Page 1

BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:26 AM

Page 1

November 2009

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine SERVING THE INDUSTRY SINCE 1912

Company Interviews: Mop Yarn & Tape Focus Jones Companies Bo-Buck Mills Lemieux Spinning Jason Mills

Packaging Focus Vonco Products Creative Poly Pioneer Packaging


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:26 AM

Page 2


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:26 AM

Page 3

GREEN AND WHITE.

CERTIFIED

GREENTEX GREENTEX

TM

100 100 % RECYCLED YARNS

Printed on 100% Recycled Paper

BY LEMIEUX SPINNING

Yarn performance: • Absorbs over 5 times its weight

Lemieux: Ready to be ‘‘Green’’

• Releases almost 40 % upon wringing • 90 % dry after only the spin cycle of the washer and completly dry after 15 minutes • Air dries 100 % overnight

‘‘Clean and Green’’ has obviously moved into the mainstream of public consciousness, driven by growing alarm over climate change and compelling all of us to assess the extent to which our lifestyles are good or bad. Today’s consumers have become more concerned about ethical and health issues; for these reasons, LEMIEUX SPINNING is now gearing up to introduce its NEW ‘‘GREENTEX’’ yarn. This yarn uses renewable energy in the production process and is made entirely from recycled fibers such as pure white PET plastic bottle fibers and post-consumer rayon/polyester.

The Mop Yarn Specialist since 1906

418 484-2169 www.lemieuxspinning.com


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:26 AM

Page 4

PAGE 4

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

November 2009

Broom, Brush & Mop A RANKIN PUBLISHING PUBLICATION

November 2009

Volume 99, Number 11

FEATURES

CALENDAR

Business Remains Steady For Mop Yarn, Tape Makers_____________________________6

NOVEMBER 19-20, 2009

Serving Diverse Markets Helps Packaging Companies In Slower Economic Times ____________13

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 3, 2010

Import/Export Overview________________________16

MARCH 14-16, 2010

National Broom & Mop Meeting, St. Louis, MO Information: 800-626-7282 or 800-637-7739

International Hardware Fair, Cologne, Germany Information: 773-326-9928

July Imports & Exports ________________________18

International Home & Housewares Show, Chicago, IL Information: 847-292-4200

Broom Corn Dealer Survey _____________________28

MARCH 17-20, 2010

ISSA Booth Photos____________________________30

ABMA Annual Convention, Orlando, FL Information: 630-631-5217

MAY 4-6, 2010

STAFF CO-PUBLISHERS Don Rankin

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Rick Mullen

drankin@consolidated.net

rankinmag@consolidated.net

Linda Rankin

GRAPHIC/PRODUCTION Jennie Grace David Opdyke RECEPTION Sandy Pierce

lrankin@consolidated.net

EDITOR Harrell Kerkhoff rankinmag@consolidated.net

National Hardware Show, Las Vegas, NV Information: 203-840-5622

MAY 22-25, 2010

National Restaurant Association Annual Show, Chicago, IL Information: 312-853-2525

NOVEMBER 9-12, 2010 ISSA/INTERCLEAN®, Orlando, FL Information: 800-225-4772

Rankin Publishing, Inc.

ASSOCIATIONS

204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130 • Arcola, Illinois 61910-0130, USA Phone: (217) 268-4959 • Fax: (217) 268-4815 • Website: www.rankinpublishing.com BROOM, BRUSH & MOP (ISSN 0890-2933) is published monthly at 204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130, Arcola, Illinois 61910. Telephone: (217) 268-4959. Subscriptions are $25 in the United States; $35 in Canada and Mexico; all others $110. The $110 foreign subscriptions include first class air mail postage. Arrangements can be made for first class postage for the United States, Canada and Mexico. Single copies of issues are $2 for subscribers; $5 for nonsubscribers, postage extra. The Suppliers Directory issue is $10 per copy. BROOM, BRUSH & MOP is a monthly trade magazine devoted to news of broom, brush and mop manufacturers and allied industries. It was established in 1912 as the Broom & Broom Corn News. It was entered as second class mail matter Feb. 27, 1912, at the U.S. Post Office in Arcola, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Arcola, IL, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: send address changes to P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910.

MOVING?

AMERICAN BRUSH MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 2111 W. Plum St., Aurora, IL 60506 • (630) 631-5217 AMERICAN HARDWARE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 801 North Plaza Drive, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4977 • (847) 605-1025 FEIBP EUROPEAN BRUSH FEDERATION P.O. Box 90154, 5000 LG Tilburg, The Netherlands • 00 31 13 5944 678 INTERNATIONAL SANITARY SUPPLY ASSOCIATION 7373 N. Lincoln Avenue, Lincolnwood, IL 60646-1799 • (847) 982-0800 INTERNATIONAL HOUSEWARES ASSOCIATION 6400 Shafer Court, Suite 650, Rosemont, IL 60018 • (847) 292-4200

Clip & return to Broom, Brush & Mop P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910

OLD ADDRESS:

NEW ADDRESS:

Affix OLD mailing label or print old address here:

Print NEW address here:

Name _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Name _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Address _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Address _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

City, State, Zip _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

City, State, Zip _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:27 AM

Page 5

Arcola Broom Corn Festival Race 2009

JIM

PAT

TIM

We Go The EXTRA MILE! 202 N. Oak • Box 250 Arcola, IL 61910 217-268-4955 • Fax 268-3113 www.thomasmonahan.com


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:27 AM

Page 6

PAGE 6

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine Associate Editor

I

nnovation, diversification, efficiency, personalized customer service and hard work are all ways that four executives, representing companies that supply mop yarn and/or tape, say their respective companies have remained competitive during the current economic recession. In recent interviews with Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine, these executives all agreed that the measures they have taken to better position their companies during these tough times have made them even stronger as the economy begins to rebound.

S

ince 1936, Jones Companies, Ltd. (JCL), of Humboldt, TN, has specialized in producing yarns made with recycled post industrial and post consumer fiber. JCL offers more than 30 yarns designed for wet and dry mopping tools. “The floor care industry is our primary market segment focus,” JCL Account Vice President Andrew Dailey said. “While we manufacture yarns and other products for other industries, the mop industry has historically, and will be in the future, our main focus.” JCL’s yarn products include: n Antimicrobial yarns: These yarns feature fiber with an active antimicrobial agent, which inhibits the growth of bacteria, fungi and yeast. According to the company’s Web site, the active process, as opposed to a one topical treatment, guarantees protection for the life of the yarn;

November 2009

n Rayon blend yarns: Although many think rayon is a synthetic fiber, it is actually a natural fiber. Like cotton, rayon is cellulose, which means its hollow cell structure makes its very absorbent. This superior absorbent property makes rayon a good choice for wet mopping. Its low lint properties and slow release makes it the fiber of choice for floor finishing applications; n Cotton blend yarns: JCL says its cotton blend yarns are designed for the dirtiest jobs. These yarns are highly absorbent and work well in household deck mops and industrial looped end products. All of the company’s cotton blend yarns are spun with a combination of 100 percent cotton fibers and recycled fiber. These economical yarns are ideal for disposable and limited use applications; and n Cellulose/synthetic blend yarns: JCL says it was the first to offer premium yarn specifically engineered to take advantage of the strengths of a multi-fiber blend. These strengths include maximum absorption, performance and durability. JCL offers various cellulose and synthetic fiber blended yarns to meet the design requirements of good, better and best mop products. Engineered combinations of cotton, rayon and polyester fiber joined by two types of spinning processes create diverse yarns to meet a variety of graded performance standards and economic targets. JCL also manufactures proprietary blend yarns to meet a customer’s application needs, from wet mops to high twist dust mops. “At the beginning of the year, we did somewhat of a realignment of products, offering a wider variety of options,” Dailey said. “One of the things that helped us in this process was working with each customer to discover some unique


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:27 AM

Page 7


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

PAGE 8

9:27 AM

Page 8

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

needs for the particular market segment in which they do business. “What we have tried to do with some of the new developments in yarns is to offer alternatives. This gives our customers a greater choice in the yarns that they choose to include in their product lines. This helps them to be more competitive for their specific market needs.” Dailey described business at JCL over the past several months as “steady.” He added that the steep swings between “highs” and “lows” of the past couple of years seem to have leveled somewhat. “This year business has had more of a steady, even keel to it,” Dailey said. “We have also seen some return from offshore sourcing in which many domestic manufacturers were involved. There has been somewhat of a return to onshore manufacturing.” Inherent in the current recession is the tendency for customers to move toward more economic yarns, which often are less durable, Dailey explained. “Consumers may shift from synthetic blends to cotton, or from yarns with higher contents of rayon to those with lower amounts of rayon,” he said. “Going to yarn with lower amounts of rayon can actually affect performance of the product as a tool. We have seen over the years the shift from synthetics to cotton products is oftentimes cyclical.” Dailey explained that during tough economic times, the cycle begins, especially at the distributor level, with the desire to help their customers save money by opting for less expensive cotton products. The cycle will come back around to using the more expensive, but higher quality synthetic products when the end-user discovers using the less expensive products may not have been the best deal, after all. “The less expensive product may not give the longevity of service, so at the end of the year, that consumer’s cost may not have been reduced,” Dailey said. “The consumers’s cost may have remained the same or increased, because he or she consumed more products.” Whether in good economic times or bad, one of the major keys for the company to remain competitive, Dailey said, is keeping abreast of fiber development. “The mop industry, by its nature, is a secondary or a recycled marketplace,” Dailey said. “In other words, we tend to be ‘chained’ to trends that occur in the textile industry.” For example, JCL launched a new yarn last September called Bio 100, which is a 100 percent biodegradable mop yarn. The yarn includes a polyester component made from PLA (polylactic acid), which is a polyester derived from cornstarch and other carbohydrate-rich substances. Because of the product’s higher cost as compared to other mop yarns, and factors in the general textile industry, it has taken about a year to generate some interest in the new yarn.

November 2009

“There is real science in this product. It brings to the marketplace a proven improvement in a mop yarn in that when it goes into a landfill it will compost,” Dailey said. “The cost is high on this material as it competes with the biofuel industry for corn and it has limited use in the textile industry. Currently, it is not economically feasible for the textile industry to use this fiber based solely on demand from the mop industry. “So, there are a number of factors in the textile industry that provide challenges for us, as well as opportunities. One of the things that Jones Companies has always considered a responsibility is to be on top of what those developments are — good, bad or ugly — and convey them to the mop and floor care industry.” Diligence in continually evaluating the marketplace to take advantage of business opportunities and innovations that may present themselves is part of how Jones Companies expects to thrive in the future. “We have a couple of projects in the works that are not necessarily related to yarn, but are directly related to the cost of a mop,” Dailey said. “We distribute mop headband and tailband materials as well as sewing threads. We see opportunities to help mop manufacturers reduce the cost of domestic made products by innovations in these materials.” For example, Dailey reported the company recently shifted from a woven tailband material to a knitted material and that has helped maintain its costs to mop manufacturers. “We have not had a price increase for nearly 26 months,” Dailey said. “We feel like that we are going to be able to bring (these products) to the marketplace that help to lower the cost of a mop. If we lower the cost by 2 or 3 cents a mop, that is significant savings in the mop industry.” While the current economy is not great, although the Dow Jones Industrial Average has been up recently, Dailey sees opportunities for companies to continue to innovate and make floor care products that are important tools and not just commodity items. “If we, as an industry, tend to allow the commodity position to grow, it will be ‘shame on us,’” Dailey said. He went on to explain that if the industry as a whole settles for just producing “a stick with some material on the end of it that goes into a bucket and cleans dirty floors,” then that is what the consumer will expect. If these types of products prevail, the end result will be that domestic manufacturers will not be able to compete with imports. “We have to be creative and we must be innovators. We must respond to market needs,” Dailey said. “It is a small market segment. It is going to take relationships between domestic suppliers and distributors to find solutions that aren’t wrapped around just the cost of the mop. If we were totally focused on driving costs out of the yarn itself, then I think we would be missing the greater chal-


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:27 AM

Page 9


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

PAGE 10

9:27 AM

Page 10

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

lenge which is to keep mop manufacturers in North America.” Contact: Jones Companies, Ltd., P.O. Box 367, Humboldt, TN 38343. Phone: Sales - 877-849-2767; Customer Service - 800-238-8334; Order Fax: 800-235-9276. E-mail: jonesco@jonesyarn.com. Web site: www.jonesyarn.com.

L

emieux Spinning, Inc., of St. Ephrem, QC, is a leading North American manufacturer of textile products including mop yarn. J.A. Lemieux, whose vision was to offer first-rate service and high quality products, founded the company in 1906. J.A. Lemieux’s son, Clément Lemieux, took over the reins of the company in 1945. Today, the company is headed by President Serge Lemieux, who took over from his father, Jean-Paul Lemieux, who had been president from 1986 to 2007. Serge Lemieux’s brother, Marc, is the company’s general manager. The company’s leadership is credited with making Lemieux Spinning Mill a world-class manufacturer. With its home base in Canada, Lemieux Spinning has not been immune from some of the negative aspects of the current economic downturn. “The United States accounts for 50 percent of our annual sales; therefore, we have been directly affected by the economic crisis. It has caused our production to run at a much slower rate,” Serge Lemieux said. “However, the mop yarn segment suffered less than other sectors, such as carpet yarn for domiciliary consumption. “This past year has been difficult due to many variables, such as the strong increase in raw material costs in 2008. The strong Canadian dollar was also a factor that affected our costs. Furthermore, the economic crisis has caused a decrease in demand and created a deceleration in our production.” Lemieux Spinning’s product offerings come in four major categories: industrial yarns, “Yarns of Olde,” specialized yarns and synthetic yarns. According to the company’s Web site, “Yarns of Olde” allow the customer to “rediscover the warmth and beauty of wool” for hand knitting, crocheting or weaving works. Environmental and social issues are an important aspect of the company’s in both its internal operations and also the products it produces. “In the mop yarn market, our focus is on green offerings and the niche of added-value products,” Serge Lemieux said. “Our first mission, as we enter into this new era, is to bring down our industrial waste to a minimum, and to find new ways to innovate recycled products. We are concentrated on saving energy as much as possible. Our goal is to focus on environmentally and socially sustainable development in order to exert a positive influence on society and the generations to come.” Along these lines, the company recently introduced its new 100 percent recycled Greentex White EcoSure™ polyester

November 2009

fiber. EcoSure is a trademark of the David C. Poole Co., of Greenville, SC, which is a distributor of synthetic staple fibers such as polyester, rayon, and polypropylene. “This sustainable fiber, which is 100 percent post-consumer recycled PET, is used in 50 percent of our blends, with the balance being recycled polyester and rayon,” Serge Lemieux said. “We are encouraging the market tendencies and are responding to the market demand for recycled products. ‘Clean and green’ has obviously moved into the mainstream of public consciousness. Today’s consumers have become more concerned about ethical and health issues. For these reasons, Lemieux Spinning is taking the direction for the future toward sustainability development.” Hand-in-hand with manufacturing quality products, J.A. Lemieux’s original vision for the company included offering the best in customer service. This commitment has not wavered over the years. Lemieux Spinning views itself as a “business partner” with its customers, rather than just a textile manufacturer. The company is willing and able to offer support in developing manufacturing strategies for its customers. “We offer personalized service in all aspects of the business, whether placing orders, delivery status, or any other requirements our customers need,” Serge Lemieux said. “At Lemieux Spinning, we are very flexible and work with customers to satisfy their needs and make sure they never miss out on any stock. “There is always a person at the end of the line. Our phones will not be answered by a machine. We don’t believe in voice mail; we believe in teamwork. Flexibility and teamwork are our strengths.” As the company looks to the future, remaining in the forefront of innovation and automation are vital aspects in its ongoing pursuit of excellence. “Automation has always been our No. 1 priority. It allows us to maintain lower production costs and stay competitive in the market,” Serge Lemieux said. “Every year we invest in new equipment, which provides more efficiency and a better output performance. This helps us keep our prices as competitive as we can. “The company’s vision is to constantly focus on the future. No matter what the specific requirements or needs are, we have the team and resources to meet them.” Lemieux Spinning, Inc., 125, Route 108 C.P 2039, St. Ephrem, QC, Canada G0M 1R0. Phone: 418-484-2169; Fax: 418-484-5561. E-mail: info@lemieuxspinning.com. Web site: www.lemieuxspinning.com.

A

pproaching six decades in business, Bo-Buck Mills, Inc., of Chesterfield, SC, continues to produce high quality narrow woven and knitted fabric, including mop tape, in a wide range of widths, colors and textures. The company makes mop tape in Chesterfield using American-made yarn. Bo-Buck prides itself in the high qual-


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:27 AM

Page 11


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

PAGE 12

9:27 AM

Page 12

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

ity of its products and its personalized customer service, according to Bo-Buck Mills President Andrew F. Maner. “There are only a few domestic companies in our industry and they all do a pretty good job. What we continue to sell, and have historically, is quality,” Maner said. “Sometimes our products cost a little more, but we make up for it with products that provide ‘runnability’ and efficiency for our customers.” In this era of just-in-time deliveries to minimize the amount of inventory businesses hold, Bo-Buck Mills’ ability to offer quick turnarounds of products has been a major key to remaining competitive. Quick turnaround times have become even more critical as a cost savings measure as the economy has weakened. “We have always offered quick turnaround times, but in today’s economy, customers depend on the last minute delivery of products more than ever before, especially in the mop industry,” Maner said. As a part of offering just-in-time deliveries, Bo-Buck is able to plan ahead and have available the styles and colors its customers desire. Bo-Buck is located in the Pee Dee region of northeastern South Carolina. The company’s colorful name stems from the nicknames of two boys, Bo and Buck, who were related to the business’ founders. Three families started Bo-Buck in 1952. The company specializes in producing consistent quality mop tape ranging in sizes from 3/8 of an inch to 7.5 inches. Bo-Buck is able to produce tape in specific widths to the nearest 1/16 of an inch in 1/16-inch intervals. Bo-Buck’s tape comes in a variety of colors, according to customer specifications. The company offers several in-stock colors, and can also custom blend dyes to meet the customer’s needs and wants. The company’s dye process enables the color to be totally imbedded into the tape. Bo-Buck’s quality control program includes the inspection by hand of every inch of tape produced. In addition to making mop tape, Bo-Buck also specializes in mattress binding tape. The company also offers a variety of other tapes including athletic wrapping, auto seat, carpet, casket, crime scene, curing, electrical, flag, government special use, leader, medical, mounting, printed label, reflective, ribbon, shoe lace, textile spinning, tie, upholstery, Venetian blind and wicking. Bo-Buck’s customer base is located in the United States and Canada, primarily east of the Rocky Mountains. As far as business is concerned in today’s economy, Maner said, “We are fairly pleased, based on the economy. Business has definitely slowed down a little bit. “We have cut back some hour-wise because of the economy, but haven’t laid anybody off. We had some people who left who we didn’t replace, which I think a lot of companies have done.” Maner said the company’s diverse customer base and its variety of product offerings have given it a competitive leg up during this down economic cycle.

November 2009

“Because of the combination of doing business in various markets and keeping our equipment up-to-date, we feel pretty good about our future,” he said. “We are constantly reaching out to other customers in selling ourselves, our products and service.” Dealing with the pressure brought on by imports and pricing remain two of Bo-Buck’s greatest challenges. The company meets these challenges by offering high-quality customer service and next-day deliveries. Maner said one of the company’s greatest strengths is, “The faith and the trust that people have in us from being in business for more than 55 years.” Contact: Bo Buck Mills, P.O. Box 692, Chesterfield, SC 29709. Phone: 843-623-2158; Toll free: 800-690-7474; Fax: 843-623-6849. E-mail: Bobuckmills@bobuckmills.com. Web site: www.bobuckmills.com. Bo-Buck Mills is represented by Manufacturers Resource, Inc., 800-772-8503.

J

ason Mills, LLC, of Milltown, NJ, is a leading manufacturer of knit mesh for the mop industry with a wideranging customer base of manufacturers throughout the United States, Canada and Europe. In addition, the company focuses on industrial and custom fabric applications and is an industry leader in dye process, finishing, slitting and dye cutting on both stock and custom fabric. Jason Mills also manufactures and distributes various types of sports netting, bird netting and agricultural shade cloth. Jason Mills was purchased by its current president, Michael Lavroff, in 2007, who has more than 25 years experience in the textile industry. The company has been manufacturing mesh for more than 30 years. “We have continually offered quality mesh fabric,” Lavroff said. “For the mop industry, we primarily sell the 5-inch harness or saddle that goes on the base of a mop. We sell 5-, 1 1/4- and 1 3/4-inch mesh fabric. The standards have never dropped. Our fabric is consistently about 3.5 ounces per square yard using the same industrial yarns that we always have. We have not compromised the weight of these goods and they have remained steady. The product is ‘battle tested.’ The mesh is basically the abrasive part of the mop. It is run to a crisp finish and it serves to encircle the sponge and create an abrasive fabric.” As the current economic recession grinds on, business at Jason Mills has grown since the beginning of the year. “When compared to 2008, business has been fairly steady the past two quarters, and has grown since the first quarter,” Lavroff said. “There is some anecdotal evidence that across the board, including the broom, brush and mop industry, some companies have pulled away to some extent from China. “While the economy remains the greatest challenge, Continued On Page 26


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:27 AM

Page 13

November 2009

By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

B

room, Brush & Mop Magazine spoke recently with executives of three companies that supply packaging products to the broom, brush and mop industries for various cleaning products such as brooms and mops, as well as to other marketplace segments. These executives shared that their respective company’s ability to do business in diverse marketplaces has been a major key in staying competitive during the recession. Both executives agreed that hard work, innovation, an emphasis on customer service and seeking new business have made their companies more efficient and poised to be even stronger when the economy rebounds.

C

reative Poly, Inc., of Rochelle, IL, boasted record sales years in 2006 and 2007, and despite business slowing somewhat since then, (a result of the economic crisis worldwide) still did well. “Although we had a profitable year in 2008, sales were down slightly from the year before,” owner Walt Dudziak said. “We actually ran more product in 2008.” Some of the reasons to Creative Poly’s success are its diversified product lines, the ability to manufacture value-added and specialty items and its reputation for high quality customer service. “The real key to our growth in the past few years is not to be satisfied with what we are currently doing, but to seek new

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

business that complements what we currently do and add new product lines. The new business which we have been developing, is allowing us to grow. Several new projects are in the works, which can potentially increase our sales as much as 30 percent next year,” Dudziak said. “We haven’t been converting as many bags for the hardware field compared to prior years. During hard economic times, food and medical always tend to be steadier markets and this is were we have put our sales effort.” Dudziak added that he sees some evidence that the hardware business may be picking up. He called the prevailing mood of many in the business world as “cautiously optimistic.” “It is just unbelievable the reduction in the total number of people with whom we did business in the hardware field, which just aren’t there anymore. But, because of how we have marketed ourselves by switching fields from hardware to other segments, we have insulated the company. We are projecting increased sales for next year even if the current economy doesn’t change,” Dudziak said. Creative Poly, Inc., was founded in 1992 and manufactures a variety of printed and specialty poly bags, including broom sleeves and mop

PAGE 13

bags. The company also has the capability of printing up to 6 colors inhouse and provides 8-color work with “Delta 2” color conformance through the use of partners. Creative Poly serves many customers, both in the United States and Mexico, with its 2 plants, 5 printing presses and 18 bag machines. “Most of our products are custom tailored for the end-user,” Dudziak said. “We are not a standard manufacturer that just pounds out bags. Everything we make has some sort of a unique quality. “There are also signs that some companies that have been doing business overseas, especially in China, are rethinking that strategy. Various issues are causing these companies to think about coming back onshore, such as shipping costs, long turnaround times and the possibility of problems with components used in some products such as lead inks/paints. One of the


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:27 AM

Page 14

PAGE 14

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

problems that still exists in the United States is that there are too many competitors in the bag packaging field, even though the number of converters is down about 35 percent over the last 15 years. The downward trend in number of U.S. manufacturers is why we continually see other converters merging, selling or going out of business.” Dudziak agreed that navigating these challenging economic times has made his company even stronger. “We are positioned well. We are running very efficiently and we’ve offset lost business,” Dudziak said. “We anticipate another profitable and record breaking sales year in 2009.” Contact: Creative Poly, Inc., 620 W. Lincoln Ave., Rochelle, IL 61068. Phone: 815-562-9002; Fax: 815-562-8551. E-mail: creative@rochelle.net.

S Carlson

ince 1955, Vonco Products, Inc., of Lake Villa, IL, a northern suburb of Chicago, has and con-

November 2009

tinues to be one of the most versatile and innovative manufacturers of thermoplastic custom packaging, specialty and promotional products sold worldwide. Vonco revolutionized the way most brooms are packaged when, in 1977, Vonco President Larry Laske introduced the company’s fast load, self-locking custom poly broom sleeves into the marketplace. Today, Vonco’s product lineup for the broom and mop industry includes mop and paint roller bags, shaped broom packaging, printed roll stock and bags on a roll. The family-owned company also services other market segments including medical, industrial, retail and promotional. For the medical field, Vonco offers drainage and specimen bags, bottle holders, disposable gloves and boots, instrument covers, and more. Its industrial products include liquid dispensers, round bottom bags, volume indicators multi-compartment bags, filter bags, boiling bags, and others.

The company’s retail products include self-locking broom sleeves, mop bags, handle bags, printed packaging materials, Christmas stockings and hand puppets for food packaging, among others. Vonco also has a strong presence in the promotional products market. It’s most famous promotional item worldwide is its ThunderStix® noisemaker (www.thunderstix.com). The colorful noisemakers have become staples at sporting events around the globe. There is even a pair on display in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY. They could be seen during this year’s Major League Baseball playoffs. Vonco’s focus on various market segments has helped it remain competitive and successful despite the economic woes of the past couple of years. While some areas of the market the company serves have been down, others have been up. “We are very diverse and there are markets that are doing better than others,” said Vonco Vice President of Sales and Marketing Les Laske.

Drills

Double Lip Spur Drills Drills For Plastics Special Half-Round and Spoon Drills

Supplier of Raw Materials to Manufacture Brooms, Mops, and Brushes • Galvanized & tinned wire for brush - broom - mop production • Processed Broom Corn & Yucca • Wood Broom - Mop - Brush Handles • Craft Broom Corn And Supplies

Often Copied But NEVER Equalled Standard Sizes Normally In Stock For Rapid Delivery For Availability And Pricing Contact Our Parts Dept.

TEL: 630.232.2460 • FAX: 630.232.2016 EMAIL: parts@carlson-tool.com

• Other Materials - Broom Twine, Broom Nails, Mop Hardware We ship by pup or truck load direct from Mexico, or LTL/ UPS from our Greensboro warehouse.

P.O. Box 14634 • Greensboro, NC 27415 336-273-3609 800-213-9224 Fax: 336-378-6047 E-mail: sales@recaddy.com


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 15

November 2009

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

In January 2008, Vonco acquired another Chicago area business, Poly Shapes, of Gilbert, IL. This acquisition has allowed Vonco to enhance its overall capabilities to provide mop and paint roller bags, as well as grommet bags. “In the past year, we have integrated Poly Shapes into our operation and things are running smoothly,” Les Laske said. While competing with Asian imports has been an ongoing challenge for several years now, the fluctuating cost of the raw materials Vonco uses such as polyethylene resins, has also been a problem. “Material costs have been fluctuating for the past couple of years, and that has been a problem. Raw material prices were down and then we received notice in the past few days that they have gone up a little — it just fluctuates,” Laske said. “Fortunately, our customers understand that we cannot control raw material costs.” Les Laske’s grandfather, Walter VonStoeser, started the company in his garage in 1955. VonStoeser was dedicated to the premise of offering quality products, excellent customer service and prompt response times. That tradition continued when Laske’s father, Larry Laske, joined VonStoeser in 1959, helping him move out of his garage and into the company’s first stand-alone facility. Today, Vonco continues its tradition of emphasizing excellent customer service, quality and rapid turnaround, the latter of which is especially desired in these times by customers who are looking to cut costs by maintaining

BROOM CAPS

minimal inventories. An important aspect of Vonco’s business that continues to be popular is in the area of high quality process printing as customers more and more desire complicated printing projects. To this end, Vonco boasts sophisticated six- and eight-color printing capability. These printing presses were added when Vonco expanded its facility in 2003, and the eight-color printing side of the business has been expanding each year. In addition, Vonco’s state-of-the-art printing operation is supported by its art department. The art department works with customers to ensure the finished product is of the highest quality, as process printing continues to gain in popularity. Process printing results in artwork that looks like a photograph, as opposed to traditional line art. “Our higher quality printing capabilities — six- and eight-color and process printing — grow in popularity every year,” Laske said. To further secure its place in the competitive markets it serves, Vonco designs and manufactures its own fabrication machinery and tooling to produce custom projects. When a customer comes to Vonco with an idea or a concept, the company’s engineers will create a design, and, in most cases, a low-cost prototype can be developed. Once a prototype has been made, Vonco can move quickly into production, taking advantage of its ability to build its own fabrication machinery and tooling. As an FDA-registered manufacturer,

PAGE 15

Vonco is equipped to satisfy a wide range of quality assurance requirements. This may be as simple as a visual quality check, or as extensive as a comprehensive program with full inspections of incoming raw materials, in-process testing and full materials and process traceability, according to the company’s Web site, www.vonco.com. Those who frequent grocery stores have heard the check-out person ask many times, “Paper or plastic?” In a past interview with Broom, Brush & Mop, Laske alluded to the issue as it pertains to the growing green movement when he said, “There is always that debate on the use of paper versus plastic. They both have their different impacts on the environment.” Vonco is continually monitoring and studying the issue of green packaging solutions. “People still inquire about green items,” Laske said in a recent interview. “For example, we are evaluating the pros and cons of recycled film packaging.” Vonco stresses to its customers that the company exceeds EPA guidelines in all of its operations and it uses recyclable materials such as polyethylene. Equipment is also in place to ensure the company is compliant with all clean air standards. Like many companies in various segments of the marketplace, Vonco feels that its effort to cut costs and become more efficient during the current recession will allow it to gain an even sharper competitive edge when the economy rebounds. “Like many others, we have had to Continued On Page 27

BRUSH and HANDLE FERRULES

MANUFACTURING INCORPORATED P.O. Box 6505

Wolcott, CT 06716

Phone 203-879-1481


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 16

PAGE 16

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

November 2009

Totals For Imports, Exports Are Generally Lower By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor U.S. government trade figures for the first seven months of 2009 indicate raw material imports were down in two of the three categories outlined in this issue and were even in a third, compared to the first seven months of 2008. Figures for metal handles prior to March 2009 are not available for comparison. For July 2009, raw material imports were up in two of the three categories outlined, other than metal handles, compared to July 2008. Import totals for the first seven months of 2009 were down in four of the six finished goods categories outlined from the same time period in 2008. Also, in July 2009, four of the six categories outlined recorded decreases, compared to July 2008. RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS Hog Bristle The United States imported 38,284 kilograms of hog bristle in July 2009, up about 51 percent from 25,326 kilograms imported in July 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, 182,625 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, about a 23 percent decrease from 236,969 kilograms imported during the first seven months of 2008. China exported 180,259 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first seven months of 2009, compared to 235,369 kilograms during the first seven months of 2008. The average price per kilogram for July 2009 was $2.79, down about 85 percent from the average price per kilogram for July 2008 of $19.03. The average price per kilogram for the first seven months of 2009 was $8.29, down about 51 percent from the average price per kilogram of $16.77 for the first seven months of 2008. Broom And Mop Handles The import total of broom and mop handles during July 2009 was 1.5 million, down about 42 percent from 2.6 million broom and mop handles imported in July 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, 12.1 million broom and mop handles were imported, compared to 18.3 million for the first seven months of 2008, a decrease of about 34 percent. During the first seven months of 2009, the United States imported 4.3 million handles from Brazil, 3.3 million from Honduras, 2.4 million from China and 1.5 million from Indonesia. The average price per handle for July 2009 was 77 cents, up about 22 percent from 63 cents for July 2008. The average price for the first seven months of 2009 was 70 cents, an increase of about 6 percent over the average price recorded for the first seven months of 2008 of 66 cents. Brush Backs July 2009 imports of brush backs totaled 234,059, up about 3 percent from the July 2008 total of 227,515 brush backs. During the first seven months of 2009, 1.6 million brush backs were imported, the same as for the first seven months of 2008. The United States imported 963,982 brush backs from Canada during the first seven months of 2009, while importing 215,350 from Sri Lanka, 145,448 from Indonesia and 112,432 from Honduras. The average price per brush back was 42 cents during July

2009, down about 25 percent from the average price for July 2008 of 56 cents. For the first seven months of 2009, the average price per brush back was 48 cents, down about 32 percent from the average price of 71 cents for the first seven months of 2008. Metal Handles The import total of metal handles during July 2009 was 3.9 million, up from June 2009’s total of 2.9 million. During the first seven months of 2009, 18.2 million metal handles were imported. The United States imported 9 million metal handles from Italy during the first seven months of 2009, 6.9 million from China and 1.9 million from Spain. The average price per handle for July 2009 was 58 cents, down from the previous month’s total of 61 cents. The average price for the first seven months of 2009 was 62 cents. FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued At Less Than 96 Cents The United States imported 34,056 brooms of broom corn valued at less than 96 cents per broom during July 2009, compared to 35,772 in July 2008, a decrease of about 5 percent. During the first seven months of 2009, 86,004 brooms of broom corn were imported, down about 41 percent from 145,206 imported during the first seven months of 2008. Mexico shipped 78,804 brooms of broom corn to the United States during the first seven months of 2009, compared to 85,272 during the first seven months of 2008. Meanwhile, China shipped 7,200 brooms of broom corn during the first seven months of 2009, compared to 59,934 during the same time period in 2008. The average price per broom for July 2009 was 69 cents, up about 15 percent from 60 cents for July 2008. The average price per broom for the first seven months of 2009 was 75 cents, up about 4 percent from 72 cents for the first seven months of 2008. Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued At More Than 96 Cents The United States imported 854,616 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during July 2009, compared to 606,025 in July 2008, an increase of about 6 percent. During the first seven months of 2009, 5 million brooms of broom corn were imported, down slightly from 5.1 million imported during the first seven months of 2008. Mexico shipped 4.7 million brooms of broom corn to the United States during the first seven months of 2009. The average price per broom for July 2009 was $2.50, up about 9 percent from $2.29 for July 2008. The average price per broom for the first seven months of 2009 was $2.47, up about 9 percent from $2.27 for the first seven months of 2008. Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during July 2009 was 143,268, up about 3 percent from 139,396 brooms and brushes imported during July 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, 848,268 brooms and brushes were imported, down about 23 percent from 1.1 million imported during the first seven months of 2008.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

November 2009

9:28 AM

Page 17

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

During the first seven months of 2009, the United States imported 492,275 brooms and brushes from Sri Lanka and 114,468 from China. The average price per unit for July 2009 was $1.64, down about 7 percent from $1.77 for July 2008. The average price for the first seven months of 2009 was $1.85, an increase of about 22 percent from the average price recorded for the first seven months of 2008 of $1.52. Toothbrushes The United States imported 58.6 million toothbrushes in July 2009, down about 5 percent from 61.8 million imported in July 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, 462.7 million toothbrushes were imported, up slightly from 458.3 million imported during the first seven months of 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, the United States received 318.4 million toothbrushes from China, 54.1 million from Switzerland, 24.1 million from Germany and 18.8 million from India. The average price per toothbrush for July 2009 was 23 cents, down about 15 percent from the average price of 27 cents for July 2008. The average price for the first seven months of 2009 was 21 cents, down about 16 percent from the average price of 25 cents for the first seven months of 2008. Shaving Brushes July 2009 imports of shaving brushes totaled 13.1 million, down about 22 percent from 16.9 million imported during July 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, 88.2 million shaving brushes were imported, down about 15 percent from 103.3 million for the first seven months of 2008. Mexico sent 27.9 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first seven months of 2009, while Germany shipped 27.1 million and China exported 20.4 million. The average price per brush was 13 cents during July 2009, the same as the average price in July 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, the average price per brush was also 13 cents, the same as the average price for the first seven months of 2008. Paintbrushes U.S. companies imported 16.7 million paintbrushes during July 2009, down about 26 percent from 22.7 million brushes imported during July 2008. Paintbrush imports for the first seven months of 2009 were 125 million, up about 6 percent from 117.6 million recorded for the first seven months of 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, the United States imported 99.6 million paintbrushes from China and 22.7 million from Indonesia. The average price per paintbrush for July 2009 was 31 cents, up 2 cents from the price for July 2008. The average price for the first seven months of 2009 was 32 cents, up 2 cents from the average price for the first seven months of 2008. EXPORTS Export totals for the first seven months of 2009 were down in all four of the categories outlined, compared to the first seven months of 2008. In July 2009, three of the four categories also reported decreases in exports, compared to July 2008. Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials The United States exported 6,769 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during July 2009, up about 3 percent from the

PAGE 17

July 2008 total of 6,559 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first seven months of 2009 were 48,455 dozen, down about 17 percent from 58,482 dozen for the first seven months of 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, the United States shipped 13,487 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada, while sending 7,695 dozen to China, 5,244 dozen to The United Kingdom, 3,781 dozen to Japan, 3,061 dozen to Hong Kong and 2,741 dozen to Italy. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $41.70 in July 2009, compared to $31.72 for July 2008, an increase of about 31 percent. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first seven months of 2009 was $40.96, a decrease of about 6 percent from the average price per dozen for the first seven months of 2008 of $43.42. Toothbrushes U.S. companies exported 6.1 million toothbrushes during July 2009, down about 50 percent from 12.1 million exported during July 2008. Toothbrush exports for the first seven months of 2009 were 53 million, down about 52 percent from 109.6 million recorded for the first seven months of 2008. The United States shipped 18.4 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first seven months of 2009, compared to 27.6 million during the same time period in 2008, while sending 12.5 million to Mexico during the first seven months of 2009, compared to 23.3 million during the first seven months of 2008. The average price per toothbrush for July 2009 was 85 cents, up about 136 percent from the July 2008 average price of 36 cents. The average price for the first seven months of 2009 was 71 cents, up about 115 percent from the average price of 33 cents for the first seven months of 2008. Artist Brushes The United States exported 519,274 artist brushes in July 2009, down about 2 percent from the total of 527,806 exported in July 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, 4.4 million artist brushes were exported, about a 17 percent decrease from 5.3 million exported during the first seven months of 2008. Canada received 2.3 million artist brushes from the United States during the first seven months of 2009, while Mexico imported 313,996. The average price per artist brush for July 2009 was $3.25, down about 19 percent from the average price for July 2008 of $3.99. The average price for the first seven months of 2009 was $3.20, down about 6 percent from $3.39 for the first seven months of 2008. Paintbrushes The export total of paintbrushes during July 2009 was 87,773, down about 47 percent from 165,007 paintbrush exports recorded for July 2008. During the first seven months of 2009, 560,467 paintbrushes were exported, down about 60 percent from 1.4 million during the first seven months of 2008. Canada imported 226,549 paintbrushes from the United States during the first seven months of 2009, compared to 502,999 during the same time period in 2008. The average price per paintbrush for July 2009 was $17.33, up about 35 percent from $12.81 for July 2008. The average price for the first seven months of 2009 was $16.46, up about 51 percent from $10.89 recorded for the first seven months of 2008.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 18

PAGE 18

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

EXPORTS July Exports By Country

Foreign Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles July Year To Date Country Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Value Canada 14 29,081 4 15,198 7 27,066 Hondura U King 5 19,673 TOTAL 4 15,198 26 75,820 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles July Year To Date Country Net Q/Dozen Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 443 42,646 3,799 263,401 Mexico 25 8,290 Norway 218 7,191 TOTAL 443 42,646 4,042 278,882 9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,601,757 1,057,083 7,745,653 6,860,650 Mexico 586 6,000 228,659 162,330 Hondura 3,456 2,848 Jamaica 17,959 51,774 Dom Rep 9,792 3,860 Finland 9,456 4,001 U King 7,032 71,953 Ireland 23,856 26,502 Nethlds 7,200 6,209 59,149 215,553 France 670 3,283 Fr Germ 111,144 66,174 Switzld 4,320 3,500 India 85,008 33,507 Malaysa 2,845 29,107 Singapr 29,520 12,540 307,394 205,944 Phil R 34,680 15,681 Kor Rep 79,819 35,333 Hg Kong 5,136 2,557 5,136 2,557 Taiwan 12,240 5,906 73,316 31,368 Japan 610 2,988 Austral 154,010 80,883 Algeria 31,392 22,006 31,392 22,006 TOTAL 1,687,831 1,112,301 8,995,356 7,931,802 9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person Year To Date July Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 85,284 92,221 607,967 792,434 Mexico 26,595 18,350 246,345 379,900 Chile 900 5,160 Brazil 3,996 3,437 7,392 6,250 U King 4,805 43,941 25,496 176,380 Nethlds 1,495 13,668 1,495 13,668 Belgium 900 5,489 Andorra 72 3,000 France 2,438 22,298 830,885 556,215 Fr Germ 1,158 61,467 204,238 274,662 Switzld 5,021 10,219 Italy 2,369 28,705 Croatia 3,682 3,070 4,580 1,500 Lebanon

November 2009

Arab Em 21,018 23,707 Indnsia 481 4,396 4,729 13,199 Phil R China 1,514 13,849 Taiwan 720 26,145 Japan 17,843 92,171 5,622 18,935 Austral TOTAL 125,771 255,382 1,990,189 2,452,134 9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar Brushes for the Application of Cosmetics Year To Date July Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 318,024 787,539 1,749,345 5,172,356 Mexico 68,861 107,539 239,781 475,867 6,114 22,560 7,579 27,967 Guatmal Brazil 2,460 8,488 32,032 75,647 Argent 1,584 3,584 25,880 68,510 Sweden 10,590 43,803 74,246 202,115 Norway 5,331 43,736 Finland 1,700 7,304 U King 18,009 58,880 258,928 788,736 5,351 1,450 Ireland 3,150 19,824 Nethlds Belgium 8,533 31,485 117,632 434,025 France 20,652 90,434 Fr Germ 2,880 6,490 20,407 41,306 Czech 2,910 8,220 Switzld 28,042 103,465 Poland 2,191 7,058 Russia 59,507 145,408 319,526 730,436 Ukraine 1,448 5,342 62,690 135,837 Kazakhs 3,859 10,863 33,346 50,688 Spain 1,920 4,373 5,668 17,019 24,396 90,012 48,582 161,713 Italy Israel 2,361 8,712 Arab Em 4,332 17,150 Thailnd 1,061 3,913 6,611 30,484 Malaysa 963 3,553 963 3,553 Singapr 14,189 53,116 Indnsia 915 3,376 2,379 8,778 Phil R 1,020 3,288 2,973 10,968 553,573 860,729 China Kor Rep 43,156 51,397 68,699 142,921 Hg Kong 703 2,594 8,079 29,809 Taiwan 11,434 52,536 Japan 6,732 44,908 48,886 211,756 Austral 7,613 29,348 47,557 174,294 Senegal 3,828 23,534 TOTAL 592,301 1,476,423 3,834,979 10,288,274

Country Canada Mexico U King Ireland Nethlds Turkey Arab Em China Austral TOTAL

9603402000 Paint Rollers July Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 7,176 66,274 32,193 10,291 25,757 105,060 191 3,354 191 354 146 144 215 615 396 17,658 95,385 139,314

Value 234,378 215,021 3,354 6,206 2,564 2,520 10,080 10,800 6,944 491,867

Country Mexico TOTAL

9603404020 Paint Pads July Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 14,712 27,178 110,077 14,712 27,178 110,077

Value 273,123 273,123

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 19

November 2009 Canada Mexico Trinid Sweden Nethlds Fr Germ Spain Malta Greece Austral TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 10,989 556

123 437

12,105

129,173 11,530

2,549 9,057

152,309

32,444 3,676 236 153 256 722 326 437 504 806 39,560

375,688 76,216 4,898 3,176 5,301 14,972 6,762 9,057 10,452 16,716 523,238

9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts For Broom or Brush Making, NESOI July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 38,686 338,664 256,457 2,639,208 14,882 225,738 76,596 1,113,986 Mexico C Rica 661 10,714 6,630 107,514 Panama 1,566 25,440 14,813 240,305 Bermuda 464 2,859 Jamaica 98 2,506 Chile 681 11,044 2,397 38,854 Brazil 11,316 30,925 17,280 52,085 Iceland 98 5,360 Norway 1,324 21,473 475 7,696 Finland Denmark 3,216 14,972 77,950 905,879 U King 275 4,465 18,560 219,764 Ireland 462 7,487 462 7,487 Nethlds 1,424 14,329 4,305 59,709 150 8,757 Belgium France 2,242 92,179 20,548 262,118 Fr Germ 262 4,253 20,684 205,376 Czech 550 2,983 753 6,271 Estonia 374 3,300 Poland 166 2,687 Russia 400 2,880 Spain 389 6,308 Italy 403 8,373 Iraq 604 9,794 Israel 50 2,580 Arab Em 300 2,946 1,325 19,574 India 458 7,431 Phil R 257 4,165 Kor Rep 256 4,148 Japan 1,224 19,861 3,119 50,212 Austral 1,619 37,969 11,608 101,514 Rep Saf 1,054 10,395 79,366 843,969 540,507 6,140,568 TOTAL

Domestic Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles July Year To Date Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Value Country Mexico 2 5,705 Ireland 3 11,862 France 5 17,280 7 23,498 Malaysa 1 3,530 1 3,530 TOTAL 6 20,810 13 44,595 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles July Year To Date Country Net Q/Dozen Value Net Q/Dozen Value Canada 2,548 70,555 13,487 536,459 Mexico 200 11,492 1,907 93,820 Belize 326 10,733 1,108 40,124 Panama 807 26,571

Bermuda Bahamas Jamaica Barbado Trinid N Antil Ecuador Peru Brazil Uruguay Argent Denmark U King Ireland France Fr Germ Poland Italy Croatia Greece Turkey Iraq Israel S Arab Arab Em Afghan India Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral Libya Nigeria Angola Rep Saf TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Salvadr Hondura Nicarag C Rica Panama Jamaica Cayman Haiti Dom Rep Antigua Barbado Trinid N Antil Aruba Colomb Venez Guyana Surinam Ecuador Peru Chile Brazil Paragua Uruguay Argent Iceland Sweden Denmark

PAGE 19 632 1,158 235 387 813 12 18 17 7 76 426 280 5,244 372 1,242 215 419 2,741 24 90 57 59 41 779 10 12 50 52 7,695 352 3,061 35 3,781 209 503 4 10 28 48,455

20,470 105,194 6,054 6,505 12,837 3,550 2,915 5,025 4,425 4,400 12,168 15,219 218,874 35,400 69,716 6,736 17,300 90,400 12,229 3,416 4,130 20,448 3,840 51,733 3,253 5,762 2,850 4,816 261,600 20,022 91,950 2,570 103,438 20,776 16,575 9,500 3,690 8,023 1,984,783

9603210000 Toothbrushes Year To Date July Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 2,954,579 1,786,532 18,441,635 1,650,903 703,819 12,471,360 2,087 45,930 26,836 61,210 3,456 5,184 23,352 106,760 11,053 10,035 18,197 666 5,904 320,669 25,980 13,402 59,330 6,054 9,992 23,690 29,448 17,724 197,810 323 3,301 34,486 7,415 8,352 3,452 94,623 540 5,893 85,158 10,440 529 11,520 3,341 87,015 141,984 281,851 102,985 48,252 1,204,045 983 6,245 706,257 2,880 1,728 7,390 1,728 4,608

Value 13,676,742 4,863,542 3,402 39,529 2,848 4,272 14,477 60,030 23,026 6,085 5,904 170,505 125,249 22,060 238,734 30,538 6,537 71,601 50,215 9,180 6,115 36,684 55,721 134,244 527,539 10,055 38,710 399,565 9,525 7,390 2,918

387 121

6,505 4,000

7

4,425

426 40 1,751 73 104

12,168 10,068 82,955 10,500 22,592

432

14,248

50

2,850

262 42

8,626 10,571

6,769

282,288


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 20

PAGE 20 U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium Luxmbrg France Fr Germ Austria Hungary Switzld Lithuan Poland Spain Italy Bulgar Israel Kuwait S Arab Qatar Arab Em India Thailnd Vietnam Malaysa Singapr Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Nigeria Rep Saf TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 36,020 497,280 61,950

232,543 255,647 579,060

278 12,043 51,996

2,849 126,305 521,807

19,200 372

36,223 3,801

6,050 83,813 11,706 51,278 143,538 67,548 70,272 101,532 55,295

4,146 76,978 8,180 205,273 87,693 35,197 27,119 302,596 52,682

360

3,681

6,119,926

5,201,749

69,282 1,327,968 2,863,844 6,931 278 1,443,060 1,290,888 364 4,680 22,658 247 3,096 404,313 83,916 908 9,250 927 12,840 2,000 16,256 520,128 235,452 207,330 6,806 1,028,397 12,069 372,577 4,501,629 907,571 904,684 956,689 1,386,893 1,158 360 10,368 53,027,374

362,924 1,745,560 3,293,319 6,971 2,849 726,492 1,441,493 3,720 2,906 10,368 2,526 2,509 174,284 59,301 4,449 57,098 9,484 12,457 12,500 79,655 1,043,448 106,229 106,200 13,313 448,269 11,898 1,102,781 1,894,285 476,049 411,569 2,386,378 743,511 5,675 3,681 3,648 37,420,741

9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use on the Person July Year To Date Value Net Q./No. Value Net Q/No. Country 335,912 260,089 1,559,715 1,625,608 Canada 409,184 318,570 2,094,346 2,500,764 Mexico Salvadr 418 6,352 C Rica 5,280 7,924 4,608 4,528 Panama Bermuda 155 3,071 Bahamas 2,688 7,044 2,688 7,044 Jamaica 161 5,871 Dom Rep 1,203 14,272 Barbado 144 2,690 Trinid 3,448 38,000 11,991 119,424 Aruba 2,496 4,524 2,496 4,524 Colomb 50 9,250 6,500 210,514 Venez 100 5,303 1,362 19,853 Guyana 576 5,622 576 5,622 Ecuador 27,998 42,078 982 17,478 Peru 1,180 2,821 6,112 22,231 Chile Brazil 12,009 109,830 Argent 1,374 21,838 1,098 10,040 Norway Finland 7,500 8,388 7,500 8,388 Denmark 117 2,691 U King 7,519 46,439 56,838 327,025 Ireland 4,668 11,679 5,571 19,934 Nethlds 1,992 10,911 9,995 78,962 Belgium 12,056 97,070 France 2,912 69,709 33,709 293,106 Fr Germ 889 23,179 50,853 244,188 Hungary 504 4,608 Switzld 1,017 9,300 Poland 938 8,575 Spain 9,412 91,213

Italy Turkey Cyprus Lebanon Iraq S Arab Arab Em India Pakistn Thailnd Singapr Indnsia Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral N Zeal Rep Saf TOTAL

November 2009

250

3,748

9,212

84,240

2,047

18,720

45,112

165,142

335,184 6,737 1,037

293,039 68,724 16,281

1,018 1,181,711

23,072 1,494,494

7,250 10,094 2,638 1,404 1,097 796 13,470 1,009 7,636 9,858 880 1,703 85,125 208,460 1,467 350,434 277,410 5,437 224 1,455 4,917,573

9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar for the Application of Cosmetics July Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Country Canada 287,056 683,999 2,320,467 Mexico 43,580 209,059 313,996 Hondura 3,516 Nicarag 3,552 Panama 17,654 Bahamas 735 2,713 735 Jamaica 1,255 Cayman 3,184 Dom Rep 5,861 14,388 32,291 Barbado 3,279 Aruba 1,920 Colomb 38,981 Venez 16,635 Ecuador 1,814 1,871 Peru 174 Bolivia 2,500 Chile Brazil 9,072 Uruguay 4,324 2,234 Sweden Norway 1,799 6,635 3,641 Finland 7,153 Denmark 3,252 U King 15,704 165,964 234,787 Ireland 16,423 Nethlds 3,154 11,636 175,582 Belgium 29,815 France 6,153 28,957 128,113 Fr Germ 2,382 8,787 49,309 Austria 1,298 4,790 7,488 Czech 1,355 1,599 Slovak 13,838 Switzld Estonia 1,992 6,262 3,029 Poland 6,284 17,801 Russia Italy 4,438 18,275 47,087 Turkey 10,516 Lebanon 909 1,443 5,324 5,443 Israel S Arab 5,760 7,819 5,760 Arab Em 10,936 Oman 157 India 20,878 Thailnd 973 8,143 25,489 Vietnam 5,111 Malaysa 799 Singapr 6,627

52,399 15,192 24,128 3,383 11,498 14,470 157,947 12,250 12,813 81,068 7,882 11,140 63,768 972,127 18,935 432,504 380,342 58,697 3,696 32,041 8,312,896 Brushes

Value 5,346,135 1,356,275 6,945 3,817 67,747 2,713 4,629 17,846 36,810 3,908 3,010 109,953 29,760 14,579 9,232 7,490 8,551 39,475 77,753 8,244 14,802 34,716 12,000 1,460,045 51,691 653,378 110,007 564,080 203,635 27,628 5,000 5,900 61,067 10,088 23,186 67,532 185,928 15,625 12,631 20,060 7,819 18,318 3,211 77,031 84,533 35,590 2,949 42,909


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 21

November 2009 Indnsia Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Tokelau Moroc Algeria Ivy Cst Ghana Nigeria Rep Saf TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

5,464 44,988 27,993 1,561

20,160 165,990 103,285 5,761

4,278 52,662

15,783 192,997

519,274

1,686,727

2,809 11,632 277,904 48,078 78,177 4,795 93,464 207,393 1,464 1,357 21,941 17,630 6,183 1,200 21,930 1,328 4,415,920

10,363 42,917 1,019,097 231,261 302,834 21,336 385,521 771,965 5,400 5,008 80,956 68,717 111,186 4,115 80,914 6,809 14,114,630

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr C Rica Panama Bermuda Bahamas Jamaica Dom Rep B Virgn Trinid Aruba Colomb Venez Ecuador Peru Brazil Argent Finland U King Ireland Nethlds France Fr Germ Austria Italy Slvenia Turkey Israel Jordan S Arab Arab Em Pakistn Singapr Indnsia China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral N Zeal Marshal Fiji Rep Saf TOTAL

9603402000 Paint Rollers July Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 968,251 1,240,940 152,268 27,706 91,762 1,024,796 100 2,009 1,016 1,671 7,052 17,810 2,324 1,168 792 13,908 76,292 3,804 638 175 903 98,484 3,432 7,660 7,159 266 4,674 1,193 8,334 2,096 150 6,374 150 560 197 2,785 8,149 28,710 177 50 3,560 507 9,152 190 1,528 5,929 20,000 16,500 35,000 29 796 1,000 4,870 5,681 388 34,557 48,959 157,802 2,888 325 5,704 18,586 4,836 706 14,228 180 3,160 176,758 241,700 1,179,363 2,968,741

Value 4,719,095 1,999,934 8,995 53,012 17,823 41,253 6,618 20,503 155,080 4,720 11,195 3,067 15,861 147,164 12,279 8,009 43,332 18,264 19,200 10,472 6,374 2,808 3,452 55,723 3,100 2,573 8,414 8,900 24,706 3,562 44,441 23,081 29,475 3,835 3,598 29,546 15,681 191,029 12,229 155,558 24,071 3,405 30,194 124,999 8,126,630

Country Mexico Hondura Panama Grenada

9603404020 Paint Pads Year To Date July Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 8,411 20 336 3,083

Value 15,225 3,400 2,768 21,882

Aruba Colomb Peru Chile Brazil U King France Israel Arab Em China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral Rep Saf TOTAL

PAGE 21

1,085 272

7,700 9,121

399

2,833

4,816 6,452 13,024

21,090 45,800 86,544

121 2,684 5,855 87 2,117 272 35 2,000 1,576 8,079 649 3,945 13,624 6,041 5,950 6,452 71,337

8,260 19,056 41,560 2,981 10,427 9,121 4,500 16,857 11,190 57,353 4,608 28,000 17,711 10,488 32,281 45,800 363,468

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) July Year To Date Value Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Country 43,198 677,279 226,549 3,184,631 Canada Mexico 1,217 18,762 2,594 49,789 Guatmal 5,395 75,449 Hondura 655 12,341 1,223 23,791 Nicarag 317 6,574 C Rica 299 9,111 3,658 72,783 Panama 340 6,026 6,359 67,570 Bermuda 828 24,068 6,316 82,758 Bahamas 2,828 63,931 13,227 272,694 Jamaica 1,015 21,038 Turk Is 78 7,820 242 5,017 2,619 50,083 Cayman Dom Rep 2,926 15,309 B Virgn 150 3,118 214 5,870 Antigua 141 2,927 Monsrat 311 18,649 S Lucia 885 20,141 885 20,141 Grenada 1,611 33,406 Barbado 368 20,462 5,087 58,085 Trinid N Antil 413 8,120 Colomb 1,488 30,875 3,070 51,388 Venez 2,720 40,356 Guyana 175 3,636 175 3,636 Surinam 151 2,661 Ecuador 1,759 46,814 Peru 120 3,084 Brazil 13,296 516,809 Argent 465 15,142 Sweden 1,040 15,600 6,305 96,775 Norway 122 6,229 422 11,327 Finland 181 3,752 1,511 5,671 10,407 42,177 Denmark U King 8,320 180,555 50,735 735,018 Ireland 5,239 37,341 8,848 76,068 Nethlds 13,583 302,979 106,647 2,199,968 Belgium 65 3,183 14,010 292,418 France 4,298 65,935 Fr Germ 125 2,600 4,063 84,276 489 11,215 Czech 2,930 141 2,930 141 Lithuan Poland 5,308 92,667 1,320 7,426 Spain Italy 555 11,506 Croatia 156 3,234 156 3,234 Turkey 483 10,010 129 2,679 Cyprus Lebanon 218 4,914 719 15,818 Israel 2,331 63,010 Kuwait 2,437 17,278 S Arab 711 14,742 Arab Em 417 8,640 4,639 45,720


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 22

PAGE 22 Thailnd Vietnam Singapr Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral N Zeal Eq Guin Ivy Cst Nigeria Rep Saf TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 540 385 130

2,756 7,980 2,698

161 54

3,346 2,583

2,079 976 206

43,115 5,952 4,265

87,773

1,520,876

1,477 1,319 4,605 28 5,497 698 1,067 5,831 6,602 1,966 98 969 750 1,164 560,467

22,197 27,360 39,258 6,581 92,906 15,947 61,736 74,108 94,700 50,920 2,780 20,104 6,525 24,146 9,223,056

9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts for Broom or Brush Making, NESOI July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 261,317 2,469,833 1,650,236 16,036,485 Mexico 53,137 654,997 427,696 5,331,848 720 5,434 Guatmal Hondura 420 6,808 C Rica 2,412 17,839 3,044 28,080 Panama 4,626 75,048 11,952 187,979 Bermuda 81 4,717 81 4,717 Bahamas 2,481 46,699 Jamaica 244 3,962 Dom Rep 580 5,400 4,900 24,396 B Virgn 152 3,314 St K N 1,073 17,410 1,073 17,410 S Vn Gr 83 2,877 Barbado 1,476 9,890 Trinid 3,565 30,450 N Antil 3,896 45,009 Aruba 221 3,580 221 3,580 Colomb 9,038 89,764 Venez 16 3,703 7,073 84,970 Ecuador 35,414 574,402 Peru 9,076 138,287 Bolivia 215 3,480 Chile 1,569 21,973 15,438 211,563 Brazil 1,569 30,661 15,796 220,188 Uruguay 116 2,601 Argent 2,760 28,730 Sweden 897 13,546 Norway 600 8,106 600 8,106 Finland 254 5,882 1,280 22,525 Denmark 2,027 20,161 4,337 31,495 U King 8,842 106,537 70,629 761,070 Ireland 2,292 40,546 Nethlds 5,452 36,100 30,828 250,074 Belgium 10,292 32,824 17,516 138,590 France 688 2,934 8,995 137,671 Fr Germ 3,113 41,417 26,073 409,339 Slovak 341 5,524 341 5,524 Switzld 1,221 28,455 3,259 58,491 369 5,988 Estonia Lithuan 902 12,806 Poland 1,829 40,799 49,299 3,055 Russia 203 3,140 Ukraine 420 6,804 Georgia Kazakhs 274 4,451 Spain 154 3,691 716 12,393 Italy 1,767 28,666 6,052 80,378 321 5,209 Greece Romania 1,541 25,000 1,541 25,000 Lebanon 161 2,609 114,357 7,198 Iraq Israel 240 6,600 2,017 35,444

Kuwait S Arab Qatar Arab Em India Pakistn Thailnd Malaysa Singapr Indnsia Maldive China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Moroc Angola Djibuti Rep Saf TOTAL

November 2009

532

8,634

4,126 210

64,850 2,618

325 455 328 288

5,275 5,295 5,315 8,640

2,600 3,285 3,718 293 3,651 15,165 189

28,743 34,014 45,640 8,785 47,368 80,392 3,064

546 50 398,894

8,850 3,030 4,017,571

60 3,882 675 10,859 460 356 1,494 455 844 5,557 14,875 14,029 15,202 5,982 7,332 28,094 54,470 7,394 135 1,499 546 813 2,574,284

3,107 45,650 11,829 165,618 6,668 5,782 32,189 5,295 30,034 70,220 92,960 313,866 147,562 98,660 125,932 329,430 576,661 42,429 2,624 25,195 8,850 13,337 27,572,475

Broom and Brush

IMPORTS July Imports By Country

Country Thailnd China Hg Kong TOTAL

0502100000 Pigs’, Hogs’ or Boars’ Bristles and Hair and Waste Thereof July Year To Date Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 154 38,284 106,782 180,259 2,212 38,284 106,782 182,625

Country Mexico Paragua U King Fr Germ Italy Thailnd China Japan TOTAL

0502900000 Badger Hair and Other Brushmaking Hair and Waste Thereof Year To Date July Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 2,400 2,640 2,400 12,987 470 3,563 488 2,353 62 123 7,048 939 69 3,952 8,502 413 13,062 413 3,475 30,265 28,144

Value 8,469 1,482,221 24,071 1,514,761

Value 2,640 141,848 43,173 92,833 3,008 53,975 172,802 13,062 523,341

0511993300 Horsehair and Horsehair Waste, Whether or Not Put Up As A Layer With or Without Supporting Material Year To Date July Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value Fr Germ 700 10,981 China 5,816 81,818 89,520 1,012,357 TOTAL 5,816 81,818 90,220 1,023,338 1404903000 Istle Used Primarily In Brooms or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles July Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value Mexico 36,662 186,348 260,762 1,304,757 TOTAL 36,662 186,348 260,762 1,304,757 4417002000 Broom and Mop Handles, 1.9 CM or More In Diameter and 97 CM or More In Length, Of Wood July Year To Date


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 23

November 2009 Country Mexico Hondura Colomb Brazil Argent Spain India Sri Lka Vietnam Malaysa Indnsia China Taiwan Egypt TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Net Q/No. 14,000 269,922 15,000 818,257 28,800

Value 6,483 161,491 6,340 683,478 17,110

16,000

21,529

22,500 108,151 215,736

29,565 98,843 130,253

1,508,366

1,155,092

Net Q/No. 59,850 3,378,983 67,662 4,268,590 28,800 32,064 10,896 134,200 100,644 65,400 1,516,958 2,368,736 33,000 20,000 12,085,783

4417004000 Paint Brush and Paint Roller Handles, Of July Year To Date Country Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable Guatmal Fr Germ 3,782 Czech 13,404 Poland 406,039 Italy Indnsia 117,762 China 84,732 Taiwan TOTAL 625,719

Country Canada Hondura Brazil Sri Lka Indnsia China Hg Kong TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr C Rica Colomb Brazil Nethlds Poland Spain India Indnsia China Taiwan TOTAL

4417006000 Brush Backs, Of Wood Year To Date July Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 146,497 69,340 963,982 112,432 52,675 25,354 27,105 215,350 145,448 62,208 2,878 62,208 25,000 234,059 99,323 1,577,095 4417008010 Tool Handles of Wood July Year To Date Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable 2,470 2,349

464,513

2,588 27,875 3,693 503,488

Value 26,836 1,634,251 46,698 3,733,046 17,110 14,758 3,704 152,725 92,051 68,666 1,302,844 1,267,766 36,190 5,000 8,401,645 Wood Value 17,581 15,069 54,531 122,490 2,687,451 505,400 2,188,053 10,446 5,601,021

Value 365,430 46,677 68,380 178,011 72,463 2,878 16,944 750,783

Value 45,469 77,220 3,050 13,119 3,088 2,273,180 5,533 30,568 18,514 2,588 53,868 340,145 25,792 2,892,134

4417008090 Tools, Tool Bodies, Broom or Brush Bodies, Shoe Lasts and Trees, of Wood Year To Date July Country Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable Value Canada 70,713 429,558 Mexico 2,600 19,450 27,311 Hondura 9,771 Nicarag 2,542 Colomb 4,957 Chile 619,780 3,928,636 Brazil 2,381 2,381 U King 3,783 35,699 56,792 Fr Germ Austria 5,143

Russia Spain Italy India Sri Lka Vietnam Singapr Indnsia China Taiwan Japan TOTAL

PAGE 23

7,760 25,092 53,409

51,960 265,179 314,225 1,426,653

3,194 4,923 16,110 636,312 584,167 27,280 3,682 129,531 1,316,757 56,951 2,199,602 9,490,978

7326908576 Metal Handles For Brooms, Mops, Paint Applicators July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value 391 14,456 Canada Mexico 51,240 19,173 C Rica 4 2,929 Brazil 130,600 15,240 156,002 45,867 Denmark 705 6,933 Fr Germ 8,565 19,449 55,568 31,788 Spain 462,084 199,055 1,887,108 804,335 Italy 1,996,631 897,676 8,966,112 4,326,237 605 7,608 Malaysa China 1,305,265 1,110,859 6,941,535 5,848,598 Hg Kong 240 4,902 74,740 58,000 Taiwan 23,148 34,273 Japan 616 6,142 TOTAL 3,903,385 2,247,181 18,157,774 11,206,339 9603100500 Wiskbrooms, of Broom Corn, LT=.96 EA. Prior to Entry or Withdrawal for Consumption of 61,655 Dozen In Calendar Year July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 3,108 3,010 China 7,200 4,757 TOTAL 10,308 7,767 9603104000 Other Brooms, of Broomcorn, LT=.96 EA, Prior to Entry or Withdrawal For Consumption of GT=121,478 Dozen in Calendar Year July Year To Date Mexico 54,456 40,808 China 2,520 2,456 TOTAL 56,976 43,264 9603105000 Other Brooms, of Broomcorn, LT=.96 EA, at Entry or Withdrawal For Consumption of GT=121,478 Dozen in Calendar Year July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 34,056 23,635 78,804 59,851 China 7,200 5,020 TOTAL 34,056 23,635 86,004 64,871 9603106000 Other Brooms, Of Broomcorn, Valued Over .96 Each Year To Date July Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 788,422 2,016,339 4,688,615 11,744,791 87,407 275,034 553,989 49,230 Hondura Fr Germ 3,200 7,910 3,200 7,910 China 13,764 23,853 29,604 56,285 854,616 2,135,509 4,996,453 12,362,975 TOTAL 9603109000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles, NESOI July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Canada 3,600 19,448 4,100 Mexico 10,452 25,198 62,956 Colomb 25,208 Fr Germ 8 Estonia 1,200 Italy 3,849 21,959 3,849

Value 22,431 94,539 31,718 7,013 8,713 21,959


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 24

PAGE 24 Turkey Israel India Sri Lka Thailnd Vietnam Phil R China Taiwan TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

174

5,130

97,097 6,500 14,900

119,769 9,823 11,522

6,696

21,709

143,268

234,558

1,100 174 376 492,275 57,604 82,750 1,000 114,468 1,200 848,268

4,640 5,130 17,403 919,302 109,954 73,325 2,504 249,361 2,401 1,570,393

9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes Year To Date July Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value 7,901 18,803 60,656 109,209 Canada 943,344 186,027 6,877,149 1,324,730 Mexico Chile 38,016 9,216 Brazil 1,619,180 517,392 9,131,588 2,598,889 77,834 80,811 Sweden Denmark 2,220 2,478 U King 101,629 62,042 Ireland 806,256 243,912 5,314,416 1,901,212 53,495 6,137 414,640 39,570 Nethlds 447 4,287 France 2,075,377 24,080,258 14,128,373 3,788,412 Fr Germ Hungary 1,464 2,919 4,387,914 2,352,501 54,063,376 19,493,756 Switzld Italy 74,880 36,012 1,134,720 568,264 Turkey 5,040 3,611 Israel 583,016 138,083 India 1,400,224 325,031 18,774,585 3,274,144 2,720 32,904 4,034,684 543,920 Thailnd 1,634,892 313,234 5,650,209 1,160,887 Vietnam Malaysa 2,407,352 153,312 7,174,660 445,037 Indnsia 65,500 3,394 466,715 31,104 China 41,193,607 6,972,306 318,433,900 50,804,845 Kor Rep 29,760 14,989 921,064 204,545 Hg Kong 95,000 28,863 217,424 104,383 Taiwan 59,484 69,128 2,428,969 558,928 15,310 50,962 2,206,585 482,029 Japan Austral 383,000 56,709 N Caldn 93,456 24,162 Kenya 3,264 4,176 TOTAL 58,585,231 13,400,284 462,674,984 98,162,319 9603294010 Hairbrushes, Valued Not Over .40 Each July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value 13,824 4,460 Poland Thailnd 46,080 14,169 Vietnam 21,600 10,611 China 4,639,998 1,297,992 26,434,943 6,583,172 Kor Rep 49,174 9,723 85,030 18,914 Hg Kong 144,000 23,765 564,576 103,283 Taiwan 10,080 2,866 TOTAL 4,833,172 1,331,480 27,176,133 6,737,475 9603294090 Shaving Brushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person, Valued Not Over .40 Each Year To Date July Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 3,324,577 269,242 27,920,497 2,495,909 Nethlds 270,000 11,990 990,000 42,039 4,155 90,000 Belgium France 564,364 141,117 Fr Germ 4,927,840 971,232 27,097,955 4,447,838 2,530,701 529,467 Italy India 779,180 21,769 China 3,249,917 426,237 20,413,285 3,549,284 Kor Rep 1,292,000 26,853 7,089,156 201,794 Hg Kong 469,000 56,993 Taiwan 247,240 56,872 TOTAL 13,064,334 1,705,554 88,191,378 11,547,237

November 2009

9603302000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Not Over .05 Each Year To Date July Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 282,500 9,451 Mexico 920,400 17,434 2,631,200 38,396 3,063,500 99,757 15,172,000 395,829 Fr Germ Italy 1,186,000 12,632 15,550,900 176,089 India 1,980,000 27,196 China 13,691,464 282,759 71,518,914 1,711,278 1,425,000 34,227 11,627,000 342,202 Kor Rep Hg Kong 1,161,385 37,229 1,478,080 33,329 Taiwan TOTAL 20,286,364 446,809 121,401,979 2,770,999 9603304000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application of Cosmetics, Valued Over .05 But not Over .10 Each July Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Country Mexico 5,563,836 441,162 38,019,197 3,068,904 Dom Rep 33,060 2,874 Brazil 96,000 6,679 288,000 20,035 350,000 30,356 1,182,500 85,506 Fr Germ 39,240 3,820 453,660 35,498 India 27,476 261,504 Indnsia China 14,011,970 1,091,139 66,622,057 5,313,896 250,000 16,119 3,504,920 231,359 Kor Rep Hg Kong 60,000 5,258 400,000 33,329 Taiwan 164,720 16,352 1,321,776 89,604 TOTAL 20,535,766 1,610,885 112,086,674 8,908,481 9603306000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Over .10 Each July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 662 45,700 3,543 163,095 Mexico 9,984,670 1,480,791 65,566,673 10,319,337 Dom Rep 143,796 162,176 984,309 1,026,725 Denmark 220 3,020 186,102 243,105 1,051,890 1,729,302 U King Nethlds 5,000 12,734 Belgium 13,976 3,673 France 59,444 315,761 476,939 1,674,236 Fr Germ 400,399 290,263 2,408,832 1,614,375 120 2,267 Czech Switzld 492 16,321 Spain 17,126 78,026 76,693 363,118 Italy 10,054 6,248 136,867 83,686 188 3,707 Greece Israel 3,494 9,528 India 591,128 290,242 2,769,636 1,324,301 Sri Lka 79,440 39,135 828,947 477,360 Thailnd 221,669 194,455 1,769,141 1,256,672 Vietnam 70,200 26,700 China 12,968,318 8,004,326 90,333,251 59,998,531 Kor Rep 446,894 374,083 1,495,973 1,404,692 802,035 321,224 3,378,759 1,756,956 Hg Kong Taiwan 328,638 100,180 1,054,756 333,187 172,442 571,653 1,829,402 5,307,201 Japan Austral 888 2,558 13,469 10,028 33,502 73,499 Maurit 26,426,286 12,527,396 174,293,691 88,986,781 TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Brazil U King Nethlds Fr Germ Austria Czech

9603402000 Paint Rollers Year To Date July Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 42,316 44,459 357,363 886,033 541,188 6,839,220 30,000 3,700 44,652 8,400 4,272 22,800 770 421,150 86,282 2,551,842 800 4,009 800 25,060

Value 336,869 4,175,832 32,369 23,814 3,440 639,015 4,009 9,777


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 25

November 2009 Italy Singapr China Hg Kong Taiwan Japan TOTAL

32,360 10,230 2,851,895

4,283,184

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 44,694 3,338 1,599,092

2,331,034

32,360 58,551 22,337,764 112,170 15,000 40,000 32,438,352

44,694 12,524 12,175,370 22,049 15,525 28,476 17,523,763

9603404020 Paint Pads (Other Than Of Subheading 9603.30) Year To Date July Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Country Canada 7,000 3,110 U King 74,700 40,130 Nethlds 1,315 6,600 1,315 6,600 Fr Germ 1,000 2,364 44 7,438 Italy China 1,120,464 640,028 7,401,782 4,189,713 Taiwan 11,264 83,709 111,956 888,314 TOTAL 1,133,043 730,337 7,597,797 5,137,669 9603404040 Natural Bristle Brushes, Other Than Brushes Of Subheading 9603.30 July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Sweden 100 4,542 U King 13,234 31,783 157,321 129,397 Nethlds 336 2,805 France 1,340 3,475 Fr Germ 39,973 24,885 Italy 60,800 84,596 Turkey 16,122 38,925 53,994 167,771 Israel 12,000 9,423 Thailnd 371,664 52,720 Vietnam 569,244 75,999 Indnsia 4,236,254 590,488 22,931,948 3,324,757 China 18,120 29,158 534,308 144,227 Taiwan 600 2,372 469,742 113,712 Japan 360 2,998 4,740 41,547 TOTAL 4,284,690 695,724 25,207,510 4,179,856 9603404060 Paint, Distemper, Varnish/Similr Brushes Exc Subheading 9603.30 NESOI July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 30,240 33,741 110,334 Canada 72 Mexico 43,317 Guatmal 61,948 Brazil 25,000 9,819 25,001 Sweden 40,270 25,951 86,020 U King 370 2,078 370 Nethlds 6,140 40,739 44,046 Fr Germ 24,000 Czech 517 Switzld 852 4,317 22,095 Italy 10,332 30,236 10,332 Turkey 30,000 India 123,140 18,873 392,878 Vietnam 10,750 Singapr Indnsia 3,636,728 527,188 22,747,564 China 12,694,198 4,484,609 99,563,210 45,000 Kor Rep Taiwan 156,456 50,626 1,472,000 Japan 4,776 8,657 265,716 TOTAL 16,728,502 5,236,834 124,955,170

Country Mexico Brazil China

9603908010 Wiskbrooms Year To Date July Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 127 2,372 3,471 2,429 102,690 90,894 319,289

Brushes of

Value 133,254 3,098 52,132 33,372 14,361 66,061 2,078 138,762 15,098 2,358 34,366 30,236 3,381 154,452 4,309 3,929,201 35,299,427 18,076 386,937 105,041 40,426,000

Value 8,098 30,033 295,592

Taiwan Rep Saf TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Salvadr Colomb Brazil Spain Italy Vietnam China Taiwan Japan Egypt TOTAL

PAGE 25 1,938 2,784 329,911

6,446 9,233 349,402

9603908020 Upright Brooms July Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 496 51,834 47,956 339,001 74,372 41,054 37,860 108,467 87,479 211,664 20,364 42,151 20,364 26,648 39,106 108,700 1,400 28,836 1,600 719,117 722,677 3,979,715 46,548 100 7,776 5,562 30,852 935,606 973,767 4,892,326

Value 12,171 340,893 90,641 39,858 31,944 281,683 42,151 167,751 39,336 4,174,322 39,311 15,000 21,135 5,296,196

102,817

93,266

9603908030 Push Brooms, 41 CM or Less in Width Year To Date July Value Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Country Argent 4,350 12,643 3,636 16,215 Sri Lka China 15,024 29,640 39,786 118,911 Taiwan 300 2,545 300 2,545 TOTAL 15,324 32,185 48,072 150,314

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Salvadr Dom Rep Colomb Venez Brazil U King Czech Hungary Spain Italy Israel India Sri Lka Thailnd Vietnam Indnsia China Kor Rep Taiwan Egypt Rep Saf TOTAL

9603908040 Other Brooms, NESOI Year To Date July Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 276,362 125,123 649,139 499,694 774,435 2,809,917 101,175 17,280 16,416 66,083 1,577 50,940 41,877 255,268 725,793 10,086 13,470 152,724 1,476 26,408 22,278 145,802 27,900 89,162 118,494 136,778 272,865 401,766 412,952 3,986 500 2,870 1,344 38,508 98,755 232,488 5,000 6,488 11,500 21,210 38,150 596,359 658,200 4,301,513 182 15,915 3,600 2,520 9,365 2,520 1,885,684 2,289,537 10,118,992

Value 723,612 5,021,605 101,156 120,562 27,278 293,548 86,988 410,464 10,981 126,725 8,777 167,003 603,306 3,257 5,064 575,276 15,522 18,403 38,974 4,865,635 2,789 93,751 2,904 9,365 13,332,945

9603908050 Brooms, Brushes, Sqeegees, Etc., NESOI July Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,992,448 13,852,043 Mexico 3,395,868 24,277,609 Salvadr 18,725 98,182 Hondura 2,159,654 9,869,138 Panama 9,716 Dom Rep 13,011 230,625 Colomb 150,829 782,323 Brazil 12,837 397,711 Argent 143,088


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 26

PAGE 26 Sweden Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Austria Czech Switzld Poland Russia Spain Portugl Italy Serbia Romania Turkey

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 4,001 141,661 92,031 277,526 214,098 22,475 178,696 2,548 8,212 40,729

24,093 2,290 471,485

117,422 10,595 689,145 475,365 3,612 1,173,248 1,197,405 102,870 1,344,111 210,285 187,961 79,071 8,487 4,643 272,675 2,290 4,661,151 29,056 8,611 15,568

Yarn/Tape Continued From Page 12 imports will continue to be an issue, and one that we welcome. We don’t welcome the recession, but when it comes to imports, we compete in a global marketplace and we are not afraid to take our products over there and say, ‘Here is what we have to offer.’ “I will guarantee our product is of a higher quality than what is coming in, basically because of the quality control measures that we have in place.” One new product Jason Mills plans to offer in the near future is an environmentally friendly mesh. The idea to enter the green marketplace with this line came about through Jason Mills’ market research that indicates customers want such a product. “We are still in the beginning stages, but we believe that there is a market for it,” Lavroff said. “The product will be an environmentally friendly version of the same mesh that we have always produced. It will be made from the recycled fibers that are used in the industry. “I can’t guarantee what the rest of the mop or the sponge is made of, because we don’t do that, but the mesh will have green properties. We have the supply chains to produce this product and we think it is something that is needed and desired in the marketplace.” Also for the broom, brush and mop segment, Jason Mills is exploring the possibility of offering an economy line of the fabric it currently sells, which would be a lighter weight version of the company’s current fabric. When speaking about what may lie ahead for Jason Mills and the textile industry overall, Lavroff is optimistic. “I am very bullish on the future of our company. I see us expanding into different technical textiles, and included in that are fabrics for the broom, brush and mop industry, such as our planned green line,” Lavroff said. “We will continue to explore into different niche markets and expand our product line into new and different textile materials.” Contact: Jason Mills, LLC, 440 S. Main St., Milltown, NJ 08850. Phone: 732-651-7200; Fax: 732-651-7222. E-mail: mike@jasonmills.com. Web site: www.jasonmills.com.

Syria Israel India Pakistn Sri Lka Thailnd Vietnam Malaysa Singapr Indnsia China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral W Samoa Egypt TOTAL

November 2009

14,452 60,964 337,115 343,940 827,574 27,423 27,115 62,651 23,870,791 368,765 482,028 891,843 45,474 104,937 10,340 36,698,629

3,299 425,438 777,814 2,908,394 2,451,734 5,168,921 370,384 188,549 28,735 353,262 177,824,779 1,897,233 2,666,775 6,970,734 273,051 825,031 83,464 135,575 263,607,178

Harper Brush Works Receives 2009 Best Of Fairfield Award Harper Brush Works has been selected for the 2009 Best of Fairfield Award in the Household or Industrial Brushes category by the U.S. Commerce Association (USCA). The USCA “Best of Local Business” Award Program recognizes outstanding local businesses throughout the country. Each year, the USCA identifies companies that it believes have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and community. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2009 USCA Award Program focused on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the USCA and data provided by third parties. Harper Brush Works, in business for over 108 years, is a manufacturer of mops, buckets, brooms, brushes, dusters, squeegees and other commercial cleaning equipment. The company’s manufacturing/distribution facilities are located in Fairfield, IA; Stockton, CA; Brownwood, TX; and Greenville, NC. For more information on the company, visit www.harperbrush.com. USCA is a Washington, D.C.-based organization funded by local businesses operating in towns, large and small, across America. The purpose of USCA is to promote local business through public relations, marketing and advertising. The USCA was established to recognize the best of local businesses in their communities. The organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations, chambers of commerce and other business advertising and marketing groups. Its mission is to be an advocate for small- and medium-size businesses and business entrepreneurs across America.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 27

November 2009

Packaging Continued From Page 15 become more efficient this year and reduce costs,” Laske said. Contact: Vonco Products, Inc., 201 Park Ave., Lake Villa, IL 60046. Phone: 847-356-2323; Fax: 847-356-8630. Web sites: www.vonco.com. www.thunderstix.com. E-mail: sales@vonco.com.

P

ioneer Packaging, Inc., of Chicopee, MA, was founded in 1946 by Gordon Shinners who dedicated the company to providing fast turnaround service and quality products. That tradition continues today under the ownership of Jeff and Jill Shinners, Gordon Shinners’ son and granddaughter. An important market segment served by Pioneer Packaging is the brush industry, for which it manufactures paintbrush keepers, roller packs and clamshells. “We have built special machinery for our brush products,” said Jill Shinners, who, along with being a co-owner, is the company’s vice president of marketing. “We also have developed a special coating for the interior of our paintbrush keepers that prevents, not only water-based paint, but also solvent-based paint from bleeding through the keepers. We have been in the paintbrush industry for more than 60 years.” Pioneer developed the first reusable paintbrush keeper made from 100 percent post-consumer waste material, making it fully compostable. In addition, this packaging utilizes soy-based inks, FSC certified material and special waterbased coatings to protect and extend the life of the keeper. This environmentally friendly product was a candidate for the American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA) 2009 Innovation Award. Another important innovation for the company has been in the area of hightech “luster” coating printing and thermoforming post consumer waste materials. In addition to the brush industry, Pioneer Packaging serves a variety of segments including health and beauty products, food, hardware, pharmaceutical, stationary packaging and consumer goods. The company serves customers in the United States,

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Europe and Mexico. The company’s varied customer base and the adjustments it has made have proven to be a successful combination in dealing with current economic conditions. “Business has been slow but it is starting to pick up,” Jill Shinners said. “We had to change the way we seek potential customers as far as targeting business and looking for new markets. Dealing with this economy has been a learning experience. “We have many customers who are looking for creative ideas and design concepts that will give them savings. We have been working to redesign things to put together cost savings for our accounts. A lot of customers are coming up with new products and we are doing the same.” Shinners explained that because the packaging industry’s customer base has drastically shrunk in recent years, innovative thinking to develop products and new markets is essential to survival. “We strive to increase our business based on new markets,” Shinners said. “The challenge for us is to continually research and come up with new markets for our products. Our company is very strong. We have been very fortunate, and I expect to see significant growth in the next few years with all the changes we have made in equipment and developing new markets.” While Pioneer has made changes to accommodate current marketplace conditions, one aspect of the company has remained the same — the commitment to personalized customer service. “We offer individual in-house customer service for our accounts, which results in strong personalized relationships,” Shinners said. “Customers have an inside personal contact. In addition, all of our sales people travel to all our accounts and are always striving to learn more about their businesses.” One way companies have battled the recession is by keeping their inventories as low as possible. Pioneer Packaging’s Vendor Managed Inventory programs are helping some of its customers in this area. The programs typically help customers prevent stock shortages; allow for artwork changes every three months, if needed; provide just-in-time deliveries;

PAGE 27

reduce inventory; and provide cost savings. “Many customers will send us their forecast for the year. They will also send us their production reports on a monthly basis and we build to what their production looks like for the next month,” Shinners said. “An important result is we help reduce our customers’ inventories, as well as our own, and we reduce the need for out customers to order large amounts of products.” A critical aspect of Pioneer’s business is its printing capabilities. The company has eight-color and six-color presses. “Last year we purchased a printing press that cost $3.5 million.” Shinners said. “We must stay current in technology to remain competitive. Each year we reinvest in our company’s machinery.” In addition to its state-of-the art printing capabilities, Pioneer manufactures folding cartons, thermoformed plastics and offers contract packaging in its modern 96,000 square-foot facility using the most efficient equipment on the market. The company also has a full-service in-house graphic design department. “One thing that is unique, is we perform all of our operations in one location,” Shinners said. “We print, cut, glue, put in cello/windows, put Velcro onto the packaging for paintbrush keepers and other specialty products — all in our facility.” In speaking of the future of the packaging industry as a whole, Shinners said, “There are fewer and fewer customers and more of the larger companies are opening plants overseas. For those companies that remain onshore, the key to success is to look to new markets and improve and add value to the packaging they offer. “Furthermore, it is not just the package anymore, people are also looking to outsource in other areas. So I think the challenge is to come up with other avenues to sell products and not just be single-minded and think you are going to do one product and that is it.” Contact: Pioneer Packaging, Inc., 220 Padgette St., Chicopee, MA 01022. Phone: 413-378-6930; Fax: 413-378-6963. E-mail: jillshinners@pioneerpackaginginc.com. Web site: www.pioneerpackaginginc.com.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 28

PAGE 28

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

November 2009

U.S. Imports 42 Short Tons Of Broom Corn In August By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

Bart Pelton of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX, said he is not aware of anyone bringing in broom corn from Sierra Leone and that this import’s price of 48 cents per pound is A total of 42 short tons of broom corn was imported into the “pretty cheap.” “Every couple of years, we (PelRay International) do get United States during August 2009, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce. Total value of this import was $93,296, inquiries from people in west Africa regarding broom corn seed. They express interest in starting a broom corn program over there, with a cost per ton of $2,221 ($1.11 per pound). Mexico was the leading importer of broom corn for the month but I don’t think any of them have ever gotten such a program off with 32 short tons. Total value of the Mexican broom corn was the ground,” Pelton said. “It’s not impossible that this could hap$83,616, with a cost per ton of $2,613 ($1.31 per pound). pen, but I’m not aware of such a program right now. Also, at 48 According to U.S. government figures, the only other country to cents per pound, it doesn’t look like this could have been import broom corn into the United States during August was processed broom corn.” He also questioned the validity of the average price for importSierra Leone. A total of 10 short tons was reportedly imported from the west African nation, with a value of $9,680 and a cost per ed Mexican broom corn in August, which was at $1.31 per pound. Pelton felt this price was too low and well below what processed ton of $968 (48 cents per pound). August’s broom corn import mark was lower compared to broom corn was trading for during the month. According to Pelton, unprocessed broom corn does enter the one year ago, when the government reported that 76 short tons of broom corn entered the United States during August United States from Mexico and is imported at a lower price. It’s used mostly by craft and novelty broom manufacturers as well as 2008. After the first eight months of 2009, a total of 205 short tons of for the production of duck blinds in some parts of the United broom corn was imported into the United States. Total value of States. “There is some (unprocessed broom corn) coming into the this import was $528,415, with a cost per ton of $2,578 ($1.29 per pound). In comparison, 676 short tons of broom corn entered the country. I just don’t know if it would be enough to bring the dolUnited States by the end of August 2008. Total value of this lar amount down that low (at $1.31 per pound),” Pelton said. He did feel the 32 short ton figure for August from Mexico was broom corn was $1,669,803, with a cost per ton of $2,470 ($1.24 more accurate compared to figures from previous months. per pound). “That (32 short tons) is about a load and a half, and I think The 2009 import breakdown in short tons by country after eight months is as follows: Mexico, 168 tons; India, 11 tons; Sierra broom corn consumption is only running about 40 tons a month Leone, 10 tons; Chile, 9 tons; and the Dominican Republic, 7 tons. right now (in the United States),” Pelton said. When interviewed on October 16, Broom Corn Imports Pelton added he had 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total Cost just returned from a Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Value Per Ton visit to Mexico and reported that the January 174 125 61 116 89 14 $47,077 $3,363 ($1.68) second harvest of February 113 44 215 90 91 21 $63,921 $3,044 ($1.52) the year is in full March 168 77 65 83 41 50 $108,699 $2,174 ($1.09) swing in the Torreon April 122 120 56 48 150 11 $27,195 $2,472 ($1.24) region. May 167 36 135 172 98 24 $62,849 $2,619($1.31) “The processors June 147 65 81 63 65 20 $57,489 $2,874 ($1.44) are all pretty busy July 162 124 160 80 66 23 $67,889 $2,952 ($1.48) right now. Some of August 183 177 216 80 76 42 $93,296 $2,221 ($1.11) them have sold out September 215 124 152 131 133 their production for November 202 133 184 92 123 the next few weeks November 194 200 96 160 29 to a month,” he said. December 127 164 76 101 17 “While some are pro$528,415 $2,578 ($1.29) 1,497 1,216 205 1,974 1,389 978 ducing bales and put-


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

November 2009

9:28 AM

Page 29

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

ting them in inventory, others are selling (broom corn) about as fast as they are producing. “The supply situation is much better than what took place in June before the first Torreon crop arrived. There was just nothing available to purchase (prior to the first harvest.) Right now (as of the middle of October) there is processed broom corn available. It’s not a huge amount, but with demand being light it doesn’t take a lot to satisfy the market.” Pelton indicated that the second Torreon harvest may take a few more weeks before completion. “There was some late planting that took place. Therefore, we expect broom corn to be harvested until the first freeze in Torreon, which usually takes place around November 17,” he explained. Concerning Mexican broom corn pricing as of October 16, Pelton added that it remains at a fairly stable rate, fluctuating 5 to 6 cents a pound. This is mostly in association with the value of the Mexican peso. He said Mexican processors have purchased most of the raw corn they need thus far, so their costs are fairly fixed. “Most of them are in a position where they would rather accumulate inventory than reduce prices. And there are not nearly as many processors as there used to be, which helps keep prices more stable,” Pelton said. “Most of the demand for broom corn comes from Mexico, and much more broom corn is now traded in pesos than in U.S. dollars. It (the price for Mexican broom corn) often depends on how the dollar and peso have been moving. Whether or not you get a good buy on broom corn can depend on the exchange rate of the day the purchase is made.” Regarding the quality of this year’s second crop from Torreon, Caddy said some of the most recently harvested broom corn is starting to run heavier to insides. This is a change from what was harvested earlier from the second crop. “There was more hurl than expected coming from the earlier part of the harvest. This was good as market demand is heavy to hurl due to more grass brooms being made these days,” he said. “With the more recent broom corn being harvested, however, it’s running greater toward insides. This is also good since the market needs insides as well. “There is some coarse fiber with the second crop broom corn being harvested — more than what we would like — but overall it’s not too bad of a problem.” When it comes to yucca fiber, Pelton reported that prices seem to be strengthening as of the middle of October. He added that some processors have indicated they are considering closing due to weak yucca fiber prices and demand. If one or two of these processors do shut down, prices could move up. “We are also getting close to the time of the year when weather plays a factor with prices. By early- to midDecember, there are cooler and wetter days taking place in the yucca growing region. There is also less direct sunlight. This all usually cuts production time and often brings on a seasonal uptick in prices. The upcoming holiday season also slows production,” Pelton said. “We didn’t really see this take place last year, but in many years yucca fiber prices do increase during the winter months. An increase in prices during

PAGE 29

December or January would not be unusual, and if some of the processors do close, there could be a bigger price spike than what is typical. “But as today (October 16), prices haven’t really changed a lot, making it a good time to buy.” Pelton also addressed the current security situation in Mexico, stating it has stabilized somewhat but those visiting the Torreon and Cadereyta areas still need to be careful. Richard Caddy of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, also had never heard of broom corn arriving from Sierra Leone. “I supposed it’s possible. I know some people who do work in western Africa. They have tried to get local business and industry going as it pertains to broom making. I would be surprised, however, if they had enough broom corn to ship back to the United States,” Caddy said. Along the Pelton, Caddy felt the $1.31 per pound average for imported Mexican broom corn in August was too low. “I could not have achieved that cost average myself unless I brought in a tremendous amount of raw broom corn. As it pertains to processed hurl and insides, $1.31 is too low,” he said. Caddy also believes there was more broom corn arriving into the United States during August than just 42 short tons. When interviewed on October 20, Caddy added that Mexican broom corn is still entering the United States and is of acceptable quality. “There was a concern about a possible supply shortage a couple of months ago, but I think this concern has passed,” Caddy said. “I’m not worried, at this point, about running out of broom corn. “I don’t know what the final tonnage will be from the second harvest, but its supply will definitely help. It should keep us from being worried about whether there are more orders booked than what processors can fill. This is what happened in July. (Processors) were taking orders, but they couldn’t fill them for 30 or so days. They were backed up with commitments. We finally did receive the broom corn, but it took a month.” He added that broom corn pricing remains steady as of the middle of October. Regarding yucca fiber, Caddy said there is plenty of product available. However, many of his customers have gone to producing all-broom corn brooms. “I have seen less demand for yucca this year. The fiber, meanwhile, is of very good quality as the processors do a good job. Pricing for yucca fiber is up by a small percentage compared to six months ago,” he said. As far as overall business at his company is concerned, Caddy described it as being “steady.” “We are not breaking any sales records, but are doing pretty well. July through October of last year were good months, and it appears these months will be good again this year,” Caddy said. Tim Monahan of The Thomas Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, was unavailable for comment for this month’s broom corn dealer survey.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 30

B

room, brush and mop exhibitors from around North America and the world had a major presence in Chicago for ISSA/INTERCLEAN速 North America 2009, held October 6-9 at the McCormick Center. The many exhibitors of brooms, brushes, mops and related products showcased their new product lines and fresh designs. Both industry newcomers and well-established manufacturers met with show attendees to help educate those from various facets of the cleaning industry. Leading exhibitors of brooms, brushes, mops and related products are featured in their company booths on pages 30-35.

Crystal Lake Manufacturing, Inc., supplies the cleaning industry with such items as corn and plastic brooms; deck, wet and dust mops; handles for floor brushes; street brooms and mop sticks. Shown, left to right, are Edward Pearson, president; JoAnn Messina Flora, sales; Dennis Vehr, sales manager.

Tucel Industries, Inc., provides such cleaning items as hygienic, sanitary, industrial, safety and maintenance fused brushware. Shown are John Lewis, president; and Joanne Raleigh, vice president.

Lambskin Specialties offers such cleaning items as dust wands; lambswool, feather and synthetic dusters; applicator pads; polishing bonnets; chamois and Window Pro strip washers; squeegees and utility handles.

Harper Brush Works is a manufacturer of mops, buckets, brooms, brushes, dusters, squeegees and other commercial cleaning equipment. Shown, left to right, are Kate Henderson, graphic designer; Jesse Henderson, inside sales/customer service representative; and Patricia Adam, marketing director.

Zephyr Manufacturing Co., Inc., is a provider of such cleaningrelated products as wet and dust mops, brooms, brushes, dusters, handles and sponges. Representatives of the company include John Lindstrom, R.J. Lindstrom and Doug Leerssen.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 31

Milwaukee Dustless Brush / Gordon Brush Wisconsin, LLC., supplies such cleaning-related products as floor and hand-held brushes, upright brooms, floor squeegees, sponge mops, deck scrubs, and hygienic and microfiber cleaning tools. Shown, left to right, are Jeff Feder, national sales manager; and Kenneth Rakusin, CEO/president.

Haviland Corporation is a provider of various types of floor and window squeegees as well as handles, floor scrapers and waterbrooms. Shown, left to right, are Joyce Dudenhoeffer, marketing director; Alice Haviland Andrews, director of strategic planning; Jan Haviland, president/CEO; Dale Heidbrink, vice president of operations; and Randy Wolfe, senior manager of operations, replacement parts division.

Carolina Mop Manufacturing Company supplies such cleaningrelated products as wet mops, dust mops, brooms and handles, brushes, carts, buckets and wringers. Shown, left to right, are Bill Ritter, national sales manager; and Jay Ritter, vice president.

The Malish Corp. is a provider of such cleaning-related products as floor machine brushes, push brooms, hand maintenance brushes, handles and specialty brushes. Shown, left to right, are Robert DiVito, western regional director of sales - distributor products; and Christopher Shaw, northeast regional director of sales.

Ha-Ste Manufacturing, Inc., offers such cleaning-related products as wet, dust and finish mops; microfiber items; frames; handles and rotary bonnets. Shown are Susan Linder, sales associate; and Robin Stewart, president.

ACS Industries, Inc./Scrubble Division products include stainless steel scrubbers, nylon scouring pads, grill cleaning products, mops, brooms, brushes, floor pads, steel wool and sand screen disks.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 32

ABCO Cleaning Products is a manufacturer and marketer of mops, brooms, handles and buckets in the commercial cleaning market. Shown, left to right, are Christopher Meaney, vice president of sales & marketing; Luis Urbina, customer service manager; and Luis Janania, administrative & sales manager.

Briarwood Products Company is a provider of such items as Adjusta-Turn surface cleaning tools, floor squeegees, dry dust mop frames and related mopping and ceiling cleaning equipment. Shown, left to right, are Manfred Tomm, vice president; and Erwin Tomm, president.

Emsco Group Commercial Products supplies such cleaning items as mop heads and handles; sponge, stick and dry mops; corn, poly, push and whisk brooms; and brushes. Shown is Kimberly Cook, national sales manager - cleaning division.

Brushtech, Inc., supplies such products as brushes used for cleaning wine glassware, high temperature fryers, kitchen equipment, grills and other areas of a facility/home such as bathrooms. Shown is Zaven Gunjian, vice president of sales.

Continental Commercial Products, LLC., is a provider of a complete line of janitorial and sanitary maintenance products for such areas as floor care, general cleaning, material handling, trash containment and foodservice. Shown is company representative Robert Libon.

Tucker Manufacturing Co., Inc., provides such items as high level window washers, aluminum telescoping handles, specialty brushes and awning cleaning systems. Shown are company representatives Carole Tucker and Robin Tucker.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 33

S.M. Arnold, Inc., is a provider of such cleaning items as chamois, synthetic sponges, car mitts, polishing bonnets and pads, wax applicator pads, brushes, squeegees, microfiber cloths and towels, push brooms and dusters. Shown is company representative Kelly Friederich.

The O’Dell Corporation supplies the cleaning industry with such items as wet, dust and deck mops; upright and push brooms; industrial mop handles; industrial sponge mops; wall washing equipment and carpet bonnets.

Remco Products is a provider of color-coded cleaning tools designed specifically for the food, pharmaceutical, safety and material handling industries. These items include brushes, brooms and squeegees. Shown are Ann Bambrough, sales & marketing; and Steve Hawhee, vice president, sales & marketing.

Magnolia Brush Manufacturers, Ltd., offers many types of brushes, brooms, mops, squeegees, buckets, handles, sponges and dust pans for the janitorial supply trade. Shown is company representative Greta Moore.

Ettore Products Company provided a window cleaning demonstration at its booth during ISSA. The company provides master brass and stainless steel squeegees as well as other window cleaning tools. Reach Higher Ground specializes in waterfed poles and pure water cleaning technology for window cleaners.Shown, left to right, are company representatives Shawn Gavin and Mike Draper.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:28 AM

Page 34

Golden Star Inc., is a full line, vertically integrated manufacturer of professional surface cleaning tools, systems and accessories. This includes wet and dust mops, microfiber pads and cloths, dusters, bonnets and hardware.

ETC of Henderson, Inc., offers such items as synthetic and natural fiber floor pads, mops, carpet bonnets, brooms, brushes and hand pads.

Filmop USA designs and produces a large range of microfiber mop systems; mop buckets; and maid, janitorial, hospital and hotel carts stocked in the United States.

Nexstep Commercial Products, exclusive licensee of O-Cedar, offers a complete line of commercial grade sanitary maintenance products including wet and dust mops; mop sticks, buckets and wringers; brooms; microfiber systems; squeegees and brushes. Shown are Todd Mauer, vice president of sales & marketing; and Jeanie Teske, customer service manager.

The Fuller Brush Company - Commercial Division provides such items as wet and dry mops, brushes, brooms and hand operated carpet sweepers. Shown are Michael Leonard, vice president of sales; and Cindi Bentley, national sales manager.

Rubbermaid Commercial Products, Inc., manufactures various types of cleaning tools and systems in the categories of cleaning, waste, safety, material handling and foodservice.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:29 AM

Page 35

The Libman Company is a manufacturer of many types of brooms, mops, brushes, dust pans and buckets. Shown, left to right, are Desi Csoka, commercial sales; and David McKnight, vice president - international division.

Padco, Inc., provides a full line of floor finish applicators, trim pads, extension poles, paint applicators and accessories. Shown are Ed Goldstein, president; and Ludmilla Goldstein, sales.

Unger Enterprises, Inc., offers a complete line of professional window cleaning tools, restroom and floor cleaning systems, and products for high access maintenance.

Marino Vileda Professional is a supplier of a full line of cleaning items such as brushes, brooms and various types of mopping equipment.

Upcoming... ISSA/INTERCLEAN速 is scheduled for Nov. 9 - 12, 2010 in Orlando, FL.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:29 AM

Page 36

PAGE 36

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

November 2009

National Broom & Mop Meeting Scheduled For November 19-20, 2009 The 2009 National Broom & Mop Convention is scheduled for Thursday and Friday, November 19-20, at the Hilton St. Louis Airport hotel, located near Lambert-St. Louis (MO) International Airport. Participating in the annual event will be broom, mop and related suppliers and manufacturers from across the United States. Co-chairmen of this year’s convention are Mark Quinn, of Quinn Broom Works, Inc., Greenup, IL; and Jim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Company, Arcola, IL. “The purpose of the meeting is to come together and discuss subjects associated with the (broom, mop and related) industry and work on answers,” Quinn said. “Everyone in business has been influenced during the past calendar year by changes in the world economy. This event can help participants better discuss industry issues and strive for future success.” This year’s agenda includes a 5 p.m. social hour and 6 p.m. dinner on Thursday while the meeting portion of the event begins at 8 a.m. on Friday. Highlighting Friday’s meeting will be the following industry reports and scheduled speakers as of late September: • Metal Handles — Jim Monahan; The

Thomas Monahan Company, Arcola, IL; • Wood Handles — Wayne Pringle, Amerwood Division, The Gateway Corporation, Ft. Worth, TX; • Fiberglass Handles — Jeff Jones, Fiberglass Innovations, Rockford, IL; • Broom Corn — Ray LeBlanc, PelRay International, San Antonio, TX; and Tim Monahan, The Thomas Monahan Co.; • Brush Fiber — Chris Monahan, Brush Fibers, Inc., Arcola, IL; • Poly — Les Laske, Vonco Products,

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS ABMA ......................................................................38 Brush Expert .............................................................38 Caddy & Co., Inc., R.E.............................................14 Carlson Tool ............................................................14 Chung Thai Brushes Co............................................37 Crystal Lake................................................................9 Jones Companies .......................................Front Cover Lemieux ......................................................................3 Line Manufacturing, Inc. ..........................................15 Manufacturers Resource ............................Back Cover Monahan Co., The Thomas .......................................5 PelRay.........................................................................7 Shanghai Aubi Metals Co. ..........................................2 St. Nick Brush Co.....................................................13 Stainless Steel Products ............................................11

Inc., Lake Villa, IL; and Walter Dudziak, Creative Poly, Inc., Rochelle, IL; • Yarn — Ralph Jones, The Jones Companies, Humboldt, TN; • Currency Connection — Bart Pelton, PelRay International; • Lacey Act/10-2 Program — Ray LeBlanc, PelRay International; and, • New Mop Concepts — Carlos Petzold, Bodam International Ltd./Borghi USA, Aberdeen, MD. A guest speaker, Paul Temme, is also part of Friday’s agenda. He will discuss marketing concepts that can be used regarding the sale of brooms and mops. Friday’s meeting is slated to be completed around noon. Reservations must be made through the hotel. The Hilton St. Louis Airport hotel is located at 10330 Natural Bridge Rd., St. Louis, MO 63134-3303. The phone is 1-314-426-5500; fax: 1314-426-3429 and Web site: www.hiltonstlouisairport.com. Registration fee for the meeting is $92 per person to be paid by check or money order to Quinn Broom Works, Inc. For more information on the meeting, contact Mark Quinn at 1-800-626-7282 (qbroom@rr1.net) or Jim Monahan at 1800-637-7739 (jim@thomasmonahan.com).

The Wooster 501 Paint Roller Frame Gets A Makeover The Wooster Brush Company’s 501™ roller frame grip has been redesigned to provide a more comfortable painting experience. With a larger overall width and a new molded thumb groove, the ergonomic 501 frame fits more snugly in the hand. Unlike frames with hard plastic grips, the Wooster 501 has a soft and cozy feel, with a supple texture-like rubber. The handle is molded with blue Shergrip® elastomeric material over durable polypropylene, making it perfect for hot or tired hands. Best of all, the new design doesn’t sacrifice any of the frame’s durability or solvent-resistance. A sturdy 5-wire cage and blue polypropylene endcaps provide full support for standard 9-inch rollers. Not only is the end threaded for extension pole use, but an extra ring of Shergrip (found at the bottom of the handle) acts as a compression washer and helps to lock it onto threads to prevent slipping and twisting. The Wooster redesigned 501 is available at traditional paint and decorating centers, hardware stores, paint sundry distributors and retailers, and home centers.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

November 2009

9:29 AM

Page 37

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

PAGE 37

ABMA Seeks Parties Interested In Reviewing Proposed Standard The American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA) is in the process of revising and updating ANSI Standard B165.1, 1979 (R2005), Power-Driven Brushing Tools – Safety Requirements for Design, Care and Use. A work committee has reviewed the standard and made recommendations for revisions. The standard was originally developed in 1979 (and last updated in 2005) to establish the rules and specifications for safety that apply in the design, use and care of power-driven brushing tools. It embraces all brushing tools whose brushing elements are made of ferrous wire, non-ferrous wire, plastic, abrasive filaments, vegetable fibers, animal hair or other materials; and brushes fabricated with any combination of such elements and whose functional performance is accomplished by power driven operation. The standard does not cover brushes constructed of wood or synthetic hub or cores, and brushing tools whose primary function is vehicle or train washing, carpet sweeping, dental hygiene, floor maintenance, sewer cleaning, street sweeping and brushing tools manufactured in accordance with other American National Standards. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) coordinates the development of U.S. voluntary national standards and pro-

vides an open, equitable and accessible consensus process that ensures due process and benefits the public interest. ABMA seeks interested parties who are willing to review the proposed standard. Interested parties may consist of the following types: • Producer — Manufacturer of power brushing tools or a trade association or society that represents the interest of such manufacturers; • User — Organization (company, association, government agency, individual) that/who uses these tools; and, • General Interest — Organization that has an interest in power brushing tools, but neither produces nor uses them directly. Those interested in participating in this activity should send a fax, letter or an e-mail to ABMA prior to Dec. 15, 2009. Contact information is required of the person in the organization who has been designated to receive the materials. For further information, contact: ABMA Executive Director David Parr, 2111 West Plum St., Suite 274, Aurora, IL 60506. Phone: 630-631-5217; Fax: 866-837-8450. E-mail: dparr@abma.org; Web site: www.abma.org.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:29 AM

Page 38

Donnelly Sales New Agency For PFERD, INC. Donnelly Sales LLC of Rio Rancho, NM, has been appointed as authorized sales representative for PFERD INC., the U.S. subsidiary of August Rüggeberg GmbH & Co. of Marienheide, Germany, a 210year-old world leader in the design and manufacture of quality abrasives, brushes, hand tool accessories and power tools. With this new assignment, Donnelly Sales will be responsible for the marketing of all PFERD abrasive and Advance Brush products through authorized PFERD distributors throughout New Mexico and El Paso, TX. In announcing the appointment, PFERD INC. President Gene Huegin stated, “PFERD was seeking an aggressive sales partner in this important market area and Donnelly Sales was an ideal choice. Their in-depth experience in working with the top distributors there, plus their solid background in representing and demonstrating metalworking solutions to manufacturing, construction and MRO customers, plus their excellent growth record are certain to bring improvement to our sales performance in the Southwest.” Donnelly Sales, founded in 1998, has earned an impressive list of industrial manufacturers as their principals and they specialize in marketing STAFDA related tools as well as manufacturing and maintenance types. Jerry Donnelly, Donnelly Sales president, commented on his company’s latest line addition. PFERD INC. was established in the United States by August Rüggeberg GmbH & Co. over 30 years ago. It also owns a subsidiary, Advance Brush, of Wisconsin, a leading manufacturer of power and maintenance brushes and accessories.


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:29 AM

Page 39


BBM.Nov.z

11/2/09

9:29 AM

Page 40

8VHV,Q7KH-DQLWRULDO$QG¬ 6DQLWDU\6XSSO\¬,QGXVWU\ Mops Screens Scrubbers

Apparel Netting Duster Pads

• Styles, Grades, 6SHFLILFDWLRQV$QG&RORUV¬ • Available, No Import Delays • Quality Made In The USA • Competitive Pricing

MANUFACTURERS RESOURCE, INC. P.O. Box 720396, Atlanta, GA 30358 Fax: 770-491-0101 Phone: 800-772-8503 or 770-491-0080 E-mail: sbpmri@bellsouth.net

Broom, Brush & Mop Nov 2009  

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine's November 2009 issue. The trade magazine for the broom, brush and mop industry.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you