmore, who plays a huge part in the team’s success, has been out due to plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the thick tissue on the bottom of the foot. This tissue connects the heel bone to the toes and creates the arc of the foot. “I kept running on it despite the pain and then since it hurt, I overcompensated and put the weight on the outside of my foot and it caused a stress fracture,” Gilmore said. She has decided to redshirt this year. “Right now I am being really patient and am going to let it heal. I just try to think about it like Lance Armstrong; if he can come back that strong after cancer, then I can come back at least half of that from a foot injury then I will be happy,” said Gilmore

Sailfish Sports Oct. 10-17

Though Gilmore plays a huge role, every team member is crucial to the team’s success. “The team consists of seven runners; five score. The team with the lowest score wins,” said cross country coach Trish Butler. “The race is a 5k (3.1 miles), sometimes a 6K. Cross country is not a glory sport. Most of the time the only reward is knowing that you tried

“I just try to think about it (recovery) like Lance Armstrong; if he can come back that strong after cancer, then I can come back at least half of that from a foot injury then I will be happy.” - Gilmore your best.” “Faith Warren has really stepped up and is a real team leader. Her overall great attitude and enthusiasm is contagious,” added Butler. Warren, a junior, has finished

Women’s Soccer Tuesday- 7 p.m., Home vs. Barry University Buccaneers

first for the fish in the past two meets. “Faith is running in the 19:30’s but our team, all five girls that score are running in the 19:30’s to the 20:30���s,” said Gilmore about her teammates. “They are all so equal and anyone can step up to be the number one runner on any day. Also it is very intimidating to have a pack of runners together so I think they have a great shot.” “The team has really come together,” said Butler. “I am very encouraged with the progress they have made in the last three weeks with Meg being out. We have managed to move up five spots in the USATFCCCA rankings.” The Fish have only six weeks till Nationals and are ranked fifth in the United States Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association poll (USTFCCCA). “Our success solely lies in the girl’s hands and what they are willing to sacrifice to make it happen. Only time will tell,” said Butler.


The women’s soccer team lost its only game of the week, losing 0-2 to Lynn University on Sept. 29. The Sailfish fell to 5-5-1 on the season. The team won’t have another game until Tuesday, Oct. 11 when it plays at home against Barry University. On Oct. 4 the volleyball team lost its only match of the week, losing in straight sets to the number-two-ranked University of Tampa Spartans. It was only the Sailfish’s second loss of the year. The team was to host the Pepsi Bash at the Beach on Friday, Oct. 7 and Saturday, Oct. 8, with the first match against Shepherd University. To see results of the match and the rest of the tournament, go to

New club hits the water at PBA By Joshua Reid Sports Editor A new wakeboard and water ski club has arrived at Palm Beach Atlantic University. Water Ski Wakeboard Association (WSWA) is a weekly club that meets at the Ski Rixen Cable Park in Deerfield Beach, Fla. “Back home in Canada, wakeboarding is huge. I wanted to bring that experience with me to West Palm,” said junior Tyler Koeller, the president of WSWA. Wakeboarding is a surface water sport which involves riding a wakeboard over the surface of a body of water. It was developed from a combination of water skiing, snowboarding and surfing techniques. When Koeller first came to PBA, he met freshman Sydney Jeffery, who is the vice president and had shared the same idea of starting a new club. “Before I moved from Chicago, I was talking with my parents about wanting to start a club,” said Jeffery. “Tyler and I both have a passion for wakeboarding. I met him at Club Rush and learned he wanted to start one too; I knew it was going to be great.” Whether you are a first timer or you have wake boarded your whole life, any person can join WSWA.

Cross Country

Wednesday- 7 p.m., Home Friday- 6 p.m. vs. Nova Southeastern Sharks UCF Black and Gold Challenge @ Orlando, Fla

“I have only wake boarded for a year,” said Jeffery. “I was on a show team in Chicago whereas Tyler has more experience. He is used to the business approach. “I have always wanted to learn the business aspect of wakeboarding. Since I wasn’t able to be on the board for my show team, I hope to accomplish that here.” Sophomore Katie Sura has also had a hand in getting WSWA started. “Growing up close to a lake in Minnesota, I have always wanted to do something on the water. Wakeboarding will allow me to do that,” said Sura. Koeller and the Cable Park staff will have instructions available year round. “When people join WSWA, it will not just be about wakeboarding. We will have ‘Chill Times’ to just relax and talk about anything,” said Koeller. “It’ll be cool for us to form as a community and to grow into relationships with one another,” said Sura. “We want to meet uplifting people,” said Jeffery. “It doesn’t matter if you have a lot of experience or if you don’t really know what wakeboarding is. Everyone will be treated the same and will have a lot of fun.” To register for WSWA, go to

Men’s Soccer

Women’s Soccer

Saturday- 2 p.m., Home vs. Southeastern University Fire

Saturday- 7 p.m. @ Valdosta State University Blazers

8 Looks

Monday October 10, 2011

“But thanks be to God, who always leads us in triumphal procession in Christ and through us spreads everywhere the fragrance of the knowledge of him. For we are to God the aroma of Christ among those who are being saved and those who are perishing.”


Photo by Tai Cornell

From movie nights and missions celebrations to prayer labyrinths and trip introductions, Missions Emphasis week is always an empowering and moving event. Students across the campus are encouraged to answer the call of the Great Commission. Every trip at PBA is student led and all student leaders are overwhelmed with joy as they serve out on God’s mission field. As one, God’s people stand and say “Send me: I’ll go.”

Photo by Tai Cornell

Photo by Christina Cernik

Photo by Tai Cornell

The Beacon 10/10/2011