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March 2013 vol 2 issue 03

Central Vancouver Island Edition

MAGAZINE

The New Star of old-timey • 6 THE NEW ART WORX GALLERY • 12


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FEATURES

Travellin’ with Carolyn: A Seaside Birthday

6 Annie Lou: The New Star of Old-Timey 12 Marlowe Goring: Art Worx Gallery

TRAVEL & OUTDOORS

4 Travellin’ with Carolyn: A Seaside Birthday 18 Tide Table

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

13 Ivory Shades of March 22 ECHO Player’s: Memory of Water

COMMUNITY LIFE 18 The Art of Conscious Living COMMUNITY PEOPLE

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Annie Lou: The New Star of Old-Timey

21 Health & Wellness Matters: Preventing a Fall

THE REGULARS 28 26-27 29 3 0-31

In the Stars: Georgia Nicols Horoscope Community Events Classifieds At Your Service - Local Services & Trades

On the Cover: “Sea Lion at Fanny Bay” ~ Linda Tenney photo

5 Images & Voices: Connie Kuramoto

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5 Images & Voices: Connie Kuramoto 14 Kwalikum Secondary School Honour Students 24 BizBanter

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LOCALLY OWNED • COMMUNITY INSPIRED

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MAGAZINE

March

VOLUME 2 NO 3

EyesOnBC Magazine is published monthly

Main Email: info@eyesonbc.com Phone: 250-757-9914 Mailing Address EyesOnBC Magazine Box 182, Bowser, BC V0R 1G0 Hours: Mon - Thu 10-4 Our Contributors this month: Lisa Verbicky, Rita Levitz, Georgia Nicols, David Morrison, JoAnne Sales, Carolyn Walton, Linda Tenney, Michael B Poyntz On the Internet www.eyesonbc.com & www.facebook.com/eyesonbc Subcriptions In Canada, from $35 CDN incl HST Inquire about foreign subscriptions Call 250-757-9914 to subscribe. VISA & MasterCard accepted or go online to www.eyesonbc.com to subscribe.

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Articles and/or data may not be quoted or reproduced, in part or in whole, without permission from the publisher.

Freelancers Queries can be directed to Linda Tenney, Publisher at info@eyesonbc.com

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For more information 250-335-2122 • www.ubcu.ca

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A SEASIDE BIRTHDAY by Carolyn Walton

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ot sun rays engulf us as we languidly soak in seaside, warm mineral pools. It’s hard to believe it’s February and we’re still on Vancouver Island. Without hectic plane flights, security hassles or currency problems to deal with, we’re totally relaxed here on the beachfront of Victoria’s luxurious Oak Bay Beach Hotel, as we gaze in awe at the towering snow-capped beauty of Mount Baker in the distance. Two resident eagles land nearby to check us out. Evening soaks are surreal as whales serenade with their songs. Opened in December, this English Country Manor House-inspired hotel sits on the site of the original Oak Bay Beach Hotel, built in 1927 by Major Merston. Although it was completely destroyed by fire in 1930, an exact replica was rebuilt on the ashes. That building, with all its old world charm, became “the place to be, and be seen” among locals and guests alike. Distinguished guests would dress up in their finest for their grand appearances in the Dining Room each night. Needing expensive renovations and seismic fittings, that building reached the end of its functioning life in 2004 and was carefully deconstructed over months, preserving many physical elements of the old building and its furnishings to be used in the new hotel. Some 95% of it was either saved for re-use or recycled, resulting in only 5% ending up in the landfill. The mirrored glass and original adzed wooden beams, along with the fireplaces recall memories of Victoria’s first neighbourhood pub, The Snug, while the street-side entrance to Kate’s Café houses the hotel’s original entryway. An early owner was an avid antique collector and dealer, whose travels outfitted the Victorian hotel with priceless antiques, many of which have been restored to their former glory. Accented by chandeliers, wood panelling, state-of-the-art audio and digital projection and a stage showcasing David Foster’s prized grand piano, the David Foster

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Mineral Pools at Oak Bay Beach Hotel with Mt Baker in the background• Carolyn Walton photo Foundation Theatre presents movies, live theatre and music, with a portion of all ticket sales going toward owners, Kevin and Shauna Walker‘s pledge to raise $2 million over 10 years for Foster’s foundation that aids families of children needing organ transplants.

with shrimp, crab and scallops in a cream sauce. The hotel’s intimate 34-seat dining room is booked by a private group, so for my birthday dinner we dine next door in the Oak Bay Marina Restaurant, on wild Sockeye salmon and Dungeness crab in a room with a spectacular panoramic ocean view of the well-lit yachts in the marina.

For my birthday we plan to only use the hotel as overnight lodging while taking in some of Victoria’s highlights: the Museum, Craigdarroch Castle, Art Gallery, IMAX movies etc., but once we are ensconced in comfy leather couches before a roaring fire in the immense copper-hooded fireplace off the lobby, and have succumbed to decadent dips in the mineral pools, we don’t want to leave! We do take a drive, following Beach Drive into Uplands, Cadboro Bay, and as far as the Cordova Bay Road where we lunch in the delightful Adriennes Tea Garden on house specialities of Shrimp & Crab Stuffed Mushroom Caps and Seafood Crepes filled

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As we head back up island the next morning, we stop in to check out “Hook” at the corner of Fort and Blanchard Streets in downtown Victoria. Co-owner, Christine Kerr, gives us a preview of the soon-to-be opened café which will specialize in all-natural, cured and smoked seafood products, processed and smoked in their own plant located in Hilliers near Coombs, BC, using only salt, sugar, spices and natural wood smoke. ~ Travel questions? Contact me at wordsbywalton@shaw.ca •

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were unsustainable, and yet teaching to industrial standards was the responsibility that I had to my students.”

CONNIE KURAMOTO

DIVERSITY EQUALS RESILIENCE by Rita Levitz

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t’s so joyful to me, seeing the light in people’s eyes when they start to understand what’s going on in their gardens and the marvelous way nature works. With that understanding we can nurture ourselves and our gardens.” Connie Kuramoto has the practical and theoretical background to make that statement. She has been teaching gardening for over thirty years; another twenty-five years of garden experience can be added onto that.

Just as Connie was thinking of retiring from her job, she was approached by Heide Hermany, founder of Gaia College. “Gaia was started to fill the need for organically focused horticultural education. Facilities are rented and courses offered in different communities.” Connie teaches the Organic Master Gardener course, Organic Food Growing course and the Plant Knowledge course, all of which can be taken separately or as part of the Organic Landcare Diploma. “An exciting thing I’m working on now is a Qualicum School Sustainability Project. The Organic Master Gardener course from March to mid-April and the Food Growing course in April and May will be at KSS, thus bringing the community into the school and connecting with the school’s own initiatives around food growing and becoming a horticultural center.”

“When I was growing up in Adams, Massachusetts, my dad arranged for us to have a garden plot at a local farm since our own yard was too small. I just thought everybody had a garden. When I moved to downtown Boston, I cleaned up trash in the backyard, planted a garden and grew some great tomatoes. Now I think about all the heavy metals and toxic material that must have been there; we were more innocent then.”

Connie is constantly testing and evaluating her beliefs and practices. “It’s a very stimulating time in horticulture, integrating traditional ways of growing with modern science, seeing what works, what doesn’t, and why.” When Connie moved to Qualicum Bay three years ago, invasive grass species had virtually taken over her new lot. “I’m transforming the un-wanted lawn into foodgrowing space. When a person drives by, they never know what they will see,” she laughs. “I believe in using what I have on

If, as Connie says when describing the workings of nature, that “diversity equals resilience,” then it must hold true for humans too. Connie studied Botany at the University of Massachusetts, fished commercially off the west coast of Vancouver Island, and then entered the twoyear Greenhouse Horticulture Technology Diploma Program at Malaspina College. “It was after a particularly bad fishing trip, and with my love of plants and good food, it seemed like a natural fit.”

hand. I found myself one day with a pile of prunings and small branches. I was going to burn them when I realized I had all this organic matter I could make use of. I loaded compost and manure on top and planted some pumpkin plants. I ended up with huge pumpkins, all feeding off of the decaying branches underneath. Turns out I had created a ‘hugelkultur’ area.” “One of the greatest misconceptions is that gardening is labour intensive. There are so many ways to save time and energy, especially if you work with nature.” Connie’s lawn is not so much being vanquished as it is being put to other uses. “I should write a book called ‘The Lazy Gardener.’” Connie brings to her classes an infectious passion, humour and joyful expectation of the un-expected—whether it is a plant, or an irrigation system on the loose, giving her the opportunity to run through the spray laughing. She retains the joy of the child she once was in the garden, and that joy too becomes accessible to her students. “With gardening you give yourself permission to get really dirty and to make discoveries. You learn to make good observations and decisions, but no-one can tell you step-by-step what to do. That’s where the art comes in. It’s okay to make mistakes in your garden--just keep building up the soil and keep planting.” ~ Connie can be found at Gaia College www.gaiacollege.ca and Gardens on the Go www.gardensonthego.net

Connie Kuramoto • submitted photo

Connie spent the next twenty years as a teacher/technician in that Program. “I’ve been lucky to have taught in different situations and to a diverse group of students, from ones with no gardening experience to horticulture teachers seeking professional development, students aged 14 to 70, students in Special Needs and Mental Health Programs, each situation bringing different joys and challenges.” “At Malaspina I had the freedom to explore different ways of doing things. I integrated my organic-growing roots with commercialscale horticultural growing. As time went on though, it became more and more obvious to me that the industrially sanctioned standards M A R C H

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Annie Lou Genest • submitted photo

ANNIE LOU: THE NEW STAR OF OLD-TIMEY by David Morrison

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ong gone she may be, but the spirit of one of my grandmothers still helps steer me through this life. As a child I spent a lot of time with my mom’s mom, so her words of wisdom and numerous proverbial sayings remain indelibly scorched in my mind. Although on several unfortunate occasions I have done my utmost to discredit this particular nugget of advice, one such saying was ‘Never mix the hop and the grape.’ So it was with a smile that I first heard the title track to the ‘old-timey’ country-folk artist Annie Lou’s latest CD, “Grandma’s Rules for Drinking.” Recalling her own grandmother’s prudent guidance in respect of alcohol consumption, including a warning of gin’s effect on the complexion, it is one of eleven utterly delightful songs on the Parksville-based songwriter’s acclaimed new release. Whether country, bluegrass or folk, any fan of rustic roots sounds not yet acquainted with the music of former baker Annie Lou is in for a joyous experience. A relaxed vocal delivery; dazzling playing from a stellar band; an uncanny knack for wistful and jaunty melodies; lyrical ingenuity, and a true grasp of string band traditions, all combine

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to gorgeous effect. As a former concert promoter and radio programmer of roots music I’ve heard a great deal in this realm, but take it from me that Annie Lou’s music is up there with the very best. A key as to why is her acute understanding of the emotional properties of old-timey-style country songs: “This music has a profound edge to it,” she says. Annie Lou is the professional name of Anne Louise Genest, yet on the evidence of the two accomplished CDs she has released under that moniker it comes as something of a surprise that Genest does not boast a particularly rich musical background or upbringing. “I didn’t play music at all as a kid,” she begins. “I came to it quite late, starting out in kitchen jams in the Yukon. When I started writing songs and got serious about a musical career, I did release two solo singer-songwriter albums as Anne Louise continued on page 10

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HEALING TOUCH

International (HTI) Certificate Program since 1997.

by Anji Jones, Healing Touch Practitioner

What is Healing Touch?

H

ealing Touch is useful for any condition where healing of body/mind/spirit is indicated to assist a return to wholeness and create a sense of well-being, and is complementary to traditional medicine. I first heard about Healing Touch back in 2005 and I admit to being skeptical and hesitant to try it. Then in 2008 I went for a detox foot bath with Eva Grodt in Parksville (organizer of ‘Shift in Action’ meetings.) After the foot detox, Eva offered a treatment and I laid down, fully clothed with a blanket over me. Afterwards feeling so totally relaxed I asked “What was that?” and Eva told me it was a Healing Touch treatment. From that moment on I was hooked and wanted to know more and a few weeks later I attended a Level 1 Healing Touch weekend workshop. Since then I have met with our Qualicum Beach Healing Touch practice group twice a month, where we practice the techniques on each other. Presently I am a Healing Touch Practitioner Apprentice HTI-PA (level 4).

Healing Touch is a relaxing, nurturing energy therapy. Gentle touch assists in balancing your physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being. Healing Touch works with your energy field to support your natural ability to heal. It is safe for all ages and works in harmony with standard medical care. How can Healing Touch Benefit You? • Stress reduction • Pain reduction and management • Acute/chronic conditions • Scientific research suggests there is accelerated healing of wounds and broken bones. Barbara Botham and Anji Jones HTI-PA will be at The Parksville Health and Wellness Fair on Saturday April 6th from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. offering “Free” 5 to 10 minute Healing Touch treatments. We look forward to meeting you.

There are five levels of workshops altogether leading to certification. However there is no requirement to do all the levels. Family and friends benefit straight away from techniques learned in Level 1 and you can link up with a local practice group. Workshops happen up and down the Island all the time. Healing Touch grew out of the nursing practice of Janet Mentgen, BSN, RN, and was further developed into the Healing Touch Certificate Program by the American Holistic Nurses Association (AHNA) in 1989. It is a compilation of the work of many different healers. The American Holistic Nurses Association has endorsed The Healing Touch

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continued from page 6 Clements, Genest has assembled a powerhouse outfit of household names in Canadian roots music circles. Alongside Genest onstage are the acclaimed, Whitehorse-based singer-songwriter Kim Barlow (banjo/ vocals), plus mandolin maestro Andrew Collins and upright bass player, Max Heineman, both of Toronto’s incredible Foggy Hogtown Boys. Genest knew Barlow from the Yukon, but as with many great things the collaboration with the latter two came about as the result of a chance meeting.

Genest (now available on iTunes). When you look back at those albums you can see the seeds of the kind of writing I was aiming towards, as I was drawn towards a more old-timey scene. Just as I was making the second album I got into bluegrass and old-timey music, which had a big influence on my musical direction.” Interestingly, Genest feels her route to that music was likely subliminally via a band that, other than by their rabid fans, would not immediately be associated with ‘mountain music,’ yet their legendary leader’s love of the genre is somewhat more than well documented. In actual fact, as a member of the bluegrass ‘supergroup’ Old and in the Way, with their debut release this particular musician co-crafted one of the best-selling bluegrass albums ever released.

“I met Andrew first, through a mutual friend” Genest explains. “I had just got my first mandolin, and he said you should have a lesson with Andrew, but we all ended up teaching at the British Columbia bluegrass workshop. I was going to Toronto frequently because my family is still there, and just connected with those guys. In the last couple of years my musical relationship, especially with Max and Andrew, really deepened, and there’s a good friendship there too. So it’s been ongoing, but really solidified with the making of the last record.”

“I’m the youngest of five and all my siblings were Grateful Dead fans, so I grew up listening to that,” Genest reveals. “But what’s interesting is that Jerry Garcia in particular was a huge bluegrass fan. He started out as a banjo player and actually drove all the way to the Grand Ole Opry to meet Bill Monroe, but he chickened out and drove all the way back to California! I would have to call that the early influence, because a lot of the Grateful Dead’s music is somewhat rooted in Jerry’s affinity for bluegrass. I don’t really listen to much of them anymore, but when I do and listen to some of the live albums, they played a lot of that material.”

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Delivering beautifully crafted songs of humour and poignancy, Annie Lou is a fast-rising star in the world of Canadian roots music. Regardless of her relatively late start, Annie Lou has arrived fully formed and the real deal. Natural talent is natural talent, and I for one love the Annie Lou sound. It is a treat to have her join the rich music community of Vancouver Island, and my pleasure to extend a belated welcome. In closing, I couldn’t help but wonder, though – does Genest adhere to her grandma’s rules for drinking? “Well, I’m kind of fond of a good gin and tonic!” she laughs. “But I think she was talking about bathtub gin, prohibition era gin; they didn’t have Bombay Sapphire® back then!” ~

Genest relocated to Parksville a year ago after two decades living in the Yukon woods. “I came to Vancouver Island by a bit of a circuitous route,” she continues. “My husband said he couldn’t stand anymore of the long, cold winters up there and he was really itching for a change. I was touring quite a bit and felt that was a fair compromise if I wasn’t going to be there very much, so we should find someplace that he really wanted to be. We actually settled on Haida Gwaii; he spent a year there and I went back and forth, so that’s where we were going to move to. We had just arrived in Whitehorse to get the rest of our stuff when his mom got sick, and she was in Parksville. So we left our vehicles

In noting some of the many qualities that make Annie Lou’s music so entrancing, I mentioned “dazzling playing from a stellar band.” Indeed, like Garcia’s Old and in the Way, which included bluegrass giants David Grisman, Peter Rowan and Vassar

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packed to the nines with our stuff and flew down here to be with her. We stayed with her, and when she passed away she left us the house. We decided to stay for a bit to see what happened; now we’re loving it, and are settled here. We have running water, which is really exciting, as we didn’t have that for twenty years! The area has really grown on us; it’s a really friendly community, and it’s close to everything – the north end, the south end, Tofino, Vancouver – so for me from a musical perspective I have quite a bit more access to resources and colleagues than I did in Whitehorse. And although I really appreciated the wilderness of the Yukon, there is plenty here.”

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For more information on Annie Lou, including forthcoming concerts and how to purchase CDs or downloads of “Grandma’s Rules for Drinking” and her Juno-nominated, eponymous 2010 debut release, please head to www.annielou.ca or email Anne Louise Genest at annieloumusic@gmail.com.

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HOME-TOWN GALLERY SHOWS RENOWNED WORKS IN QUALICUM BEACH by Lisa Verbicky

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t’s a flat, drizzly, February morning around 8:30 when Marlowe Goring invites me into his new Art Worx Gallery (previously Qualicum Frameworks Gallery) and busy framing shop on Primrose Street. His bright orange sweater feels like an instant shot of serotonin after months of grey. I realize immediately that my expectations of visiting another bohemian, west-coast, ‘gum-boot’ gallery is not in order as I enter a sleek, industrial-like, modern space you’d be more likely to see in an urban creative burrough than a sleepy Vancouver Island hollow. After eight months of renovations, the new gallery features wide-plank hickory-style flooring, soft white moveable walls, wrought iron appointments and track lighting beaming down on the works of some of the best established and emerging artists in North America. Attached to the gallery are the beginnings of a wine bar and boutique-style restaurant set to be offering up fresh, local fare by a yet undisclosed ‘mystery’ chef as early as this Father’s Day. The new venue beckons the music, clinking glasses, and creative cavorting that make for a lively community cultural hub, and has the potential to add an economic boost to the downtown business area. As I sit across from him in his trendy, black-rimmed glasses at a low, modern table littered with glossy art catalogues, I suddenly feel the need to apologize for the dusting of powdered “Timbit” sugar I’ve noticed on my jacket, left there from a 5:45 am hockey practice. “That’s OK,” he laughs. He’s spent his fair share of time at the rink with his own kids over the years. In fact, says Goring, he’s already planning a “Hockey Night in November” exhibition featuring the winter-inspired, iconic works of Chris Dahl and Peter Shostack. As I glance around at his collection of paintings by the late Ojibwe artist, Norval Morrisseau (1932-2007) whose famed works have shown at prestigious museums around 1 2

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Marlowe Goring • Art Worx Gallery • Lisa Verbicky photo the world including our own National Gallery of Canada, and have sold in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, the first question that crosses my mind is, how did this happen? Here? In a renovated hardware store formally named “Dolly’s”, across from a small town liquor store?

who he admittedly shared more than a few late nights with, selling for $160,000, as well as similar works by Morrisseau’s son Christian. On the east wall I could almost step into the west coast wilderness through a painting by Allan Dunfield. Even the washrooms are adorned with modern abstracts by Sally Laidlaw.

“I figured I’d bring it up a notch,” he laughs. “Why tread water in mediocrity when there is so much to celebrate in the way of beautiful art?”

In the front of the gallery is a playful oil by award winning poet, artist, and winner of the Governor General Award, Joe Rosenblatt.

And, Goring holds much of it in one of the largest collections of art in the province worth about $1 million. Tucked away in storage are anywhere between 500 and 1,000 pieces at any given time.

By the entrance, a young woman who’s wandered in for a look-see comments on the stunningly realistic large-scale paintings of Koi by Terry Gilecki, a best selling artist in Hawaii.

“I wish I could hang every one,” he says, as he reaches in and pulls out a 1948 piece by Flathers who worked with the Group of Seven. He then pulls out an original by Vancouver artist Arnie Fisk, and a figurative by American artist Daniel Diaz.

On an easel in the front west-side window is a striking minimalist seascape by bestselling Canadian artist Pat Service. Shocking blue horizon with a pop of red. Above it flies a massive carved Eagle by Comox artist, Wes Seeley, each feather an independent, hand-carved piece that took 2,000 hours to complete.

“Hey, check this out,” he says, showing me a small board with the image of a molting camel on it. “This is an original 1977 Robert Bateman, before he started doing his prints.”

Many people don’t understand the work involved and the value of art as an investment, says Goring, who sells works ranging in price from about $500 and up.

Goring did a lot of Bateman’s framing, as well as Morrisseau’s. On a tour around the gallery he points out a large, eye-popping acrylic by Morrisseau, •

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continued on page 20 •

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s I write this poem I seem surrounded by a plethora of grey days so abundant I am beginning to think they are produced on a conveyer belt somewhere in Asia. I know, I know…we don’t have to shovel rain (and I have lived in the east and remember having to look for my car under a snowdrift) and am trying not to come off like a whining windmill. In truth it is our winter rain that rewards us with landscapes of green in the summer that would make Monet jealous. I’m going to reach for my pad and paper thankful for that which makes me truly happy during the dregs of our mid-island winter.

THE IVORY SHADES OF MARCH The gentle sound of a cat purring through a rain filled night curled up safe at the end of the bed the luxurious feel of toes held warm and dry within thick winter socks...with red stripes, of course intense winter downpours that arrive from out of nowhere the sound of firewood being chopped the old-fashioned way the rhapsody of waves crashing on the shore throughout the night over and over...and over the exotic scent of nature’s perfume that embroils Englishman River Falls at dawn Sunday jams at the Crown with Dave Marco endless games playing pool...no one keeping score as I walk to get the mail wearing a baseball cap passersby, who I do not know, smile and wave I am finally considered a local The daily surrender of darkness by the minute to an ever encroaching and relentless daylight the highs and lows of the tide as predictable and sure as a King’s archer wild bouquets of crocus and Easter daffodils deliver the unwritten promise Spring is just around a cloud…or two…or three unexpectedly meeting old friends at the market sharing an afternoon over exotic teas and warm scones …and whining about the rain! Irish

Never let it be said that I do not give thanks for every moment I spend here on the island. I have lived and worked in countries where what we have and share here in our country, our culture and nature’s beauty everyday, would be treasured as if gold itself...and I never let go of that realization!

Michael B. Poyntz, author of “Dusk to Dusk” has over 150 poems published on www.poetrysoup.com/Irish. His “That Canadian Poet” greeting cards are available at many gift shops, book stores, and other find retail outlets on Vancouver Island, and can also be found at all BC Ferry on-board gift shops.

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MEET THE HONOUR STUDENTS OF KWALIKUM SECONDARY SCHOOL The Qualicum Beach Honours Society is an independently funded, non-profit Society whose mandate is to celebrate “Academic Excellence with Pride in Achievement”. Kwalikum Secondary School grade 12 students apply to become members in the fall of their graduation year. Members are inducted into the Honours Society at a banquet in June if they have maintained an 83% average in their academic courses for the year. As a society, we have awarded over $115,000 in scholarships over the past 20 years to these deserving students. During the school year, a photo and profile of each applicant is showcased here in EyesOnBC Magazine. KRISTEN NELSON Although my experience in secondary school was a very exciting and knowledgeable time I am very excited to be moving on with my life, and continuing on to university. I will be going into the denturist program at NAIT in Edmonton, Alberta. Both my grandparents as well as my mother entered into the denturist profession, so I was raised with this particular profession all around me, and therefore I have grown to respect it highly. I am very much looking forward to my experiences at post-secondary school, but I will be very sad to leave my beautiful community and amazing friends. KATIE MENASSA Nothing could have prepared me more for my future than the past four years at Kwalikum Secondary. Not only do I leave with a profuse amount of new friends and memories, but I leave feeling confident that I have the skills, knowledge, and mind set to succeed in whatever I put my mind to. I can't thank Qualicum enough!

SABINA HAMILTON I haven't always lived in Qualicum Beach, but I moved here in elementary school, and have loved it ever since. Going to KSS has given me the opportunity to learn and experience things that would never have happened elsewhere. I had the chance to participate in a Coastal Adventure Tourism program at NIC, and plan to follow it up by attending university for marine biology, and going into a career of working with youth in the outdoors.

TIANA MICHAELS My four year journey at KSS has undoubtedly prepared me for the new journey to come after graduation. With the help of great teachers, courses, and friends, I feel I am fully equipped to tackle my future. I can't begin to thank everyone enough, but it can be assured that I will never forget the people that helped me get to where I am today. Thank you, Kwalikum Secondary.

JASEN WRIGHT My time at KSS has gone by in the blink of an eye. I can remember my first day so clearly; it’s crazy to think that my last day is coming so soon. I had a lot of fun at KSS, made some amazing friends, and had some memorable teachers. High school will be a time I never forget. I hope to attend Waterloo and get my computer science degree so I can apply for the Canadian Space Program.

DECLYNN ROBERTSON-HOOPER Living in Qualicum Beach has been a pleasure and I am constantly surprised and grateful at all of the opportunities open to us high school students at Kwalikum Secondary School. The community has given me countless chances to volunteer and involve myself with unique past times such as yoga or participating in the Qualicum Beach Farmers Market. Next year I have plans to continue my studies at the University of Victoria and eventually I am hoping to receive a Bachelor’s degree in Social Work and Child Development.

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KATIE LINDSAY Attending Kwalikum Secondary School and growing up in Qualicum Beach has given me an abundance of happiness and comfort; yet it has also taught me that I need to further explore the world. I plan to travel and enrich myself in many other cultures as well as attend university. I would love to study psychology and counsel young children who have had to deal with traumatic events, which is something close to my heart; and it will further benefit future generations to come. Thank- you to everyone who has helped me throughout my school experiences; your support is truly cherished.

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This page has been sponsored by:

NORM & DIANE DUNCAN OF COOMBS, BC If you would like to support our volunteer efforts by sponsoring the student write-ups in this space, tax receipts are available for donations of $50.00 or more. Please contact Donna Furneaux at (250)752-9935 or Jill Chudleigh at (250)752-3842 for more details. M A G A Z I N E

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HARMONYUM®

PROMOTION

by Sharron Hudson

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n exciting healing system is currently available in our area. “Harmonyum® is a calming healing system which increases the energy supply to all body cells. This is achieved through relaxing the body, therein releasing mental and emotional tensions so that the life force may flow freely. It is becoming common knowledge that hurt feelings, emotional entanglement, resentment, fear and anger generate a stress response in the body. This triggers a multitude of inflammatory responses, suppressing immunity and blocking the flow of life or energy in the body thereby manifesting disharmony and disease. A Harmonyum® treatment gently eliminates destructive energies such as anger, fear, stress and anxiety and replaces them with feelings of peace and serenity...it induces a psychological shift helping to create a platform for self-healing to begin.

Harmonyum® works in the body to regulate the autonomous nervous system. In turn, the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems work together in harmony. Strong health is contingent upon these two systems working in harmony, because together they coordinate the functions of our organs. Harmonyum® enhances the body’s ability to regulate immune functions so that self healing mechanisms can kick into gear and diminish the cycle of disease. Harmonyuym® is a Divine healing system that assists in raising the body’s vital energy and rate of vibration in a way that cannot occur with medicines, extracts or man made substances. It is an important compliment to all health and healing regimens. Harmonyum® is one of the rare healing systems known to nurture and give unconditional Love that

can be automatically experienced by the recipient. “ Dr. Joseph Michael Levry, PhD. Harmonyum® is the lifelong prayer of it’s creator Dr. Joseph Michael Levry, PhD. in the form of a gift to us all. We are blessed, blessed, blessed to have it. Harmonyum® healing and Naam Yoga® therapy shine in the arena of prevention, rehabilitation and early intervention. There is literally something for everyone within the vast sciences of these lovely compliments to traditional medicine and other common therapies. ~ Sharron Hudson teaches Naam Yoga®, Shakti Naam and practices Harmonyum® in the Oceanside area, please direct inquiries to her at 250594-5902.

Pre-School to Class 8 Natural Soap and Aromatherapy Products for Bath & Body Saltspring Soapworks travel sizes are perfect for your spring getaway.

106 W. 2nd Avenue, Qualicum Beach Monday to Saturday 10am - 5pm

250-594-BATH (2284) 2 0 1 3

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Open House

Sunday, March 17th • 2 to 4pm

Rocky Mountain Soap Therapeutic Roll-Ons are a great way to enjoy the benefits of aromatherapy on the go.

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A balanced approach to school life; academics, music, art and outdoor activities

Gary Anaka Workshop Your Magical Brain - How it Learns

Tuesday, March 12th • 6pm

Parksville Community Centre • Admission $10 250-752-2722 • mgs@shawcable.com www.morninggloryschool.ca 861 Hilliers Rd. off Hwy 4 close to Qualicum Beach

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Promotion

LIGHT BASED TREATMENTS NOW AVAILABLE AT LONGEVITY MEDICAL AESTHETICS Dr. Andy Biro, owner of Longevity locally and has recently acquired Medical Aesthetics in Qualicum a system to address this. The UVB Beach, opened his clinic with the light system from UVBiotek has desire to offer Oceanside residents two units, one to treat hands or feet, aesthetic skin and the other treatment options for full body in a local setting. treatments. NARROW BAND Aesthetic services Depending ULTRAVIOLET B FOR range from upon the botox injections, extent of A VARIETY OF SKIN cosmetic fillers, the patient’s CONDITIONS ESPECIALLY laser treatments condition PSORIASIS for photoageing, initial acne and rosacea treatments to hair removal may only and much more. last for 20 Other services include photodynamic seconds. Subsequent treatments over therapy (specialized “Blu” light the course of the next weeks last with Levulan) can treat conditions longer until the condition improves. as varied as acne to precancerous Patients generally feel nothing more changes called actinic keratoses. than mild warmth. Dr. Biro also recognized that light treatments for common skin ailments such as psoriasis were not available

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Narrow band UV-B is not a tanning bed although it has some similarities in appearance. Tanning beds utilize

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UV-A which offers tanning but has deeper penetration into the skin with associated increased risk for skin cancer and premature photoageing. Light therapy is a recognized treatment for many skin conditions, especially psoriasis. Patients should be referred by their family physicians. Medical assessments and UV-B treatments are covered by the BC Medical Services Plan (MSP). For more information on this or other services contact Longevity Medical Aesthetics at (250) 752-6116 or online at longevitymedical.ca. Referrals for UVB treatments can be made at (250) 738-1166. Dr. Andy Biro is a Medical Doctor (MD) with a Bachelor of Science degree (BSc) from Simon Fraser University and a Master of Science degree (MSc) from UBC.

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MARCH 2013

WHY DID YOU THINK THAT THOUGHT?

LOCAL TIDE

By Joanne Sales

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ust where did you get that idea from?  Why did you think that thought?  In order to take our thoughts and belief systems seriously, we need to look at how they got there.  Above all else, our thoughts and beliefs are determined by the accident of our birth.  From that circumstance, our thoughts are formed from past experiences and relationships, what we perceive with our senses, what we have heard or been taught, and what we think others think. After we gather all that input together, we adopt it as our own and call it the truth. Well, maybe. In the first few months after I went away to college, I decided I no longer believed in God.  This quick change-of-heart decision was in response to the strong Midwestern accent of a girl in my philosophy class.  Instead of “God”, she said “GAD,” and I just couldn’t stretch my previously open hearted belief structure to include Gad.  When she said the word, Gad sounded like some hick with a cold who spat tobacco. I soon returned to the altar I had abandoned, using many names, but never the name of Gad.

Our tide table measurements are taken from the Hornby Island substation. For other tides, visit http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/english/Canada.shtml on the Internet. Printed courtesy Canadian Hydrographic Service.

We know that the questioning of an 18-year-old is good and necessary. But the questioning of a 30, 50 or 80-year-old is also good. Remember the bumper sticker, “Question reality?” Sometimes it takes decades to grow strong enough to ask the hard questions.  You can’t be a good scientist or even a reasonable human being without asking questions. We have to walk through many guest rooms before we find our way home. We have all heard the stereotype of “a grumpy old man.”  Don’t be offended, goodhearted gentlemen.  Actually the grumpiest old man that I know right now is in the body of a young man. When I hear him share his thoughts, I have to wonder, how did this young man arrive at his “grumpy old man” conclusions so much ahead of schedule?  His heavy-hearted, hard-line notions are weighty items, enough to sink a smile, and totally outside the realm of questionable in his mind.  It’s a shame.  It’s like he got stuck in the dark, cold shadowing room at the back of the hotel while the sun is still shining in the front.  Is that room really his, or did he move in with his father? How do we get stuck in rooms of limiting beliefs? I remember once as a teenager when I was the traveling messenger between my brother upstairs and my mother downstairs.  I was easily convinced that whoever was talking to me at the moment was ‘right.”  So I traveled up and down the stairs carrying contradictory messages.  Finally my brother said, “You’re just a parrot!”   Yes I was!  Fortunately, it was a good-natured banter

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- because we don’t like to think that we are parrots, and we don’t like the idea that someone is controlling our minds.  But our minds are controlled!  Not always, but often.  The sooner we realize that, the sooner we can actually use our minds, and grow up. There are those who want us to be parrots and to believe the party line, and to stay at their party, wherever it is. Advertising is legal mind control. Untrue and incomplete media coverage is mind control (i.e. Fox News). Intentionally induced fear and threats of hell fire and brimstone are mind control. But an effective democracy demands that we question, that we demand open books and open meetings, and that we have open minds. The hardest time to listen is when we already know the answer.  Recently my friend and I had a communication breakdown while rebuilding a tumbling down gate. We had posts in the ground, pieces of cedar and a nice cedar arch.  “How are we going to support that beam?” I asked.  He explained, “It is held up by that post.“  “But that post won’t be there,” I answered. Then he explained again, and I answered again - “But there is no post!” This conversation kept repeating itself.  We just couldn’t hear each other. It was a perfect example of wrestling match of preconceived notions.  Communication was blocked because each of us Already Knew.

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We have to be curious in order to really listen.  And just like the preconceived notion wrestling match at the gate, we have to listen as though we don’t already know.  No faking it either!  It’s hard!  It’s a real challenge of compassion and intelligence.  A higher use of mind.  Can I really hear this person who is speaking to me?  Can I really look at this situation anew? In Buddhism, they call it the Beginner’s Mind.  In Christianity, Jesus said we have to be like little children.  We were not being talked down to when we were given these words of wisdom.  Rather, we were being shown a way to not be parrots, grumpy old men, or dupes to the powers that be.  We were also being shown a way to walk out of the rooms that don’t fit us anymore.  Perhaps we could think of ourselves as gardeners to our own minds.  We can choose to nurture our minds - to expand, water, weed, feed and enrich our thoughts.  We can spend time with those beings and books and practices that uplift us and expand our horizon.  This does not mean we want to hide from what’s hard, nor do we don’t want to shrink and close our eyes to the crises and suffering around us. Here, we need to look for the wisdom of balance.  Waking up is the key and goal. ~ Joanne Sales is a writer, organic farmer, and director of Broombusters, living in Qualicum Beach. joanne@glasswing. com

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and it was a bit too off the beaten track, he says.

“There’s more of an established artistic community out here on the west coast.”

“An artist might work 30 years to get to a point to sell a piece for $20,000.”

“The new gallery has been my dream, my labor of love. I couldn’t have done it without Suzanne.” he says of his girlfriend, Suzanne Tonna, who he reunited with after 35 years. He credits her for keeping him organized and on task.

While much of Goring’s collection is contemporary west coast art, he has a special affinity for minimalist and abstract works and sees the new space as the perfect opportunity to introduce the community and his clients to the world of modern art.

Also on staff is 17-year-old, Tyson Imber who helps out in the framing shop.

“I get tired of hearing how ‘my 5-year-old could paint that’ when it comes to modern art. I have tried to paint a modern piece, and there’s a lot more to it than you think. A painter is compelled to paint. He or she has to paint. Their works are much more than paint on canvas. It’s who they are.”

We have to support that type of dedication by buying art, he says. “I always tell people it’s best to buy an original piece by a full-time artist, even if it’s just a few inches by a few inches in size. Look for a great price with great upward mobility, and think of your kids. Think of the long-term.” His first purchase? An limited edition aqua-tint by Miro bought for $450 and is now worth about $28,000 today. Goring’s clients are mostly from his home-province of Alberta, who often come here to visit and want to take a piece of the west coast home with them, he says. The artists he represents are from all over but many of them have moved to the west coast. “We live in the Hawaii of Canada. A lot of amazing artists gravitate here.” Goring first came here on a family trip in the 1970’s and promised himself he’d be back to raise his family. “So, I did. And I love it here. It’s a great place to raise kids.” Goring moved to the Island from Vancouver in 2000 and started the original Qualicum Frameworks Gallery and framing shop tucked beside the train tracks in a corner of town, behind Naked Naturals. The recent move to his new space came as the old gallery was just getting too small,

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Goring’s own foray into the art world began at age 17 when he got a job at a U-Frame-It store that opened up across from his grandmother’s home in Vancouver in 1977. In 1979, he took a leave of absence from the store and did a stint with the National Museum of Art in restorations.

The gallery will be hosting “Lush”, on April 12th at 7 p.m., featuring modern works by three BC women, Susan McLennan, Leslie Gregory, and Chris Kazeil.

He resumed his work with U-Frame-It in Ottawa, and in 1985 after helping to build it up to 28 stores, he decided it was time to move on.

“They are a fun group of girls,” says Goring. “It’s going to be a great show.” If you can’t make an opening, you can catch any one of the artists in the gallery on any given day, though, says Goring. “They are always coming in.”

“I was burned out of the art world at that time and tried my hand at tile setting which I hated,” he laughs. “I’m really an art lover and a salesman. Closing a sale on a fine piece of art is like finishing a painting. There’s nothing like it.”

The new location is a hit judging by admirers coming through the doors on a Tuesday morning in February. It appears to me by the smiles and warm wishes of people dropping by that not only does Goring have a solid client base, but some solid roots in this community.

And, a salesman he is. In 1983, he sold an original Salvador Dali for $345,000 and in 1988 he sold an original Morrisseau for a quarter of a million dollars.

“I’m optimistic,” he says.

Goring opened a second gallery in Calgary in 2004, but shut it down three years later in 2007.

For more information on the new Art Worx Gallery visit www.qualicumframeworks.ca or drop in to 701 Primrose St., Qualicum Beach. Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 p.m., Saturday between 10 am and 2pm. Or call (250) 752-7350.

“At the time, the Calgary art scene was under-developed. I just got tired of educating people about fine art,” he says.

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PREVENTING A FALL prepared by Lucy Churchill, RN

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alls are the leading cause of injury related hospitalization and deaths. Falls are also the major reason for admission to a residential care facility. A fall can happen to anyone, anywhere, any time. Being proactive can reduce your risk of having a fall! Why people fall There is no single reason why people fall. All of the following are risk factors:

SAVE ON ALL

Home Health Care

PRODUCTS

• Raised toilet seats • Commodes • Bathroom safety bars • Canes • Walkers • Shower stools • Shower chairs • Reachers

until Mar 31 2013

• Change in posture such as standing up suddenly from a sitting or lying position • Impaired vision • Some medications • Home and community hazards • Reduced strength and impaired balance • Changes in walking pattern, difficulty turning, backing up and moving around obstacles or changing direction • Fatigue • Stress and anxiety • Changes in thinking and memory Taking risks Sometimes we all take unnecessary risks without thinking. Do you do any of the following? • Climb onto furniture when reaching for an object? • See hazards in your home and never get round to fixing them? • Move heavy objects yourself? • Wear slippers with an open heel or socks around the house? • Rush to get things done or answer the phone? • Never ask for help? • Do too much and feel exhausted or over tired? • Go up or down stairs with parcels in both hands? What you can do • Fix unsafe areas in your home • Store items on lower easy to reach shelves • Stand directly in front of what you are reaching for • Try wearing lace up or Velcro fastening sturdy shoes which are comfortable • Look where you are going, try not to be distracted or to rush. It is important to focus on one thing at a time • Ask for help to carry or move heavy bulky objects. • Install handrails on stairs. Keep at least one hand free to hold the hand rail. Holding two hand rails is even better. • Consider a personal alarm system, which can call for help if you fall and are alone What to do if you fall Take the time to develop a plan of what you might do after a fall. Some things to consider are: • Wear a personal alarm around your neck or wrist • Keep a cellular or cordless telephone with you at all times • Set up quick dial numbers on your home phone • Carry a whistle • Leave a spare key with a family member, neighbour or friend who lives nearby, so they can get to you quickly

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ECHO PLAYERS PRESENTS

THE MEMORY OF WATER submitted by Aileen Fabris Vi has died. Her three daughters have reunited in the family home for her funeral. Mary has been forced to sleep in Vi’s bedroom and the other sisters and guests insist on congregating there. Each sister is haunted by her own demons, and in one scene, probably motivated by those unresolved issues, they try on Vi’s precious collection of hats and dresses. In scenes like this, the play explores how Vi’s death forces the sisters to relive and reevaluate the basic facts of their childhood and their subsequent justifications for why they have each become who they are. The problem is Mary, Teresa and Catherine nurse wildly divergent accounts of that shared childhood.

MARCH SALE! ALL regular priced merchandise 20% off in March. Come in for great deals on yarn, needles, accessories, books, shawl pins, buttons, gift items, yarn bowls, needle cases ... the list goes on and on !!!

(250) 594-3608

#2, 211 Second Ave. West Qualicum Beach

Two men, Mike, Mary’s lover, and Frank, Teresa’s husband attempt to keep the proceedings under control but with little success.

MAGAZINE

You might cringe at this brief synopsis of the play. Don’t! “The Memory of Water is a leavened with many moments of near-insane humor. It delights. It raises issues. It is a rousing evening of truly alive and lively theatre. If the psychology of relationships or the inner working of a family are the sort of topics that provide endless fascination you should make a point of seeing this play – it will leave you with lots to think about. ~ “Memory of Water” runs at the Village Theatre in Qualicum Beach April 4 – 21 and is ECHO Player’s entry into the North Island Zone Festival. Tickets 250-752-3522 or info@echoplayers.ca

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MAGAZINE

2013 Annual General Meeting Choose us for your advertising. We’re locally-owned, economical and offer unique ways to help get your message out to your customers in print, on our website, or on our Facebook, Twitter and YouTube channels.

250-757-9914

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March 6th • 5:30pm Reception • 6:30pm Dinner at the Arrowsmith Golf & Country Club

Member meet & greet during the Reception Guest Speaker: Evelyn Clark, Executive Director Qualicum Beach Chamber of Commerce

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RSVP: lcba@shaw.ca or Judy (250) 752-2473 •

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BIZBANTER Sussex Automotive Ltd., a family run business in Parksville, is celebrating their 7th Year in Business. Alan Petrie & Anji Jones would like to give a Big Thank You to all their loyal customers, many of whom have been coming since they opened their doors in 2006. Although they are recognised as a British Car Specialist repair, service and restoration shop, they have a wide variety of vehicles they look after as computer scanning on newer models is available.

Specialty cars include: Jaguar, Land Rover, MG, Triumph, Austin Mini, Morgan, Austin Healey, Rolls Royce and Bentley. Alan served a traditional apprentice period in the U.K. working at a large Rolls Royce, Jaguar, Daimler and Jensen dealership. Our other mechanic Eric Bradley brings many years of experience maintaining British cars including working at a Jaguar specialist shop in Vancouver. Eric has also owned Mini’s and Jaguars and currently drives an MGB. Alan built a replica of a 1930’s Jaguar called an SS100 for a Victoria customer, which has won 100 points at various car shows since completion in 2010. To see pictures of this project check out www. sussexautomotive.com.

BE PREPARED • SAVE A LIFE

Courses offered locally CPR • Emergency First Aid Worksafe Emergency First Aid Standard First Aid • Marine First Aid

Liz Olson

Petite

PIZZAZZ

Introducing! LIJA Golf & Active Wear

Recognized by the PGA for its fine fabrics, intricate design, functionality and beautiful colour palettes.

Baroness Ashley Rain Hats A sunburst of fashion colours to cheer your day - rain or shine.

FIRESIDE BOOKS Freedom 55 @ Fireside Books

Since I’m turning the BIG 55 I’m extending to anyone who has a birthday in March to come in! We will give you a discount on your purchase. Who says birthdays can’t be fun? March is FREEDOM MONTH! Quote of the Month

Happiness is like peeing in your pants. Everyone can see it, but only you can feel its warmth. And that’s what you feel today!

High Quality Used Books

Styles and fits to flatter the “pleasantly petite” part of you! WIDE SELECTION • SIZES 4 to 18+ and Small to 2XL 691-A Memorial Avenue Qualicum Beach 250-594-0040

(250) 248-1234

114 Middleton Ave. Parksville

www.firesidebooksparksville.com

WWW.EYESONBC.COM

P: 250-586-6683 C: 250-228-8409

Canadian Red Cross

Training Partner

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ARROWSMITH AUTO & TOWING LTD

BCAA Towing • ICBC Towing • RV Towing Lock outs • Service Calls Auto & Heavy Duty Recovery

Diesel Repairs and Tires Full Mechanical Service General Repairs • GM Specialist • Motor Vehicle Inspection

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Tue-Sun 9:30-5pm Sat 10-4:30pm • Sun 10-4pm 7581 S. Island Hwy, Fanny Bay Tel&Fax 250-335-1475 www.fannybaytrading.com

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Community Event Calendar March 2013 Annual General Meeting Saturday April 13th 2pm to 4pm Union Bay Community Hall Refreshments Door prizes

Everyone welcome!

LIGHTHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE (LCC) Qualicum BOWSER LEGION – RCL BRANCH #211 LADIES Bay INFO: LOIS NELSON: 757-9938 AUXILIARY – Meets at 1pm the first Thursday of each month. FMI Call Joyce at joyce.bartram@shaw.ca or LIGHTHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE AGM – Evelyn at wefoot@shaw.ca. Wednesday, Mar. 6 at 7pm at the Lighthouse Community Hall. TAOIST TAI CHI – Classes at LCC and Fanny Bay OAP Hall. New beginner classes start February. FMI Call: BOW HORNE BAY COMMUNITY CLUB AGM – Susan 250-757-2097. Thursday, Mar. 21 at 7pm in the Nordine Room at the Lighthouse Community Hall. LIGHTHOUSE TRAILS GROUP needs your help. FMI Call: Val Weismiller: 250-757-9667. LIGHTHOUSE COMMUNITY HALL PANCAKE BREAKFAST – Sunday, Mar. 10 - 8am to Noon, LIGHTHOUSE RECREATION INFO, PATTY: FMI Call 250Pancake Breakfast, Poultry Swap, Flea Market. 757-8366 or Email shipshore@shaw.ca. Live Music on the Hall Stage until 2:00pm. The Lighthouse Community Hall Board will be cooking QUALICUM BAY LIONS CLUB. Through fundraising up breakfast this morning. and other activities throughout the year, our mission is to ‘give back’ to our community. If you would like to LIGHTHOUSE SENIORS #152 – Next meeting is become involved in our active group, contact George March 4. Everyone welcome! FMI Call Shirley at Dussault at 757-8422. Activities in 2012 included: 250-757-2384. food concessions for the pancake breakfast, bluegrass festival and fall fair, and our ongoing Meat Draw BADMINTON & MINI-TENNIS – Has now moved to every Sunday at the Roadhouse/Crown & Anchor Pub the Lighthouse Community Centre in Qualicum Bay! in Qualicum Bay. We thank the community for their 7:00pm. 14 -80 yrs, beginners welcome, equipment ongoing support so that we can serve others. provided. FMI Call 250-757-8307 or steelehunt@ shaw.ca. RDN RECREATION PROGRAMS LIGHTHOUSE FLOOR CURLERS – Join a fun & easy REGISTRATION STARTS MARCH 13th - Please preto play activity for all ages! Enjoy, indoors on a gym register for all programs to avoid program cancellation. floor, with a friendly mixed group. Curling rocks Call Chrissie at 250-757-8118, email at cfinnie@rdn. supplied. Come play with us Mondays & Fridays, bc.ca or call Oceanside Place at 250-248-3252 for more 1:00-3:00pm, Sept. to May at the Lions Rec. Hall in information. Qualicum Bay. Drop in $2. FMI Call: Dennis Leach 250-757-8218 or Fred or Lorraine 250-752-0216. ADULT LIGHTHOUSE SPINNERS – Tuesdays 10:30-2:30pm GENTLE YOGA - An introduction to Yoga, this class is in the Community Centre Board Room. New suitable for all levels, especially those who are just members welcome. FMI Call Jo 250-757-8402. beginning yoga or prefer a gentle class. No flexibility required! Lighthouse Community Hall CARPET BOWLING – Commencing October 2, 12:45 Thursdays 9:30-10:45am $70/8 Apr 4-May 23 to 3:00pm at the Lighthouse Community Hall. FMI Call Layne 250-757-8217. MOM & BABY YOGA - Mom and baby yoga is a wonderful way to take care of your mind, body and AA LIGHTKEEPERS: PLEASE NOTE NEW TIME – baby post pregnancy. Strengthen your core, improve Fridays at 7:00pm at the Lighthouse Community your posture, build confidence and relax using Centre, 240 Lions Way, Qualicum Bay. FMI Call inspirational yoga postures, breath and meditation. 250-757-8347. Meet other new moms and create community. This class will be taught with two instructors so that BRIDGE – Nordin Room 1:00 to 4:00pm Friday personal instruction can be given, along with help to afternoons at the Lighthouse Community Centre. care for your little one. Lighthouse Community Hall FMI Call: Sheila Steele 250-757-8307. Fridays 9:30-10:30am $60/6 Apr 12-May 17 LIGHTHOUSE COUNTRY SCRAPBOOKERS – Meet 3rd Saturday monthly at the Lions Den, Qualicum Bay, 9:30am- 4:30pm, $10. Door prizes. FMI Call Jorgie 250-757-8358 or Shirley 250-757-8384.

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CHILDREN CHILDREN’S YOGA 5-11YRS - Children can do yoga too! Join Meagan & Lindsey for this interactive yoga class. Children will improve strength, balance, •

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games, stories and parenting resources. This is a FREE program supported by Comox Valley Family Services Association, Baynes Sound Lions and the Fanny Bay Community Association. Facilitated by Evelyn Bally 250-335-9022. FANNY BAY COMMUNITY HALL - YOUTH GROUP - Fridays 6:30-7:30. Children and their never ending supply of energy will burn it off with us. We play soccer, hockey, basketball and all manner of games they come up with. 3-6 years play in the studio with a parent 7-12 year olds play in the gym. This is a FREE program supported by the Fanny Bay Community Association and Evelyn Bally 250-335-9022.

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN MARCH!

BOWSER • BRANCH 211

250-757-9222 • website: www.rcl211.ca • email: rcl211@shaw.ca Mar 7 Mar 19 Mar 26 Mar 28

LA General Meeting Branch 211 Executive Meeting Branch 211 General Meeting LA Executive Meeting

Hall Rentals 250-757-9222 • Tue to Fri 9am - 12 noon Mar 1 Mar 9 Mar 16 Mar 16 Mar 23 Mar 30

Silent Auction Begins Silent Auction Ends LA Pie Sale at 11am St. Paddy’s Bar Party Giant Meat Draw (Turkeys & Hams) LA serving Fish & Chips TEXAS HOLD’EM TOURNAMENT Advance Buy-In $40 at the Lounge - limited seats

Mixed Pool Ladies Pool Cribbage Texas Hold’em Mixed Darts

THE ARROWSMITH NEEDLE ARTS GUILD - Meets the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month at 9:30 at the Qualicum Beach Civic Centre at 747 Jones St.  Come to embroider, learn new techniques and for friendship with other stitchers. In Park/Qual, contact Jeri at 250-752-9230 and in Nanaimo contact Roberta at 250-758-6783 or email keberta@shaw.ca for more information. February 18 – March 8 ART EXHIBITION AND SALE OF THE ARROWSMITH CHAPTER OF THE FEDERATION OF CANADIAN ARTISTS – Continues until March 8 at The Old School House (TOSH) 122 Fern Rd, Qualicum Beach.

Tuesdays.................................................5:00 pm Wednesdays ...........................................4:30 pm Wednesdays ...........................................7:00 pm Thursdays...............................................7:00 pm Fridays....................................................7:00 pm

Food available on Fridays!

coordination and flexibility in a fun, relaxed environment. Class may be divided into two age groups. Bowser Elementary School Wednesdays 3:00-4:00 $40/6 29904 Apr 10-May 15 LIGHTHOUSE TREKKERS 6-11YRS - Discover the trails and parks in Lighthouse Country! Research shows that children are happier and healthier when outdoor time is in better balance with indoor time. Spend time outdoors discovering a new trail or park within EA H each week. Hiking, exploring and maybe even treasure hunting will be included! Bowser Elementary School pick-up only. Meet at Bowser Elementary School. Mondays 3:00-4:30pm $49/5.Apr 15-May 13

PRESCHOOL LIGHTHOUSE TOT SOCCER 3-5YRS - What could be more fun than kicking a soccer ball with your child on a sunny spring morning? Children will start to learn very basic soccer skills with the emphasis on motor development and fun. Parent participation is required. Lighthouse Community Centre Field. Saturdays 10:00am-10:45am $35/6 Apr 6- May 11

YOUTH NEW! YOGA FOR YOUTH - Join Meagan and Lindsey for yoga. Specifically for youth aged 11-16, this class will offer an introduction to the practice of yoga that can last a lifetime. Yoga teaches flexibility, centers the mind, helps promote self-confidence, and can be part of an active lifestyle. Bowser Elementary School. Wed 4:30-5:30pm $55/6. Apr 10- May 15 FANNY BAY COMMUNITY HALL - PARENTS & TOTS - Tuesdays 10-11:30am. Come and enjoy a morning of socializing, snack, early literacy activities, songs, M A R C H

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DO YOU WANT TO QUIT SMOKING? If you want to smoke, that is your business. BUT, if you want to QUIT, and stay quit, that’s OUR business! Join us every Tuesday evening at 7:30pm at the Baptist Church 600 Beach Rd, Qualicum Beach. We are a group of people who have – or wish to - quit smoking, using the 12-step method of recovery from nicotine use. Come to a meeting and share an hour with us – we talk about our smoking history, learn how to succeed in our quest to be FREE at last, and have some laughs too. We look forward to meeting you. FMI visit www.nicotine-ananymous. org.

March 12 WORKSHOP HOSTED BY MORNING GLORY SCHOOL - led by Gary Anaka www.braincoach.ca on “Your Magical Brain, How it Learns”. For Parents of Elementary and Middle school students, learn key points on what helps the brain and what hinders learning. Tuesday, March 12th at 6 pm Parksville Community Centre in the Garry Oaks Room, Admission is $10. FMI Call 250752-2722. March 16 SPRING FLEA MARKET - Saturday, Mar. 16 at 9am - 1pm at Union Bay Community Hall. Light refreshments. Tables $15.00. FMI Call Dave at 250335-2317 or visit www.ubcc.ca. March 16 Q.B. SUNRISE ROTARY 2nd ANNUAL “SPRING BALL” - includes a 3 course meal, Filet Mignon Gourmet Dinner by Giovanni, Dance and Auction @ the Q.B. Civic Centre. Semi Formal Dress, with complimentary Limo Service Home. Tickets $75.00/person. Contact Ron Stothers (250) 752-0270 or (250) 240 -7771. Net proceeds go to our Charities. Book early as it was a sell out last year. March 20 THE QUALICUM BEACH FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY – will hold it’s Annual General Meeting, Wed., March 20 at 7:00pm at the QB Legion. Guest speakers Barbara Parry and Joe Forsyth: topic, the life and family history of Elizabeth Little, owner of St. Andrews Lodge in Qualicum Beach. All guests welcome. March 24 THE PARKSVILLE & DISTRICT COMMUNITY CHOIR PRESENTS - “Glorious” featuring “Mozart’s Requiem” and more. Guest soloists are Aaike Biglow, Élizabeth Grenon, JohnDoughty, and Paul Broughen. Sunday, March 24, 2:30 p.m. at Knox United Church, 345 Pym St. PV. Tickets $15 at Mulberry Bush Books and door.

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are beginning to redefine who you are in the world. Ironically, this is a very playful month for you. Love affairs, sports events, vacations and fun times with children are all promising diversions.

Aries (March 21-April 19) In the last few years, many of you have suffered with challenges in relationships, which means that in the next two years, you might be getting along with less support from others. This is scary, but consider it boot-camp training for a career peak in about five years. Yay! This process will strengthen you and give you confidence in yourself. Since 1996, you have reinvented yourself. And around 2003-05, hopefully, you strengthened your home base. You can handle whatever arises. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Around 1999, you started to reinvent yourself. By around 2005, it was vital that you establish a solid home base. After busting your buns since 2010, you are now book-ending a process you began in 1999. It’s time to step out in the world and gain increased recognition for your efforts. However, as you focus more on your external world, this switch of focus might create problems in partnerships because the balance of power is shifting. Nevertheless, you must go forward. (Pack a hot lunch.) Gemini (May 21-June 20) In the mid-90s, you got recognition for your achievements; and by 2001, you were in a new sandbox, creating a new identity, which was eventually established by 2008. (Right?) Now you’re entering a time of hard work. In fact, in the next few years, you might feel overwhelmed; but fear not, you will prevail. Lucky Jupiter is in your sign giving you a major boost of good fortune and by next year increased earnings will reward your hard labour. (Applause! Applause!) Cancer (June 21-July 22) Around the turn of the millennium, you began to downsize. By 2003-4, you sailed off into a new world. The last few years have been a strong focus on home and family with renovations or residential moves. Now you’re entering a time where you might have increased responsibilities with children, but privately you’re asking, “What do I really want to do with the rest of

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Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Home, family, renovations, family meetings and visiting guests my life?” (That, plus the basic question of how long keep you on the go. Enjoy entertaining midst the after Labour Day one can get away with wearing white chaos. But in the bigger picture, you’re starting to shoes.) let go of people, places, relationships, homes, jobs and possessions. Why? Because in about 18 -24 Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Although you’re focused on months, you will enter a new sandbox, which will shared property, taxes and debt, in the big picture, be the beginning of you completely reinventing you want to solidify your home base by moving or yourself in the world. (Wow.) You love an exciting, repairing/renovating where you live. In 2003-4, you stimulating future full of all kinds of possibilities! gave up a lot so that by 2005, you could move in a new direction that would completely redefine you. The big Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Short trips, visits and question now is what are you going to do with the errands create an accelerated pace but you love it. new you? What do you want to do? Where is home? This is a good time to write, teach, edit, act, sell or Once this is settled, you will be free to pursue career market. This is also an excellent year to improve your questions. job as well as your health. You feel confident and much on top of your game because others appreciate Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you feel you are in a what you have accomplished. Later this year and into state of flux, that’s exactly how it should feel. Since next year, partnerships and close friendships will be 2008, you’ve been tweaking your life to where it is wonderfully enriching. In fact, singles could meet now. This is a crossroads. In the next two years, you and marry someone older, richer or worldlier. will either change jobs, change residences or both so that you have a strong sense of who you are and Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) This is wonderful what you’re doing in the world. Right now, a gaggle time to wrap up financial projects. But in the bigger of planets opposite your sign heightens your focus on picture, you want to play! Lucky Aquarians are on close friendships and partnerships. Think of this as a vacation, enjoying love affairs and delighting in learning opportunity. the arts, sports events plus playful activities with kids. However, in the “really big” picture — we’re Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Since 2010, you’ve been talking a 30-year cycle — you are entering your reinventing yourself. Now you’re focused on cash flow, time of harvest where you will achieve success earnings and major expenditures. The question is how and recognition for past efforts. It’s a time of do you want to earn money? At a deeper level, you’re kudos, raises, promotions, graduations and the questioning your basic values. Essentially, you have to achievement of cherished dreams. Yay me! define to yourself what really matters in life. Different things matter for different people. If you don’t know Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) It’s all about you what’s important for you, you won’t know what to now. However, retrograde Mercury brings confused work for. This is why success is defined so differently communications, lost papers, books, glasses and by so many different people. keys. You might lock yourself out of the house with the bathtub running. Nevertheless, you have much Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) This is a defining time to look forward to because this year, you will feel for you because Saturn is in your sign. Saturn is the richer at home. In fact, many will move to a bigger Great Teacher forcing us to focus on responsibilities home. You will also enjoy a happier relationship with and duties in turn, lead to external success, rewards family members. Start planning for a big vacation and a sense of accomplishment. Saturn is a straight late this year or next year because it’s going to shooter and always comes through. Right now you happen.

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Illusion Lake Sand & Gravel Off Horne Lake Road

SERVICES

• CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES • SAND & GRAVEL

DRUMMER AVAILABLE – for gigs and studio projects. Acoustic or electronic. Years of experience. FMI call Ed 250-752-0119.

For those larger projects… Call for delivery or to Arrange pick-up Trucks for Hire • Pick Up or Delivery

For smaller quantities… Call or stop by our Gravel Mart at 911 Church Rd., Parksville, BC

(250)

248-3693

LEARNING

MORE THAN JUST PAIN RELIEF - Transdermal Power Strips deliver fast acting pain relief, more energy, better mood, immune boosting results. Feel better fast! Call 250-752-9272 or visit http://dejavu. FGXpress.com. PICK-UP AND DELIVERY – Tune-ups and repairs to riding lawnmowers and all small engines. Buy and sell used equipment. Call Ron (250) 240-1971 e-mail: ronmorrison100@gmail.com.

NELSON'S MUSIC STUDIO Piano/Theory Lessons Parksville/Qualicum Area Beginners to Advanced Your Home or Ours John/Margaret 250-954-5895

VILLAGE GARAGE

DON’S HOME REPAIR – Plumbing repairs and installations, complete renovations, no job too small. Call Don at (250) 757-8757 or cell (250) 951-8757.

3 RD ANNUAL

“OCEAN OF PLENTY” GALA DINNER

April 13, 2013, 7pm @ Fanny Bay Community Hall. Please mark your calenders for this fundraiser dinner for Coal Watch Comox Valley Society. The event will feature locally harvested seafood, 50/50 draw, cash bar, silent and live auction items. Tickets are $50 and will go on sale in mid-March. For more information on donating auction items or to volunteer, contact John (250) 335-2246 or Fiona (250) 335-0476.

FOOTCARE – HYGIENE Soaking feet, cutting nails, filing calluses, treating dry skin – fingernails too. Reflexology – 1 hour sessions. Services offered from Nanoose to Royston. Please call Vikki at (250) 7579244.

GROUPS/SOCIETIES/CLUBS THE CANADIAN SOCIETY OF QUESTERS – Next meeting is March 25. For more information call Kris (250) 752-1419.

DELIVERING THE SAME GREAT SERVICE FOR OVER 20 YEARS! Complete Automotive Repairs In Town • Brake Service • Tires • Batteries • Tune-Ups • Exhaust Systems • Fuel, Snacks, Beverages and More!

Monday - Friday 7:30-6 • GAS ONLY Saturdays 9-6

(250) 752-9542

665 Memorial, Qualicum Beach

WORSHIP WILDWOOD COMMUNITY CHURCH 113 McColl Road, Bowser

Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 am 757-8136

ISLAND GOSPEL CENTRE “A house of LIGHT in Lighthouse Country”

SUNDAYS - 10AM WORSHIP SPECIAL SERVICES IN MARCH March 29 - Good Friday Service - 10:30am March 31 - Celebrate Easter - 10:00am 90 McColl Road, Bowser, BC (250) 757-8253 FMI Call Pastor Colin Meikle (250) 594-8299 M A R C H

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Accommodation

Septic Installation

Need an electrician? Give us a call.

Residential and commercial design, construction and service

250-618-3182

Monthly Rentals Available September to April

Yoga

Home Improvement

Electrician

We encourage you to “think local” when looking for products or services

WWW.MOORESYSTEMS.CA

Choose us for your advertising. We’re locallyowned, economical and offer unique ways to help get your message out to your customers in print, on our website, or on our Facebook, Twitter and YouTube channels.

Drywall

Hypnotherapy

Advertise

MAGAZINE

Counselling

Picture Framing

M.A. CCC

diane@corecounselling.ca www.corecounselling.ca

Military Surplus

250-757-9914

DEJA~VU DECOR Lawn Services

Insurance

Home Decor

• M A R C H

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20

Same Day Service. Fully Insured.

FREE ESTIMATES

• Yard Clean-Ups • Rubbish Removal • Pruning/Hedges • Aeration • Lawn Maintenance • Power Raking • Fertilizing • Odd Jobs Yearly Maintenance Programs

310-JIMS (5467)

250-752-8772

BOOK A JOB AT WWW.JIMSMOWING.CA

Convenient In Home Appointments

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SPRING SERVICES

CUSTOM DECOR & WINDOW COVERINGS

Call

Wool Canadian Army Blankets Thermol EACH Tops & 99 $ EACH Drawers $

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EVENINGS

MAGAZINE

surveyor-ark@uniserve.com

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL ALTERNATE ENERGY

T.J. Farrell

250 • 240 • 7778

Sand - Gravel - Topsoil

Call Carey in Bowser 250-757-2089 (H) 250-951-4861 (C)

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250-757-9914

IRV MUELLER R.O.W.P. Registered Inspector, Treatment Plant Certified & Maintenance Provider

Custom Carpentry

Plumbing

Gravel and Landscape Soils

House Painting

Trucking / Bobcat

Underhill Trucking

M A R C H

Choose us for your advertising. We’re locallyowned, economical and offer unique ways to help get your message out to your customers in print, on our website, or on our Facebook, Twitter and YouTube channels.

tjfarrell@shaw.ca

Parts Store Open Mon to Fri 9-4

Small Truck Loads, Bobcat & Excavator Service

Heating

Philip Brown

250-240-4902 • 250-757-8077

Advertise

Land Surveying Electrician

INSTALLATION SERVICE & REPAIRS

Sani Services

Chimney Cleaning Appliance Repair

cjsroofing@shaw.ca Justin Molyneaux (250) 240-3472

PLUMBING • GAS • HEATING

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105 Islewood Dr. Bowser, BC V0R 1G0

M A G A Z I N E

Custom Renovations

Roofing

· Re-roofing · Sheet Metal · Shakes · Tile · Repairs · Maintenance

Plumbing Gas Heating

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

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Georgia Park Store Liquor Store Agency Post Office Fishing Tackle Lottery Centre Groceries

250-757-8386 Fax 250-757-8386

HOURS Mon-Fri 7:30am to 9pm Sat & Sun 9am to 9pm

6871 W. Island Highway, Bowser, BC V0R 1G0

• Your Neighbourhood Pet food Supper Store • Farm Feed • Garden Supplies • Rental Equipment

Spring into a

NEW YOU Across from the Bean Counter Café

Lighthouse Country! TREASURE HUNTERS WANTED! Discover your gem in Bowser!

FREE SCRAP METAL DROP OFF

6881 West Is. Hwy., Bowser

250-757-8815

thebestthingsandstuff@gmail.com

BOTH locations open Tues to Sun 10am to 5pm 2340 B Alberni Hwy, 113 Magnolia Court Coombs • 250-586-7779 Bowser • 778-424-1000

About 15 minutes north of Qualicum Beach


March 2013 EyesOnBC Magazine