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January/February 2011

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine SERVING THE INDUSTRY SINCE 1912

Abtex Corporation: 30 Years Of Making Abrasive Filament Power Brushes Paintbrush Makers Seeing Recovery Company Interviews With Paintbrush Producers: Nour Trading Jen Manufacturing Purdy Corporation

Manufacturers Discuss Changes In Toothbrush Market Company Interviews With Toothbrush Producers: Benedent Corporation Team Technologies

Imports Continue To Increase


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SCU-CNC QUICK AND EASY, VERSATILITY AT ITS BEST Boucherie has pushed the envelope once again when it comes to flexible machinery : the SCU-CNC can be converted from scrubbing brushes to toilet brushes, or from 24” brooms to tank cleaning brushes in a matter of minutes. It speaks for itself that, just like any other Boucherie machine, the output of the SCU-CNC is extremely high and the reliability is unsurpassed. > available as a manually loaded machine or with any customized automation level > single, double or triple fibre box > variety of quick-change brush holder turrets available > turret change with click-on system > anchor- or staple filling tools > user friendly computer interface with touch-screen > 3D software “WinBrush” for easy CNC program creation or modification > compact footprint with excellent accessibility

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World renown manufacturer of specialized and custom yarns. LEMIEUX SPINNING INC. has been in the textile industry since 1906. The company opted out for marketing high added value products. They rely on the latest technologies and the qualification of their personnel to offer top quality custom products and services worldwide.

Synthetic rayon and cotton blended yarn for wet or dust mop.

For more information: 1-418-484-2169 | www.lemieuxspinning.com


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

January/February 2011

Broom, Brush & Mop A RANKIN PUBLISHING PUBLICATION

January/February 2011

Volume 101, Number 1

CALENDAR

FEATURES Abtex Corporation: 30 Years Of Making Abrasive Filament Power Brushes ______6

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 3, 2010

Paintbrush Makers Seeing Recovery __________17

MARCH 14 - 16, 2010

International Hardware Fair, Cologne, Germany Information: 773-326-9928 International Home & Housewares Show, Chicago, IL Information: 847-292-4200

Manufacturers Discuss Changes In Toothbrush Market ________________________22

MARCH 17 - 20, 2010

ABMA To Hold 94th Annual Convention Near Austin, TX _______30

ABMA Annual Convention, Orlando, FL Information: 630-631-5217

Import/Export Overview ____________________35

APRIL 26 - 29, 2010

October Imports & Exports __________________37

ISSA/INTERCLEAN®, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Information: 847-982-0800

Broom Corn Dealer Survey __________________49

MAY 4 - 6, 2010 National Hardware Show, Las Vegas, NV Information: 203-840-5622

STAFF CO-PUBLISHERS Don Rankin

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Rick Mullen

drankin@consolidated.net

rankinmag@consolidated.net

Linda Rankin

GRAPHIC/PRODUCTION David Opdyke

lrankin@consolidated.net

EDITOR Harrell Kerkhoff rankinmag@consolidated.net

MAY 22 - 25, 2010

National Restaurant Association Annual Show, Chicago, IL Information: 312-853-2525

NOVEMBER 9 - 12, 2010 ISSA/INTERCLEAN®, Orlando, FL Information: 800-225-4772

RECEPTION Sandy Pierce

ASSOCIATIONS

Rankin Publishing, Inc. 204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130 • Arcola, Illinois 61910-0130, USA Phone: (217) 268-4959 • Fax: (217) 268-4815 • Website: www.rankinpublishing.com

AMERICAN BRUSH MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 2111 W. Plum St., Aurora, IL 60506 • (630) 631-5217

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP (ISSN 0890-2933) is published monthly at 204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130, Arcola, Illinois 61910. Telephone: (217) 268-4959. Subscriptions are $25 in the United States; $35 in Canada and Mexico; all others $110. The $110 foreign subscriptions include first class air mail postage. Arrangements can be made for first class postage for the United States, Canada and Mexico. Single copies of issues are $2 for subscribers; $5 for nonsubscribers, postage extra. The Suppliers Directory issue is $10 per copy. BROOM, BRUSH & MOP is a monthly trade magazine devoted to news of broom, brush and mop manufacturers and allied industries. It was established in 1912 as the Broom & Broom Corn News.

MOVING?

AMERICAN HARDWARE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 801 North Plaza Drive, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4977 • (847) 605-1025 FEIBP EUROPEAN BRUSH FEDERATION P.O. Box 90154, 5000 LG Tilburg, The Netherlands • 00 31 13 5944 678 INTERNATIONAL SANITARY SUPPLY ASSOCIATION 7373 N. Lincoln Avenue, Lincolnwood, IL 60646-1799 • (847) 982-0800 INTERNATIONAL HOUSEWARES ASSOCIATION 6400 Shafer Court, Suite 650, Rosemont, IL 60018 • (847) 292-4200

Clip & return to Broom, Brush & Mop P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910

OLD ADDRESS:

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Print NEW address here:

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New Carousel Series for Brush Production

Z.TIGER is available in wide variety of configurations and can be equipped with several options for manual, semi, or fully automatic production of most staple-set brush and broom models.

σ Highest tufting speeds σ Simple flexibility σ Reduced stand-still times < 2 s σ Extremely smooth and quiet operation σ Fully or semi-automated operation

Reliable processes resulting in highest quality “Made in Germany” – this is what ZAHORANSKY stands for with over one hundred years of machine building experience and brush industry expertise.

www.zahoransky-group.com


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By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

F

D. Mark Fultz, president

“Our mission statement is: To provide our customers with the most effective and efficient brushing solution for their specific application.”

or more than 30 years, Abtex Corporation, of Dresden, NY, has held true to its original mission of manufacturing application-specific abrasive filament power brushes. Today, in addition to brushes, Abtex also makes brush deburring machines and is the exclusive distributor of elastic bonded abrasive and polishing tools for a wellknown international company. “The idea for the company was developed in the late 1970s by a much larger company located in Rochester, NY,” said Abtex President Mark Fultz, during a recent interview with Broom, Brush & Mop. “They were trying to diversify their product lines and they developed and patented a very unique way for manufacturing abrasive filament power brushes.” Within a couple of years, the company decided that making abrasive filament power brushes did not fit well with its overall mission and didn’t seem to offer the growth potential desired. “The abrasive filament power brush portion of the business was sold to the person who was managing it,” Fultz said. “In 1980, he incorporated the company as Abtex Corporation. At that time, Abtex solely produced abrasive filament power brushes.” Since 1980, Abtex has been successful in becoming a leader in the field of abrasive filament power brushes, which are used in industrial applications such as deburring, edge radiusing and surface finishing. Abtex brushing tools are available in disc, radial wheel, tube and end type, and cylindrical formats. “There is also a side of our business that we refer to as the Systems Group. In this group, we design and build automated brush deburring machines,” Fultz said. “These are typically used by our customers for removing burrs/sharp edges from high volume, precision ground metal parts. So there are really two sides of our business. There is the brush side and the machine building side. “Today, just as 31 years ago, our core business remains the production of application-specific abrasive filament power brushes. We work closely with customers to understand their specific application needs, and then we produce a brush that will offer them maximum effectiveness and efficiency.


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“Our mission statement is: ‘To provide our customers with the most effective and efficient brushing solution for their specific application.’ “The vast majority of our customers produce metal parts. These companies are trying to remove sharp edges, what are referred to as burrs, without dimensionally changing the part. Furthermore, a fairly good proportion of our customers are producing a component that will ultimately be used in an automobile. “Traditionally, our customer base has been automotive related, but it is evolving and changing, and this is intentional. I don’t think it is good for any company to be entirely dependent upon one market segment.” Abtex’s 24,000 square-foot Dresden facility is located on the west shore of Seneca Lake in the picturesque Fingers Lake Region of New York. “When I travel around the country and tell people the company is located in New York, they immediately visualize New York City,” Fultz said. “We are more than six hours from New York City. Our plant is surrounded by farmland, lakes and small wineries. “I am proud of our facility. We occasionally give tours to potential customers and, with-

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John Roman, engineering manager

“What has always been successful for us, and sets us apart, is providing customized solutions, while exceeding customers’ expectations,” Fultz said. “We have a catalog that shows numerous brush types and part numbers, but the majority of our sales are for variations of what is in the catalog. Our design capabilities are literally infinite. We have the ability to simulate our customer’s process at our facility. Through experienced testing, we can then develop the ideal brush for the customer. “The great thing about our manufacturing process is it is flexible enough that we can almost immediately provide a customer with a customized brush. Even if it is a single brush, we can do it economically. Also, because we are a relatively small company, we can react very quickly. Once we have designed a custom brush, we can have it in a customer’s hands in a matter of days.” One of Abtex’s challenges has been to educate people about the highly engineered and technical products the company manufactures. In other words, helping existing and potential customers understand Abtex offerings are technical tools. This bucks the traditional mindset among many in the industrial brush segment who think they can just go to catalog A, B or C and order a brush that will meet their needs. “Getting the customer to appreciate the fact that a brush should be an engineered product for his or her specific application is not always easy,” Fultz said. “We work hard to try and get this point across to the customer, because the average person tends to think, ‘OK, I will just open up a major distributor’s catalog and pick

“What has always been successful for us, and sets us apart, is providing customized solutions, while exceeding customers’ expectations.”

out exception, they comment upon how clean and neat and organized our building is. I think it is important to maintain a very clean and well-lit working environment. It makes good business sense, it makes for an enjoyable place to work and it fosters a sense of pride among our employees.” Customization Keeps Abtex In The Forefront Of The Industrial Brush Market

I

f there is one word to describe Abtex’s highly visible and successful niche in the industrial brush segment, it is “customized.” Abtex’s brush offerings fall under several general categories, including disc brushing tools, Hex-Drive™ brushes, fineblanking brushes, composite hub radial wheels, small diameter wheel tools, tube type tools, metal end type brushing tools, flexible honing tools and wheel deburring brushes.

January/February 2011

Judy Roman, expediter

Betsy Bourne, controller

out a brush.’ When it comes to abrasive filament brushes, if a customer is just picking at random from a catalog, the odds of that brush being successful are very remote. “Therefore, our approach is to work very closely with the customer to understand what his or her specific needs are and then design and produce a brush for those specific needs. It is a bit of a challenge from a marketing standpoint to get someone to appreciate the fact that a brush is an engineered tool.” Marketing such specialized niche items as customized abrasive filament power brushes can be difficult. Using what Fultz calls “shotgun” marketing techniques do not work well with Abtex’s product lineup. “The challenge that we have is to try to employ the most effective strategy to get our message out — finding the right people and then finding the way to get our message noticed by those people,” Fultz said. One industry trend, in particular, seems to be a promising factor in expanding the marketplace for Abtex’s products, which will help in marketing the company’s brushes. In recent times, suppliers of abrasive filaments have


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Kurt Lodge preparing filaments for molding.

been experimenting with different types of grits. “Developments in filament technology that we are seeing will broaden the potential marketability of our brushes,” Fultz said. “For years and years, only silicon carbide and aluminum oxide grits were available. We are beginning to see filament suppliers getting a little more aggressive and trying different abrasive types with the hope of being able to expand the marketability of these brushes. “A large majority of people in industry still do not understand or even know that abrasive filament brushes exist. Our success has drawn competition into this market segment. I look at it from a standpoint of ‘a rising tide lifts all boats.’ The competitive activity has definitely expanded the market for abrasive filament brushes. I think as filament suppliers continue to innovate and develop new abrasives and new materials, it is going to push the application of these brushes beyond what we have all considered to be the standard or existing practices.” Because most of Abtex’s brushes are custom engineered to meet a customer’s specific need or application, close interaction with the customer is a necessity. Abtex engineers and

Sue Sanderson, brush finishing department.

January/February 2011

Dave Mickelsen, molding department.

designers must have a thorough understanding of what the customer is seeking to be able to design a quality brush that will do the job effectively and efficiently. “To provide the best possible brush, all of us at Abtex are intent on making it as easy as possible for our customers to do business with us,” Fultz said. “Our culture is to do whatever it takes to satisfy the customer. As a company, we are solely focused on customer service, and on the abrasive filament brush segment. This allows us to supply the best product and the best service.” While Abtex’s product focus has not changed in 31 years, the way the company does business has changed and evolved. Some of the most significant changes in the business landscape are a result of the ever-changing and rapid technological advances of the modern world. “The way we do business has changed over the years, and I think it will continue to change,” Fultz said. “Customers today demand the most effective and efficient products from their suppliers. We have continued to invest in both process automation and laboratory test equipment to make sure we are able to meet

Steve Gleason, applications technician.


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expectations. “If you think back to 31 years ago, who could have envisioned what role computers would play in business? Today, we have an Internet presence. We accept purchase orders and we pay and receive funds electronically. We receive e-mails on smart phones. In today’s world, constant investment in computer technology is an absolute necessity. “In addition, we have become more aggressive with our machine design and build capabilities, enhancing the value that we can provide for our customers.”

The good news is, as 2011 begins, there is evidence that the economy is moving forward and there has been some positive movement in the auto industry. “I would characterize the past year as being one of a recovery,” Fultz said, speaking of business at Abtex. “Like many companies, we were impacted dramatically by the economic collapses that started in 2008. We started seeing light at the end of the tunnel right around the summer of 2009, and business has steadily strengthened since then. We are actually quite busy at this time.” Fultz attributed some of Abtex’s upturn in business to the uptick in the automotive industry. “Many people really don’t have an appreciation for how much of the world’s economy is dependent upon automobile production — the trickle down is huge.” When the recession hit, Abtex officials were quick to recognize the downturn had the potential to be devastating and that recovery would likely be slow and painful. The company took immediate steps to remain viable and to lessen the impact of the crisis on its work force. Abtex began an aggressive effort to eliminate non-essential expenses. The company also took advantage of a “shared work” program offered by the state of New York to help reduce labor costs without having to instigate permanent layoffs. The program involved splitting Abtex’s work force into two parts. The way the program worked was, one group of employees would work for one week, while the other group was allowed by the state to collect unemployment benefits for the week. With the two groups alter-

“...as filament suppliers continue to innovate and develop new abrasives and new materials, it is going to push the application of these brushes beyond what we have all considered to be the standard or existing practices.” Manufacturing Showing Signs Of A Re-Awakening

E

ven before the recession hit late in the past decade, U.S. manufacturing had been experiencing hard times in certain sections of the country as many companies either shut down or moved operations overseas. The automobile industry, a large customer base for Abtex’s products, has also struggled in recent years and was further devastated when the recession hit.

January/February 2011


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nating from week to week, the company was able to retain its valuable work force. When the economy improved, Abtex discontinued participating in the program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I kind of characterize what is happening now as manufacturing is all of a sudden waking up from a long sleep and everybody is busy playing catch-up,â&#x20AC;? Fultz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many companies are still reluctant to hire, and, as a result, there seems to be more emphasis being placed on automation. This has really helped create a demand for our Systems Group, where we build automated solutions.â&#x20AC;? Fultz said he is â&#x20AC;&#x153;bullishâ&#x20AC;? on 2011 and feedback from Abtexâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s customers is optimistic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I spend a lot of time traveling and visiting our customers, and without exception, all are projecting increasing volumes through this year,â&#x20AC;? Fultz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One company we do business with is expecting January to be one of its busiest months, ever. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conservative projections for the automotive industry for 2011 are predicting an increase of about 11 percent in automobile sales, which would definitely help us. In addition, automakers are incorporating a technology that allows them to generate more power from a smaller displacement engine and improve fuel economy. There is a key component in this technology that requires brush deburring, and we are participating pretty heavily in that market. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think anybody is expecting anything too dramatic in terms of an economic turnaround. It seems to be happening at a slow and steady pace, which may be better in the long run.â&#x20AC;?

January/February 2011

While there is good news on the economic front, challenges remain, including the movement of manufacturing offshore. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Customers, in several cases, have decided it makes more sense for them to produce their product in one of the developing countries,â&#x20AC;? Fultz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a challenge for us because, as these

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our culture is to do whatever it takes to satisfy the customer. As a company, we are solely focused on customer service,

and on the abrasive filament brush segment. This allows us to supply the best product and the best service.â&#x20AC;?

companies would naturally prefer to purchase their consumables locally, it becomes very difficult for us to hang on to their business once they leave the United States. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Another concern is the availability of labor. While it is not the case at Abtex, unfortunately, I think the prevailing image of manufacturing for younger people is that it is kind of a dirty, low-paying, low-tech career choice. By and large, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think many young people aspire to work in manufacturing. We are starting to feel it here in our business, which leads me to believe it is being felt in other places. As the years go by, it becomes more of a concern.â&#x20AC;? Conserving Energy, Recycling And A â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Victory Gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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hen the facility Abtex now occupies was built in 1955, such concepts as energy conservation, the green movement, sustainability, etc., were not a part of the national conversation. Today, whether a company manufactures â&#x20AC;&#x153;greenâ&#x20AC;? products or not, environmentally friendly practices have become a staple of doing business and are important to a companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s image. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over the years, since we have been at this facility, we have done a number of things to improve the efficiency of our building,â&#x20AC;? Fultz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We used to have single pane windows and we have replaced those with argon insulated windows. We have insulated the entire structure.â&#x20AC;? The company also replaced a central steam boiler with high-efficiency natural gas units. Efficient T-8 fluorescent lighting was also installed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In addition to our efforts to improve the efficiency of our structure, all of our products are shipped in non-bleached cardboard boxes. For some of our brushes, we also offer a trimming service. If a customer is not able to dress the brush on a regular basis, rather than throwing it away and buying a new brush, the customer can return the brush to us and we will trim and return the item. This saves the customer money and saves us from having to make a new brush as a replacement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In our facility, we separate all of our recyclables. We have a separate dumpster for all of the recyclable material. We also have a community â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;victory garden,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; where we grow vegetables during the summer. All of the employees participate in maintaining the garden, and we all share in the produce is grown. Everybody is pretty excited about participating in this activity.â&#x20AC;?


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January/February 2011

Abtex Corporation facility in Dresden, NY.

Committed To ABMA

B

efore Fultz came to Abtex 18 years ago, he had worked outside of the brush industry. He soon learned of the American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA). Fultz saw the ABMA as a good source from which to learn about, and keep abreast of, the industry and decided to join. “I saw ABMA as an opportunity to get into, and stay in, the loop,” Fultz said. “Once I became familiar with the organization, I attended the annual conventions and joined committees to try to learn more about the brush industry. “I also wanted to learn about the ABMA as an organization and the value offered by participating. I enjoyed serving on the committees and decided I wanted to become even more involved. I expressed an interest in joining the Board of Directors.” Fultz became a member of the Board, and is now in his sixth year of service. This year also marks his final year at chairman of the Industrial and Maintenance Division of ABMA. “It has been a wonderful experience. There are plenty of tangible benefits to membership, but, to me, the value in ABMA membership lies in the friendships that I have made, and the opportunity to rub shoulders with a concentration of fellow brush makers and suppliers at the annual conventions. The membership fees are insignificant when you compare it to the value you receive. It has just been a great experience for me.”

Employees Responsible For Abtex’s Success

T

hrough good times and bad and highs and lows, Fultz attributes the company’s successful journey on the quality, loyalty and dedication of its employees. “From my perspective, our employees are solely responsible for the success of Abtex,” he said. “I tell everybody just about anyone can make a brush. The key is knowing what type of brush to make and then having a passion for providing unparalleled customer service. This is what our team does day-in and day-out. “I am still very much amazed that here in Dresden, NY, we have this great group of people who are willing to do anything to ensure the success of this business. “We have been very fortunate in terms of the people we have attracted to our business, and we have been able to develop a very cohesive team. Everybody is pulling together for the success of the company. “We have been very successful in creating a culture where our employees enjoy what they are doing. We reward them for their hard work and we all kind of have the same mindset for success. “After the challenges of the past few years, we are growing and we are back to having fun again, and that is what it is all about.” Contact: Abtex Corporation, 89 Main Street, P.O. Box 188, Dresden, NY 14441. Phone: 888-662-2839. E-mail: sales@abtex.com. Website: www.abtex.com.


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January/February 2011

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

A

s 2011 gets underway, there are signs that the recessionary times are easing somewhat. While no one is talking fullblown economic recovery as of yet, executives from three paintbrush manufacturers who recently spoke with Broom, Brush & Mop voiced optimism about the futures of their respective companies. The companies featured have weathered the recession by employing successful proactive strategies such as maintaining their focus on customer service, innovation and increasing sales.

S

ince 1978, Nour Trading, of Waterloo, ON, has been a leading Canadian manufacturer of professional painting tools and related products in the North American, European, Asian, Middle Eastern and Australian markets. The company’s professional bristle paintbrush lineup uses only natural black China bristle. Nour sorts, cleans and mixes the bristle to create a high-quality, professional painting tool. Nour’s synthetic brushes are made with high-quality polyester and nylon filaments. The company also offers quality paint roller refills, which are hand wound to eliminate gaps and overlaps. Other products include extension poles, trays and tray liners, foam brushes, wire brushes and more. “The focus of the company is on the painting trade, but, over the years, customers have asked us to supply them with more and more products. Therefore, we have extended our line quite dramatically in order to take care of most of their needs,” said Nour Vice President

PAGE 17

of Sales and Marketing Bob Shaw. “We have also been drawn into the environmental product end of the business, because people are demanding the option to buy that type of product. We have had to evolve to give our “We have also been drawn into customers what they want. the environmental product end “While Nour supplies the professional of the business, because people market, we are also are demanding the option to selling more and more to hardware buy that type of product. We chains, because many of them are carrying have had to evolve to give our professional brushcustomers what they want.” es.” Shaw described Nour V.P. Sales/Marketing Bob Shaw business at the company as “OK” and reported last year’s sales were better than the previous year. “The Canadian market, where the balance of our business is conducted, is doing relatively well, although we are not back to where we want to be,” Shaw said. “As a Canadian company, the Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar is always a major concern.” When interviewed on January 10, Shaw said the Canadian dollar was valued at a little more than the U.S. dollar. When the U.S. dollar is valued lower than the Canadian dollar, it hurts Nour’s export business as the company sells in American dollars. “In addition to the Canadian market, the Australian market is doing very well for us and our European business is also doing well,” Shaw said. “In general, business is good, but we are always hoping it could be a little better. “There has been a lot of consolidation in the manufacturing end of the paintbrush industry and many companies have diversified their operations, such as we have done, as we now manufacture in Vietnam and the Middle East, as well as in Canada.”


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January/February 2011

Responding to the desires of customers, Nour has incorporated using natural bristles to synthetics, and this is happening all over the environmentally friendly materials and practices into its manufactur- world. The United States led the way in the ’70s and ’80s, and then ing operation. Canada followed in the ’80s and ’90s. Now, Europe, and most other “We use recycled plastics in almost everything we make,” Shaw places in the world, are following suit. This movement from natural said. “Unless it is specified otherwise, we use bristles to synthetic bristles is primarily a recycled materials. We make handles out of result of the evolution of modern-day “We use recycled plastics in bamboo in Vietnam for our environmental paints.” line.” Applying the latest technology in such almost everything we make. Nour has responded to the marketplace and areas as filament processing is one of Nour’s Unless it is specified otherwise, strengths. Filament processing is done by the desires of customers in other ways as well, including offering low-cost professional machines that the company builds. we use recycled materials.” brushes, which has blossomed into a growth “Some areas of our manufacturing are still Nour V.P. Sales/Marketing Bob Shaw area for the company. done by hand, such as the formulation of “I believe, in the future, low-cost profesmixes and processes of that nature. We still sional brushes will continue to become a growth area for us,” Shaw wind rollers by hand, but all of the other processes have generally said. “We take the technology we use for processing very high-end been automated,” Shaw said. filaments and apply it to process filaments that are less expensive, Nour’s veteran work force is an important cog in the company’s allowing us to keep the quality up. The end result is the performance successful effort to make high-quality products. The average length of the brushes for painters is still there. Also, the addition of many of service for Nour employees is from 13 to 15 years. Nour employs sundry items to our product line is an important add-on to our busi- about 100 people in Canada and around 300 worldwide. ness.” “We don’t lose many people, and this is very, very important, not As the business world continues to change and evolve and the only in Canada, but in our operations in other parts of the world,” economy shows signs of rebounding, Nour has been busy with some Shaw said. expansion projects of its own. Shaw said the ability to focus on business and customer service, “We have expanded our facilities in Canada. We have purchased while investing in the company, have been the keys to success some buildings, all in the same area,” Shaw reported. “Meanwhile, throughout Nour’s history. we have doubled the size of our operation in Cairo, Egypt. “We are a privately-owned company. I believe the company has “Our roller business has been very steady. As far as the paintbrush made the investments now that will pay off in the future, whether it segment is concerned, there has been a progressive change from is our different manufacturing locations or the technology that we


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have developed,” Shaw said. “In the paintbrush industry, if you are not competitive, you are not going to be around long. You really have to be on top of your game. You must be able to compete against lowcost producers and if you can’t, you are going to have issues going forward. “Nour has taken the necessary steps to make sure the company will be healthy and competitive for the foreseeable future. We will have the methodology in place to make sure Nour is innovative going forward, and is not a follower, but a leader.” Contact: Nour Trading, 637 Colby Drive, Waterloo, ON N2V 1B4. Phone: 800-686-6687; Fax: 888-886-9744. Web site: www.nour.com. E-mail: nour@nour.com.

F

ounded in the 1950s, Jen Manufacturing, Inc., of Worcester, MA, is a pioneer in the disposable paintbrush marketplace. Today, the company manufactures its high quality and special patented polyurethane foam Poly-Brushes® and Poly-Rollers®. “The company was founded by my father-in-law, John J. Chisholm, who invented the disposable paintbrush,” said Jen President Gerald Gendron. “We are approaching close to 4 billion brushes sold. You don’t sell 4 billion of anything unless it is quite good.” Jen currently produces products for more than 1,500 wholesale and retail customers nationwide, including several wellknown retail chains. “We have four sizes of disposable brushes — 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-inch,” Gendron said. “We also have three sizes of rollers — a 9-, a 4- and a 3-inch — made out of the same polyurethane foam as the paintbrushes. We can make a 7-inch roller, but there is not much of a market for this size roller. “We have a variety of packaging options for these products. This includes multi-packs of 1-inch brushes that contain four brushes to a bag. We have an economy pack that contains a 1-, 2- and 3-inch brush, and we also have a twin pack of our 9-inch rollers, as well as single-bagged rollers.” Gendron said one of the challenges the company faces is competing with the proliferation of low-cost, inferior quality imported disposable paintbrushes that are made with two separate pieces — a head and a handle. “We make high performance brushes. We believe our method of fabrication is superior to others. Unlike many imports, our brushes are single-piece units, which means it is physically impossible for the head to become detached,” Gendron said. “We designed and built our own brush machines, which is primarily why we make the only one-piece disposable foam brush on the market. We have received positive feedback from people who have switched to using our brushes after trying lesser quality twopiece brushes. They praise the fact that our brushes do not fall apart and are made with the best polyurethane foam available.” Indeed, Jen officials take quality control very seriously. The company stands by its products with the guarantee that if a customer has an issue with a prod-

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uct, Jen will replace the item, no questions asked. “We are a small family-owned business and we make sure we have good, consistent quality control,” Gendron said. “Disposable brushes are not in direct competition with bristle brushes, but it is interesting how many professional painters use our product, such as sign painters and others. Many professional painters have used our products for years. There are obviously certain “We are approaching close to 4 things they cannot billion brushes sold. You don’t use our brushes and rollers for, but whensell 4 billion of anything unless ever they can, they use our products. it is quite good.” “As long as we Jen President Gerald Gendron own and run the business, quality will be maintained. We will not deviate from our commitment to quality.” Jen’s veteran and well-trained work force is also a key element in maintaining the high standards of quality the company demands. “Many of our employees have been with the company from 20 to 30 years. Their high level of training and knowledge guarantees that we will have consistent quality,” Gendron said. “My son, (Jen Vice President Jeffrey Gendron) really runs the business and does an exceptionally good job. COO John Brodeur has been with the company almost 35 years. The two of them work very well together overseeing the business. We are fortunate to have a very good work force.” While Jen does not manufacture “green” products per se, the company has made the commitment to environmentally friendly practices, such as recycling waste. “Foam waste, for example, is re-used as fill for pillows,” Gendron

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said. “We also recycle our corrugated items. We are very conscientious about recycling, which certainly helps the environment.” While the economic outlook in the country shows signs of looking up, business at Jen is “steady,” Gendron said, as a result of steps the company took to be “lean and mean” as it dealt with the recession. “We have steady orders coming in, but not like prior to the economic downturn,” Gendron said. “We have been struggling a little bit since the recession hit in 2008; however, we are slowly moving in the right direction. “A good percentage of those who use our products are do-it-yourselfers, and many of them have lost their jobs. Many people don’t have the income to buy disposable paintbrushes as they are worried about buying food, paying rent, paying mortgages, etc. “Furthermore, unemployment is not improving by any stretch of the imagination. All of these factors have caused many businesses, ours included, to go into basically survival mode. There are a lot of things we have done internally that have been effective in helping the company weather this economic downturn.” Gendron said the company and its products have been successful because of the quality of materials used in the manufacturing process and the quality of service Jen consistently offers. “We continually produce products that live up to their billing and we pride ourselves in excellent service,” Gendron said. “The paintbrush industry has undergone changes over the years, but the paintbrush has been around many, many decades, and I don’t see any reason why it won’t continue to exist.” Contact: Jen Manufacturing, Inc., P.O. Box 20128, Worcester, MA 01602. Phone: 800-225-7276. E-mail: polybrushes@aol.com. Website: www.jenmfg.com.

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January/February 2011

ith a wide assortment of brushes, roller covers, faux finishing tools and painting accessories, Purdy Corporation, of Portland, OR, offers quality products to meet the needs of professional painters and serious do-ityourselfers. “Since Purdy’s beginnings, in 1925, in a small garage in Portland, OR, the art of making premium painting tools has always been at the heart of the Purdy story,” said Purdy Senior Product Manager Mark Ksiezyk. “Today, Purdy remains committed to creating the best in painting experiences. Professionals understand the difference between price and value, which has helped Purdy maintain its strong positioning with professional painters. “Properly trained craftspeople understand that our applicators help them increase production, allowing them to finish jobs more quickly. They’ve realized that using the correct, high-quality brush and/or roller cover will ultimately increase their ROI (return on investment).” As Purdy moves into “Most of our innovations 2011, the company has made some changes and focus on targeting areas additions to its product lineup, including packagwhere we can improve ing and new painting repetitive motion tasks. ” tools. “We have updated our Purdy Senior Product Manager packaging to make the Mark Ksiezyk brush selection process much easier,” Ksiezyk said. “The improved messaging will also include new information that will help the end-user and the sales staff make the correct choice for applicators. “Also set for 2011 is our new Jumbo Mini-Roller System and a new traditional Mini-Roller System. We are also launching a new adjustable roller frame that adjusts between 12 and 18 inches. It has the most lightweight, durable handle in its class. In addition, we are introducing the first in a series of new wire brushes as part of our Prep Tools line. We committed to launching new products that will help the professional painter and quality-minded DIYer get the job done easier, better and faster.” While much of the manufacturing process of Purdy’s painting tools is done by hand, automation also plays an important role. “We are always looking to improve our manufacturing processes. We have taken steps to improve our processes, without affecting the quality of our tools,” Ksiezyk said. “Most of our innovations focus on targeting areas where we can improve repetitive motion tasks. One of the things that distinguish Purdy brushes is the handcrafting that goes into each tool. Each brush maker applies a sticker to the finished brush with his or her signature on the brush. It is a stamp of pride that promises exceptional quality and finish.” Because of Purdy’s reputation of offering high-quality handcrafted products, the company’s work force must step up to the plate each day with the focus and drive it takes to maintain such high standards. “Purdy employees are extremely important to our success. Without the employees and their high attention to detail to the tools they produce, we would be just another tool manufacturer,” Ksiezyk said. “We have a strong sense of pride among our employees, with two and three generations of the same family working side-by-side, creating the finest applicators and paint sundries. We have many employees who have been with Purdy


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more than 30 years. The average length of employment is 14 years. Currently we have approximately 400 full-time employees.” Along with the company’s skilled brush makers, customer serv-

“We also view quality control as an integrated partner to customer service. Because of the quality checks we have in place, we’ve been able to dramatically improve our customer experience, since only the best products find their way onto the store shelf.” Purdy Senior Product Manager Mark Ksiezyk ice people and the sales and marketing teams also work diligently and display the same amount of pride in upholding Purdy’s high standards. “Our customer service department continues to do what works best for our resellers and end-users. By providing excellent customer service, we strive to have any order, comment or issue resolved within 24 hours,” Ksiezyk said. “The sales and marketing teams work closely with our manufacturing facilities to ensure we keep our resellers in stock with the tools they request. “We also view quality control as an integrated partner to customer service. Because of the quality checks we have in place, we’ve been able to dramatically improve our customer experience, since only the best products find their way onto the store shelf.

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“Our goal is always to provide the end-user with peace of mind that if they are using a Purdy tool, it will yield the same level of high performance they have come to expect from our applicators. We want to continue developing and testing our new products to ensure that we’re providing the highest quality tools in the market.” In catering to professionals and serious DIYers, consistently providing high quality products is the underpinning of maintaining the company’s success and stellar reputation. “Our customers have come to expect only the best when it comes to our tools,” Ksiezyk said. “A professional painter knows what works and feels right in his or her hand. A homeowner or DIY customer knows that our tools will make the prep and painting process less aggravating. “We will continue to raise the bar high with our innovation in the paint sundry industry. Purdy creates new and improved tools that offer our resellers and end-users a wide selection of highquality products. We know that paint formulas are constantly changing, and we have learned to adjust our tools and create new products to work well with changes in finishes.” Contact: The Sherwin-Williams Company, 101 Prospect Ave. NW, Cleveland, OH 44115. Phone: 800-547-0780; Fax: 800-380-9422. Website: www.purdy.com. E-mail: info@purdy.com.


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January/February 2011

When

it comes to brushes, few types are as personal as a toothbrush. It’s usually one of the first items a person will use in the morning and one of

the last at night. Although it may be considered a simple product, toothbrush manufacturers/suppliers spend a lot of time, effort and money coming up with new concepts to help improve this tried-and-true product. Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine recently interviewed two toothbrush company representatives to learn more about the state of this important industry and what trends are driving the market.

I

n its ongoing quest to provide “the perfect brush for the imperfect brusher,” the Benedent Corporation, of Houston, TX, has been designing and supplying unique toothbrush options for a wide customer base over its 15-year history. The company has made a name for itself over the years by offering its flagship product, the ADA (American Dental Association) accepted Benefit toothbrush. This innovative item is made with three independent heads, each mounted on a stem. The brush heads wrap around teeth and brush all three sides at once. “The three headed feature of the toothbrush itself is not the main reason for the product’s success,” Benedent Corporation General Manager Jorge Zarur said. “The core reason for the success is that these heads are flexible and independent of each other. Therefore, each head adapts to the side and shape of each tooth with every stroke. This process makes it easier to brush either your own teeth, or while brushing the teeth of others with disabilities.” It is this latter point that helped launch the company’s three-headed toothbrush in the first place. The product was developed in the late 1990s to specifically aid those people with special needs who may need assistance while brushing their teeth. “The result has been a toothbrush that everybody can use. It’s a perfect product for those who don’t brush correctly,” Zarur said. — Jorge Zarur There have been challenges to overcome, however, when introducing and selling a three-headed toothbrush. As Zarur explains, with a regular, single-headed toothbrush, people are taught early on in life to brush their teeth “up and down.” With the Benefit triple-headed toothbrush, it’s important to brush “backward and forward.” He added that the Benefit brush heads maintain the correct angle while in use, and allow the user to apply the right amount of pressure on both large and smaller teeth for proper cleaning.

C h a n g e Manufacturers Discuss “The only way products can succeed in the marketplace is by providing what consumers want.”

In Toothbrush Market By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor


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January/February 2011

“Operational costs increase everyday. On the other hand, the market continues to put pressure on us to provide products at lower prices. Therefore, everything we do must be carefully planned ahead of time.” — Jorge Zarur The outermost bristles are extra soft to massage gums. The side brush heads are mounted at a 45-degree angle, which is the optimum angle for cleaning the gum line, according to Zarur. The brush’s unique triple-headed design reduces the need to twist and turn the arm or wrist, making the Benefit toothbrush ideal for people with limited hand, wrist and/or arm movement as a result of arthritis, Parkinson’s disease or other similar conditions. Benedent Corporation’s Benefit Plus toothbrush, meanwhile, is the same type of product as the Benefit brush, but comes with a wide and padded easy-to-hold handle. The padded handle is designed to protect the sensitive mouth area and can better help a caregiver when assisting a person with physical challenges. To help make sure children brush their teeth correctly, the Benefit for Kids toothbrush features a padded, easy-to-hold handle and comes in “fun” colors. It also is designed with three flexible inde-

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pendent heads that allow children to clean each tooth surface. Along with introducing a new type of toothbrush, another challenge early on for the company was finding shelf space for its products in retail establishments. This space was traditionally taken by large toothbrush companies that continue to dominate the marketplace today. “Our company realized it was fighting for shelf space against some of the largest companies in the world. Shelf space was full, and no buyer was willing to open up more space for a little company,” Zarur said. To counter this challenge, the Benedent Corporation found success selling its toothbrush line to dental practices. As the company moved forward, officials realized that there was a huge market for pet products, including toothbrushes. “People often go to the veterinarian to have their pets’ teeth cleaned. This process can be quite costly,” Zarur said. Benedent’s new Benefit In response, Benedent created ProFan toothbrush the Triple•Pet toothbrush and began marketing it toward the pet supply business. Zarur said this turned out to be a large success. “We offer three-in-one toothbrushes for both humans and pets, but they are not three times more expensive than regular toothbrushes. Instead, our products are very competitive in pricing,” Zarur said. Benedent’s pet lineup also includes an all-natural toothpaste, plaque remover, breath freshener and products to eliminate pet odors. Zarur stressed that officials at the Benedent Corporation have always wanted to remain a toothbrush supplier for humans as well. “Humans are what our main product was intended for in the first place, and we have always looked to improve upon our initial concept,” he said. Therefore, in February of this year, the company is launching the next generation of triple-headed Benefit toothbrushes. This launch includes redesigned packaging. The products, known as “Benefit 3D Clean” and “Benefit 3-D Clean Junior,” will be available for purchase at CVS Pharmacy and possibly other retail establishments, Zarur said. The company’s classic version of the Benefit toothbrush will still be manufactured as well. Also being launched is the next generation of the Triple•Pet toothbrush, known as the “Triple•Pet E-Z Dog.” “The message that we are conveying is that with our new brush, it’s now even easier to keep your dog happy,” Zarur said.


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A separate item is the company’s finger brush for pet owners. This product’s brush handle simply wraps around a person’s finger. Another product launch, this one scheduled for March 2011, is a single-head toothbrush called the “Benefit ProFan.” “It’s a toothbrush with one head instead of three and features sports-related themes. These toothbrushes either have a football, basketball or soccer ball designed into the handle,” Zarur said. The brush is targeted toward kids who may be tired of cartoon characters found on their old toothbrushes and are now more interested in sports. According to Zarur, product updates and changes are necessary in order to grow the Benedent Corporation. “The only way products can succeed in the marketplace is by providing what consumers want. The Benedent Corporation seeks products that feature the proper ergonomics and quality,” Zarur said. “We design our toothbrushes based on personnel experiences. By doing this, we have been able to come up with products that are suitable for everyone.” At the beginning of the company’s history, The Benedent Corporation manufactured its own products. In an effort to cut down on expenses, this process is now done by other U.S. and foreign companies. “All of our products are designed by the Benedent Corporation and all molds are created in the United States. Once we get the molds, it’s just a matter of deciding where to inject each particular product,” he said. “This decision is determined by the price we want to sell each product. It’s a cost-related issue.” Zarur added that packaging of the company’s products is done with the help of people with special needs.

January/February 2011

As for the future, officials at the Benedent Corporation have been able to put aside significant funds for ongoing product development. They have also planned for coming challenges. “Operational costs increase everyday. This includes the cost of plastic, cardboard and transportation. On the other hand, the market continues to put pressure on us to provide products at lower prices,” Zarur said. “Therefore, everything we do must be carefully planned ahead of time.” Contact: Benedent Corporation, 16810 Barker Springs, Suite 217, Houston, TX 77084. Phone: 800-450-4977. E-mail: info@benedent.com. Website: www.benedent.com.

D

ue to its role as a custom contract manufacturer of various types of dental, medical, cosmetic and industrial products, toothbrush production remains a very important business for Team Technologies, Inc., of Morristown, TN. The company makes toothbrushes for both the professional and retail markets. Officials at Team Technologies strive to become an extension of its customers’ businesses, taking those customer ideas and concepts and turning them into successful products. Along with toothbrushes, the company also makes prophy angles used by dental hygienists for cleaning and polishing teeth, along with other dental care items. “Most hygienists prefer toothbrushes where the head is compacted,” Team Technologies Vice President of Sales & Marketing Gene Damico said. “These are smaller brush heads which are easier to get into the back of teeth. “With retail toothbrushes, meanwhile, people want flashy, bigger


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“Everybody seems to want a piece of this business (making toothbrushes). It comes down to who can be smarter about making these products.” — Gene Damico brush heads and handles. These are more colorful products. Appearance does sell.” Team Technologies is a privately-owned company headquartered in Morristown, TN; opening for business in the 1980s. It has three separate factories in Morristown, located in eastern Tennessee, as well as a molding operation in Batavia, IL, and facilities in Wisconsin, Colorado and Nebraska. “We take pride in making products in the United States. This can be done because of our advanced automation,” Damico said. “We find the best ways to make our products, which helps keep us a domestic manufacturer.” Damico said in late January that his company remains very busy when it comes to producing toothbrushes. This is true for both the professional and retail side of the business. “We remain on the cutting edge. Traditional production of toothbrushes involves staple-set technology. This is

where bristles are stapled into the brush head. Technology has improved to the point, however, where we have purchased machines that use molded-in technologies to place bristles into the brush head. These bristles are then trimmed and profiled,” he said. “Trimming is very important as well as the angle of the brush for better cleaning.” Team Technologies is also using new bristle technology featuring tapered nylon. “It’s almost like a feather, where the nylon bristle is tapered on top and comes to a point. This helps people to better clean under the gum line when brushing,” Damico said. Along with improving automation during the production process, officials at Team Technologies focus on providing solid customer service. “We love to grow with our customers. Our speed to market is fast. We can turn orders over in two weeks or less. This includes products that have been imprint-

New Customer Service Manager At Zahoransky USA Zahoransky USA (ZUSA) has announced the addition of Jack Kee as customer service manager. Kee comes to the ZUSA team with more than 30 years of technical experience in the brush industry. Prior to joining ZUSA, Kee spent 16 years with Carlson Tool & Machine Company where he was most recently employed as the company’s plant manager. During his 16 years with Carlson, Kee worked in the final assembly and set-up of all machines including staple set, twisted-in-wire and metal back strip brush machines. Kee also spent significant time on the road installing and servicing machines throughout North America. Kee also spent seven years with National Brush as a senior maintenance technician; and seven years with the Anchor Brush Company, where he was the cosmetic brush department maintenance manager.

January/February 2011

ed,” Damico said. He explained that imprinting the name, logo and/or telephone number on a toothbrush handle for a dental practice or company is an important function at Team Technologies. “This is one way we can keep producing toothbrushes in the United States,” Damico said. “Our service and automation capabilities allow Team Technologies to remain competitive. We have become a very big player in the industry, but everyone here wears many hats. No job is too small for any of us to do.” Looking ahead, Damico said the company will continue to reinvest in “newer, better and faster machines.” “This is how we keep moving products and technology in the right direction. Regarding the industry as a whole, the good thing about toothbrushes is that they are not expensive. In fact, toothbrushes for the professional market are given away as preventative dental care remains very important to dentists,” he said. “In retail, new machinery allows Team Technologies to constantly change its style of brushes, helping the company stay current. “Everybody seems to want a piece of this business (making toothbrushes). It comes down to who can be smarter about making these products.” Contact: Team Technologies, Inc., 5949 Commerce Blvd., Morristown, TN 37814. Phone: 423-587-2199; Fax: 423-587-0642. Website: www.teamtechinc.net.


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ust off the beaten path from Austin, TX, the 94th Annual American Brush Manufacturers Association Convention is scheduled for March 23-26. The event will take place at the Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort and Spa, located approximately 25 minutes from Austin. The ABMA event is billed as four days of networking, fellowship and information sharing. The theme of this year’s convention is “Howdy Partner,” and will include the awarding of the 2011 William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award, the Suppliers Display, the Finished Goods Static Display, divisional meetings, guest speakers, receptions and other key events. (A complete schedule accompanies this article.)

J

Convention Program Highlights ednesday, March 23, is the first full day of activities for the ABMA Annual Convention this year. The Convention Committee Breakfast Meeting is scheduled from 8 to 9:20 a.m., followed by the Public Relations Committee Meeting from 9:30 to 10:20 a.m., and then the Membership Committee Meeting from 10:30 to 11:50 a.m. ABMA Convention Registration on Wednesday is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. At noon on Wednesday, the Finished Goods Static Display is open. ABMA offers active and affiliate members a chance to promote their finished broom, brush, roller and mop products via an unmanned static tabletop display. This display opportunity will to open until 6 p.m. on Friday, March 25. A Statistical Committee Lunch Meeting is set for noon to 12:50 p.m. on Wednesday, to be followed by a Safety & Standards Committee Meeting from 1 to 1:50 p.m. This year’s ABMA Divisional Meetings are also slated for Wednesday. The Paint Applicator Division Meeting will convene from 2 until 2:50 p.m.; the Broom & Mop Division Meeting from 3 to 3:50 p.m.; the Industrial Maintenance Division Meeting from 4 to 4:50 p.m.; and the Suppliers Division Meeting from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Technical presentations will be incorporated into this year’s first three divisional meetings. A representative from DuPont Filaments, of Wilmington, DE, will discuss Trends And

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Opportunities In Contrasting The North American And European Paint Brush Markets during the Paint Applicator Meeting, while an official from Bodam International/Borghi USA, of Aberdeen, MD, will talk about The ABMA Website As A Working Tool during the Broom & Mop Meeting. A technical presentation during the Industrial Maintenance Meeting will be presented by a representative from Pioneer Packaging, of Chicopee, MA, titled Ever So Much More Than Just A Box. Each divisional meeting is open to everyone who attends the convention. Wednesday evening events include the New Members & First Time Attendees Welcome Reception from 6 to 7 p.m., followed by the Welcoming Reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Dress is business casual for both events. A day earlier, on Tuesday, March 22, the Officers Finance Meeting will take place from 5 to 6 p.m. and will be followed by the 100th Anniversary Task Force Meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. The main program to start Thursday, March 24, will be the Opening Business Session from 8 to 8:50 a.m. The event will feature a welcome by ABMA President Mark Godfrey, of Felton Brush Inc., Londonderry, NH. Prior to the Business Session, a continental breakfast will be available from 7 to 8:30 a.m. Registration will open at 7:30 a.m. and remain until 2 p.m. Following the Business Session there will be an ABMA AllAttendee Educational Institute session from 9 to 10:45 a.m. The event features Ed Rigsbee, who will present a program titled Partnering For Profits. Rigsbee is an author and consults organizations on business growth through strategic alliances, strategic marketing and organizational strategy. An All-Exhibitor Display set-up time is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday, while the Teambuilding Adventure Olympics will take place from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. During the “Olympics,” manufacturers and suppliers will compete in a series of challenges found throughout the Hyatt grounds and the McKinney Roughs Nature Park. Designed for ages 12 and up, participants will be tested with a variety of physical and mental challenges that include a rock wall, canoeing and survival trivia. Thursday’s Mid-Convention Reception is slated for 6 to 7 p.m.


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From 7 to 10:30 p.m. the Austin Dinner Excursion takes place, allowing participants to visit various sights and sounds of “The Music Capital of the Southwest.” Reservations are required for this event. A full day of activities are planned for Friday, March 25, starting with a continental breakfast from 7 to 8:30 a.m. Registration is scheduled from 7:30 a.m. to noon. One highlight will be the ABMA Suppliers Display, which will begin at 8 a.m. and run until noon. This event provides a showcase for ABMA members to see that latest products, ideas and components offered by exhibiting suppliers. In addition, the event is another opportunity for members to network. From 9 to 10:30 a.m., meanwhile, the ABMA Companion Program will take place featuring a watercolor painting class. A buffet lunch is slated for noon until 1 p.m. and will be followed by the annual ABMA Scramble Golf Tournament from 1 to 6 p.m. at The Wolfdancer Golf Course. The tournament price includes greens fees, golf cart rental, range balls and prizes. Participants are asked to make their own club rental arrangements directly through the pro shop by calling 512-3089653. Friday evening’s featured event will be the Suppliers Reception, which takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. The theme is “Trail’s End Chuckwagon Dinner and Party.” Dress is resort casual and Western wear is encouraged. This year’s Supplier Reception includes an area for dancing so attendees are asked to consider appropriate footwear. The final day of the convention is Saturday, March 26, beginning with a continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. and followed by the Closing Business Session and the William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award presentation. This all takes place from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. After the award presentation, Saturday’s ABMA AllAttendee Educational Institute is scheduled from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Ed Rigsbee will lead a workshop, helping attendees define their ABMA Return on Investment (ROI). From 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., the ABMA Board of Directors’ Luncheon and Meeting is scheduled. The final event of the 2011 ABMA Annual Convention will be the Board of Directors’ Dinner from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Hotel Registration, Dress And Weather Information he Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort and Spa is located at 575 Hyatt Lost Pines Road, Lost Pines, TX 78612. Phone numbers are 512-308-4700 (reservations) and 512-308-1234 (local), while the fax number is 512-308-4800. On-line hotel reservations can be made by visiting: www.ABMA.org/AC2011quicklinks. For ABMA events, comfortable and casual dress is appropriate. Daytime attire is casual and sportswear is customary (golf shirts and slacks or shorts for men; slacks, shorts or skirts/dresses for women). Evening activities are “nice” informal or daytime business casual attire and may include sportcoat for men; pantsuits, slacks, skirts/dresses for women. Austin’s average daytime temperatures in March are in the high 70s to low 80s. Nighttime temperatures average in the low to mid 50s. Call 720-392-2262 or visit www.abma.org for additional information on this year’s ABMA Annual Convention.

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January/February 2011

Innovation Award Candidates ne of the three following candidates will be presented with the William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award during an award ceremony scheduled for 9:20 a.m. on Saturday, March 26. This will be part of the ABMA Closing Business Session. The award, which recognizes innovation of manufactured products, components or services in the broom, brush, mop and roller industry, is named after William Cordes, who served as the first ABMA president from 1917-1928. According to ABMA, this award serves as a reminder that new and exciting endeavors have beginnings that connect with real people. The 2011 candidates are:

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Pferd/Advance Twin-Nut Reversible Nut Wire Wheel Brush This patent-pending attaching system clinch nut design increases the tool life of wire brushes by solving the problem of brush interference with the guard when changing the mounting position of the brush. Reversing the mounting position of the brush also takes advantage of the self-sharpening effect of the wire, resulting in longer service life, improved brush performance and increased user safety. Sanderson MacLeod Z-Tip Brush Sanderson MacLeod’s Z-Tip is a new protective brush tip for twisted-wire brushes. The company has a patent-pending on the invention and is manufacturing the Z-Tip for endoscopic cleaning brushes and cytology brushes. Sanderson MacLeod developed the Z-Tip to create a smoother, safer and stronger protective tip. Traditional methods, such as molded and acrylic tips, can cause problems like scratching, scarring and detachment of the tip from the brush. In setting out to find a better way to solve these problems, Sanderson MacLeod searched beyond the brush industry and found the answer in material joining engineering. As a result of many rounds of research, trials and testing, the company devised a new manufacturing process using high energy fusion welding technologies. As a result, the company is able to melt a pre-constructed core wire section of a twisted-wire brush into a consistent, smooth and inseparable protective tip. Purdy 12-inch To 18-inch Adjustable Frame The Purdy premium adjustable roller frame fits all standard roller covers from 12- to 18-inches. This patent-pending design works with a cam latch system for quick adjustment. According to the company, it’s the lightest adjustable roller frame in the industry. Having a unique angle design allows the painter fast and easy production. A QuickFit™ JiffyLoc ferrule allows for quick connectivity to extension poles. This frame also has a universal threaded end for compatibility with all extension poles in the market.


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94th ABMA Annual Convention Schedule Of Events — March 22 - 26, 2011 Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort And Spa, Austin (Lost Pines), Texas

Tuesday, March 22 5 to 6 p.m. Officers Finance Meeting 7 to 9 p.m. 100th Anniversary Task Force Meeting

Wednesday, March 23 8 to 9:20 a.m. Convention Committee Breakfast Meeting 9:30 to 10:20 a.m. Public Relations Committee Meeting 10:30 to 11:50 a.m. Membership Committee Meeting 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Registration / “Gathering Place”

Noon Finished Goods Static Display Opens Noon to 12:50 p.m. Statistical Committee Lunch Meeting 1 to 1:50 p.m. Safety & Standards Committee Meeting 2 to 2:50 p.m. Paint Applicator Division Meeting & Technical Presentation by DuPont Filaments 3 to 3:50 p.m. Broom & Mop Division Meeting & Technical Presentation by Bodam International/Borghi USA 4 to 4:50 p.m. Industrial Maintenance Division Meeting & Technical Presentation by Pioneer Packaging 5 to 5:30 p.m. Suppliers Division Meeting 6 to 7 p.m. New Members & First-Time Attendees Welcome Reception Dress: Business Casual 7 to 9 p.m. Welcoming Reception Dress: Business Casual

Thursday, March 24 7 to 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration / “Gathering Place” 8 to 8:50 a.m. Opening Business Session - President’s Welcome 9 to 10:45 a.m. ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute

Speaker: Ed Rigsbee “Partnering For Profits” 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. All Exhibitor Display Setup 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Lunch on Own 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Teambuilding Adventure Olympics 6 to 7 p.m. Mid-Convention Reception 7 to 10:30 p.m. Austin Dinner Excursion or Dinner on Own

Friday, March 25 7 to 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast 7 to 7:45 a.m. All Exhibitor Display Setup 7:30 a.m. to Noon Registration / “Gathering Place”

8 a.m. to Noon ABMA Suppliers Display 9 to 10:30 a.m. Companion Program — Watercolor Painting Noon to 1 p.m. Buffet Lunch 1 to 6 p.m. Golf Tournament (Shot Gun Start) 6 p.m. Finished Goods Static Display Closes 7 to 10 p.m. Suppliers’ Reception Theme: Trail’s End Chuckwagon Dinner & Party Dress: Resort Casual, Western wear encouraged. This event includes an area for dancing so consider appropriate footwear.

Saturday, March 26 7:30 to 9 a.m. Continental breakfast 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. Closing Business Session 9:20 to 9:30 a.m. Innovation Award Presentation 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute Speaker: Ed Rigsbee “ABMA Return On Investment” 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Board of Directors Luncheon & Meeting 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Board of Directors Dinner


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Imports Continue To Increase By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

U.S. government trade figures for the first 10 months of 2010 indicate raw material imports were up in all four categories outlined in this issue, compared to the first 10 months of 2009. For October 2010, raw material imports were also up in all four of the categories outlined, compared to October 2009. Import totals for the first 10 months of 2010 were up in four of the six finished goods categories outlined from the same time period in 2009. In October 2010, five of the six categories outlined recorded increases, compared to October 2009. Toothbrush and paintbrush imports were both up for October 2010 and for the first 10 months of 2010, compared to the same time periods in 2009. RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS Hog Bristle The United States imported 101,564 kilograms of hog bristle in October 2010, up about 277 percent from 26,908 kilograms imported in October 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, 355,810 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, about a 29 percent increase from 274,790 kilograms imported during the first 10 months of 2009. China sent 355,407 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first 10 months of 2010. The average price per kilogram for October 2010 was $6.44, up about 50 percent from the average price per kilogram for October 2009 of $4.30. The average price per kilogram for the first 10 months of 2010 was $7.60, down about 7 percent from the average price per kilogram of $8.17 for the first 10 months of 2009. Broom And Mop Handles The import total of broom and mop handles during October 2010 was 2 million, up about 11 percent from 1.8 million during October 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, 17.8 million broom and mop handles were imported, up about 5 percent from 17 million for the first 10 months of 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, the United States received 8.2 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 4.8 million from Honduras and 2.6 million from China. The average price per handle for October 2010 was 72 cents, up about 31 percent from 55 cents for October 2009. The average price for the first 10 months of 2010 was 74 cents, up about 9 percent from the average price recorded for the first 10 months of 2009 of 68 cents. Brush Backs October 2010 imports of brush backs totaled 633,424, up about 452 percent from the October 2009 total of 114,649 brush backs.

During the first 10 months of 2010, 6.5 million brush backs were imported, up about 171 percent from 2.4 million for the first 10 months of 2009. Canada shipped 2.7 million brush backs to the United States during the first 10 months of 2010, while China shipped 2.2 million and Brazil sent 1.1 million. The average price per brush back was 49 cents during October 2010, up 1 cent from the average price for October 2009. For the first 10 months of 2010, the average price per brush back was 49 cents, up about 11 percent from the average price for the first 10 months of 2009 of 44 cents. Metal Handles The import total of metal handles during October 2010 was 3.1 million, up about 48 percent from 2.1 million for October 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, 31.8 million metal handles were imported, up about 27 percent from 25.1 million for the first 10 months of 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, Italy shipped 16 million metal handles to the United States, while China sent 11.3 million and Spain exported 4 million. The average price per handle for October 2010 was 61 cents, down about 10 percent from the average price for October 2009 of 68 cents. The average price for the first 10 months of 2010 was 52 cents, down about 17 percent from 63 cents for the first 10 months of 2009. FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued At Less Than 96 Cents Imports of brooms of broom corn valued at less than 96 cents per broom during October 2010 totaled 19,092, up about 143 percent from 7,872 brooms imported during October 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, 111,744 brooms of broom corn were imported, down about 9 percent from 122,568 imported during the first 10 months of 2009. All the brooms were imported from Mexico. The average price per broom in October 2010 was 81 cents, up about 9 percent from 74 cents for October 2009. The average price per broom for the first 10 months of 2010 was 82 cents, up about 8 percent from 76 cents for the first 10 months of 2009. Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued At More Than 96 Cents The United States imported 733,156 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during October 2010, compared to 728,706 in October 2009, an increase of about 1 percent. During the first 10 months of 2010, 7.7 million brooms of broom corn were imported, up about 5 percent from 7.3 million imported during the first 10 months of 2009. Mexico shipped 7.5 million brooms to the United States during the first 10 months of 2010. The average price per broom for October 2010 was $2.42, up about 4 percent from the average price for October 2009 of $2.33. The average price per broom for the first 10 months of 2010 was $2.45, the same as the average price for the first 10 months of 2009.


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Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during October 2010 was 259,845, up about 90 percent from 136,560 brooms and brushes imported during October 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, 2.4 million brooms and brushes were imported, up about 85 percent from 1.3 million imported during the first 10 months of 2009. Sri Lanka exported 1.6 million brooms and brushes to the United States during the first 10 months of 2010. The average price per unit for October 2010 was $1.52, down about 16 percent from $1.81 for October 2009. The average price for the first 10 months of 2010 was $1.48, a decrease of about 20 percent from the average price recorded for the first 10 months of 2009 of $1.84. Toothbrushes The United States imported 75.2 million toothbrushes in October 2010, up about 12 percent from 67.1 million imported in October 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, 766.1 million toothbrushes were imported, an increase of about 17 percent from 652.6 million imported during the first 10 months of 2009. China sent 543.2 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first 10 months of 2010, while Switzerland shipped 86.4 million. The average price per toothbrush for October 2010 was 24 cents, up about 20 percent from the average price for October 2009 of 20 cents. The average price for the first 10 months of 2010 was 21 cents, the same as for the first 10 months of 2009. Shaving Brushes The United States imported 9.4 million shaving brushes in October 2010, down about 35 percent from 14.4 million imported in October 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, 95 million shaving brushes were imported, a decrease of about 26 percent from 129.1 million imported during the first 10 months of 2009. China sent 41.3 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first 10 months of 2010, while Mexico sent 31 million and Germany shipped 14.2 million. The average price per shaving brush for October 2010 was 14 cents, up about 56 percent from 9 cents for October 2009. The average price for the first 10 months of 2010 was 13 cents, the same as for the first 10 months of 2009. Paintbrushes U.S. companies imported 14.2 million paintbrushes during October 2010, up about 8 percent from 13.2 million paintbrushes imported during October 2009. Paintbrush imports for the first 10 months of 2010 were 213 million, up about 21 percent from 175.5 million recorded for the first 10 months of 2009. China shipped 179.2 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first 10 months of 2010, while Indonesia exported 29.5 million. The average price per paintbrush for October 2010 was 33 cents, up about 14 percent from 29 cents for October 2009. The average price for the first 10 months of 2010 was 27 cents, down about 10 percent from the average price of 30 cents for the first 10 months of 2009.

January/February 2011

EXPORTS Export totals for the first 10 months of 2010 were up in all three categories outlined, compared to the first 10 months of 2009. In October 2010, all three categories also reported increases in exports, compared to October 2009. Toothbrush and paintbrush exports were both up for October 2010 and for the first 10 months of 2010, compared to the same time periods in 2009. Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials The United States exported 6,130 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during October 2010, up about 3 percent from the October 2009 total of 5,947 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first 10 months of 2010 were 83,949 dozen, up about 22 percent from 68,674 dozen for the first 10 months of 2009. The United States shipped 31,350 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first 10 months of 2010, while Mexico imported 14,860 dozen. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $34.81 in October 2010, down about 17 percent from $42.09 for October 2009. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first 10 months of 2010 was $34.19, a decrease of about 15 percent from the average price per dozen for the first 10 months of 2009 of $40.11. Toothbrushes During October 2010, the United States exported 8.4 million toothbrushes, up about 6 percent from the total recorded in October 2009 of 7.9 million. During the first 10 months of 2010, 94.1 million toothbrushes were exported, up about 27 percent from 74.3 million exported during the first 10 months of 2009. The United States exported 30.7 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first 10 months of 2010, while sending 27.7 million toothbrushes to Mexico, 7.5 million to South Korea and 5.8 million to Hong Kong. The average price per toothbrush for October 2010 was 66 cents, down about 14 percent from the average price for October 2009 of 77 cents. The average price per toothbrush for the first 10 months of 2010 was 67 cents, down about 11 percent from 75 cents for the first 10 months of 2009. Paintbrushes The export total of paintbrushes during October 2010 was 160,825, up about 53 percent from 104,949 paintbrush exports recorded for October 2009. During the first 10 months of 2010, 1.7 million paintbrushes were exported, up about 91 percent from 888,594 during the first 10 months of 2009. Canada imported 1.1 million paintbrushes from the United States during the first 10 months of 2010, while The Netherlands received 190,779. The average price per paintbrush for October 2010 was $13.57, up slightly from $13.53 for October 2009. The average price for the first 10 months of 2010 was $11.66, down about 25 percent from $15.60 recorded for the first 10 months of 2009.


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EXPORTS October Exports By Country

Foreign Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles October Year To Date Country Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Value Canada 2 5,177 27 68,804 Hondura 3 12,490 10 40,017 Dom Rep 2 6,580 Belgium 1 3,879 1 3,879 Austral 4 19,167 TOTAL 6 21,546 44 138,447 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles October Year To Date Country Net Q/Dozen Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 564 65,295 8,139 380,538 Mexico 1,711 62,835 Sweden 125 4,230 Singapr 417 18,700 Kor Rep 83 4,920 Austral 292 30,102 TOTAL 564 65,295 10,767 501,325

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9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,221,166 1,169,069 12,648,604 10,862,011 Mexico 96,468 50,065 572,604 539,297 Guatmal 3,456 2,845 C Rica 3,456 2,845 19,008 15,647 Cayman 783 3,419 Haiti 2,256 2,987 Dom Rep 1,138 11,644 1,138 11,644 N Antil 1,251 3,762 Colomb 12,192 5,235 Brazil 25,920 15,552 Argent 9,072 6,790 U King 43,460 238,196 280,809 414,376 Nethlds 29,292 141,153 67,877 347,805 France 4,629 46,336 Fr Germ 30,750 141,899 45,352 210,518 Czech 3,168 3,960 Poland 5,240 53,607 5,240 53,607 Italy 3,251 33,264 6,910 70,704 Turkey 182 4,992 393 10,008 India 10,368 13,238 Thailnd 3,456 3,256 Singapr 38,434 29,466 258,849 132,342 China 7,827 58,234 Kor Rep 41,394 31,788 Hg Kong 5,112 3,019 11,448 6,565 Taiwan 4,896 2,676 121,848 65,751 Japan 9,740 11,261 Austral 8,400 6,811 228,341 203,011 Rep Saf 467 5,325 TOTAL 1,491,245 1,888,706 14,404,400 13,157,274

Royal Paint Roller Royal Paint Roller — a name known in the industry for over 35 years for top quality products, fine service and competitive prices. Manufacturer of paint rollers in ALL SIZES—from Slim Jim to Jumbo 21⁄4” I.D. in VARIETY OF FABRICS—including lambskin, kodel, lambswool, synthetic blends & “Lint Free” woven line. Also a complete line of frames, trays, paint brushes & painting accessories for the professional and Do-It-Yourself markets. Specializing in private labeling at competitive prices.

ROYAL PAINT ROLLER 248 Wyandanch Avenue West Babylon, N.Y. 11704 Tel: (631) 643-8012 • Fax: (631) 253-9428


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9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 204,516 316,258 1,289,499 1,812,011 Mexico 85,968 56,294 1,419,159 794,709 Ecuador 6,480 9,541 Chile 20 3,360 20 3,360 Brazil 3,495 6,810 U King 13,168 125,992 Ireland 2,400 6,128 Nethlds 957 16,038 Belgium 11,410 114,691 France 324,000 75,495 339,814 495,387 Fr Germ 311,400 62,948 331,159 297,416 Switzld 359 11,602 Russia 128,157 58,744 Ukraine 20,736 7,788 Kazakhs 15,360 6,850 Spain 15,360 5,465 Italy 4,116 37,637 Turkey 3,575 4,875 Thailnd 20,000 4,030 Indnsia 20,000 3,318 Phil R 40,368 61,437 China 990 13,809 3,746 39,009 Japan 324,000 68,783 1,482,694 370,737 Austral 11,129 6,783 Senegal 9,216 5,733 Rep Saf 300 7,252 TOTAL 1,250,894 596,947 5,192,677 4,313,343

Supplier of Raw Materials to Manufacture Brooms, Mops, and Brushes • Galvanized & tinned wire for brush - broom - mop production • Processed Broom Corn & Yucca • Wood Broom - Mop - Brush Handles • Craft Broom Corn And Supplies

9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar Brushes for the Application of Cosmetics October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 381,994 1,410,765 3,431,980 11,610,569 Mexico 42,429 59,561 441,229 1,074,854 Panama 1,920 4,934 1,920 4,934 Dom Rep 396 5,655 Trinid 6,305 17,014 Colomb 7,766 57,212 Venez 3,612 13,326 7,265 26,803 Ecuador 1,456 5,372 Chile 1,727 6,372 Brazil 25,545 42,849 186,001 352,470 Argent 5,040 4,258 Sweden 3,920 21,377 55,699 232,319 Norway 1,440 5,312 7,740 49,799 Finland 1,012 3,734 Denmark 3,100 9,436 U King 49,279 220,986 349,261 1,326,172 Ireland 786 15,245 Nethlds 775 2,858 6,997 33,378 Belgium 48,419 178,648 275,762 1,024,756 France 6,361 32,265 55,086 207,091 Fr Germ 14,506 25,695 63,595 162,430 Czech 9,384 13,549 17,897 33,067 Switzld 5,543 20,451 104,503 385,578 Estonia 138 3,107 Latvia 111 3,833 Poland 3,120 3,926 15,874 27,832 Russia 20,614 34,640 380,388 823,026 Ukraine 57,048 59,962 143,620 265,353 Kazakhs 4,761 15,786 51,412 133,078 Moldova 2,734 7,498 Spain 50,492 166,419 85,329 242,101 Italy 69,547 315,425 Greece 1,029 3,980 4,350 14,095 Turkey 31,552 47,603 Israel 2,028 7,486 Arab Em 11,536 42,897 India 2,335 10,904 Thailnd 2,171 8,011 22,935 92,034 Malaysa 1,524 5,624 Singapr 1,894 6,989 26,322 97,116 Phil R 8,063 29,749 China 3,854 14,220 122,400 324,145 Kor Rep 10,837 37,754 100,035 293,653 Hg Kong 7,043 25,988 123,582 451,602 Taiwan 5,433 13,848 34,234 142,343 Japan 9,030 36,610 167,663 771,935 Austral 6,376 32,447 88,765 300,018 Rep Saf 26,165 88,486 TOTAL 778,829 2,513,156 6,555,165 21,189,461

• Other Materials - Broom Twine, Broom Nails, Mop Hardware We ship by pup or truck load direct from Mexico, or LTL/ UPS from our Greensboro warehouse.

P.O. Box 14634 • Greensboro, NC 27415 336-273-3609 800-213-9224 Fax: 336-378-6047 E-mail: sales@recaddy.com

January/February 2011

Country Canada Mexico Brazil Fr Germ Hungary Spain China Hg Kong Mayotte TOTAL

9603402000 Paint Rollers October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 23,567 37,520 894,300 18,410 22,717 196,478 400 221 213 207 820 452 375 41,977 60,237 1,093,466

Value 1,155,372 316,030 18,948 3,881 3,744 3,625 14,400 7,948 6,577 1,530,525


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Country Mexico Switzld Hg Kong TOTAL

9603404020 Paint Pads October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 8,527 12,714 135,520 1,125 843 8,527 12,714 137,488

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Value 265,241 7,987 5,985 279,213

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 2,177 29,315 49,843 715,164 Mexico 11,097 138,091 Salvadr 505 10,466 N Antil 7,317 151,760 Chile 874 10,101 Sweden 133 2,751 Norway 1,042 21,616 Denmark 367 7,622 U King 2,926 42,302 Ireland 1,449 30,045 Nethlds 44 3,844 France 980 24,907 Fr Germ 417 8,652 Switzld 190 3,950 Israel 178 3,695 Vietnam 770 15,960 China 432 8,952 575 11,913 Hg Kong 174 3,603 1,005 19,487 Austral 216 4,474 TOTAL 2,783 41,870 79,928 1,226,800 9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts For Broom or Brush Making, NESOI October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 58,678 571,044 526,768 5,849,228 Mexico 9,117 123,510 90,290 1,317,488 C Rica 1,308 21,215 16,541 268,274 Panama 3,761 61,002 12,530 175,005 Bermuda 1,739 5,939 Dom Rep 301 4,888 Trinid 683 11,080 1,818 29,491 Colomb 353 12,559 Chile 227 8,218 3,237 48,108 Brazil 3,168 47,771 Argent 297 4,817 Iceland 55 2,774

BROOM CAPS

Sweden Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Czech Russia Spain Italy Israel Kuwait S Arab Arab Em Afghan India Thailnd Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral N Zeal Rep Saf Namibia TOTAL

PAGE 39

157

2,546

212 450

3,445 12,437

172

2,790

211 477

3,420 8,588

387

6,282

604 76,444

12,900 848,477

178 1,261 1,423 2,230 914 2,497 250 5,348 12,627 980 532 482 353 200 974 1,158 666 1,752 648 465 621 1,568 4,271 14,057 4,619 9,400 1,160 274 604 728,609

Domestic Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles October Year To Date Country Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Value Mexico 2 8,130 Dom Rep 1 3,933 Chile 1 8,250 France 6 23,328 48 172,800 Portugl 1 2,756 Israel 1 2,691 TOTAL 6 23,328 54 198,560 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles October Year To Date Country Net Q/Dozen Value Net Q/Dozen Value

BRUSH and HANDLE FERRULES

MANUFACTURING INCORPORATED P.O. Box 6505

2,886 20,460 23,086 48,186 31,117 55,000 6,155 86,743 201,533 15,903 21,281 7,815 5,731 12,667 16,899 18,774 11,648 17,976 3,149 7,547 11,688 25,439 69,268 47,186 65,619 143,131 18,816 15,485 12,900 8,790,430

Wolcott, CT 06716

Phone 203-879-1481


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PAGE 40 Canada Mexico Belize C Rica Panama Bermuda Bahamas Jamaica Dom Rep B Virgn S Lucia S Vn Gr Barbado Trinid N Antil Aruba Guadlpe Colomb Brazil Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Austria Czech Switzld Poland Spain Portugl Israel S Arab Arab Em Afghan Singapr Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral Angola TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Belize Salvadr Hondura C Rica Panama Bermuda Bahamas Jamaica Cayman Haiti Dom Rep Antigua Barbado Trinid N Antil Aruba Colomb Venez Guyana

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 2,655 681

98,687 26,904

206 315

4,831 5,619

103

84

3,402

4,202

310

11,633

460

16,399

9

3,245

102 120 17 318 337 211

3,378 4,279 2,504 9,244 7,106 9,040

202 6,130

2,897 213,370

31,350 14,860 250 801 1,092 985 1,662 396 21 12 309 100 184 701 146 195 146 783 1,554 22 6,635 392 135 196 9,385 25 307 6 9 84 1,240 14 80 3,637 21 33 1,259 521 17 461 467 3,025 229 202 83,949

9603210000 Toothbrushes October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 2,609,576 1,437,017 30,650,853 2,252,836 820,864 27,633,959 20,150 77,472 425 5,994 23,009 18,144 3,456 2,845 19,034 9,792 8,802 8,536 4,634 6,310 58,311 361 50,444 21,000 23,793 426,639 26,340 19,110 11,304 6,742 129,116 14,673 5,816 21,444 12,131 165,692 51,744 40,996 345,042 473 4,844 1,114

1,089,358 301,641 16,144 15,757 18,093 29,751 86,264 11,500 6,260 3,121 8,799 4,867 7,599 23,115 4,800 8,640 3,374 30,715 54,963 15,400 362,790 21,012 7,869 6,463 232,326 3,840 10,120 2,502 3,245 3,460 39,849 7,108 9,557 185,869 6,666 7,664 42,801 9,040 2,504 24,074 9,856 103,993 24,601 2,897 2,870,267

Value 19,370,352 9,847,716 173,647 24,731 69,938 15,836 32,166 5,350 23,806 12,048 49,733 3,698 23,392 238,442 21,519 17,681 93,283 31,839 8,690 227,735 229,901 11,134

Ecuador Peru Chile Brazil Paragua Argent Sweden Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds France Fr Germ Austria Slovak Hungary Switzld Poland Russia Spain Italy Greece Lebanon Kuwait S Arab Qatar Arab Em India Thailnd Vietnam Malaysa Singapr Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Senegal Benin Rep Saf TOTAL

January/February 2011 32,400 29,232 48,096 33,408

13,059 11,497 18,195 13,291

229,428 1,504

123,344 6,163

68,261 432,000 25,645

382,134 144,284 139,863

479,746

856,247

51,190

25,050

5,450 1,700 600 17,145

38,140 9,197 3,414 26,726

3,200 264 1,088 176,544 66,999

2,559 2,697 6,343 353,350 57,558

60,476

26,947

146,537 159,702 966,703 281,280 5,000 68,388

164,318 78,346 458,379 120,913 20,371 47,459

3,500

3,885

8,372,378

5,515,265

163,008 248,384 470,982 1,050,172 2,000 1,789,199 1,984 6,576 27,936 432,928 2,937,600 570,209 19,823 2,423,500 463 344 123,246 958 5,450 9,825 1,560 60,417 2,736 977 480 26,452 447 1,115,555 1,418,130 342,786 485,000 8,784 412,233 18,920 2,533,881 7,493,395 5,804,001 1,506,921 592,320 2,178,300 19,552 8,000 3,500 27,840 94,059,183

62,674 120,266 243,824 697,990 16,993 962,377 9,360 6,212 29,030 1,838,729 947,617 3,865,863 53,267 5,313,919 8,400 3,520 59,134 11,804 38,140 61,876 9,386 102,320 3,118 10,000 8,861 25,796 6,190 657,110 2,744,146 284,453 72,750 2,749 224,943 42,321 2,520,620 3,704,934 3,355,426 753,978 2,304,651 1,319,277 29,137 5,600 3,885 18,549 63,093,832

9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use on the Person October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q./No. Value Canada 420,576 318,165 3,386,118 2,794,169 Mexico 1,906,180 464,647 7,509,558 3,671,511 Guatmal 573 5,241 3,632 17,330 Salvadr 1,440 10,483 Hondura 400 5,520 1,633 21,050 C Rica 10,051 9,489 Panama 854 14,197 Bahamas 21,340 24,090 Turk Is 600 2,556 Cayman 137 10,395 Haiti 23,664 30,890 23,664 30,890 Dom Rep 2,358 23,372 S Lucia 121 3,988 Grenada 1,735 2,681 Barbado 5,016 4,398 6,674 11,220 Trinid 17,914 143,565 N Antil 10,152 13,427 Colomb 183,474 50,731 1,025,644 333,188 Venez 4,162 38,064 208,227 102,608 Ecuador 2,634 25,623 Peru 2,928 27,107


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January/February 2011 Chile Brazil Argent Sweden Norway Finland U King Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Czech Switzld Poland Russia Spain Italy Cyprus S Arab Arab Em India Bngldsh Thailnd Singapr Indnsia Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Egypt Gabon B Ind O Rep Saf TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

288 1,175,470 308,846

8,239 273,953 77,647

10,378

220,764

5,183 6,634

47,396 23,037

1,061

3,497

5,319

29,054

328 166

3,000 11,011

2,649

24,226

287 6,229

2,625 56,968

388

3,551

84,000 2,792

31,780 34,392

1,357 4,155,420

36,506 1,805,302

19,249 5,295,862 1,062,688 5,598 374 19,781 76,573 12,982 26,816 71,629 88,631 15 1,164 1,875 4,901 492 22,764 5,040 2,620 7,367 1,739 437 19,295 8,357 3,516 1,533 73,650 5,078 375,792 1,588 276,251 31,077 140 720 551 1,948 11,161 19,776,668

172,467 1,610,330 362,967 45,545 6,657 19,656 659,741 77,988 59,409 510,642 302,979 3,085 10,651 17,150 16,588 16,783 203,552 13,362 6,727 105,283 28,711 4,000 176,458 56,599 20,994 22,728 630,005 44,293 556,616 10,824 317,217 219,585 7,686 3,492 5,040 8,518 171,586 13,798,853

9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar for the Application of Cosmetics October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Canada 443,928 1,104,697 3,956,347 Mexico 197,794 632,924 608,862 Salvadr 3,014 Hondura 750 Nicarag 2,412 2,994 2,412 C Rica 782 Panama 3,882 Bermuda 98 Jamaica 2,961 Dom Rep 11,247 B Virgn 6,444 S Vn Gr 2,628 Barbado 4,238 Trinid 106 N Antil 1,062 Colomb 922 3,403 39,922 Venez 10,053 Ecuador 10,854 Peru 3,018 Chile 9,461 Brazil 1,539 5,574 93,406 Argent 1,962 Sweden 956 6,319 20,897 Norway 5,003 25,711 51,542 Finland 2,511 9,389 14,896 Denmark 4,558 24,850 7,508 U King 129,195 280,000 473,104 Ireland 91 2,929 180,803

Brushes

Value 9,529,365 1,995,568 11,122 5,124 2,994 9,763 18,344 3,129 10,927 38,544 6,191 3,925 5,181 4,058 5,041 88,739 28,775 60,079 16,782 110,592 366,097 3,630 98,194 281,763 60,412 41,094 2,631,787 550,477

Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Austria Switzld Estonia Poland Russia Armenia Spain Italy Greece Turkey Israel S Arab Arab Em India Thailnd Malaysa Singapr Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Libya B Ind O Tnzania Rep Saf TOTAL

Country CCanada Mexico Guatmal C Rica Panama Bermuda Bahamas Jamaica Cayman Dom Rep Trinid Aruba Colomb Venez Ecuador Peru Chile Brazil Argent Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Czech Switzld Italy Israel Jordan Kuwait

PAGE 41 9,747 16,589 95,679 49,548 18,644 2,302 633 69,940 5,889 4,398 3,737 48,390 2,789 692 5,132 2,148 4,174 16,512 7,618 2,998 18,373 16,928 62,464 62,843 190,890 8,222 56,494 192,892 780 1,355 3,206 4,605 7,877 6,516,747

54,782 65,412 359,766 205,230 68,790 19,777 9,600 258,052 25,942 16,228 12,451 174,716 10,291 2,552 18,935 7,925 16,915 13,038 36,376 11,061 67,791 45,982 235,686 706,151 488,010 30,336 190,886 736,392 2,879 5,000 11,304 46,000 29,063 19,971,016

9603402000 Paint Rollers October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 119,264 398,994 1,774,206 26,958 61,920 291,877 5,616 1,905 5,905 4,673 5,190 9,528 9,709 2,438 5,725 21,293 1,916 3,750 1,224 18,952 5,286 11,108 5,322 2,181 7,563 3,851 49 2,072 105 7,779 12,055 275 5,247 275 165 7,000 2,202 8,432 2,202 12,571 2,081 151 10,811 447 1,877 32,936 34,962 367 3,616 1,590 950 491 498

Value 4,958,972 701,845 4,960 41,681 29,365 63,982 4,586 9,567 3,459 174,545 14,699 38,279 8,257 58,999 8,334 30,636 31,649 5,247 14,907 14,180 8,432 49,408 11,601 2,650 52,401 7,852 149,389 6,440 25,188 27,911 16,670 4,745 8,750

12,095 1,820

46,044 6,714

34,412 1,320

126,967 7,147

240 8,787

4,062 27,514

774

2,856

244

7,065

11,464 7,260 2,165 13,932 1,090 1,433 7,375 780

25,822 25,228 33,268 51,402 4,020 5,287 29,956 2,879

894,100

2,505,021


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PAGE 42 S Arab Arab Em India Thailnd Vietnam Malaysa Singapr Indnsia Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral N Zeal Fr Poly Egypt Nigeria Angola Rep Saf TOTAL

Country Mexico Dom Rep Trinid N Antil Venez Ecuador Peru Brazil Argent

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 41,218 14,764 4,158 70 1,311 1,725 1,886 2,640 570 19,896 430 436,463 5,117 172,117 2,256 452 1,980 4,320 174 210,510 3,166,543

39,434 26,048 46,120 4,287 23,000 18,239 12,344 8,395 10,000 119,920 14,185 429,518 34,541 245,625 8,138 5,988 4,060 4,295 3,060 169,121 7,815,904

9603404020 Paint Pads October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 52,031 321 352 350 12,052 399 4,422 1,128 3,616 1,128 906

Value 157,872 8,419 2,502 2,673 85,553 2,830 29,784 3,616 9,072

305

17,500

642

3,244

570 1,906

10,000 33,454

421 496 20,141

7,390 2,944 26,801

189,981

648,907

Finland Denmark U King Belgium Russia Italy Israel Thailnd Singapr China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral Mali Rep Saf TOTAL

January/February 2011

908

6,443

6,275

18,780

8,311

28,839

2,000 2,147 1,045 98 440 984 1,267 1,816 1,535 498 7,283 9,000 2,481 53,340 90 200 156,185

3,320 13,252 13,020 2,817 5,263 6,983 42,575 12,886 6,166 5,976 51,692 31,740 9,687 92,663 3,960 4,580 608,901

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 87,289 765,602 1,103,256 8,964,775 Mexico 870 16,899 11,230 160,347 Belize 693 2,959 693 2,959 Salvadr 2,877 59,668 3,699 76,724 Hondura 236 6,394 3,466 73,987 Nicarag 187 3,239 1,105 11,264 C Rica 134 4,554 5,138 123,536 Panama 472 17,953 14,096 252,887 Bermuda 129 2,680 10,055 92,132 Bahamas 720 8,405 10,784 230,532 Jamaica 138 2,862 1,408 29,183 Turk Is 168 8,878 Cayman 5,198 70,767 Haiti 689 14,292 Dom Rep 714 4,081 4,347 81,875 B Virgn 219 10,645 Antigua 1,085 22,774 5,677 116,263 Monsrat 342 22,549 S Lucia 675 22,523 S Vn Gr 365 7,572 Grenada 2,095 9,244 2,095 9,244 Barbado 687 17,044 Trinid 1,410 17,374 N Antil 26,840 165,458 Aruba 40 2,748 560 16,353 Colomb 3,778 66,580 12,099 233,219 Venez 3,461 55,258 3,461 55,258 Surinam 127 2,638 Ecuador 2,594 38,402 Peru 1,362 37,177 Chile 8,709 186,477 Brazil 4,629 96,072 Uruguay 2,347 48,671 Argent 5,018 112,120 Iceland 12 2,699 Sweden 8,830 128,850 Norway 248 5,142 Finland 1,260 10,150 2,098 15,075 Denmark 960 58,500 15,447 135,189 U King 20,305 482,588 98,448 1,963,611 Ireland 134 2,774 5,067 40,807 Nethlds 19,819 379,060 190,779 3,834,063 Belgium 17,041 353,467 France 5,323 126,632 Fr Germ 19,136 276,985 Lithuan 60 2,938 120 5,876 Poland 4,254 85,905 Russia 274 5,673 Italy 282 5,853


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January/February 2011 Greece Israel S Arab Arab Em Bahrain India Sri Lka Thailnd Vietnam Malaysa Singapr Indnsia China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Moroc Nigeria TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

132

2,738

378

4,483

139 2,412

9,524 9,049

1,325 4,699 600 670 1,194 1,820

31,339 97,465 6,900 13,893 3,969 15,016

160,825

2,182,286

44 7,485 155 7,386 191 1,072 204 41 4,382 2,498 10,229 1,372 6,428 14,308 9,438 670 6,234 11,932 12,189 213 306 1,718,684

7,553 164,904 3,210 128,500 6,830 21,817 4,226 6,840 90,904 55,011 125,337 28,464 161,275 282,778 172,394 13,893 64,929 182,105 114,592 4,415 7,564 20,042,565

9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts for Broom or Brush Making, NESOI October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 188,516 2,179,392 2,531,962 23,754,281 Mexico 49,807 719,006 576,561 7,835,606 Guatmal 100 3,000 416 8,121 Salvadr 893 12,377 Hondura 3,097 50,232 Nicarag 128 5,008 C Rica 615 3,532 9,344 112,291 Panama 1,524 24,723 28,522 457,217 Bermuda 5,277 58,197 Bahamas 353 8,274 Jamaica 2,890 42,172 Turk Is 60 3,126 Haiti 1,588 20,568 Dom Rep 3,782 61,336 9,430 160,282 B Virgn 20 3,700 20 3,700 Antigua 336 2,771 Barbado 160 2,598 Trinid 1,104 11,180 5,251 59,377 N Antil 281 3,502 1,064 21,014 Aruba 2,225 32,369 Colomb 24,843 180,087 Venez 4,493 75,134 Ecuador 1,220 24,107 4,317 82,334

Peru Chile Brazil Paragua Uruguay Argent Sweden Norway Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium Luxmbrg France Fr Germ Czech Switzld Estonia Latvia Lithuan Poland Russia Kazakhs Spain Portugl Italy Greece Romania Turkey Cyprus Lebanon Iraq Israel Kuwait S Arab Qatar Arab Em Oman Bahrain Afghan India Pakistn Thailnd Vietnam Malaysa Singapr Indnsia Brunei Phil R China

PAGE 43

3,900 8,252

58,159 140,835

24 920

2,702 3,109

393

6,375

6,887

205,431

322 2,109 197 7,574 3,499 3,032

5,219 35,826 3,196 48,190 21,075 49,177

790

7,635

136

3,480

3,985

46,671

60

2,919

5,542

36,740

164 591 316

7,855 9,591 5,123

684

11,100

159 1,131 644

2,576 24,678 10,440

8,656

66,750

12,552 26,086 27,762 1,079 4,087 2,610 470 1,547 11,460 2,438 55,146 3,984 42,655 11,635 996 31,432 26,646 11,929 8,147 48 500 26 483 13,346 357 2,986 263 16,641 389 449 855 1,932 3,468 740 2,061 7,086 33,264 6,143 13,416 2,350 164 7,254 4,414 27,897 2,214 903 4,058 6,595 1,640 170 4,018 68,930

111,028 199,236 412,110 17,500 26,968 71,982 7,628 25,092 184,614 85,230 896,021 70,857 348,574 128,037 44,654 200,166 411,598 193,190 76,842 5,046 3,575 6,671 27,624 202,979 5,793 40,707 4,271 226,013 15,630 7,278 13,860 11,183 15,591 12,005 47,633 91,898 282,590 102,065 149,488 19,708 7,855 117,673 39,039 180,479 47,654 14,644 47,373 123,072 21,962 2,763 23,699 707,275

Brush Manufacturers

STAPLE SET MANUFACTURER CUSTOM SHAPES: Wheel–Cylinder–Strip–Disc ALL MEDIUMS: Wood–Plastic–Metal–Leather Short Run and Private Label SEND US YOUR SPECIALS

YOUNG & SWARTZ, INC. CHERRY & SPRUCE STS.

BUFFALO, N.Y. 14204

PHONE 852-2171 AREA CODE 716 FAX (716) 852-5652


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PAGE 44 Mongola Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal N Caldn Tonga Algeria Libya Egypt Eq Guin Nigeria Gabon Burkina Angola Ethiop Kenya Reunion Rep Saf TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

2,010 1,346 790 5,386 10,144 3,325

38,619 24,323 22,118 85,148 165,294 53,926

373 170

6,056 9,258

582

2,606

75

5,146

40

2,732

50

2,836

331,227

4,266,392

163 31,505 21,944 10,638 52,599 82,074 18,701 235 950 373 170 4,696 1,207 1,624 75 316 40 513 50 194 2,652 3,961,670

2,641 361,455 354,647 183,913 505,989 992,278 145,787 3,816 7,831 6,056 9,258 76,165 8,775 26,102 5,146 3,956 2,732 8,315 2,836 3,150 46,856 41,881,263

Country Thailnd China TOTAL

0502100000 Pigs’, Hogs’ or Boars’ Bristles and Hair and Waste Thereof October Year To Date Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 403 101,564 654,498 355,407 101,564 654,498 355,810

Value 23,564 2,680,571 2,704,135

Country U King Fr Germ Thailnd China Japan TOTAL

0502900000 Badger Hair and Other Brushmaking Hair and Waste Thereof October Year To Date Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 7 87 235 30,132 2 30,463

Value 13,776 74,764 38,665 628,733 7,747 763,685

Broom and Brush

IMPORTS October Imports By Country 0511993300 Horsehair and Horsehair Waste, Whether or Not Put Up As A Layer With or Without Supporting Material October Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value Paragua 14,490 172,816 Argent 24 9,395 Nethlds 4,758 45,492 China 17,135 149,012 242,871 2,277,153 TOTAL 17,135 149,012 262,143 2,504,856 1404903000 Istle Used Primarily In Brooms or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles October Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value Mexico 23,378 121,946 333,937 1,666,844 TOTAL 23,378 121,946 333,937 1,666,844 4417002000 Broom and Mop Handles, 1.9 CM or More In Diameter and 97 CM or More In Length, Of Wood October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 26,748 40,369 Mexico 49,000 9,859 371,100 80,519 Hondura 467,890 233,883 4,772,814 2,278,222

Panama Colomb Brazil Argent Sri Lka Indnsia China Taiwan TOTAL

January/February 2011

901,406

917,437

112,718 421,399 2,200 1,954,613

85,778 155,762 2,147 1,404,866

2,232 66,684 8,237,462 75,400 43,274 1,616,380 2,612,008 10,862 17,834,964

3,487 38,784 7,825,726 43,565 41,039 1,256,316 1,508,532 10,155 13,126,714

4417004000 Paint Brush and Paint Roller Handles, Of Wood October Year To Date Country Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable Value Nethlds 251,878 Fr Germ 4,755 17,846 Czech 38,696 105,271 Poland 83,790 219,757 Italy 1,027,761 6,083,800 Thailnd 31,130 Indnsia 15,763 1,062,437 China 161,391 1,886,986 Taiwan 18,850 127,900 TOTAL 1,351,006 9,787,005

Country Canada Brazil Sri Lka Vietnam China TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Brazil Nethlds Spain India Vietnam Indnsia China Taiwan TOTAL

4417006000 Brush Backs, Of Wood October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 340,176 128,204 2,680,099 34,850 36,743 1,087,591 65,600 80,395 524,452 13,350 192,798 63,854 2,153,963 633,424 309,196 6,459,455 4417008010 Tool Handles of Wood October Year To Date Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable 2,290 12,055 135,752

52,892 13,012 216,001

Value 998,165 1,081,358 544,356 13,428 533,910 3,171,217

Value 48,153 123,441 2,105,336 11,543 29,594 20,396 2,730 16,369 646,532 163,602 3,167,696

4417008090 Tools, Tool Bodies, Broom or Brush Bodies, Shoe Lasts and Trees, of Wood October Year To Date Country Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable Value Canada 144,492 998,300 Mexico 7,596 50,012 Hondura 12,751 Chile 543,938 5,294,295 Brazil 26,150 Sweden 4,115 U King 4,630 39,405 France 17,510 Fr Germ 2,466 24,967 Switzld 8,447 Russia 7,214 Spain 29,636 Italy 5,066 20,740 India 133,325 1,270,742 Sri Lka 176,721 1,079,691 Vietnam 137,210 Indnsia 203,712 China 127,346 2,195,888 Taiwan 5,285 55,856


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Page 45

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 107,466 1,258,331

3,830,275 15,306,916

7326908576 Metal Handles For Brooms, Mops, Paint Applicators October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 15,000 8,464 23,099 46,742 Mexico 13,056 7,524 175,681 65,558 Brazil 33,600 17,826 209,762 143,850 Denmark 525 6,411 4,337 54,110 U King 3,950 5,284 3,952 9,433 Spain 652,056 316,726 4,025,352 1,785,103 Italy 1,267,752 687,543 16,040,323 7,252,837 Israel 3,600 4,006 India 108 4,204 Thailnd 1,200 4,387 Malaysa 2,056 3,741 2,056 3,741 China 1,115,940 847,407 11,306,310 7,069,877 Hg Kong 2,248 4,833 Taiwan 11,960 11,880 TOTAL 3,103,935 1,900,926 31,809,988 16,460,561 9603100500 Wiskbrooms, of Broom Corn, LT=.96 EA. Prior to Entry or Withdrawal for Consumption of 61,655 Dozen In Calendar Year October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 26,556 23,899 China 10,800 7,608 TOTAL 37,356 31,507 9603104000 Other Brooms, of Broomcorn, LT=.96 EA, Prior to Entry or Withdrawal For Consumption of GT=121,478 Dozen in Calendar Year October Year To Date Mexico 6,288 5,345 TOTAL 6,288 5,345 9603105000 Other Brooms, of Broomcorn, LT=.96 EA, at Entry or Withdrawal For Consumption of GT=121,478 Dozen in Calendar Year October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value MMexico 19,092 15,524 111,744 92,050 TOTAL 19,092 15,524 111,744 92,050

Hg Kong Taiwan Japan TOTAL

PAGE 45 13,464

14,630

259,845

393,746

13,464 1,740 3,600 2,357,540

14,630 2,210 2,801 3,500,504

9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 39,470 16,653 263,620 152,075 Mexico 980,133 183,260 9,774,054 1,754,252 Guatmal 226,560 39,601 Colomb 2,930 10,218 2,930 10,218 Brazil 28,800 9,501 6,237,832 1,694,656 Sweden 241,450 206,717 Finland 40,000 179,918 U King 131,760 37,922 141,408 46,018 Ireland 125,784 101,645 3,524,760 1,648,366 Nethlds 29,559 9,271 194,885 43,043 Belgium 101,376 55,688 France 900 9,531 Fr Germ 2,119,115 1,691,313 18,802,081 14,364,471 Hungary 153,504 215,601 Switzld 7,670,411 3,410,780 86,397,162 26,302,110 Italy 84,894 57,201 1,607,194 661,289 Turkey 11,979 171,849 Israel 1,207,296 161,949 India 2,640,230 454,755 29,187,472 5,578,995 Bngldsh 98,496 7,007 193,536 14,435 Thailnd 39,160 7,884 6,335,184 766,676 Vietnam 4,759,920 234,907 30,519,925 2,400,348 Malaysa 351,200 21,929 19,271,858 731,445 Indnsia 1,279,905 178,520 China 55,938,881 11,402,523 543,229,331 103,769,790 Kor Rep 39,440 19,319 1,938,522 381,140 Hg Kong 20,232 15,580 566,872 119,658 Taiwan 117,408 54,232 1,201,618 529,705 Japan 16,660 152,574 3,151,506 707,687 Austral 266,349 29,690 TOTAL 75,234,483 17,898,474 766,071,069 162,925,441 9603294010 Hairbrushes, Valued Not Over .40 Each October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value 11,000 4,341 150,768 62,143 21,120 5,615 7,714,049 1,876,952 41,856,793 11,406,006 307,860 51,185 30,024 13,564 7,714,049 1,876,952 42,377,565 11,542,854

9603106000 Other Brooms, Of Broomcorn, Valued Over .96 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 719,468 1,748,663 7,459,563 18,368,300 Hondura 13,688 27,204 282,752 575,713 TOTAL 733,156 1,775,867 7,742,315 18,944,013

Country Fr Germ Thailnd Vietnam China Hg Kong Taiwan TOTAL

9603109000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles, NESOI October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 7,633 32,132 Mexico 110,419 148,462 Brazil 79,645 43,505 Denmark 408 3,372 408 3,372 U King 1,800 12,310 Fr Germ 20 2,561 Estonia 3,800 28,218 Italy 2,156 6,623 Turkey 2,000 5,220 Israel 120 3,434 India 5,268 5,077 Sri Lka 183,146 277,536 1,599,254 2,395,491 Thailnd 9,162 26,276 63,876 158,038 Vietnam 10,800 16,535 230,350 211,458 Phil R 6,000 12,945 25,046 38,918 China 36,865 42,452 206,335 379,731 Kor Rep 606 6,313

9603294090 Shaving Brushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person, Valued Not Over .40 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 3,628,275 269,387 30,952,235 2,152,844 Belgium 256,040 49,227 326,040 68,688 France 48,165 5,953 Fr Germ 1,067,640 231,227 14,150,546 2,871,201 Switzld 13,200 3,560 38,547 12,101 Italy 156,000 13,144 399,628 75,130 India 978,473 69,820 Vietnam 8,784 3,740 14,832 6,325 Macao 100,000 22,835 China 2,858,610 636,401 41,311,512 6,453,033 Kor Rep 1,205,000 48,098 5,293,816 170,282 Hg Kong 51,350 11,552 197,490 32,129 Taiwan 109,340 27,880 1,122,020 266,877 Japan 40,384 13,738 TOTAL 9,354,239 1,294,216 94,973,688 12,220,956


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9603302000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Not Over .05 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 335,500 12,595 Mexico 2,838,000 36,457 10,680,000 224,655 Fr Germ 1,392,000 60,996 19,400,960 611,928 Italy 4,015,500 54,757 44,893,550 489,922 India 1,909,920 36,540 China 13,570,866 441,682 156,527,663 3,501,684 Kor Rep 3,060,000 70,312 20,863,900 584,791 Hg Kong 251,952 5,146 2,984,376 62,539 Taiwan 2,400,000 45,981 5,367,848 133,724 Japan 1,154,755 47,037 TOTAL 27,528,318 715,331 264,118,472 5,705,415

Canada Mexico Brazil Sweden U King Nethlds Fr Germ Austria Greece Singapr China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan TOTAL

9603304000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application of Cosmetics, Valued Over .05 But not Over .10 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 5,939,069 470,197 67,041,339 5,208,783 Brazil 288,000 20,899 U King 28,800 2,289 Fr Germ 1,015,160 73,035 16,396,684 1,247,549 Italy 460,800 31,250 India 42,480 3,570 78,768 6,347 Thailnd 98,888 9,836 Indnsia 239,808 26,070 China 16,216,463 1,199,701 134,592,834 10,292,803 Kor Rep 659,200 49,513 4,948,200 347,915 Hg Kong 30,000 2,965 300,102 24,409 Taiwan 749,632 49,087 6,221,984 423,613 Japan 199,190 13,535 TOTAL 24,652,004 1,848,068 230,895,397 17,655,298

9603404020 Paint Pads (Other Than Of Subheading 9603.30) October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value U King 104,048 38,729 Pakistn 84,400 8,000 China 568,132 537,833 8,877,189 6,459,251 Hg Kong 18,000 6,305 TOTAL 568,132 537,833 9,083,637 6,512,285

9603306000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Over .10 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 3,185 53,578 5,604 193,463 Mexico 9,637,920 1,531,329 115,697,950 18,402,646 Dom Rep 188,150 143,077 1,916,881 1,764,027 Argent 5,085 40,847 U King 517,347 439,615 2,292,936 3,088,625 Ireland 112 11,245 Belgium 972 34,029 France 61,192 221,207 822,947 2,678,844 Fr Germ 423,958 171,612 11,328,700 3,230,749 Austria 25,200 8,077 Czech 26,784 47,051 Switzld 177 5,412 4,303 87,394 Poland 4,824 10,240 7,044 14,300 Spain 14,943 166,460 105,550 866,718 Italy 625,668 388,186 Israel 2,341 6,986 India 734,749 274,790 6,681,839 2,612,505 Sri Lka 165,792 87,313 1,522,500 838,192 Thailnd 449,831 276,964 3,016,179 2,036,813 Vietnam 10,000 4,001 China 27,574,031 15,615,290 181,865,906 116,808,270 Kor Rep 313,859 255,941 3,450,846 2,650,069 Hg Kong 351,714 211,750 5,030,342 2,589,186 Taiwan 818,501 157,376 2,186,974 653,850 Japan 232,688 920,971 2,813,076 10,531,011 Austral 711 5,877 Mauritn 31,851 105,952 Maurit 22,844 45,823 TOTAL 41,492,861 20,542,925 339,501,145 169,744,736

Country

9603402000 Paint Rollers October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No.

Value

1,040,598 2,400 100 3

330,990 5,315 4,045 3,350

41,460 480

19,712 5,485

3,744,119

1,608,889

1,250 4,830,410

5,357 1,983,143

18,732 11,060,059 5,376 1,600 11,123 1,120 2,466,773 1,430 29,880 10,200 38,750,123 12,468 441,524 1,250 52,811,658

35,801 4,899,540 7,896 16,175 23,618 9,762 512,328 9,504 117,536 4,244 16,368,975 10,057 214,559 5,357 22,235,352

9603404040 Natural Bristle Brushes, Other Than Brushes Of Subheading 9603.30 October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 7,614 9,387 136,778 168,497 Mexico 11,576 13,160 Sweden 56,881 15,844 U King 26,940 13,550 Nethlds 252 2,104 France 63,552 18,150 Fr Germ 4,197 19,746 16,329 64,657 Italy 56 3,845 26,256 142,173 Turkey 50,976 173,927 Israel 21,450 19,606 Sri Lka 6,756 6,763 Thailnd 87,288 47,855 464,586 251,143 Vietnam 1,492,782 173,563 Indnsia 4,988,092 818,674 53,187,405 8,424,679 China 319,736 95,960 1,428,605 472,363 Hg Kong 353,376 48,649 Taiwan 167,040 49,268 666,406 248,416 Japan 1,660 15,949 7,498 71,418 Austral 984 2,851 Tokelau 7,308 40,015 TOTAL 5,575,683 1,060,684 58,026,696 10,371,528 9603404060 Paint, Distemper, Varnish/Similr Brushes Exc Brushes of Subheading 9603.30 NESOI October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 3,514 14,701 47,943 82,286 Mexico 20,674 17,177 Brazil 26,040 53,264 107,544 82,880 Sweden 25,000 11,068 100,250 47,359 U King 141,458 153,951 Nethlds 1,596 5,469 France 1,306 16,605 Fr Germ 5,543 28,208 151,932 274,943 Switzld 6 2,791 Spain 3,344 9,543 Italy 1,852 5,559 62,441 176,075 Turkey 15,392 56,362 34,292 107,828 Israel 913 2,826 India 405,240 66,993 Pakistn 9,480 9,480 Sri Lka 15,096 25,361 15,096 25,361 Thailnd 112,728 45,253


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January/February 2011 Vietnam Singapr Indnsia China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral Tokelau TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 6,650 6,400 29,518,928 179,248,228 175,060 10,800 1,861,336 926,970 1,095 2,052 212,973,762

15,306 4,262 4,717,081 50,778,845 30,751 12,882 629,930 368,689 7,750 8,658 57,700,974

Country Mexico Belgium Fr Germ Switzld Spain India Vietnam China Hg Kong Taiwan TOTAL

9603908010 Wiskbrooms October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 3,456 240 63 4,722 1,728 3,059 1,728 51,858 3,000 35,424 47,241 343,467 1,000 3,216 37,152 50,300 412,750

Value 5,943 8,495 4,759 4,571 3,059 48,381 2,896 436,392 12,008 2,595 529,099

Country Mexico Guatmal Colomb Brazil Argent Denmark Fr Germ Spain Italy India Sri Lka Vietnam Malaysa Phil R China Hg Kong Taiwan Egypt TOTAL

9603908020 Upright Brooms October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 48,064 60,365 440,795 99,288 4,920 4,728 24,000 12,891 99,493 71,992 5,408 10,123 43,088 408 715 30,186 44,088 69,830 506,137 25,104 6,155 19,400 1,500 1,500 751,288 1,022,784 7,769,210 12,096 12,456 7,668 6,261 28,008 874,327 1,273,584 9,092,038

Value 487,373 115,050 22,880 327,339 76,194 5,493 2,352 70,551 729,932 20,659 18,501 20,252 3,145 4,408 9,574,599 16,303 52,155 23,019 11,570,205

2,025,860 11,901,294

391,951 3,967,155

127,578 55,647

114,076 22,410

14,202,816

4,690,115

9603908030 Push Brooms, 41 CM or Less in Width October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 1,920 7,781 U King 2 4,598 Sri Lka 1,440 5,995 China 33,148 51,050 175,466 327,032 Taiwan 3,468 17,619 TOTAL 33,148 51,050 182,296 363,025

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Salvadr Panama Colomb Brazil U King Czech

9603908040 Other Brooms, NESOI October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 206,184 453,093 1,208,785 212,970 353,385 3,925,398 19,440 21,412 60,720 19,944 25,423 203,724 11,700 33,576 27,852 335,134 12,207 39,908 88,680 1,005 89,808 81,379 500,560

Value 2,717,998 6,296,170 62,328 189,054 20,281 426,041 389,591 12,392 478,993

PAGE 47

Switzld 3,576 4,682 Russia 4,000 2,553 Spain 1,296 3,603 207,246 304,773 Italy 118,661 206,287 1,176,328 1,810,047 Israel 900 4,434 India 14,750 11,493 48,900 39,647 Sri Lka 94,956 215,694 574,431 1,442,855 Thailnd 2,500 3,036 42,850 64,093 Vietnam 9,200 9,297 46,150 64,002 Phil R 1,500 3,495 China 456,965 962,324 5,377,291 7,697,264 Kor Rep 600 2,148 Hg Kong 44,880 27,376 Taiwan 5,631 29,659 Austral 550 116,600 TOTAL 1,292,457 2,414,186 13,870,539 22,206,476 ` 9603908050 Brooms, Brushes, Sqeegees, Etc., NESOI October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,999,335 21,976,456 Mexico 2,916,433 28,968,468 Salvadr 42,842 219,177 Hondura 1,350,627 13,322,726 Dom Rep 2,966 296,859 Colomb 69,070 922,407 Chile 3,378 6,177 Brazil 21,161 278,205 Argent 69,248 Sweden 12,215 106,383 Norway 10,125 Finland 56,263 Denmark 309,072 1,844,380 U King 131,479 774,224 Ireland 10,998 Nethlds 269,333 2,114,565 Belgium 126,484 1,159,884 France 14,322 103,887 Fr Germ 183,245 2,136,738 Austria 2,301 16,121 Czech 20,941 582,403 Hungary 3,462 Switzld 8,458 249,227 Estonia 14,021 Latvia 3,935 Lithuan 20,461 198,793 Poland 5,331 104,241 Spain 5,294 876,709 Italy 349,252 4,502,508 Turkey 2,448 54,574 Israel 197,957 Jordan 4,414 India 93,716 736,013 Pakistn 207,391 3,476,761 Bngldsh 30,108 Sri Lka 243,939 2,877,794 Thailnd 385,386 4,183,395 Vietnam 24,347 527,752 Malaysa 19,323 180,987 Singapr 5,609 Indnsia 100,907 406,177 Phil R 2,504 37,552 Macao 3,602 China 23,998,925 290,678,008 Kor Rep 180,365 2,048,033 Hg Kong 942,666 6,547,648 Taiwan 1,020,013 10,178,111 Japan 82,027 736,593 Austral 310,685 1,304,574 Egypt 8,486 137,543 Maurit 7,779 TOTAL 35,487,128 405,289,574


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INDUSTRY NEWS 2011 January/February

Zahoransky Introduces Its Latest Development For The Fully Automated And Hygienic Production Of Anchorless Toothbrushes The Zahoransky Integrated Anchorless Production (Model Z.IAP) system allows for the design and production of highly complex toothbrush head geometries, bundle shapes and bundle positions. Furthermore, the fully automated “hands free” process provides hygienic production; and the brushes are fully recyclable given that metal anchors are no longer used to secure filament tufts. How The Z.IAP System Works Complete filament hanks are loaded into the rotary filament rounding machine which includes a series of grinding and polishing stations. Once sufficiently end rounded, pucks are cut from the hanks and transferred to the tufting unit’s material stock box. Up to four different filament colors and/or types can be processed and fed by this unit. Using Zahoransky’s filament picking technology, filament tufts or bundles are sectioned off from the material stock box in specified sizes and then punched into a predefined tuft-hole platens with the help of tuft plungers. Z.IAP technology is the first to allow for the production of complex tuft-hole shapes and geometries, according to Zahoransky. Tuft-holes are then profiled, pushed into a mold insert plate and non-contact welded (or fused) at the back-side of the mold insert plate. Once the filaments have been rounded, organized into tufts of var-

Shown are the injection molding machine and Z.IAP system for non-contact production of toothbrushes. Head platelets are created from mold inserts in the injection molding machine.

ious shapes and colors and inserted into the mold insert plates, they are now ready to move to the over-molding process. In order to provide the most reliable and efficient production system, it’s necesAnchorless toothbrush is shown sary to first over mold small with encapsulated head platelets. head platelets onto the welded or fused bristle ends. This first step can be accomplished with reliability and precision given that it requires only small amounts of plastic injection volume. Now that the brush head sub-assemblies have been produced they are automatically (or manually) transferred to the second injection molding module, where they are over-molded into two or three component handles, as required. The Z.IAP endrounding, tufting and profiling units — as well as both injection molding machines — are linked via a power and free mold insert plate carrier system. A vision system monitors the inser-

tion of mold insert plates as well as the removal of finished toothbrushes once the process is completed. The Z.IAP system can then be linked to Zahoransky’s blister pack machines via automated handling systems, providing fully integrated toothbrush production and packaging. Benefits of the new Zahoransky IAP system include: ■ Fully automatic “hands free” and hygienic production; ■ Metal free toothbrushes that provide easy recycling and are allergy free; ■ Complex tuft-hole geometries and profiles; ■ Slim head geometries; ■ Direct encapsulation or over-molding of brush-head platelets, providing completely sealed and hygienic assembly; ■ No brush-head miss-assemblies; ■ Optimum end-rounding through eight grinding/polishing stations; ■ Wide variety of filament types that can be processed; ■ Large magazine for up to four colors of filament material; and, ■ Non-contact tuft welding process, preventing risk of contamination with harmful emissions.

Gordon Brush Executive Vice President Bill Loitz Retires Gordon Brush, of Commerce, CA, has announced that Executive Vice President Bill Loitz is retiring after more than 37 years. Loitz, whose father bought the company from the founder, will pursue other interests and hobbies. During his tenure, Loitz designed and built machines and technology systems that helped Gordon Brush become a leading industrial manufacturer of specialty and standard brushes. Loitz will remain with the company for several years to aid in the transition with his replacement. Bill Loitz Loitz sold his interests to Ken Rakusin, president and CEO of the company since 1990, making Rakusin the sole owner of Gordon Brush Mfg. Co., Inc. The two veterans of the brush industry have worked closely, side-byside for the past 21 years. According to Rakusin, "When Loitz joined the company it was a small 'mom and pop' operation in a 5,000-squarefoot building with 5 employees." "I feel very proud of the legacy,” Loitz said. “Our growth has been amazKen Rakusin ing. Ken and I have built this into a leading enterprise consisting of 100,000 square feet and almost 100 employees." Gordon Brush is a manufacturer of specialty, custom and standard brushes. The company stocks over 2,000 different brushes for same day shipment. Visit www.gordonbrush.com for more information.


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U.S. Imports 154 Short Tons Of Broom Corn In November By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor The U.S. Department of Commerce reported that 154 short tons of broom corn were imported into the United States in November 2010. Total value of this import was $450,643, with a cost per ton of $2,926 ($1.46 per pound). All imported broom corn for November came from Mexico. November’s import figure of 154 short tons was the highest monthly total thus far in 2010. The next closest month was July, when 134 short tons were imported. The United States received 993 short tons of imported broom corn during the first 11 months of 2010. Total value of this broom corn was $2,693,061, with a cost per ton of $2,712 ($1.36 per pound). All but 10 short tons of this imported broom corn arrived from Mexico, with the remaining coming from Indonesia in June.

Mexico will be on the light side. “I don’t expect (Mexican broom corn) crops to be as large (in hectares) this year. Prices for other crops that can be grown have gone up so dramatically that this could very well decrease the planting of broom corn,” he said. Pelton also does not expect too much broom corn to be available from the Apatzingan region of Mexico in late February and March. “I do know some people who normally plant down there, or send money for contracting, who are not doing so this year. I would expect to see very little come out of Apatzingan,” he said. When asked about yucca fiber, Pelton said on February 1 that prices had become firm by a couple of cents per pound. There was also less yucca fiber processed. “I think, to some extent, we are now paying a little bit more for yucca fiber due to earlier demands that were made for better quality fiber,” Pelton said. Regarding overall business as of the first part of February, Pelton said that compared to 2009 and the early part of 2010, it’s much improved. Additional growth, however, would be welcomed.

Bart Pelton, of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX, noted that November’s import mark of 154 short tons was higher than the norm for 2010. He added, Richard Caddy, of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, however, that sales were brisk during NC, said November’s reported 154 short ton mark was a bit highthe month. er than he had expected. Caddy noted some of this broom corn “Prices were more reasonable for may have actually been imported in October and then reported for (Mexican) broom corn during this periNovember. od compared to what had been previ“On the other hand, 154 short tons could still be correct for ously experienced. I think this might November,” Caddy said. have helped with (broom corn) sales,” He added November’s $1.46 per pound figure did seem more Pelton said. accurate compared to previous months. This was especially so when He added that November’s total factoring in imported broom corn insides, hurl and raw material. value for Mexican imported broom Bart Pelton Regarding current broom corn activity in Mexico, Caddy said on corn was higher than expected, but felt the reported $1.46 per pound figure was more believable compared February 2 that security issues remain a problem, particularly in the northern part of the country. However, U.S. broom corn buyers still to several previous months. When interviewed on February 1, Pelton said broom corn activity enjoy good access to inventory. “We can get what we need with fairly quick turnaround possible,” in Mexico was quiet and that prices have become firm. This can be attributed, in part, to Broom Corn Imports the strengthening of the Mexican peso 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total Cost against the U.S. dollar. Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Value Per Ton “(Broom Corn) proJanuary 125 61 116 89 14 48 $165,991 $3,458 ($1.73) cessors are not willing February 44 215 90 91 21 84 $202,685 $2,413 ($1.21) to discount on pricMarch 77 65 83 41 50 90 $237,691 $2,641 ($1.32) ing,” Pelton said. April 120 56 48 150 11 54 $200,869 $3,720 ($1.86) “There is still plenty May 36 135 172 98 24 77 $231,863 $3,011 ($1.51) of processed broom June 65 81 63 65 20 108 $245,846 $2,276 ($1.14) corn available for July 124 160 80 66 23 134 $336,860 $2,514 ($1.26) prompt delivery as well as a fair amount August 177 216 80 76 42 68 $166,766 $2,452 ($1.23) of raw corn inventory. September 124 152 131 133 22 53 $116,151 $2,192 ($1.10) The market is well October 133 184 92 123 28 123 $337,696 $2,746 ($1.37) supplied right now.” November 200 96 160 29 53 154 $450,643 $2,926 ($1.46) Pelton is concerned December 164 76 101 17 16 that broom corn plant1,389 1,497 1,216 978 324 993 $2,693,061 $2,712 ($1.36) ing this spring in


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he said. “Apatzingan broom corn may become available in the next couple of weeks to a month. It’s hard to say right now whether the quality of this broom corn will be good enough to bring into the United States.” Caddy also said it’s too early to predict how much broom corn will be planted in the Torreon region of Mexico this spring. “We can specuRichard Caddy late, but a lot depends on what kind of prices the farmers down there think they can get for growing broom corn,” he said. As of the beginning of February, Mexican broom corn pricing had remained stable, Caddy added, with no quality issues to report. When asked about recent yucca fiber activity, he said quality is also not a factor, while lead times are at the two- to threeweek level. “(Yucca fiber) pricing did increase a couple of months ago, but it hasn’t moved up much since,” he said.

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The Thomas Monahan Co. Announces Formation Of Monahan Partners, Inc. The Thomas Monahan Co., longtime supplier to the broom, brush and mop industries, announces a spin-off of its mop and broom supply division. The new company, Monahan Partners, Inc., is led by Pat Monahan, assisted by Debbie Dunagan, Wayne Smith and Ron Cooper. The new division will continue the traditions of The Thomas Monahan Co. and concentrate even more on customer service and innovation. Pat Monahan, president, said, “We are all excited to have the opportunity to be a better partner to all our customers and our loyal vendors. We would like to hear from our customers as to any area where they need a product, a particular price point, or assistance of any kind. We want to be like a division of our customers’ companies. This will be as seamless a transition as

possible. People, place, products, prices and performance will be unchanged as will phone numbers and e-mails. It has been a blessing to work with brothers Tim and Jim Monahan, and this cooperation will certainly always continue.” Tim Monahan, president of The Thomas Monahan Co., added, “Pat has built the mop division from scratch and deserves the opportunity to follow his destiny. The Thomas Monahan Co. will focus on serving the natural fiber and synthetic filament needs of the brush industry through Brush Fibers, Inc. and Monahan Filaments. “We have capable and eager Monahans in the next generation to assure a bright future for both Monahan Partners and The Thomas Monahan Co.,” Tim Monahan said.

Wooster Brush Celebrates 160 Years

Throughout all of 2011, The Wooster Brush Company will be celebrating its milestone anniversary of 160 years. The company has been making products for professional and DIY painters throughout its history in Wooster, OH. The invention of the angle sash brush, the first use of synTim Monahan, of The Thomas thetic brush filament, and even Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, was unavail- the production of synthetic paint able for comment for this month’s broom roller covers — now accepted as industry standards — all happened first in corn dealer survey. Wooster, according to the company. The current average duration of service for Send News Of Wooster employees is 17 years. Also, instead Your Company To of moving operations overseas, Wooster rankinmag@consolidated.net Brush has kept producing tools in the USA —

allowing the company to maintain high quality standards and hands-on customer service. According to company officials, this dedication is why a small brushmaking operation, opened in 1851, has grown into The Wooster Brush Company of today. Now one of the largest privately owned paint applicator manufacturers in the United States, the company’s operation encompasses over 888,000 square feet of manufacturing, shipping, administrative and warehousing facilities. Every day 520 Wooster employees go to work, producing more than 2,300 products that are sold around the world.

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS ABMA .......................................................................................26 Amerwood .................................................................................24 Borghi USA ...............................................................................52 Boucherie USA............................................................................2 Briarwood Products Company ...................................................10 Caddy & Co., Inc., R.E..............................................................38 Crystal Lake...............................................................................31 Culivover & Shapiro, Inc...........................................................42 Deco Products Co. .....................................................................27 Distribuidora Perfect, S.A..........................................................21 DuPont .......................................................................................13 Gordon Brush Mfg. Co. Inc.......................................................29 Hahl Filaments...........................................................................51 Jewel Wire Co............................................................................20 Jones Companies .........................................................................1 Keystone Plastics .......................................................................12 Lemieux Spinning Mill Inc..........................................................3

Line Manufacturing, Inc. ...........................................................39 Manufacturers Resource ..............................................................9 Mill-Rose Company...................................................................25 Monahan Filaments ...................................................................14 MonahanPartners .......................................................................19 Paul Marsh Co. ..........................................................................33 PelRay International ....................................................................7 PMM..........................................................................................16 Royal Paint Roller .....................................................................37 Shanghai Aubi Metals Co. .........................................................15 St. Nick Brush Co......................................................................43 Vonco Products, Inc. ..................................................................23 WorldWide Integrated Resources...............................................11 Young & Swartz ........................................................................43 Zahoransky ..................................................................................5 Zelazoski Wood Products ..........................................................18


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Technical Support & Training

Spare Parts Warehouse

Machinery Showroom

Machine Shop Services

A World Leader in Broom and Brush Manufacturing Equipment! Borghi USA, Inc. / 903 Cirelli Court / Aberdeen, MD 21001 / USA Telephone: (410) 272-9797 / Fax: (410) 272-0799 / info@borghiusa.com / www.borghiusa.com

Broom, Brush & Mop Jan/Feb 2011  

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine's January/February 2011 issue. The trade magazine for the broom, brush and mop industry.

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