Bay State Banner 3-31-2016

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inside this week

Recovery begins at Madison Park Voc Tech School pg 2

A&E

business news

ACTOR ELIMU NELSON TALKS ABOUT HIS NEW FILMS ‘BLEED’ AND ‘IN EXTREMIS’ pg 13

Black engineers draw major recruiters at Hub conference pg 10

plus Terence Blanchard teaching at Berklee pg 13 Poet’s Theatre honors Dario Fo pg 14 Thursday, March 31, 2016 • FREE • GREATER BOSTON’S URBAN NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1965 • CELEBRATING 50 YEARS

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Council extends urban renewal BRA agrees to give Council advance notice of land takings By YAWU MILLER

The City Council voted 10-3 last week to extend the Boston Redevelopment Authority’s 14 urban renewal areas for the next six years, following a year-long public comment period that included contentious meetings with BRA officials and community activists. While several councilors had sought a more limited two-year extension for the urban renewal designations, BRA officials agreed to report more regularly to the council and to inform councilors of modifications to its urban renewal plans within 30 days. In the end, Councilors Ayanna Pressley, Tito Jackson and Josh Zakim voted against the extension. “This has been a tough decision for me,” said City Council President Michelle Wu, who initially opposed the extension of the urban renewal designation. “And this has been an evolution in terms of my own thinking.” The BRA’s urban renewal districts, most of which were established in the 1960s and 1970s, were originally established in blighted areas of the city to help encourage redevelopment. In the 1960s, the term urban renewal became synonymous with forced displacement of mostly black residents of low-income, inner city neighborhoods. Some blacks in Boston sardonically referred to

AT A GLANCE BRA’s 14 urban renewal areas: n 1. Brunswick-King (Dorchester) n 2. Campus High (Roxbury) n 3. Central Business District Boylston-Essex n 4. Central Business District School-Franklin n 5. Central Business District South Station n 6. Charlestown n 7. Downtown Waterfrond-Faneuil Hall n 8. Fenway n 9. Government Center n 10. Kittredge Square (Highland Park) n 11. Park Plaza n 12. South Cove (Chinatown) n 13. South End n 14. Washington Park (Roxbury) the program as “Negro removal.” Last year, as BRA officials met with community groups, many neighborhood activists questioned why the BRA is seeking to maintain blighted status in parts of Boston where blight is a distant memory. BRA officials argued that the designation helps them with assembling parcels of land for development, clearing land titles for sale and other steps necessary for advancing large development projects. District 7 City Councilor Tito Jackson is unconvinced. “The city of Boston is on fire with real estate development,” he said. “Less than ten percent of the city is under urban renewal. Not having urban renewal hasn’t kept the other 90 percent of the city from developing.”

See URBAN RENEWAL, page 19

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School Committee Vice-Chair Hardin Coleman (left) and Chair Michael O’Neill look on as Superintendent Tommy Chang gave his report at the committee’s budget vote meeting.

School Committee approves BPS budget Committee, public criticize both funding proposals By JULE PATTISON-GORDON

The Boston School Committee voted last week to approve the mayor’s latest budget proposal, even as many committee members expressed disappointment with the options before them. The vote followed a charged public testimony session, in which many speakers broke down in tears while a few others railed at the committee and administration of Mayor Martin Walsh. During testimony, students,

parents, teachers and activists voiced objections to any budget resulting in shortfalls. Many said the latest — March — budget proposal risks harming students with special needs. Still the budget passed, 5-2, with committee members Regina Robinson and Miren Uriarte dissenting. School Committee Chair Michael O’Neill said the committee’s options were limited: Voting no, or not voting, would mean the February budget — which cut millions from high schools and sparked a more than

3,000-student walkout — passes on to the City Council. “I fundamentally believe this budget is better,” O’Neill said, adding that this latest version restores more funding. The budget received a boost between the March 16 and March 23 committee meetings: more than $197,000 was added to the Opportunity and Achievement Gap Office. Student representative Savina Tapia, who does not have voting powers, called the March budget

See BUDGET VOTE, page 18

Rox. real estate market waking up Values, location draw buyers from elsewhere By YAWU MILLER

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This single family home at 34 Lambert Street is on the market for $750,000.

Within 45 minutes, 16 individuals and couples had filtered through 39 Copeland Street and real estate broker Delince Louis had five offers well over the $299,900 asking price for the three-bedroom, 1,200 square foot first floor condominium on Copeland Street. If Louis’ open house was any indication, Roxbury’s real estate market may be off to a strong start. While Roxbury sales prices are substantially lower than in many

neighboring communities of Jamaica Plain, South Boston and the South End, pressure from those markets may continue to push prices up. “Lots of folks who are coming through are residents of Jamaica Plain and the South End,” Louis said of the mostly-white prospective buyers. “What people see here is value. You have nice architecture. Great buildings. You have close proximity to public transit. Close proximity to downtown.” Louis is bullish on Roxbury’s real estate market. A three-bedroom Dorr Street condo his firm

sold last year for $550,000 is now back on the market for $618,000. One single family at 10 Elmore Street sold recently for $550,000 in cash to a Chinese graduate student. Another single family at 45 Elmore Street sold for $590,000.

Still a bargain

Those prices are still far below the $799,000-$879,000 asking prices for condos on Wyman Street in neighboring Jamaica Plain. As good a value as Roxbury real estate is, many potential sellers are holding on to their inventory, awaiting the day when their

See ROXBURY, page 18


2 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

Recovery begins at Madison Park Voc Tech By JULE PATTISON-GORDON

Hopes are high for Boston’s long-struggling voc tech high school, Madison Park Technical Vocational High School. Kevin McCaskill, who took the helm as executive director of Madison Park in April 2015, says the school is on track to turnaround. Madison Park has a troubled history: Former Mayor Thomas Menino called for its overhaul in 2012. The school was declared underperforming in both 2014 and 2015. School Superintendent Tommy Chang selected Madison Park as the launch site for high school redesigns in his 100-Day Plan. In December 2015, the state gave Madison Park a Level 4 designation, based on its record of poor MCAS scores, low graduation rates and high dropout rates. It has three years to improve. Should it fallfurther, to Level 5, the state will take it over. McCaskill says that will not happen. “This school is going to be successful,” McCaskill said. “No doubt in our minds about that.” This February, the school’s 13member stakeholder group — which includes teacher, parent, student, administrator and city and state school department representation — submitted to Superintendent Chang a set of recommendations on the turnaround plan. While a blueprint is pending, Madison Park administrators have initiated some remedial action. Bob Marshall, a Friends of Madison Park member who taught at the school for 28 years, said that the work is off to a promising start, but large change will take several years. “It’s a large shift to turn a ship around,” Marshall said. “They’ve started off on good footing.”

Sense of purpose

School year 2014-2015 began chaotically: Students were without schedules and room assignments for weeks, teachers were still being hired and the principal resigned in early September when it came to light that she was not certified in Massachusetts. After four days without classes, students walked out in protest. McCaskill outlined several changes that focus on providing students with a sense of consistency and direction, and faith in leadership. Fixes include using common lesson plans, protocols and structures across the

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Chef/educator Tonia Larkins instructs students Jose Teixeira and Tania Martins in Madison Park Vocational Technical High School’s kitchen. academic and vocational programs. Other efforts under exploration: Show students how the different areas of their curriculum work toward a coherent and purposeful outcome. This includes figuring out how to integrate core academics with vocational subjects: For instance, the role of chemistry in the cosmetology, culinary arts and dental programs. Administrators also are seeking to create more dual-enrollment programs with higher education institutions, which allow students to earn college credit while in high school, McCaskill said.

Here to stay

Another step: Reduce turnover. The senior class has experienced at least four different headmasters already, McCaskill said. Now, he says the students are starting to believe that the latest administrators are here to stay. “They’re beginning to see that this isn’t just temporary,” McCaskill said. “There’s a commitment here that this is not

a one-year deal and folks are out the door. We’re going to lay down roots and move this school forward.” As part of the turnaround, teachers are required to reapply for their jobs. In their February 2016 letter, school stakeholders advocated for a turnaround model that would allow the school to retain as many of the effective current staff as possible — as opposed to following a model that requires that a specific percent of staff be new — to offset reduce instability. The letter called for more staff professional development. Madison Park administrators will begin hiring in a few weeks and have received several inquiries so far, McCaskill said.

Pride and climate

McCaskill says he wants students to feel connected to and welcomed at Madison Park. Simple steps include reminding teachers to greet students entering the school or their classrooms and physically brightening up the building with

college banners and murals that depict post-high school life paths. Several murals were begun last fall. McCaskill said there is a clear change among the students since the time he visited last May and today. “They’re different. They feel comfortable in school,” he said. Another step: meeting student academic needs that extend past the school day. Headmaster Shawn Shackelford, who also is new, implemented after-school and Saturday tutorial programs this year.

Enrollment and funding

Administrators are reaching out to counselors and administrators at middle and K-8 schools to spread the word about what Madison Park offers and encourage more rising high school students to come. Boosting enrollment will be important, in part, for securing funding, because the school department provides per-student funding. The school has been under-enrolled for the past several years, according to McCaskill. Getting to capacity would allow it

to offer more programs, he said. Madison Park has been long underfunded, according to Marshall. Other vocational schools in the state have budgets that are greater by tens of thousands of dollars, and while those schools may have shop classes run by four teachers, Madison Park has similar classes with only one teacher and one paraprofessional, he said. Madison Park’s study body currently comprises many students who may need more resources: according to state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education figures, in School Year 2015-2016, more than 32 percent of students are English language learners, more than 37 percent have disabilities, nearly 58 percent are economically disadvantaged and approximately 85 percent are high needs. “Madison’s got a lot of potential. As long as they give them the resources that they need,” Marshall said. “If they don’t give Madison the resources it deserves, then the school is going to fail.”


Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 3

Case asks if mandatory minimums have exceptions, constitutionality By JULE PATTISON-GORDON

A new court case could decide if judges may consider context when deciding punishment for offenses with mandatory minimum sentences. Next Tuesday, the commonwealth appeals a 2015 ruling, in which a judge reduced a drug possession with intent to distribute sentence to below the level prescribed by mandatory minimum sentencing laws. Based on the low-level of the offense and the severe health problems of the convict, Superior Court Judge Shannon Frison passed a sentence that was lower by a year — a move the commonwealth challenges as unlawful. According to American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, however, a 1996 piece of legislation provides legal basis for the reduction. Appellee attorneys — advocating for the reduced sentence to be upheld — charge that without such “safety valves” to allow for exceptions, mandatory minimum sentencing drug laws are unconstitutional. The case, Commonwealth v. Laltaprasad, will be heard by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. ACLU attorneys Adriana Lafaille and Matthew Segal, as well as Keith Nicholson and retired federal judge Nancy Gertner, will represent Laltaprasad. Thomas Clifton Maxim of the Middlesex county district attorney’s office will represent the commonwealth. The case brings to surface questions about how “mandatory” mandatory minimums really are, how much judicial discretion judges should have and the impact of such laws on public safety and justice.

Considering context

In Commonwealth v. Laltaprasad, the commonwealth contests an earlier ruling. In July 2015, Imran Laltaprasad, 31, was convicted on charges of possession with intent to distribute

BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

heroin and cocaine. He was arrested in Somerville in 2013, and, according to the state’s mandatory minimum sentencing laws, a judge would be required to sentence him to at least three and a half years in state prison. However, when Judge Frison issued Laltaprasad’s sentence, she said she took into account several details: the quantity of drugs was small — “[it] would amount to less than a fivegram packet of sugar,” according to Adriana Lafaille an attorney on the case — and Laltaprasad has a severe medical condition. When officers apprehended Laltaprasad at the scene, he had a prosthetic leg and a colostomy bag. These were visible evidence of the life-threatening injuries and years of surgery he endured after being a shooting victim in 2010. Laltaprasad also asked the court to consider that his assailants — who shot him at least seven times at close range, according to a court briefing — only received sentences of two years. Judge Frison sentenced him two and a half years. He is currently serving time.

Safety valve dispute

Lafaille said that, in 1996, the state legislature codified a “safety valve” measure allowing justices to consider the context and specific details of a crime and, in appropriate situations, depart from mandatory minimum sentence requirement. She was not aware of a time before Laltaprasad’s case when the safety valve had been invoked but said that does not prevent it being used now. “Whether it’s been used or not in the past 20 years, it is a part of our law that has a plain meaning, and that meaning is that judges can depart [from mandatory minimum sentences],” she said. “It is a law that’s on the books and there’s no reason that it shouldn’t apply to this case.” The commonwealth, however, argues that mandatory minimums are just that: mandatory. In all cases. Meaning, Laltaprasad’s sentence reduction was not lawful.

PUBLIC MEETING

RSMPOC PUBLIC MEETING MONDAY, APRIL 4 6:00 PM - 7:45 PM

65 WARREN STREET Dudley Branch Library Auditorium Roxbury MA 02119

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Roxbury Strategic Master Plan Oversight Committee (RSMPOC) public meeting with status update on PLAN: Dudley Square-Roxbury and projects under the Roxbury Strategic Master Plan. RSMPOC public meetings are held every first Monday, each month, at the Dudley Branch Library, at 65 Warren Street for updates and community input. PLAN: Dudley Square-Roxbury workshops will be held every third Monday, each month, at the Bruce Bolling Municipal Building, at 2300 Washington Street in Roxbury to update current visions and plans for Dudley Square and Roxbury. Please join your neighbors and the City of Boston at the workshops to help make the neighborhood a better place to live, work, and raise a family. All meetings are open to the public.

mail to:

phone: email:

HUGUES MONESTIME

Boston Redevelopment Authority One City Hall Square, 9th Floor Boston, MA 02201 617.918.4320 hugues.monestime.bra@cityofboston.gov

BostonRedevelopmentAuthority.org Teresa Polhemus, Executive Director/Secretary

@BostonRedevelop

“Courts are bound by mandatory minimums,” states the commonwealth’s court briefing. “Separation of powers principles precludes a sentencing judge from disregarding the legislature’s directive [the mandatory minimum sentence].” According to the commonwealth’s court briefing, the safety valve is part of a set of sentencing guidelines that were never enacted into law, meaning they cannot be used. According to Laltaprasad’s attorneys’ briefing, the safety valve is just one part of a law that also proposed sentencing guidelines, and that the safety valve’s validity is not dependent on the enactment of the guidelines. The commonwealth’s attorney cites a 1995 case ruling, Commonwealth v. Russo, while Laltaprasad’s attorneys argue in their briefing that the cases are significantly different. A representative of the Middlesex DA’s office said it could not comment on the case because it currently is being appealed.

Disproportionate impact

Beyond seeking to defend the view that the safety valve is a valid option, defense attorneys and supporters argue without such a provision, mandatory minimums are unconstitutional. “Time has proven that mandatory minimum drug laws create serious constitutional problems,” said Benjamin Keehn, CPCS appellate co-counsel, in a press release. “They strip judges of the ability to fairly consider mitigating circumstances unique to the offender, resulting in

some sentences that are ‘cruel or unusual.’ And they are enforced at an intolerably disproportionate rate against people of color, like Mr. Laltaprasad, in violation of equal protection principles.” While people of color comprise 20 percent of Massachusetts’s population and approximately 22 percent of those convicted on drug offenses, they make up about 75 percent of those given mandatory minimum sentences, according to the ACLU of MA. “Without enforcement of the safety valve[,] mandatory minimum sentencing in Massachusetts has proved to be racially discriminatory, disproportionate, and therefore unconstitutional,” states an ACLU of MA press release.

Need for mandatory minimums?

Opponents of mandatory minimum sentences argue that they cause minor offenders to be locked up, resulting in overcrowded prisons and hefty incarceration costs — keeping a person in state prison costs approximately $47,000 a year according to the nonprofit Families Against Mandatory Minimums — while failing to reduce recidivism or crime rates. “There is no evidence that such severe and inflexible sentences have made any measurable impact on crime rates, public safety, recidivism or rehabilitation and reentry of prisoners,” states the amicus curiae brief filed by the Constitution Project, the Drug Policy Alliance and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Supporters of the law include Suffolk County District Attorney Dan Conley, who said at a June hearing on mandatory minimums

that he credits them with reducing crime rates. Conley wrote in a March 2015 Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly op-ed that prosecutors are better equipped than judges to discern whether there are mitigating circumstances that mean imprisonment is not warranted. “Since mandatory minimum laws were first adopted in the early ’90s, police and prosecutors have staked out this same ground, steering lowlevel, non-violent offenders away from jail and leveraging tougher sentences against the most dangerous offenders,” he wrote. Instead of sending a defendant to trial, the prosecutor can in some cases opt for what is known as “pretrial diversion.” Under this, they require the defendant to meet certain conditions — for instance, counseling, probation or community service — and upon its completion, charges are dismissed. Conley said that most of the drug offenders incarcerated in his district are violent and have long records.

Legislative action

Last year, state legislators introduced two bills that would eliminate mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent drug charges: the Justice Reinvestment Act, filed by Rep. Mary Keefe and Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz, and An Act Eliminating Mandatory Minimum Sentences Related to Drug Offenses, filed by Rep. Ben Swan and Sen. Cynthia Creem. Hearings on the two bills were held in June and September 2015; they currently are with the Committee on the Judiciary. An extension was granted allowing them to remain in committee until June 2016, pending a review of Massachusetts’ criminal justice system.

MAKING OUR COMMUNITY BETTER Carney Hospital Job Fair Date: Wednesday, April 6, 2016 Where: Carney Hospital Cafeteria (basement level of main building) 2100 Dorchester Avenue Dorchester, MA 02124 From: 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. We invite you to come for on-site interviews. THE HOSPITAL IS RECRUITING FOR A VARIETY OF POSITIONS, INCLUDING: Staff RN (ED, ICU, OR and Psych), CT Scan/X-Ray Techs, Medical Assistant, Nursing Assistant, Maintenance Mechanics, Mental Health Counselor positions and more.

Check out all available positions at www.steward.org/careers


4 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

EDITORIAL

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INSIDE: BUSINESS, 10 • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT, 13 • COMMUNITY CALENDAR, 16 • CLASSIFIEDS, 19

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Republicans wage class warfare This year, many working class whites are rejecting conservative candidates in support of Donald Trump. Four years ago, during the last presidential campaign in 2012, Mitt Romney angered many Americans by writing off almost half of the electorate. He commented to a group of affluent contributors at a fundraiser in Florida: There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president [Barack Obama] no matter what. All right, there are 47 percent who are with him, who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you-name-it. That that’s an entitlement. The media treated this comment as though it was a derogatory remark about African Americans. However, Romney meant much more than that. He anticipated an overwhelming black vote for Obama, but he was aware that blacks constituted only 13 percent of the electorate. That is far short of 47 percent. With 72 percent of the voters, whites

were by far the largest voting bloc. Romney was more than capable of doing the math. He knew that he would encounter the opposition of a great outpouring of black, Hispanic and Asian voters on Election Day, as well as a substantial number of destitute whites who had been unable to prosper even with the benefit of the competitive advantage afforded to whites. Romney’s remarks, which were secretly recorded, reeked with disdain for all those he perceived to be losers. Now many of those marginal whites have done something even more defiant. Under the cover of Republican loyalty, they have emerged in support of Trump. However, this political deviancy is about to topple the oligarch’s hold on the controls of the Republican Party. Now the paternalistic attitude of affluent whites toward their beleaguered brothers is in jeopardy. Even the National Review, the venerable publication of political conservatives, has published an article chastising the white working class dysfunction. The criticisms are similar to the attacks on blacks over the years. One wonders whether working class whites have been paying attention this time to the rejection of support from their brothers. They seem to have ignored Romney’s rejection four years ago.

Something’s not right in Roxbury. We’ve got Imagine Boston 2030, the Plan: Dudley Square process and the Plan: JP/Rox. Process – all led by the Boston Redevelopment Authority and moving full-speed ahead, but we’ve got nothing com-

INDEX BUSINESS NEWS ………………………………...................... 10 BOSTON SCENES …………………..................................... 12 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT …………………...................... 13 COMMUNITY CALENDAR …………………........................ 16 CLASSIFIEDS ……………………………………....................... 19

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dents. Truth be told, many of the people who are in those meetings – black and white – are not from Roxbury. It’s long overdue Roxbury residents got down to planning for the future of their own neighborhood. — R. Thomas Roxbury

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Rachel Reardon Karen Miller Martin Desmarais Jule Pattison-Gordon Sandra Larson Kenneth J. Cooper Caitlin Yoshiko Kandil Anthony W. Neal Brian Wright O’Connor Marcy Murninghan

Health Editor Staff Writers

D.C. Court of Appeals, fit the bill perfectly. Rather than declare victory for having forced Obama to choose a moderate for the court, Republican senators continued their rant about letting the people choose after the November election. There is no such constitutionally sanctioned process. Furthermore, inquiry into Garland’s writings and decisions indicates that he actually supports judicial restraint, a quality much admired by most conservatives. So now Republicans have placed themselves in the awkward position of disrespecting a Supreme Court nominee whose judicial views they support, and they do so despite strong popular preference for the “Advice and Consent” process to proceed. Republicans have snatched defeat from the jaws of political victory and handed Obama another political coup.

ing from local Roxbury residents. There’s an oft-repeated saying: “If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu.” Those meetings are not organized by Roxbury residents, they aren’t led by Roxbury residents and the impetus for them to happen did not come from Roxbury resi-

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Obama upstages Republicans with court choice Article II of the Constitution empowers the president to nominate candidates for the Supreme Court, and it further empowers the president, with the “Advice and Consent of the Senate,” to appoint such nominees to the court. The language is unambiguous. Nonetheless, the loss of their reliable conservative on the court with the sudden death of Antonin Scalia induced Republican senators to assert that they would not consider a replacement until after the November election. President Obama had every intention of responsibly fulfilling his constitutional responsibilities, but he understood that the situation was politically sensitive. He did not want to offend progressive Democrats in an election year with a candidate who was too conservative. Yet he also wanted a choice that Republicans could reasonably support. Merrick Garland, a centrist judge of the

“Now that we’re all out of work, maybe we’d be better off joining forces.”

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Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 5

OPINION THE BANNER WELCOMES YOUR OPINION: EMAIL OP-ED SUBMISSIONS TO YAWU@BANNERPUB.COM • Letters must be signed. Names may be withheld upon request.

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Vote: for democracy’s sake

What do you think the Democratic and Republican parties could do to make their agendas more relevant to the American people?

By LEE A. DANIELS This year’s presidential election has cast the importance of voting and of American citizens’ right to vote in the sharpest relief. One reason is our contemporary drama: Donald Trump’s success in wrecking much of the “old” Republican Party; the popularity among GOP voters of the “platform” of bigotry both Trump and Ted Cruz are running on; the continuing efforts of GOP-controlled state legislatures to block black and Hispanic voters from voting; and the Republican effort to prevent President Obama’s nominee to the Supreme Court from even being considered by the Senate. All these are rooted in conservatives’ “long-game” strategy to preserve white conservative control of But the state governments and the Congress Selma Movement, by denying as many Americans of building on decades color as possible their right to vote. But a second reason is because of struggle across March, the month just ended, has the South, birthed a an extraordinary history in the post-World War II freedom strugdramatic expansion of gle. That history underscores the democracy that is still point that not since the struggle for black Americans’ voting rights producing progress — in the South — which reached its and provoking fierce dramatic climax fifty-one years ago resistance — today.” in Selma, Alabama — has the fundamental question Americans have always grappled with been so clear and so stark: Is America to be a democracy or not? Before 1965, it was a democracy for whites only. But the Selma Movement, building on decades of struggle across the South, birthed a dramatic expansion of democracy that is still producing progress — and provoking fierce resistance — today. On March 15, 1965, eight days after the infamous Bloody Sunday assault of civil rights marchers at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, President Lyndon Baines Johnson stood before Congress to announce the legislation that became the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965. LBJ opened his great speech, “The American Promise,” with these resounding words: “I speak tonight for the dignity of man and the destiny of democracy.” He was doing so, he proclaimed midway through the speech, “... because it is not just Negroes, but really it is all of us, who must overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injustice.” And then, for emphasis, he repeated words that were the signature declaration of the Civil Rights Movement: “And we shall overcome.” A decade earlier no one would likely have imagined an American president speaking those words. Instead, civil rights forces had to brace for the fundamental message of the Southern Manifesto of 1956. That document, signed by nearly all the Southern Senators and Representatives in Congress and made public on March 12, 1956, was the white South’s answer to Brown, the 1954 Supreme Court decision outlawing racial segregation in public schools: that white Southerners’ “massive resistance” to equal rights for blacks should include violence. (Among those who didn’t sign the statement was Lyndon Baines Johnson, then the Senate Majority Leader.) It was white Southerners’ allegiance to the Southern Manifesto that made the Voting Rights Act of 1965 necessary that year — and ever since. The law’s protections enabled black voters to marshal their voting power and play smart politics in the only party open to them, the Democratic Party. That four decade effort reached a pinnacle with President Obama’s 2012 re-election. That dynamic exercise in democracy led the following year to the Supreme Court’s then-majority conservative bloc gutting the VRA’s most important protection, the so-called pre-clearance clause. That violation of democracy, in turn, inspired a substantial increase in the efforts of Republican-dominated state legislatures to enact voter identification laws and other measures to limit the number of Democratic-leaning voters able to exercise their right to vote. That reality has intensified campaigns by a constellation of Hispanic American, Asian Americans and Muslim American groups, respectively, to increase their representation on the nation’s voting lists. Those campaigns, along with similar efforts to get more blacks registered and confident of their ability to overcome states’ voter identification laws, are the bedrock of this year’s voting-rights movement. They underscore what is righteous Americans’ most important responsibility in 2016: to vote Democratic — for democracy’s sake.

Lee A. Daniels is writing a book on the Obama years and the 2016 election. He can be reached at leedanielsjournalist@gmail.com.

There are so many different ideas they could implement. I’d like to see more funding for education.

They could support gay marriage and better health care.

Job retraining for people in transition. We need to put people back to work.

William White

Jasmine

Disabled Veteran South Boston

Customer Service Rep. Dorchester

Shedrick Gavin

Definitely higher wages, education and more funding for affordable housing.

Post-treatment services after detox. There aren’t enough beds. People need support. Without it, they’ll just go back to the corner and start using again.

For me the number one issue is the housing problem. There are too many people on the streets, especially homeless veterans.

Peter

AnnMarie

ciple officer of Amtrak Sports and Affinity Marketing. “Krystal Banfield has been a pioneer in creating pathways towards college and success for thousands youth throughout Boston and across the United States. Throughout her career, she has been dedicated to music education, community music awareness, and accelerated learning models for urban youth.” Banfield sets the academic standards for the college’s celebrated Berklee City Music program, which serves thousands of youth across the U.S. and Canada. Throughout her career, she has been dedicated to music education, community music awareness and accelerated learning models for urban youth, developing curricula such as BandQuest (distributed by Hal Leonard) and the Composers Suitcase (supported by the California Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts). She has written for Cambridge Press and the Teaching Artist Journal; is recorded

on INNOVA; has held posts at national CBOs VocalEssence and the American Composers Forum; and served as adjunct voice professor and music education lecturer at University of St. Thomas and on school and community boards. Banfield holds a bachelor’s degree in music education from Howard University, Washington, D.C.; a master of music from Indiana University-Bloomington; and a doctorate in education from University of St. Thomas-Minneapolis.

Danika

Health Care South End

Certified Nursing Assistant Roxbury

Consultant Roxbury

Unemployed Roxbury

IN THE NEWS

KRYSTAL BANFIELD Krystal Banfield, dean of Berklee City Music, received the 2016 Amtrak Pioneer Award, created in celebration of Black History Month to honor African American leaders who have made impactful contributions to the city of Boston and the greater community. Also receiving awards were Adrian Mims, founder of The Calculus Project, and Robert Lewis, Jr., founder and president of The BASE. This year, for the first time, the Boston Celtics joined Amtrak in presenting the awards to the three distinguished community leaders during the February 29 match with the Utah Jazz. Banfield, Mims and Lewis, Jr. were recognized for their hard work and dedication, the positivity they bring to their organizations and communities, and for being pioneers in creating pathways towards success for Boston youth. “Whether through music, sports, or academics, each recipient has influenced countless lives of adolescents,” said Crystal Hudson, prin-


6 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

Q&A

Symone Sanders and a Presidential Campaign By CAROLE BERNARD

At first glance, the 25-year-old Symone Sanders seems to have little in common with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, more than 50 years her elder. But when the presidential candidate tapped the budding communications professional to serve as national spokeswoman for his campaign, she jumped at the chance. Raised in Omaha, Nebraska, Sanders has worked as a community organizer and communications manager for the Empowerment Network, a nonprofit that advocates for better policies for North Omaha, a predominantly African American part of the city. She has been involved in the BlackLivesMatter movement and is the immediate past chair of the National Coalition for Juvenile Justice National Youth Committee, and a former member of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice. In both positions, she worked to ensure the voices of system-involved young people were an integral part of criminal and juvenile justice policy conversations. She held listening sessions with judges, community leaders, and lawyers about the state of the juvenile justice system, particularly for young people of color in this country, and she drafted recommendations for change. These experiences have prepared her, she says, to work on the national level for Senator Bernie Sanders. Connections, according to Sanders, is one of the key ingredients to being

effective in grassroots advocacy, as well as in the national arena. Sanders says Senator Bernie Sanders’ messages resonate with hard working American people, whether they are Black, White, Latino, Asian American or Native American. “It is about doing the work of meeting people where they are in their communities – whether we are in the beauty shops, the barber shops, or the bible studies, or out there in the neighborhoods, or holding town halls or small group sessions,” says Sanders. ”Connecting with people really makes the difference.” The following excerpts are from an interview the Banner conducted with Sanders:

You could have taken that your advocacy work to any presidential candidate. Why Senator Sanders? Symone Sanders: I really love the things that Senator Sanders is talking about and the issues he is advocating for — economic inequality, hardworking American people, standing up against disastrous trade deals, criminal justice reform — those are the issues that were personally important to me. I like that Senator Sanders stands up to the private prison industry and stands up for criminal justice reform while not taking money from the private prisons. I believe his discussions about the disastrous trade deals that have decimated communities of color across the country in cities like Baltimore, [ones in] Michigan, Boston

PHOTO COURTESY SYMONE SANDERS

Symone Sanders and Wilmington, Delaware, are important. His willingness to take on the billionaire class and Wall Street is critical. When Wall Street brought America to the brink of its collapse in 2007 and 2008, it was black and brown Americans that really lost the most. When the housing market crashed, lots of wealth was lost for lots of black and Latino families, and that gap still has not been closed. I believe now, and I believed then that Senator Sanders is not only talking the talk, but also walking the walk on these issues.

Have you faced any challenges being the National Press Secretary? SS: I have never been a National Press Secretary before, but Bernie Sanders makes it easy. (Laughing) Senator Sanders is an authentic candidate that unabashedly speaks

out on behalf of the overlooked and underserved in this country. It is challenging, however, to have a substantive candidate when sometimes all that people care about are catchy and flashy headlines. Last year, the campaign issued a release on the “Bernie Blackout,” citing how the media spends hundreds of minutes on Donald Trump. In 2015, some media outlets only spent 10 minutes covering Senator Sanders. We’ve been fortunate that our campaign is people powered. The American people have really gotten behind Bernie Sanders and have gotten our message out there.

Some African Americans feel the campaign is focusing too much on criminal justice reform. How does the campaign expand and broaden its issues to really hit home with African Americans? SS: When we say criminal justice reform, it is the entire spectrum of the criminal justice system – whether we’re talking police brutality, police community relations, or the mass incarcerations of African Americans. I think that is an issue we definitely need to talk about. But I also think the Senator has unabashedly talked about the wage gap in America and how it especially affects the black and brown people in this country. The African American community has not yet actually recovered from the imminent Wall Street crash for a number of reasons. We talk about trade. Trade is an issue that disproportionately has affected black and brown communities in America. Many hard working American jobs that families could earn great livings off of, or people could send their kids to colleges off of, are no longer here because trade deals have snatched these jobs out of communities like Baltimore, like Detroit, like Boston, parts of Illinois, out of places in North Carolina and shipped them overseas. And there has been nothing to replace those jobs.

What does the campaign do to strengthen its message in the black community? SS: I think there is a misconception when we talk about presidential politics, specifically in the Democratic Party — the South equals all black people. As a black person from Nebraska, that is absolutely not true. The black community is not monolithic. There are black people all over America, and we have to actively work for every single one of those

votes in various capacities.” I believe the Senator’s campaign policy issues on income inequality, education, and criminal justice are important to people of color in this country. Under Senator Sanders’ college affordability plan, he believes someone who wants a quality education should receive it regardless of zip code or what their economic status is. As the price of college rises and the wage gap widens, many lower income and middle class families are working 40-60 hours a week and faced with the challenge of putting food on the table. Many of those families are black and brown. There have been too many instances in America over the last year, particularly for black men and women, where they have been gunned down in the streets, have lost their live at the hands of police officers, have lost their lives in police custody, according to Sanders. Kudos to the Senator; he has not been shy about shining a light on these issues before they were popular. We’re not just saying Black Lives Matter, and that’s it. We’re saying Black Lives Matter, so we need to invest in education. We’re saying Black Lives Matter, so we have to end the disgrace of racism in the incarceration of African Americans. Black Lives Matter, which is why we need to invest in jobs and education for our kids, not jails and incarceration. And that is why he’s put forward a plan to create 1 million jobs, specifically aimed for black and brown young people in this country. When we talk about going into communities and speaking with people, those are some of the issue we need to talk about and really break it down for folks. Senator Sanders has met with residents affected by the water crisis in Flint, Michigan before it was popular and before they brought in the cameras. In Chicago, he has met with community organizers, young people who have been on the front lines of recent protests, and with community leaders who have been doing the work for years. The Sanders campaign hosted a roundtable to bridge the gap between the two and to discuss the issues facing the people of Chicago and the greater state of Illinois. Dr. Jane Sanders, the Senator’s wife and an educator, held an education panel to discuss the importance of investing in education, especially in communities that serve predominantly children of color. They also discussed the need for suburban schools and inner city schools to have similar resources to ensure quality education. He has spoken out about HBCUs and has reached out HBCU presidents.

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Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 7

How urban renewal shaped Boston Look at the past as city plans for future State Rep. Byron Rushing gives talk on suburbanization, the BRA, gentrification By JULE PATTISON-GORDON

Community members gathered at the First Church Roxbury last week to hear State Rep. Byron Rushing speak as part of a series on structural racism in Boston. His talk, “Urban renewal then, gentrification now,” traced the history of Boston’s urban renewal and how profiteering, topdown policy decisions and prejudice contributed to shaping the city’s neighborhoods. Today, the shape of Boston’s growth again is focus. The Walsh administration is developing a citywide plan for 2030 and examining how to house Boston’s growing population. Meanwhile, a 2014 Brookings report declared Boston the most unequal large city in America. Chief Resilience Officer Atyia Martin said at the event that, based on five months of community engagement, her department has selected tackling racial inequities and “promoting social cohesion” in the city as the guiding theme for its work. The underlying theme of gentrification, Rushing said, is mobility inequality — that is, inequality in people’s abilities to determine where they live, with the haves making choices and the have-nots subject to decisions imposed on them. “What we call gentrification is in many ways the movement of people in a city,” he said. “What makes some people find it objectionable is that the movement of those people doesn’t seem equal.”

Birth of suburbia

After World War II, people flooded into the cities, and as veterans returned, housing was in scarce supply, Rushing said. The federal government provided veterans with subsidies to help them buy housing — an opportunity developers quickly jumped on. Developable land was expensive in the tightly-packed cities and rehabilitating the cities’ old buildings to provide housing was a costly endeavor. So developers sought the greatest return on investment: persuading veterans

to buy newly-built houses in areas that formerly was farmland. “[The veterans] could buy that housing any place,” Rushing said, “but, of course, developers realize the best way and most profitable way to sell them housing is to sell new housing. And so that’s the beginning of suburbanization in this country.”

Emergence of urban renewal

The suburbs were largely an escape for those with means, whether from government aid or wealth. Racial discrimination was a significant factor as well: With no civil rights laws yet restraining them, many banks and authorities refused to offer housing subsidies or mortgages in the suburbs to people of color. Cities were growing crowded, with Boston’s population soaring from 770,000 people in 1940 to a record-breaking 800,000 people in 1950, Rushing said. In the midst of this, Rushing said, municipal governments sought to make cities seem more livable and enticing. Many central cities had crumbling infrastructure and housing and limited space for development. The proposed solution: redevelop cities. The tool for that: urban renewal. In 1949, the federal government launched an urban renewal program, providing funding for city governments to acquire land for redevelopment and revitalization. Boston officials used the power of eminent domain to purchase areas they deemed deteriorated. Rushing said that residents in these neighborhoods were largely poor renters and saw little benefit from the process; developers who owned the homes made money selling them to the city, while renters were evicted with no guarantee of regaining a place to live.

West End and the BRA

Boston’s first urban renewal target was a series of South End blocks known as “The New York

Streets,” which were demolished. The land was redeveloped as headquarters for the Herald-Traveler newspaper and a few other commercial buildings. With this project under their belts, city officials turned to a larger prospect: the West End. As was the case in many cities, local officials sought to win community support for redevelopment. Rushing said that working class residents of the West End were encouraged to view their neighborhood as a slum, and that this message was promoted via comic books distributed to public school children, among other methods. These efforts achieved mixed success, and the city proceeded to demolish most of the West End and in their place construct a highway, housing, commercial and government buildings. Widespread outcry over the massive destruction forced the city to take a new approach. The Boston Redevelopment Authority was organized and given control of urban renewal; the city recruited as director Ed Logue, who had gained a reputation in New Haven for choosing rehabilitation over demolition.

Black Boston

Meanwhile, racial division was stark in the ‘60s and ‘70s, with most of Boston’s approximately 63,000 black residents packed into the South End and Roxbury, creating overcrowding. Banks largely refused to offer blacks mortgages in other areas, making it difficult to move out. The city’s housing planning ignored housing problems in Roxbury, and many in the black community did not feel they had leaders who could advocate on it, Rushing said. Then, in the ‘60s, fears of unrest spurred city officials to address problems of density and segregation. Long-simmering anger over Roxbury’s living conditions erupted in 1967. The catalyst: Boston police responded to a group of mothers’ fiveday sit-in protest over welfare benefits by dragging the women out of the Grove Hall welfare office building. Black leadership was not consulted or forewarned, and many in the community had regarded the protest as

BANNER PHOTO

State Rep. Rushing spoke at the First Church Roxbury at lecture series sponsored by the UU Urban Ministry and the Roxbury Historical Society. ordinary. The reaction: riots. “It was ‘The Event,’” Rushing said. “The anger flared up. In two hours, buildings and stores were burning on Blue Hill Avenue.” When the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. a year later sparked violent outbursts across the nation, Boston officials feared another riot. Turning with a new sense of urgency to black residents’ complaints, the city administration asked bankers to help black residents expand further into the city. A group of bankers created the Boston Bank Urban Renewal Group, selected areas of Dorchester and Mattapan — primarily home to working class Jews — and offered blacks mortgages there. As Jews sold homes and left, blacks entered.

South End

The story of the South End provides a new chapter on urban renewal, as the racially diverse neighborhood of primarily poor working-class homeowners mobilized. Existing organizations and ones created specifically to deal with the BRA made demands on a project-by-project basis for building rehabilitation — instead of demolition and new construction — and establishment of longterm affordability rent subsidies. Original residents remained in their neighborhood, and as urban renewal created new housing options, middle class white people moved in as well. The influx of residents in part comprised lesbians with the means and gay men seeking the greater anonymity offered by cities and the lessened prejudice that brought with it. Also arriving:

members of the middle class leaving the suburbs for the liveliness of cities. Whites were particularly drawn to the South End over Roxbury, because the South End’s the racial mix meant they would not be in the minority, Rushing said. The new South End comprised working class blacks and a growing Hispanic population in guaranteed-affordable housing, a growing gay community and other middle class whites.

Rise of condos

With people flowing into the South End and housing costs rising, developers introduced in the mid70s the idea of condos, marketing to potential customers the chance to buy part of a building if the whole was outside their reach. “These buildings are getting too expensive to buy. Buy a piece of it,” Rushing said. “The value of buildings literally changes fourfold by just changing the deed to make it a condominium deed.” Condos play a special role in gentrification by allowing a greater influx of upper-class newcomers, shifting demographics of the community, Rushing said. “One rich family doesn’t make gentrification,” Rushing noted. “They could just be the eccentric people who live in the biggest house at the top of the hill. … For those people who think an area’s getting gentrified and want to do something about it, the first thing you do is zone for no condominiums.”

FIND OUT MORE West End Museum has an exhibit on urban renewal: http://thewestendmuseum.org

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Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 9

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TECH TALK Despite the best efforts by security companies, hackers keep finding ways to break into unsuspecting people’s See BIZ BITS, page 11

PHOTOS: MARTIN DESMARAIS

Above, the career fair floor at the National Society of Black Engineers national convention in Boston. Below, audience members react to a company presentation at the career fair.

Competition for black talent Black engineers draw major recruiters at Hub conference By MARTIN DESMARAIS

Gov. Charlie Baker and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey may have gotten all the news headlines surrounding last week’s National Society of Black Engineers national convention in Boston, but their talk about increasing business to minority-owned firms and trying to improve employee diversity was nothing new. The real story for the event’s attendees was the ability to get up close and personal with representatives from the world’s biggest engineering firms — a concrete accomplishment for some of the U.S.’s hottest young engineering talent. Throughout the event, which ran from March 23-27 at the Boston Convention Center, attendees bumped shoulders with companies like Proctor & Gamble, Boeing and Cisco Systems, but it all culminated in Friday’s career fair with more than 200 companies chasing the kind of employees that NSBE boasts as members — engineering students and professionals. “This is the biggest career fair I have ever been to,” said Phillip Braden, a 20-year old junior from the University of Arkansas, who is studying chemical engineering. “All these companies that you have heard of, and even companies you haven’t heard of, that work on products that we know of are here and are looking for more diverse candidates. It has been a

great experience getting to know what companies are looking for out there.”

Valuable experience

Braden was attending his first NSBE convention, though he has attended regional events through his college chapter of the organization. Forty students from his chapter attended with him. He admitted that the end result many of his peers were looking for is a job or an internship, but even if that does not happen he stressed it is very valuable to have companies

look at a resume and give feedback on what they are looking for. He also said he was impressed with the high level of reps from the companies who were on hand, not just entry-level employees, but experienced, high-level employees that gave advice about how to prepare or guide your career to get where they are. “It has been a pretty eye-opening experience and it has been great,” Braden added. “It has been a worthwhile trip for my career. They always talk about engineering and technology as the largest

growing field in America right now and right here you can see that. There are so many companies looking for engineers, not just one type of engineers, all types of engineers as well.” Being a chemical engineering student, Braden was most interested in sector giants like BP, Shell or Chevron, but the career fair floor was packed with booths from companies that are dream jobs for all kinds of aspiring engineers, such as Corning, Johnson &

See NSBE, page 11


Thursday, March 24, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 19 Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 11

BUSINESSNEWS CHECK OUT MORE BUSINESS NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/NEWS/BUSINESS

NSBE

continued from page 10 Johnson, Intel, 3M, IBM, Google, General Motors, Northrop Grumman and Raytheon. Lines to talk to reps were commonly a dozen deep, but often double that. For most, it was a chance too good to pass up. “It is a great opportunity for black students to be heard and be seen in a field that is predominantly Caucasian. I feel like this is a great opportunity to really let our voice be heard to say that we are just as capable no matter if we are minority or not,” said Amber Green, 19, a sophomore from Ohio University studying engineering technology. This was her first NSBE convention, though she is a member, but she said she plans to come back, especially as she gets older and begins the job search in earnest. Seeing the amount of companies made her very excited about her future. “It is very encouraging because these are huge companies you see every single day, you see Ford cars everywhere you go, you see Chrysler, you see P&G. You see commercials of all these things and here they are right here in front of you,” Green added. “The fact that they are here offering people jobs is really surreal, but it is a real blessing.” Linking engineering industry leaders with young talent gets at the driving mission of the

PHOTO: MARTIN DESMARAIS

Attendees meet with company reps at the NSBE career fair. four-decade-old NSBE — provide the inspiration, education and connections needed for its 31,000 members to succeed as engineers and technology professionals. The group has 400 chapters around the world and has held an annual convention for 42 years. This year about 10,000 attended the Boston event, which featured networking, workshops, professional development and keynote speakers, in addition to the career fair.

Career exposure

Nana Asiamah, a 32-year-old petroleum engineering graduate student from the University of Texas, Austin, was attending his second convention in as many

years and is a member of the organization. He has worked as a process engineer for several years before returning to school and said he has used the conventions to help prepare him for entering back into the professional world. “For most of us that are graduated or about to graduate we get a chance to get a feel of how the industry is,” Asiamah said. “Most people get a job coming to NSBE, so it is worth it.” Thony St. Jean Jr., a senior at the New York Institute of Technology, called it “career suicide” to miss the convention. The 31-year-old, who is studying electrical engineering and computer science, was in the military

prior to starting college and said he became involved in NSBE as he started to look toward graduating and finding a job. His experience at the convention is unlike any he had before in this quest. “I was able to, on the spot, get an interview,” Jean said. “You have instant gratification. You can actually talk to companies and you have people here that understand your field. Other fairs have been a whole bunch of HR reps — it wasn’t actual engineers that you get to talk to like here. It made it a lot more streamline to actually get an interview and understand if this will be a good fit for you and the company.” NSBE also works hard to promote a future in engineering and technology through STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education for children and high school students. Weeks

before the Boston convention, national organizers and Boston chapter members were hitting the streets to promote the event and connect with local schools. On Wednesday last week, the convention was free and open to the public with a special innovation fair targeted for younger students called Torch Fest. The fair showcased engineering and technology exhibits and hands-on displays of the types of things that engineers work on and create. NSBE has an ambitious goal, which it calls its 2025 Strategic Plan — a goal of graduating 10,000 black engineers annually in the United States by 2025. If anything, the companies courting the group, on hand throughout the convention and at the career fair, certainly suggest that many in the engineering industry would love to see this goal achieved.

Biz Bits

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According to CareerTrends, the most popular six-figure jobs are: 1. Lawyers 2. Financial managers 3. Sales managers 4. C omputer and information systems managers 5. Physicians and surgeons 6. Pharmacists 7. Chief executives 8. Marketing managers 9. Engineering managers 10. General practitioners — More Content Now

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(former Chapter 13 Bankruptcy trustee) Attorney in Boston area for over 35 years AREAS OF PRACTICE: Bankruptcy, Mortgage Loan Modifications, Financial Issues, Real Estate (buy and/or sell). Offices in Charlestown Navy Yard and Andover, MA call for appointment: (617) 241-7555/978-470-1601 e-mail address: askenaselaw@aol.com website: www.askenaselawoffice.com “Put my experience to work for you”

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OPHTHALMOLOGISTS URBAN EYE MD ASSOCIATES. P.C.

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REALTOR BERNICE OSBORNE, SRES, REALTOR PROFESSIONAL REAL ESTATE SERVICES Residential, Commercial, Land, Estate sales and short sales, 14+ years of experience. Serving Greater Boston and surrounding areas. SRES® Seniors Real Estate Specialist specializes in working with seniors (persons 50+) and their caregivers. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, Direct: (617) 804-5789 Office: (617) 696-4430 Email: Bernice.Osborne@nemoves.com, Web: www.nemoves.com/Bernice.Osborne

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12 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

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Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association - Lifetime Achiever and Trailblazers Gala Over 600 guests attended the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association (“MBLA”) Annual Gala on March 31, 2016 to celebrate the outstanding accomplishments of Wayne A. Budd, Paulette Brown, Stephanie Lovell, and Patricia J. Williams. The event was held at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel and emceed by WCVB-TV CityLine host, Karen Holmes Ward. The distinguished guest list included national, state, and local dignitaries, appointed and elected officials, members of the First Circuit Court of Appeals, the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts state judiciary, the Massachusetts legal community, and many supporters throughout Massachusetts.

PHOTOS COURTESY TONY IRVING PHOTOGRAPHY

Top left: (Left to right) Angela Gomes (MBLA President), Wayne A. Budd (Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient), Stephanie Lovell, Paulette Brown, Patricia J. Williams (Trailblazer Award Recipients); Bottom left: (l-r) MBLA Gala 2016 Bennie Wiley, Courtney Scrubbs (MBLA Treasurer); Middle: (l-r) Vanessa A. O’Connor (Chair, MBLA Student Support Committee), Stephanie Johnson (The Honorable Reginald Lindsay Public Service Award Recipient), Cheryl Lindsay, Angela Gomes (MBLA President); Bottom right: (l-r) Wayne A. Budd (Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient), Angela Gomes (MBLA President), Chief Justice Roderick L. Ireland (Retired) (Distinguished Professor, Northeastern University)

Coming April 14! The Banner’s quarterly health and wellness magazine returns with more content you won’t want to miss: n Focus on high cholesterol: Risk factors and symptoms n Stress and heart disease n Peripheral arterial disease — Common, but often undetected n Preventing high cholesterol — You can eat your way to good health n Healthy steps: A change in dietary guidlines; Exercise — Better than a pill

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Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 13

ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT CHECK OUT MORE ENTERTAINMENT NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/ENTERTAINMENT

Q&A

TERENCE

BLANCHARD Terence Blanchard (center) at Berklee Week 2015.

PHOTO: DAVE GREEN

ON TEACHING THE NEXT GENERATION

OF MUSICIANS By COLETTE GREENSTEIN

I

f you give these kids the tools to handle the stuff where they can look at something else and really appreciate it, but know that what they have is of worth too, then you stand a better chance for them developing and becoming stronger within their own musical personality,” says Terence Blanchard of his students at the Berklee College of Music.

Since the fall of 2015, Blanchard has been a visiting scholar at the nationally renowned college. In a small, jampacked classroom this past February, nearly 17 musicians were in rehearsals for their Jazz Composition class before the Grammy Award-winning musician and Eric Gould, chair of Berklee’s Jazz Composition Department. Blanchard was back on campus during that final week in February visiting classes, holding rehearsals

and giving private lessons. For many of the students who are not composition majors, this course has been about challenging themselves to think and to write as composers, as well as producing new musical ideas within their own performance skills. “It’s an invaluable experience to have 17 musicians in a room reading your music for free,” said Blanchard of the rehearsal process. And for Blanchard, teaching

this course has been an opportunity to pass on his knowledge and experience. Seeing how the “light goes on” and how the students are becoming more comfortable with the sound and music that they create has been eye-opening for the accomplished composer and bandleader. After much listening and observing the students, and giving constructive feedback, Blanchard took a break midway through to speak to the Banner about the progress of the students and what he’s learned from them over the course of the year.

How did the students make the transition from performing to creating compositions? Terence Blanchard: The whole idea is to help them find themselves through composition. The interesting thing about it is that

the more they get into it you can see the more aggressive their ideas are and that’s something to really become freer in their thinking. It’s a transition for all of us.

And so is the goal for this course this year to really get them to start thinking in a different way then they normally do as performers?

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Actor Elimu Nelson talks about his new films ‘Bleed’ and ‘In Extremis’ By COLETTE GREENSTEIN

Hailing from Milton, Mass., actor Elimu Nelson has been steadily making his mark in Hollywood for the past 10 years. He’s had a recurring guest role on the Showtime series “House of Lies,” opposite Golden Globe winner Don Cheadle, and has also appeared on VH1’s “Hit the Floor,” BET’s “The Game” and CBS’ “Criminal Minds.” In 2013, Nelson starred in director Charles Murray’s (FX’s “Sons of Anarchy”) independent feature film “Things Never Said” alongside Shanola Hampton (Showtime’s “Shameless”) and Omari Hardwick (Starz’ “Power”), and last year he appeared on two ABC series: “Modern Family” and “Castle.” This year finds Nelson starring in two films: the horror flick “Bleed,” opposite Chelsey Crisp from ABC’s “Fresh Off the Boat” and the psychological thriller “In Extremis,” directed by Don E. Fauntleroy. The film “Bleed” (released on VOD on March 25) is about a group of friends celebrating Sarah (Chelsey) and Matt’s (Michael Steger) new marriage, new house and baby on the way, only to find the celebration short-lived when a ghost hunt turns deadly as the group explores the remains of a burned-out prison. The movie, which was shot in a former prison in Atlanta, provided just the right amount of unease and spookiness. “The whole vibe was crazy,” says Nelson by phone from California, of shooting in the prison.

See NELSON, page 14

HOW TO WATCH “Bleed” is now available on Video On

Demand through Comcast, The Dish Network and other providers as well as on iTunes.

TB: Definitely. Not only thinking in a different way but having the practical experience of conceiving of an idea, writing it out, and seeing what it actually is versus the initial concept.

Why did you want to teach? TB: You know really what it is, you look around and you go ‘all of the guys who taught me are not around.’ And you sit there and go, ‘Well, that was a great tradition, PHOTO: VARELA MEDIA

See BLANCHARD, page 14

Elimu Nelson


14 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

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Poet’s Theatre production honors Nobel Prize-winning performer By SUSAN SACCOCCIA

Italian man of theater Dario Fo celebrated his 90th birthday on March 24, and in Boston as well as in major cities throughout the world, fans held theater festivals and academic symposia in his honor. When Fo received the 1997 Nobel Prize in Literature, he was cited as an actor “who emulates the jesters of the Middle Ages in scourging authority and upholding the dignity of the downtrodden.” Fo’s plays have been translated into more than 30 languages and millions of people have seen him perform his mime masterpiece, “Mistero Buffo (Comic Mystery),” a collection of satirical pieces based on folk tales, gospel stories and events in the daily news. A resident of Milan, Fo speaks Italian as well as French, but his true native language is the nonverbal expressiveness of his large, nimble body, rubbery face and a voice that can roar, growl, caress or soar like a jazz saxophone. Adapting techniques of traveling street performers (“giullari”) in the rough-and-ready early days of Commedia dell’arte, Fo uses the arsenal of a standup comic to satirize those who abuse power and give voice to society’s most

vulnerable people. Fo employs no props but a microphone and often needs no translator. Performing “Mistero Buffo” at the American Repertory Theater in 1986, during his first visit to North America, he wordlessly portrayed a starving man feasting on a flea.

Tribute performances

Boston’s celebration of Fo’s birthday featured a Poet’s Theatre production of five stories from “Mistero Buffo” at Suffolk University’s Modern Theatre. Acclaimed Boston actors Remo Airaldi, Benjamin Evett, and Debra Wise performed multiple roles in the short plays, loosely based on Gospel stories. Well-staged in the intimate theater, with deft lighting by John Malinowski, the production was directed by Poets’ Theatre president and artistic director Bob Scanlan, who translated Fo’s Italian texts with Walter Valeri, who once served as Fo’s company manager. Barefoot and wearing neutral attire, the trio began the evening with a little dance, like marionettes at the start of a commedia dell’arte routine. But defying the cardinal rule of theater to show rather than tell, the production then shifts to a short lecture by

Evett on the medieval comic tradition that inspired Fo. Next, he performed a long, word-heavy solo piece, “Birth of the Giullare (Jester).” Its best moments were near the end, when Evett’s character, an oppressed peasant, serves a makeshift meal to a hungry visitor who turns out to be Jesus Christ and finds his calling — to defend the poor using his knack for humor. Next, Remo Airnaldi performed “The Wedding at Cana,” Fo’s take on the Gospel story in which Christ turns water into wine at a wedding feast. Airnaldi has a quietness about him that draws an audience in, and he was captivating as a wedding guest who witnesses the miracle, becoming ever more joyful and inebriated as he tells his tale. Debra Wise performed a solo, “The Resurrection of Lazarus,” Fo’s retelling of another miracle, and played Fo’s distraught Mary in the closing piece, “Mary at the Cross.”

Redemption

Evett and Airaldi paired up for Fo’s “The Blind Man and the Cripple,” which, like the Samuel Beckett short “Rough for Theatre I” (1979), tells the tale of two beggars who get by better as a team. But Fo’s slapstick start molts into

PHOTO: ARIA LYNN SERGANY

Remo Airaldi and Benjamin Evett in Poets’ Theatre production of Dario Fo’s “The Morality Tale of the Blind Man and the Cripple.” something more. Astride Airaldi’s Blind Man, Evett’s Cripple spots Christ in the distance, healing the sick. If they are cured, the Cripple warns, they’ll “have to join the working class.” The two panic and yell, “Save me. I don’t want to be miracled.” Yet both are healed and while Evett’s beggar stomps,

kicks, and frets, Airaldi expresses his character’s wonder at seeing the world. And as they see Christ being tortured and nailed to the cross, they ask each other why people would want to harm this man who fed the hungry and healed the sick.

Blanchard

keep you on your toes. What have you learned from them?

continued from page 13

a great education that I was a part of. How do we continue this?’ And you look around and there aren’t that many people who are here to do this. I love teaching. The sad part about this, it’s one of those things, you realize, life is short, you realize that these kids are looking for information and you’re the one that has it. And then you go, ‘Oh, I guess it is my turn.’ The other part of it too is when you accept that and you get into this arena of teaching, these people keep you on your toes. And you learn as well, and it keeps me fresh.

You mentioned that these students

Nelson

continued from page 13

THE OSCAR MICHEAUX FAMILY THEATER PROGRAM COMPANY Presents the 18th Annual Harlem Renaissance Revisited With a Gospel Flavor

“OUR HISTORY IS NO MYSTERY” Play Written by Haywood Fennell, Sr. Set Design in Association with Leica Lucien Blackstone Community Center 50 West Brookline St. April 22 2016, 6:30 PM April 23rd, 2016, 2 PM Matinee

Ticket Donations: $25 General Admission Elders, 65 and Older and Youth Under Twelve $10 MBTA Bus SL4 and SL 5 down Washington St. Recommended to Darmouth St, Bus Stop

Sponsored by The Osiris Group

Nelson stars as Dave, one of Sarah and Matt’s friends celebrating their good fortune. Of his character in the film, Nelson was drawn to the role because he’s “believable, totally likeable, very forthright and kind.” Later this year, Nelson will star in “In Extremis” with Tobin Bell (the “Saw” trilogy), Adrienne Barbeau (CBS’ “Criminal Minds”) and Lesley-Anne Down (CBS’ “The Bold and The Beautiful”). Nelson plays the character Randy O’Connor, who’s one-half of an interracial couple, and whose stepson is going through a very hard time dealing with the loss of his father, against the backdrop of the Catholic Church. “I’m definitely like the backbone,” says Nelson of Randy. “Dads will be able to relate, kids

TB: I think the thing that I’ve learned the most is, oddly enough, to not be afraid. These kids have a passion and that’s the reason why they’re all here. They’re all here because there was something that drew them to music, and there’s a need for them to express themselves. Some of these kids, they’re coming here and they’re not jazz musicians. You have classical musicians, R&B musicians, and they’re all fused together. There’s no division of ‘Oh you’re this and you’re that.’ It’s none of that. Everybody’s appreciating each other. I think that’s one of the big lessons I’ve learned from all of them, is to be all encompassing, not only in my appreciation but in my application. will be able to relate. He holds the family down while the craziness happens.” The film “makes you think,” adds the actor. “There’s a lot of tension, and a slow-build. It’s a really good story that has a lot of heart to it.” Next up for Nelson is the project titled “Me n Z.” He wrote the script, and will also star and direct the film he describes as “an unconventional love story,” this fall in Los Angeles. It will be produced by Spitfire Studios, the company behind “Bleed.” The drama is based on a very special relationship in his life. It’s about two single people who happen to be out late one night, who meet, have an instant connection, and soon find themselves in a relationship, struggling to make it work. He likens “Me n Z.” as a “cross between ‘500 Days of Summer,’ ‘The Notebook,’ ‘Marley & Me’ and probably ‘Brown Sugar.’”


Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 15

FOOD

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TIP OF THE WEEK

Fresh new ways to enjoy potatoes Not only are potatoes uber satisfying, but research published in the Journal of American College of Nutrition shows that when prepared healthfully, they can be a part of a weight-loss program. Here’s a little inspiration for potato dishes sure to become favorites in 2016: n DIY potato chips: Boil a russet potato and a few purple potatoes for 5 minutes, drain, dry and cut into thin slices. Toss the freshly cut slices in one beaten egg white. Spray a non-stick pan with cooking spray and evenly space the chips throughout the pan. Bake slices at 400 degrees F for 35 minutes, turning halfway through. Top chips with sea salt or a sprinkle of bleu cheese. n Slim-belly baked potato bar: Top a baked potato with ground turkey, salsa and light sour cream for taco night, or top your potatoes with tomato sauce, turkey pepperoni, Italian blend shredded cheese and other veggies for a pizza-style delight. n Customize a nutritious breakfast hash: Drizzle a tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil in a skillet and add diced potatoes (fresh, frozen or refrigerated) with bell pepper and onion, cover and cook on medium heat for 10 minutes. To serve with soft-cooked eggs, use a spoon and make 4 shallow depressions in the hash and carefully crack an egg into each hollowed-out spot. Cover the pan and cook eggs for five minutes, or until the whites are set and yolks are still runny, then serve immediately. Alternatively, scramble four eggs and top your hash. For a final touch, top with hot sauce or a sprinkle of tarragon, salsa or chimichurri sauce. — Brandpoint

NUMBER TO KNOW

124

The average American eats 124 pounds of potatoes

each year.

— More Content Now

Debearding: Wild mussels require an additional cleaning step — debearding. Protruding between a mussel’s shells is a small bristle or beard, by which the mussel attaches itself to rocks or pilings. Shortly before cooking, remove the beard by tightly grasping the hairs near their base and giving a sharp tug. The beard should snap off along with a tiny bit of mussel flesh. — Cookthink

BY THE EDITORS OF

RELISH MAGAZINE

F

or each of the variations below: Preheat the oven to 425°F. Wash two large russet potatoes and pat dry. (Russets have a high starch content and are better for baking than red-skinned or Yukon Gold potatoes.) Rub the skins with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Prick the potatoes with a fork in several places. Place on a baking sheet. Bake 50 to 60 minutes, until tender. Let cool slightly. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F. Cut the potatoes into halves lengthwise. Scoop out the pulp, leaving about ¼ inch of potato pulp on the skin. Place the scooped pulp in a large bowl and the skins on a baking sheet. Add the remaining ingredients to the pulp, mixing well. Pile into the potato skins. Bake about 15 minutes, until hot. Serves 4.

Artichoke Swiss Stuffed Potatoes n 1 (6 oz.) jar marinated artichokes, chopped, plus 2 Tbsp of the marinade n 4 oz. Swiss cheese, shredded

Pizza Potatoes n ½ cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes in oil n 4 oz. Fontina cheese, grated n Chopped pepperoni (optional)

Broccoli Cheese Stuffed Potatoes n 2⁄3 cup Alouette or Boursin cheese n 1½ cups broccoli or cauliflower florets, microwaved for 2 min.

Loaded Sweet Potatoes Serves 2 n 1 large sweet potato, washed n 2 cups broccoli n 2 green onions, minced n ¼ cup light sour cream n ¼ cup shredded cheddar

Loaded Smashed New Potatoes For when you want to go decadent. Serves 4 n 4 medium red new potatoes

n 3 tablespoons white truffle extra-virgin olive oil n 1 teaspoon kosher salt, coarse n 1 teaspoon ground black pepper n 4 tablespoons sharp cheddar cheese, shredded n 4 slices fried bacon, crumbled n 4 teaspoons sour cream n 4 teaspoons chives Boil potatoes until just tender, about 15 to 20 minutes depending on size of potato; drain water off. Heat white truffle oil over a medium heat in a 10-inch or larger frying pan until hot. With the back of a spatula, press potatoes flat; transfer potato patties to frying pan. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Fry to a golden brown on both sides (flipping only once). Once you flip, season with salt and pepper again. Place about a tablespoon of shredded cheese on each smashed potato. Once cheese begins to melt, transfer to serving plate. If desired, add bacon and a dollop of sour cream; sprinkle with chives.

UPCOMING EVENTS AT HALEY HOUSE BAKERY CAFÉ THU 3/31: Stories Celebrating Life

THE DISH ON ... “On Toast: Tartines, Crostini, and Open-Faced Sandwiches” by Kristan Raines — In “On Toast,” lush photographs accompany 100 ideas for toast. From the simplest snack to the most complex and satisfying meal. The book even includes straight forward instructions for how best to toast your bread. Use in a sandwich, as a vehicle for condiments, as a side to dip into other meals, breakfast, lunch or dinner... the possibilities are endless! — Quarry Books

cheese or cheddar/Monterey jack mixture n 2 tablespoons maple syrup n Salt n 1 tablespoon soy bacon bits (optional) Bake potato in a 375-degree oven 45 minutes or until tender. Cool baked potato, cut in half lengthwise and scoop out flesh, creating a cavity inside both sides of the shell; set shells aside. Place cooked potato in a mixing bowl. Add broccoli, green onions, sour cream and cheese. Mix lightly and use to fill potato shells, mounding slightly. Drizzle with maple syrup and sprinkle with salt. Sprinkle with soy bacon bits, if using. Place in a baking pan and bake 15 to 20 minutes until potatoes are golden brown on top and heated through.

with Sumner & Linda McClain, 7 pm FRI 4/1: First Fridays Karaoke with Gary, 6:30 pm

Be sure to check out our website and mobile site www.baystatebanner.com

THU 4/7: Jazz By Any Means Necessary celebrates Jazz Appreciation Month, 7 pm FRI 4/8: The House Slam Last Chance Slam, 6:30 pm THU 4/14: Lifted Boston from Outside the Box Agency, 7 pm

Come By The Bolling Building to check out our new enterprise, Dudley Dough Haley House Bakery Cafe - 12 Dade Street - Roxbury 617 445 0900 - www.haleyhouse.org/bakery-cafe

PHOTO: RELISH MAGAZINE

WORD TO THE WISE

fullyloaded

Lighter ways to get your Potato fix


16 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

COMMUNITY CALENDAR CHECK OUT MORE EVENTS AND SUBMIT TO OUR ONLINE CALENDAR: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/EVENTS

THURSDAY “ART OF JAZZ” CINEMA SERIES Cooper Gallery Film Series — “Art of Jazz” Cinema Series: Syncopation: Short Jazz Films. Symphony in Black, 1935, Duke Ellington and Billie Holiday (9:36); Rhapsody in Black and Blue, 1932, Louis Armstrong (10:00); St. Louis Blues, 1929, Bessie Smith (15:41); Cab Calloway’s Hi De Ho, 1933 (10:00); Bundle of Blues, 1933, Duke Ellington (9:00); Hoagy Carmichael, 1939, Hoagy Carmichael, Jack Teagarden (10:00); Artie Shaw’s Class in Swing, 1939, Artie Shaw (10:00); Jazz a la Cuba, 1933, Don Aspiazú (5:19); and Black and Tan Fantasy, 1929, Duke Ellington, Fredi Washington (19:00). Thursday, March 31, 12pm, Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art, 102 Mount Auburn St., Cambridge. Free and open to the public.

MULTICULTURAL ARTS CENTER GALLERY SHOWS Through April 1, the Multicultural Arts Center will host “To My Mother Who Used to Tell Me Stories” and “Young Artists” in the galleries. Erica Frisk is back, this time showing her photographs from Guatemala and the women of the weaving community. Colorful photos of textiles and the faces of women and their daughters fill the walls of the Lower Gallery. Local Cambridge students also get the chance to show their artwork on real gallery walls as we invite back the CPS group to the Art Center. Galleries are FREE and open to the public. Regular Gallery hours: Monday-Friday, 10:30am 6pm. Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge.

EXHIBIT: MUJERES For this year’s celebration of Women’s Month, we present the exhibit “Mujeres,” a unique exhibition that presents the work of Isabella Mellado. Mellado was born in Puerto Rico and is a current student of Rhode Island School of Design. Despite her young age, her paintings reveal the depth of a much older artist. Isabella’s work in acrylic and oils create portraits that are mysterious and revealing. Her subjects, who are oftentimes nationally recognized individuals and business leaders, have been said to look out at the viewer from the canvas with inscrutable gazes. This exhibition will run through April 6. The gallery is open Thursdays and Fridays 1-5pm, and by appointment. La Galería at Villa Victoria Center for the Arts, 85 W Newton St., Boston. Register here: http://bit.ly/Mellado-Register.

SATURDAY BLUE HILLS RESERVATION Moderate to difficult walk, hilly terrain, 3+ miles. Loop around the base of Great Blue Hill. Meet at the Trailside Museum north parking lot at 1904 Canton Ave. in Milton Saturday, April 2 at 1pm. The Southeastern Massachusetts Adult Walking Club meets each weekend on either a Saturday or Sunday at 1:00 for recreational walks. This club is open to people of 16 years of age and older, and there is no fee to

join. Walks average 2 to 5 miles. New walkers are encouraged to participate. The terrain can vary: EASY (mostly level terrain), MODERATE (hilly terrain), DIFFICULT (strenuous & steep). Walks will be led by a park ranger or a Walking Club volunteer leader. Occasionally, the Walking Club meets at other DCR sites. Some DCR sites charge a parking fee. The rangers recommend wearing hiking boots and bringing drinking water on all hikes.

YOGA FOR OLDER ADULTS AT BPL PARKER HILL Practice gentle yet energizing standing & seated (chair yoga) poses and movements to maintain strength & agility as you age. Learn deep breathing & meditation techniques to increase memory & focus and achieve emotional balance. Connect with other older adults age 50+ to cultivate a community of elders inspired to enhance their health, wellness & wisdom with yoga. These classes are free and open to the public. Saturdays, 10-11am, April 2 - May 28; there is no class on May 14. Parker Hill Branch Library, 1497 Tremont St., Roxbury (Boston’s Mission Hill); take the MBTA to Roxbury Crossing, Ruggles or Brighams Circle stations, or bus routes #39 or 66. Some on-street parking is available. To RSVP, call head librarian Katrina Morse at 617-427-3820, email earthseedyogi@ gmail.com, or visit earthseedyoga.com.

SUNDAY PICS IN THE PARKS Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the Boston Parks and Recreation Department invite Boston residents to participate in the free Pics in the Parks photography workshops taking place on select Sundays in April and May from 3-4pm. Individuals of all ages and skill levels are welcome to bring their cameras and participate in these informal sessions led by a photography instructor. Participants will learn techniques for taking impressive photographs of Boston’s scenic parks as well as be given a theme to focus on each Sunday. Select photos may be chosen for an exhibit at Boston City Hall. Dates and locations are as follows: April 3 — Geneva Avenue Cliffs, 275 Geneva Ave., Dorchester; April 10 — Christopher Columbus Park Trellis, 110 Atlantic Ave., North End; April 17 — Chandler Pond (main entrance), 95 Lake Shore Dr., Brighton; April 24 — Franklin Park Bear Cages, 25 Pierpont Rd., Dorchester; May 1 — Lagoon Bridge, Boston Public Garden, 4 Charles St., Boston. For more information please visit the Boston Parks and Recreation Department at www.facebook.com/bostonparksde partment or www.cityofboston.gov/ parks. Participants must bring their own equipment and can register via email by contacting mavrick.alfonso@boston.gov.

MONDAY THE RHYTHM OF OUR STORIES The Rhythm of Our Stories: Songs, Movement, Games ­— April 4, 18,

SATURDAY, APRIL 2

BLOODSKINLAND PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS AFRO-CINEMA

An afternoon of important films (documentary or motion picture) being shown, followed by a discussion about the film — in celebrating National Poetry Month. @ Hibernian Hall, 184 Dudley St., Roxbury. 12:30pm SHARP! Doors open at 12pm. Donations suggested | Light refreshments. Featured film: BLACK WAX — “Black Wax” is a musical-political entertainment film that centers on the late legendary poet/singer-songwriter Gil Scott-Heron (the man many dubbed the forefather of rap music) and his Midnight Band. For more info contact VCR at bloodskinland@yahoo.com or 617-480-7663.

25, May 2, from 5:30-7:30pm at Jamaica Plain Community Center (Curtis Hall), 20 South St., Jamaica Plain. FREE workshops from Families Creating Together with award-winning teaching artist and drummer Cornell Coley who mashes up storytelling with drums and percussion — songs, movement, games. Experience stories with a live pulse and ambient sound. Find your storytelling rhythm! Presented in English, Spanish and American Sign Language (upon request). Wheelchair accessible. Child care provided. FCT is a program of Community Service Care/Tree of Life Coalition. To register and for more information call 617-522-4832 or email mfcabrera53@ gmail.com. Additional information at www.familiescreatingtogether.org.

UPCOMING FREE FAMILY COOKING CLASSES There are free cooking demos for adults accompanied by one or two children at the Dudley Branch of the Boston Public Library (65 Warren Street in Roxbury). The classes will be taught by Haley House Chef Rachel of the Take Back the Kitchen Program on Mondays: April 11, 18 and 25, 5:30-7pm. Families can sign up for one, two or all three. Please register before April 8. By contacting Robin at 617-543-0393 or TakeBackTheKitchen@HaleyHouse.org. The classes are funded by the Fellowes Athenaeum Trust Fund of the Boston Public library (fellowestrust@yahoo.com).

FIELDWORKS: SEASON ONE Impact : A screening of the documentary FIELDWORKS: Season One. How do you measure the impact of socially engaged art? Explore seven artist projects, their beauty, rigor, and impact in the short documentary FIELDWORKS: Season One from A Blade of Grass Films, screening at Massachusetts College of Art and Design on April 11 at 6:30pm in the new Design and Media Center Lecture Hall. Feature artists include Mel Chin, Brett Cook, Pablo Helguera, Fran Ilich, Jan Mun, SexEd: Norene Leddy & Liz Slagus, and Jody Wood. This event is free and open to the public however registration (https://impact-fieldworks-screening.eventbrite.com/) is required. FIELDWORKS: Season One is produced by RAVA Films and One Hundred Seconds. The event is hosted by Massachusetts College of Art and Design and Now and There in partnership with A Blade of Grass, a New York City based organization nurturing socially engaged art.

FREE COOKING DEMOS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS The Dudley Branch of the Boston Public Library (65 Warren Street in Roxbury) is offering free cooking demos for seniors, taught by Chef Fulani of the Take Back the Kitchen Program at Haley House. Each class has a focus: April 12 — Cooking on a Budget, April 19 — Swap the Salt — Spice It Up, April 26 — Smart Shopping. All classes run from 1-2:30pm. Sign up for one, two or all three. Please register before April 8 because space is limited. To register, call Robin 617-543-0393 or TakeBackTheKitchen@HaleyHouse.org. The classes are funded by the Fellowes Athenaeum Trust Fund of the Boston Public library (fellowestrust@yahoo.com).

PEEK-A-BLUE HIKES FOR PARENTS AND TOTS Calling all parents and tots! Join the Friends of the Blue Hills for a new season of Peek-a-Blue Hikes for parents and tots. Enjoy a kids and parents scavenger hunt, complete with prizes for all! Complimentary water, juice and snacks too. Tuesday, April 12 from 11am – 12pm. Meet at Houghton’s Pond main parking lot at 840 Hillside Street in Milton. Hikes will then be offered every other Tuesday morning throughout the season. For more information and 2016 dates, visit www. FriendsoftheBlueHills.org/peekablue.

SOL Y CANTO Simmons College presents Music in the Gallery with Pan-Latin ensemble Sol y Canto, on Thursday, April 14 from 11-12:30pm, with reception to follow, at the Trustman Art Gallery, located on the fourth floor, Main College Building, 300 The Fenway in Boston. The concert and reception are free and open to the public. Pioneers of Boston’s Latin scene, Sol y Canto welcomes their listeners on a journey into the world of Latin music and culture. The band, led by Puerto Rican/Argentine singer and bongo player Rosi Amador and her husband, New Mexican guitarist and composer Brian Amador, is backed by musicians playing a variety of instruments. Their ensemble connects audiences to the richness of Pan-Latin music through the interpretation of classic folk songs as well as their original compositions influenced by Chilean, Venezuelan, Mexican, Cuban and other Latin musical traditions. All of these influences are woven together to create their colorful repertoire. This concert is supported by the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Department of Art

and Music. Trustman Gallery hours are 10am - 4:30pm, Monday through Friday. The gallery is free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Marcia Lomedico at 617-521-2268, or visit the Trustman Art Gallery website at www.simmons.edu/ trustman and Facebook.

STARTING YOUR OWN SEEDS Hybrid or heirloom, conventional or organic, days to maturity. With so many options, selecting seeds for your garden can be a challenge. Join us as we demystify the process of choosing seeds and starting them, indoors or out. Bring extra seeds for a swap after the workshop. Space is limited. Thursday, April 14, 6pm, Uphams Corner Branch of the Boston Public Library, 500 Columbia Rd, 617-265-0139. www.bpl.org.

PASSOVER CELEBRATION Families are invited to a free Passover celebration on Sunday, April 17, from 10am - 4pm at the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA. At 11am, visitors can learn Yiddish holiday songs at a sing-along workshop led by Asya Vaisman Schulman, director of the Center’s Yiddish Language Institute, accompanied by musician Brian Bender. At 2pm, visitors are invited to make a keepsake seder plate in a workshop led by crafter Debbie Way. The celebration will also include a storytime with holiday-themed children’s books. Young detektivn (detectives) can take part in scavenger hunts throughout the Yiddish Book Center all day. Guided public tours of the Center will be offered at 11am and 1pm. All events are free and open to the public. More information can be found at yiddishbookcenter.org/calendar.

ONGOING DROP INTO ART Danforth Art Museum\School will continue its monthly tradition of hosting a free afternoon of art and art-making for children and their accompanying adults. On the first Sunday of the month, through May, from 2-4pm, families are invited to enjoy current exhibitions, tours, and hands-on activities in the museum galleries and art school studios. Each month features a different theme inspired by artwork on view in the museum, and use a variety of artist materials. Drop Into Art is sponsored by Impact Framingham and the MutualOne Charitable Foundation. For more information on Danforth Art Museum\School, please visit www.dan forthart.org or call 508-620-0050.

The Community Calendar has been established to list community events at no cost. The admission cost of events must not exceed $10. Church services and recruitment requests will not be published. THERE IS NO GUARANTEE OF PUBLICATION. To guarantee publication with a paid advertisement please call advertising at (617) 261-4600 ext. 7799 or email ads@bannerpub.com. NO LISTINGS ARE ACCEPTED BY TELEPHONE, FAX OR MAIL. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Deadline for all listings is Friday at noon for publication the following week. E-MAIL your information to: calendar@bannerpub.com. To list your event online please go to www.baystatebanner.com/ events and list your event directly. Events listed in print are not added to the online events page by Banner staff members. There are no ticket cost restrictions for the online postings.


Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 17

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AUTO BITS

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AUTO REVIEW

TIP OF THE WEEK

Tips help boomers in the car market Times have changed for the buyers who made the Mustang so hot back in the 1960s. The kids are grown, and the lure of a shiny new car is very strong, but there are things to think about before you buy. Here are five tips for Baby Boomers about to buy their next car. n Consider cash flow: You’ve worked hard and deserve that retirement, but it does change your cash flow. If you’ve got a lot tucked away, then it may be tempting to put down a large deposit or even pay for the car in full. But, be careful. Don’t dip into money that you saved for retirement, and don’t leave yourself without a cushion in case something unexpected leaves you in need of that cash. A monthly payment is more in the long run, but it keeps your cash free for emergencies. Where else could you put that money? Another consideration in the cash versus loan equation is how much your money could make elsewhere. Even if you have the cash and can comfortably spend it, that only makes sense if you are saving more on interest than you would be if you invested that money someplace else. Depending on the price of the car, it might not make sense to pay up front. n Consider used: You might want a new car, but it might not be the choice for your finances. A used car means someone else took the depreciation hit and that saves you money. Today’s used or pre-owned cars also come with warranties that remove the fear over maintenance costs. You’ll pay less for a used version of the car you want than for the new one sitting on the lot and can still drive away happy. n Check your car insurance: A portion of car insurance is based on how much you drive, and chances are you aren’t driving as much as you did years ago. This can reduce the cost of your insurance and free up money to use for your car payment. Check with your insurer before you buy and make sure you’re not paying for miles you don’t even drive anymore. n Consider a lease: If you’re driving less, then this is a good time to lease a car, especially if you like the idea of having a new car every few years. Your down payment and monthly payment will likely be lower than buying, which could get you into a more expensive car than if you bought a car. Buying a car is almost always cheaper in the long run, but leasing makes sense if you aren’t looking to build equity and want another new car in a few years.

DID YOU KNOW BMW is 100 years old this year, and Mercedes-Benz have joined in the celebration by extending a special invitation to BMW employees and proving Germans do have a sense of humor. The Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart, Germany opened its doors for free to any employees of BMW earlier in March. Not only did BMW employees get into the museum for free, they’ll even got special parking privileges. — More Content Now

PHOTOS: SIMPLYRIDES.COM

Above, the 2016 GMC Yukon Denali XL. Below, the Denali interior with seats up and seats down.

GMC Yukon Denali XL

Extra-big SUV has plenty of room for road-trip passengers By SÉKOU WRITES SIMPLYRIDES.COM

The first thing one notices about the GMC Yukon Denali XL is its size. Not only can you fit anything you need into the Denali, you can also pack plenty of people. It’s practically a party bus. For a moment I considered putting out an all-call for anyone who might be available to hop into the back and come along for a super-sized road trip. My destination, after all, was the vast expanse of NY State. Sure, everyone likes to talk about NYC, but the state in which The Big Apple is located somehow gets ignored. While the island of Manhattan is only about 23 square miles, New York State is about 55,000 square miles. Needless to say, there are plenty of things to do and see in the state once you head north of the City. Since we’re talking about size, let’s get specific about the Denali. At 18 feet long, the XL is equipped to seat up to 9 adults, plus it has enough cargo space for three adults to sleep comfortably behind the second row. The XL also has it’s own Wi-Fi hotspot allowing you to connect all your devices and keep them from eating up data on a long drive. Aside from that, you can equip the car with up to two drop down DVD players so no one has to share. The other thing you need to know is that the XL is vastly

AT A GLANCE

2016 YUKON DENALI XL n Starts at about $70K n MPG: 15 city, 22 highway n Hands free lift-gate n Seats 9, sleeps 3 n H as it’s own private Wi-Fi hotspot through OnStar. customizable. Power seat and steering wheel settings, as well as adjustable brake pedals, towing and suspension all means you can make the XL feel just right for you. Now, on to the road trip!

Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, NY

Definitely one of my favorite NY State attractions, the Corning Museum of Glass houses some of the most spectacular glass sculptures in the world. In the lobby there is a massive Chihuly installation that stretches 3 stories high. It would take the better part of a whole day to fully explore the museum but if you go, make sure you spend some time in the glass-making studio making your own glass beads, cups and flowers.

The Strong, home of the National Museum of Play

Named after Margaret Woodbury Strong, a wealthy woman who collected dolls as a child, the Strong National Museum of Play is dedicated to the idea of playing. The huge structure includes a mock Sesame Street set, an arcade

room full of vintage video games, a NASACR pit stop for kids, the very first monopoly board (it’s round) and a display dedicated to the super soaker, which was invented by a black man: Dr. Lonnie Johnson, a Tuskegee Institute-trained mechanical and nuclear engineer.

Memorial Art Gallery

Founded in 1913, the Memorial Art Gallery has more than

12,000 items. One of their most exciting exhibits is a tribute to Ebony Fashion Fair, which showcases many of the styles (and designers) that Ebony promoted over the years. In fact, the exhibit itself is groundbreaking as well. Not only are the manikins depicted in varying shades of brown, which is almost unheard of, but also the faces of the models are based on famous black women like Tyra Banks.


18 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

Roxbury

continued from page 1 homes fetch the same value as those on the other side of Columbus Avenue. The gulf between the higher values in abutting neighborhoods and lower values in Roxbury hasn’t stopped sellers from reaching. There’s the nine-room puddingstone house on Lambert Avenue in the Highland Park section of Roxbury that was last year listed at $829,000. It didn’t sell and is now on the market for $750,000. Then there’s a rather battered looking triple decker at 8 Greenville Street near Dudley Square. “Great opportunity for developers! Major rehab in the heart of Roxbury,” reads the $659,900 listing on Trulia. That property hasn’t sold in the 56 days it has been on the real estate website Trulia, despite a price reduction from its original $699,000 asking price. The undisputed king of the high asking prices is 27 Howland Street, where a developer carved out a 4,500 square foot unit and a 3,500 square foot unit from a

budget vote continued from page 1

“the lesser of two evils.” After the vote was tallied several audience members burst into boos and cries of “Shame.”

Shortchanging special education

As it stands, amount of funding allocated to cover the needs of children with autism, emotional impairments and unidentified disabilities decreased by $5 million. Tabitha Kast-McBride, a senior at TechBoston Academy, said she feared her school could lose PATH, a program that provides psychological and academic support, and which she said played a critical role in keeping her in school. “[There are] students who are emotionally fragile, like me, who might not be here today without PATH,” Kast-McBride said.

three-story home and listed listed them for $1.39 million and $1.34 million, respectively. Those prices are down from $1.5 and 1.4 million when the property debuted on Trulia 83 days ago. Will the developer get those prices? “I don’t think so,” says broker Kobe Evans. “I don’t see it happening. There are some smoothtalking agents who get owners thinking about prices they wouldn’t ask for.” Evans notes that many developers rehabbing buildings in and around Roxbury are renting out units, rather than selling. With young professionals no longer frightened by the prospect of living in a predominantly black neighborhood, the rental market in Roxbury is now being inundated with students. “Anything cheap or half-way cheap is being rehabbed and converted into rentals by investors,” he said. Whether or not there is room for record breaking sales prices in Roxbury, inventory remains an issue, with many potential sellers waiting for the market to peak.

One expansive Humboldt Avenue Victorian, briefly on the market for $1.2 million last year, is coming back at just under $1 million, notes broker Sharif Abdal-Khallaq. “There are a few properties that could sell for a million dollars in Roxbury,” he said. “But most of the people who own them don’t want to sell.”

Teens need emotional-wellness programs to be expanded, not reduced, she said, breaking down as she recalled a friend who had committed suicide. John St. Amand, vice chair of Boston Special Education Parent Advisory Council, criticized the reasoning behind reducing special education funding — which will affect 19,022 students, he said. “Was there a report that showed that all of these students were meeting their educational goals?” he said. S u p e r i n t e n d e n t To m m y Chang assured attendees that this fall, an analysis will be conducted regarding the services provided to students with autism and emotional impairment. Chang said the school department also will reevaluate its formula that determines educational funding allocations for each student, based on needs.

Diploma Plus survives

Growing demand

Whether or not Roxbury residents are ready to sell, buyers are coming, driven by the rapid rises in prices and rents in the rest of Boston. Millennial renters and home buyers are moving into the areas of Roxbury closest to public transit — Highland Park near the Roxbury Crossing MBTA station, Marcella, Townsend and Elmore streets near Jackson Square and the Moreland Street neighborhood near Dudley Square. “Walkability is key for millennials,” Evans said. “If they can ride a bike or walk to the T, it’s ideal.” At Copeland Street, just a few blocks from the Dudley Square bus terminal, Brighton resident Katie, who asked that her last name be withheld for this story, compared

Charlestown High School was slated to lose Diploma Plus, a program credited with helping many struggling students, primarily black and Latino, to graduate, via smaller classes and tailored curriculum pacing. At a budget hearing last month, Malik Johnson-Mignott said that before entering Diploma Plus, he was shunted from school to school and had gotten in trouble with police. “Being a person of color in Boston and being 22 years old at the same time … statistically speaking I should be dead or in jail now,” he said. But, he said, at Diploma Plus, teachers took the time to understand his background and life, and the program helped him turn his life around. Even with the new budget, which restored much of high school funding, Charlestown High faced a $300,000 shortfall. School

BANNER PHOTO

Real estate broker Delince Louis (center) speaks to prospective homebuyers during an open house in a condo unit on Copeland Street. the spacious three-bedroom to her $1,600 one-bedroom. Growing up in Brookline, Katie avoided Roxbury and Dorchester, like many whites. But as she looks for a first home, those

neighborhoods are now on the table. “I had pre-conceived notions about Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan,” she said. “I was surprised at how well-kept those neighborhoods are.”

administrators expected they would have to cut the program. Late into the budgeting process, the axe was withdrawn. At last week’s budget vote meeting, Superintendent Chang announced that Liberty Mutual had stepped forward with program funding. “This would not have been possible without the generous financial support of Liberty Mutual,” Chang said. During the public testimony, City Councilor Tito Jackson expressed concerns that the city had to resort to a private partner for education funding.

who chairs the council’s Committee on Education. Savina Tapia assured attendees that she will keep fighting for more funding, and said the budget is subject to change up until Department of Elementary and Secondary Education sets the final budget in August. Reflecting on the financial planning, several school committee members said it demonstrated the need for greater analysis of budget impacts and performance. Alexandra Oliver-Davila called for the creation of a budget task force that would provide year-round budget evaluation, instead of waiting until February to hold these conversations. Jeri Robinson asked for an examination the economic stability of high school graduates, to assess if the amount and distribution of funding is supporting students adequately. “Are we creating the achievement gap through our own practices?” Jeri Robinson said.

Chance for change

The School Committee vote is not the final word. The budget is sent to the City Council in April, with councilors’ vote due on June 30. The council cannot increase line items, but often is able to negotiate with the mayor for changes, said Jackson,

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Thursday, Thursday,March March31, 31,2016 2016 •• BAY BAY STATE STATE BANNER BANNER •• 19 19

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

urban renewal

GNEMSDC 41st annual gala dinner

continued from page 1 LEGAL Jackson says the council vote extended the BRA’s urban renewal designation without giving the council any significant oversight over the agency. The council’s vote comes after scathing audits of the BRA found a lack of accounting and internal controls that failed to track payments from developers and leases on publicly-owned land. The city council last year asked the BRA for an accounting of its land disposition agreements with developers and its assets as it made its case for extending urban renewal another ten years. Pressley said the agency ought to have presented that information before the council agreed to extend the program. “The sequencing should be about getting an inventory of assets,” she said. “From there we could determine whether urban renewal should be renewed.” Councilor Bill Linehan, chairman of the Committee on Planning and Development, authored the council’s compromise with the BRA. In it, the agency is required to

LEGAL

LEGAL

PHOTO: COURTESY AYANNE PRESSLEY

Ayanna Pressley compile an inventory of its land disposition agreements, provide the council with notice of any planned changes to its urban renewal areas 30 days before they are due to take effect, provide 30 day notice of any planned land takings and review its current processes for disposition of BRA-owned land in accordance with community planning goals and priorities. Pressley said, given those agreements, she would have favored a shorter extension period. “I just couldn’t get to six years,” she said. “Two or three years would have been fair.”

PHOTO: DON WEST

In attendance at the Greater New England Minority Supplier Development Council 41st annual gala dinner were (l-r) Darren Haynes, ESPN sports anchor; JoAnn Price, Managing Partner of Fairview Capital Partners; Darryl Settles, Boston developer and owner of Darryl’s Corner Bar & Kitchen; and Peter Hurst, President and CEO of GNEMSDC. Nearly 400 people gathered at the Aqua Turf Country Club in Plantsville, Conn., on Thursday evening to celebrate entrepreneurs of color and their corporate partners.

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS LEGAL

LEGAL

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU16P0435GD

Citation Giving Notice of Petition for Appointment of Guardian for Incapacitated Person Pursuant to G.L. c. 190B, §5-304

lawyer. Anyone may make this request on behalf of the above-named person. If the above-named person cannot afford a lawyer, one may be appointed at State expense. Witness, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: March 01, 2016

Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate

In the matter of Rachel L. Rhoden Of Boston, MA RESPONDENT Alleged Incapacitated Person To the named Respondent and all other interested persons, a petition has been filed by Edgar Benjamin Health Care Ctr. of Boston, MA in the above captioned matter alleging that Rachel L. Rhoden is in need of a Guardian and requesting that Racheal Williams of Boston, MA (or some other suitable person) be appointed as Guardian to serve Without Surety on the bond. The petition asks the court to determine that the Respondant is incapacitated, that the appointment of a Guardian is necessary, that the proposed Guardian is appropriate. The petition is on file with this court and may contain a request for certain specific authority. You have the right to object to this proceeding. If you wish to do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance at this court on or before 10:00 A.M. on the return date of 04/07/2016. This day is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline date by which you have to file the written appearance if you object to the petition. If you fail to file the written appearance by the return date, action may be taken in this matter without further notice to you. In addition to filing the written appearance, you or your attorney must file a written affidavit stating the specific facts and grounds of your objection within 30 days after the return date. IMPORTANT NOTICE The outcome of this proceeding may limit or completely take away the above-named person’s right to make decisions about personal affairs or financial affairs or both. The above-named person has the right to ask for a lawyer. Anyone may make this request on behalf of the above-named person. If the above-named person cannot afford a lawyer, one may be appointed at State expense. WITNESS, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: March 01, 2016 Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

DOCKET NO. SU16P0441PM

In the matter of: Rachel L. Rhoden Respondent (Person to be Protected/Minor) Of: Boston, MA CITATION GIVING NOTICE OF PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF CONSERVATOR OR OTHER PROTECTIVE ORDER PURSUANT TO G.L c. 190B, §5-304 & §5-405 To the named Respondent and all other interested persons, a petition has been filed by Edgar Benjamin Health Care Ctr. of Boston, MA in the above captioned matter alleging that Rachel L. Rhoden is in need of a Conservator or other protective order and requesting that Racheal Williams of Boston, MA (or some other suitable person) be appointed as Conservator to serve Without Surety on the bond.

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

IMPORTANT NOTICE The outcome of this proceeding may limit or completely take away the above-named person’s right to make decisions about personal affairs or financial affairs or both. The above-named person has the right to ask for a

Docket No. SU16C0084CA In the matter of Alexis Hernandez of Boston, MA

NOTICE OF PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME To all persons interested in a petition described: A petition has been presented by Alexis Hernandez requesting that Alexis Hernandez be allowed to change her name as follows: Julia Brianna Adorno IF YOU DESIRE TO OBJECT THERETO, YOU OR YOUR ATTORNEY MUST FILE A WRITTEN APPEARANCE IN SAID COURT AT BOSTON ON OR BEFORE TEN O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING (10:00 AM) ON 04/21/2016. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: March 15, 2016 Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate

ing that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that Jennifer E. Brock of Mattapan, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of 04/21/2016. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken without further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised administration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: March 15, 2016 Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU16D0277DR

Divorce Summons by Publication and Mailing Luma, Jean Everance

vs.

Guerrier, Myslande

To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon: Jean Everance Luma, 65 Wood Ave., Hyde Park, MA 02136 your answer, if any, on or before 05/12/2016. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court.

INFORMAL PROBATE PUBLICATION NOTICE To all persons interested in the above captioned estate, by Petition of Petitioner Lily W. Lam of Allston, MA and Petitioner Charles H. Lam of Allston, MA. Lily W. Lam of Allston, MA and Charles H. Lam of Allston, MA have been informally appointed as the Personal Representatives of the estate to serve without surety on the bond. The estate is being administered under informal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but interested parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. Interested parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute formal proceedings and to obtain orders terminating or restricting the powers of Personal Representatives appointed under informal procedure. A copy of the Petition and Will, if any, can be obtained from the Petitioner. Witness: Magistrate of the Probate and Family Court Date: March 2, 2016 Felix D. Arroyo, Register of Probate

Witness, Hon. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: March 1, 2016

Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

INVITATION TO BID The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority is seeking bids for the following: BID NO.

DESCRIPTION

DATE

TIME

OP-315

Groundskeeping Services – Metropolitan Boston

04/11/16

2:00 p.m.

WRA-4198

Purchase of One (1) Three Phase Substation Transformer, Primary Voltage of 69,000 Y, Secondary Voltage 6,900 Delta (or Equal)

04/13/16

10:00 a.m.

WRA-4199

Removal of Hazardous Waste from the MWRA Deer Island Treatment Plant

04/22/16

11:00 a.m.

Docket No. SU16P0575EA

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication Estate of Kathleen R. Reid Date of Death: 01/12/2015 To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Representative has been filed by Jennifer E. Brock of Mattapan, MA request-

Docket No. SU16P0131EA Estate of: Mary Y. Wong Date of Death: October 02, 2015

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department

The petition asks the court to determine that the Respondent is disabled, that a protective order or appointment of a Conservator is necessary, and that the proposed conservator is appropriate. The petition is on file with this court. You have the right to object to this proceeding. If you wish to do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance at this court on or before 10:00 A.M. on the return date of 04/07/2016. This day is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline date by which you have to file the written appearance if you object to the petition. If you fail to file the written appearance by the return date, action may be taken in this matter without further notice to you. In addition to filing the written appearance, you or your attorney must file a written affidavit stating the specific facts and grounds of your objection within 30 days after the return date.

LEGAL

To access and bid on Event(s) please go to the MWRA Supplier Portal at www.mwra.com.


20 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

LEGAL MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. H244-C1 TAXIWAY J REHABILITATION AND RUNWAY 5 END SAFETY AREA IMPROVEMENTS, L. G. HANSCOM FIELD, BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2016 immediately after which, in a designated room, the proposal will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE 3RD FLOOR CONFERENCE ROOM, CIVIL AIR TERMINAL, L. G. HANSCOM FIELD, BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS AT 10:00 AM (LOCAL TIME) ON THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2016. The work includes RECLAMATION OF TAXIWAY J AND EXISTING RUNWAY 5 END SAFETY AREA BITUMINOUS CONCRETE, RE-USE OF THE RECLAIMED BASE MATERIAL FOR TAXIWAY J AND RUNWAY 5 END SAFETY AREA, RELOCATION OF VEHICLE SERVICE ROAD, REGRADING, WARM MIX ASPHALT FOR TAXIWAY J, MASSDOT WARM MIX ASPHALT FOR RUNWAY 5 END SAFETY AREA AND VEHICLE SERVICE ROAD, PAVEMENT MARKINGS, LOAMING AND SEEDING AND OTHER INCIDENTAL WORK. Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2016. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. The estimated contract cost is ONE MILLION, THREE HUNDRED TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($1,320,000). A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. Bidders must submit a Buy American Certificate with all bids or offers on AIP funded projects. Bids that are not accompanied by a completed Buy American Certificate must be rejected as nonresponsive. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater.

LEGAL NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 1:00 PM LOCAL TIME ON MONDAY, APRIL 4, 2016. The work includes ALL LABOR, MATERIALS, AND EQUIPMENT NECESSARY FOR MAKING IMPROVEMENTS TO THE NOISE REDUCTION PERFORMANCE OF SELECTED RESIDENTIAL DWELLINGS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO: REPLACEMENT OF WINDOW SASH AND/OR WINDOW UNITS; REPLACEMENT OF EXTERIOR DOOR UNITS; REPLACEMENT AND/OR ADDITION OF STORM DOORS; WEATHER-STRIPPING; CAULKING; CARPENTRY; PAINTING; AND OTHER INCIDENTAL WORK. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of DOORS AND WINDOWS OR GENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION The estimated contract cost is TWO HUNDRED SIXTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($260,000.00). Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44H inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and/ or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance, Auto Liability Insurance, and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of ONE MILLION DOLLARS ($1,000,000.00). Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. No filed sub bids will be required for this contract.

The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $5,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details.

This contract is subject to a Minority/Women Owned Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than 5.6% of the Contract be performed by minority and women owned business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible.

This contract is subject to a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than ELEVEN POINT FIVE (11.5%) of the Contract be performed by disadvantaged business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible.

This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246).

This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. A Contractor having fifty (50) or more employees and his subcontractors having fifty (50) or more employees who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will, within one hundred twenty (120) days from the contract commencement, be required to develop a written affirmative action compliance program for each of its establishments. Compliance Reports - Within thirty (30) days of the award of this Contract the Contractor shall file a compliance report (Standard Form [SF 100]) if: (a) The Contractor has not submitted a complete compliance report within twelve (12) months preceding the date of award, and (b) The Contractor is within the definition of “employer” in Paragraph 2c(3) of the instructions included in SF100. The contractor shall require the subcontractor on any first tier subcontracts, irrespective of the dollar amount, to file SF 100 within thirty (30) days after the award of the subcontracts, if the above two conditions apply. SF 100 will be furnished upon request. SF 100 is normally furnished Contractors annually, based on a mailing list currently maintained by the Joint Reporting Committee. In the event a contractor has not received the form, he may obtain it by writing to the following address: Joint Reporting Committee 1800 G Street Washington, DC 20506 Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. L1388-C1, RCC BUFFER MITIGATION PROJECT, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2016 immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly.

The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Notice of Public Hearings and Public Comment Period The City of Peabody and the City of Haverhill, in cooperation with the North Shore HOME Consortium, an organization comprised of thirty cities and towns in the Merrimack Valley and the North Shore, are seeking public comment on their Draft Action Plans for Federal Fiscal Year 2016. The City of Peabody, the City of Haverhill, and the Consortium are hoping to receive feedback on these documents from interested parties regarding 1.) The use of HOME funds for the development of affordable housing in the North Shore HOME Consortium region in the coming year; and 2.) The use of CDBG funds to assist low and moderate income persons in the City of Peabody and the City of Haverhill in the coming year. The Consortium’s communities include: Amesbury, Andover, Beverly, Boxford, Danvers, Essex, Gloucester, Georgetown, Hamilton, Haverhill, Ipswich, Lynnfield, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Marblehead, Merrimac, Methuen, Middleton, Newburyport, North Andover, North Reading, Peabody, Rockport, Rowley, Salem, Salisbury, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, West Newbury and Wilmington. The activities proposed with HOME funds include: Creating Affordable Rental Housing; Rehabilitating Existing Housing Stock & Removing Physical Barriers for People who are Disabled; Creating Affordable Homeownership Housing Units; Providing Downpayment Assistance to Income-eligible Homebuyers; Providing Tenant-based Rental Assistance to Target Populations; Assisting Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs). Current proposed CDBG projects in Haverhill include: Social Service Projects administered by non-profit subrecipients, Public Improvements, such as Sidewalk and Park Improvements and Tree Planting in the federally-designated inner city Target Area neighborhoods; Housing Rehabilitation for low to moderate income homeowners as well as organizations serving low to moderate income populations; Code Enforcement; Program Administration and planning efforts; First-Time Homebuyer Assistance; and Economic Development activities including Commercial Façade Improvement and Microenterprise Support. Current Proposed CDBG projects in Peabody include Social Service Activities, Creation/Retention of Affordable Housing, Demolition of Blighted Structures and Clearance for Public Safety, Infrastructure and Safety Improvements, and Economic Development Activities. An electronic copy of the Consortium’s 2016 Action plan is available at www. peabody-ma.gov, and will be forwarded to each member community, will be available for public inspection at their Community Development/Planning Departments. The document will also be available at many of the regions’ anti-poverty, housing, and elder service organizations. A copy of the City of Peabody 2016 Action Plan will also be available online and at the Community Development & Planning Department of the City of Peabody, City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA during normal business hours.

LEGAL The public comment period will begin on Monday, April 11th and will end on Thursday, May 12th, 2016. During this time, two Public Hearings will be held to invite comment on the draft document at the following locations: Tuesday April 12th at 10:00 a.m. at Haverhill Public Library, 99 Main Street, Haverhill, MA; and on Thursday, April 14th at 6:00 p.m. at Peabody City Hall, Community Development Conference Room, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody. (Both of these locations are accessible) Citizens, all interested parties, representatives from the Consortium’s member communities, and nonprofit providers are urged to participate in these hearings. Written comments are also encouraged, and may be addressed, on or before May 12, 2016, to: For Peabody and the NSHC: The Department of Community Development, City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960/ FAX (978) 538-5987/e-mail addresses: lisa.greene@peabody-ma.gov or stacey.bernson@peabody-ma.gov/ or for the City of Haverhill: Andrew Herlihy, Division Director, 4 Summer Street, Room 309, Haverhill, MA 01830/ Fax: 978/374-2332 e-mail: aherlihy@ cityofhaverhill.com. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed General Bids for MPA PROJECT NO. M585-C1 PARCEL D-3, PARKING LOT IMPROVEMENTS, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S - Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2016, immediately after which, in a designated room, the proposal will be opened and read publicly. NOTE:

PRE-BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10:00 AM LOCAL TIME ON THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2016.

The work includes: •

GRADING AND FULL DEPTH BITUMINOUS CONCRETE PAVING

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE REMOVAL, SHIMMING AND REPAVING

INSTALLATION OF 2:1 SLOPE WITH 3” LAYER OF ¾” CRUSHED • STONE •

INSTALLATION OF EROSION CONTROL MEASURES

PAVEMENT MARKINGS

PARKING LOT LIGHTING

INSTALLATION OF BOLLARDS AND JERSEY BARRIERS

INSTALLATION OF TWO SOLAR POWERED PAY STATIONS

The Add Alternative #1 work includes: •

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE REMOVAL, SHIMMING AND REPAVING

The Add Alternative #2 work includes: •

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE REMOVAL

GRADING AND FULL DEPTH BITUMINOUS CONCRETE PAVING

Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNEDAY, MARCH 30, 2016. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. The estimated Base Bid cost is $326,764.00 The estimated Add-Alternative 1 cost is $39,467.00 The estimated Add-Alternative 2 cost is $64,963.00 A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub-bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub-bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and/ or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance, Auto Liability Insurance, and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $1,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. This contract is subject to a Minority/Women Owned Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than NINE POINT FOUR PERCENT (9.4%) of the Contract be performed by minority and women owned business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non-Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of NonSegregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 21

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

LEGAL MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. AP1516-C2(R), FY16-18 PUMP & MOTOR SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE, BOSTON, BEDFORD AND WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2016, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 2016. The work includes PROVIDE ALL LABOR, TOOLS, TESTING, EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS TO SERVICE, MAINTAIN AND REPAIR WASTEWATER, STORMWATER, CONDENSATE AND OTHER PROCESS PUMPS, MOTORS AND CONTROLS OF VARIOUS EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS FOR ALL MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY FACILITIES IN BOSTON, BEDFORD AND WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of MECHANICAL SYSTEMS. The estimated contract cost is TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS ($200,000.00). Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44J inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of TEN MILLION DOLLARS ($10,000,000.00). Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. No filed sub bids will be required for this contract. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CLASSIFIED LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE DIVISION OF CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT & MAINTENANCE Sealed proposals submitted on a form furnished by the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance (DCAMM) and clearly identified as a bid, endorsed with the name and address of the bidder, the project and contract number, will be received at the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance, One Ashburton Place, 1st Floor, Room 107, Boston, MA 02108, no later than the date and time specified and will forthwith be publicly opened and read aloud. General Bids before 2:00 PM:

April 26, 2016

This notice is for three to five contracts bid in accordance Chapter 9, Section 49 of the Acts of 2011 as amended by Sections 23 and 24 of Chapter 119 of the Acts of 2015. Mass. State Project No.

IFM1601

Every General Bidder must be certified by the Division of Capital Asset Management & Maintenance for the category of work and for no less than the bid price plus all add alternates of this project. The Category of Work is:

General Building Construction

JOB ORDER CONTRACT – IFM METRO BOSTON REGION Job Order projects under this Contract may include alteration, conversion,

LEGAL maintenance, and/or repair (as defined in the Contract Documents) of state buildings and facilities located in the following cities and towns:

LEGAL Filed sub bids will be required and taken on the following classes of work: ELECTRICAL

$15,000.00

Brookline, Milton, Quincy (which are all located in Norfolk County); Cambridge, Everett, Malden, Somerville, Watertown (which are all located in Middlesex County); Boston, Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop (which are all located in Suffolk County).

The Authority reserves the right to reject any sub bid of any sub trade where permitted by Section 44E of the above referenced General Laws. The right is also reserved to waive any informality in or to reject any or all proposals and General Bids.

Each Job Order project will have an estimated cost of construction of not more than $100,000. Total of all Job Orders performed by a Contractor under an awarded Contract may not exceed $1,000,000 subject to terms of the Contract Documents. Job Orders will be priced based on Bidder’s Contractor’s Coefficient(s) multiplied by applicable Unit Prices in the Contract Documents.

This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246).

Maximum Contract term is two years (including any extensions). Time for completion of individual projects is TBD in Job Orders.

The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000.

The pre-bid informational meeting will be held on Wednesday, April 6, 2016 @10:00 AM in Room 1, 21st Floor, One Ashburton Place, Boston, MA 02108. Minimum rates of wages to be paid on the project have been determined by the Director of the Department of Labor Standards under the provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 149, Sections 26 to 27H. Wage rates are listed in the contract form portion of specification book. Each general bid and sub-bid proposal must be secured by an accompanying deposit of $5,000 in the form of a bid bond, in cash, a certified, treasurer’s, or cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company made payable to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The bidding documents may be examined at the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance Bid Room, One Ashburton Place, 1st Floor, Room 107, Boston, MA 02108 Tel (617) 727-4003. Paper copies may be obtained by depositing a company check, treasurer’s check, cashier’s check, bank check or money order in the sum of $100.00 payable to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. No personal checks or cash will be accepted as deposits. Refunds will be made to those returning the documents in satisfactory condition on or before May 10, 2016 (ten business days after the opening of General Bids) otherwise the deposit shall be the property of the Commonwealth. CD is available at no charge. WE DO NOT MAIL PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS. Messenger and other types of pick-up and delivery services are the agents of the bidder and the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance assumes no responsibility for delivery or receipt of the documents. Bidders are encouraged to take advantage of a rotating credit plans and specifications deposit program initiated by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance to encourage the easy accessibility of documents to contractors. Carol W. Gladstone COMMISSIONER MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. L1504-C1 CARGO BUILDING NO. 56 DRY SPRINKLER SYSTEM REPLACEMENT, LOGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S - Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2016, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. Sealed filed sub bids for the same contract will be received at the same office until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2016, immediately after which, in a designated room, the filed sub bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 1:00 PM LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2016. The work includes INSTALLATION OF NEW HYDRAULICALLY CALCULATED AUTOMATIC FIRE PROTECTION SPRINKLER SYSTEM WITH NITROGEN AND LIMITED FIRE ALARM AND ELECTRICAL WORK. REMOVAL OF EXISTING SYSTEM. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form.

Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. AP1610-C1 FY16-18 ROOF MAINTENANCE TERM CONTRACT, BOSTON, BEDFORD, AND WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2016, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly. NOTE: PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 2016. The work includes: PROVISION OF LABOR, INCIDENTAL MATERIALS, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES TO REPAIR AND MAINTAIN ALL ROOFING SYSTEMS AT ALL PROPERTIES UNDER THE CONTROL OF THE AUTHORITY, AS REQUIRED FROM TIME TO TIME, ON AN AS NEEDED/ON CALL BASIS, FOR A TIME PERIOD OF TWENTY-FOUR (24) MONTHS. Bid documents will be made available beginning THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2016. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form. In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of ROOFING. The estimated contract cost is SEVEN HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS ($700,000.00). Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44J inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid.

The estimated contract cost is FIVE HUNDRED EIGHTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($580,000.00).

The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater.

In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract, filed Sub-bidders must submit with their bid a current Sub-bidder Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and a Sub-bidder Update Statement. The filed Sub-bidder must be certified in the sub-bid category of work for which the Sub-bidder is submitting a bid proposal.

The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $10,000,000. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details.

Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44H inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

No filed sub bids will be required for this contract.

In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Assessment Management and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of FIRE PROTECTION SPRINKLER SYSTEMS.

A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of $10,000,000.00. Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details.

This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000. Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals. MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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22 • Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

Mosaic on the Riverway 80 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115

Parker Hill Apartments

Affordable Housing Opportunity in Boston

Brand New Renovated Apartment Homes

(8) One-Bedroom (48) Two-Bedroom & (4) Three-Bedroom apartments (4) of the One-Bedroom apartments have a preference for disabled households requiring wheelchair accessibility Maximum household income limit 30% & 60% of HUD Boston Median Income HH Size

30%

60%

1

20,700

41,400

2

23,650

47,200

3

26,600

53,220

4

29,550

59,100

5

31,950

63,840

6

34,300

68,580

Stainless Steel Appliances New Kitchen Cabinets Hardwood Floors Updated Bathroom Custom Accent Wall Painting Free Parking Free Wi-Fi in lobby Modern Laundry Facilities

Two Bedrooms Starting at $2200 888-842-7945

Informational sessions: Thursday, April 14th at 6:00 p.m. at RTH Community Center, 20a Vining Street, Boston Monday, April 18th at 1:00 p.m. at POP Allston, 89 Brighton Ave, Boston

HELP WANTED

Wollaston Manor

HEALTH INSURANCE FIELD!

Senior Living At It’s Best

Companies Now Hiring MEMBER SERVICE CALL CENTER REPS Rapid career growth potential

91 Clay Street Quincy, MA 02170

A senior/disabled/ handicapped community 0 BR units = $1,027/mo 1 BR units = $1,101/mo All utilities included.

Call Sandy Miller, Property Manager

#888-691-4301

New Jobs In Fast-Growing

$ STIPEND DURING 12-WEEK TRAINING Are you a “people person?” Do you like to help others? Full-time, 12-week training plus internship. Job placement assistance provided.

FREE TRAINING FOR THOSE THAT QUALIFY HS diploma or GED required. Free YMCA membership for you and your family while enrolled in YMCA Training, Inc. Call 617-542-1800 and refer to Health Insurance Training when you call

Program Restrictions Apply.

Affordable Rental Housing Plainville, MA

Applications may be picked up from Wingate Management: RTH Community Center: 20a Vining Street, Boston, MA 02115 April 4, 2016 - April 28, 2016 Mon/Tues/Wed/Fri: 9:30 am - 4:00 pm Thursdays: 10:00 am – 7:00 pm Saturdays: from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Messenger Woods at 21 Messenger Street Six Affordable Rental Units (1 ADA)

One 1BR Unit: $1,273 per month Five 2BR Units: $1,404 per month

Application Return RTH Riverway Management Office in person or via U.S. Mail to 747 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 or emailed to MosaicApts@wingatecompanies.com

Information Session: April 14, 2016, 7:00 pm, Plainville COA, 9 School Street, Plainville MA 02762

Applications accepted through: May 19, 2019 1:00PM

Deadline: Completed applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. or have a postmarked date of Friday, May 6th, 2016.

Maximum Income: 80% of area median income Minimum Income: No more than 35% of an applicant’s gross income can be spent on rent

Income Restricted Housing Opportunity

Application and Information: Housing@Sudbury.Ma.US

10 Roxbury St Roxbury, MA 02119

278 Old Sudbury Road, Sudbury, MA 01776, 978-639-3373

2 Income Restricted Units # of Units

Type

Rent

Income Limit

1

1 BR

$1068

70%

1

1 BR

$1246

70%

Maximum Income per Household Size (HUD 2013 limits, provided by BRA) HH size

70%

1

$46,250

2

$52,850

3

$59,450

4

$66,100

5

$71,350

6

$76,650

7

$81,950

8

$87,250

Applications may be picked up in person from Isalia Property Group 305 Dudley St Roxbury, MA 02119: Day/Dates: Monday, April 11, 2016 Hours: 9 am to 7pm Tuesday- Friday, April 12-15, 2016 Hours: 9 am to 5pm Saturday, April 16, 2016 Hours: 9am to 1pm Deadline for completed applications at the above address In Person by 4pm Monday, April 25, 2016 or mailed and postmarked by that day Selection by lottery. Asset, Use & Occupancy Restrictions apply. Preference for Boston Residents. Preference for Households with at least one person per bedroom. For more information or reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities, call Jennifer Lampa, Isalia Property Group 617-299-1075 Equal Housing Opportunity

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SMALL ADS BRING

BIG RESULTS! Call 617-261-4600 x 7799 or visit www.baystatebanner.com now to place your ad.

HELP WANTED Are you interested in a

Healthcare CAREER? Project Hope, in partnership with Partners HealthCare is currently accepting applications for a FREE entry level healthcare employment training program. Program eligibility includes: • • • • •

Have a high school diploma or equivalent Have a verifiable reference of 1 year from a former employer Pass assessments in reading, language, and computer skills Have CORI clearance Be legally authorized to work in the United States

MECHANIC Full Time Boston Area

Looking for full time reliable and experienced person with knowledge in general apartment maintenance. The Mechanic is responsible for performing maintenance functions in the community, including rental units, office buildings, residential areas, grounds and parking lots. On-Call Rotation required. Good communication skills (written and verbal), C.OR.I., S.O.R.I. & Drug Test Required. Please send resume to: Langham Court Apartments Attn: Margarita Ballester 26 Worcester Street Boston, MA 02118 Fax: 617-859-0024 Email: langhamcourt@winnco.com

For more information and to register for the next Open House please visit our website at www.prohope.org/openhouse.htm or call 617-442-1880 ext. 218.

CRUZ

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS

Boston based property management firm, Cruz Management Company seeks experienced candidates, to fill open positions, in our maintenance department location, in the Boston area. Must have 5+ years of experience in property maintenance including: painting, plumbing, electrical, HVAC, carpentry, snow removal. Must have own tools, valid driver’s license, own vehicle for travel to properties. We offer an excellent compensation/benefits package. Please email all resumes to: SUCCESS@CRUZCOMPANIES.COM Absolutely no calls please!

Restaurant Manager We are currently seeking qualified applicants for this position. Our ideal candidate loves the dynamic work environment of a busy restaurant, enjoys social interactions with our customers and performers and aspires to create new ways to make it all run seamlessly. If you have at least 3 years of restaurant experience, including all front of the house operations, we want to hear from you. Salary commensurate with experience. Email resume to dsettles@cvdboston.com 604 Columbus Avenue · Boston, MA 02118 · 617.536.1100


Thursday, March 31, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 23

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Maintenance Technician

Graphic Designer

Cruz Management Company, Inc. is seeking experienced candidates to fill open positions in our maintenance department. The ideal candidate must have 5+ years of experience in property maintenance which includes but is not limited to: Painting Electrical Carpentry

HELP WANTED

Greater Media Boston Interactive (GMBi) is looking for a talented and upbeat Graphic Designer to join our creative, cutting edge team!

Responsibilities include designing promotional elements for our five major market radio stations, executing digital products for client programs, including logo design, website design, print/ web advertisements, event signage and more. He/she will also update our radio station responsive-design websites on Wordpress platform, support our web developer, and assist the Digital Project Manager with daily management of all digital project submissions.

Plumbing HVAC Snow Removal

Prospective candidates must be a team player and have the ability to complete work orders timely on their own. Candidates must be able to work overtime which includes overnight on-call duties and snow removal when necessary. A valid driver’s license is required as well as your own vehicle to travel to properties. All maintenance technicians are required to have their own tools.

Must be proficient in Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator), Wordpress, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Excel. Must have excellent written and interpersonal skills, be detail oriented, and organized. Bachelor’s degree and knowledge of HTML5 preferred.

Cruz Management Co., Inc. offers our employees a competitive salary and excellent benefits package which includes paid vacations & sick days, paid health & dental, holidays and a 401K plan.

All qualified candidates please submit a cover letter and resume to: hrjobs@greatermediaboston.com.

Please email all résumés to: SUCCESS @ CRUZCOMPANIES.COM Absolutely no calls please!

~ No phone calls, please! ~ Greater Media is an Equal Opportunity Employer WBOS 92.9 / WKLB 102.5 / WMJX 106.7 WROR 105.7 / WBQT 96.9

Employment Opportunities Early Care and Education Center: Roxbury n Lead Teacher: The Lead Teacher is to work in conjunction with the Senior Lead Teacher and Center Director to ensure high quality child care. Collaborate with other program staff to ensure smooth program operations. The Lead Teacher will share the responsibilities of educational goals, classroom activities, creation of new projects and programs, licensing requirements with the Senior Lead Teacher. *Must have an Associates (and/or enrolled in Bachelor Degree program in Early Childhood and/or Special Education) or Bachelor degree in Early Childhood Education or related fields. Lead Teacher must have Infant, Toddler or Preschool Certification with E.E.C. n Teacher: The teacher is responsible for assisting the lead teacher in the development, implementation and maintenance of the classroom curriculum and educational activities. *Associates Degree preferred in Early Childhood or related field and/or CDA certificate. Must have Infant, Toddler or Preschool Certification. n Substitute

Teachers: Teachers on call.

Behavioral Health Services – Roxbury Community Service Agency (Specialized in Black Families): This program provides support to families with young people with Severe Emotional Disturbances: Roxbury n Family Partners: Individuals who are experienced caregivers of youth with emotional challenges and are able to support and coach other families. n Intensive Care Coordinator: An individual that facilitates the Wraparound care planning process and coordinates services and natural supports for youth experiencing emotional and behavioral challenges. n In Home Therapist: Providing strength-based therapeutic relationship between a Master level clinician and the youth and family for the purpose of treating the youth’s behavioral health needs, including improving the family’s ability to provide effective support for the youth to promote his/ her healthy functioning within the family. *Must be a master’s level (or above) with at least 3 years experience in providing outpatient Behavioral health services to youth and families. Experience managing a home-based or Wraparound program models is preferred. Must be certified in the Massachusetts CBHI CANS. n Director of Outpatient Therapy: The Outpatient Director provides clinical leadership and management of the Outpatient services(mental and substance abuse). The Outpatient Director is also part of the Behavioral Health Department Senior Management Team, which supports compliance with all delivery of services to the fiscal, ethical and legal standards of the Commonwealth and the mission and core values of CSR. The Outpatient

Director is also responsible for the clinical case review process, continuing education development and the certification and recertification needs of all of the clinical staff of CSR’s Outpatient clinic. This individual ensures a high quality of Cultural and Linguistic competence and Trauma Informed therapeutic care. In addition this individual will ensure that care is being provided by a staff of appropriately trained duly certified and licensed practitioners and ensures a safe and efficient physical environment. *Must be a master’s level(or above) clinician. Experience managing a homebased or wrap-around program is preferred. Must be licensed at the Independent practice level or eligle for licensure to support the requirements of the program. Must be certified in Massachusetts CBHI CANS. n Outpatient Mental Health Therapist: Performing assessments; formulating clinical diagnoses; providing individual, family and group counseling; collaborating with other agencies, family members and other relevant parties involved in the client’s care; providing consultation to CSR non clinical and home-based clinical staff; and participating in research/ evaluation activities to ensure the delivery of evidence-based trauma informed care and best clinical practices. *Master’s level degree is required in Social Work, Counseling, Psychology, or a related field with 2 years experience in providing Behavioral health services to youth, adults and families. Experience in home-based or wraparound program models is preferred. Must be certified in the Massachusetts CBHI CANS. n Recovery Coach: The Recovery Coach (RC) will provide peer recovery support services to adult /adolecent client’s with substance use disorder (SUD). Recovery Coach Services allow the coaches to meet client’s where they are both in the community and in their stage of change. This position will facilitate client access to recovery-oriented substance use disorder treatment, resources, and community recovery groups to assist the client. These services are individualized and help the clients identify their needs and plans for next steps. The RC will bridge the segregated treatment system into a more holistic care model through providing support across multiple systems and frameworks of care. In addition, the RC will maintain ongoing client support regardless of relapse and will serve as a motivator, role model, recovery guide,and encourages hope for clients with substance use disorders. n School Based Coordinator: Under the direction of the School Based Manager and in collaboration with School Staff/School Administration, the coordinator will supervise the delivery of behavior health services provided by CSR. The School Based Coordinator will act as the contact person for all school partnerships and co-supervise the School Based Pods. *Candidate must possess a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in the fields of Humans Services, Management, Business Administration, Psychology, Sociology and or other related field or 5 years experience in a related field. Masters degree is encouraged but not required. A minimum of 1-3 years of management/supervisory experience is preferred.

n Substance Abuse Counselor: The Substance Abuse Counselor will provide quality substance abuse counseling services according to the program’s established policies and procedures. The Counselor reviews referrals, conducts screening to assign to outpatient counseling services, and if deemed appropriate, conducts bio-psycho-social assessments for use in treatment planning and referrals. The Counselor will conduct individual, couples, and family counseling. Furthermore, the Counselor will also provide case consultation, in-home therapy, and group therapy. As a group therapist the Counselor will be expected to participate in the development of group content. S/he works closely with treatment providers and referring organizations to expedite the referral processes and avoid duplication. Substance Abuse Counselors are expected to accurately complete all required record keeping forms, insure that clients’ charts are complete, and keep progress notes up to date at all times. S/he works to obtain and/or maintain clinical credentials and licensure by receiving supervision and attending training opportunities.

Intensive Foster Care Program: Tewksbury n Child Specific Worker (Spanish Speaking- Tewksbury): CSR’s Intensive Foster Care Program works to place children in stable, loving, nurturing foster homes. Our goal is to find both short-term and long-term placements for at-risk children and youth with a broad range of emotional, physical and developmental special needs. Reunification with the child’s biological family is our goal. When that is not feasible, care providers and staff work together to formulate an alternate plan for permanency such as kinship care, guardianship, or adoption. *Bachelor’s level; and/ or 2-5 years of experience. Must be LCSW, LSW, LSWA, or LICSW eligible. Must have a valid driver’s license without restrictions and have reliable transportation.

Family Childcare Program – Roxbury n Social Worker: The Social Worker will work with DCF(Dept. of Children and Families)/DEEC (Dept. of Early Care and Education) to ensure quality childcare for all children. The social worker will report to Family Childcare Program Director, and will recruit qualified educators and DCF referrals. Social worker will meet contract guidelines with DCF/DEEC, and ensure that all children’s needs are met in a quality child care home. He/She will attend community meetings, and share materials with Program Director. *Masters in Social Work or related field required. Must have a valid driver’s license without restrictions and have reliable transportation.

Congregate Shelter Program – Roxbury n Case Manager: Coordinates all family support services and monitors family’s compliance to the individual’s self-sufficiency plan. Assists Participants in identifying and reducing barriers to permanent housing. Must be sensitive to the dignity and respect of program participants and staff. *BA in Human Services, Social Work or related field preferred. 1-3years of Case Management/ housing search experience preferred. Bilingual in Spanish required.

For more information regarding these listings and/or other employment opportunities, please visit our website at www.csrox.org and send your resume to Children’s Services of Roxbury, Inc. 520 Dudley St. Roxbury, MA 02119 Attn: Human Resource Department or email to cshropshire@csrox.org NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

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On top of our game X1 from XFINITY® will change the way you experience TV We are a straight-up, no joke, can’t-get-enough sports family. If it’s on, we’ll watch it. And if it’s going to be on, we’ll know about it with personalized recommendations. With X1, we even have 24/7 sports coverage on all major networks and local-team coverage with XFINITY On Demand™ . Plus, XFINITY delivers the fastest Internet in America, according to Speedtest.net, which means we’re all connected to our favorite teams, from our favorite devices, from pre-season to the very last game. Now, if only winning a championship was as easy as XFINITY.

Get started with

89

XFINITY X1 Triple Play

$

99

Ask how to get a $200 Visa® Prepaid Card when you step up to a qualifying HD Triple Play

per month for 12 months with 2-year agreement

Call 1-855-589-0602 or visit xfinity.com today

Offer ends 4/10/16, and is limited to new residential customers. Not available in all areas. Requires subscription to Starter XF Triple Play with Digital Starter TV, Performance Internet and XFINITY Voice Unlimited services. Early termination fee applies. Equipment, installation, taxes and fees, including regulatory recovery fees, Broadcast TV Fee (up to $5.00/mo.), Regional Sports Network Fee (up to $3.00/mo.) and other applicable charges extra, and subject to change during and after the promo. After applicable promo, or if any service is cancelled or downgraded, regular charges apply. Comcast’s current service charge for Starter XF Triple Play is $148.49/mo. (pricing subject to change). Service limited to a single outlet. May not be combined with other offers. TV: Basic service subscription required to receive other levels of service. XFINITY On Demand selections subject to charge indicated at time of purchase. Not all programming available in all areas. Internet: America’s fastest Internet based on report at Speedtest.net/awards/ us. Speedtest is a trademark of Ookla, LLC. Used under license. Voice: $29.95 activation fee applies. Service (including 911/emergency services) may not function after an extended power outage. Two-year term agreement required with prepaid card offer. Money-Back Guarantee applies to one month’s recurring service charge and standard installation charges up to $500. Visa® prepaid card requires subscription to qualifying HD Triple Play with minimum term agreement. Early termination fee applies. Prepaid card mailed to account holder within 18 weeks of activation of all required services and expires in 90 days. Cards issued by Citibank, N.A. pursuant to a license from Visa® U.S.A. Inc. and managed by Citi Prepaid Services. Cards will not have cash access and can be used everywhere Visa® debit cards are accepted. © 2016 Comcast. All rights reserved. NPA178552-0002 DIV16-1-203-AA-$89TPx12-A5

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3/2/16 3:30 PM


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