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C E L E B R A T I N G

FIFTEEN YEARS OF BATON ROUGE FOOD , CULTURE and COMMUNITY

SPECIAL KEEPSAKE EDITION

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15 carats for

15 YEARS

Lee Michaels is proud to support 225 Magazine. Congratulations on 15 amazing years!

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A New Healthcare Experience

in Ascension

When we designed Baton Rouge General – Ascension, we created an experience like no other; a neighborhood hospital with the services you want and a new healthcare experience that puts our patients first. With no patient waiting rooms, patients can check in when they arrive through the Baton Rouge General app or our on-site kiosk. And don’t worry, friendly staff members will be there to help every step of the way. • Reduces the risk of contracting or spreading illness • Increases comfort and privacy • Gives you more face-to-face time with your care team

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225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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Dr. Todd Howell & Brittany Lipoma MPAS, PA-C

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THANK YOU FOR MAKING BATON ROUGE

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Dr. Todd Howell

20 years as a Premier Cosmetic Surgeon in Baton Rouge Dr. Howell is Nationally Recognized and Award-winning in Cosmetic Surgery & Aesthetic Medicine

“Dr Howell is caring, detailed, and patient which was so comforting for me in my aesthetic journey” – CAROL H “Before I visited Dr. Howell I wasn’t able to be my daily self anymore. He helped me get back to the old me and my family and I are forever grateful!” – ROBERT J

“Does the ABSOLUTE best lips around!” – ASHLEY B

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UPFRONT //

Happy birthday, ‘225’

BY JULIO MELARA

As I look back over the past 15 years, I’m humbled by the efforts so many people have given to make 225 a success. We have been fortunate from the beginning to have great people help lead the way. I have mentioned a few already, but also want to thank Jill Stokeld, Katie Baron and Elizabeth McCollister Hebert, who were an integral part of our sales efforts for many years. Today, I’m surrounded with a great team that continues to take 225 to new heights. Art director Hoa Vu, managing editor Benjamin Leger and account executive Manny Fajardo have all been with us a long time on this journey and are still here. Six years ago, I was fortunate to find our current editor, Jennifer Tormo, who has done an exceptional job leading the editorial team. Our passionate sales director Erin Palmintier-Pou and graphic designer Melinda Gonzalez are a big part of the talented team that produces 225 every month.

TIME IS FLYING! It all started as a conversation. It was the early 2000s, and my business partner Rolfe McCollister and I were discussing where young professionals go to socialize—how did they get and share information? (This was before the iPhone, of course.) Downtown Baton Rouge was evolving. What if, we wondered, we started a new publication that would help locals discover more about their city? It would connect people and help shape the conversations and events that were transforming our community. In April 2005, we decided there was a void in the marketplace and the time was right to capture the culture we could feel evolving in Louisiana’s Capital City. We’d name it 225, after the area code for a city that was growing and changing. We didn’t know then how that magazine would evolve, or how it would shape our city’s style in its own special way. The goal was to launch our first issue in November 2005. We hired our first editor Tom Guarisco and staff writer Jeff Roedel, who would later become editor. Then we hired Nancy Clary as sales manager and Rei Heroman to help lead the charge with advertising sales. Little did we know that in late August, we would experience the wrath of a hurricane named Katrina, and it would change the Baton Rouge landscape overnight.

Our goal from the beginning has always been to inform and inspire. We’ve aimed to help readers truly discover, experience and celebrate their city—and to record all the conversations that are happening around town. From our first cover story, “Is BR turning—dare we say it—cosmopolitan?” to our annual Best of 225 Awards and all the stories in between, we’ve hoped to capture Baton Rouge’s past, present and future. It all started with a print magazine—like the one you hold in your hands today—distributed at restaurants, shops, offices and salons. Over the years, we’ve continually found new ways to connect with readers through 225. In 2006, we launched 225batonrouge.com and our first e-newsletter, 225 Select. Because Baton Rouge is such a food-driven city, we later launched our food newsletter 225 Dine, which is now published twice per week; and 225 Best Eats, boasting exclusive offers to popular restaurants. We’ve increasingly turned to social

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media to share stories and interact with readers. And this year, we capped it all off ith our 225 Magazine app, bringing you notific tions about headlines and offers on-the-go. We’ve published nearly 19,500 articles on 225batonrouge.com since its launch, and we have even more stories—and innovation—in store for 2021. Over the last 15 years, so many of you have told us that you pick up 225 every month, that it’s become your must-read for knowing about what’s going on in the city. But the best compliment we get often is that 225 makes readers proud to live here. Baton Rouge isn’t perfect, but there is so much passion in this city. It is our people who make our home such a remarkable, memorable place to live—and they are the reason we have so much fun putting together this publication. This community has been very supportive of 225, and I want to thank all of our readers, friends and customers. In this month’s commemorative issue, we’re looking back at 225’s journey. Throughout the magazine, you’ll find a review of the magazine’s greatest hits, the Red Stick’s most headline-grabbing stories and thoughts from some of the community figures we’ve featured over the years. Unplug from your devices, and sit back and enjoy this issue. We were honored to make it for you, and we hope you’ll keep it for years to come.

LSU hadn’t yet won its two historic football championships, and we’d never heard of Joe Burrow. Our city hadn’t yet been rocked by events like the August 2016 floods or the fight over St. George. We had so much growing up to do, and we didn’t have an inkling back then what the future would hold. To commemorate our 15th anniversary, we’re refl cting on the last decade and a half. In these pages, we look back at some of the biggest moments, openings and trends we’ve seen in the 225 area. Turn to page 29 to read the community and sports highlights, page page 93 for trends in shopping and style, page 149 for a look at food trends and page 175 for cultural moments.

’Tis the season Have you started your holiday shopping yet? After a tough year, the next two months will be make-orbreak for retailers. That especially goes for smaller, mom-and-pop businesses, many of which have been hit hard by the pandemic. Shopping locally for gifts was on our team’s mind when we profiled two local toy companies this month. The first, Tatro, is a newer startup, and its magnetic playsets are sparking creativity in children. The second, Victoria’s Toy Station, is a longstanding shop that’s been with Baton Rouge for more than three decades. Turn to page 23 for their stories.

15 years of local history Think back to 2005. The Shaw Center for the arts had just opened, signifying a bright future for downtown. Hurricane Katrina had driven a new population boom in the Capital Region, particularly in Ascension and Livingston parishes. It altered everything from the traffic during our commutes to regional restaurateurs increasingly setting their eyes on Baton Rouge. Our region was on the cusp of change. But there was no Knock Knock Children’s Museum, Perkins Rowe or Celtic Studios yet. We weren’t ready back then for cool openings like Electric Depot or Millennial Park, and there weren’t yet vibrant murals being painted all over the sides of buildings. Downtown was the neighborhood to watch, but Mid City was perhaps the one that would see the biggest cultural transformation.

Of course, these two tales are just a slice of the retail scene in Baton Rouge. There are so many incredible businesses to support, selling everything from clothes to home wares to children’s gifts. I’d encourage you to take a peek back in the archives at 225batonrouge.com for our September 2019 cover story, “The Ultimate Guide to Shopping in Baton Rouge.” Let's support our stores and shop locally.

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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CONTENTS //

Features 23 Where to feel like a kid again this holiday season

40 Fifteen places that changed the landscape of Baton Rouge

109

Fashion trends we’ve featured since 225 started

166 How our restaurant reviews and

recipes come together each month And much more … THE SING THE RIVER sculpture in downtown Baton Rouge was unveiled in December 2019. It’s become a welcomed sight throughout 2020 as residents looked for ways to get outside and stay active during the pandemic.

Departments 16 What’s Up 29 Our City 56 I am 225 60 Cover story 93 Style 149 Taste 175 Culture 190 Calendar

ON THE COVER

The 15th anniversary edition

COLLIN RICHIE

TO COMMEMORATE our birthday, 225’s longtime art director Hoa Vu designed this month’s colorful, splashy cover. Our goal was to create something timeless, and we hope you’ll keep this issue on your coffee table for seasons to come!

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[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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Since the last time you sat in Tiger Stadium, how many times have you had your HVAC system maintenanced? 90% of system failures are due to lack of proper maintenance. Text “HALFTIME” to 31996 during haltime of LSU home games to get your Tiger Tune-Up!

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

CONGRATS TO 225 MAGAZINE ON 15 YEARS!

PINNACLE EXTERIOR CONSTRUC TION IS PROUD TO CELEBR ATE WITH YOU.

CALL US TODAY for a complimentary consultation! 225.757.6138 | pecbuilt.com | LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

MENTION 225 & RECEIVE $225 OFF

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NOV 070PM 6:0

live music by Blue Verse wine tastings silent auction food from local restaurants

must be 21 or older to enter

THE BROC FOUNDATION IS A NOT-FOR-PROFIT, REGISTERED 501(C)3 ORGANIZATION. THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF THE FOUNDATION IS TO UTILIZE THE FUNDING TO PROVIDE ADDITIONAL ON-SITE CARE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE COMMUNITY AND TO ENSURE THE SAFETY OF CHILDREN PARTICIPATING IN YOUTH SPORTS. 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Dyslexia is NOT my Disability, it’s my

! r e w o p r Supe

A S K T H E S TA FF

Let’s flash back to 2005, in honor of 225’s anniversary. Where were you 15 years ago? Publisher: Julio Melara

EDITORIAL

Editorial director: Penny Font Editor: Jennifer Tormo Managing editor: Benjamin Leger Staff writer: Cynthea Corfah “My daughter was 6 years Digital content editor: Mark Clements old, my twin boys were Staff photographer: Collin Richie 3—and I was preparing Contributing writers: to give birth to a new Julia-Claire Evans, Maria Marsh, baby: 225 Magazine.” Tracey Koch, Elle Marie, Kayla Randall, —Julio Melara Maggie Heyn Richardson, Stephanie Riegel, Jeff Roedel Contributing photographers: Ariana Allison, Joey Bordelon, Catrice Coleman, Sean Gasser, Amy Shutt, Haskell Whittington

ADVERTISING

Sales director: Erin Palmintier-Pou Account executives: Manny Fajardo, André Hellickson Savoie, Jamie Hernandez, Kaitlyn Maranto, Brooke Motto Advertising coordinator: Devyn MacDonald

CORPOR ATE MEDIA

Editor: Lisa Tramontana Content strategist: Allyson Guay Multimedia Strategy Manager: Tim Coles

“Writing for 225! I wrote a story on the Mid City Dance Project called ‘Troupe Dreams.’ I was also listening to helicopters fly overh ad for weeks as they went back and forth from BR to NOLA after Hurricane Katrina.” —Maggie Heyn Richardson

MARKETING

Chief marketing officer: Elizabeth McCollister Hebert Marketing & events assistant: Taylor Floyd Events: Abby Hamilton Community liaison: Jeanne McCollister McNeil

At The Brighton School, we prepare and empower students with dyslexia and other language-based learning differences to succeed. Baton Rouge’s leader in the field of educating students with dyslexia. Grades K-12

“Settling into my new Baton Rouge home and homeschooling two of my three children at the Bluebonnet ADMINISTR ATION Public Library after losing Assistant business manager: Tiffany Durocher my New Orleans house, Digital manager: James Hume neighborhood and way Business associate: Kirsten Milano of life to the floodwaters Office coordinator: Tara Lane of Hurricane Katrina.” Receptionist: Cathy Brown —Stephanie Riegel

PRODUCTION/DESIGN

Production director: Melanie Samaha Art director: Hoa Vu Graphic designers: Melinda Gonzalez, Emily Witt

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

Audience development director: Katelyn Oglesby Audience development coordinator: Ivana Oubre

“Designing the first edition of 225 in our old downtown office ” —Hoa Vu

A publication of Louisiana Business Inc. Chairman: Rolfe H. McCollister Jr. President and CEO: Julio Melara Executive assistant: Kathleen Wray

12108 Parkmeadow Ave • Baton Rouge, LA 70816 thebrightonschool.org

225.291.2524 12 

• ............

9029 Jefferson Highway, Suite 300 Baton Rouge, LA 70809 225-214-5225  •  FAX 225-926-1329 225batonrouge.com  ©Copyright 2020 by Louisiana Business Incorporated. All rights reserved by LBI. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited. Business address: 9029 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Telephone (225) 214-5225. 225 Magazine cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material—manuscripts or photographs—with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed.

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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    Peace Prosperity Progress Peace Prosperity Progress Peace Prosperity Progress

“Since day day one, one, “Since “Since day one, 225 Magazine has has helped 225 225Magazine Magazine hashelped helped our residents residents discover and and our our residentsdiscover discover and celebrate the the rich culture culture celebrate celebrate therich rich culture ofofBaton Baton Rouge. of BatonRouge. Rouge. Congratulations on your Congratulations Congratulationson onyour your 15-Year Anniversary!� 15-Year 15-YearAnniversary!� Anniversary!�

Mayor-President Mayor-President Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome SharonWeston Weston Broome Broome Sharon

   @mayorbroome @mayorbroome @mayorbroome

MayorPresidentSharonWestonBroome MayorPresidentSharonWestonBroome MayorPresidentSharonWestonBroome 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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F E E D B AC K / / W H AT ’ S O N L I N E / /

READER COMMENTS

TE

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AA RO N

WILL

IAMS

UR CO

—Jamie Politz

Aaron Williams, winner of our grand prize.

About our online-only “225 Things to Do in a Pandemic” special issue:

Winner, winner the 225 Magazine app, available for iPhone, iPad or Android. Several other locals won restaurant gift cards, including Elizabeth Schwab, Andrea Erckert, Milica Courtenay, Sarah Normand, Babette Bourgeois, Susan Landry and Allison Sceroler. Watch for more giveaways through our social media channels and 225 Dine in the future. And don’t forget to download the 225 Magazine app for regular updates, including the latest food news, features, events and more.

—Stacy Ortego

THINGS

TO DO in a pandemic E XCLUSI V E DIG ITA L E DITION

SPONSORED BY:

HE

A RD JO

Coach Ed Orgeron heading into Tiger Stadium last season

About “Our Next Leaders,” our October cover story on young people making a difference in Baton Rouge:

“Really enjoyed this issue!! Great job!!” —Ena Lacy

About our profile o the new restaurant ThaiHey Thaifood: COLLIN RICHIE

EVERYONE LOVES a prize. And to help Baton Rouge get excited about the new 225 Magazine app, we gave away prizes to locals who downloaded in the weeks after the launch. Congratulations are in order for Aaron Williams, who won our grandprize drawing for an in-home, customized, four-course dinner with wine pairings for eight prepared by Mansurs on the Boulevard executive chef Chris Motto. The prize is valued at $2,000. And all he had to do was download

“We should do some exploring!”

225

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“Not gonna be a fair weather LSU fan. They are working hard to rebuild to become the team we all love and support! Geaux Tigers!”

FL ER

About the rocky start to LSU’s 2020 football season:

ThaiHey’s Massaman Ribeye

OC TOBER 2020 • FREE ELECTION GUIDE 27 SAVING THE MUSIC 97 HALLOWEEN TOWN 104

OUGE .COM

“EAT here!!!! So good and the staff is so friendly and attentive!”

Our next

leaders Baton Rouge students helping our community and taking a stand for change

—Angelle Guitreau Tibbets

NEW 225 App is Here! 01 Cover.indd 1

See Page 15

Download to WIN $2,000 Grand Prize.

9/15/20 5:18 PM

CONNECT WITH US facebook.com/225magazine

twitter.com/225batonrouge

instagram.com/225batonrouge

pinterest.com/225batonrouge

youtube.com/225magazine

225 AD_8.875x5_15thAnniversary_Congrats.pdf 1 9/30/2020 11:25:31 AM

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[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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Happy

TH

Anniversary

RaisingCanes.com Follow us on Instagram:

@RaisingCanes | @ToddGraves | @RaisingCane3 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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November

Picture perfect

Testing out 2020 TikTok and Instagram photo trends around Baton Rouge DO YOU EVER see photos on Instagram and wonder how the person took them? On TikTok, photographers have been pulling back the curtain and showing users the behind-thescenes steps to capture artsy photos. From ghostly photo shoots where people cover themselves with a sheet to milk-bath photos

where the model lays in a tub of cloudy water, there were many photo trends circulating social media this year. Since one of the most memorable years of our lifetime is soon coming to a close, the 225 team decided to give the trends of our era a shot. Here’s what we had to say about the experience.

Projecting pride

—STAFF WRITER CYNTHEA CORFAH

In the shadows

STAFF PHOTOS

• Find a large, blank wall to create a spacious backdrop for a projector. If you don’t have a mount, prop the projector on a stand or table. The more wall space you have for the projected image, the more photo opportunities you’ll uncover. • Pick a photo or video with a funky print, design or text to project onto the subject. I used a photo of African fabric to celebrate my Liberian heritage! • Use a dark room for the photo shoot. If photographing in the daytime, use blackout curtains or pin blankets over the windows to darken the room. Any extra light makes the projected image appear less clear and vibrant.

• Cut out fun shapes on a posterboard. Don’t waste your time with scissors! Carve your design with an X-Acto knife; it’s much easier to work with and more precise. • Recruit at least one partner for shooting, if not two. One person will hold the posterboard over you— casting the shadows—while the other takes your photos. If you’re short on crew, set your phone’s or camera’s self-timer and mount it on a tripod. • Harsh, direct sunlight will give you the best shadows. Just try not to squint!

—EDITOR JENNIFER TORMO

Mirror image

My reflection

• Find a puddle during golden hour, or another time of day when the light isn’t too harsh. That’s when you’ll get the best reflections • Try to find cl ar water, without grass or litter, to mimic the most mirrorlike surface. We went out after Hurricane Delta, so unfortunately we struggled with a lot of debris. • Parking lots and bridge underpasses are great places to look for puddles around Baton Rouge!

—EDITOR JENNIFER TORMO

• Grab the biggest mirror you can carry and haul it outside. In my case, it was one that just came in the mail and was supposed to go in the bathroom. But first let’s take a selfie • Find the best light (usually late afternoon). Calculate the angle of the sun hitting your face as reflected in the mir or. Perhaps get a degree in advanced geometry. Make sure you’ve also got a decent background like shade trees from above or tropical foliage. • Wear sunglasses for cool factor, to protect against the harsh reflection and to hide crow’s feet.

—MANAGING EDITOR BENJAMIN LEGER

Follow the rainbow

• Stand near a window during the afternoon or when the sun is peeking through the most. • Use a CD to bounce colorful light from the window on to yourself or another subject. You may have to rotate the disc around until you see the rainbow. • Experiment with the distance of the subject and the CD from the window until you get the perfect, visible rainbow.

—STAFF WRITER CYNTHEA CORFAH

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[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

Coffee on wheels

Meet Espresso Geaux: a local coffee truck that’s here to serve ESPRESSO GEAUX IS like an ice cream truck but for adults. After all, coffee is the grown-up equivalent of treating yourself. Espresso Geaux is a woman-owned, Capital Region coffee truck that serves caffeinated beverages to local subdivisions, businesses, schools, organizations and events. Imagine dropping your child off at school and getting rewarded with a hot cup of joe. That’s what happens at the local schools on Espresso Geaux’s route. Brandi Plaisance opened her coffee truck in August 2019. At the time, she wasn’t a coffee drinker, but she was fascinated with the complex process of coffee making. “I fell in love with making coffee while volunteering at church,” Plaisance says. “I was working offshore as a safety paramedic when God gave me the idea. So when I came back home I went to coffee school in Texas and bought a coffee truck.” Plaisance sells iced and hot lattes, fresh-brewed coffee, frappuccinos and non-coffee drinks like tea, hot chocolate and smoothies. The most popular drink is the iced caramel macchiato, which is made with a vanilla milk base, caramel and espresso. Espresso Geaux really is on-the-go. It travels mostly to schools in Livingston, East Baton Rouge and Ascension parishes. Once teachers and parents get their morning coffee fix f om the truck before classes, Espresso Geaux rolls to the next school or booked event. Sometimes Plaisance parks at up to three schools a day. “Our business tripled during quarantine because we started going into subdivisions,” Plaisance says. “We went from having 2,200 followers on Facebook to 6,800.” This November, Espresso Geaux hopes to plant its roots. The Walker native plans to open a drive-thru coffee shop in Watson in mid-November. Until then, locals can find Esp esso Geaux at Watson Farmers Market on the first S turday of every month, unless it is booked for an event. espressogeaux.com

DIGITS

5.25

Number of golf courses per 100,000 residents in Baton Rouge, which is higher than all peer cities but Birmingham. SOURCE: A 2020 CITYSTATS REPORT BY BATON ROUGE AREA FOUNDATION

COURTESY BRANDI PLAISANCE

WINNERS

—CYNTHEA CORFAH

Light my fire Local candle makers to shop this fall CANDLES MAKE ANY room feel cozy. It could be the middle of summer, but as long as the pumpkin spice candle is burning, it feels like fall. Now that holiday season is upon us, it’s officially time to stock up on your candle collection. Here are some local makers to shop. A Sacred Space Candles

ON OCT. 7, Red Stick Together, a food ministry of Broadmoor United Methodist Church, served its 20,000th free meal since the COVID-19 shutdown began in mid-March. Red Stick Together began in December 2019 in an effort to help feed locals and guide people toward a Christ-centered life.

For fragrant soy and coconut wax candles EJ & Co. | ejcandles.com For soy wax candles made with essential oils KayGreaux Candles | Find it on Facebook For nature-inspired soy candles Ms. Mason’s Jars | ms-mason-jars.mybigcommerce.com For long-lasting, room-filling fragrance Nouvelle Candle Company | nouvellecandle.com COURTESY RED STICK TOGETHER MINISTRY

For eco-conscious coconut wax candles with cotton wicks Pollumination | pollumination.com

COURTESY SIMONE BANKS

For affirming, nature-inspired coconut wax candles A Sacred Space Candles | asacredspace.co For homey mason jar soy candles SadieRoux Soy Candles | Find it on Facebook

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

W H AT ’ S U P / /

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

W H AT ’ S N E W

Buzz feed

HASKELL WHITTINGTON

By Julia-Claire Evans

Tacos, tequila and whiskey, oh my! MODESTO TACOS, TEQUILA and Whiskey opened in early September, boasting a menu of authentic Mexican dishes, including tacos made with al pastor, barbacoa or brisket birria, and appetizers like campechana and elotes. If that doesn’t make your mouth water, its cocktail menu is hugely diverse, and the salt lining the rim of each drink is customized specifically for th t cocktail. Find Modesto on Facebook

WHAT’S ON THE OUTSIDE MATTERS

CYPRESS COAST BREWING finally opened its doors t 5643 Government St. in early September after years of delays. Founders Caleb Schlamp and Justin Meyers began brewing out of their homes and experimenting with different recipes before deciding to grow their business. Their extensive menu of brews features a coffee porter made with French Truck Coffee. cypresscoastbrewing.com

CATRICE COLEMAN

Newest brews in town

225.926.6892 | w w w.carriagesbr.com

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COURTESY SONIC

7620 Old Hammond Hwy, Baton Rouge, LA 70809

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #2 W H AT ’ S U P / /

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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$4,225,000 AR IA

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THE AMOUNT OF money the 225 GIVES event on Dec. 1 hopes to raise for area nonprofits The 24-hour online fundraising competition will support nonprofits hit hard by COVID-19-related event and fundraiser cancellations. All 501(c)(3) nonprofit o ganizations in the Capital Region are invited to participate. Capital Area United Way and the Baton Rouge Area Foundation have partnered on the event. Find out more at 225gives.org.

Size matters EVERYTHING’S BIGGER AT Fat Boy’s Pizza. The restaurant brought its 16-inch slices and 30-inch pies to the Nicholson Gateway area in September. Made with specialty ingredients shipped twice a week from an Italian family in Chicago, one slice is enough to satisfy. But you might not be able to stop yourself from buying a whole pizza. That is, if you can fit the box into your car. eatfatboyspizza.com

90.4%

THE PERCENTAGE OF COVID-19 cases at Louisiana colleges attributed to students living on campus or attending in-person classes. As of late September, the Louisiana Department of Health’s coronavirus dashboard showed 1,558 college cases—1,409 of which were from the aforementioned students, and 149 that were from faculty and staff teaching or attending work on campus. Only 29 were from students attending class virtually, and 16 were from faculty and staff working virtually.

WINNERS The last straws ARTISTS DENISE AND Desiree Verrett used 250,000 straws to create an art installation at Sonic’s new Siegen Lane hybrid dine-in location. The twin LSU students have since been commissioned by Sonic Industries to create an installation for its corporate office in Oklahoma Cit . sonicdrivein.com

COURTESY SONIC

50

WHERE BATON ROUGE marketing and creative agency ThreeSixtyEight ranked on AdWeek’s annual list of the nation’s fastest growing advertising and marketing agencies.

ACT BOOT CAMP 1 DAY = HIGHER SCORE SERVICES INCLUDE: ACT Boot Camp • ACT Math Course • ACT Prep Online Course ACT Knowledge Tutoring • Private ACT Boot Camp

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Best in class tutoring was my saving grace when it came to taking the ACT. The tutoring sessions were engaging, helpful, and effective. After just eight tutoring sessions at Best In Class, my ACT score went up 10 points and I got into my dream college. I am

incredibly grateful for Best In Class and always will be!

— MADISYN M.

TAUGHT BY ACT® CERTIFIED EDUCATORS 7516 Picardy, Suite A & C | Baton Rouge bestinbr@yahoo.com | 225-505-6900

BESTINBR.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Here For The Community

LIFELONG BATON ROUGE resident Peyton Murphy started Murphy Law Firm in 1993. He has been representing injured victims throughout the state of Louisiana for the last 27 years. When Peyton started his own practice, he made it a priority to give back to the community. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit Baton Rouge, Peyton and his staff initially planned a mask giveaway at his office and promoted it only through social media. The staff worked tirelessly for back-to-back weekends and gave out 50,000 masks

to those in the community who needed them. A movement was born as government officials in the area started having their own mask giveaways, inspired by Murphy Law Firm. Health care facilities—including nursing homes and hospitals—in the area began reaching out, explaining their own needs for face masks and hand sanitizer. Peyton and his team responded by delivering PPE to 31 healthcare facilities. Peyton also donated face masks and hand sanitizer to multiple churches and nonprofit organizations in the area.

In all, Peyton was able to give away more than 67,000 masks and 100 gallons of hand sanitizer to help the community. Additionally, Peyton and his staff donated 100 bags to HOPE Ministries. The team also recently distributed 2,176 grocery and produce boxes to staff members at Baton Rouge General. Even before the pandemic, Murphy Law Firm was active in the community, supporting a variety of causes such as American Cancer Society, the Capital Area CASA Association, Kelli’s Kloset, HOPE Ministries, and more.

27 YEARS 2354 SOUTH ACADIAN THRUWAY 225.928.8800 MURPHYLAWFIRM.COM

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

YOUR FLAVOR

THE

N

AVOR WHAT’SUP:YOURFL Your first kiss?

Your last vacation?

On the playground in kindergarten

San Antonio, 4 months ago

Erika Katayama Curator of Education at the Louisiana state Museum

Jeff Kleinpeter President of Kleinpeter Farms Dairy

Favorite local music artist?

Farrah Munson

Jennifer Terbieten Mayer,

Mixed Media Painter

Cancun with my wonderful husband in April

Fourth or fifth grade, at my house, role playing game getting married

our very first issue we’ve spotlighted locals every single month in a fun Q&A called “Your Flavor.” Despite years of magazine redesigns, even our grid-style layout for this section has largely remained the same. And to this day, people say we make their day when we call and tell them we want to feature them in it. As we like to say in the publishing biz, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it

Gin

The Molly Ringwalds

Sure you’ve seen actor Dylan McDermott on television,

Stoli up, dirty, with 2 olives, please

The Captain Legendary Band

August, Cabo San Lucas

7th grade, at a boy/girl party

Esthetician, Salon at Seven Oaks

Kenny and Steve Kleinpeter

and you’ve watched Scott r Oswalt forecast the weathe on WAFB. But have you ever seen them at the same time? Think about it.

Most Definitely Vodka. Dirty martinis are fabulous!

W H AT ’ S U P / /

n Rouge Downtown Bato

Tu e s - S a t Lunch & Dinner

YOUR FLAVOR Fave subject when you were in school

Food you are great at cooking

Mauree Brooksher 225.346.5100

Owner/lead trainer, Nourish Wellness Baton Rouge 37

Jason Knighten

The first a tist you want to see when concerts return

White Claw is …

especially muffin

Lauren Daigle or Taylor Swift

Some moms’ best friend, but I prefer fresh frose.

My family’s themed costumes (as long as my kids allow it)

Something I don’t know anything about

The day after Halloween, when the candy is 50% off. Especially love the pumpkinshaped Reese’s!

Algebra

Owner, Morning Music Movement 33

I am known for my sugar cookies.

Tobe Nwigwe

Joanne Cowgill

Retired teacher and grandma 68

Crawfish jambalaya

Public speaking

Stedman Powers

Banker 30

12

Greek mythology

I make an excellent vegetarian threepepper pasta.

[225] November, 2005

NOW

LET US HOS T YOU R

Holiday Gaings

THE

AT THE ROYAL STANDAR D

Favorite Halloween tradition

Anything I make from-scratch,

English

16016 PERK INS ROAD 225.308.4773 caterbr@thecrownbistr o.com

Who you would love to dress up as for Halloween

Eliza from Hamilton

Mr. Brown from Tyler Perry’s productions

Trick-or-treating The Eagles

Daniel Caesar

Refreshing

High-class Four Loko

15 years of ‘Your Flavor’

AT BIRTH IT’S BEEN ONE of the biggest consistencies in 225. Dating all the way back to

Vodka

The Myrtles

This summer, Lake St. John

11-years-old. Best one was yesterday

SEPARATED

Vodka or gin martini?

A hurricane

Seeing a friend perform his annual Halloween show

Fake news

A small sampling, through the years JANUARY 2006 Favorite candy “Pralines, don’t tell my dentist” —Sylvia Weatherspoon, WBRZ anchor APRIL 2009 April Fool blunder “My high school varsity baseball coach cut me from the team.” —Ian Dallimore, Lamar Advertising’s then-digital strategist OCTOBER 2015 Last app you downloaded “Tind—I mean, Smoothie King mobile app.” —Beau Didier, then-business development at Edgen Murray JUNE 2017 I’m dying for someone to open a restaurant in BR that specializes in ... “Bacon-based dishes!” —Christopher Polk, musician/bassist of Alabaster Stag and The Easy

BY THE NUMBERS

720

Estimated number of Baton Rougeans we’ve featured in “Your Flavor”

4

Fewest questions we’ve asked in an issue

7

Most questions we’ve asked in an issue

What is YOUR FLAVOR?

You’re next! Email us at editor@225batonrouge.com to be featured.

TIS THE SEAS ON FOR

FA MI LY PA JA MA S

16016 PERKI NS ROAD | 2877 PERKI NS ROAD

THE ROYALS TAN DAR

D.CO M

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

FOR THE KIDS

Magnetic fie ds

Baton Rouge-born Tatro Toys sparks creativity and imagination through magnetic playsets By Julia-Claire Evans // Photos by Collin Richie

“JOY.” WHEN ASKED what he hopes his toys bring to children, Tatro Toys founder Will Barrios only has this one word. As a child, Barrios was always looking for something new and creative to do. At 10, he started messing around with some magnets on a cardboard box. He figured out how to make them stick, and decided it would be cool if he could turn the box into a playset and add characters on top of the magnets. He even started adding scenery. As he grew up, the playset followed him—with some adjustments. “As I matured,” Barrios says, “the playset matured.” Eventually he moved to New York City to study design, then to Los Angeles, and he started to get the same creative itch he had when he was younger. He remembered that homemade playset. “I started thinking, ‘This was a silly thing I did as a kid,’” Barrios says. “‘Would anyone be interested in it?’” Barrios moved home to Baton Rouge, and in 2017 and started his toy business: Tatro Toys—24 years after he made his first childhood playset. He began testing different playsets by giving them to parents and gathering their feedback. It was important to make sure his sets were reusable, which is why he was drawn once again to magnetic tools. With magnets, he says, “you can put something on it, you can take it off, you can rearrange it. I followed that idea, and it’s now become a magnetic toy company.” The first Tatro playset came in nine different themes, including superheroes, dinosaurs and fairytales. Now the company offers much more, including magnetic dough and coloring cards. “There are companies that use magnets,” Barrios says, “but not in the same way that we’re using them, and definitely not with magnetic dough.” All of Tatro Toys’ playsets are handmade and designed to spark creativity in even young children. Its dough can be sculpted into any shape, and magnets can adhere to it. Tatro Toys’ magnetic coloring cards are small enough to fit in an envelope, and its travel playset fits inside the brand’s tote bags and onto the backseat of a car or plane. “We’re creating a community to talk about creativity and imagination,” Barrios says. “I just wanted to see one kid, like myself, who saw the playset and his eyes would just light up. ... And I saw that very early on.” Tatro Toys also advocates for groups that are underprivileged and undervalued, and every year gives a portion of its proceeds to organizations that spark creativity in kids. Last year it donated to the Knock Knock Children’s Museum. “We believe that when you find expression, you can find your voice,” Barrios says, “when you find your voice you can be heard, and when you’re heard, you can advocate for positive change.”

In 2017, Will Barrios launched Tatro Toys after he returned to his hometown of Baton Rouge.

HOLIDAY SHOPPING

Tatro Toys ships nationwide and offers free pickup in Baton Rouge. To learn more and order toys, visit tatrotoy.com.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

FOR THE KIDS

A toy story

Victoria’s Toy Station has been open for more than three decades, but the COVID-era holiday season may be its most meaningful yet

Issue Date: November Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

FILE PHOTO BY MALARIE ZAUNBRECHER

By Jennifer Tormo

NEARLY 300,000 TOYS are just past the front door of a little yellow house on Government Street. Floor to ceiling, there’s something exciting to see at every eye level inside Victoria’s Toy Station. The littlest shoppers are greeted by board games and miniature cars poking out from the bottom shelves. Stuffed animals seem to smile playfully at adult-height shoppers. And those whose imagination draws them to look toward the sky are rewarded with a view of shiny objects hanging from the ceiling: glittering disco balls, iridescent umbrellas and tinsel chandeliers. With the toy shop celebrating its 36th birthday this year, it might be one of Mid City’s oldest stores. It helped set the tone early on for the eclectic,

artsy neighborhood—because there’s so much more to this shop than Magic Markers, Play-Doh and Lava Lamps. In a room dedicated to dolls, chandeliers made of vintage Barbies dangle from the ceiling. In a bathtub-themed room, there are bubbles painted on the ceiling. Baskets brim with crayons shaped like ice cream cones and rubber snakes as long as your arm. This is a toy store with a sense of humor. A toy store tailored to, well, kids. On a rainy morning, owner Katie Shoriak walks across the creaky wood fl ors toward the store’s entrance. She adjusts her face mask as she greets the handful of customers shopping today. It’s a late summer day, but Shoriak is already thinking of the holidays. “People need Christmas,” she says.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

BUSINESS HOURS

Monday-Thursday: 11am - 9 pm Friday-Saturday: 11am - Till Sunday: 11am - 3pm

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

Station was part of Catfish Town, an old marketplace that operated on a former freight station site downtown in the mid ’80s and early ’90s. The shop moved to Government Street in 1989, still a couple years before Superior Grill would open across the street, and decades before many of the area’s hip restaurants and shops arrived. “The difference today is night and day, but my mom knew the area would one day be what it is now. She took a chance on it,” Shoriak says. That chance has paid off, because Shoriak now runs the store she used to play in as a 4-year-old. All of her nieces have worked in the shop, and Culotta herself is still involved as the store’s visionary. From day one, the store has remained an escape, a therapeutic refuge from the outside world. Even in a year with so much uncertainty, a year when people need an escape more than ever, Shoriak is looking forward to the future—and just maybe another several decades on Government Street. “I hope in-person retail lasts. People don’t realize how important shopping local is,” she says. “My 9-year-old says this store is going to be hers one day. And I hope it will be.” victoriastoystation.com

MASK NOW so we can

Victoria’s Toy Station’s owner Katie Shoriak hopes to someday pass the store down to her daughter, LeMoine.

COLLIN RICHIE

“It’s going to give people something to look forward to.” It’s been a wild year in the toy world. Markets were canceled. When schools closed and stir-crazy families were stuck at home, demand increased—while supply decreased. It’s been harder than ever to keep Shoriak’s store stocked, and she estimates the shelves only had onethird of their usual supply for much of the stay-at-home order. She misses the way her regular customers’ kids used to run into the store and wrap her in hugs. But she and her team have learned to adapt. After the shutdown was announced, they had a new store website and e-commerce platform running within three days. For Easter, customers dropped off baskets, entrusting the store to decorate and fill them with goodies for their children. All of it has Shoriak dreaming of happier times. By early November, the shop will be dressed in twinkle lights and garland. “I love the way the store is at Christmas. You walk in, and that Christmastime feeling just takes over,” she says. “It feels like a wonderland.” A “wonderland” was exactly what Shoriak’s mother, DeeDee Culotta, had in mind when she first opened the store in 1984. The original Victoria’s Toy

‘Tis the season for parties and celebrations. With the holidays upon us, let’s work together so we can get back to the life we love in Louisiana. Wear a mask now to protect yourself, your family and neighbors—so we can party later!

01MK7441 09/20

Learn more about ways to protect yourself at bcbsla.com/covid19

later! 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

SPONSORED CONTENT

THE LOWDOWN

SPONSORED BY:

WOMEN WITH ENERGY—

FAST TRACK OPPORTUNITIES YIELD LIFE-CHANGING RESULTS

L

ena Toups was a middle-aged restaurant cook for over a decade, and even after moving on to work in a customer service call center, she longed for something different. It took a toll on her mental health. Living paycheck to paycheck her entire working life—struggling to make ends meet every month and worrying about unexpected repair bills—it was all too much. “I just became accustomed to the anxiety,” Toups says. “I was convinced that this was just how my life was always going to be until my husband’s friend mentioned the North Baton Rouge Industrial Training Initiative (NBRITI) at Baton Rouge Community College (BRCC).” So with no industrial knowledge, experience, or anything left to lose, she applied. During enrollment process interviews, naturally Toups had to choose a trade to study. “I had no idea what any trade really did on a day-to-day basis, so I flipped a coin

26 

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and chose pipefitter,” Toups laughs. “Thankfully, after a series of tests and interviews it became clear that my strengths would be better suited for millwright.” The internship at ExxonMobil taught Toups more than just how to work on pumps. It provided her the opportunity to learn beyond the classroom at BRCC. “It is still very surreal to me, that I am advancing to apprentice at ExxonMobil,” Toups says. “It’s hard to believe, but I did it! I’ve made it this far, I have to keep going, to keep asking questions. I have to keep learning.” Since her internship with ExxonMobil began six months ago, Toups has excelled in her work and continued to learn. Toups is now a full time apprentice machinist in the central services department at the ExxonMobil Refinery. According to the American Petroleum Institute, nearly 1.9 million job opportunities are projected in the oil and natural gas and petrochemical industries through 2035.

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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SPONSORED CONTENT

WHEN I STARTED AT NBRITI, I HAD NO IDEA THERE WAS SUCH OPPORTUNITY IN THE INDUSTRIAL WORLD, ESPECIALLY FOR A (BASICALLY) UNTRAINED, UNSKILLED, MIDDLE-AGED WOMAN.

— LENA TOUPS

IF NOT FOR THIS PROGRAM, I WOULDN’T BE WHERE I AM TODAY AS A WORKER, OR A PERSON. I WOULD STILL BE A CONTRACTOR, NOT SURE OF MY SECURITY OR MY ROOM FOR GROWTH. THIS PROGRAM HAS HELPED ME IN COUNTLESS WAYS ESPECIALLY TOWARDS MY PATH TO SUCCESS. — KIA BROWN

Women and minority workers represent a critically vital and available talent pool to help meet the demands of the projected growth and expansion. A vast opportunity exists for the oil and natural gas industry to attract, retain, and develop lifelong careers for women and minorities. Since 2012, ExxonMobil has been leading a collaboration between industry partners, contractor firms and BRCC. Assisting its neighbors in getting the skills they need to compete and excel in industrial jobs, the North Baton Rouge Industrial Training Initiative was designed to help residents who may not have access to technical or job skills training in the northern part of the parish. The program was carefully designed to be a fair and easy process empowering its students to be accountable for their own success. Kia Brown was a contractor, struggling to find consistent work. She noticed a post on her social feed about NBRITI and enrolled at BRCC with plans to just graduate in an electrical trade, then go back to school for instrumentation. The internship opportunity presented itself at the perfect time, right before graduation. “Working in the refinery while I was in school put everything in a new perspective,” Brown says. “I was able to see, first-hand, how the business operates from the electrical and instrumentation side of things. Graduating from this program helped me get a foot in the door at my ideal job and jumpstart my path to success.”

The NBRITI program and her internship at ExxonMobil has given Brown a renewed dedication and love for her craft. “I learn so much working in the field getting hands-on experience in real life scenarios that would have otherwise just been examples in a book.” The thought of taking on a new trade may seem intimidating, but Brown assures anyone considering the NBRITI program that the end result is totally worth the time, patience, motivation, and hard work it takes to get there. Brown is grateful for the NBRITI program and says her experience working as an intern has been nothing short of amazing. Kia Brown is now an instrument tech apprentice at the Baton Rouge Refinery. She joined ExxonMobil as an intern and is proud to have recently advanced to a full-time employee. Over the course of the one-year training, the NBRITI program goes further to include a life skills component along with a financial management program. This sort of consistent coaching and feedback produces graduates better prepared to excel in the industry. This translates to students earning their credentials in electrical, millwright, pipefitting or welding along with safety, time management, housekeeping and other key performance areas that contribute to their overall growth and career success. Instructors monitor students’ daily timeliness, safety, use of hand tools, use of PPE, housekeeping, and teamwork.

NUTS & BOLTS: • The past five cohorts have graduated more than 330 students into a stable and essential workforce. • There are currently 20+ contractor partners involved with the NBRITI, and the majority of the program’s graduates obtain initial employment with contractor partners, several of whom have maintained this employment at ExxonMobil or other area industrial facilities. • Under ExxonMobil Baton Rouge Refinery Manager Gloria Moncada’s leadership, the fifth cohort expanded craft career tracks to include millwright certification so ExxonMobil can now hire graduates directly. • For more information on the North Baton Rouge Industrial Training Initiative, visit mybrcc.edu/nbriti.

BEGIN HERE:

NBRITI Virtual Open House Curious? Don’t miss the NBRITI 2021 Session Open House November 18 at 6 p.m. Find out more about the upcoming session, program offerings and results from last year, visit mybrcc.edu/nbriti.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Sleep Tight Mode Lock doors. Adjust lights. Arm home security. Sleep soundly.

Protect. Monitor. Control. Call 844-347-2219 or visit cox.com/homelife

Cox Homelife is available to residential customers in select Cox service areas. A high-speed Internet connection is required. Cox Homelife Security service plan required for professional monitoring services for intrusion, smoke/fire and related system components. Applicable monthly service charges, installation, additional equipment, taxes, trip charges and other fees may apply. Subject to credit approval. Other restrictions may apply. Local ordinances may require an alarm user permit or external lock box. Cox Homelife Service provided by Cox Advanced Services: Arizona, LLC – Alarm Lic. #18141–0 &nROC Lic. #310876; Arkansas, LLC – Lic. #E 2014 0026 & #CMPY.0002278; California, LLC – Alarm Lic. #7196 & Contractor’s Lic. #992992; Connecticut, LLC – N/A; Florida, LLC – Lic. #EF20001232; Georgia, LLC – License: Bryan David Melancon #LVU406595; Idaho, LLC – Lic. #024933; Iowa, LLC – Lic. #C121646 & #AC268; Louisiana, LLC – Lic. #F 2006; Nebraska, LLC – Lic. #26512; Nevada, LLC dba Cox Homelife – Lic. #78331; Ohio, LLC – Lic. #53–18–1671; Oklahoma, LLC – Lic. #2002; Rhode Island, LLC – Lic. #9314; Kansas, LLC – Topeka Lic. #109 & Wichita Lic. #2015–36492; Virginia, LLC – DCJS Lic. #11–7776 & DPOR Lic. # 2705164725 ©2020 Cox Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. MAG107433–0011

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OUR CITY //

I N S I D E : BR’s biggest moments since 2005 / The pipe dreams that haven’t happened

Into the

future We celebrate the magazine’s crystal anniversary with an eye toward what’s to come

+

COLLIN RICHIE

15 places that shaped the landscape

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

PRESS ASSOCIATED

Patient and Community Focused

FOR OVER 17 YEARS

2020

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Recognized at the local and national level for patient satisfaction Continual expansion of Surgical Services State of the Art Equipment • Onsite Retail Pharmacy

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Companie

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Physician Owned, Patient Focused 8080 BLUEBONNET BLVD. BATON ROUGE, LA 70810 • (225) 408-8080 • WWW.SSCBR.COM 30 

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PRESS ASSOCIATED

OUR CITY //

NOVEMBER 2005

ASSOCIATED PRESS

After Katrina, Baton Rouge rebuilds in its own way

Making local history 15 big moments and trends that have redefined the apital Region since 2005 BY MAGGIE H E YN R ICH A R DSO N

2005

Hurricane Katrina forever changes Louisiana. Hurricane Katrina upended life unalterably in New Orleans. And after the levees broke and the city filled with flood ters, Baton Rouge became high ground. Thousands of evacuees relocated here—at least temporarily—while New Orleans rebuilt. Some came by choice, and others arrived because they had nowhere else to go. A FEMA trailer shelter called Renaissance Village was established in Baker, which operated until 2019. Baton Rouge staged the National Guard’s relief efforts, and became the center of operations for evacuated New Orleans businesses and nonprofit agencies Though it’s difficult to know how many former New Orleans residents moved here permanently, Greater Baton Rouge’s population grew by about 105,000 from 2004 to 2019.

Bobby Jindal

2005-now Historic elections redefine local politics.

State and local elections over the last 15 years have been anything but boring. Louisiana’s first woman governor, Kathleen Blanco, was succeeded by the state’s first Indian-American governo , Bobby Jindal, in 2008. In 2004, Baton Rouge saw its first elected African American mayor, when Melvin “Kip” Holden defeated Bobby Simpson and went on to serve three terms. Holden was followed by Sharon Weston Broome in 2016, the city’s first elected woman mayor and second Black mayor.

Sharon Weston Broome

HOW DID NEW Orleans reshape our city? Here’s an excerpt from a 225 staff editorial from our first issue Turns out 2005 was grow-up or shut-up time for Baton Rouge. Hundreds of thousands of newcomers sought refuge here after Kat-Rita, bringing out the best and worst in the community. Baton Rouge dodged two historic hurricanes, but the city has been challenged. In a way, the city has been given a gift, a rare chance to evolve into a more cosmopolitan place. Will it become a place that absorbs new ideas or just get better at bouncing them out? For much of its history Baton Rouge has been a place where “big city” meant something bad. Now, in more ways than anyone was prepared for, Baton Rouge has become a big city. It has required us to adapt in order to maintain our quality of life. We have to be more patient on the roads, we have to accept strangers in our spaces, and most important, consider new points of view. New Orleans has no choice but to rebuild and re-invent itself. In a way, Baton Rouge has the luxury of doing the same. Let’s not blow the chance.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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OUR CITY //

2008

Hurricane Gustav blows through Baton Rouge.

Congrats, 225, on 15 years! This calls for a celebration!

The second-most powerful storm of that year’s hurricane season, Gustav made landfall in Cocodrie on Sept. 1, causing damage in 34 Louisiana parishes, including East Baton Rouge. Winds ripped through neighborhoods like Old Goodwood, knocking down old hardwoods like matchsticks. For days, nearly a million state residents were without power, including 300,000 in Baton Rouge.

OCTOBER 2018

“When I first got to Mid City, it felt like I was beating a drum and no one was listening. Today, they’re beating with us, and we’re making some pretty good music.” —Samuel Sanders, Mid City Redevelopment Alliance’s executive director since 2006, recalling his early efforts to promote the area

2011-now

On the path to becoming a “complete” street, Government Street fuels Mid City’s growth.

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

APRIL 2014

2012-now Continuing a Legacy that began in 1880 Located in North Baton Rouge, Southern University is the flagship campus of the Southern University System — the only system of Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the nation. We are proud to be the home to more than 7,000 students representing a vast array of states and nations, fostering a global community and workforce. Our Southern University alumni consistently serve in leadership roles in top companies regionally and internationally. Southern University wants to congratulate 225 magazine on 15 years of publishing. Thank you for contributing to the lifestyle, culture and enjoyment of the Greater Capital Region.

MALARIE ZAUNBRECHER

Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #3

The late John Fregonese, an innovative planner from Portland, Oregon, led the East Baton Rouge Parish Comprehensive Master Plan in 2011 and was a champion of Government Street. Fregonese teased out a vision for the corridor that included reimagining an abandoned Entergy substation at Government and 16th Street (now the Electric Depot) into a mixeduse facility, and transforming Government Street from a speedy thoroughfare into a complete streets asset. Nearly a decade later, much of the vision set forth in the FuturEBR Master Plan has been realized, with a significant po tion of Government Street now outfi ted with bike lanes and traffic calming m asures. Lots of private investment has taken place up and down the street, including ventures like Curbside, Tim’s Garage, French Truck Coffee, Ritter Mayer Architects, Mid City Beer Garden, the Radio Bar, Elsie’s Plate and Pie, Rocca Pizzeria and more.

St. George divides the community— literally and figuratively.

“It’s very stressful to think about. [Children’s] educational fate is in part dependent on defeating this breakaway school district. I just couldn’t sit by and let it happen without trying to stop it.”

In 2012, residents in the southeast part of the parish frustrated by the poor performing East Baton Rouge Parish School System proposed to the Louisiana Legislature that they form their own school district. Eight years later, the fight continues with —Belinda Davis of One Commutwists and turns no one could have predicted. nity One School District Organizers needed a two-thirds majority of voters in the area to move forward with a school district, The great and attempts to get the votes failed An Old Fashioned twice. Then, organizers changed Easter Celebration Sunday, April 13, 2014 strategies, proposing to voters 5:00 1:00 untilthat $5 keep they form their own city and tax dollars close at home for not only schools but drainage and traffic too. Voters agreed, giving the green light to form the new city of St. George in 2019. A month later, Mayor Sharon Weston Broome and others sued, sending the thorny issue, for now, to the courts. Issue Date: April Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • Ad will run As is unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2014. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

divide

pm

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LSU Rural Life Museum 4560 Essen Lane Per 225-765-2437 Person rurallife@lsu.edu

The Friends of the LSU Rural Life Museum will celebrate the fourth annual An Old Fashioned Easter Celebration on Sunday, April 13, 2014. Children will experience springtime excitement and the welcome of the Easter season with wonderful old fashioned activities overseen by the Easter Bunny. Join us for Easter Egg Hunts with plastic eggs filled with confectionery for children ages 2-8. Refreshments will be served throughout the day. General admission is $5 per person.

Meet the strong personalities driving the St. George debate

by CHRISTIE MATHERNE HALL • PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

F

or some within the boundaries of a proposed new city in East Baton Rouge Parish, the plans of the Committee for the City of St. George and Local Schools for Local Children—the group promoting a new school district and backing the committee—are a glimmer of hope for a brighter educational future for their children. But for others, the concept of a separate City of St. George with its own governing bodies and school system feels like a threat to Baton Rouge’s efforts to improve crime prevention, education and infrastruc-

ture. (See sidebar for how we got to this point.) As local media coverage of the debate grows, the mess of numbers and angry quotes can serve to mask the personal motives on all sides of the conflict. And in the confusion, something important to solving these problems is lost: the average citizen’s ability to understand how and why these factions arrived at this point, and on such hostile terms, too. The flame of conviction that drives these civic leaders to keep pushing toward their goals can get lost in the smoke. While there are more than two sides, and two opinions, to this debate, 225 takes a look at the personalities and purposes of six locals in various stages of being for or against the City of St. George.

Those in favor of St. George

Norman Browning, Committee for the City of St. George Norman Browning is used to having a captive audience. The 60-yearold Baton Rouge native tends to stand or pace when he’s explaining something, making full use of the body-language arsenal he acquired

in 15 years of teaching at Woodlawn High School. Every spoken bullet-point ends with a pointed finger and a stare; the whole package propelled by one arched eyebrow. “When you have community schools in an independent school district, the parents get to know the teachers,” he explains, tapping two fingers on the table with each inflection. “So when Johnny comes home and says, ‘The teacher’s pickin’ on me,’ you’re gonna say, ‘I know that teacher. Let’s call him up, Johnny.’” Though he left Southeastern with a degree in Education, Browning spent most of his post-military adulthood working in pharmaceutical sales outside the state, and later returned to Baton Rouge. He’s always had a passion for coaching, however, and that’s why he took Woodlawn High School up on the offer when they approached him about a volunteer coaching position upon his return. “At some point I was sitting in the bleachers and realized I had coached both teams that were playing on the field,” he adds with a

beaming smile. The skill set involved in his tangible passion for coaching sports seems to resonate with his perspective on what’s wrong with the parish’s public school system, the ultimate driver for his support for a city of St. George. “The students are running the schools,” he says, “not the principals, and not the teachers.” He goes on to detail how, in the present condition of Woodlawn, a student can “get literally nose-tonose” with a teacher to “curse them out,” and the student will only get sent home for the day with no further disciplinary action. “When do we begin to hold the students, and the parents of these students, accountable for this behavior?” he asks. Joshua Hoffpauir, Committee for the City of St. George Sitting just across the table from Browning is Joshua Hoffpauir. An architect by trade, the 37-year-old Crowley native comes off as the yin to Browning’s yang, most obviously in his oratory style. He doesn’t pace, barely ever fidgets, and does

not employ common tactics of persuasion, even when given ample opportunity. His involvement in the St. George movement goes back three or four years, he says, adding that his wife told him to “get a hobby” around that time. He perceives his role in the group to be the grounding force of logic and reason, and attributes this forte to his “architect’s thought process.” But what exactly does such a thought process entail? How do architects think? “It’s not very structured,” he begins, then recants: “Well, it’s structured at a certain point—just in the building aspect—but the aspect of forming ideas and conceptualizing, it’s very abstract. It’s a creative process; you have to bury yourself away. And architecture school will consume you.” Aftergraduating from architecture school, Hoffpauir moved to Vail, Co., to do high-end residential design for an architecture firm. It was a stark change of landscape compared to his comparatively flat hometown of Crowley, and it was there in the Rockies that he discov-

ActivitiES incLUdEd thE foLLowing: Music | Story Telling | Easter Bonnet Decorating

Egg Pacquing | Egg Dying | Egg Races | Petting Zoo Old Fashioned Games

SUBR.EDU @southernu_br 32 

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#WeAreSouthern #FinishStronger

All funds raised will help support the LSU Rural Life Museum’s Interpretive Programs. For more information 225-765-2437

Advocates for the proposed City of St. George: Dustin Yates, Norman Browning and Joshua Hoffpauir.

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Opponents of the proposed City of St. George: Susan Nelson, John Delgado and Belinda Davis.

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Issue Date: NOV. 2020 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

OUR CITY //

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

2013-now

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

New bike trails improve quality of life.

COME SHOP WITH US AND Celebrate 15 Years

Councilman Buddy Amoroso’s 2018 death while cycling in West Baton Rouge Parish was not the first biking f tality in the area. But coupled with numerous fatalities over the years, it was another reminder of the Capital City’s serious need for safer cycling conditions. While we still have miles to go (literally), we’ve made significant p ogress, beginning around 2013 with projects like BREC’s Capital Area Pathways Project, and later, the Mississippi River Levee Bike Path and the Downtown Greenway. In 2019, the long-awaited Gotcha e-bike rentals became available at LSU, Southern, City Park and downtown. They have become wildly popular, with daily rides spiking to nearly 600 this spring.

2013-now

Hospitals open and close, and a health district emerges.

MALARIE ZAUNBRECHER

We’ve seen significant changes in h alth care in Baton Rouge, from the 2013 closure of Earl K. Long Medical Center and the 2015 shuttering of Baton Rouge General’s Mid City Emergency Room (and its recent reopening along with its dedicated COVID-19 wing). Pennington Biomedical Research Center has continued to ascend as one of the world’s premier research facilities linking diet to disease. It—and other projects like the new Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital— are part of the Baton Rouge Health District, established by Baton Rouge Area Foundation in hopes of taking our region to the national stage of health care.

The downtown Baton Rouge skyline, seen here in 2015, has evolved continuously since 2005.

2015-now

Downtown becomes residential. The opening of Matherne’s Market on Third Street was a critical milestone in downtown’s decades-long revitalization effort. A full-service grocery store, combined with new residential developments, finally m ant that downtown had begun to attract a critical mass of permanent, year-round residents. Girded by historic neighborhoods Spanish Town and Beauregard Town, downtown is now home to hip complexes like 440 on Third, The Heron, the Commerce Building, the Fuqua Building, Maritime One and the Kress Condominiums—many of them historic buildings outfi ted with sleek renovations. In recent years, the neighborhood has seen a 70% increase in housing units built, with an additional 2,000+ residences in the pipeline, according to the Downtown Development District.

“We need to envision a downtown circa 2012 or 2015 that encompasses the current area, Spanish Town, Beauregard Town, the Old South area around the I-10 and the area from east of the I-110 to 22nd Street. Within these boundaries, you can envision 5,000 residents, sustainable retail stores and public transporation.” —Cyntreniks co-owner John Schneider

COLLIN RICHIE

JUNE 2008

Corporate Blvd at Jefferson • 225.925.2344 townecenteratcedarlodge.com • HEALTH • BEAUTY • DESIGNER SHOPPING HOME DECOR • GOURMET DINING • AND MORE 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Reconnecting Families One Holiday Meal at a Time

We have everything you need to prepare or serve your Holiday Meal. Smoked, Fried, & Stuffed Turkeys Turducken

Turducken Roll

Cornbread Dressing

Macaroni & Cheese and more! Gift Boxes Available

3075 Millerville Rd. Baton Rouge, LA 70816

17357 Airline Hwy. Prairieville, LA 70769

(225) 755-1783

(225) 667-8869

6251 West End Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70124

(504) 309-0010

We’re working to create a

Healthier Tomorrow!

6363 Dallas Pkwy. Ste 110 Frisco, LA 75034

(214) 308-2800

Walk-In

Check-In Online

Schedule a Virtual Visit

Whether you or a loved one are in need of a

flu shot, flu test, or COVID-19 test, we’re here for you. Together we can slow the spread of flu and COVID-19!

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LakeUrgentCare.com

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OUR CITY //

“Alton was a very big hearted and nice guy—always smiling and always kind to everyone. … It was really hard and still is to this day.”

AUGUST 2016

—Triple S Food Mart owner Abdullah Muflahi, nearly one year after Sterling was killed in front of his store

2016 2015-now Changes to film tax incentives see Hollywood South fading.

Alton Sterling’s killing and the shootings of police officers rock the city. As the July heat descended on Baton Rouge, Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old Black man, was shot at close range by two white police officers during an ar est attempt outside a convenience store. Subsequent protests over the Sterling shooting and policing took place in Baton Rouge. Nearly two weeks later, a Kansas City, Missouri, resident named Gavin Eugene Long shot six Baton Rouge police officers killing three and seriously wounding one.

ALLIE APPEL

Back in 2002, Louisiana rolled out the country’s most generous tax credit program for film p oduction, quickly dubbing it Hollywood South. Baton Rouge saw a lot of movie-making action— remember when Dukes of Hazzard was filmed a ound town in 2005? Plenty of other productions followed, from Pitch Perfect to All the King’s Men, thanks also to the formation of Celtic Studios. Ten years later, legislative changes to Louisiana’s tax credit program created uncertainty for filmma ers, cooling their enthusiasm for shooting here. The program saw improved changes in 2017, slowly reinvigorating the sector—until COVID-19 put the brakes on production earlier this year.

MIRIAM BUCKNER

MIRIAM BUCKNER

JUNE 2017

Please don’t let hate infect your heart.

....This city MUST and WILL get better. I’m working in these streets so any protesters, officers, friends, family, or whoever, if you see me and need a hug or want to say a prayer. I got you.”

PAT RIC

KM

ELO

N

—Police officer Montrell Jackson in a July 8 Facebook post, nine days before he was killed on July 17

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

WHEN KIDS NEED US THE MOST Since the pandemic started, we have been working hard to provide our Club members with the enriching experiences. Club is offering virtual Fall programs, LitClub and ClubOndemand. With these programs we provide students with homework help and engaging activities. We knew our Club members did not have access to learning at home, so we provide chrome books to our kids. We also organized drive-thrus at our office to supply our youth with over 500 backpacks. Coca-Cola and Albertson’s recently teamed up to donate more than 200 backpacks and school supplies. These donations are what help us continue to give our youth the best experience.

YOUTH LEGISLATURE DEMOCRACY EDUCATION PROGRAM

MISSION SPONSORS

&

Boys & Girls Club’s Youth Legislature is a middle school program that introduces students to the legislative process. For 35 years, the program has promoted youth leadership, cooperation and teamwork among peers. Students who participate in Youth Legislature receive classroom instruction and participate in a two-day mock legislative session at the Old State Capitol where they elect the Governor, House and Senate officers. They lead and serve on legislative committees and speak publicly before an audience. Currently, more than 45 schools from 13 parishes participate in Youth Legislature, and more than 1,800 students experience the mock legislative process over a period of eight weeks.

TAKING A STAKE IN OUR COMMUNITY

THANK YOU TO OUR STEAK & STAKE SPONSORS

The Club’s annual Steak & Stake is a Corporate event to celebrate the companies, firms and corporations that support the Club. This year’s event is virtual, but that didn’t discourage our supports. The online event on Thursday, October 22, highlighted the work of the Club, featured Club members singing and allowed donors to interact with the Club Members. Thanks to all of this year’s sponsors (see box to the right).

VISION SPONSORS

IMPACT SPONSORS

MEMBERSHIP SPONSORS

Apex Industries | Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson | Capital One Healthy Blue | Home Bank | Investar Bank | J.P Morgan Chase Bank Jones Walker | Kean Miller | Louisiana Lottery Corporation Perkins-McKenzie Insurance Agency Inc. | Person Touch Properties Phelps Dunbar | Regions | TWRU CPA’s Financial Advisors

WHATEVER IT TAKES FOR YOUTH, FAMILIES & COMMUNITIES 222.383.3928 | WWW.BRCLUBS.ORG | 36 

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OUR CITY //

2016

Devastating floods shake the Capital Region. Betsy, Camille, Audrey, Katrina, Rita … named storms are part of Louisiana’s collective memory and storytelling predilection. But it was an unnamed weather system that we’ll be talking about for generations. Relentless precipitation poured into already swollen river systems, causing catastrophic flooding in g eater Baton Rouge and beyond. If you were lucky enough to escape flood damage you could still name scores of others who didn’t. About 150,000 properties were flooded and one estimate placed the economic fallout for the region at $10 billion.

90%

Initial estimate for the homes that flooded in Denham Springs during the August 2016 floo

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

OCTOBER 2016

“I went through this 11 years ago with Katrina, so I knew what to do. I helped my neighbors, walking through chest-deep water. I’ve been doing all I can like Superwoman.” —Antoinette Brown, who spent every day after the flood voluntee ing at her church, Healing Place’s Baton Rouge Dream Center

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OUR CITY //

2017

Death of Max Gruver makes national news.

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2018-now

CAMILLE DELAUNE

With new parades on the rise, Baton Rouge becomes more of a serious Mardi Gras town.

E CAMILLE DELAUN

The LSU community was gutted when Max Gruver, an LSU freshman and a pledge at Phi Delta Theta fraternity, died from alcohol poisoning attributed to hazing. The incident was one of several fraternity hazing deaths that year, bringing renewed attention to the issue nationwide. LSU banned Phi Delta Theta from campus until 2033, and in 2018, Gov. John Bel Edwards signed the Max Gruver Act with Gruver’s family standing behind him. The new law stiffens penalties for hazing and requires uniform hazing policies across Louisiana colleges and universities. From their home in Atlanta, Max Gruver’s family launched the Max Gruver Foundation to spread awareness about fraternity hazing. Four fraternity members were indicted on charges of negligent homicide in Gruver’s death, and one, a former LSU student, was convicted in 2019 and sentenced to five y ars in prison.

You’ve probably experienced the charming, nighttime Southdowns parade or the notoriously raucous Spanish Town Parade—and maybe even the all-female Krewe of Artemis parade, the Mystic Krewe of Mutts dog parade, the Krewe of Mystique parade or the Krewe of Orion parade. But recent years have seen a few more festive events added to the annual Carnival calendar. Mid City Gras formed in 2018, and the Krewe of Oshun Parade and Festival launched this year in Scotlandville. Recent years have seen parades and krewes working to make Mardi Gras a more inclusive and environmentally friendly experience. We have a constantly growing king cake culture, too. Eat your way through dozens of varieties— you’ll even find f esh savory spins, or health-conscious gluten- or sugar-free options.

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OUR CITY //

2020

The community adapts to a COVID-19 world.

H

IE

MAY 2020 C

IN LL CO

RI

In the kitchen, you can go through a multitude of emotions all in a two-hour period. You’re anxious, you’re nervous, you’re frustrated, you’re overwhelmed. But at the end of service, you’re elated. You got your butt kicked, but you made it. And right now, that’s everything we’re feeling, and more. Asking ourselves if we’re going to be able to stay open, the emotions of letting staff go, and then hearing people say, ‘Thank you guys for staying open.’ —Vu “Phat” Le, co-owner of Chow Yum Phat, when asked why Issue Date: November 2020 Adtheproof #2 he decided to stay open for takeout during shutdown • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Grocery stores without toilet paper. Kids without classrooms. LSU games without tailgating. Celebrations largely canceled. Unemployment on the rise. Life around Baton Rouge has been shaken this year by the spread of the novel coronavirus. In late March, Gov. John Bel Edwards issued a stay-at-home order to curb the spread, shuttering schools and offices and limiting restaurants to to-go orders. Phase Two openings in May and Phase Three openings in September brought life closer to normal in the Capital City, but we have a long way to go before our regular rhythm is restored. By early October, more than 15,000 people in Baton Rouge had become infected with the coronavirus, and more than 440 had died.

2020

Protests and anti-racism advocates push for real change. The killing of George Floyd by a Minnesota policeman, followed by other deaths at the hands of police nationwide, sparked numerous protests against racism in Baton Rouge. High school students organized a march at the state capitol. LSU football players boycotted practice to march through campus. There were multiple nights of protests on Siegen Lane. And it seemed community leaders were listening. LSU removed from its library the name of Troy H. Middleton, the former university president who wrote a letter in 1961 to the University of Texas chancellor that laid bare his racist beliefs. Lee High School’s name was changed to Liberty High. The debates leading to the name change also saw East Baton Rouge Parish School Board member Connie Bernard instructing people they should learn more about Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The comments, along with a video that showed Bernard shopping online during the debates, triggered a recall movement to remove her from office th t still continues.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Sparkling Stackables

7513 Jefferson Hwy 225.927.9444 robertrothjewelers.com

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The incubator has helped mom-and-pop food producers like Hanley’s Foods, Davey’s Salsa, City Gelato and many others perfect their culinary concepts and get them to market. It has expanded twice since it opened, and recently added a bottling plant that can turn out more than 25,000 bottles a day. lsuagcenter.com

The LSU AgCenter’s Food Incubator

2013

Louisiana’s film industry has had it ough lately, but there’s no doubt the opening of Celtic Media Centre placed the Capital Region on the map as a filmmaking destination. Scores of productions have been filmed t Celtic, including Greyhound, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn and The Fantastic Four. celticmediacentre.com

Celtic Studios

2008

Pulsing with live music, theater and fine a t, the Shaw Center for the Arts on Third Street has played a key role in shaping downtown Baton Rouge. Home to the Manship Theatre, the LSU Museum of Art and the Glassell Gallery, and restaurants Tsunami, Capital City Grill and PJ’s Coffee, the facility invites visitors to dine, view, listen and take in breathtaking river views. shawcenter.org

Shaw Center for the Arts

2005

BY MAGGI E H E YN R IC HA RD SO N

The new Companion Animal Alliance shelter has been a game changer for the care of animals. Built with almost $13 million in privately raised funds and on land donated by LSU, the shelter’s adoption programs have helped significantly educe the kill rate. The shelter includes climate-controlled kennels, high-quality veterinary treatment, an equine pasture, dog park and a disaster relief shelter for evacuated pets. caabr.org

Companion Animal Alliance Shelter

2018

A $51 million public-private workforce training facility at Baton Rouge Community College’s Ardendale campus, the McKay Automotive Technology Center opened to provide the next generation of automotive workers with high-tech training in a sought-after field Until it opened, mechanics had to go out of state to get this kind of education. mybrcc.edu

McKay Automotive Technology Center

2017

Yes, it was short-lived. But before its 2020 closure, the Mid City food mall demonstrated the creativity brewing among cottage culinary professionals eager to test concepts. Tenants like Gov’t Taco, Chow Yum Phat and ThaiHey Thai Food built followings there, helping them later launch freestanding locations.

White Star Market

2018

15 openings and upgrades that changed Baton Rouge

Shaping the landscape

OUR CITY //

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2015now

Thirteen years of planning, research and fundraising went into the reveal of the simply magical museum in BREC’s City-Brooks Park. The attraction captivates young children with 18 learning zones that inspire critical thinking, literacy and exploration. knockknockmuseum.org

Knock Knock Children’s Museum

2017

Health care has continued to evolve, from state-of-the-art additions to Woman’s Hospital to last year’s ribbon cutting of Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital, which includes 25 pediatric specialties, Level II Trauma capabilities and a pediatric ER. In 2015, Baton Rouge Area Foundation released plans for the Baton Rouge Health District, with an aim to unify the medical community and give Baton Rouge a competitive edge nationally. A health loop is planned for the Essen Lane-Bluebonnet Boulevard corridor, with pedestrian- and bike-friendly access to medical offices parks, restaurants and shops. brhealthdistrict.com

Baton Rouge Health District

Beginning with this eye-popping library on Goodwood Boulevard, Baton Rouge has discovered just how cool libraries can be. Natural light pours into the meeting rooms, children’s and teen’s rooms, neat stacks and high-top seating with charging stations. ebrpl.com

Main Library at Goodwood

2014

Death Valley continued its forward march as one of the nation’s premier college football stadiums. An $80 million upper deck expansion in the south end zone in 2014 added more seating, and the 2017 addition of the Skyline Club gave fans more chances to dine and drink. In 2019, a $28 million renovation to the football operations center and locker room gave student athletes access to nap pods and a performance nutrition center. Now with a capacity of 102,321, Tiger Stadium is the sixth largest stadium in the NCAA. lsusports.net/sports/football

Tiger Stadium renovations

North Boulevard Town Square

2019

2020

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE, JORDAN HEFLER, RAEGAN LABAT, MIRIAM BUCKNER, CATRICE COLEMAN, KRISTIN SELLE, JIM ZIETZ AND COURTESY OUR LADY OF THE LAKE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, BRCC PUBLIC RELATIONS AND RICHARD HANLEY

The brainchild of 24-year-old Baton Rouge native Cameron Jackson, Millennial Park is the area’s first g thering place made from shipping containers. The Florida Boulevard property features shaded seating surrounded by what will soon be six fast-casual concepts set in shipping containers, the first o which opened this summer. The park’s drive-in movie nights have routinely sold out, scooped up by those looking for safe fun during the pandemic. Next up: Jackson’s developing Millennial Park Produce on North Street in Mid City. millennialparkbr.com

Millennial Park

This summer saw the long-awaited opening of the new Downtown Library, where contemporary design elements and a fourth floor outdoor terrace make reading an absolute pleasure. The building was under construction beginning in 2016, but a 2018 structural failure and the 2020 pandemic led to delays. Children’s and teen’s areas, a recording studio, and a digital maker lab for 3D printing and arts and crafts made the long wait worth it. ebrpl.com

Downtown Library

One of the most-buzzed-about developments, the mixeduse Electric Depot on Government Street helped push the revitalization of downtown east. It gave us a place to bowl with friends, listen to live music, enjoy a meal and rent a stylish apartment. COVID-19 has slowed its action this year, but the grounds recently became the new home of the Mid City Makers Market. electricdepotbr.com

Electric Depot

completion

2019

The urgency of Louisiana’s diminishing wetlands was just part of the impetus behind the Water Campus, a multimillion-dollar project now positioning Baton Rouge as a global hub for rising seas research. The stylishly designed riverfront facility is home to the Center for Coastal & Deltaic Solutions, The Water Institute of the Gulf, the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority and the LSU Center for River Studies, where a massive model of the Mississippi River can track the movement of water and sediment. thewatercampus.org

The Water Campus

If downtown is Baton Rouge’s “living room,” North Boulevard Town Square is its couch. The plaza, which was completed in full last year, is a gathering spot for fun runs, concerts, parades and festivals. The square’s public stage is flan ed by the wavelike “Crest” sculpture, café seating, shade trees and pedestrian paths. downtownbatonrouge.org

2018 2020

2014-2019

OUR CITY //

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Remember when …

A look at some big ideas around the Capital Region that never panned out By Benjamin Leger

COURTESY STATE LIBRARY OF LOUISIANA

Film industry attempts to jump the river

The geodesic dome in its 1950s heyday

The dome is done It was a Baton Rouge attraction even though it lay abandoned. The geodesic dome on Scenic Highway was built in 1958 as a railway tank car service shop. But years of wear and tear and a caving roof led to rumors that it would be demolished for safety reasons. AndNovember though the Foundation for Historical Issue Date: Ad proof #1 Louisiana tried to push for its preservation and • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. it came down around Thanksgiving 2007. • ADrenovation, WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours.

As the state watched its film industry clout g ow, plans were announced around 2007 for the nearly $500 million Studio City Louisiana in West Baton Rouge. The massive project on 135 acres of riverfront would include eight sound stages and generate more than 5,000 permanent jobs. It was expected to be operational by 2009 with the help of Gulf Opportunity Zone bonds. But by 2008, little traction had been made, and the project got tied up in legal disputes.

COURTESY CHENEVERT ARCHITECTS

COURTESY JANSON DESIGN GROUP

Developers imagined a Universal Studiosstyle film lot on 135 acres across the river.

It’s definitely not alive! Mayor Kip Holden’s ambitious plan for a riverfront tourism attraction needed major funding for its $248 million price tag. The plans for Audubon Alive, a nature-themed park with an aquarium and 4D theater, went before voters as part of a $1 billion bond. It failed in November 2008, and the idea never came up again. Its location just south of Hollywood Casino has since been flo ted as a passive park, with boardwalks that can withstand the rise and fall of the river.

Flicks downtown? As the city worked to develop a designated arts and entertainment district downtown, talk brewed of the need for a movie theater. Early plans to renovate the Kress Building included mockups of an art-house cinema. But when the building opened in October 2008, that wasn’t part of the amenities. Still, the Manship Theatre has filled the gap over the y ars, hosting film festivals and movie sc eenings.

• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Handcrafted in Louisiana Seared into your memory – like we sear each burger – is sweet, juicy, specially selected beef – memorably adorned with your choice of fresh toppings, hand-cut fries, and a craft beer. Some things, you just never forget.

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OUR CITY //

RA HA NA RC HIT EC T TES YT UR CO

River Park was set to include an open-air concert venue.

Developer Pete Clements had a $600 million idea for a mixed-use development just north of Hollywood Casino that would include an open-air concert venue, several multi-story residential and office buildings, restaurants, shops and a hotel. Things seemed to be moving forward for River Park: Clements partnered with the casino to build a railroad underpass from River Road, and the state legislature approved a special tax financing district in 2010 to help with funding But by 2016, little movement had been made, and the banks threatened seizure of the 36.8-acre property over ongoing financial disputes

The push for a revitalized Lincoln Theater The Louisiana Black History Hall of Fame purchased the rundown space in Old South Baton Rouge in 2009 and soon began repair work. Its important history as a Black movie theater and the site of organizing efforts for the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott of the 1950s make it a vital hub for revitalizing the neighborhood. The overhaul would create a performing arts and exhibition space with a $4.9 million price tag (at the time, at least). And while restoration efforts have seen starts and stops in the years since, this is one project that might still have a future thanks to the passionate efforts of preservationists.

The accordion-style design for the downtown library meant to fluidly connect each floor, according to Trey Trahan.

The streetcar some of us desired The project seemed like a no-brainer at the time: A public transit line linking downtown to LSU along Nicholson Drive. What form it would take was a matter of contention as the city secured federal funding in 2015. Some people wanted a New Orleans-style streetcar, others wanted a modern tram line that blended in with the futuristic Water Campus just breaking ground on Nicholson. Though the sleek tram line model won out and the Metro Council threw $10 million at the project in 2018, Mayor Sharon Weston Broome scrapped plans in favor of a 9-mile bus rapid transit line connecting Plank Road to LSU. The new project likely wouldn’t begin service until 2023.

COURTESY TRAMLINKBR

A riverfront Perkins Rowe

Trey Trahan, the architect of eye-catching structures like the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame, was a frontrunner to design the new River Branch library downtown in 2011. But a side-by-side comparison of his ambitious design and a similar proposed library by a different developer in the Czech Republic circulated among the selection board. Trahan was soon passed over amid allegations of plagiarism. Frustrated by what he saw as an attempt to tarnish his credibility, he relocated his firm to New Orleans. (And, the troubles for the downtown library didn’t stop there.) But Trahan hasn’t completely abandoned Baton Rouge; he’s since designed the Crest stage downtown and the Magnolia Mound visitors center. Yet the prolific de signer’s plan for a mixed-use structure on the old City Dock was scrapped for the Water Institute for the Gulf, and his design of a slim, 26-story residential tower wedged between the Shaw Center and River Road has yet to gain traction. S

COURTESY HOLDEN ARCHITECTS

A controversial downtown library plan

The modern tram line designed to connect downtown to LSU

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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Sports center

OUR CITY //

15 times Baton Rouge sports captured headlines

ASSOCIATED PRESS

B Y M A R K C L EM ENTS

BATON ROUGE IS a unique place for a large number of reasons, and the local sports scene is definitely one of them. Even if a player or coach doesn’t have some significa t personal ties to the city, we will rally behind anyone who can build athletic achievement—and hype us all up. Simply put, if you embrace Baton Rouge, it’ll embrace you right back. From Tigers and Jags to various high schools across the area, there are dozens of stories each athletic season that bring buzz and local, state and national attention. Since 225’s birth in 2005, we’ve been lucky enough to be a part of conference championships, national championships and even world records. Here are 15 of the biggest storylines in sports that we haven’t— and likely won’t—forget from 2005 to today.

2006

LSU basketball makes a run to the Final Four. Led by a host of local talents, the 2006 LSU basketball team took the nation by storm with its impressive showing in the NCAA Basketball Tournament. Baton Rouge natives like Glen “Big Baby” Davis, Garrett Temple and Tasmin Mitchell became household names across the country after taking down top-seeded Duke and No. 2 seed Texas in back-to-back matchups. The marquee wins earned the Tigers a trip to their first inal Four in 20 years.

2007

2009

While it may not have been quite as historic as the season LSU would put together in 2019, the Tigers’ 2007 run was an unforgettable ride capped off with the national championship trophy. LSU lost two games that regular season, both of which came in triple overtime to other Southeastern Conference rivals. Some major upsets across the national landscape gave the Tigers another opportunity at the national title, and they took full advantage by beating Ohio State 38-24 (also in the New Orleans Superdome).

The 10-year stretch of success LSU baseball boasted throughout the ’90s will likely never be repeated. The program won five n tional titles in 10 years, setting a new standard for college baseball. It took nine years for the Tigers to get back to the pinnacle of the sport— which felt like a long time by LSU standards—but beating Texas to reclaim the throne was just as rewarding. The squad was chockfull of memorable names and future pros, from Mikie Mahtook and D.J. LeMahieu to pitchers Louis Coleman and Anthony Ranaudo.

After a roller coaster season, LSU wins its third national football title.

LSU returns to the top of the college baseball world.

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OUR CITY //

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Southern scares top-seeded Gonzaga. It’s not often that a postseason loss steals national headlines, but in the case of Southern’s first round matchup with Gonzaga in the 2013 NCAA Tournament, college basketball history was nearly made. The Jaguars entered the tournament as a No. 16 seed, facing off against the top-seeded Bulldogs. At that point, a 16-seed had never beaten a No. 1 seed in tournament history, and Southern had the game tied with less than 4 minutes to play. The Jaguars ultimately lost 64-58, but the 6-point loss marked the closest by a 16-seed to a 1-seed since 1996.

2013

Southern secures the SWAC. The first y ar under Southern University’s new head football coach Dawson Odoms started off with a bang. Despite kicking off the season with a pair of tough losses, the Jaguars went on to win seven of its final 10 games to take home the SWAC Championship for the first time in a decade. The conference title game was a double overtime thriller against Jackson State, which had beaten Southern 19-14 earlier in the year. The Jaguars got the best of the rematch.

Southern University’s winning score in the 2013 SWAC Championship

2014-now Southern University works to overcome academic issues.

Starting in 2014, Southern University was forced to halt its athletics due to poor record-keeping within the university. There was a massive uphill battle to climb in order for the school to get back in good academic standing with the NCAA. Then-head basketball coach Roman Banks gave up his whistle and whiteboard in order to take over as athletic director and work to bring the university back up to par. It was a remarkable transformation for a university that was in such disarray, seemingly without an end in sight. Southern will remain on probation until November 2021, so this is a story to continue monitoring.

2015

Turnover reshapes the LHSAA. The issue of public vs. private split championships has been a major controversy in Louisiana high school athletics for years. Eddie Bonine took over as executive director of Louisiana High School Athletic Association in 2014 and has had to work through countless issues already. This will likely be an ongoing headline for the next decade.

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Issue Date: Nov 2020 Ad proof #3 OUR CITY //

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

“ S E PTE M B E R 2 0 1 8

“I would never have thought I’d be the athletic director, because I was passionate about basketball. … God brought me to Southern University through basketball, but it was destiny [becoming AD].”

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SAM ABRAMS, GENERAL MANAGER

—Roman Banks, Southern University athletic director

2014

LSU establishes the school’s first beach volleyball team. Baton Rouge loves its sports. So naturally it was exciting news when LSU announced the introduction of its sand volleyball team in 2014. The Tigers have gone from a 6-10 record in the first s ason to a 31-8 mark last year, including three straight NCAA Championship Tournament appearances.

2015

Baton Rouge dominates the state’s high school football scene. It’s not breaking any news to say high school football is just different in Louisiana. So there were some serious bragging rights building in 2015, when Lutcher High, Zachary High, Catholic High, Parkview Baptist and Southern Lab—all 225-area schools— took home their respective state championships. It was the first time since 1966 that three or more Capital Region schools won state titles in the same year.

2015

LSU men’s golf takes home its first national title in six decades. The LSU men’s golf team’s national championship in 2015 was an impressive feat. It was the fi th national title in the program’s history, but the first since 1955. The Tigers also tied a team record with five wins on the season, matching the single-season mark previously set in 1959-60.

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OUR CITY //

Les Miles out. Coach O in.

2016

ASSOCIATED PRESS

JO RD AN

HEF LER

Discussing Les Miles’ future at LSU had become a regular topic of conversation in Baton Rouge around 2012 or 2013, and it was often pretty polarizing. It was hard to hate on the quirky “Mad Hatter” who had brought LSU a national title. But it was equally tough to justify some of the coaching decisions that were taking place on the field Two losses in the first four games o the 2016 season meant the final st aw for Miles, and in stepped Louisiana native, Ed Orgeron. Three full seasons into Coach O’s tenure: so far, so good.

77% Les Miles’ winning record at LSU (114-34)

77.8% Ed Orgeron’s winning record at LSU (41–11), as of Oct. 16

2017

Will Wade takes over the LSU basketball program.

IN LL CO

RI

CH IE

—Will Wade, LSU basketball head coach

2019

Mondo Duplantis vaults his way into the record books. Mondo Duplantis may have only spent one season on LSU’s campus, but the excitement he drew will last a lifetime. The pole vaulter was the brother of former LSU baseball standout Antoine Duplantis and ultimately left Baton Rouge after his freshman season to pursue a professional career. He finished his collegiate career with countless records and titles to his name, including NCAA indoor champion, SEC indoor and outdoor champion, collegiate indoor and outdoor record holder and LSU indoor and outdoor record holder, among many, many others. Duplantis has since broken the world record in the pole vault, with a height of 6.18 meters.

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2019

Nothing may ever top LSU’s historic 2019 national championship.

It may have been the fourth national title in LSU’s history, but this is one that’s going to hold a special place in the hearts of Tiger fans forever. Led by Heisman Trophy winner Joe Burrow (or “Burreaux,” as he affectionately adopted), Biletnikoff winner Ja’Marr Chase and Baton Rouge native Clyde Edwards-Helaire, LSU strung together a perfect 15-0 season, breaking record after record along the way. Lifting the trophy from the friendly confines o the Mercedes-Benz Superdome was another cherry on top.

AU G U ST 2 0 1 9

“You can tell this year is really different.” —Joe Burrow, ahead of his Heisman-, SEC- and nationalchampionship winning season

JORDAN HEFLER

JA NUA RY 2018

“We are going to build something that the whole state of Louisiana can be proud of. ... We are going to do that on a culture based on acting the right way.”

JORDAN HEFLER

After some of the worst years in LSU basketball’s history, the Tigers brought in a young, bright mind to run its program. Will Wade came from a promising track record at VCU and has already shown signs of more growth in Baton Rouge. LSU went 18-15 in Wade’s first y ar but improved to an SEC-best 25-5 in the next. Wade’s third season couldn’t be played out because of COVID-19, but the future sure looks bright in Baton Rouge—assuming none of these rumored NCAA investigations pan out poorly.

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Congrats on 15 years to our friends at 225 magazine! Celebrate with a Free Waffle Cheese Fry when you download our app! walkons.com |

Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #1

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EXPERTS YOU’VE TRUSTED FOR OVER 80 YEARS

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2020

Gymnastics legend D-D Breaux retires after 43 seasons. D-D Breaux has long been an icon not only on LSU’s campus, but nationwide on the gymnastics scene. She retired this year as the longest-tenured coach of any sport in SEC history and her track record speaks for itself. Breaux has helped elevate LSU to a national powerhouse, racking up more than 800 wins and 31 top-10 finishes in her career, including three secondplace finishes She won’t be running the gymnastics program anymore, but she’ll still be rocking the purple and gold as an LSU ambassador for the athletics department.

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PHA

I’ve spent my entire career selling the community on gymnastics. You don’t have to understand gymnastics to enjoy the athleticism and the aesthetics of the sport. But once you come, you become part of that excitement. —D-D Breaux

STE

Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #2

COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

NIE

LAN

DRY

AUGUST 2015

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From left to right: Robbie Sandlin, Eric McGee, Jamie Sandlin, Billy Sandlin.

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Our 400+ pediatric specialists are here for your little one. Since 1955, Children’s Hospital New Orleans has provided extraordinary care for children and families across Louisiana, including Baton Rouge. With our all new, expanded Baton Rouge multi-specialty clinic, choosing specialized care for your little one close to home has never been easier! To schedule an appointment today call 844.200.2466.

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OUR CITY //

What does the future hold? 15 ideas, plans and movements to watch for BY MAGG IE H E YN R ICH A R DSO N

The lakes

RENDERING COURTESY BREC

Imagine a day spent kayaking on the lakes from LSU to City Park, or cycling around them on a dedicated path, or tracking migratory birds from spacious green spaces protected from traffic The first phase o a forthcoming $50 million, multi-year revitalization coordinated by state and local governments, BREC and LSU should come in the next few months. The project will begin in fall 2021 with dredging to make the water bodies deeper and healthier. The effort is being compared to Houston’s once-neglected Buffalo Bayou, now an award-winning park.

JANUARY 2010

“Until the city, LSU and BREC can come to terms with how the cost will be shared, how they are going to come up with that, we cannot move forward.”

Traffic Greater Baton Rouge’s traffic woes a e the stuff of legend, especially for commuters. How we continue to chip away at them will depend, to some extent, on who wins the race for mayor. Meanwhile, DOTD is in the first stage o a plan to widen Interstate-10 from the Mississippi River bridge to the I-10/I-12 split. The plan includes new east- and westbound travel lanes, new on- and off-ramps, and lane additions to the eastbound side of the Mississippi River Bridge to smooth the incoming flow of traffic into B ton Rouge.

—Nick Sims, project manager with the Army Corps of Engineers, had said improving the lakes would cost $7 million in 2008. That ballooned to $21 million in 2010—and $50 million in 2020.

Retaining talent

DIGIT

348

The number of articles on 225batonrouge. com that have mentioned the word “traffic” over the last 15 years.

St. George Last fall, residents of a southeast portion of Baton Rouge voted to break away and form the city of St. George, citing motivation to establish an independent school district. What the future holds is still unclear—but plenty contentious. Mayor Sharon Weston Broome filed a lawsuit to stop the incorporation, but if St. George clears that hurdle, Baton Rouge will have to square significant lost tax evenue, and St. George will have to build—and pay for—a school system and local government from the ground up.

North Baton Rouge The new Plank Road Master Plan aims long-awaited development energy at this long neglected critical corridor where high crime and disinvestment have been the norm. In 2021, the Build Baton Rouge-led project should break ground on a pocket park and an $8 million mixeduse development that features affordable housing and an Early Start Child Care Center. A forthcoming Bus Rapid Transit line planned by CATS will be built in the next few years. It links Plank Road to Nicholson Drive.

For decades, cities like Houston, Atlanta, Austin and Nashville have lured local college graduates with hot job opportunities and quality-of-life amenities. Projects like the Electric Depot and a host of new bars and restaurants have beefed up Baton Rouge’s cool factor, but a new strategy in the business community may also help keep 20-somethings in town. BRAC is encouraging local businesses to build relationships with students earlier, through both paid internships and job postings on the talent recruiting platform Handshake. No doubt we’ll see local businesses step up their efforts to partner with regional higher ed institutions.

NOVEM BER 2015

‘‘We need to make sure we nurture talent.” —Musician and teacher John Gray, when asked how we keep young musicians in the state

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #2

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OUR CITY //

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2019 Recipient of the Greater Baton Rouge Association of REALTORS® Most Cooperative Agent Award

COVID-19’s lasting impact Distillers began making hand sanitizer. Home delivery became even more popular. Restaurants added outdoor dining without a city ordinance. Business went virtual. Handshakes were no more. Unemployment rose. So did food insecurity and cases of domestic violence. By early October, the state had seen nearly 170,000 cases and more than 5,400 deaths. It’s anyone’s guess what the next few months will bring, but there’s a good chance we’ll see some of the pandemic’s trappings for a while, even with a vaccine.

DIGIT

7.1

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Issuewww.RYNJONES.com Date: November Ad proof #1

Gallons of water dumped on Louisiana during the August 2016 flood—th ee times as much rain as Hurricane Katrina and enough to fill Lake Pontchartrain four times, according to The Washington Post.

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WE MAY BE YOUNGER THAN 225 MAGAZINE, BUT JUST LIKE THEM WE DELIVER A QUALITY PRODUCT!

Public education Lately, the East Baton Rouge Parish School System has been focused on safely reopening during the pandemic. But its future holds much larger issues concerning equity and performance. Improving the C-rated system will be the focus of the next superintendent. Meanwhile, Baton Rouge continues to excel at attracting high-performing charter school models, including Basis and IDEA, adding to a growing list of choices for families.

Race relations

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We used to love a good rain storm. But after 2016, steady rainfall sends shudders about where all that water goes—and whether local rivers and bayous can absorb it. Sustainable development may finally be ge ting its due, with good examples for green infrastructure set by the Baton Rougebased Center for Planning Excellence. Meanwhile, BREC is finding new ways o helping parks absorb water. In addition, we’ll likely see watersheds encouraged to flow and carry w ter, rather than being covered with concrete.

Each office is independently owned & operated

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Climate change

Baton Rouge still has a lot of work to do. We are a city, after all, whose school system functioned under a federal desegregation order for 51 years, where Black and white residents are divided geographically, and where the pandemic is impacting a disproportionate number of African Americans. The good news? More police officers now w ar body cams. Organizations like Dialogue on Race Louisiana continue to bring diversity training to groups. And student-run, peaceful protests in Baton Rouge after a Minnesota policeman killed George Floyd in late May demonstrate a racially diverse commitment to improving race relations.

Saltwater intrusion For years, we’ve known about saltwater slowly creeping into the main aquifer that supplies Baton Rouge with drinking water, but have yet to pinpoint a solution. Recently, the Water Institute of the Gulf got involved, teaming with LSU scientist Frank Tsai and the Capital Area Groundwater Conservation Commission. The Water Institute is working on a study for a 50-year solution.

“The way we’re going, people are going to be forced to drink from the Mississippi River. Everybody loses if we don’t act.” —Hays Town, who led the formation of Baton Rouge Citizens to Save Our Water, Inc.

DEC EM BER 2013

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Issue Date: October Ad proof #1

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OUR CITY //

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RENDERING COU RTESY BREC

Greenwood Park and the Baton Rouge Zoo

NOVE M B E R 2 0 1 9

With the heated discussion about whether to renovate or relocate the Baton Rouge Zoo finally settled, the focus turned this year to finishing a master plan to improve the current zoo and to create a coherent connection to the adjacent Greenwood Park. Phase One construction starts shortly. The project may take a decade or more to complete. But among the finished amenities you’ll eventually see are a new visitor’s entrance and orientation center, underwater hippo exhibit, and a zipline through the surrounding park. 6

Get FIT, Stay FIT!

“[The zoo] will make the whole area a destination.” —BREC Communications Director Cheryl Michelet

ARRTIST TISTT REND RENDERRINGS INGS

Baton Rouge to New Orleans railway

RENDERING COURTESY JOHN

Downtown Station Transit Oriented

SPAIN

Linking Baton Rouge to New Orleans is a heavily researched idea whose time, many believe, has come. Baton Rouge, Gonzales, LaPlace and New Orleans all have drawn rail station plans—ours would include a station in the Health District and the final stop at Government and 16th streets—and many see the rail as a way to coalesce Render ing of a possible economic development in a downtown Baton Rouge rail station super region. A large portion of funding will need to come from the federal government, ultimately requiring political will at the state level. Time will tell. Development Concept

NOOVEMBER 20018

DRAFT

A new ‘new’ bridge Discussions of another bridge constructed somewhere to the south have been ongoing. DOTD is studying the issue, but it’ll be years before it’s completed. The bridge could be built at one of five sites betwee Brusly and Plaquemine, thus linking La. 1 to La. 30.

Take the first step in a healthier direction by scheduling your initial consultation. Call (225) 928-0486.

F I T N ES S PERSONAL TRAINING || GROUP TRAINING SPIN || YOGA || PILATES

Housing

T HER APY

Baton Rouge’s housing stock needs to accommodate everyone from low-income residents to first-tim homebuyers to a possible influx o residents relocating from coastal areas. Build Baton Rouge’s recently established land bank will help quicken development in lower-income areas. Investors might replicate developer David Treppendahl’s Ardendale Oaks apartment complex. And a $30 million grant for the Baton Rouge Housing Authority in 2019 will eventually replace a dated housing project and move its residents to mixed income developments in Ardendale.

PHYSICAL THERAPY || MASSAGE THERAPY

NUTRITION NUTRITION COUNSELING

EST HET I C S

TS COUN SY THE AR G COURTE RENDERIN

As COVID-19 restrictions lift, the last sector to return to normal will be the arts. When that happens, be sure to show your support by seeing a show or exhibit. It’ll take the next few years for arts organizations to bounce back from their extended shutdown. In the good Cary Sau news department, the city looks forward to the rage Center, ex Community Arts opening of the Cary Saurage Community Arts Cenpected Au gust 2021 ter in Beauregard Town in August 2021. Set in the historic Triangle Building, the Arts Council’s facility will be a true community gathering spot with gallery and rehearsal space, studios for working artists, meeting rooms and arts offices

CIL

The arts

NO MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED A goal and some serious commitment will do.

FUTUREFITNES S BR.COM | 1 65 0 LO BD E L L AVE NUE | BATO N R O UG E , LA 70806 ST U D IO PA R K • AC R O S S F R O M TOW N E C E N T E R

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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I AM 225 //

I feel like I owe my education in French and my love of French culture to growing up in the South and having the opportunity to go to an immersion school here. I’ve seen in the past 10 years how much the city has grown and how much we’ve adopted different cuisines and different cultural influences to shape us into the Baton Rouge that we see today.

Baton Rouge is where the heart is. And my heart is with the people I love. I couldn’t imagine living away from family, friends, my church, coworkers or our community.

—LAUREN SPANN

There’s simply no place like it.

I am

—PATRICK HARRINGTON

“I feel Baton Rouge is New Orleans grown up with a conscience. There’s the same food, festivals, music and basic culture, but so much more effort to build community, be responsible to our residents and be more inclusive.”

225 There is no place like home: Locals share what they love about Baton Rouge FROM ITS ROARING football fans to its vibrant murals, Baton Rouge steals hearts with its quirks and homey charm. In each issue of 225, we feature a different local person in our “I Am 225” feature. But for our anniversary issue, we’re shining the spotlight on our readers. We wanted to know why locals chose to make the Capital City their home. We asked our Instagram followers and 225 Dine subscribers. Here’s what they said.

—KRISTINA MANN

“This city hugged me when I didn’t feel like I belonged anywhere. The feeling of the downtown skyline smiling at you from a distance while you’re on a bike ride on River Road near LSU was enough for me to desire more from this city.” —MICHAEL ARMSTEAD

—COMPILED BY CYNTHEA CORFAH

—BARBARA W. AUTEN

—ERIN KRUPPNER

“Baton Rouge is home because it’s a city of neighborhoods. Everyone knows everyone, and that’s our strength.” —COLLIN LINDREW

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“ I’m proud to live

here because I get to see the growth and experience the evolution of our city.” —CIARRA WILLIAMS

COURTESY PHOTOS

I’m proud to live here because I’ve leaned into becoming a member of the vibrant, friendly community that welcomed me with open arms and opened so many doors for me, professionally and personally.

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad1 proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

CASUAL DINING PRIVATE PARTIES AWARD-WINNING WINES

SERVING CONSISTENT EXCELLENCE SINCE 1996!

THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT THROUGH A CHALLENGING YEAR. frenchmarketbistro.com • 225-753-3500

Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #2 @frenchmarketbistro

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Young Life Baton Rouge would like to thank our friends and sponsors for this year’s Young Life Sporting Clays Classic. We appreciate each of you and your faithful support of Young Life in Baton Rouge! Every kid. Everywhere. For eternity.

COURTESY PHOTOS

Bill Barkas

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

AD V E RT I SE ME N T

Dudley DeBosier recognizes those who

#

4LA oRight4

*Some staff are not pictured

EMPOWER 225 Empower 225’s mission is to help youth and families in the Greater Baton Rouge Area escape the cycle of poverty and violence. The organization is focused on providing youth with the resources they need to reach their highest potential through educational support, life-skills training, career preparedness, housing and mentorship programs. Below are some of Empower 225’s programs: • • • • •

The Empower 225 Leadership Academy Empower 225 Housing Programs The Foster Care/Adoption Initiative The Street Outreach Program  The HOPE Team

Because Empower 225 has many programs, they have been successful in addressing a specific need of an individual and then connecting them to other services they may want. For

example, there was a client who came to Empower 225 for the employment program. Because of the knowledge she gained through the employment program, she was inspired to start her own photography business. She got a job, saved up to purchase a camera, drafted a business plan and successfully launched her own photography business last month. Through the generosity of individuals, churches, corporations and foundations, Empower 225’s mission is made possible and greatly impacts the community. Empower 225 invites everyone to become involved with our programs through volunteering, mentoring and donations. To learn more about Empower 225, visit empower225.org, email info@empower225.org or call (225)236-5249.

Do you know someone “doing right?” Submit their name to promos@dudleydebosier.com

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AD V E RT I SE ME N T

MAKING A

Difference

DUDLEY DEBOSIER DONATES TECHNOLOGY TO HELP STUDENTS WITH VIRTUAL LEARNING In the past Dudley DeBosier gave away backpacks filled with school supplies to help students and their families get ready for the start of school. This year there were so many uncertainties with how students would return to school and what it would look like. With the increase in virtual learning, access to technology has become imperative for children to be successful in school; however, some children are not as fortunate to have home computers or tablets. Dudley DeBosier wanted to make sure students did not fall behind.

These organizations are working to ensure that our youth have the ability to learn and receive educational support, and Dudley DeBosier is honored to be able to assist them. Managing Partner, Chad Dudley stated, “At Dudley DeBosier, it’s important to us that we give back to the communities where we live and work, as well as support individuals and organizations that are making Louisiana better. Each year, Dudley DeBosier donates to individuals and organizations that are working on a specific event/program that will positively impact our community.”

Dudley DeBosier partnered with TRUCE BR and Empower 225 to donate a total of 15 computers and accessories to make sure that children have the access to technology to be successful in school.

For more information and to stay up-to-date with what Dudley DeBosier is doing in the community, like and follow them on Facebook at facebook.com/DudleyDeBosier

Responsible Attorneys

444-4444

1075 GOVERNMENT STREET BATON ROUGE, LA 70802 WWW.DUDLEYDEBOSIER.COM

CHAD DUDLEY | STEVEN DEBOSIER | JAMES PELTIER, JR.

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C OV E R S T ORY

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[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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C OV E R S T ORY

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y G R A C E O W E N CO M P I L E D B Y J E N N I F E R TO RM O // I N TE RVI E W S B Y JE F F RO E D E L AN D CYN THEA COR FA H

“IT WILL BE fun, but it won’t be fluff.” These were the words of 225 publisher Julio Melara in November 2005, when he wrote his first column introducing the magazine. “Our mission is to become the indispensable guide to living in the Capital Region,” he wrote. “We’ll be a provocative, yet familiar, friend, and we’ll make a difference as we build our city of the future.” Here we are, 15 years into that future. And what a ride it has been! We’d like to think we’ve made a difference, as Julio promised. But as our staff dug through hundreds of pages from the 225 archive, gathering research for this issue, one thing did become clear. 225 is a time capsule, a chronicle of an ever-changing city. Each issue of this magazine freezes in time all the hopes and dreams of those who were interviewed in it. As the creatives who make this magazine,

we routinely crank out an issue, put it on stands and move on. It’s not that we’re not proud of our work. It’s just that we’re too busy hustling to put together the next one, so we rarely have time to stop and reflect on our accomplishments. The great thing about a project like an anniversary issue is the rare chance it gives us to look backward. This time, we realized something: The same phenomenon happens with our city. Life moves so quickly and is so fraught with challenges that we rarely slow down to appreciate what we’ve achieved in Baton Rouge—or to celebrate all that we’ve risen above. Thank you for reading 225, for letting us be your provocative yet familiar friend. We hope this issue makes you proud to live here. But more than that, we hope it helps you realize Baton Rouge wouldn’t be where it is today without its most important ingredient: all of you.

DIGIT

180

Number of monthly issues of 225 that have hit print newsstands since 2005. If you count our Extra publications and special editions like Tiger Pride, the total jumps to 213.

Too many people outside Louisiana think of Baton Rouge as a sleepy college town with limited social and entertainment opportunities for young professionals. ‘225’ will help showcase what the Baton Rouge area has to offer in the way of lifestyle, entertainment and culture, and will present all this in an edgy, contemporary fashion that will appeal to young professionals. I can’t wait to get my hands on the first edition. —Stephen Moret, then-president and CEO of Baton Rouge Area Chamber, in a note printed in 225’s November 2005 “Letters” section

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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HOLIDAY READY? BOTOX® COSMETIC JUVÉDERM® XC DIAMOND GLOW FACIAL LASER SKIN TONING COOLSCULPTING

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?

C OV E R S T ORY

The recurring stories Best of 225 2006-now

DIGIT

It’s probably the issue you know us best for: our yearly reader-chosen awards, crowning the best restaurants, bars, shops, events, people and more. The point of the awards has always been to engage readers, who determine the results from start to finish They decide who appears on the ballot through nominations. Then they vote on those nominees to determine the final awards—shining the light on local businesses. Our team changes the categories each year in an effort to improve the process and better reflect the landscape in Baton Rouge. Over the last 15 years, the results have sometimes made us laugh and cry, but mostly they’ve made us beam with pride at all the talent in our region—and how passionately our readers speak up about that talent. The changing winners each year are also a reminder of the ever-growing competition and innovation in Baton Rouge.

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Number of awards readers voted on in 2020. That’s17 more awards than the first edition in 2006

L

m

Y COV E R STOR

NTS BY MARK CLEME

A new era

AWAR D

WINNING!

of offense

—and newcomer Joe Brady— Led by quarterback Joe Burrow spark major change this season LSU’s offense hopes to finally

COLLIN RICHIE

and an easygoing, laid-back Off he field, he’s time, Saturday of guy. When it’s go same routines every rather endearing kind oe Burrow has the he’s quite the opposite. Burrow’s ride before a game. current coach what le sucker on the bus Ask any former or hear He eats a caramel-app inside out and you’ll repeatedly flips one of his socks like on the gridiron, .” to the stadium. He taking or “tough” or “competitor He two minutes before words like “gritty” lack. s (usually his left). And quarterback song. a lot of to the same exact He has a swagger openly admits the field, he listens l called from contact and 53-second instrumenta doesn’t shy away a big hit is It’s a minute and Despite by sliding, even if Fest” by Kid Cudi. he won’t play it safe “New York City Rage typical imply, it’s not your coming. the what the name may smack, and he has no hardcore hip-hop He likes to talk a little hype-up song. There’s an guitar riffs. And, being game to back it up. tells 225. beat, no heavy metal Burrow touting guy,” lyrics obviously aren’t “I’m just a competitive on the instrumental, there chess, pingpong or championships. “Whether I’m playing whenever hard work or winning synth-y, sort of kind of comes out ways football field, that Ironically, it’s an electronic, repetitive drum . There’s a lot of different with a trippy, … there’s competition dance-pop track, getting in scuffles you see guys . to lead, but when team a little thumping throughout for the kind of fires up your But that’s just par taking late hits—it leader.” It’s a little different. I try to do to be a may bit. That’s just what course for Burrow. kind of cat, but he of the norm native is a bit out Joe Burrow is a different The Athens, Ohio, a place they in recent lead the Tigers to seen under center just be the one to from what LSU has coach and some time. of a longtime football haven’t been in quite years. He’s the son game. the by surrounded was born and raised

40

225batonrouge.com

People to Watch 2006-now | [225] August 2019

41

| 225batonrouge.com [225] August 2019

All things LSU

Who is redefining B ton Rouge? It’s the question we ask every year as we determine who to feature in our “People to Watch” edition, released each January. Alumni include political figu es like Steve Carter, Gary Chambers and Garret Graves; athletes like Glen Davis, Aaron Nola and Kennedi Edney; and yep, local celebs like Jay Ducote, Andi Eaton, Kenneth Brown and Brooks Nader. An important distinction: We select candidates based on who we think will make waves and grab headlines—locally or nationally—but we leave it up to readers to decide whether that impact will be positive or negative.

2006-now

We’ve published an LSU sports-themed cover story almost every year since our launch, and the first version o our annual Tiger Pride edition appeared in 2011. It’s a little funny trying to cover fall football in a print publication. We often start working on our stories five months in advance of when LSU takes the field for its first game o the season. That’s part of why our approach has always leaned more toward the human side of the sport and less toward analysis. For our 2008 cover on LSU football’s then-head coach Les Miles, we spent an afternoon with him and his family at home. Another 2008 story about LSU’s former baseball coach and athletic director Skip Bertman aimed to find out who he was “outside the Box.” And in 2019, we found out Heisman winner Joe Burrow’s pregame routine included a caramel-apple sucker and flipping one of his socks inside out.

“I think there’s a lot of things that are more important in the development of your home and your children’s lives than whether or not it’s exactly spick and span and whether the food is square on the table.” —Les Miles, in an August 2008 profil

‘Extra’ issues 2008-2019

Because 12 issues per year just didn’t seem like enough, we produced special standalone publications including The Playlist; Health, Wellness & Beauty; Menu Guide; Eats & Entertaining and Spaces & Places. 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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C OV E R S T ORY

15 YE A R S L AT E R

Renee Chatelain

COLLIN RICHIE

“WITH MID CITY Dance Project teaching at-risk children dance and creativity, we had been performing for a few years. But that first issue of 225 helped people embrace our group in new ways. If you look at the photo, the commitment to fully represent all in Baton Rouge is really important. To beautifully depict everyone in that photo in a way they had not been shown ever before, it said a lot about what 225 was going to be committed to. And it’s thrilling to see the Melrose East area now get the attention and the financial backing to support a bigger vision for the neighborhood. 2005 was the year of Katrina, and here we are in 2020, the year of the pandemic. How do you celebrate when you have these forces beyond your control dictating so much of life? I think the answer is in how Baton Rouge has grown in the last 15 years, overcoming challenges, and supporting what’s good and unique to us. The Shaw Center for the Arts opened in 2005, and that sprung from the Create Baton Rouge strategic plan of the ’90s, the same plan the Arts Council went back to for the Cary Saurage Community Arts Center opening in 2021. The Crest Stage, and all the greenspaces, the Downtown Development Districts efforts, Repentance Park, the bike trails, and the launch of 225. All this connectivity is accomplished through creativity. One of the first performances at the Shaw Center was by Mid City Dance Project: The Fading Line, about the 1953 Baton Rouge bus boycott. In 2007, Greg Williams Jr. started New Venture Theatre, a force in our community opening the door for people of color to perform quality productions. We’ve had many events and talented performers that started here under the radar but now have national acclaim. Women In Dance Leadership Conference moved to NYU and will now be in Chicago. It’s a vital conversation around dance, and it started in 2015 in Baton Rouge. With the Arts Council’s Ebb and Flow festival, we’ve put connectivity at the center. The dream is to have recreational barges that connect LSU, downtown and Southern University by the river. Baton Rouge is becoming less self-deprecating, but we can go farther by recognizing and elevating new talent, celebrating our people and embracing new ideas.”

Renee Chatelain, at the construction site for the upcoming Cary Saurage Community Arts Center

VIVRE:ART

Troupe DREAMS A CHANCE TO BE IN THE

Renee Chatelain (center) and her Nutracker crew: (clockwise from top center), Tierrany Malbrue, Ashley Larche, Ashle Handy, Chelsea Handy (Chatelain’s left arm is on her shoulder), Keesha McKey, Christine Negulescu (blue tutu), Whitney Handy (green tutu), Moryiah Scott (Chatelain’s right arm on her shoulder), Kristen Handy, Elaine Savoy and Jonathon Handy.

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[225] November, 2005

I

NUTCRACKER THRILLS INNER

CITY KIDS BY MAGGIE HEYN

RICHARDSON

n a large storage room off the School gym, dance instructor Melrose Elementary the hour. The children are itching to know their Christine Negulescu roles in stretches out her long, the December performance thin arms and slowly reaches of The Inner City Nutcracker. down to touch her bare One child asks about stage toes. The three boys and fright. Someone else pipes six girls in her class watch her, then up about make-up and costumes. inch their own hands toward “I heard,” says one of the sock-clad feet. Swaying boys, “that the soldiers slightly, get to carry guns with blanks.” positions, peeking at Negulescu the children hold their “Well, not blanks,” counsels for the cue to roll back Negulescu. “But there is up. a big battle scene between the mice and soldiers, and the More stretching exercises soldiers carry toy guns.” follow. Athletes, says the lithe instructor, aren’t The students stare wide-eyed. the only ones who need These children, and to warm up. In the midst of it all, hundreds of others one of the girls raises her across Baton Rouge, comprise hand. the Mid “Um. Um,” she says. “What City Dance Project, an 11-year-old ballet troupe is going to be the title of created our dance?” by Renee Chatelain, a former attorney and professional All heads jerk toward Negulescu. dancer. Chatelain, Negulescu and eight other instructors It is the question of teach at the organization’s Lobdell Avenue studio and in

NOVEM BER 2005

“There’s a lot of talent, but not a lot of opportunity for these kids to be introduced to ballet. For some of them, it’s the only time they’ll ever get to perform.”

—Renee Chatelain, in a story in 225’s inaugural issue about the 11th year of Mid City Dance Project

—AS TOLD TO JEFF ROEDEL

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN BAIAMONTE

President/CEO, Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge; co-founder, Mid City Dance Project; attorney Formerly: Executive director at The Manship Theatre; educator

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C OV E R S T ORY

The stories that went

VIRAL

July 2010

‘Cayenne Report’

SAtIRE

ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL News Ticker:

2006-2012

“If we can have drug dealers coming in here, why can’t we talk to a reporter? I don’t need no chaperone to have a conversation with you. I’m 42#2years old.” Issue Date: November Ad proof

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your park approval or minorMichael revisions.Whins —FEMA trailer resident • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

It. Is. Satire. That was the chant 225 repeated through the years, in an attempt to remind angry readers they shouldn’t take our “Cayenne Report” so seriously. The tabloid-style column included stories like: reality shows that should be made about Baton Rouge; LSU’s plans to add “Death Alley” cemetery next to Tiger Stadium; and a Louisiana Crawfish Boil-flav ed Kleinpeter ice cream. It was fake news before there was fake news. “‘Cayenne Report’ has been fabricating and exaggerating news just the way you like it,” wrote editor Tom Guarisco in 2010. “Along the way, we’ve confused you. We’ve deceived you. We’ve offended you. We’ve even alienated some of you.”

In honor of 225’s anniversary, we thought we’d reprise some old Cayenne Report faves. We’re confident you’ll find them as tasteless as the day they were first published. — TOM GUARISCO, EDITOR

Prominent B.r. couple splits BATON ROUGE–It looks like the end of the road for a wellknown Baton Rouge couple as divorce papers were filed yesterday in district court. It’s been a bumpy ride for Interstates 10 and 12 since the couple first split near Essen Lane years ago, and now the two cite irreconcilable differences as the reason for

smiley Anders secretly replaced with Folgers

[225] november 2010

|

This Old Pod

Enterprising New Orleans refugees Andrew and Carla Grismo, who ran out of housing options after Hurricane Katrina, have converted their rented portable storage unit into a single-family home, complete with shag carpeting and a wall-mounted aluminum can crusher. “Pod sweet home, podnuh,” Grismo told reporters, who stopped by to see his 16-by-8 foot customized home, which costs $140 a month. “When it gets cold we call the PODS people and they haul us to the warehouse,” Grismo said. “It’s a bouncy ride, but man it’s warm up in there.”

LsU markets ‘Death Alley’ cemetery

BATON ROUGE—Smiley Anders, the beloved and longtime feature columnist for the Advocate, was secretly replaced with Folgersbrand coffee in 1982, “and nobody noticed,” according to a media watchdog group. The news was included in a recent report by Accuracy In Media. Anders “Anders’ texture today is just as smooth and satisfying as before the switch was quietly made” more than two decades ago, the report said. Anders’ newspaper coworkers expressed surprise over the switch and their inability to detect it. “We’re shocked,” Executive Editor Linda Lightfoot said. “I’ve known Smiley for years. I could’ve sworn it was him—sip after delicious sip.”

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the permanent separation. “Sometimes I needed a shoulder [to cry on],” says I-10, “and she wasn’t there. Love should be a two-way street.” Meanwhile, I-12 chose to take the high road and issued a statement saying the highways were “simply headed in different directions.”

In collaboration with the Arts Council and the Baton Rouge Convention and Visitors Bureau, 225 released Red Stick Sounds. It had 13 songs from the likes of Henry Gray, Chris Thomas King and other local bands and songwriters.

cajun man stuns coffee shop patrons

photo sports information

To this day, people ask us about Chuck Hustmyre’s investigation of FEMA’s Renaissance Village trailer park in Baker. 225 set out to uncover what life was like for its 1,600 displaced New Orleanians. But officials bar ed our access. Instead, Hustmyre found other ways to connect with residents, who confirmed rumors of the crime and poor living conditions. It resulted in the arrest of three convicted sex offenders who lived there. “Your article is what stirred it up,” East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff ’s Office spo esman Fred Raiford told 225 afterward.

For five years, Cayenne Report has been fabricating and exaggerating news just the way you like it. Along the way, we’ve confused you. We’ve deceived you. We’ve offended you. We’ve even alienated some of you. None of these achievements would have been possible without a team of dedicated, twisted writers.

courtesy smiley anders

February 2006

Man sues Raising Cane’s, claims chickens don’t have fingers … ‘Actually, I deep-fry everything!’ Holly Clegg confesses … Probe by WAFB’s Paul Gates concludes Cayenne Report is ‘fake news!’ …

LOyAL reADers:

staff illustration/lsu

‘FEMA’s dirty little secret’

A ‘225’ CD

fork over big Dead and loving it. Fans Stadium. bucks for plots near Tiger

Dudley Thibodeaux angered coffee shop patrons when he cranked up his homemade, gasoline-powered battery backup for his Dell laptop at the new Starbucks in Thibodaux. ”Da factry battry don’t never lass on dat computah, so I did me some tinkerin,” said Thibodeaux, a shrimper who won the laptop at a casino. “I was at Starbucks da udda day — mais, dat’s some expensive coffee. Anyway, my battry was low, so I took out my invention — it uses a Briggs and Stratton tree horsepower motuh. Man, I cranked dat puppy up and I was Wi-Fi-ing!” Thibodeaux said. “Least, I taught I was. Da manager come running out shoutin’ ‘Turn dat ting off!’ But mais, I couldn’t hear him! You talk about dat guy was mad!”

225batonrouge.com

“Organizers of the St. Patrick’s Day parade have announced the cancellation of the event. ‘We’ll just stay home and drink this year,’ said chairperson Bobby Flanigan. “All that walking and throwing beads—I think we’ve really gotten away from our core values.’” —A 2006 ‘Cayenne Report’ (although it hits a little too close to home in 2020)

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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‘225 things to do’ 2008, 2018, 2020

If we wanted to roast ourselves, we’d tell you that through 2017, the most-read story on our website every year was an article published in 2008. Yes, people were flocking to ‘225 things to d ,’ a decade-old story that had some great suggestions for discovering hidden gems. But as it aged, it also became full of defunct attractions and now-closed restaurants. To celebrate its 10-year anniversary, we revamped it as a 2018 cover story. When the 2020 shutdown arrived, much of the list again became irrelevant. We introduced ‘225 things to do in a pandemic’ this fall on 225batonrouge.com. And because our lives have gone virtual, that edition is—you guessed it—digital-only.

JORDAN HEFLER

31

Soji

‘First Looks’ 2015-now

Los Reyes

LSU videos DIGIT

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With 225 Dine’s coverage ramping up, we began our “First Look” tours inside new restaurants and bars. Estimated We have a few rules about what’s number of “First worth a “First Look.” We must be Look” restaurant able to publish the story before or tours we’ve by opening date. And there must published be a story our writers can really dig into as they introduce the restaurant to readers. Fun fact: The vast majority of photos for our “First Looks” are taken by interns. We’re convinced our youngest photographers are some of the best and brightest.

2016-now

This is the part where we give a shout-out to Mark Clements, our digital content editor. He’s also the host of our Tiger Pride Podcast, and during nonpandemic times is at every LSU game on behalf of 225. There’s one video in particular that will forever be part of 225 lore: footage of Breiden Fehoko and his father, Vili Fehoko, sharing the haka ritual during the Tiger Walk down Victory Hill. The video attracted more than a million views, and was reposted by national media outlets.

DIGIT

51,000 The number of shares our Oct. 13, 2018, Breiden Fehoko haka video garnered on Facebook

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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1 4 Y E A R S L ATER

Collins Phillips III Owner, Innovative Construction and Repairs; co-owner, Millennial Innovations; founder, 2020 Vision Gun Club Formerly: LSU student; youth advocate specialist, East Baton Rouge Parish Schools

Collins Phillips III at Millennial Park

OURCITY

Graduating senior Collins Phillips says he’ll continue to fan the flames of protest over the purple and gold Confederate flag.

STUDENT LEADER SOUNDS CENSORSHIP, UNITY AND OFF ON ESCALATING HIS PROTESTS OF THE LSU-COLORED CONFEDERATE FLAG BY JEFF ROEDEL PHOTOS BY AARON

Last semester, last stan d

HOGAN

“It sounds like I’m talking about a war.” –COLLINS PHILLIPS, FOUNDER

OF THE STUDENT EQUALITY COMMISSION

N

obody is anxious and excited for the upcoming LSU football season in quite the same way as Collins Phillips. The 23-yearold graduating senior and founder of the Student Equality Commission ignited a fi when he organized a number restorm last fall of massive gameday marches in protest of the purple-and-gold Confederate flags that have slowly gained popularity, and notoriety, among tailgaters in the past five years. Phillips sees this as his last chance to affect positive change for the minority community at LSU.

The vandalizing of the Alpha Pi Alpha house just weeks after Katrina displaced his entire family bolstered his intolerance for inequality and prejudice. What started as 400 students march-

ing against the Kappa Alpha house—a fraternity known for flying a traditional rebel flag—spontaneously turned into a march against all purpleand-gold Confederate flags flown in tailgating camps. Administrators moved quickly to neutralize Phillips and quarantine any negative national press that claims of racist LSU fans might attract. Interim Vice-Provost for Equity & Diversity Katrice Albert asked Student Government President Michelle Gieg and others to encourage Phillips to put an end to the protests. Gieg did not oblige her, and administration efforts only escalated the controversy. Newspapers from The Times-Picayune to The Harvard Crimson jumped on the story as the lat[225] August 2006

AU G U ST 20 06

25

“THE [LSU] STUDENTS marching with the administration [this] summer was a beautiful photo op. But what I would say to those students is: When we marched 15 years ago, we didn’t want any administrators marching with us. We just wanted them to do their jobs. In a very personal way, all the protesting I did and things that transpired in 2005 and 2006 affected me negatively. It made trust diffi lt for a long time. Now, looking back, have things changed in terms of racism in Baton Rouge or at LSU in any significant way? When I’m asked that question, my first thought is ‘Where are the people who were spitting on us, yelling at us on LSU’s campus, because we stood up to that Confederate flag, when we marched because we didn’t want to be demeaned by a piece of cloth?’ What could happen in 15 years to change their minds? Nothing. We have people who do not care in the community, and the people who do care can’t relate to them. It’s diffi lt to communicate. Obama being elected drew it out. Trump’s shenanigans bring it out. The biggest blessing came from getting laid off by East Baton Rouge Parish Schools in 2015. I’d been doing handyman stuff n the side. I used my house as a contractor school and renovated everything. I started my own construction company and didn’t look back. Now I’m the builder at Millennial Park, the container park with restaurants and stores at 3817 Florida St., and we’re doing great things with these shipping containers. This might be the life-changing job my dad always talked about. We are working on residential designs, and on pools, too. I’m excited to see where this can go, how far we can push these container designs. We can stack them four high. I like the idea of taking something that’s an afterthought and turning it into something amazing. Going forward, I hope the wider Baton Rouge community gets more involved with the schools. The workforce needs to be integrated with it, not just grandma. The pandemic showed parents just how detached they’ve been from their own children’s education. My goal eight years from now is to step back from the day-to-day operations, oversee my companies but make time to give back to education in our community.”

—AS TOLD TO JEFF ROEDEL

What kind of reactions did you get during your first march (on LSU’s campus during game day festivities)? “People were yelling at us ‘Go back to Africa!’ and ‘Go back to Southern!’ We got a good response.” Why do you consider that a good response? “Well, because it’s the truth. It’s honest. That’s the way some people feel, and it’s good to have it out in the open.” COLLIN RICHIE

u

C OV E R S T ORY

—Taken from a Q&A with Phillips, then an LSU student protesting the purple-and-gold Confederate flag 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

C OV E R S T ORY

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The stories that looked deeper TWO THINGS HAVE always been at the heart of our coverage: people and community. When you read our profile stories, we hope you feel like you’re getting to know a friend. When you read our narratives, we hope you feel like you’re there with us. In journalism school, we learn to take notes on the details— the name of someone’s dog, what kind of car they drive. It’s how we bring people and places to life, whether we’re talking about a politician or a parade. And at the end of the day, it’s how we give Baton Rouge—and its people—a voice. Here’s a small sampling of some of those features through the years.

On people A willing vessel

A local mother’s obituary for her son is impacting lives across the country BY KACI YODER • Photos by Miriam Buckner THE FIRST THING that stands out in Gwen Knox’s home is the living room wall, stacked with shelves of books on everything from law to philosophy. The 71-year-old is a collector of words, often searching for the perfect poem for a situation. It’s how she found “Let Me Fall All By Myself,” an anonymous poem about loving a child with addiction that she shared years ago with a friend in need. In December, she returned to the poem, but this time for herself. Her son Brian died of a heroin overdose on Dec. 30, and she had to write his obituary. She spent four days composing the obituary and sent all 1,054 words, including the text of “Let Me Fall All By Myself” and a frank description of Brian’s path to addiction, to The Advocate. “He just never seemed to get a break, always falling and having to pull himself out of one hole after another,” Knox wrote in the obituary, describing how her son went from a soccer-playing tween to dying at age 40. “He started experimenting with drugs in his teens and came to think that the only solution to whatever he was dealing with was drugs… When he was drug-free, he had to deal with all of the thoughts going through his head. Coping with life was not a skill that he ever acquired.” As soon as it was posted online, the obituary began to spread— first across the country, then the world. Within the first two weeks, Knox received more than 300 emails from people who had read the obituary and reached out to the email address she appended to the last line. “I never planned for anything this big. All I knew was, ‘Oh my God, an obituary has to be written,’” Knox says. Since its posting, she’s gotten 700-plus emails and more than

where copies of the writing will be passed out and used to discuss the struggle of loving—and losing—an addict. “She expressed her grief so eloquently, in a way that really helped many people understand the pain and the loss associated with a death due to an overdose,” Hamilton says. “She was getting so much feedback from people, not only around town but around the world, that we saw there was a great deal of need to be addressed at the O’Brien House. Talking to her, we realized one of the things we might be able to do uniquely was to help families of addicts come to

Photographs on his mother’s kitchen table show Brian Knox throughout his life, along with a copy of his obituary.

Gwen Knox in her backyard, where she does much of her reading and writing

750 notes in the obituary’s digital guestbook, which The Advocate has left open indefinitely. One email came from a pharmacist in Staten Island, New York, whose husband got clean from drugs; the couple now has a 2-yearold daughter. Several emails have come out of Indiana, where an explosion of heroin use has led to 200 new cases of HIV. One came from an addict who wished her own mother would take away her daughters and “let her fall” so she

could hit rock bottom and be forced to get clean. One came from a mother who had never told anyone that her daughter’s death was from an overdose—until she emailed Knox. Knox tries to respond to as many as she possibly can. Here in Baton Rouge, the obituary has become part of the recovery community. Todd Hamilton, executive director of the O’Brien House treatment facility, says his staff designed a new program for families of addicts as a result,

grips with the painful truth about addiction.” What’s resonated most with these people, Knox says, is the unfl inching honesty of the obituary. “What I found out is that there’s so much shame connected to a drug overdose, and people were not talking about it,” Knox says. “What I feel the Holy Spirit did [when I was writing] was just to take the shield off and let me discuss the pain of the experience and the life of the person, just raw, to the point that it affected so many people.” Brian’s overdose, Knox explains, doesn’t diminish his character. He burned bright, with a penchant for mischief and a way of making every person in his life feel import-

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Age: 69 Christi, Texas Hometown: Corpus of the House of Occupation: Superior Sisters of Blessed the Mercedarian Sacrament

| 37

“Sometimes people don’t want anything from you. They just want you to hear them out. They just want to know that you care about them.” —Sister Dulce Maria, who is visited at Cypress Springs Mercedarian Prayer Center every week by those who hope her hands will heal them

RICHIE • PHOTO BY COLLIN BY JENNIFER TORMO

Kleenex and in her office: aprons, always has three things SISTER DULCE MARIA a blue pink Dubble Bubble gum. in her wheelchair, wearing the nun sits brightly On a Thursday morning, robes. apron over her white whale- and dolphin-printed It’s the angel of healing,” she says. as the angel of healing. “The dolphin is my symbol. though, know Sister Dulce Many around Baton Rouge, at Cypress Springs Mercedarian Prayer Center visit her illnesses, as well as More than 80 people terminal and cancer help with can every week, seeking her Her visitors say her hands and personal matters. marriage, bereavement get on illness. might cure that or relieve pain makeup and oils white robes from the patients who get Her aprons protect her always has tissues for she says. tearful patients. She them when she hugs makes everything better, Bubble? Bubble gum prayer awakes for a 4-6 a.m. emotional. And the Dubble day at 3 a.m., when she with two patients every Sister Dulce starts each and afternoons, she meets the with patients from around session. In the mid-morning her evenings on the phone 15 minutes. She spends Dulce. Dressed Sister see to globe. baby has brought her small any other This morning, a woman sandals, he looks like jumper and tiny brown in a gray and white striped has kidney disease. “Papa,” she and closes her eyes. little boy—except he hand on his lower back and give Sister Dulce places her his disease into my hands for the Lord. “I’ll receive says, using her name it you.” mother he will be fine. she assures the baby’s When she is finished, relieving everything from for more than two decades, of the She’s been doing this also alleviate the pain injuries. Her touch can toothaches to spinal she says. an prepare them for death, terminally ill and help the healing, though—she’s her she is not the one doing She is steadfast that in medicine and encourages support. work. She believes strongly instrument for God’s about giving her patients hear doctors. Above all, it’s They just want you to patients to talk to their want anything from you. she says. “Sometimes people don’t that you care about them,” know to a nun want just for others. She has been them out. They has been about caring order of the Sister Dulce’s whole life when she entered the growing up in Texas, since she was a teenager says, and Blessed Sacrament. Mercedarian Sisters of God called her here, she her gift to Baton Rouge. In 2001, she brought life. her own,” of my rest were the she will stay for I love them as if they people of Louisiana. “I fell in love with the it is an sees on a daily basis, she says. pain that Cypress Springs Despite the amount of colors to create a cheerful s partners dress in vibrant uplifting place. The prayer include financial planners, lawyers, communication how environment. Prayer partners their time because of and they all volunteer as Natchez. professionals and more, commute from as far the center. Some even to give pockets apron her in powerfully they feel about Sister Dulce often digs Before a patient leaves, Bubble gum. gift: a piece of Dubble them one more encouraging

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[225] August 2015

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SEPTEMBER 2013

“He’s a great example that you don’t become a different person once you’re diagnosed with cancer. Ryan’s still an open book, and he’s not slowing down.” —The Wellness Studio founder Dr. Mary Kathryn Rodrigue on Project Runway All Stars winner Anthony Ryan Auld

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“What I found out is that there’s so much shame connected to a drug overdose, and people were not talking about it.” —Gwen Knox, a mother whose raw obituary for her son Brian went viral after he died of a heroin overdose

AUGUST 2015

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he camcorder’s flip-out screen is small, but young black kid, who the image still captivates. can’t be more than A 13, in the depressed neighborhood between sits on a rundown porch north gates of LSU, Beauregard Town known for generations and the ing voice asks the as The Bottom. A deep, child if he’s carrying. but invitWithout hesitation, long shirttail up and the kid lifts his pulls from under his waistband. a handgun, big and flashing in the sunlight, out His eyes narrow as he holds the Glock across town might up for the camera show off a new baseball the way a kid defiance of Dirty Harry. mitt. He wields it with the casual Local rapper Silky Slim, 35, has hours and hours of footage most of it revealing just like this, the shock and awe of teens who arm protection, or worse. themselves for He also has too much for his friends. The footage from too many compact digital video camera remains charged funerals on the backseat of his sleek black Hummer, and street, but particularly an astonishing vehicle ready so in on any He plans on compiling The Bottom. these real life clips what’s really going into a documentar on in the ’hood. He y about wants the movie to entertain, to

“Sometimes, I’ll be at a funeral and wonder if this many people will come to mine.” —Arthur Reed, a rapper and activist known as “Silky Slim,” who was then working on a documentary about violence impacting Black youth

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

Perfect

ANGELS

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

OCTOBER 2016

How two families went out of their way to help a 94-yearold evacuated from the flood BY BENJAMIN LEGER Photos by Collin Richie

WHEN MRS. B stepped off the bus at the shelter, she had with her a raincoat, a small pet carrier, a few belongings hastily taken from her flooded home and three curiously bulky pillowcases tied up at the top. Sue Day saw the short, 94-yearold woman arrive at Celtic Media Centre. It was Sunday, and Sue and her two teenage daughters were supposed to be at church. Instead, Sue decided, they would volunteer to help flood victims. Unsure where to go first at the sprawling shelter, they walked out to where the buses were unloading, and there was Mrs. B. In the pet carrier she held was a small cat named Little Bitty Kitty. “Come to find out she had three more cats in the pillowcases,” Sue remembers. Once they got her inside Stage Six, other volunteers tended to the cats while Sue helped Mrs. B get settled and into dry clothes. Her full name is Eulalia Bonneville. She’s a widow; her husband Ralph died in 2007. She didn’t have any children, and her next of kin, a cousin and his wife, live in Hammond on the other end of the flooded I-12. “The more I sat and just got to know her, honestly it made me think about my mom,” Sue says. “[Mrs. B] can’t hear that well, and my mom was hard of hearing. She’d always say, ‘You’ve got to talk in my good ear.’ And Mrs. B was saying the same thing.” That day, Sue’s husband David was out on a rescue boat with the Cajun Navy helping to evacuate other flood victims. When they finally reconnected at Celtic, Sue told David about Mrs. B.

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

“She would celebrate the meal you put in front of her, and she’d say, ‘Oh my Lord. How in the world can a 94-year-old woman be so blessed?’” —David Day on Eulalia Bonneville, a woman who lost everything in the August 2016 flood Day and his wife, Sue, welcomed Bonneville—and her four cats—to say at their home in the storm’s aftermath. Eulalia Bonneville with Sue and David Day—strangers who housed her after the flood and have helped to restore her flooded home.

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[225] October 2016

FOR NEARLY 30 YEARS

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| 77

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[225] October 2019 | 225batonrouge.com

225batonrouge.com | [225] October 2019

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OCTOBER 2019 “I’m no Elvis at all. I’m Laine, doing my own thing.” —American Idol winner and Livingston Parish native Laine Hardy

COVER STORY

Congressman Bobby Jindal uses every small window of time he gets talking to his wife, Supriya, and kids on his BlackBerry.

The Brain Blazing a fresh trail through

T

BY JEFF ROEDEL

small-town Louisiana

he morning air is dewy and the skies gray above the Ville Platte Rice Drier It’s just the type of crowd in the heart of this rural of rural white gun owners who probably didn’t vote town an hour north of Lafayette. Bobby Jindal for Jindal on the Republican is nowhere to be seen, but ticket four years ago. And tucked inside a white, low-slung yet, here they are. It is mid-Auroom in the belly of the gust and armed with a splashy factory, his name is inescapable. endorsement from the NaIt’s levitated on red and tional Rifle Association, blue helium balloons, scripted this is already Jindal’s third on hand-painted posters, visit with the people of Ville printed Platte. I don’t know if the against the wall, and reclining on yard signs that lean Baton Rouge native wore boots and khakis for the first on fold-out tables baring two, but stacks of campaign bumper he’s wearing them now stickers. “Ville Platte [hearts] as he strides into the room to pep Bobby” and other sugary rally applause and premeditated testimonies cover almost chants of “Bah-bee! Bahevery inch of a blackboard, as bee!” if the Congressman is running for student council president, It is impossible to miss how and homeroom is the politickthin Jindal looks without a ing Mecca. jacket. He likes to stay that way, too, because he exercises “Are you signed in?” a meek almost every day before voice asks from somewhere going to work. Though he later in the region of my hipbone. admits that his late nights I look down to find a mopon bus tours often mean topped boy no older than fast food for dinner. Over the 7 staring up at me. He carries continual a clipboard and wears a blue Jindal wastes no time launching hum of the rice drier, campaign sticker on his into an informal speech chest like a sheriff wears a badge. about cutting bureaucratic red tape, increasing discipline The Jindal machine has in public schools and prepared the way. And they’ve weeding legislators’ undisclosed brought their children. special projects out of a bloated budget. By 9 a.m. some 60 people Over and over Jindal uses mill about anxiously on the phrase “common sense.” the concrete floor, a mural of He throws out broad-stroke large red and green tractors goals but always follows staring back at them. Even Miss up with a casual “Now, what Ville Platte, a petite brunette do I mean by that?” He saddled with the unenviable confidently alludes to detailed task of balancing a giant strategies, his 25-point cone plan for of a crown on her head, cracking down on corruption, has turned out to see him. his 31-point plan for “gold standard” ethics. Eyes in the crowd blink at those 225batonrouge.com | [225] October 2007

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C OV E R S T ORY

7 Y E A RS L ATER

NICK HUFFT Restaurateur, director of operations, H+M Hospitality Group—Curbside Burgers, Gail’s Fine Ice Cream, Junior’s on Harrison (New Orleans), The Overpass Merchant

“IN 2005, I was in college at LSU, and I was enjoying cooking late-night food way too much. Ha! I noticed that in Baton Rouge, aside from fast food, there weren’t many food options at all after 9 p.m. I thought there could be a need for something different, which is how the food truck idea started for me and eventually became reality. Now, each of my restaurants means the world to me, because they provide jobs for people in our community and, hopefully, they are a space where anyone can come to snag a quick lunch, wind down for a happy hour or spend a long evening with friends and family. In the past several years in restaurants, I think what I’ve learned the most is that no matter how hard I try, I can’t do everything by myself, and I can’t grow a restaurant group by myself. Our management team is the best in the business. I’ve been able to let go of some in-store things and focus on bigger growth, and that’s all because of the team we’ve built and the trust they’ve put in me to continue to grow this thing for all of us. And Baton Rouge is changing, too. Smart growth is great. As we open more stores, the expectation level is set higher and higher. When choosing a restaurant, people are demanding more—which for me, is exciting to continue to push the envelope. Having Curbside open in Mid City was important to me. It’s where we beta tested the truck during the food truck round-ups, and it’s an amazing neighborhood. I can’t wait for these streets to get some landscaping down the middle and really bring to life what the city has been working on for a while now. And along with that is this growth of more independent restaurants in the city, and they are being supported, which is the biggest change in the food scene. For us, we are part of that. We have four amazing concepts under our belt with a commissary kitchen on the way. And we are building our team to grow, so it’s an exciting time for all.”

—AS TOLD TO JEFF ROEDEL

JA N UA RY 201 3

COLLIN RICHIE

“I haven’t climbed past the mountain yet. I’m not done with what I’m here to accomplish.” —Nick Hufft, in our 2013 “People to Watch” issue when Curbside was still operating as a food truck on Baton Rouge streets

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C OV E R S T ORY

On the community

worship How we

OURCITY

share Volatile history: Baton Rouge has its own was of Confederate landmarks—one of which look removed with little public fuss. We take a at some of the city’s historical and controversial sites on page 31.

L ITO COU CAP RTESY OLD STATE

Datta Temple During a service at Datta Temple, statues of sacred deities are cleansed with water and milk, the latter of which is regarded by Hindu observers as one of the purest liquids.

series The second piece in a three-part faith hubs looking into Baton Rouge’s

Photos by Sean Richardson

series, 225 IN THE SECOND installment of our photo diverse houses steps inside three more vibrant and stoles and of worship, where golden statues, rainbow ough no church or rejoicing choirs color the services. Th was just as warm temple was the same as the last, each and welcoming as the next. —KACI YODER

FOLLOW THE SERIES

many Beginning in our September issue, we visited to get to know houses of worship throughout Baton Rouge a connection where locals find peace, enlightenment or to see to a higher power. Pick up our November magazine the final installment in the three-part series.

The restaurant HUSTLE BY BENJAMIN LEGER

country are struggling to adjust RESTAURANTS IN MAJOR CITIES across the rents and the expectations of to labor shortages, rising food costs, steep posting a damning Yelp review. modern diners who are one click away from their doors. Others are turning to Some are downsizing, some are shutting like Waitr to squeeze out more catering, special events and delivery apps growing restaurant scene revenue. We wanted to find out: Is Baton Rouge’s for more. page the Turn heading in the same direction?

FILE PHOTO

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OCTOBER 2017

OCTOBER 2011

“There’s a romantic story being told by television that is a completely different reality from what’s really going on in the [restaurant] industry.” —Charlie Ruffolo, LCI’s director of public affairs and a BRQ partner, on the increasing challenges of running a restaurant

EN IFTE

#F

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sh a

all fter

“Local animal lovers were no longer content to accept high euthanasia rates, poor shelter conditions or old excuses blaming the problems on too many unwanted animals, too few homes and too few dollars in municipal budgets.” —From a 225 story profiling 10 advoc tes for Baton Rouge pets and animals

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[225] October 2016

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[225] October 2016

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225batonrouge.com

SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER 2016 “A warm welcome at the door. A couple with their hands interlocked. A mother scolding her child for not paying attention during service. Though the religions observed and celebrated in our city range wider than many of us may expect, the common threads of reverence, humanity and love link them all.” —From a 225 three-part series highlighting the diversity of Baton Rouge’s houses of worship

rs

ea se y

the

100 LAFAYETTE STREET | DOWNTOWN BATON ROUGE | 225-346-5100 | SERVINGSUSHI.COM 74 

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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C OV E R S T ORY

OUR CITY

FEBRUARY 2020

project / More local news I N S I D E : Latest on the lakes

In the

—Louisiana Parole Project Executive Director Andrew Hundley. After 19 years in prison for murder, Hundley was the first juvenile lifer paroled in the state.

reentering society after Juvenile lifers face an uphill battle about parole. One court decisions changed the rules transition local organization seeks to help them RICHIE E R S / / P H OTO S B Y CO L L I N B Y A P R I L CA P O C H I N O M Y

Executive Reentry specialist Christi Cheramie, reentry specialist Director Andrew Hundley and Project Louis Gibson of the Louisiana Parole

23

FEBRUARY 2006

OURCITY:CULTURE

I

pink flamingos

“It was hijacked by people who don’t even live in the neighborhood—aging alcoholics from the suburbs who think they’re being edgy and perverted, when in fact they are the squares, and they’re just trying to outrage the sense of middle class decency that they live out in their everyday lives … It’s an establishment thing now, not edgy at all.”

(LEFT) COURTESY OF BOB APPLEGATE; (RIGHT) WARD BOND

HOW A SMALL NEIGHBORHOOD PARTY GREW INTO A MONSTER BY JEFF ROEDEL

&

t was a dark February night on the narrow, tree-canvassed streets laid out below the shadows of the state capital when two buddies from Spanish Town drove home from a fishing trip with a long pirogue fastened to the top of their pickup truck. They had been drinking what people drink when they fish and drove up and down Spanish Town Road honking and hollering about Mardi Gras. The ruckus attracted a couple of young black kids who fell in behind the slow-moving pickup rattling off second-line beats on found cardboard boxes. Neighbors crept out of their bungalows and stepped off their porches for a spontaneous street party. This is how many people will tell you the Spanish Town Mardi Gras Parade began. There are several versions of the myth. In some the boys drum on overturned paint buckets. Others say the fishermen were just hanging out on a porch. “All those stories are probably about me,” architect Don Zeringue laughs from behind his desk at the State Fire Marshal’s office. “I love to fish.” Having grown up in New Orleans, and lived in the carnival of the French Quarter, the Spanish Town import thought it ridiculous that Baton Rouge had no Mardi Gras celebration of its own. Zeringue thought, “People in Mamou don’t have to go to New Orleans to celebrate Mardi Gras, so why should people in Baton Rouge?” Neighbors like Nick Spitzer, Ted and Margo Hicks, and Charles Fisher agreed. But Zeringue and Spitzer, a folklorist who hosts NPR’s American Routes series, wanted

COURTESY OF THE SPLL

—Michael Beck, the first g and marshal of the Spanish Town parade, on the history of the parade—and how it had Issue Date: Nov 2020 Ad proof #2 changed since its inception • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. The precision lawnmower brigade has become a parade tradition.

[225] February, 2006

—Physical therapist Jason Greene, one of several local medical professionals who traveled to Haiti to help those devastated by the January 2010 earthquake

23

Linked by a

OURCITY:LAW

MARCH 2007

North Street

Park, 4100

killer:

North Street

• Dianna Williams, found beaten • Deanna Wesley, found to death, April 13, stabbed to 2000. death, July 30, 2004.

455 Roselawn

• Tannis

Avenue

Walker, found strangled, April 17, 2000.

3600 block

of N. Acadia

n Thruway

• Terry Jackson, found strangle • Sylvia d, July 22, Cobb, found 1996. beaten to death, July 25, 2001.

1600 Laurel

West

Street

(behind old Maison • Renee Newman, found strangle Blanche d, April 11, 2002.

1700 block

• Patricia

B.R.’s other serial killer

“I think there was another serial killer in south Baton Rouge that’s gone, that got away.”

T

—Retired Baton Rouge Police Capt. Ben Odom, who suspected possibly two unaccounted serial killers operating in north and south Baton Rouge in the late ’90s and early 2000s 42

[225] March 2007 | 225batonrouge.com

found strangle d, May 28, 2000.

Drive

Courtney, found strangle d, June 8, 2000.

1100 block

of North Boulev ard (inside

Dynasty Lounge

old ) • Florida Edwards, found strangle d Sept. 3, 1999.

4100 block

of Florida Boulev

• Shirley Mikell, found beaten to death, Oct. 16, 1999.

ard

14th Street • Tawanna

ANOTHER SERIAL KILLER MAY BE AT LARGE AND OPERATING IN BATON ROUGE. WHY DOES NO ONE SEEM TO CARE? BY CHUCK HUSTMYRE he killer hunts women mostly on North Street, between Acadian Thruway and Foster Drive. When he finds them, he usually strangles them. A few he’s beaten to death. One victim he killed by stabbing. The last victim likely linked to this killer was Deanna Wesley. At 7:30 on the morning of July 30, 2004, someone walked into the office of the director of the North Street Park summer day camp and reported finding a dead body in the park. When police arrived, they found 37-yearold Wesley lying partially clothed in a small stand of trees behind the recreation center. She’d been stabbed to death. Wesley, who also went by the name Deanna Lafayette, lived what police euphemistically call a “high-risk” lifestyle. Her rap sheet included arrests for possession of marijuana, possession of a crack pipe, forgery and theft. Wesley was the 11th woman found dead within a four-square-mile area around that stretch of North Street since July 1996. All of the slayings remain unsolved. In a city all too familiar with serial killers and the fear they create, it’s remarkable another one may still be operating with little or no notice. This killer targets black women, many of whom have been prostitutes. The victims are linked—at least circumstantially—by location, manner of death, and in all but one case, by the similarity of the victims. Most had drug arrests. All but two were in their 30s.

building)

of Plank Road

Hawkins,

986 Monet

• Veronica BRIAN BAIAMONTE

2020 225batonrouge.com | [225] February

pomp

“Once we started teaching them how to walk, the spirit of the whole camp changed. It went from suffering and darkness to light and hope. It was a transformation like I’ve never seen. That was the most fulfilling day o my career.”

“If you judge someone by their worst mistake, you’re not going to like anyone. So in prison, you learn to judge people by how they treat you.”

gray area

Parody,

APRIL 2010

at Spanish

Town Road

Hayes, found strangled, Dec. 23, 2002.

Ten were found nude or partly undressed. Seven were strangled. Three had been beaten to death. cases tells 225 that one victim, a 36-year-old Four were found either in or adjacent to North woman who was found inside the Street Park. old Dynasty Lounge on North Boulevard, looked The rest were found within two and like she had a half miles been “sacrificed on an altar.” of the park. Most were killed somewhere other “The thing that was so glaring to us than where they were found. In police was that it lingo, they was so personal with this guy,” Odom were “dump jobs.” says. “This guy definitely wanted these women Retired Baton Rouge Police Capt. to suffer.” Ben Odom Th e notion of another Baton Rouge serial killer spent 18 years investigating homicides. In an exis especially upsetting, so soon after clusive interview with 225, Odom says the serial he thinks killer era the past few years. there is still a serial killer stalking the streets of Derrick Todd Lee was captured in north Baton Rouge. May 2003, and in April 2004 police arrested Odom, who left the Homicide Division and charged in 1998, Sean Vincent Gillis. Lee was linked says he can only speculate as to how through DNA many womto seven murders and has been convicted en might have been victims of the of two. Gillis has confessed to killing eight same killer. “Conservatively, I’d women and is scheduled to go on say 20. There were at least 17 I trial later this year. knew of before I left.” Some of the victims were sexuCould there really be a third ally assaulted. Some showed signs serial killer in Baton Rouge? of having fought hard for their “There’s another one out there,” lives. “They didn’t all go easy into says Sid Newman, former chief of the night,” Odom says. detectives with the Baton Rouge What linked the killings, the rePolice Department. Newman was tired homicide cop says, was the head of the department’s CrimiBen Odom way the victims were killed, where nal Investigation Bureau when they were found, and in some cases, the position Ben Odom was a homicide detective. of their bodies. Odom says sometime around 1996, he took 17 “A lot of them were displayed,” Odom unsolved hosays. “I micide case files to Newman. think they were killed by the same guy.” “I think we have a serial killer north Another source familiar with many of Florida of these Boulevard,” Odom recalls telling his boss, “and I

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Congratulations on your 15 Year Anniversary! -Chris & EJ Krampe, MacLaff, Inc.

225.800.4901 Baton Rouge | 337.981.4800 Lafayette | mcdonalds.com 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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C OV E R S T ORY 3 YE A RS LAT E R

Maxine Crump President/CEO, Dialogue on Race Louisiana

“FIFTEEN YEARS AGO, it was only the troublemakers who spoke out, and I was one of them. I still speak out, but I don’t get called a troublemaker that much anymore. I led the design and development of The Dialogue on Race Series. The YWCA housed it until 2009, and by 2012, Dialogue on Race Louisiana was born as its own nonprofit. In 2005, the Shaw Center opened, but soon after, on the rooftop there, Baton Rouge’s best happy hour was shut down because of complaints of too many Black people. Yes, more people are now choosing to look at their businesses, their own lives and open up. But unless institutions examine how past barriers might still be operating in ways that are indirect, unintentional and unconscious, what looks like good business can have disproportionate negative outcomes for people of color. In 2015, I spoke at TEDxLSU about systemic racism and the importance of having spaces for talking about it, and how Southern ‘politeness’ has kept us from facing real issues. I was shocked at the positive response from a diverse crowd. In the last 15 years, Baton Rouge has elected two African American mayors. It’s symbolic and meaningful, but asking them to undo hundreds of years of racial discrimination of a system that was set up to be a white system is not realistic. That takes budget realignment and buy-in from the public. With Dialogue on Race, we promote an open, honest, brave conversation. And I’m so proud that we hear this a lot: ‘I’ve never told anyone this before …’ We need to address the purpose of police, specifically at the community level. I think this focus on good cop and bad cop is missing the point. The question is ‘What are we asking our police to do? What are we calling police for?’ We’ve had the police chief and district attorney at Dialogue on Race. When they go back to work they face the same issue of serving what the people want. That has to be tough to navigate, especially in the case of an elected official. But I’m not elected, and it’s in the mission of Dialogue on Race Louisiana to talk about the issue of race and its impact, so I speak openly.”

J U N E 2017

“If they feel the need to cry or if someone shows outrage, we have room for that as well … We want them to come out of this having a different perspective on race than they see in the common narrative.” —Maxine Crump, in a cover story on issues of race in Baton Rouge a year after the killings of Alton Sterling and three police officer

COLLIN RICHIE

—AS TOLD TO JEFF ROEDEL

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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C OV E R S T ORY

More than an area code ‘225’ readers share what the magazine has meant to them over the years

FOR 15 YEARS, 225 has strived to connect readers with local businesses, creators, organizations and changemakers. Though the staff members, story ideas and writing styles have evolved over the years, one thing has remained the same: 225’s appreciation for readers. From the print story selection to the online content, every decision our team makes is with the audience in mind. While locals regularly read stories written by our staff, it’s not every day the 225 team gets to hear from the readers. We asked our social media followers what the magazine means to them. Here’s how you replied. —COMPILED BY CYNTHEA CORFAH

“I have always related 225 Magazine with top-of-the-line information about the latest in our area, from events to top restaurants, local entrepreneurs and much more. I love the writers and their dynamic. Some of my favorite sections are Style, Calendar and, of course, the Taste section. Overall, 225 has become part of our community and informs us of the latest that is happening in town.” —JENNIFER Issue Date: November Ad2 proof #3 RECINOS

“I pick up an issue of 225 every month because I enjoy seeing familiar faces doing things to better Baton Rouge. The older I get and the more involved in the Baton Rouge community I become, the more faces I recognize in the magazine, and that’s the beauty of local media. Every city needs a place to highlight the growth and changes that happen. 225 Magazine shines a light on those pushing Baton Rouge forward.” —ADRIENNE WOOD

“I absolutely love picking up 225 Magazine! I am always looking for the next new cover on the stands. It has introduced me to some seriously amazing restaurants and creatives over the years! It helps locals support locals, and I just love that.” —VICTORIA HINES

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

For 43 YEARS, we’ve been driving happy couples, bridal parties, and special guests on the Big Day.

IMPECCABLE SERVICE. STYLISH VEHICLES. ELEGANT DETAILS. THAT’S THE RIVERSIDE LIMOUSINES WAY. Call 225-928-5466 or visit www.riversidelimos.com to book today. 78 

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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C OV E R S T ORY

“Over the years, 225 has meant for me: opportunity and thankfulness. I am proud to say that I live in Baton Rouge and was granted the opportunity to grow my business here. I like to read the magazine because it keeps me up to date with what’s going on in the 225 area.”

“225 has meant quality reporting on a wide variety of topics about Baton Rouge. It’s also my go-to publication for where to go for a good time, good food and drinks and good music. I hate when I can’t find a copy. I’ll read it online, but it’s so much better with a paper copy in my hands! Hey, I’m old school.” —JOANNE COWGILL

I was mailed 225 Magazine while deployed to Iraq in 2008-2009, and it brought me a piece of home while in a terrible spot serving in the U.S. Army. I’ve been a devoted fan ever since that Issue Date: Nov year! Ad proof #1

—JUSTIN WALKER

“225 has always been a great way to capture the pulse and the people of our great city. You can learn about all kinds of different businesses being born here that you would have never known of otherwise.”

“I am a newcomer to Baton Rouge, and 225 was one of the first resources I picked up. I have been an avid 225 reader since moving to Baton Rouge in May 2019! I get excited to see a new issue on newsstands each month. Every issue I get the chance to learn about a new place to explore or local maker to check out, and I just love it! Thanks for inspiring me to be more connected to my new home!”

—SARAH COLLINS BENNETT

—KRISTINA PEPELKO

• Please respond by—ERIC e-mail orHART fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

2020 WINNER

2019 WINNER

2018 WINNER

2017 WINNER

2016 WINNER

2015 WINNER

2014 WINNER

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

Thanks 225 Readers for Voting Albasha the BEST Every Year!

ALBASHA

Greek & Lebanese Restaurant Since 1992 albashabr.com

BEST OF

BEST OF

BEST OF

BEST OF

BEST OF

BEST OF

BEST OF

BEST OF

AWARDS

AWARDS

AWARDS

AWARDS

AWARDS

AWARDS

AWARDS

AWARDS

2 013

2 012

2 011

2 010

2009

2008

2007

2006

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

BEST HUMMUS

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

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BEST CHICKEN SHWARMA & BEST HUMMUS

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

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225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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This is the age of a new Louisiana. We built Louisiana’s largest pediatric health network to care for any of the one million children in our state and deliver on the belief that your child can be part of a stronger, healthier tomorrow. From check-ups to complex medical and emergency care, your child’s care begins here. Visit ololchildrens.org/believe for more.

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C OV E R S T ORY

Page

ONE

Editor’s note: Sources’ job titles are listed as they were attributed when these stories first printed

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but maybe we can make an exception just once—as we look back on 15 years of ‘225’ covers

2020

“Once [the coronavirus shutdown] is all over, I believe we’re gonna be back to normal within a month, because people are just missing us so much.”

2018

“Everything that we have [in Louisiana], well, in a similar spot, they’re using those same ingredients and doing something completely different.”

AWAR D

WINNING!

—Cocha co-owner Saskia Spanoff on her restaurant’s global cuisine concept

—Nick Haghighi, owner of Goodwood Grill

2017

2020

“You’re running this gauntlet up to the stage, and Denzel and Octavia Spencer and Kevin Spacey are patting you on the back. It still doesn’t feel real, and at the time even I felt like ‘Did that happen?’”

“Really good barbecue is probably the hardest thing to get right at a large scale, but that’s the beauty of it. It means a lot to so many people because it’s an ancient form of cooking that’s just in our bones.”

—Local actor Joe Chrest on winning top honors with the Stranger Things team at the Screen Actors Guild Awards for Best Ensemble Cast in a Drama Series

—BRQ Seafood & Barbeque chef-partner Justin Ferguson

RD AWA !

WINNING

2019

“We want to see the city rise. But we are not the magic bullet solution. We are part of a much greater solution.”

STAFF

FAVORITE!

2017

“Baton Rouge is the only place in the world where pink is a Mardi Gras color.” —Parties Start Here owner Nelson Maddox

—Walls Project founder Casey Phillips on the organization’s role in creating a better city

2019

“We’re all familiar with the revelry of New Orleans and the Cajun spirit of Lafayette, but what about all the space in between?”

2016

“We don’t need Government Street to be like Magazine Street. We need Government Street to be like Government Street.” —Andrew Moran, owner of Midcity Handmade

—A 225 story on all there is to discover in the eight parishes surrounding East Baton Rouge

2018

“The Mid City buzz isn’t buzz anymore. It’s real.” —Samuel Sanders, Mid City Redevelopment Alliance’s executive director

.

2016

“These musicians are legendary. They’ve traveled the world a thousand times over. Kenny Neal is in the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. Buddy Guy is one of the great blues artists of all time. So for this festival to happen in the place where I grew up, it’s always special.” —Singer-guitarist David Jones II on sharing the Baton Rouge Blues Festival 2016 lineup with blues legends 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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2015

“I joke with DiGiulio’s owner, Mike Johnson, that he’s my biggest competitor because my clients eat at his restaurant, and vice versa. I love his veal picatta, pounded veal with white wine, lemon juice and capers and served with the spaghetti G.O.P.” —Jim Urdiales, Mestizo Louisiana Mexican Restaurant chef/owner, on his favorite spots to eat in town

STAFF

FAVORITE!

2015

“A lot of young Black men don’t make it out of New Orleans. They either get shot or are in jail. But God happened to have his hands on me. He gave me a talent, and I’m just using what he gave me. I’m not taking that for granted.” —LSU running back Leonard Fournette

2014 Issue Date: November Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

F STAF

FAVORITE!

“This is a landmark and jewel. We have to bring the spirit back and make this a destination.” —Brenda Perry Dunn, founding board member of the Louisiana Black History Hall of Fame, on reviving the Lincoln Theater in Old South Baton Rouge

2014

More than 2 Million Middle School, High School & College Students Vape CDC 2017 E-Cigarette use and Juuling are NOT a safe alternative to other forms of Tobacco

“Baton Rouge is still a clean slate. This is an entire metropolitan city that the youth and younger middle-aged can do anything we want with. There are very few barriers to battle past. The youth can build anything, and there are huge swaths of people here [who] will celebrate it. People just need to keep building it. And they will.” —Sam Terito, estimator, Apex Industries Corporation

2013 #BeTobaccoFree #NoVapeNovember CONTACT I CARE TO LEARN ABOUT OUR PREVENTION EFFORTS:

“Guitar Slim, Lightnin’ Slim, Muddy Waters, they all came through this little club off Government Street, and I would always be the first one to show up, pay my 50 cents and wait for them to come on the stage.” —Buddy Guy, on growing up in Baton Rouge

ICARE.EBRSCHOOLS.ORG (225) 226-2273 | @icareebr NOVEMBER IS TOBACCO AWARENESS MONTH

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2013

“The people here are just really welcoming and friendly. You don’t realize how much they are ’til you travel to other places.” —Lolo Jones, LSU star and Olympic athlete, on her return to the Capital City

2012

“Baton Rouge has a lot of places to eat, but it doesn’t have a great restaurant culture. God help any place there that doesn’t serve burgers and beer.” —Chef Donald Link “Locals are starting to demand more than just fried po-boys. I’m starting to get calls from national publications. I think in the next five y ars you’re going to see Baton Rouge’s food scene take off.” —Beausoleil chef and coowner Nathan Gresham

STAFF

FAVORITE!

2012

“Baton Rouge has yet to hone an identity that reflects even its st engths, much less any future goals. Ideas for brands have been tossed around from time to time. Blues music? Our friendly people? But the answer is right under our noses: Baton Rouge should build its brand on sports and fitness No community in Louisiana—and few in the country—can compete with our passion for athletics.” —A 225 story on ideas for a brighter Baton Rouge future

2011

“Why are they so pissed off? [Everywhere else,] everybody loves their downtown. They may be ambivalent about subsidies, but they don’t hate downtown. I have never seen this.” —John Fregonese, an urban planner who spent five y ars helping to create FutureBR, on the clashes between those pushing progress for downtown and those clinging to the status quo

2011

“My daughter has come to me through the year to express her sadness about the oil in the Gulf and her concern for the animals. I try to reassure her, but at the same time, I don’t want to lie. We’ve been told, ‘It’s going to be okay,’ by BP, prominent scientists, media and pundits. We still don’t know the outcome of this technological disaster. Scientists say, ‘We’ve dodged a bullet.’ Me? I’m not so sure.” —Linda Hooper-Bùi, associate professor of entomology in LSU’s Department of Entomology, one year after the Deepwater Horizon spill

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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C OV E R S T ORY

STAFF

FAVORITE!

2010

“I witnessed a killing, but I never said nothing about it.” —A man, who also asked not to be identified said fear of retaliation against witnesses had long discouraged him from cooperating with police.

2010

“People will be looking to see how this will turn out. … It’ll put Baton Rouge on a stage that we haven’t yet experienced.” —Mayor Kip Holden on the debut of Bayou Country Superfest

2009

“Three feet—that’s a minimum. Go stand on the side of the road, close your eyes, and let a car go by at 60 miles an hour. See if that doesn’t scare you out of your shoes. That’s what it feels like to get buzzed from 3 feet away.” —Attorney and competitive cyclist Randy Pipes, on the Louisiana 3 Feet law that went into effect that August

2009

“I thought, ‘I can be back in Baton Rouge, with a support system here,’ and I had people to work with. Even a star should probably star at home first It’s more comfortable. That’s how I felt.” —Steven Soderbergh on deciding to shoot Sex, Lies and Videotape in Baton Rouge, the film th t at age 26 made him the youngest Cannes Film Festival winner ever

2008

“I’m at a breaking point. I’ve ridden out every hurricane and am tired of it. Depending on what the insurance adjustment is, I may relocate to the Garden District with smaller trees and less vegetation. ... This was the worst one for me. We were watching trees snap like spears of broccoli.” —Susan Hamilton, Seven Oaks resident for 40 years, after Hurricane Gustav

Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Caring for your children since 2012 At In Loving Arms, high-risk pediatric care is our specialty. Through a family-centered care approach, we work closely with our physicians to provide the best plan of treatment and the most favorable outcomes.

Meet one of our former patients:

NOW HEADED TO 1ST GRADE!

“Loving is our MIDDLE name” INLOVINGARMS.COM | 225.359.9777 | 2315 HARDING BLVD. BATON ROUGE, LA 70807 84 

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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STAFF

FAVORITE!

2008

“There is nothing better for them than to hear the word of God and teachings of life in their native language. I know. I’ve been here 23 years, and I still think in Spanish.” —Fernando Gutierrez, pastor of the Healing Place Church Spanish Campus

2007

“I used to think I only coached kids; the older I get, the more I see I should be coaching the parents.” —M.L. Woodruff, Parkview Baptist baseball coach

2007

“We didn’t want to fight We wanted to make movies, but we made the mistake of believing the advertising. … We want to come down and spend money in Louisiana. Just let us.” —Armada Studios managing partner John Sweeney, on the East Feliciana Parish movie soundstages and film school he was trying to build, which were ultimately denied tax credits

Issue Date: November Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

2006

“D’oh! Entergy pulls its best Homer Simpson as a power outage sweeps across downtown, LSU, and well, most of South Baton Rouge. State workers are trapped in elevators for nearly an hour, although their productivity reportedly was not affected. And a Metro Council meeting is delayed but continues awkwardly in the dark. Which raises the question: If Metro Council persons speak and no one can see them, are they still wrong?” —A 225 story on that year’s many blunders

2006

“The reality is the prime venues for live music in Baton Rouge have shifted from places such as the River Center to clubs, like the Varsity and SoGo. Such gigs are not as profitable as a ena shows, but they are still important for the music industry.” —Former Varsity Theatre booker Glen Prejean, on Baton Rouge’s struggles to attract big-name concerts

2005

“When you have a strong magnet in a downtown, it serves as an economic engine for the region. It’s a beacon, and it should be.” —Davis Rhorer, Downtown Development director

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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C OV E R S T ORY

DIGITS

W H AT ’ S O N L I N E

Off paper

28,600 225’s followers on Instagram

A timeline of how ‘225’ has evolved digitally

March 2006

Meet 225batonrouge.com The plan was always that 225 would be more than a magazine. Within months of our print launch, our website was live, loaded with magazine content, blogs, galleries and recipes.

March 2006

Our first newsletter 225 Select was about helping readers plan their weekends, with editors’ picks for the best happenings. It was renamed 225 Weekender in May 2012, before retiring December 2014.

February 2009 First taste of ‘225 Dine’

launched this weekly dispatch on new restaurants, chefs, and Maggie Heyn Richardson’s recipe column, “Spatula Diaries.”

May 2010

Shopping with ‘Avenue Rouge’ In partnership with our sister publication inRegister, we launched a weekly newsletter about shopping. (Avenue Rouge became inRegister’s newsletter, before rebranding as inRegister@ Home in 2017.)

September 2010 Dishing ‘Best Eats’

Our 225 Best Eats email Yes, our food e-newsletter is has brought exclusive spemore than a decade old—and cials from local restaurant going Baton Rouge has Ad partners Issuestrong! Date: November proof #1 for more than a always a food town, weyour approval • Pleasebeen respond by e-mail or faxsowith or minor revisions. decade. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

37,000

February 2016

Best of 225 voting on our website In 225’s early days, our annual Best of 225 Awards were determined by e-newsletter subscribers. Participants were randomly selected by an independent research firm to nominate and vote for their favorites in an emailed survey. In 2016, we opened nominations and voting on our site—giving a voice to all 225 area residents.

May 2017

January 2019

More ‘Dine’ servings In response to reader feedback— which pretty much asks for more food, always—we doubled the frequency of 225 Dine. We now deliver the newsletter on Tuesdays and Thursdays, with first loo s inside the newest restaurants, food news, interviews with culinary industry leaders, and recipes. Sign up at 225batonrouge.com.

Newsletters go visual

June 2020

Coinciding with a redesign of 225batonrouge.com, we relaunched 225 Dine to better showcase our food photography and First Look tours inside new restaurants. We also introduced Best of 225 This Week, a weekly e-newsletter on the best things to do and see. (In January 2019, we folded that newsletter content into an event roundup in 225 Dine.)

Did you really think we’d miss a chance to get in on all of 2020’s virtual-event fun? We took our annual Hot off the Press - Best of 225 Awards party to Facebook Live and YouTube. Our staff got dressed up for an Oscar-style presentation, where we announced the winners of this year’s categories.

First virtual event

225’s followers on Facebook

38,300 225’s followers on Twitter FIGURES ARE ROUNDED UP AND AS OF PRESS TIME.

September 2020

An app for ‘225’ Baton Rouge, get ready for fun push notific tions! You can now download our 225 Magazine app for alerts on food and community news and special offers to local restaurants, bars and other businesses.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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C OV E R S T ORY

Our favorite stories Memories from some current and former ‘225’ contributors

FROM THE FOUNDING TEAM Reflections f om some of the people who made ‘225’ what it is today from the early years

Gimme g

ShelTter

T

PHOTO

SAT I R E

FAIR AND BALA NCED? YEAH, R IGHT

VOL.1 /NO.3

BRIEFS

Irish return to basics

BATON ROUGE–Organizers of the St. Patrick’s Day parade have announced the cancellation of the event. “We’ll just stay home and drink this year,” said chairperson Bobby Flanigan. “All that walking and throwing beads— I think we’ve really gotten away from our core values.”

Prominent BR couple splits

BATON ROUGE–It looks like the end of the son for the permanent road for a well-known separation. “Sometimes I needed Baton Rouge couple as divorce papers were a shoulder [to cry filed yesterday in dis- on],” says I-10, “and she wasn’t there. Love trict court. should be a two-way It’s been a bumpy ride for Interstates 10 and street.” Meanwhile, I-12 chose 12 since the couple first split near Essen Lane to take the high road and years ago, and now the issued a statement the two cite irreconcilable two highways were “simdifferences as the rea- ply headed in different directions.”

The fraternity members sporting Kiss Me, I’m Irish shirts also played a role in the cancellation. “What posers! I don’t walk around with a shirt that says ‘Sleep with me, my daddy’s loaded!’ As a second-generation Irish immigrant, that really grinds my gears.”

How many levee boards

Honoring the late Gov. Huey “chicken in every pot” mantra, P. Long’s the Legislature opted to create a new levee board in every parish in the state, rather than consolidating levee protection under an efficient regional panel.“Louisiana will be safe from hurricanes thanks to 64

no rivers and no levees in them. When pressed by reporters about that detail, Sen. Don Hines snapped: “You guys always try to find somethingmedia negative to report on.”

Red’s not right

Despite the promises of bold sta- Say You, Say Me incident, he’s lost all tion ID breaks, listening to the new faith in Red’s ability to make him cool. Red 93.7 FM won’t, in fact, make you Now Wilson only listens to talk radio cool, a local man reports. while driving with a date. “It’s really hard for me,” says sys“Last week I was jamming tems engineer Stanley Wilson. to ‘Sweet “I know Home Alabama’ that the songs are all really loud on Red safe manufac- when I pulled up at my blind date tured pop, but I kind of Kristhought listen- tin’s house—all good, right? ing to popular music would Wrong!’ make me Wilson said. “When we got back in the more popular.” car Lionel Ritchie was But thanks to what Wilson singing some calls the whiny love song. Talk about embarrassing.” Cayenne Report has learned from a source close to Wilson that the date was awkward throughout, and Kristin is not returning his instant messages.

86

Cajun stuns coffee shop patrons

Dudley Thibodeaux angered coffee shop dat’s some patrons when he cranked expensive coffee. Anyway, up my gasoline-powered battery his homemade, battry was low, so I took out my backup for his Dell — it uses a Briggs and Stratton invention laptop at the new Starbucks tree horsein Thibodaux. power motuh. ”Da factry battry don’t Man, I cranked dat never computah, so I did me some lass on dat and I was Wi-Fi-ing!” Thibodeaux puppy up tinkerin,” said said. “Least, Thibodeaux, a shrimper who won the lap- running I taught I was. Da manager come top at a casino. out shoutin’ ‘Turn dat ting off!’ But mais, “I was at Starbucks da udda day — mais, about dat I couldn’t hear him! You talk guy was mad!”

[225] March, 2006

—Tom Guarisco, editor, 2005-2011

R STO RY

Clawing from the iTs way up botTom

As a municip Rouge Parish al service, East Animal Control Baton mandated is to disease and protect the public from injury caused The departm ent is obligateby animals. animals d to remove roamin in any unwant g city streets and take public, includined animals from the g dogs, cats, horses, etc. lizards, For decades , Animal remaine d a low priorityControl budget and in the city’s maintained across from a the airport low profile— East Baton behind the Rouge Parish because Prison— nobody these animals was looking to adopt . “I rememb er when had iron [Animal cat cages Control] from the with fixed 1970s food and water bowls,” says longtim e animal CAA board advocate and member Cathy Wells. the kittens were so tiny “If reach them, they couldn’ they t literally starved were out of luck and As the metro to death.” deteriorated—unarea grew, conditio ns til Cat Haven members board inspired Baton Rouge Foundation Area to community make animal welfare priority. a In 2010, BRAF created nonprofit CAA as and soon contracted a the city to with provide shelter Early on, CAA’s board services. the need recogni for a new shelter and zed adoption center. capital campai Before launchi ng a they needed gn, though, they knew trust. They to gain the commu nity’s started by improve working the 80% to euthana conditio sia rate and ns at the existing CAA also lobbied the shelter. to adequat Metro Council ely well as changefund shelter services , as an ordinan for the trap, neuter and ce to allow neighborhood release of cats. In 2015, CAA’s board LSU Board approached of Regents ing a new in hopes of placshelter on the LSU campus. 225baton

Compan ion Animal Alliance adoption counselo r Janea Foster helps Jhayce choose the Dioinck right dog the new in shelter lobby.

does it take?

separate bureaucratic entities that will live up to Louisiana’s long-tradition of effective, fair governance,” said Sen. Huelette “Clo” Fontenot, state R-Livingston. “Now we’re talking.” Strangely, many of 64 levee boards will lord over land-locked parishes with

N E. HIRSC S BY COLLIN H RICHIE

“Over the years, the most rewarding story I’ve covered is animal welfare. In August 2010, ‘Please Save Me’ introduced readers to the horrid conditions at the city’s dilapidated shelter and advocates’ desperate efforts to improve the lives of homeless animals. By the time we published ‘Gimme Shelter’ in our February 2019 cover story, Baton Rouge had just opened a $12 million, state-of-the-art shelter on LSU’s campus. Shelter staff’s ambitious goal was to reduce the number of animals needing rescue through programs designed to keep pets in their homes and promote spay/neuter to avoid unwanted litters. This year, local shelters and rescues are reporting record breaking adoption rates, which are—remarkably—due to the pandemic. In only a decade, what was unimaginable is now reality. Through 225, it has been my privilege to shine a light on the status quo and on the people and organizations saving lives and leading the charge for change.”

“Tucked in the back of each issue was a the page of humor called ‘The Cayenne Report.’ CayenneeReport A source of wicked laughs for satire devotees, more practical-minded readers were frequently bewildered, and occasionally annoyed—even though the word SATIRE was atop the page in all caps. We published this punchy little item that riffed on the wellknown slang name of ‘the 10-12 split.’ The ar“All good, right? Wrong.” ticle claimed that, after nearly four decades of being split, I-10 and I-12 were finally ge ting divorced. A panicked Livingston Parish reader called wanting to know how the hell he’d be able to commute to work without the split. Pure gold.”

COV E

his past Novemb animal welfare er, Rouge advance in Baton d 40 years overnight. For two days Compan ion Animal moved 232 Alliance dogs and 160 cats old Progres from its s Road location new shelter to a brandon LSU’s Gourrier The staff Avenue. eft behind 40 years more than of decrepi t and insuffic space, climate ient clinic trailer control, kennels and a with a hole With the move, our in the floor. also left community behind the idea that animals’ shelter lives were not worth It did not saving. come quickly or easily.

Local rescue collaborate s and LSU more home to save the lives of less anima ls than ever BY ADRIA

rouge.co

m | [225] Februar

y 2019

39

—Adrian E. Hirsch, contributing writer, 2005-now

“I was fortunate enough to be a staff writer from the inception of the magazine in 2005, and then later to serve as editor. Back then, this city was just beginning to search for itself in new ways, exploring identities old and new and deciding to build up its culture and its people, rather than tear down—or leave town. It was a search long overdue. At its heart, a publication’s veins run hot with hope. Hope in a city’s progress. Hope that its stories are worth remembering and its people are worth honoring. Looking at your city in a deeper way is a look inside yourself, too, and for that I’m always grateful, both for Baton Rouge and this voice of it we call 225.”

“What I loved best about writing for 225 was that the editors let me follow my gut and tell stories I thought people would find inte esting, whether it was uncovering drug dealing and violence at the post-Katrina FEMA trailer park near Baker, investigating the possibility that Baton Rouge had a third active serial killer, checking in for the night at the creepy Alamo Plaza, riding with two bounty hunters, getting sprayed by a crop duster, or blasting zero to 100 in less than 6 seconds in the shotgun seat of a dragster. I loved it all.”

—Jeff Roedel, staff writer, 2005-2007; assistant editor, 2008-2010; editor, 2011-2014; contributing writer, 2015-now

—Maggie Heyn Richardson, contributing writer, 2005-now

28 |

[225] August 2017

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—Daisy’s mom, Kristen Prescott

dollars that other, more well-known diseases have,” says Kristen, who has worked since Daisy was diagnosed at age 3 to increase awareness about the disease and raise money for research. “It’s been very grassroots. There’s no famous celebrity, no telethons or major events that help spread the word. We’re a bunch of moms and dads working together and doing the best we can.” What the cause does have, Kristen says, is Daisy. Even while managing her life-threatening chronic illness and forming the nonprofit Cure for Daisy, the Prescotts discovered

along the way that Daisy has a talent for acting. It happened in 2015 when the marketing team at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Hospital Foundation asked Daisy, then 5, to shoot a video for the annual gala on being a patient at the hospital. The foundation’s marketing team had heard about Daisy’s funny, quirky personality from her caregivers and thought she’d be a perfect messenger for the hospital’s pediatric services. “That night at the gala, she just blew everyone away,” Kristen says.

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70

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225batonrouge.com

Spinach

twitter.com/225

to a

by maggie heyn richardson photoS by erin parker keep serving native n 1956, St. Francisville the dish at mullMadeline Wright was dinner parties for ing over what to prepare and family events. friends a bridge luncheon for Two years later, the six-ounce when she spotted a Junior League of Baton cheese in her roll of Kraft jalapeño Rouge asked its mempicked up the for its first refrigerator. She had bers to submit recipes supermarket the handed over from new product cookbook, and Wright no specific go-to spicy a few days earlier with instructions for her plans for using it. creamed spinach. creamed Madeleine, Maybe it would enhance She named it Spinach Despite her of her spinach, she thought. using the French spelling she flourish. lack of cooking experience, what first name for extra pubproceeded to toss together River Road Recipes was spinach, became seemed right: chopped lished in 1959 and quickly to flour, vegled diced onion, butter, a regional hit. Its success which shakes of celery etable liquor, a few three subsequent volumes, chunks of the salt and garlic salt, together form the best-sellingin and Worcesseries roll cheese cookbook jalapeño community stirred the of readtershire sauce. Wright the nation. Generations thick and and cooked concoction until it was ers have discovered a casserole and it has long creamy, placed it in Wright’s recipe, and . She local topped it with breadcrumbs served a standard item on been and Madeleine plated it on good china holiday tables. Spinach regionally that it to her friends. became so popular its and spiked It was creamy, salty when Kraft Foods discontinued Her in 1999, fans with unexpected spiciness. her to jalapeño cheese roll inspired friends’ rave reviews

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Madeline’s Kitchen whimsy leads beloved regional dish

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A budding young local actress, Daisy Prescott has been cast in three movies, including a role as a flower girl in independent film Fighting Belle.

port in her chest every month, along with other medications. Her energy level and overall health are routinely up and down, and life revolves around the latest lab report. Last year, Daisy’s parents, Kristen and Luke Prescott, decided to homeschool Daisy because the traditional school schedule was too much. What the future holds for kids with JM varies from patient to patient, say experts, because there is still much to be learned about the condition. “JM just doesn’t have the research

Wright caused a Local retiree Madeline regional dish with sensation and a renowned Madeleine in 1956. her creation of Spinach

. She went to Williamson

“She’s magic. She makes an impression.”

BY MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON Photos by Collin Richie

APPLE-CHEEKED WITH BROWN bangs, Daisy Prescott is instantly alluring. Her eyes gleam and her hands dance as she talks about the things going on in her 7-year-old life. There’s her passion for big, juicy sour pickles, her love for sequined shirts and her recent, mind-blowing backstage meeting with Blake Shelton at the Bayou Country Superfest in May. Her face is open and earnest as details pour out, words punctuated with the occasional falsetto chirp for added emphasis. Listening to her, it’s no surprise this expressive Ascension Parish native is a budding actress with her own agent, a recent speaking part in an independent film and lots of forthcoming auditions. None of that has gone to her head, however. In fact, what’s most striking about Daisy is that she seems to be completely unaware of her charm. Her earnestness stems from life experience. It’s not obvious to most people she meets, but Daisy suffers from a rare autoimmune disease called Juvenile Dermatomyositis, or JM. The immune system of children with the disease attacks blood vessels, causing skin rashes and muscle weakness and inflammation. JM currently affects 3,000 to 5,000 kids younger than 16, or about one to three per 1 million people, in the United States. There is no known cure for the disease. Depending on symptoms, children are treated with existing therapies normally used for other conditions. Daisy’s treatment includes painful intravenous immunoglobulin therapy delivered through a

The Secret is out...

SURGICAL PROCEDURES

Autoimmune disease or not, Daisy Prescott won’t let anything stand in the way of her dreams

taste

NON-SURGICAL PROCEDURES

“One of my favorite features to write was on Daisy Prescott, then 7, who suffers from a rare and at times painful autoimmune disease called juvenile dermatomyositis. Somehow this plucky kid had found a way to develop a legit film ca eer Daisy in bloom with an agent and everything. In our interview, she told me she loved sour pickles, anything sequined and that she had a big crush on Blake Shelton. When I finished interviewing he , she drew me a picture. Revealing interesting people like Daisy in our pages is what this magazine has always been about.”

—Chuck Hustmyre, contributing writer, 2005-2010

the company of the dish showered maintained with complaints. Kraft local cooks to its decision, forcing cheeses for turn to other jalapeño the recipe. at the Today, Wright still marvels by her earned unexpected attention bout of kitchen spontaneity. a and “It’s really sort of funny , but it’s nice little bit embarrassing says to be known for something,” in still living Wright, now 82 and St. Francisville. one of Cooking had not been When Wright’s favorite activities. learning to many of her peers were dual bachcook, she was earning LSU in psycholelor’s degrees from she apogy and sociology. As to William proached her marriage graduation, Reymond shortly after her mother had a suggestion.

to take a “She told me I ought to learn how home economics class “My motherto cook,” Wright says. cook in-law was also a well-known stana lot of and hostess, so I had to.” dards to measure up husband and Wright and her first moved to their children eventually a comcreated Houston. She later to corpopany that leased plants rate offices. to St. FranShe returned home in 1992, cisville years later, and breakfast on she opened a bed and the Green family property called it in 2005 Springs Inn. She closed with family. to spend more time Wright As for her famed dish, occasionally says she has made it as often as over the years, but not its fans might think. me to “Our B&B guests expected

Linked by a killer:

North Street Park,

455 Roselawn Avenue

• Tannis Walker, found strangled, April 17, 2000.

3600 block of N.

Acadian Thruway

West

• Terry Jackson, found strangled, July 22, 1996. • Sylvia Cobb, found beaten to death, July 25, 2001.

1600 Laurel Street

(behind

old Maison Blanche • Renee Newman, found strangled, April 11, 2002 .

1700 block of Plank

building)

Road

• Patricia Hawkins, found strangled, May 28, 2000.

BRIAN BAIAMONTE

986 Monet Drive

• Veronica Courtney, found strangled, June 8, 2000.

1100 block of North

Dynasty Lounge)

Boulevard (inside

B.R.’s other serial killer

old

• Florida Edwards, found strangled Sept. 3, 1999.

4100 block of Florida

Boulevard

• Shirley Mikell, found beaten to death, Oct. 16, 1999.

14th Street at Spanish

Town Road

• Tawanna Hayes, found strangled, Dec. 23, 2002.

ANOTHER SERIAL KILLER MAY BE AT LARGE AND OPERATING IN BATON ROUGE. WHY DOES NO ONE SEEM TO CARE? BY CHUCK HUSTMYRE

T

he killer hunts women mostly on North Street, between Acadian Thruway and Foster Drive. When he finds them, he usually strangles them. A few he’s beaten to death. One victim he killed by stabbing. The last victim likely linked to this killer was Deanna Wesley. At 7:30 on the morning of July 30, 2004, someone walked into the office of the director of the North Street Park summer day camp and reported finding a dead body in the park. When police arrived, they found 37-yearold Wesley lying partially clothed in a small stand of trees behind the recreation center. She’d been stabbed to death. Wesley, who also went by the name Deanna Lafayette, lived what police euphemistically call a “high-risk” lifestyle. Her rap sheet included arrests for possession of marijuana, possession of a crack pipe, forgery and theft. Wesley was the 11th woman found dead within a four-square-mile area around that stretch of North Street since July 1996. All of the slayings remain unsolved. In a city all too familiar with serial killers and the fear they create, it’s remarkable another one may still be operating with little or no notice. This killer targets black women, many of whom have been prostitutes. The victims are linked—at least circumstantially—by location, manner of death, and in all but one case, by the similarity of the victims. Most had drug arrests. All but two were in their 30s.

42

Ten were found nude or partly undressed. Seven were strangled. Three had been beaten to death. cases tells 225 that one victim, a 36-year-old Four were found either in or adjacent to North woman who was found inside the old Dynasty Street Park. Lounge on North Boulevard, looked like she had The rest were found within two and a half miles been “sacrificed on an altar.” of the park. Most were killed somewhere other “The thing that was so glaring to us was that it than where they were found. In police lingo, they was so personal with this guy,” Odom says. “This were “dump jobs.” guy definitely wanted these women to suffer.” Retired Baton Rouge Police Capt. Ben Odom The notion of another Baton Rouge serial killer spent 18 years investigating homicides. In an exis especially upsetting, so soon after the serial clusive interview with 225, Odom says he thinks killer era the past few years. there is still a serial killer stalking the streets of Derrick Todd Lee was captured in May 2003, north Baton Rouge. and in April 2004 police arrested and charged Odom, who left the Homicide Division in 1998, Sean Vincent Gillis. Lee was linked through DNA says he can only speculate as to how many womto seven murders and has been convicted of two. en might have been victims of the Gillis has confessed to killing eight same killer. “Conservatively, I’d women and is scheduled to go on say 20. There were at least 17 I trial later this year. knew of before I left.” Some of the victims were sexuCould there really be a third ally assaulted. Some showed signs serial killer in Baton Rouge? of having fought hard for their “There’s another one out there,” lives. “They didn’t all go easy into says Sid Newman, former chief of the night,” Odom says. detectives with the Baton Rouge What linked the killings, the rePolice Department. Newman was tired homicide cop says, was the head of the department’s CrimiBen Odom way the victims were killed, where nal Investigation Bureau when they were found, and in some cases, the position Ben Odom was a homicide detective. Odom says of their bodies. sometime around 1996, he took 17 unsolved ho“A lot of them were displayed,” Odom says. “I micide case files to Newman. think they were killed by the same guy.” “I think we have a serial killer north of Florida Another source familiar with many of these Boulevard,” Odom recalls telling his boss, “and I

[225] March 2007 | 225batonrouge.com

“One of the photo assignments that stands out in my mind from my time at 225 was a seemingly simple one, when I drove up to St. Francisville to photograph Madeline Wright in her home. Mrs. Wright invented the now-famous Southern staple, Spinach Madeline. On this assignment, I chatted with her about its creation while making her portrait. As someone who loves hearing about how things came to be—and as someone who now develops recipes like Mrs. Wright—I love that I got to help share her story. Sharing the lives and stories of the people of the community is something 225 does so well, and I am honored that I got to be a part of it.” 225batonrouge.com

|

[225] December 2011

71

—Erin Parker, photo intern, 2007-2008; staff photographer, 2011-2012

225batonrouge.com

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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4100 North Street

• Dianna Williams, found beaten to death, April • Deanna Wesley, 13, 2000. found stabbed to death, July 30, 2004.

OURCITY:LAW

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C OV E R S T ORY

FROM TODAY’S TEAM The people who conceptualize ‘225’ each month on the assignments they’ll always treasure

/ An antique- lled house

Finders

keepers

The suburban home of two local artists is a celebration of art, fashion and life

BY JENNIFER TORMO // PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

What a lot of people don’t realize is how integral our interns are to producing 225’s content. Here, two former interns share their experience.

T “One of the first 225 style shoots I ever did was at contributing photographer Tate Tullier’s house. I immediately fell for its rusty Louisiana-shaped signs, worn-in wood floors and the eclectic fashion magazines Tate had piled higher than my head. I had just moved to Baton Rouge, and that space will forever represent what I think of as a quintessential Louisiana artist’s home. So it was truly a dream come true to profile Tate and his wife, Sarah, from their home for our 2018 Spaces & Places edition. The Tulliers are deaf, and they had an American Sign Language interpreter come to the interview because they were so excited to be interviewed and wanted to make sure I got every detail right. We spent hours talking that day, dissecting every painting they owned, and digging through every drawer in their closet. It’s an interview that will always be in my heart—the kind that continually reminds me why I wanted to be a journalist in the first place ” —Jennifer Tormo, editor, 2015-now ate Tullier’s whole world changed forever in 1990. That year, he picked up People’s first-ever “50 Most Beautiful People” issue. Michelle Pfeiffer was on the cover, her blond curls dangling over her blue eyes. Tate was 12, and years later he still remembers the awe he felt flipping through those portraits, each shot in a different setting. It was the moment he fell irreversibly in love with photography. From then on, he’d go with his mom to the hair salon so he could read Vogue and Vanity Fair. The hairdresser finally told him he could bring the magazines home. He built a stash in his bedroom. He’d clip out his favorite photos and collage them into his own magazines. Soon, he was begging his mom for copies of Vogue Paris. “I remember my mom telling me, ‘This is expensive,’” he says. “And I said, ‘But you need to look at the cover!’” Armed with an orange and blue Fisher-Price camera and his mom’s Minolta X-700, one of Baton Rouge’s great photographers was born.

your app.

Long before Tate and Sarah Tullier moved into their house, a father of six lived here. He built a playhouse for his kids back in 1942. When the Tulliers moved in, it was lopsided and had pink walls. They leveled it, fixed the wood and painted the whole space white. They use it often for photo shoots, so the white paint gets dirty fast and needs to be touched up often.

225batonrouge.com

My skin, my story

Dressed in eclectic, neutral and earth-toned clothing for the fall, local women go beyond skin deep to share personal stories about their skin conditions

pp premieres this month

[225] SPACES & PLACES 2018

C OV E R S T ORY

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C OV E R S T ORY

Joe Burrow

r free and register to win special prizes!

IS EVERYTHING you’re looking for in

C R EAT I V E D I R ECTO R : Cynthea Corfah / STY LI N G : Elle Marie / P H OTO G R A P H Y: Adam Vo H AI R AN D MAK EUP: Cekeisha W illiams / MO D E L S : Ferrin Roy, Nicole Scott and Taylor Thomas S HOT ON LOCATI ON AT AC HR OM A STU D I O 225batonrouge.com | [225] September 2020

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Player in LSU history to throw for 2,500 yards and rush for 350 yards or more in a season

“My favorite memory at 225 (although I have many) has to be the September 2020 style shoot I directed on real skin representation. After a long battle with severe full-body eczema, I was able to articulate in words the struggles I went through and the negative feelings I thought about myself during that dark time. Deep down, I knew I wasn’t the only one silently suffering. So, when I got to share space with three other women with unique skin conditions, make them feel beautiful, and give them a moment to shine, it was truly a full-circle moment. What makes it even better was receiving the sweetest, thoughtful messages from other eczema warriors across the world (even New Zealand!) about their struggles and how empowered they felt by the story in 225. From conceptualization to seeing it printed in the magazine, it will forever be one of my favorite experiences at 225.” —Cynthea Corfah, staff writer, 2018-now

—LSU passing game coordinator Joe Brady

“Working at 225 has opened doors to all kinds of unique opportunities. I’ve had the chance to meet 1st some amazing individuals, eat plenty of fantastic 10 food and take a deeper dive into the city I love so much. There are several memories that will stay I’m just a competitive guy. with me forever, but none bigger than having the chance to cover the historic 2019 LSU football season. It feels like a Hollywood script when I think back to our first summer interviews with Joe Burrow, Ja’Marr Chase and Grant Delpit, among others. Then having the chance to follow them week-in and week-out as they set record after record on their way to an undefeated season, Heisman trophy and national championship is something I’ll never forget. We’ve always strived to show off the best Baton Rouge has to offer at 225. And there was none better than LSU that year.” —Mark Clements, digital content editor, 2016-now Number of school records Burrow set or tied in 2018

Quarterback in school history to lead LSU to four wins over top10-ranked teams in a season

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a quarterback.

RECORD BREAKER

Number of wins Burrow led LSU to in 2018—the most for a first-time sta ter with the school, a record Burrow tied with 2012’s Zach Mettenberger

ST EPPING (SL O W LY ) OU T OF T HE DA RK AGES

It’s no secret the LSU offense hasn’t exactly been prolific in recent years. The Tigers have finished in the upper tier of the SEC in yards per game just once in the past decade. The team has ranked right in the middle of the pack three times in that span but finished in the lower half every other year. The numbers get even more bleak when broken down to passing stats. Since 2009, LSU has ranked dead last in the league in pass yards more times than it has finished in the top half. Many people feel LSU has been stuck trying to transition out of the antiquated ways of former coach Les Miles, who relied on a more oldschool, hard-nosed style of offense that centered around a strong running game. Even Burrow admits it was a concern of his when he decided to transfer out of Ohio State a little more than a year ago. “That was one of my big questions when I was deciding where I was going to go last year,” he says. “But you could tell that they wanted to move in a different direction.” There’s no denying coach Ed Orgeron has made an effort to modernize the Tigers offense since his formal hiring in 2016. His one-year stint with Matt Canada running the offense in 2017—despite ending in an ugly divorce—did look diff rent.

COLLIN RICHIE

N C E . C E L E B R AT E .

From the intern desk

SPACES

INSIDE: A next-level rental / Futuristic downtown dwelling

—LSU quarterback Joe Burrow

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“One of my favorite sessions was with Joe Burrow (before he was Joe Burreaux) for the August 2019 cover. He had already shown a presence on the field against UC , but you could sense something special was coming. I use small talk to help get my subjects comfortable, but he was a young, confident man o quick answers that left me trying to draw deep on my knowledge of both football and LSU lore. I remember asking him what would be different this year. He kind of smirked and said something along the lines of ‘Just wait. I think you will be surprised.’ Truthfully, I was but I wasn’t, because he had the same poise in front of the camera as he did with the pass rush. I have been a lifelong fan of LSU football; I am a fourthgeneration LSU graduate with longstanding family and personal ties to the university, so this photo shoot in hindsight is something I will speak of for years to come.” —Collin Richie, staff photographer, 2012-now

“When I started working at 225 full time, I told then-editor Jeff Roedel that one of my interests was smart growth and urban development. He suggested I start a blog on the 225 website, and not long after that, I found myself standing on the orr ow ? uge of tom Baton Ro side of Government Street in a makeshift, n for the the hor izo Wh at’s on temporary park, interviewing residents about what they wanted to see in the Mid City corridor. It was the inaugural Better Block event in 2013 to help locals reimagine what Government Street could look like, and seeing so many people engaged in the process had me hopeful for the city’s future. From there, I covered the years of community meetings and workshops and talked to business owners as the street was torn up. Now, seeing the project come to fruition today, I’m reminded of how much work goes into making big changes like this—and how important it is for 225 to keep sharing the progress and all the ups and downs with the community.” C OV E R S T ORY

C OV E R S T ORY

“My favorite shoot to style was this year’s ‘My Skin, My Story’ feature. I loved the diversity of it all and how it celebrated different women’s skin—no airbrushing, no filters The story gave the looks more life, and the clothing told its own story. Outfits in shades o golds and muted colors represented each lady’s own strong, powerful style perspective, but the photos still all came together as one.” —Elle Marie, contributing stylist, 2015-now

BY BENJAMIN LEGER

OUR CITY IS changing so fast, it can be hard to keep up. Every week, we hear of a new restaurant opening, a new mixed-use development in the works, a new office building going up. But we wanted to see the bigger picture—those developments that will bring the biggest impact to Baton Rouge and help us become an innovative hub, that road project that will completely overhaul and help revitalize a struggling neighborhood. More than that, we wanted to know if these fancy new projects would be sustainable. Looking into the future these days is not all about flying cars and gleaming, shiny skyscrapers. We have to be clear-eyed about our position on the Gulf Coast, and what that means in a future experts say will include stronger storms, rising sea waters and migrating populations. Baton Rouge has the potential to lead in that respect, and we wanted to know how. As we head into 2020, let this cover story be your roadmap to our city’s greatest expectations. Here’s what local leaders plan to do to improve everything from traffic and infrastructure to parks and recreation. And in the middle of it all, we asked residents to dream big and share their own ideas for our future. What will Baton Rouge think of next?

ILLUSTRATION BY BRAD JENSEN

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“In my time at 225, I’ve had the pleasure of working with wonderful, dedicated editors, and the great honor of exploring Baton Rouge and its captivating people. One of my favorite experiences came courtesy of my enduring love for the holiday season: a photo shoot celebrating Christmas tree ornaments made by local artists. I went to The Foyer, which allowed me to borrow lovely ornaments, and then I got a tree and decorations. For one afternoon, a 225 office space became the site of a tree-decorating session. I couldn’t have been happier. And four years later, I still have that tree.” —Kayla Randall, writing intern, 2016; contributing writer, 2017-now “The photo internship at 225 was invaluable. In my role, I was consistently challenged to step into situations that were out of my comfort zone, and in turn I became a stronger, more competent photographer. Nothing could have prepared me for the summer of 2016. After Alton Sterling’s death, I was charged with capturing the pain of a city. My lens was a thin mesh between myself and the tremendous grief and disbelief of the community. The impact of the events surrounding Alton Sterling have left me forever changed and certainly more enlightened to the chasms of inequality in our justice system. Alton’s death was a tragedy, as were the deaths of the police officers the following week.” —Allie Idrac, photo intern, 2015; contributing photographer, 2016-2018

—Benjamin Leger, managing editor, 2012-now

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #4

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

THE CAT’S OUT OF THE BAG... “

Howdy humans! Though 2020 has been full of surprises, our vet visits don’t have to be. It’s true, us felines are the masters of disguise, but Dr. Lacie sees through the fluff. With just one annual visit, she has the ability to detect illness before we ever show symptoms. I believe they call this sorcery a wellness exam and it’s quite remarkable!

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I N S I D E : How shopping local has changed / Stylish spaces / Fashion trends

Our stylist’s take on Baton Rouge in 2020

Le Superbe ombre leopard jacket, $595 Cinq à Sept “Whitney” dress, $495 From NK Boutique Hearty Diamond earrings, $15 From Be Obsessed Kollection STRUT clutch, $30 From B’Klutched

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Shoes, hat and bracelets Stylist’s and model’s own

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Going our

way What is Baton Rouge style? Our growing community of boutiques, designers and creatives have come a long way in defining it

STYLED BY Elle Marie PHOTOS BY Joey Bordelon MODELING BY Taylor Wright

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STYLE //

Baton Rouge, in an outfit We asked 225 contributing stylist Elle Marie to create one look to symbolically represent Baton Rouge. She surprised us with two. Ruby represents a 15th anniversary, so each outfit nods to the Red Stick and 225’s birthday with its red hues. But both styles have a distinct story to tell. The first is polished and p eppy, capturing a city 15 years ago that was comfortable in its own traditions but also ready to be on the cutting edge. The second is bolder, signifying a community redefined by g owth and change. We’re no longer afraid to wear mismatched prints, mix unexpected colors or rock statement pieces. We’re confident We’re edgy. And we’re finding our own voice

Our stylist’s take on Baton Rouge in 2005

Endless Rose “Caroline” blazer, $104 Endless Rose “Amore” sweatshirt, $73 Ontwelfth “Penelope” mini skirt, $41 Necklaces, $21-$28 Bracelets, $34-$72 From Rodeo

Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #1

Diamond Royalty earrings, $13 From Be Obsessed Kollection

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

HAPPY HOUR MON–FRI • 2–6PM APERITIVO BOARD • CHICKEN WINGS $5 DRINK SPECIALS 3897 GOVERNMENT ST | (225) 478-1286 | ROCCAPIZZERIA.COM | 94 

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Educating tomorrow’s biomedical engineers, one biology class at a time

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STYLE //

Paving the

(run)way

15 big moments that elevated Baton Rouge’s shopping scene

2

COURTESY PERKINS ROWE

1

B Y CYN T H E A CO R FA H

COLLIN RICHIE

4

COLLIN RICHIE

3

Sneaker Politics

6 COLLIN RICHIE

BATON ROUGE IS a completely different city to shop in than it was in 2005. Over the years, dozens of boutiques have opened, some shops closed their doors, and others expanded. And over the last decade, we’ve really seen the “makers movement,” with local creatives turning their jewelry- and clothes-making hobbies into businesses all over town. This has led to the creation of pop-ups like Mid City Makers Market, Scotland Saturdays and continued growth of shopping-driven events such as Hollydays and White Light Night. Meanwhile, boutiques have increasingly turned to social media as an additional platform to sell their wares. And while Baton Rouge still has an incredible variety of brick-and-mortar shops, it is also now proof that you don’t have to have a storefront to run a successful business. Here’s a look back at some of the biggest moments that made the local shopping scene what it is today.

5

2. Perkins Rowe helps introduce us to mixed-use shopping attractions. (2007) Towne Center changed Corporate Boulevard back in 2005, and Perkins Rowe has had a similar effect on the Perkins Road and Bluebonnet Boulevard intersection. The mixed-use development is home to restaurants, a movie theater, boutiques, an open green space, Barnes & Noble, Starbucks and residential spaces. Tenants have come and gone, but there always seems to be at least one exciting new shop to visit. In recent years, mixed-use developments have continued springing up everywhere from downtown to Gonzales.

COURTESY KIMBERLY BROUILLETTE

When the vintage store moved into a larger spot on Government Street, it went from being a small Mid City shop to Louisiana’s largest vintage clothing store. Today, it is the go-to spot for tourists, movie stylists, creatives and vintage enthusiasts.

STOCK PHOTO

1. Time Warp expands, fueling fashionistas’ obsession with all things retro. (2005)

Lululemon store entrance in Washington, D.C.

3. Mimosa Handcrafted launches, eventually proving how a BR jewelry business can make it nationally. (2008)

4. Boutiques turn to social media— while keeping their storefronts alive, too. (2011-now)

In just over a decade, the business went from solely selling at markets to also being sold at local boutiques and to online customers across the country—and has even collaborated with the likes of Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry. Other brands, such as million-dollar sweatshirt company Woolly Threads, have taken their products across the country.

The stylish sneaker boutique Sneaker Politics is a perfect example. The Lafayette-based shoe store opened its Baton Rouge shop in 2012, specializing in the hottest new sneaker releases and streetwear. And with more than 280,000 followers on Instagram, it has found success in both digital and retail spaces.

5. Record shops make a comeback. (2011-now) Kerry Berry’s Atomic Pop Shop opened in 2011. It quickly became the hangout spot for music lovers, vinyl collectors and hipsters. After it was sold to new owners, it moved its wares to Mid City Ballroom in 2019. Another spot, Capital City Records opened on Perkins Road in 2014, giving locals more chances for crate digging.

6. The second stand-alone Lululemon in Louisiana opens in Baton Rouge. (2015) Would it be fair to say the city has gotten even better at working out as it’s added more options for stylish workout gear? The wildly popular yoga apparel brand is set to expand its footprint this winter when it moves next door into the former space occupied by Provisions on Perkins and Galatoire’s Bistro.

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Issue Date: Month Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Taco Tuesday $3 tacos

. $4 margaritas All Day

eatmodesto.com 225-478-0860 3930 Burbank Drive Tues – Thu 11.00am – 10.00pm Fri & Sat 11.00am – 11.00pm Sun 11.00am – 10.00pm Closed Mondays

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STYLE //

7. Mid City Makers Market kicks off the makers revolution. (2016)

7 8

MIRACLE MARCELLE

Friends Paul Claxton, Justin Lemoine and Mimosa Handcrafted’s Dawson and Madeline Ellis wanted to create a community where visitors of all ages could experience and shop creations by local artists, makers, bakers, painters and creators. It’s since encouraged similar markets to pop up on monthly or annual schedules.

8. Wanderlust by Abby goes from mobile boutique to brick and mortar. (2017) After popping up around Louisiana and the South and eventually transforming a van into a mobile boutique, store owner Abby Bullock made a permanent home on Perkins Road. Her store is a celebration of local designers like Krafty Kravingz, Strother Co. Apothecary and Abba + Nim, formerly known as Elohim + Nim—giving small businesses without a storefront a chance to showcase their work.

COURTESY MOLLY TAYLOR

10. Baton Rouge designer takes New York Fashion Week. (2019)

The Plant Studio at Outside Stimuli

11

COLLIN RICHIE

Beneath the Bark jewelry designer Molly Taylor showcased her jewelry at the epicenter of New York fashion, helping put her on the radar of editors at magazines like Vogue and Vanity Fair. Taylor uses reclaimed wood from pecan, sycamore, cherry, Louisiana sinker cypress and walnut trees to make her creations. She also uses other materials like stainless steel to create handmade necklaces, bracelets, earrings and cufflin s.

COLLIN RICHIE

10

STOCK PHOTO

Before it was an Instagram-worthy plant shop, Baton Rouge Succulent Co. started as a pop-up plant stand at local markets. Local nurseries have long drawn plant lovers, but this well-lit space packed with unique finds became the city s first plant supplier with a highly curated style and selection. Last December, the design-driven Plant Studio at Outside Stimuli opened downtown. We hope this trend continues.

Baton Rouge Succulent Co.

COLLIN RICHIE

9. The first succulent boutique opens its doors. (2018)

9

11. H&M opens at The Mall of Louisiana. (2019)

SHOP LOCAL WITH ‘225’

Local stylesetters’ prayers were answered when the chain clothing store H&M opened a Baton Rouge location. Here’s to hoping it helps attract other big brands. Can we get a Zara next?

Through the years, we’ve covered everything from boutique openings to emerging designers to local style trends. Our first style-focused cover story appeared in 2006.

D AWA R !

WINNING

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STYLE // 12

12. Fly Girl Pop-up hosts its first pop-up event. (2019) Local creatives Tyronecia Moore, Meghan Daniel and Gabby Murphy launched an event series for locals to sell secondhand clothing from their closets. It’s one example of a growing movement to make our wardrobes less wasteful.

13

KRISTIN SELLE

IMAGE TAKEN FROM GOOGLE EARTH

13. Cortana Mall closes for good. (2019)

14

This mall, one of the city’s original mega shopping centers, opened in 1976. Over the years, business declined, the Mall of Louisiana opened in the ’90s, and Cortana became a ghost town before officially shu ting down. Amazon nearly took over the space earlier this year, with plans to convert it into a 1 million-square-foot regional distribution center. But interestingly enough, it appears the still-open Dillard’s Clearance Center was the final holdout th t killed the deal.

14. Sweet Baton Rouge opens the first retail shop in the new mixed-use venue Electric Depot. (2020)

15

CATRICE COLEMAN

MALARIE ZAUNBRECHER

The former T-shirt company went from selling locally inspired T-shirts to adding game-day wear, accessories, gifts and other Louisiana-inspired goods. It’s already been part of shopping pop-ups held at the venue, including a football style event this past September.

Hair

Skin

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15. Vintage home decor shops draw younger shoppers. (Ongoing) The 2016 opening of the mural-adorned Pink Elephant Antiques brought more than 35 dealers of vintage and eclectic home, clothing and gift items to Mid City. The same year, then-21-year-old Garrett Kemp bought The Market at Circa 1857, revamping the store’s layout, upping its social media presence and collaborating with nearby businesses on events. Both openings seemed to draw a new kind of shopper to the antique world: millennials and Gen Zers.

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CHARLES AYCOCK, M.D.

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Issue Date: Nov. Ad proof #4

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Turning your dreams into a home since 2001 Buying or selling your home is a life-changing experience. We’re here to help you enjoy the process and embrace an exciting change of seasons. We are your local real estate agents.

BLYTHE JOHNSON

LINDA WILLIAMS

LAURA GILLILAND

ROBERT LYNCH

MARTHA WELLS

SUSANNE FOS

ELIZABETH NACHMAN

MIRIAM DEL RIO

HEATHER KLEINPETER

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Del Rio Real Estate, Inc. is a team of Baton Rouge natives who have a lifetime of experience learning the area and being a part of its communities.

225.218.0888 delriorealestatebr.com 4874 Bluebonnet Blvd Baton Rouge, LA 102 

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STYLE //

Spaces & places Some of the coolest local homes from the ‘225’ archives B Y J E N N IFE R TO R M O BACK IN 2007, Kenneth Brown dropped this gem in 225: “People are always shocked when I say this, but people in Louisiana and Baton Rouge have better taste than people in Los Angeles.” Back then, the Baton Rouge native interior designer had spent plenty of time in California, having starred in his own HGTV show, and he would soon be appearing in a TLC series. But Louisiana homeowners, he said then, simply “take more pride in where they live.” Well said, Kenneth. It’s the same sentiment we’ve witnessed over the last 15 years, as we’ve peeked inside dozens of homes in 225’s pages. And it’s why we launched an annual home-themed issue in 2015, 225 Spaces & Places. You won’t find a t-for-art’s-sake here. Homeowners and renters alike favor sentimental pieces, heirlooms and everything local, local, local. We’ve often felt that the most personal reporting we can do is about someone’s home. It tells the story of those who live inside. We’ve always tried to cover a mix of homes of different sizes and in varied neighborhoods—as well as a blend of professionally and non-professionally designed interiors. Because we’ve found in either case, Louisianans just have that eye for design. It’s like artist Meghan Daniel told us when we put her home on the 2019 cover of Spaces & Places. “Just buy what you like. If it’s all your style, it will come together.”

2019

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE AND ECKO360 / COURTESY LEONE ELLIOTT

Leone Elliott’s Bocage Lakes house

Elliott drew the stairway himself and commissioned David Cano with Iron Designs to create it. “From the side, it looks like an exam table,” he told 225.

2019

Bridget Tiek’s Garden District home “It was a historic home. We didn’t want to see it torn down.”

DIGIT

108

Estimated number of homes we’ve featured in 225 over the last 15 years

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225-300-8333

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STYLE //

Early spaces

90%

Before we launched our annual design-themed issue, we featured many homes in our recurring “MySpace” feature:

of artwork in the home was made by local artists, Kaufman told ‘225.’

2006

Sherry and Rick Browns’ downtown loft

Mary Kay Davis’ Southdowns bath

2008

Amanda and Ty Larkins’ Hundred Oaks family room

2011

Melanie Way’s Airstream offic

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

2008

2015

John Kaufman and Lesley Kernan’s Mid City rental

2018

Prescott Bailey’s downtown, custom-built home

600

The weight in pounds of Bailey’s outdoor concrete dining table. He had the table lifted up to his balcony by a crane.

2017

2012

Aron Coates’ University Acres hom

Ty Larkins’ Hundred Oaks townhouse Larkins designed the home to resemble what he describes as a “city house,” pulling a blend of architectural details from New York, Philadelphia and New Orleans.

FILE PHOTOS

2013

Becky Gottsegen’s University Acres abode

2015

Todd Graves’ treehouse on the LSU Lakes The house is made primarily of Louisiana heart pine and cypress, with some Washington western red cedar.

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STYLE //

2018

Lauren Hill’s kids’ playhouse

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

Hill converted some extra space in her living room into a two-story playhouse for her kids. It’s concealed by two folding, leatherstudded doors.

2016

Madeline Ellis’ Perkins Road overpass area home

2019

Arianne Bellizaire’s European-inspired kitchen in the Country Club of Louisiana

I love natural things—leather, wood, fur. I like shiny metal and brass, and old, old rusted stuff. … Putting those things next to each other highlights each thing’s essence more.

“One thing Louisiana has in common with European cultures is our love of gathering, and that’s how I designed this home. It’s meant to be the place we want to be more than anywhere else in the world.”

REFRESH. RESTORE. REPEAT. JUST CALL THE MAIDS. ®

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225-755-8383 | MAIDS.com

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2018

Rafael Domingo’s downtown apartment “I think what I like the most about my place is how it’s become a collection of all the things that define me. There’s an adventure to go with every picture I have hanging in my gallery.”

2017

Elise Rosato’s Perkins Road apartment

2018

Rosato livened up the white walls of her rental with estate-sale antiques and vibrant art, like this painting by late New Orleans artist Bill Hemmerling.

Tate and Sarah Tullier’s Gonzales house Floor-to-ceiling bookshelves showcase the Tulliers’ decades-long collection of fashion magazines and art books.

2020 HONOREE

WWW.FMMLA.COM | 225.910.8757 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Issue Date: Nov 2020 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

EVENTS ARE BETTER AT THE OASIS THE OASIS IS THE PREMIER PATIO BAR, RESTAURANT CATERING AND RECREATION FACILITY! NOW BOOKING for Private Parties, Company Events, Holiday Parties or Special Occasions!

theoasisbr.com 7477 Burbank Drive

Open Daily: 5:00pm-11:00pm Restaurant: (225) 223-6223 Volleyball: (225) 223-6598 108 

Follow Us:

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STYLE //

Fashion forward backward 15 fashion trends through the years as seen from 225’s editorial photo shoots B Y CYN THE A CO R FA H FASHION IS LIKE a revolving door. Just when you thought you saw the end of a trend, it comes right back around a few years later. Some trends are a flop and die the same y ar they began, while others evolve and return every couple of decades. It’s been this way for bell-bottom jeans, classic Converse sneakers, large statement earrings and neon clothing. Take a look back at how fashion trends have evolved since 225 first started publishing style features in 2006. Walk down memory lane, and see if you can spot what fashion must-haves you wore over the years.

2018

Statement earrings If there was a theme for the ’80s, it would be “the bigger the better.” From the hair to the earrings, the ’80s made a statement. Who would’ve thought a couple decades later, big, flashy arrings would make their return? Local makers designed everything from tassel earrings to funky earrings in the shape of plants, food and animals.

2020 Earth tones

It could be the Kardashians’ love of nude colors and neutraltoned clothing or the minimalist movement, but 2020 fashionistas are all about earthy hues. No matter the season, locals can elevate their attire with warm tans, chocolate browns, deep evergreens, mauves and sandy off-whites.

2019

Snakeskin footwear 2019 was wild. And not just because astronomers released the first-ever photo o a black hole. It was the year of snakeskin footwear. Snakeskin boots, heels, fl ts, wedges and even sneakers slithered their way into local boutiques, making them the ultimate go-to statement footwear.

PHOTOS BY ADAM VO, ALLIE APPEL, RAEGAN LABAT AND JORDAN HEFLER

2017

Off-the-shoulder ruffled tops and dresses A little shoulder never hurt anyone. And 2017 is proof of that. From ruffled flowy tops to full-length maxi dresses, off-the-shoulder accents were the new crop top.

2016 Chokers

Hello? Is that the ’90s calling? Chokers returned around 2016. But it wasn’t just the plastic chokers we wore back in the day. Local boutiques sold chokers made from denim, leather, lace and metal. Some were embellished with charms, stones or other decorative accents.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Congratulations 225 Favorres for 15 years

in Baton Rouge

Annual “BEST OF” Readers Choice Awarded - 10+ years in a row. Best Sushi & World Class Hibachi

217 N Airline Hwy @ E Cornerview, Gonzales (225) 767-2288

217 N Airline Hwy @ E Cornerview, Gonzales (225) 767-2288 5741 Essen Lane @ Perkins, BTR (225) 767-2288 ichibanbr.com 110 

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STYLE //

2014

Asymmetrical tops and dresses

2015 Lapel pins

Why choose between a mini and maxi skirt when you can have them both? In 2014, local boutiques and clothing designers got creative with clothing shapes and began making them asymmetrically. This was most popular with summer dresses and skirts, and it eventually made its way to formal wear.

With the help of a few decorative lapel pins, your classic denim jacket or baseball cap can go from boring to bangin’. Everyone from local boutiques to bigname designers sold stylish pins to accent your wardrobe in 2015.

2013 Wedges

PHOTOS BY ALLIE APPEL, CHARLENE GUILLIAMS, JORDAN HEFLER AND RAEGAN LABAT

Wedges took over the footwear world in 2013. Maybe it was the comfort or the functionality, or maybe women just grew tired of wearing stilettos. Whatever the reason, designers began making wedges for every style: cork wedges, leather wedge sandals and the most memorable— sneaker wedges.

2012

Peplum pieces What was the best way to look feminine, fie ce and fit in 2012? Peplum tops and dresses. Women wore peplum cocktail dresses to events, professional peplum tops with pencil skirts to the office and even peplum outerwear. This figu e-fl ttering style can still be found around town today.

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2011

Chain necklaces *Cues “Chain of Fools” by Aretha Franklin* Chain necklaces aren’t just for ’80s rappers and basketball players. 2011 revealed a different side to chain necklaces. They were worn casually and formally and made from different materials like gold, acrylic and silver.

Harem pants Want to see a group of fashion stylists fight? Ask them how they feel about harem pants. They’re either loved or hated. The dropcrotch style came in all types: sweatsuit material, silk and bohemian prints.

Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #1

2009

Gladiator sandals Gladiator sandals, also known as Jesus sandals, were the hot summer essential in 2009. Women wore gladiator sandals and heels with everything from shorts to formal dresses. The ankle-hugging footwear drew attention to and visually lengthened the legs.

PHOTOS BY BRIAN BAIAMONTE, STEPHANIE LANDRY, JORDAN HEFLER, MALARIE ZAUNBRECHER AND BIANCA ZARAGOZA

2010

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

holiday event & BOOK YOUR

ROOMS NOW!

www.marriott.com/btrbb | 225.215.7000 www.watermarkbr.com | 225.408.3200 112 

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN BAIAMONTE, STEPHANIE LANDRY, JORDAN HEFLER, MALARIE ZAUNBRECHER AND BIANCA ZARAGOZA

STYLE //

2008

2007

Sack dresses These days, fashion designers are all about accentuating the waistline, creating a shapely silhouette and showing off a woman’s curves. That wasn’t always the case. In 2008, loose-fi ting, unshapely, sack dresses were in style. Some dresses were worn plain, while others were belted at the waist for a feminine feel.

Cropped blazers with mid-length sleeves What was it about the early 2000s and garments with awkward lengths? From low-rise, capri pants to crop tops and jackets with mid-length sleeves, in 2007 full-length garments just didn’t make the cut.

2006

Boot-cut jeans It doesn’t get much earlier-2000s than boot-cut jeans. Before we switched over to skinny jeans, high-waisted pants, bell-bottoms and rawhem jeans, straightlegged, boot cut jeans were the norm. (Hard to imagine now, right?)

Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020 All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

HAVE A

Merle-y Christmas

Our library has history blocks. Don’t just read about history, feel it in Natchez. Walk through the past on our downtown history trails. Explore the Grand Village of the Natchez Indians. Dive into the stories at the Museum of African American History and Culture. Bracelets by BuDhaGirl

17424 Airline Hwy | Prairieville, LA | 225.744.2656 |

Get the latest safe travel information at VisitNatchez.org/Responsibly.

visitnatchez.org

#VisITMSResponsibly

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

A GREAT DRIVEWAY IS THE START TO A SOLID FOUNDATION

AFTER

Residence of a 225 Magazine Reader

FALL PRO TIP: A TEMP OF 55˚ IS IDEAL FOR POURING CONCRETE.

BEFORE

Call to get a FREE estimate! 17534 Old Jefferson Hwy, Ste A | Prairieville, LA | 225.290.4800 | jrconstructionsolutions.com | E Q 114 

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CELEBRATE Capital Region companies and organizations share what makes the 225

community special to them.

Mestizo

Exigo Technology Services, LLC

Window World

Bassett Furniture

Ford Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Collegiate Advisory Placement Service

Hannon Jewelers

Parkview Baptist School

Valluzzo Companies

City Group Hospitality

Vidrine Insurance

LSU Rural Life Museum

AR Workshop

Louisiana Business & Technology Center

Cypress Roofing MG3, LLC BLDG 5 HerringStone’s Trichell Law Firm Niels J. Linschoten, MD

StoneTrust Workers’ Compensation

Presonus Audio Electronics

Future Fitness Wellness Center

Lipsey’s and Haspel

Breechen Pipe & Steel

Eggie Salon Studios

The Ray Firm, LLC

Pearl Dental Group

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

MESTIZO

CUISINE • COCKTAILS • CATERING LOCALLY OWNED AND operated for the past 21 years, Mestizo Restaurant serves Mexican cuisine with a Louisiana fl ir. As a third-generation restauranteur, Jim Urdiales, is proud to continue the family legacy with a fresh take on the culinary scene. Mestizo is known for innovative menus and is proud to offer Keto, vegetarian and gluten-free menu options. Mestizo’s bar serves a wide array of specialty cocktails and freshly squeezed margaritas. The bar even has a special keto cocktail menu and an impressive list of specialty tequilas and mezcals. Also, drop by for Sunday brunch to enjoy classic cocktails and Mexican-inspired breakfast cuisine.

21 YEARS

116 

2323 ACADIAN THRUWAY

A recent remodel of the restaurant has expanded the footprint with a private dining space that can accommodate up to fifty people. Mestizo also offers offsite catering for parties and special events. As the pandemic unfolded, the restaurant adapted by offering Family Meals for pick up, neighborhood drop-offs, and individual boxed meals for businesses. They even offer meal prep to simplify your life! Visit the website to view their menu offerings as well as all their catering services. Come and see what everyone is talking about at Mestizo restaurant.

225.387.2699

MESTIZORESTAURANT.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BASSETT FURNITURE BASSETT’S STORY BEGAN more than a century ago. Their history of building furniture with strict attention to detail and respect for quality materials has always been a source of pride for the company. Today, Bassett remains committed to their early principles of perfecting the art of crafting quality furniture. With quality, they are also focused on creating fashionable and comfortable home furnishings at a great value for their customers. Bassett’s custom furniture programs make it simple to create a unique sense of style with a variety of options including upholstery, beds, dining, home storage and home entertainment. Customers can choose to work with a design consultant to create furniture that compliments their space whether it is a new home or room refresh.

115 YEARS

Every piece of furniture is built by hand in North Carolina, ensuring that each piece has expert craftsmanship. Frames are built with interlocking, laminated hardwoods, trim is placed by hand and high-density foam is used to keep cushions looking plusher, longer. To provide convenience and added value, Bassett offers complimentary in store design consultation or virtual appointments that customers can book online. The Bassett Baton Rouge family is fourth generation locally owned and operated. They feel fortunate to have served the 225 community for many years. The Bassett team is committed to providing the Greater Baton Rouge Area with home furnishings and design to celebrate the art of living.

11655 REIGER ROAD, BATON ROUGE, LA 70809

225.755.0600

BASSETTFURNITURE.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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CYPRESS ROOFING CYPRESS ROOFING IS a a family-owned and -operated company that values faith, family, honesty and integrity—not just the bottom line. The licensed and insured roofing company provides turnkey solutions for insurance claims, roofing and construction services in and around South Louisiana. It specializes in helping clients utilize their

1 YEAR 118 

6161 ROYAL PALMS DRIVE

homeowner’s insurance to help pay for some of the cost associated with a repair or replacement of a roof. The company proudly builds long-term relationships with its clients and guarantees their satisfaction. It stands behind its work. Cypress Roofing is a proud member of the East Ascension Rotary Club in Gonzales.

225.450.5507

CYPRESSROOFINGLA.COM

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G

• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

MG3, LLC AFTER SEVERAL decades in the corporate world, Kelly Ghara wanted to return to her passion: home improvement and design. In 2014, she founded MG3, LLC with her son-in-law, Beau Maginnis. Drawing inspiration from her global travels and experiences is what fuels her appreciation of spaces big and small, as does helping create the perfect homes for modern and extended families. Vice President Beau Maginnis was born and raised in Baton Rouge. After graduating from University Lab School, Beau attended LSU, where he received a Bachelor of Science in Business Management. After years in political consulting and national sales, he realized his true passion and joined forces with Kelly. Since inception, MG3’s superior work ethic, timeliness and transparency is focused on creating satisfied lifetime customers. 7 YEARS

6355 MOSS SIDE LANE

Whether buying, selling, or building, Kelly and Beau guide every client through the process with complete ease of mind. Its expertise includes remodels, new construction, commercial and historic. MG3 primarily works within the Baton Rouge city limits, but has taken on projects elsewhere, including Zachary, Central and Denham Springs. As a team, they want to shape our community by designing and building their clients’ dream homes or custom renovations. Being a local, family-owned business, client-satisfaction is a key driver at MG3 and a pillar of the company. Collaborative client-focused projects create a custom result that continues keep clients raving and coming back for every design project they dream up. Explore completed projects on instagram at @MG3_Construction. 225.288.0801

MG3BUILDS.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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BLDG 5

MARKET KITCHEN PATIO •

NESTLED BENEATH the Perkins Road Overpass, BLDG 5 made a splash in its first year as part of the Baton Rouge community. Garnering the recognition for Best New Restaurant in the Best of 225 Awards, owners Brumby and Misti Broussard have operated with the belief that the kitchen is the heart of the home and have carefully curated a welcoming place to gather, complete with local fl vors and fresh, indulgent cuisine. BLDG 5 is much more than a restaurant—it’s an entire experience. From the interesting décor full of soul and character, to the variety of fl vors on the lunch, bar and dinner menus, BLDG 5 is a unique neighborhood spot. A quick lunch, lingering afternoon drinks at the bar and patio, or an enjoyable night out with friends you won’t want to end— it’s the place to be—day, afternoon or night!

1 YEAR

120 

2805 KALURAH STREET

BLDG 5 offers both lunch and dinner in all five of their unique spaces throughout the restaurant, both indoor and outdoor, Monday through Saturday. The market offers fresh salads, frozen meals, BLDG 5 lemonades and cocktail mixes, as well as great gifts. The salads and protein plates are a must for lunch, and don’t miss their Grazing Dinner Boards! And the fresh ideas don’t end there. Brumby, Misti, and Executive Chef Kevin Anderson are launching new fall menu items with seasonal ingredients. The Broussards have added a rooftop bar and waiting area to amplify the BLDG 5 experience. Having celebrated the eatery’s first year of business, the BLDG 5 team is excited to continue serving regulars, welcoming new guests, and creating a second home for its ever-supportive customers.

225.256.2287

BLDG5.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

HERRINGSTONE’S OF BATON ROUGE

ON APRIL 1, 1989, two sisters, Debbie Herrington and Cindy Stone, turned their dreams into reality and opened the first HerringStone’s Boutique in Monroe, Louisiana. The sisters dreamt of bringing innovative and trend-setting fashion to their hometown. With a great deal of hard work, years of perpetually targeting new trends, and seeking out the best brands and merchandise, their dream took off beyond the twin cities and HerringStone’s became a household name for women’s wardrobes across north Louisiana. Over the years, HerringStone’s has become a Louisiana staple boutique. The sisters created an iconic company that continues with a second generation, Hanna Herrington Lavergne and Haley Herrington; hence their phrase “two generations and growing.” An heirloom is something of value passed on from one generation to the next. Branching off from the limbs of 31 YEARS

HerringStone’s as a sister store, HeirLoom by HerringStone’s was established in 2017 and continues to flourish. What started as a small family business has steadily grown into something greater and the family thanks Baton Rouge for following along and supporting them. In addition to its website, HerringStone’s has five store locations in Louisiana: HerringStone’s Monroe, HerringStone’s Lafayette, HeirLoom by HerringStone’s Youngsville, HeirLoom by HerringStone’s in Houma, and the newest addition: HerringStone’s Baton Rouge. Each storefront is a haven for style, fashion, and top of the line customer service. Haley Herrington is so excited to be in Baton Rouge. She recently moved her entire life to 225 so she can get involved in the community and really see what Baton Rouge is all about.

7474 CORPORATE BLVD. SUITE C

HERRINGSTONESBOUTIQUE.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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TRICHELL LAW FIRM TRICHELL LAW FIRM was founded in 2018 by 30-year-old Chase Trichell, who grew up in Natchitoches as the third of four boys. An LSU grad, Chase spent his college years bartending, hustling golf games, writing poetry, and playing quarterback for the Purple Team in LSU Law’s annual tackle football game benefitting Make-A-Wish Foundation. Chase’s background served as the perfect segue to a colorful and impactful career. TLF’s mantra is “a fresh approach to an old profession.” Its Instagram handle is @PeoplesLawyer for a reason. Trained as a plaintiff’s attorney, Chase took a case to trial—alone—only eight months after being sworn in. And won. He’s become a Baton Rouge favorite among clients ever since (just read his Google reviews). David v. Goliath is not a legal case citation; it’s TLF’s mentality. One satisfied client described Chase as “the Floyd Mayweather of injury law,” while another called him the “G.O.A.T.” in the industry.

2 YEARS

122 

529 SPAIN ST.

But beyond a successful and popular torts practice, TLF commits at least 25% of its resources to charitable causes. A constitutional law junkie, Chase’s proudest work comes from his pro bono civil rights cases, some of which have garnered international attention. TLF is active in the Black Lives Matter movement and is especially focused on criminal justice reform. Chase also was nominated to participate in American Cancer Society’s Real Men Wear Pink 2020 campaign. “At TLF, we grind. We hustle. We’re out there in the community. Our entire firm is based on transparency and streamlining legal representation,” Chase says. “We’re just as likely to get a new case through a DM as we are on the business line. We’re entirely paperless, we interact socially, we’re accessible, and above all else, we actually care about people.” One thing is for sure—Trichell Law Firm is quickly carving out its own niche in the Baton Rouge legal market.

225.500.0900

TRICHELLFIRM.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

NIELS J. LINSCHOTEN, MD DR. NIELS LINSCHOTEN is part of the Baton Rouge Orthopedic Clinic, the preeminent orthopedic group of the region. With more than 25 years of surgical experience, he specializes in hip and knee replacements and revisions, and receives referrals from all over the state. He is known for taking on complex cases and turning them into patient success stories.

28 YEARS

Dr. Linschoten is an enthusiastic proponent of the most advanced technology in joint replacement surgery. He was among the first physicians in Baton Rouge to utilize Stryker’s Mako Robotic Assisted Surgical system. “I will never tire of the joy of helping patients with unique problems who could not get help elsewhere,” the doctor says. From routine to complex or rare, Dr. Linschoten is a master in orthopedic care.

8585 PICARDY AVENUE OFFICE TOWER 2, STE. 518

LINSCHOTENORTHO.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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PRESONUS

AUDIO ELECTRONICS JIM ODOM AND BRIAN SMITH, LSU College of Engineering grads, founded PreSonus Audio Electronics in Baton Rouge in 1995. The operation has moved twice in that span of time—three times if you count moving out of Jim’s garage—but never outside of the Red Stick city limits. Baton Rouge’s close community and robust musical traditions are at the heart of the PreSonus company culture, and Odom and Smith can’t imagine a better place to call home. They even include a favorite family recipe at the back of the owner’s manual for every high-quality audio product they make to share some southeast Louisiana love with the world. Teams focus on innovating complete end-to-end 25 YEARS

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solutions, ensuring that customers reach their goals wherever sound takes them: in the studio, on a live stream, or on a stage. As customers have gravitated toward software and membership services, PreSonus adapted accordingly. Since its beginnings leading the home recording revolution in the last decade and a half, PreSonus has grown into a global organization and a leader in all things audio. As they look to the future, Odom and Smith continue to keep their customers’ needs at the forefront of everything they do. Whether you’re recording your first song, your 100th podcast, or your 400th worship service, PreSonus has the right intuitive tools for the job. 225. 216.7887

PRESONUS.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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BRECHEEN PIPE AND STEEL WHEN DON BRECHEEN founded Brecheen Pipe & Steel in 1980, he laid the foundation for the small family-owned business to grow into one of the most dominant steel distributors in the Gulf Coast region. Today, the Port Allen company provides carbon, galvanized steel, stainless, aluminum and alloy steel to the petrochemical, marine, fabrication, refinery, pulp and paper, sugar, and construction industries. For 40 years Brecheen Pipe and Steel has remained in the Brecheen family, and since 1995 it has been managed by Danielle Brecheen, Don’s daughter. Danielle grew up learning the industry from her parents. She

40 YEARS

2340 AMERICAN WAY, PORT ALLEN

began working for the company when she was 19 years old. Brecheen is now one of the only female-owned steel companies in Louisiana. Danielle is an avid LSU and Saints fan, a former rugby player, and enjoys fishing and golf. She is driven by a competitive spirit and believes in being fair. “It’s important to invest in the community around us,” Brecheen says. “You have to give back and supporting youth is a long-term investment. If you can keep them on a good path, you’ll have good people around you in the community as well as good employees of the future.” Brecheen Pipe & Steel is proud to be an integral part of the Greater Baton Rouge community.

225.749.3553

BRECHEENPIPEANDSTEEL.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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EXIGO

TECHNOLOGY SERVICES LLC EXIGO IS THE continuation of CamSoft Data Systems Inc., founded in 1992 in Baton Rouge. Over the last 28 years, the company has provided IT solutions for all types of business entities, from government to health care to distribution. Some of CamSoft’s earlier initiatives propelled Baton Rouge into the fastest growing wireless city in the country. Because of their accomplishments, founder Carlo MacDonald was recognized in the Baton Rouge Business Report’s Forty Under 40 in early 2000. In 2012, Exigo decided to expand and focus almost entirely on business outside of Louisiana.

28 YEARS

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Seven years later, after building a successful practice on the east and west coast, MacDonald turned his focus back on Louisiana and the south. He made Baton Rouge his company headquarters once again. MacDonald has enjoyed reconnecting with his original customers, and he looks forward to expanding technology in the Greater Baton Rouge area. In addition to building his clientele, MacDonald seeks to create more opportunities for college graduates pursuing careers in IT by expanding the local job market. Exigo is excited to lead the way in making Baton Rouge a tech center and “smart city.”

9100 BLUEBONNET CENTRE, STE. 303

225.308.4467

EXIGOTECHNOLOGY.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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FORD PLASTIC &

RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY FORD PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY consists of two 225 natives and one of the few motherdaughter plastic surgeon practices in the country: Drs. Katherine Ford Chiasson and Ann Ford Reilley. Dr. Chiasson is thrilled to be home after many years of specialty training and serve the city that is so close to her heart. Dr. Reilley is pleased to join her daughter in starting a new practice and brings the experience of her three-decade career in Baton Rouge. A true family business, Ford Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery values building authentic relationships with their patients that will last a lifetime. Its beautifully restored office in Baton Rouge’s medical corridor was created with a single objective: Take away the stress and unease that typically accompany a doctor’s visit and instead make patients feel

1 YEARS

welcome and comfortable in an elegant setting. Here the focus is on personalized evaluation, carefully tailored treatment plans and creating an elevated patient experience. In addition to Drs. Reilley and Chiasson, the practice is enhanced by Louisiana native and licensed aesthetician MeLisa Stalter. The experience she adds to the practice makes Ford Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery a destination for patients in all stages of life with nonsurgical or surgical needs. Although many things have changed in medicine and in Baton Rouge since Dr. Reilley first started practice more than 30 years ago, both she and Dr. Chiasson share a dedication to excellent patient care that will always stand the test of time. Trends will come and go, but confidence is timeless.

4864 BLUEBONNET BLVD., STE. A, BATON ROUGE, LA 70809

225.269.2610

FORDPRS.COM

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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HANNON JEWELERS FOUNDED IN BATON ROUGE in 1980, Hannon Jewelers is a family owned jewelry store that specializes in creating and repairing fine jewelry. As an accredited American Gem Society store, Hannon Jewelers provides unparalleled gemological expertise and the highest quality of service in the areas of appraisals, custom design, and repairs. At Hannon Jewelers, we blend old world techniques with modern computer aided design (CAD) technology to create custom and unique fine jewelry to your exact specifications. Our master jewelers and gemologists handle the entire the custom design process in our workshop locally. Our specialty is helping couples select the perfect diamond and engagement ring that represents their unique love story, while making the custom design process accessible, affordable, and memorable. Hannon Jewelers has served Baton Rouge since 1980, but our

39 YEARS

128 

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story starts much earlier in 1940 in Managua Nicaragua, where the tradition of handcrafting fine jewelry has been passed down through three generations. The Jiron-Hannon family has a long tradition in the fine art of designing and handcrafting fine jewelry, traditions that have been passed down through three generations. In the late 1970s, when the communist Nicaraguan government confiscated family jewelry store and threatened their lives, the Jiron-Hannon family started over—this time in Baton Rouge. For the past almost 40 years, the 225 community has embraced Hannon Jewelers. Today, although our team of experts have expanded, you can still find owner Bayardo Hannon Jiron (known as Mr. Hannon) proudly sharing his expertise and his story with each and every customer. Three generations later, Hannon Jewelers is committed to helping each customer tell their unique life story through custom designing family heirlooms, fine jewelry that will last a lifetime.

225.766.8242

HANNONJEWELERS.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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VALLUZZO COMPANIES THE VALLUZZO FAMILY opened its first McDonald’s restaurant in 1961 on Plank Road, and founded Valluzzo Companies in 2010. While the past 15 years have brought a lot of change to the Baton Rouge community and to the Valluzzo organization, Valluzzo Companies still holds onto its core values. John, Nicholas, and Michael celebrate their business, family and faith in the cities in which they operate, and that will continue for generations to come. Valluzzo Companies has been joined by incredible team members from the Baton Rouge area, and has expanded and opened 10 YEARS

8710 JEFFERSON HIGHWAY

locations in both Mississippi and Alabama. For Valuzzo Companies, Baton Rouge will also be home and no matter where its locations operate, its team strives to bring the best of what Baton Rouge has to offer to every community it serves. Each generation commits to leaving this town better for the one that follows. “I want my kids to have as much pride in Baton Rouge as I do,” Michael Valluzzo says. “We can achieve that by committing your best, investing not only in our work but also into the greatest areas of need in the town that surrounds us.” 225.300.8960

VALLUZZOCOMPANIES.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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VIDRINE INSURANCE KYLE VIDRINE KNOWS how important insurance coverage is. He has been in the financial and insurance industry for 24 years. He is an expert on homeowner’s, flood, and commercial insurance as well as other insurance products. The biggest mistake people can make is not understanding the type of coverage they need or taking a lower rate without considering the repercussions they may face. Kyle’s expertise comes from his background experience. He has 22 years of experience in consumer lending with his father and has owned and operated four consumer finance companies including a mortgage business. He was also a licensed

4 YEARS

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realtor for ten years. This experience gives Kyle an advantage in writing homeowners insurance because he understands all aspects of a real estate transaction. Whether a customer is buying a home or shopping for a homeowner’s policy, Vidrine can help make the process seamless. Everyone needs insurance to protect against disaster. Kyle and his team work on all types of polices and make customer service their top priority. Kyle urges potential customers to spend time researching options and then come to him with questions. The Vidrine team is focused on ensuring the best coverage for an individual or business at an affordable rate.

11851 WENTLING AVE. STE A, BATON ROUGE, LA 70816

985.500.4500

VIDRINEINSURANCE.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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AR WORKSHOP BATON ROUGE

KELLY WEBSTER FIRST discovered AR Workshop while living in Roswell, Georgia. She wasn’t exactly searching for a business opportunity, but after seeing AR Workshop’s amazing DIY projects and designs on Facebook, Webster just fell in love with the whole concept. On a whim, she requested more information, and after one conversation with the executive team, there was no question that this was something she was going to do. Not only did the founders have a huge passion for business, but Webster was also sold on the idea of a woman-owned franchise. Webster and her fiancé had reached a point

<1 YEAR

18303 PERKINS RD E SUITE 406

in life where they wanted to get back home and thought this was the perfect opportunity to introduce AR Workshop to Louisiana. AR Workshop Baton Rouge is a place where friends, families, and co-workers can get together to not only make something beautiful to display in their home or give as a gift, but also create amazing memories. It’s rewarding to make something yourself—and Webster assures, “it’s so addictive!” Now, more than ever it’s important that our community has a place where they can put down their phones, relax, have fun, and get creative. AR Workshop is that place.

225.663.7997

ARWORKSHOP.COM/BATONROUGE 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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STONETRUST

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION STONETRUST PRESIDENT AND CEO Mike Dileo is a Baton Rouge native and an LSU graduate. He has been in the workers’ compensation insurance business for more than 31 years, and he loves what Stonetrust is building. “We’ve assembled a great staff of 53 workers’ compensation professionals who are extremely passionate about delivering the best insurance service experience to all of our agency partners, our policyholders, and their injured employees,” he says. Proud to be headquartered in Baton Rouge, Dileo and his team at Stonetrust have been a vital part of the 225 community for 27 years. What started as a self-insured workers’ compensation fund has grown into a multistate regional company, operating in eight states with plans for expansion into six additional states by 2022. “We are a relationshipdriven company,” Dileo says, “with a goal of becoming the first choice workers’ compensation carrier in all of our markets.” 27 YEARS

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Stonetrust offers workers’ compensation coverage and services to business owners in just about every class of business and delivers customer responsiveness that is second to none. The team at Stonetrust has an extraordinary commitment to providing quality underwriting, accident prevention and claims management services with a particular focus on ease of doing business. Their goal is for every Stonetrust customer to experience what it means to be Stonetrust Safe—referring to its system of in-house resources that includes the best people, processes and services strategically designed to help business owners achieve safety goals, and keep premium and claims costs down. Dileo and his team take pride in knowing what it means to show up when it matters the most. Always striving to be there for independent insurance agents and policyholders who trust them with their workers’ compensation business, the Stonetrust team loves working with all of its business partners and being part of the 225 community. 225.923.1050

STONETRUSTINSURANCE.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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FUTURE FITNESS FROM THE TIME you walk in the doors of Future Fitness, your safety and mind/body experience will seem effortless and make you feel whole again. The immaculate private wellness and training facility located in the heart of Baton Rouge takes on a limited number of clients at a time for one-on-one training to ensure focus and success. The establishment is unique in Baton Rouge, with offerings in all areas of wellness; its clients don’t have to shop around for a full body holistic health plan that includes private yoga, private barre, private pilates, small training classes, massage therapy, physical therapy and esthetics. Over the past 15 years, Future Fitness has expanded tremendously from its origins in a 1,000-squarefoot facility to its new 8,000 square-foot home with 14 employees that includes trainers, instructors and therapists. The facility is sanitized throughout the day and deep-cleaned nightly. Clients begin their experience by meeting with Fitness 30 YEARS

1650 LOBDELL AVE.

Director and owner Chris Gendusa to establish a plan of action. Spa Ambassador Christine Pizzolato guides guests through a menu of spa services, from a dry sauna to nails. One could make a day from nutritional counseling, yoga, manicure/pedicure and massage. Linx Physical Therapy specializes in sports and orthopedic injuries. Marcy Linxwiler and her team of skilled therapists help to rehab and coordinate with our trainers and massage therapist for a complete recovery. Pilates instructors Melanie Griggs and Caroline Zollinger together provide more than 30 years of experience. Guests enjoy a solo experience in the reformer room, unlike other facilities that allow for 15 people at a time. The company culture at Future Fitness is progressive, motivating and welcoming. Its team is involved in the 225 community, supporting nearby fellow small businesses and celebrating the atmosphere of the Baton Rouge community with its ever growing small businesses and innovative culture. 225.928.0486

FUTUREFITNESSBR.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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EGGIE SALON STUDIO WITH HER GRANDMOTHER Ursula Gordon as a role model, Rachel Eggie knew from the age of 14 that she wanted to pursue a career as a hair stylist. She graduated from LSU in May of 2013 with a degree in marketing, then moved to Houston and began the path to her career. She was a dedicated, ambitious student at the Aveda Institute of Houston, where she was a recipient of the Aveda’s Edwin Neil Full Potential Award, given to select Aveda students across the country. After her schooling, she began working at an elite hair salon in uptown Houston: Therapy Hair Studio. She was fortunate enough to be able to work under highly trained professionals who are veterans to the beauty industry. Four years ago, she returned to her hometown, Baton Rouge with a goal of opening her own salon. As she continued to grow, she knew her calling wasn’t just to be behind the chair but to help grow stylists into becoming successful and independent women doing what they love to do. She wants to empower them 4 YEARS

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by not only teaching them cut/coloring techniques but teach them about business and marketing skills. Today, the salon has a team of nine amazing women (three stylists, three associates in training and three support staff), and is on track for 653% growth from its first year in business. She started building her dream salon in August (photo above) and is opening this November. “We only hope to bring joy to our community and the goal is to put as many smiles on as many faces as we can,” Rachel says. “Being a part of Baton Rouge’s community is such a blessing and I feel there’s something that is very special about this city.” To that end, the salon was extremely generous during COVID-19, matching $10,000 in contributions from the community to donate a total of $20,000 in hair care products to more than 1,000 community health care workers on the front lines. Says Rachel: “We only hope this is the beginning of what this salon can bring to Baton Rouge and can’t wait for you to be a part of it.” 225.328.4998

EGGIESALONSTUDIO.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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WINDOW WORLD WINDOW WORLD is a family-owned local company that has earned the Good Housekeeping Seal. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the business was founded by Jim Roland, a graduate of LSU who often points to the entrepreneurial spirit fostered at LSU as contributing to his success. Window World’s premium quality products include energy-efficient double pane windows, custom made in the U.S. to fit each individual customer’s home, as well as entrance doors and siding. From its beginning in Baton Rouge as a small remodeling company with a dozen employees, the business has expanded to provide services to customers in three states that include major markets such as Houston, Dallas-Fort Worth, New Orleans and Tampa. The company was recognized again this year as the number one window installation company in the U.S. 25 YEARS

8504 AIRLINE HIGHWAY

Newly named President Jerell Thomas took the helm of Roland’s Window World franchises in early 2020 after working closely with his mentor for 16 years. Roland’s sons, Jacob and Macon, work with Thomas day-to-day, with Jacob serving as director of customer service and internal marketing and Macon as corporate production manager. While Thomas is tasked with continuing to build on 25 years of success, he says that he wants the company to be known for more than just sales volume. “We saw firsthand after Katrina how strong the emotional attachment is to our customers’ homes, and it influenced our company culture. We recognize that attachment and strive not only to sell windows, but more importantly, provide individualized customer service,” he says. “My priority as president is keeping each homeowner we interact with as a lifelong customer.” 225.706.2100

WINDOWWORLD-BTR.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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COLLEGIATE ADVISORY PLACEMENT SERVICE

FOUNDED 35 YEARS AGO by a mother, Adele R. Williamson, and her daughter, Nancy W. Cadwallader, Collegiate Advisory Placement Service, or CAPS, assists students and their families in finding the right schools and colleges for them. Having volunteered on college and boarding school campuses for many years and having visited over 500 campuses, Williamson and Cadwallader were urged by school administrators to launch a business and assist families through the process. Cadwallader is a people person—skilled at matching students to schools—and feels this personal contact is one of the most important parts of making the school match. Each school has a personality, just as a student has a personality, and once that trait is matched, academics fall in place. Born, raised and married to a Baton Rouge native, Cadwallader is firmly rooted in the city. Although she

35 YEARS

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graduated from Tulane and her husband graduated from Georgia Tech, both returned to their home base of Baton Rouge to live and raise their family. They feel that Baton Rouge is their home—it’s where their families are, and they love the people, the “small overgrown town” feeling, and the culture in Baton Rouge. When CAPS first began 35 years ago, the admissions process was done on paper. Now all applications, catalogs and the rest of the process are online—even visits to campus have gone virtual. Getting accustomed to the digital world can be challenging, but one must change as change happens. Over the past 15 years, the business has become more digital, but CAPS still values a personal touch and meets with all its students personally. The team also can meet remotely: After students from out of town come to Baton Rouge to meet in person, follow-up meetings can be remote.

225.931.7518

CAPSBR.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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PARKVIEW

BAPTIST SCHOOL PARKVIEW BAPTIST SCHOOL’S Christ-centered college preparatory education for pre-K through grade 12 equips students with the intellectual, spiritual, social, physical, and emotional skills necessary for college, for life, and for eternity. Our exceptional educational program is built on the four As: Abundant Life, Academics, Arts, and Athletics. Each day, our team of nurturing, dedicated faculty support and challenge our students to grow and mature into the individuals God created them to be. For students desiring a rigorous, college preparatory curriculum and a flexible schedule,

40 YEARS

Parkview also offers a Flex Program in Baton Rouge and St. Francisville. Learning coaches monitor student progress daily and our subject-area specialists facilitate students’ content mastery. We are proud to be the only private school in Louisiana to receive national Blue Ribbon School recognition in 2019. We are now welcoming our third generation of students to Parkview, expanding both our facilities and programs, and focusing on building our city’s next generation of citizens committed to Christ and the future of our community. We look forward to showing you everything Parkview has for your family!

5750 PARKVIEW CHURCH ROAD

225.291.2500 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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CITY GROUP HOSPITALITY WITH HOSPITALITY AT the core of everything we do, the City Group Hospitality name in itself conveys the central values held by all of our restaurants. When owner Patrick Valluzzo and managing partner Stephen Hightower are asked what it means to be a part of the brand, they are quick to deem it a true family. Employees are treated like guests; we work as a tightknit team around a culture of Southern hospitality, companionship, generosity, and a dedication to fil ing the Capital City with beloved dishes, while still contributing to the growing food scene with our constant innovations in the kitchen. The City Group Hospitality family is growing, too. We are constantly looking to bring more diversity to our range of restaurants, and have recently added Beausoleil, a familiar culinary name in the city, to our family. The devotion to our firm ideals of unity and integrity in the

3.5 YEARS

138 

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food we make has never been stronger. City Pork Brasserie & Bar, City Slice, City Pork Catering, Rouj Creole, and Beausoleil all represent something unique; they each have a story, and they’re each driven by hard-working teams that work tirelessly to maintain the standard of our restaurants. Stephen Hightower is a Baton Rouge native and an LSU graduate. His roots, and the roots of City Group Hospitality, are deeply embedded in the city’s culture. It means there’s always a friend in all of our restaurants, and that the fl vors and dishes of the city will always be reflected in our food. We’ve grown from one BBQ restaurant on Jefferson Hwy, to an entire group of distinctive restaurants—all bringing something innovative to their tables. In the past 15 years, our range of culinary skill has grown to be something more than we ever imagined and we’re excited to see where it takes us.

225.691.9219

CITYGROUPHOSPITALITY.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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L


Y

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LSU RURAL LIFE MUSEUM THE LSU RURAL LIFE MUSEUM, often referred to as “Louisiana’s best kept secret,” is located on property donated to LSU by Ione, Steele and Pike Burden. Founded in 1970, special care has been taken to preserve the rural setting and feel of “days gone by,” as part of the Burden Family’s vision for the museum and gardens. The Rural Life Museum provides insight into the largely forgotten lifestyles

50 YEARS

4560 ESSEN LANE

and cultures of 18th and 19th century Louisianans. Once voted one of the top 10 open air museums in the world by the British Museum, the LSU Rural Life Museum has the largest collection of Louisiana vernacular architecture and the most extensive collection of material culture from rural Louisiana. The museum curates a collection of over 10,000 artifacts and buildings.

225.765.2437

LSU.EDU/RURALLIFE 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

LOUISIANA BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY CENTER

ESTABLISHED BY CHARLIE D’Agostino on the LSU campus in 1988, the Louisiana Business & Technology Center, or LBTC, now operates from and manages the LSU Innovation Park, a parcel of more than 200 acres of land just south of LSU’s Baton Rouge campus. Tenants at the LSU Innovation Park benefit from ready access to LBTC’s experienced staff, who provide business counseling, networking and advice on access to potential sources of capital. Additionally, LBTC’s Louisiana Technology Transfer Office division manages Louisiana’s SBIR/STTR assistance program, providing counselling and early-stage support for grant proposal preparation to qualified Louisiana-based small businesses. With a focus on providing support and business incubation services to science and technology-based startup companies,

32 YEARS

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8000 INNOVATION PARK DRIVE

LBTC has labs, mixed-use space, and light manufacturing spaces available for rent and land for private development. In mid-2021, a new road will provide direct access to the Park from Nicholson Drive (LA 30). Since its inception, LBTC has played a crucial role in the 225 community and has helped Louisiana entrepreneurs and small businesses obtain more than $185 million in loans, grants, and investments, while helping support and create over 10,000 jobs in Louisiana. In recognition of its support to Louisiana’s entrepreneurial small business community, LBTC was named Incubator of the Year by iNBIA, the International Business Incubation Association. Innovation Park is home to LSU’s Student Incubator as well as Protostripes, a 3D prototyping center where LSU engineering students assist entrepreneurs with bringing their ideas to life.

225.578.7555

LSU.EDU/INNOVATIONPARK

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

PEARL DENTAL GROUP DRS. ANDRE AND Jessica Bruni are part of Baton Rouge tradition of dental comfort and care. They have devoted their professional careers to creating gorgeous smiles and providing comprehensive dentistry using the latest technologies since 2001. In addition to Family Dentistry, Pearl Dental Group provides dental implants, full mouth rehabilitation, porcelain veneers, invisalign and more.

<1 YEAR

4450 BLUEBONNET BLVD., STE. C

Sedation Dentistry is also popular for the anxious patient, allowing them to relax in comfort during dental procedures. Our goal is for you to leave our office with a memorable and enjoyable dental experience, which is why our welcoming and compassionate staff will do everything they can to make you feel right at home. Come experience the Pearl Dental Difference and let our experienced team help you achieve the smile you desire and deserve!

225.256.1163

PEARLDENTALGROUP.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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LIPSEY’S AND HASPEL THE FAMILY AND TEAM at Lipsey’s has proudly been a part of the Baton Rouge community since 1943 when they began in the retail sporting goods business. Today, their current wholesale business continues to expand. In the last 15 years, they’ve expanded their facility, built a new office building, and they are once again adding on to their warehouse to facilitate growth. The culture is what makes Lipsey’s so special. The hiring process is one of the most important aspects of creating the perfect team which is evidenced in their corporate and culture videos. The company has continued to hire new team

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members throughout this growth. They are highly involved in the local community and everyone in the company contributes in some way. Each year they have a March Madness promotion and that month is also dedicated to assisting local charities. They are fortunate to have Haspel, their men’s clothing brand, also located in the company’s headquarters in Baton Rouge which was moved from New York a few years ago. The future is bright for the team, and their unique culture has been a special part of the 225 community for many decades.

7277 EXCHEQUER DRIVE

225.755.1333

LIPSEYS.COM

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE RAY FIRM, LLC THE RAY FIRM LLC is owned and operated by John D. Ray, who has practiced law for over 20 years and specializes in workers’ compensation. He opened his law firm in Baton Rouge in 2016 after years of working for New Orleans and Lafayette based defense firms, serving as Assistant Attorney General for the Louisiana Department of Justice and then serving as the Section Chief of Workers’ Compensation Section of LDJ. In addition to his role as Section Chief, he served as an in-house legal advisor to the Office of Risk Management and the Louisianan Department of Justice regarding legal matters relating to workers’ compensation. John came from humble beginnings, growing up in a very rural and poor part of central Louisiana. He learned from an

4 YEARS

212 LAUREL STREET

early age that a solid work ethic was critical to move forward and succeed. His dream was to open his own law practice and represent the working-class people he had grown up around. Today, John’s dream is a reality. He represents individuals in Greater Baton Rouge and surrounding areas. Along with John’s passion for justice, he also supports the Alzheimer’s Services of the Capital Area’s Walk to Remember. The Ray Firm was founded on John’s ambition and hard work. His story is a reminder that no one should be embarrassed of where they came from because its hard work and perseverance that will get you where you want to be.

225.960.4449

RAYFIRM.NET 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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MAGNET

N

PROGRAMS

2022 202t1in-g applicat ions ccep a ! ow

APPLY ONLINE

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org . t e n g a m www.ebr (225) 922-54 43

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

MEET THE

NEW BOWIE

We’ve got something

FOR EVERYONE NEWLY RENOVATED!

Baton Rouge location - Open 7 Days a Week 8630 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70810 | 225.766.1200 Natchez location: 135 US-61, Natchez, MS 39120 - Closed on Sundays Lake Charles location - Coming in Spring 2021

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For the past nine years, the third generation of the Falcon family of Crowley, Louisiana, has run the Falcon Rice Mill. Always looking forward, the family has taken steps to share Louisiana’s quality rice in the Texas and Mississippi markets. With exciting opportunities to continue expansion already on the horizon, the family couldn’t be more thrilled. Siblings Robert Trahan and Christine Fulton, along with their spouses, continually evaluate the market to ensure that the company thrives over the next 75 years and beyond. “This is a family business, and we want it to stay that way. We always strive to provide a quality product and great customer service. These values will enable us to pass this business onto our children and have a fourth generation be a part of our success,” says Robert Trahan. Today, the Falcon family enjoys getting together and sharing a great meal — and rice is always on the menu. As we believe the best memories are made over a home-cooked meal, please share your stories and experiences with us. We are proud to provide the superior quality found in each bag of Cajun Country Rice. Find us at your favorite grocery store – or shop online at cajuncountryrice.com.

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I N S I D E : Our favorite food photos and past recipes / 225 restaurant reviews explained

The quintessential Baton Rouge dish Sensation Salad

a, e s s et

a s n.

s l, or

COLLIN RICHIE

Baton Rouge culinary

SENSATIONS All the food trends, chefs and openings that changed the Capital City 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Have your prized treasures evaluated FREE by local and regional collection specialists!

20TH ANNUAL

Attic Treasures & Collectibles FREE and open to the public 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. • Saturday, November 14 Main Library at Goodwood • 7711 Goodwood Blvd. Registration is required • Limit 3 items per person • Masks or face coverings are required to attend, and the event will adhere to social distancing protocol.

For more information and to register, call (225) 231-3740.

ebrpl.com | (225) 231-3740 ebrpl.com/DigitalLibrary

Check Out the Library’s FREE Resources for Antiques! The Prices4Antiques Database is used by experts on Antiques Roadshow, and has information drawn from the 50 leading regional auction houses located throughout the United States, plus other selected specialist auctions. Find pictures and sale prices of hundreds of antiques and collectibles offered at auction like vintage advertising, autographs, folk art, clocks & dolls, fine china, sports & war memorabilia, paintings and more!

FREE in the Digital Library at www.ebrpl.com/DigitalLibrary All you need is your Library card to get started!

For more resources on antiques, visit the InfoGuide at https://ebrpl.libguides.com/antiques.

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TA ST E / /

COLLIN RICHIE

IN A LOT OF WAYS, Tsunami helped usher in a more cosmopolitan dining experience in Baton Rouge. Fifteen years later, locals and visitors still get dressed up and flock to the top floor o the Shaw Center for a meal at the sushi restaurant with views of the river (pictured at left and above in our inaugural issue). And it still wins regular kudos from readers in the Best of 225 Awards, nabbing Best Restaurant Design in 2017 and Best Romantic Restaurant in 2019.

A food revolution 15 big trends that reshaped how we dine in the Capital City

All the local options at the Rouses location on Bluebonnet Drive, which opened November 2017.

JULY 2013 RAEGAN LABAT

g,

y

B Y M AG G I E HE Y N R I C H AR DS ON

Expanding grocery and culinary retail options change the way we shop. THE SAME YEAR 225 launched, we saw the much anticipated 2005 opening of Baton Rouge’s Whole Foods Market. It triggered a new era of supermarket and specialty stores, including local spots like Red Stick Spice Co., Iverstine Farms Butcher and Martin Wine Cellar and popular national chains like Sprouts and Trader Joe’s. Meanwhile, independent and international groceries have upped their game, making ingredient sourcing in the Capital Region one satisfying adventure.

“What has struck me is that I can have a chef come in and buy something completely unusual, and then I can have a mom looking for solutions to weeknight dinners.” —Anne Milneck of Red Stick Spice Co. She bought and reinvigorated the spice retail shop in early 2013.

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TA ST E / /

COLLIN RICHIE

Coming in 2021, get your daily dose of

A bartender at Lock & Key, now Hayride Scandal, where cocktails are still meticulously prepared—and the ice cubes are given just as much care, too.

Cocktails get crafty. 225 is giving our readers more good news every day. Read about…

AT HOME, OR in a growing number of trendy watering holes, opportunities for craft cocktails have exploded. Belly up to a vintage bar like Hayride Scandal for a Sidecar or Sour, find high-end spirits t your local independent grocer, and stock your bar cart with small-batch bitters, syrups and mixers from Baton Rouge brand The Cocktail Experiment. Newer restaurants have emphasized thoughtful cocktail menus, too, with eateries like The Vintage and Soji prioritizing their bar programs.

COMMUNITY PEOPLE

FOOD

Baton Rouge goes global.

THINGS TO DO

FASHION For all 225 Daily advertising opportunities, contact Erin Pou today! 225-421-8147 • erinp@225batonrouge.com

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COLLIN RICHIE

CULTURE Soji opened in July 2018 on Government Street.

IT’S HARD TO remember a time when global eating wasn’t ubiquitous in Baton Rouge, but what a difference 15 years makes. Modern Asian spots like Soji, Chow Yum Phat and others are a core component of the local restaurant industry’s new guard. We’ve also seen the arrival of more Vietnamese, Indian and Thai eateries, bubble tea vendors and authentic taquerias. In a given week, you can nosh your way through Salvadoran pupusas, Spanish tapas, Caribbean jerk, Cuban sandwiches, Nigerian Egusi soup and more.

F E B R UA RY 2 0 0 8

“People see us as family. They rely on us not just for the products and food we sell, but they come to us for advice and really see our store as a constant in their daily lives. That makes us feel pretty good.” —Jaime Pineda, owner of La Tiendita on Siegen Lane, from a cover story on Baton Rouge’s increasing Hispanic population. Pineda is originally from Chicago, and his parents moved to the U.S. from Guerrero, Mexico.

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

TA ST E / /

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Pizza grows up.

Pizza is just one part of the experience at Rocca.

COLLIN RICHIE

BEDROCK ESTABLISHMENTS like Fleur de Lis and Pastime have anchored pizza’s longtime popularity in Baton Rouge, but the last decade and a half has welcomed scads of newcomers, including Red Zeppelin, Lit Pizza, Rocca, Reginelli’s, City Slice, Wildwood Pizza and others. Each brings its own special spin on pies. Notable openings continued this year with Pizza Byronz and Fat Boys Pizzeria.

STOCK IMAGE

Gift Card Social media gives restaurants a platform to talk directly to customers. In the last 15 years, restaurateurs went from rolling their eyes at photo-happy diners framing the perfect food shot, to encouraging us to snap, post, link and comment. Instagram and Facebook became fundamental to the operations of all restaurants. They’ve turned chefs into local celebrities. They’ve changed the way dishes are plated, transforming food into viral, shareable content. They’ve also become the first place you’ll see new menu items But they’ve been especially important to smaller, independent eateries, food trucks and pop-up culinary events, all of which have played a big role in Baton Rouge’s gastronomic inventiveness.

The Perfect Gift Laser Hair Removal • Tattoo Removal • Body Contouring Vein, Scar & Stretch Mark Reduction • Botox & Fillers Skin Tightening • Chemical Peels • Microblading

lalaserderm.com | 225-490-9090 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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TA ST E / /

The Capital Region gets its own craft breweries and distilleries.

After opening in 2017 in downtown Baton Rouge, Cane Land Distilling went through a name change to become Three Roll Estate in 2019.

ALLIE APPEL

Starting with Tin Roof Brewing Co. in 2010, Baton Rouge has slowly seen the arrival of more craft breweries, including Southern Craft, Cypress Coast and Rally Cap, with more on the way. Spirits distillers like estate rum producer Three Roll Estate, fruit brandy producer Baton Rouge Distilling, whiskey maker Laissez Versez and Gonzales’ Sugarfield Spirits also made their entrances. It’s all part of a larger trend unfolding statewide.

COLLIN RICHIE

GABRIELLE FELD

Tin Roof was the first on the scene in Baton Rouge, and it’s still a go-to for beer aficionados.

Prepared meals become a go-to. FAMILY LIFE HAS only gotten busier since 2005, and restaurants and caterers have responded with vast options in prepared meals. Bergeron’s City Market and BLDG 5 sell a big variety of frozen meals to go, while City Pork, Maxwell’s Market and others rescue working parents with prepared suppers. Red Stick Spice Co. recently launched monthly dinner bundles with tailored spices and fresh ingredients, and the online business Ingle Eats circulates a popular family catering menu that changes weekly.

Frutta Bowls brought its colorful and healthy smoothie bowls to Nicholson Drive.

Does food taste better in a bowl?

COLLIN RICHIE

The playground of millennials, the curated “foodin-bowls” concept is alive and well in Baton Rouge. Burrito bowls, acai bowls, poke bowls, Buddha bowls, protein bowls and others on the menus of places like Mestizo, and in bowl-dedicated concepts like Southfin Southern oke and Playa Bowls, have us, well, bowled over.

BLDG 5’s market section offers prepared meals to take home.

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GAME-CHANGING GROWTH All rising professionals, executives, and small business owners are invited to join us in taking their leadership up a notch. Business Report’s Executive Leadership Academy is a transformative program that will take your career and your organization to new levels of success.

BUSINESS

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SPRING 2021

BRLeadershipAcademy.com The fact is that to BE A BETTER LEADER, you need to BE A BETTER YOU. Who you are determines how you LEAD and how you lead determines the culture and the organization you CREATE. This is why we started Business Report’s Executive Leadership Academy. – JULIO MELARA, CEO

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TA ST E / /

Farmers markets bring chefs closer to their ingredients.

COLLIN RICHIE

RED STICK FARMERS Market continued its ascent as the Capital City’s premier green market, with amateur cooks and restaurant chefs increasingly prioritizing local ingredients. But other fresh food vehicles emerged, too, including The Market at the Oasis at the former Harb’s Oasis Nursery and Scotland Saturdays in Scotlandville, both of which offer lineups of food and arts vendors. CSAs have gradually become more mainstream, with Fullness Farms, Maranatha Greens, Loup Farms and Luckett Farms among those now offering memberships. Others, such as Grow Baton Rouge and Sweet Jones Farms, have aimed to make healthy food more accessible through services like mobile markets or locally sourced produce boxes.

Green thumbs

Andeab and Mila Berhane of Greenhand Nursery

By Maggie Heyn Richardson

The Red Stick Farmers Market’s best-kept secret just might be this couple that’s been there since the beginning WITH ITS SPRAWLING display of fl wers, heirloom veggie plants and offbeat herbs, Greenhand Nursery is often the first thing people see when they visit the Red Stick Farmers Market. Founders Mila and Andeab Berhane sell their carefully raised herbs and vegetables at both the Thursday and Saturday markets to loyal patrons who like buying local plants as much as they like buying local produce. “The highlight is always talking to the customers,” says Mila, a sustainable agriculture instructor at Southern University’s Department of Agricultural Sciences. “It’s a two-way learning experience. We find out all the different ways people are using our plants in their home cooking, and we share how we use them.” Conversations about global cooking come easy for the Berhanes. Mila is a native of El Salvador, and Andeab is

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from Eritrea. They both love to cook. Before they pack up and leave the market, they often pick up ingredients for that night’s dinner from fellow vendors, Mila says. The couple was part of a core group of growers and agricultural experts who helped plan and launch the farmers market in the mid-’90s. The Berhanes’ booth started with selling tropical plants—something they were wholesaling to local nurseries at the time—but soon added herbs and vegetables. Over the years, they’ve expanded their variety significa tly to accommodate advancements in home cooking. Customers in search of exotic herbs and peppers, heirloom tomatoes and vegetable plants appropriate for Baton Rouge’s humid subtropical climate flock to the Berhanes’ booth for both growing guidance and culinary inspiration.

“In the spring, we’ll have up to 20 different kinds of tomatoes, and in the fall, about 10 different kinds of lettuce. We usually have six or seven different varieties of mint, three or four different basils, and on and on,” Mila says. “People also come to us for hard-to-find pepper plants, too, like Bird’s Eye chilis.” On Saturdays, the Berhanes set up on the south end of the market at Fifth and Main streets, their tidy protrusion of plants welcoming shoppers. At the Thursday market, their booth is near market organizer BREADA’s info table. In between markets, the couple works on different aspects of their business throughout the year. About 10 years ago, Andeab quit his job as an etymologist at a pest control company to focus on the nursery full time. The farmers market is their sole retail outlet. “It’s a year-round operation,” Mila

says. “We do all of our own propagation. The first week in January, we start growing seedlings for spring plants, and in July, we begin our fall seedlings.” Everything the Berhanes sell is appropriate for south Louisiana’s climate. They test plants in their home garden before selling them, Mila says. “We’re very careful about the plants we introduce,” she says. “We make sure that they are going to perform, and that they won’t become invasive.” This fall, look for several different varieties of greens, as well as carrots, turnips, beets, Swiss chard, kale, arugula and multiple lettuces. Fall herbs, including cilantro, dill, parsley, fennel and others will also be in good supply. Greenhand also sells fl wers for pollinator gardens, including milkweed and other plants. Find Greenhand Nursery on Facebook

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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SCAFFOLD INSULATION ABATEMENT SPECIALTY SURFACE PREP AND COATINGS ROPE ACCESS MECHANICAL TURNAROUNDS AND PROJECTS FIREPROOFING REFRACTORY

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sales@bartlett.group

(855) 804-4443

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TA ST E / /

Chefs keep plant-based diners in mind.

COLLIN RICHIE

NO, WE’LL NEVER lose our meat-loving ways, but plantbased options are solidly in the mainstream thanks to 15 years of gradual progress. Dedicated vegetarian and vegan eateries MJ’s Café and Vegan Friendly Foods are now joined by many, many restaurants—upscale and fast casual—that have added flavorful menu options specifically for vegetarian and vegan diners— and not the afterthought kind. Gluten-free and keto options are also on the rise.

The Zesty Kale salad with smoky-sweet coconut bacon and more vegetarian delights at MJ’s Cafe

DECEMBER 2018

“I just want to give an alternative to fast food restaurants. You can still have those types of food, but there can be a healthier version of it that still tastes good.” —Cornelius Roy, who opened Vegan Friendly Foods on Bennington Avenue in 2018

Design becomes part of the whole restaurant experience.

Blue Corn Modern Mexican covered a full wall of its Essen Lane location with an eye-catching mural.

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GONE IS THE mammoth dining room with staid décor that dominated local restaurants of the past, and in its place are stylish eateries with modern trappings. Bright murals like those at Blue Corn Modern Mexican and Cafe Mimi are commonplace, as are rustic woods, intricate metalwork, trendy color palettes and mood lighting. More rooftop dining spaces are now in play, as seen at Bumsteers and The Chimes, and outdoor dining continues to grow, with open-air spots like Mid City Beer Garden and COVID-19 pandemicfueled patio expansions at eateries like Zippy’s and the Overpass Merchant.

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Issue Date: October Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received by the close of business today. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

TA ST E / /

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Barbecue gets its own Baton Rouge flavor.

TESTIMONIAL

NO LONGER IS Baton Rouge a barbecue hinterland overshadowed by Texas, Memphis and the Carolinas. Several new spots, including Hannah Q, City Pork, BRQ, Cou-Yon’s, Pimanyoli’s, Pit and Peel, Memphis Mac BBQ and others opened in the last 15 years, placing the Capital City on the map for technique-driven, hardwood-smoked meats and homemade sauces and sides.

COLLIN RICHIE

Cou-Yon’s has won national acclaim for its barbecue.

“One of the best rehabilitation centers in the entire state; it is one of the reasons why my son is sober today. They gave him the tools he needed to fight against his addiction. The way they help is unique for they preach by example. What better way than a former addict to help one who is in recovery? They helped my son become the man he is today; I do not know how to pay them back! He has changed in body and soul, so thank you Serenity Treatment Center for giving my son back his life and for showing him that he could overcome the addiction and now he can lead a wonderful life.” —Parent of a Serenity Treatment Center Patient

We’ll take that to-go, please. EVEN BEFORE THE coronavirus turned us into homebodies, delivery apps and to-go ordering had become big. Louisiana-born Waitr led the way in our firm emb ace of third-party delivery apps that also include GrubHub, UberEats and others. In response to controversy over the app’s high commission fees, we’ve seen more restaurants launching their own online ordering portals and apps. And some, like Red Zeppelin and Serop’s Express, do a lot of business through drive-thru windows.

Right here, Right now, Life changes for the better Addiction Recovery and Treatment Center

“It was tough the first 10 years. Back then, it wasn’t like it was today where people are willing to try new foods. It took us a while to learn what people would like.” —Vasken Kaltakdjian, of Serop’s, in an story about the growth of Lebanese cuisine in Ichiban co-owner Randy Wong says he sees automation through delivery apps becoming Baton Rouge

COLLIN RICHIE

AUGUST 2010

225.361.0899 • On call 24 hr. 225.241.9471

Baton Rouge, LA • www.serenitycenterla.com

more prevalent in his business.

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TA ST E / /

DON’T CONFUSE THIS national trend with fast food. Baton Rouge has fully embraced restaurants that fuse counter ordering and speedy service with imaginative menus. Try it at concepts like Chow Main, Too Saucy Pasta, Atomic Burger, Torchy’s Tacos, Curbside Burgers and Small Sliders.

IE

HIE RIC

TW ORK

LIN

CH RI

NE

C OL

IN LL

D

Made-to-order meals go fast casual.

CO

FO O

FreshJunkie has long been a popular fast-casual spot for locals, serving up healthy salads and wraps.

WE’VE WATCHED AN impressive number of Baton Rouge chefs and food personalities cook on national television, elevating their own profiles and the Capital City’s reputation as a food town. Blogger and restaurateur Jay Ducote competed on Cutthroat Kitchen, was runner up in Season 11 of Next Food Network Star and Chris actually beat Bobby Motto Flay on Beat Bobby Flay. We saw Mansurs Executive Chef Chris Motto fare impressively on Fox’s Hell’s Kitchen. We rooted for Baton Rouge native Chef Jesse Romero in Season 6 of Fox’s MasterChef, and for then 9-year-old Avery Kyle, who was runner up on Season 4 of MasterChef Junior. And we saw life unfold for restaurateurs Samantha and Cody Carroll, founders of Hot Tails in New Roads and the now-closed Sac-a-Lait in New Orleans, who starred in the Food Network’s reality show, Cajun Aces.

Jay Ducote

TE SY

COLLIN RICHIE

Chefs step into the spotlight.

UR CO

Samantha and Cody Carroll

JOIN BREC TENNIS FOR

Holiday Tennis Camps !

BREC Tennis camps range for ages 4-16 and are sure to have something for all skill levels!

REGISTRATION DEADLINES:

Thanksgiving Camp

NOV. 21

Winter Camp

dec. 18

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Camps during the Thanksgiving + Winter Holidays at these Tennis Centers:

» City-Brooks Community park » Highland Road Community park » Independence Community park

To register + MORE INFO BREC.ORG/TENNIS 225-923-2792

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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FO O

D

NE

TW ORK

EBR SCHOOLS CREATE

Specialized Curriculums

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Learn more about EBR Magnet Programs and apply online at ebrmagnet.org. Applications are open through December 2, 2020.

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TA ST E / /

SEPTEMBER 2013

PICTURE THIS

Feast your eyes Some of our favorite food photos from the ‘225’ archives

Food porn: The early 2010s were a turning point on the local food scene, with the likes of Beausoleil dishing out elevated takes on Southern fare. That also meant we had to up our photography game with shots like this thanks to Collin Richie.

Such style We can’t talk about food photography without talking about the work of photographer Amy Shutt and recipe writer Tracey Koch, who cook, style and shoot our “Dining In” recipes each month (such as this classic strawberry pie from June 2014). Turn to page 168 for more on how it all comes together.

AUGUST 2008

More to Tony’s Seafood than crawfish: David Gallent captured blue crab season at the North Baton Rouge seafood spot.

DECEMBER 2013

AUGUST 2015

That’s hot: Fried kasseri cheese gets flambéed tableside with the help of Zorba’s Bistro co-owner Dinos Economides, and Amy Shutt captured the pyrotechnics.

Everything and the kitchen ink: For a story on tattoos in chef culture, we asked then-City Pork chef Ryan Andre for the deets on his 25 tattoos, captured by Collin Richie.

APRIL 2017

Getting the scoop: Writer Kaci Yoder scooped and styled some City Gelato into cones for Collin Richie to shoot against a colorful background.

JUNE 2015

Shucking good time: A Jolie Pearl employee shucked oysters for a restaurant review shoot by Amy Shutt.

APRIL 2017

Take a bite: It’s burgers for days at Curbside, photographed by Collin Richie for our restaurant review.

DECEMBER 2016

Take one: We wanted to illustrate just how big Strand’s Cafe’s cinnamon rolls truly are. Luckily, local Kia Bickham had just walked in and became an impromptu hand model for this shot by Collin Richie.

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TA ST E / / SEPTEMBER 2018

Rainbow bright: Editor Jennifer Tormo dug through antique stores in Baton Rouge and Denham Springs to gather this collection of vintage colored glassware. Photographer Raegan Labat brought a prism to the shoot to get all the gorgeous shadows and reflections.

DECEMBER 2017

Cooking school: Nino’s chef and owner Elton Hyndman taught managing editor Benjamin Leger how to make a simple delight: spaghetti peperoncino, photographed by Collin Richie.

JULY 2018

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TA ST E / /

MAY 2019

Keeping up the tradition: Collin Richie photographed Tio Javi’s Maria Perez while she made fresh tortillas for the restaurant. She had been making them by hand at that location since 1993, when it was still Ninfa’s.

SEPTEMBER 2018

It’s all good: Collin Richie went behind the scenes to see how Frank’s flaky, buttery biscuits get made.

OCTOBER 2019

Short stuff Staff riter Cynthea Corfah taste-tested the offerings at Smalls Sliders, and intern Taylor Moran took the brilliantly lit photo.

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #3

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TA ST E / /

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

R E S TA U R A N T R E V I E W

Everyone’s a critic So, who is our secret reviewer? We’re not telling, but here’s how it all comes together

By Benjamin Leger

openings and older ones that might FIRST OFF: IT’S not me. Really. need a revisit because of a new chef or Though I edit the 225 Taste section revamped menu. We refer to a master each month and I often show up at list of every review that’s appeared in restaurants with photographer Collin the magazine to make sure we aren’t Richie to shoot the dishes we review repeating ourselves or circling the for the magazine, I’m not the one same neighborhood too frequently. We penning those critiques. try to give brand-new restaurants a And it’s not 225’s longtime food grace period to work out the kinks. writer Maggie Heyn Richardson, Most importantly, we don’t either. announce our visit to the restaurants. In fact, I can confid ntly They, like you, have no idea who say you haven’t seen our the secret critic is, and thus, restaurant reviewer’s real they won’t be driven to offer name on a byline in this special attention, fuss over magazine. Though, the plating or have a table as the text under D.J. Number of reviews ready immediately. Beauticia’s byline each filed by our sec et That way, our critic can month declares, this reviewer assess the dining experience is someone who knows the same way any diner would. the local food scene inside Once the review is submitted, and out. we contact the restaurant and request Our critic has also reviewed more to photograph whatever has been than 100 restaurants in the Capital sampled. Region within these pages since May We’re sometimes asked why we 2012. (And to the joy of this editor, has don’t run negative reviews. We’re also never missed a deadline.) not out to burn anyone. When our To decide which restaurants to reviewer has a horrible experience, review, we talk regularly about new

100

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On dining out Our secret reviewer dishes on the changing local food scene AS A TEENAGER, I would often pass my evenings at Louie’s Cafe. I didn’t know it at the time, but the late nights surrounded by the sights and smells of the beloved diner would help further the growing passion I had for food. I’ve lived in Baton Rouge my entire life. In that time I’ve seen such vast changes to this city’s food scene that it almost seems incomprehensible. Having spent my adulthood exploring edible delicacies all over the globe, I’m gratified to now have many of those world enchantments right here at home. Long before I ever left our shores, though, I got my first taste of international food right here in Baton Rouge: Rama Thai Kitchen. (RIP, old friend.) I soon expanded my taste buds along Florida Boulevard by way of Vinh Phat, the Vietnamese market. Before I could blink, a variety of other Vietnamese restaurants opened up to me, furthering my obsession with the city’s global offerings. In the years since, Baton Rouge has seen an explosion of culinary options. While some came before their time, others were right on schedule. The dining experience has changed in decor as well as cuisine, though not always for the betterment of conversation. Sadly gone are the tablecloths and background music, replaced instead Our reviewer (not pictured) has visited the city’s fanciest and more casual dining spots, by hard surfaces and all the noise that like Elsie’s Plate & Pie in April 2018. reverberates off t. My ears are ringing thanks to a fun, engaged server; a flavors through the interpretative just thinking about it. Slowly, though, friendly, knowledgeable bartender; talents of individual chefs as well as local restaurants are coming to their and staff ho remember you and your the much-appreciated opinions of senses and seeing that patrons actually particulars. Those things more than front-of-house staff. I’ve learned to ask want to converse with their table comthe food itself bring me back to certain not what is most popular, but rather panions using their “inside voices.” establishments again and again. what’s the most interesting or Dessert options are becoming a Chefs around the city are pushing “What’s your favorite?” highlight of many menus with the envelope. Though patrons ask so The most important thing a wide variety of interestmuch of them, they now ask even I’ve learned is not to become ing options. Yet still I’m more of us. They ask us to educate too attached to any restaurant finding that one of the only ourselves and know where our food for any reason (staff, chefs, in-house sweets offered comes from. We are asked to appreciate the restaurant itself) since so is bread pudding. Can we the changes in seasons through everoften they can come and go. I move past this? It’s time to evolving menus. They ask us to open now ponder a great meal realizing bring on in-house pastry chefs By D.J. Beauticia that it might not be there the next our minds and explore new delights. at area establishments to remedy Most importantly, they ask us to trust time I crave it. that situation and offer new ideas. them to take us on a journey using all I’ve learned that if we want the Another thing that would be five senses. culinary institutions that enthrall us appreciated: an authentic Korean This city that I love and this to not only survive but thrive, we must restaurant. Perhaps a Cuban sandwich magazine I write for have been through visit often and encourage others at shop and more African options, too? much in my short tenure. What every opportunity to do the same. Just saying. Let’s make these happen. dynamic changes await us on the And I’ve learned that a good meal Since I became a restaurant horizon? Only time will tell. can be elevated, made great and more reviewer with 225, I’ve had so many memorable by a remarkable experience opportunities to experience interesting

COLLIN RICHIE

we don’t run the story. (Though I can count on one hand the number of times that’s happened.) We’ll be honest and critical, but never with an aim to ruin a local business. Plus, what use is a bunch of gorgeous food photos if we’re telling you it’s disgusting? Prior to D.J. Beauticia’s reign, the restaurant review process was a little more complicated. We began with more general coverage of the restaurant industry in 2005, and shifted to include critical reviews in 2008. From then to early 2012, a rotating team of three unnamed reviewers visited the same restaurant and filed separate takes on the meal. They each gave their recommendations, dishes to avoid and an overall rating. It became difficult over time to get all three reviewers to the same spot and deliver their reviews by deadline each month, so 225 opted for D.J. Beauticia’s single, expert opinion in 2012. And considering how popular our food coverage has become—we now have two weekly 225 Dine newsletters in addition to the Taste section every month—I think it’s safe to say the community has discovered the delicious options the city has to offer and continues to celebrate it every day. Let’s keep digging in!

?

Sampling the dishes at the former Al Noor Indian Cuisine on O’Neal Road, now Swagat Indian Cuisine. AMY SHUTT

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TA ST E / /

A roasted turkey stuffed with boudin was the entree for the November 2012 issue, shot in Tracey Koch’s dining room.

DINING IN

Home cooking

By Benjamin Leger // Photos by Amy Shutt

How the magazine’s monthly recipe feature comes together WHEN I WAS told back in 2012 that part of my job would include editing a monthly collection of recipes for 225’s food section, I had my worries that I could screw this up majorly. I wasn’t much of a cook or baker then, and what would happen if I accidentally printed the wrong ingredients? What if a little old lady in Broadmoor called to complain the proportions were incorrect? Fortunately, those recipes each month come from someone with much more experience in the kitchen: Tracey Koch. She’s a chef, cooking instructor, author and has been writing and testing the recipes for 225’s “Dining In” feature since May 2012—along with the help of her sister and Business Report editor Stephanie Riegel.

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In their hands, the readers get clear and simple instructions on a variety of dishes, and I’m free to move on to my favorite part of the process: shooting the dishes with Tracey and photographer Amy Shutt. Once a month, we gather at Tracey’s Southdowns home with plates and bowls, poster boards and on-theme dinner napkins in tow. You might not know it from the images that appear in these pages, but they are all shot in Tracey’s home: at the breakfast table, at the more formal dinner table, on the concrete kitchen counters and even outside on the back porch. Amy has been known to climb a step ladder or chair in wedge sandals in order to get the perfect shot of the spread.

I’ve raided Tracey’s china cabinets for interesting dishes or silverware to use, and by now I know her kitchen as well as my own. And with each month’s menu, Tracey has continued to surprise with her fresh ideas and takes on recipes people in south Louisiana might think they know by heart. She can make the most complicated dishes seem less intimidating, and she’s always game to try her hand at international cuisines. She’s also not above scolding me if I try to throw on a garnish that doesn’t belong during a photo shoot. And that’s why I’ll always leave the recipes and the final say to Tracey, 225’s cooking pro.

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Eggs Sardou from April 2014

COLLIN RICHIE

TA ST E / /

Mock Turtle Soup from December 2019

Shrimp Lo Mein from January 2019

Setting the scene Lighting, props and a couple other tricks have helped create fancy dinners and brunches, casual picnics, family meals, holidays, tailgates and spreads that call to mind international destinations.

A dinner celebrating Mardi Gras colors from February 2017

An outdoor picnic spread from May 2019

Mixing up a Champagne cocktail in December 2012

Assembling blueberry turnovers for July 2013

Working with your hands

Stirring a Roasted Sweet Potato Bisque for October 2012

It’s not all just about the plating. Our photo shoots for “Dining In” also include some process shots of Tracey preparing the dishes, to give readers a visual of how the more complicated ones are made.

Topping cinnamon rolls in September 2017

Steaming fish in parchment in June 2014

Prepping crawfish tamales in March 2013

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TA ST E / /

Tracey’s favorites

TIME SURE FLIES when you’re having fun, and—well, except for a few weather events and the challenges of 2020—the past several years dining in with 225 have been a lot of fun for us. We hope for you, as well. In honor of the magazine’s anniversary issue, we’ve pulled together some of our favorite recipes Tracey Koch that we created for this column, which was no small task. We had more than 245 of Tracey’s original creations from which to choose, and it was hard to pick just a few favorites. So, we selected those that we personally like best or that have generated the most positive feedback from our readers over the years. You can find them and more of our favorite recipes on 225batonrouge.com. With the holidays just around the corner, we primarily focused on seasonally appropriate dishes, though we also included some classics that can be enjoyed year round. We love what we do and who we do it for: our faithful readers. So please keep reading and cooking!

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Ladling Crawfish Bisque for a September 2014 shoot

Some of Tracey’s Southern favorites that would be perfect for a November night. Head to 225batonrouge.com/recipes for these recipes and more picks from Tracey.

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—TRACEY KOCH AND STEPHANIE RIEGEL

Fare for fall

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MY

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Bread Pudding Souffle with Bourbon Sauce from January 2014

CMY

Green Goddess Salad from December 2018

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Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Cane Syrup and Bacon from November 2018

Crawfish Bisque from September 2014

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Quick Classic French Boulle from January 2018

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LH_225_one-page_november_02.pdf

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CULTURE I N S I D E : Big moments in the arts / BR celebrities

Featuring: Roxi Victorian, part of our 2016 “People to Watch” class now starting a Black professional dance company in Baton Rouge

Making moves

COLLIN RICHIE

How the local arts scene has grown in 15 years

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J U LY 2 0 1 6 | V O L . 2 | I S S U E 1

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C U LT U R E / /

The creative spark

BY BENJAM I N L EGER

Important moments on the local arts scene

Melanie Couvillon Executive director, Manship Theatre manshiptheatre.org

15 years ago: Starting her first year as executive director of Playmakers of Baton Rouge

FILE PHOTO

FILE PHOTO

Tell us about the Shaw Center during its 2005 opening: “When the Shaw Center opened, I was there for all the festivities and the tours. Even though I wasn’t at Manship yet, I was able to see firsthand their vision o what they wanted the theater to be. I remember doing these tours, and they talked about how the Manship stage is perfect for small dance ensembles and small chamber orchestras. They kept talking about all the things this theater could do on a smaller scale—they wanted it to be a real intimate space. Jump forward, and the next thing you know the B-52s are on stage, and we’ve had these enormous shows and brought in professional dance companies that aren’t small in any shape or form. I really don’t think they anticipated growing the way we did and bringing in the caliber of artists we bring in on a regular basis.”

Attendees at the 2006 Art Melt held at the Shaw Center

Underground art gains traction (ongoing) AN INDICATION OF a healthy arts scene is all the smaller groups—even the short-lived ones— that pop up and add their flavor to the gumb . The last 15 years have seen plenty of that, with the likes of the collectives 4484, Elevator Projects and others. Culture Candy’s online arts calendar helped under-the-radar art shows get their due. And its Uncommon Thread wearable art show was always a hit. The Stabbed in the Art pop-ups and Ephemeral Gallery provided outlets for artists who might not get into major galleries. Meanwhile, we started to see underground art garner more legitimate support around the city. Elevator Projects took over an entire floor o the Chase Tower South in 2014 for an exhibit of more than 80 artists. And since 2008, Baton Rouge Gallery has hosted the city’s weirdest and funkiest art exhibit and costume party with Surreal Salon.

What’s been the most surprising thing you’ve seen happen on the local arts scene? “What I’ve noticed now is that so many people have said, ‘I can’t wait to come back and see a live show. I miss that so much.’ I feel that way, too. I can’t wait to walk on stage and introduce an act or a band. I’m hoping in 15 years that’s old hat and we’re back to normal for people of all ages.”

FORUM 35’S ART Melt began as a small juried art competition in 2003 and soon turned into the biggest summer event in Baton Rouge and the largest juried show in the state. As it grew, it also faced some controversy, including a 2009 show where organizers pulled down a black-andwhite photograph of a nude woman at the request of some attendees and to the outrage of others. The incident brought up important questions of whether the conservative Capital City was ready to support serious art. Still, Art Melt continued its run until 2019, when a partnership with the Arts Council morphed the event into Art Flow as part of the Ebb & Flow Festival weekend held annually in April.

A full floor of Chase Tow er South played host to works by more than 80 artists in 2014.

Blake Hernandez and Chelsea Norris at Baton Rouge Galler y’s Surreal Salon in 2016 FILE PHOTO

THE TURNING POINT of modern attempts to revitalize downtown can be traced to the opening of the Shaw Center for the Arts in 2005. The shimmering futuristic facility seemed to usher in a new identity for Baton Rouge that was hip, cool and brimming with activity. Housing the Manship Theatre, Glassell Gallery and the new home of the LSU Museum of Art, nearly every weekend saw a new cultural event in its performance spaces and on its rooftop terrace. Another boon: muchneeded office space for small a ts groups and nonprofits

Art Melt comes into its own (2003-now)

MIRIAM BUCKNER

Shaw Center brings cultural events and opportunities to downtown (2005)

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C U LT U R E / /

JAN UAR Y 2016

FRE E

GET YOUR RUN ON

Moving forward

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.COM

By Benjamin Leger

Roxi Victorian’s plan for a Black dance company is another step in her vision of a Baton Rouge dance revolution

JANUARY 2016 Victorian was featured on the cover of our 2016 “People to Watch” issue

PEOPLE WA 2016

to

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TCH

C A P I TA L

R E G I O N

COLLIN RICHIE

WHEN SHE MOVED to Baton Rouge in her late 20s, dancer Roxi Victorian often saw herself as the only Black performer in local companies. Coming from Washington, D.C., Victorian had a lengthy resume including Julliard, Howard University and The International School of Ballet. In Baton Rouge, she says, the Alvin Aileys, the Ronald K. Browns and other Black-focused dance movements were missing. “Often with dance here, you would have one or two or at most four minority dancers in the company,” she says. “That wasn’t speaking to me culturally or speaking to my own personal experience.” Nearly 10 years after moving to Baton Rouge—during which she ran her own dance studio and taught at McKinley Middle School—Victorian says she’s paid her dues as a dancer and educator in the community. Now it’s time to build a professional dance company of her own that’s focused specific lly on Black dancers. Nyama Contemporary Dance Company will get off o a big start next year as one of the arts companies in residence at the Arts Council’s new Cary Saurage Community Arts Center. Though Victorian was responsible for the launch of the Baton Rouge Hip Hop Festival in 2011, she wants to be clear that Nyama isn’t about urban dance. It’s also not a dance studio. “It’s not a Monday through Friday thing, where people can come and take classes,” she says. “It’s invitation-only for professional dancers. We’re trying to present something new and contemporary and present a voice not currently heard in our community.” Victorian started gathering her small group of six dancers just before the COVID-19 stay-at-home order began, along with Executive Director Jonathan Blackwell. Not wanting to lose momentum during the shutdown, they saw each other for three to four hours of work on weekends, then would disband for two weeks. During that time apart, they’d still connect on Zoom and through email to share their work and choreography. The one-two punch of the pandemic and this summer’s social unrest following George Floyd’s death would

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Dancers Julian Guillory, Kerrington Griffin and April Bell flank Artistic Director Roxi Victorian and Executive Director Jonathan Blackwell of Nyama Contemporary Dance Company.

have placed more obstacles in front of any fl dgling performing arts group. But Victorian was instead emboldened to keep moving as she sought support for her company. “The need to support Black professionals, Black business—we thought prior to that movement we’d have to explain what we were trying to do. I now feel like I have to explain a little less,” Victorian says. “There’s always that question of whether me supporting a Black business is that I’m anti-something else, and the answer is a resounding ‘no.’ I grew up being the only Black dancer most of the time. I wanted to give minority artists a platform, a place where they can

collaborate.” And the Nyama dancers intend to share that platform with the public beginning in 2021 with the goal of at least two local performances a year. By year two or three, Victorian hopes to add a third performance at national or international conferences in order to share the talent of Baton Rouge with a broader audience. Through providing the Black community with an outlet for contemporary, professional dance, Victorian sees it as a way to improve Baton Rouge as a whole. “I want young dancers to see there is a home base company that could actually lend itself to their

needs. While it’s a lofty goal, I’d love for Baton Rouge to set an example, because I believe in our community that much. I believe that opening this space and allowing all voices to be heard artistically is something we can do in a really rich and full manner.” And as for the origin behind the company’s name? Victorian says “Nyama” is Swahili for “flesh.” Victorian grew up in a Baptist household and was inspired by a much-quoted phrase in the Bible: “The world became fle h.” “All of that preliminary work, that was the word,” she says, “and this dance movement is it becoming flesh.” nyamadance.com

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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EXCLUSIVE DIGITAL EDITION

ed 2016 ssue

Here’s your de nitive guide to getting out during a pandemic. Check it out at 225batonrouge.com or scan here S P O N S O R E D B Y:

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C U LT U R E / /

Nonprofits didn’t flinch during the pandemic. Thank them with donation on Baton Rouge’s first organized Giving Day. Your contribution will help them win a share of $500,000 in incentives.

JORDAN HEFLER

Build Community. Ignite Action.

FILE PHOTO

The crowd at SoGo Live in 2006

December 1, 2020

PHOTOS BY ERIN PARKER SKINNER

Kristin Diable plays a set at Dyson House Listening Room in 2016

Taylor Swift and Keith Urban play to a packed Tiger Stadium in 2010.

Bayou Country Superfest begins (2010)

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WE ADMIT IT, 225 poked fun at the prospect of a major country music festival in Baton Rouge when it was first announced Why here and not Nashville or Texas? But the inaugural Bayou Country Superfest in 2010 showed the city and event organizers were onto something. Crowds of cowboy boot-wearing music lovers poured into Tiger Stadium to see Keith Urban, Taylor Swift, Kenny Chesney and Brooks & Dunn perform. The caliber of country music stars only continued after that, with a peak attendance of 135,000 in 2014. That was until the festival moved to the Superdome in 2017 for two years while Tiger Stadium underwent updates. A return in 2019 never matched the original appeal, with only about 50,000 attendees, and organizers announced in January 2020 that it would go on hiatus.

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #1 C U LT U R E / /

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

The shifting landscape of music venues (ongoing) AT BATON ROUGE’S heart, it’s still a small city with a small music scene, and that means music venues come and go. Some went away tragically, like The Caterie, the Acadian-Perkins Plaza hub for college-crowd shows that burned down in a New Year’s Day fi e in 2010. In contrast, Chelsea’s used a New Year’s Eve 2015 party with Michael Foster Project to bid farewell to its patrons. Others promised to come back but have yet to return, like the Spanish Moon, which closed indefinitely for renovations in 2017. Mid City Ballroom has since taken up the banner for indie shows. Others have morphed into something new, like Dyson House Listening Room, which shuttered its Jefferson Highway location in 2018 but was reincarnated as an intimate regular series at Zeeland Street in 2019. Downtown has been a revolving door of venues over the years, too, like SoGo Live, Red Star and Roux House. And now we’re hoping places like The Basin Music Hall and Squeaky Pete’s can survive state regulations that came during the pandemic.

John Gray

Musician, Michael Foster Project Find the band on Facebook 15 years ago: Just finished his second degree in music performance at Southern, substitute teaching part time and playing gigs with the Michael Foster Project What’s been the most surprising thing you’ve seen happen in the local arts scene? “There’s really been no expansion into the variety in which venues have been opening up. As far as the venues are concerned, they’ve been very generic. Which is why so many places open and shut down. Everybody is trying to cater to the 25-year-old crowd.” How do you see yourself growing in the next 15 years? “I think the Project is going to continue doing what it does, which is performing. We’ll continue being that particular band and doing things our own way. Even though we’re getting older, we’re continuously getting new younger crowds. We’ve played for people while they’re in college, then played years later at their wedding. For myself, I look forward to new projects. I ventured out and started playing with bands in New Orleans. Now, I’m knocking out this graduate degree in music.”

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The Red Stick’s film industry boom (2008-2015) WHERE WERE YOU when The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn filmed in B ton Rouge? Parts one and two of the insanely popular series’ final installment filmed ound the city in 2010-2011. It was a big win for us, and the state saw more than 75 applications for film p ojects in the first hal of 2010 alone. Sightings of Patrick Dempsey, Liv Tyler, Ashley Judd, Tom Cruise and others became a regular activity. And with Celtic Media Centre launching in 2008, Baton Rouge was primed to be the true Hollywood South until uncertainty about the state’s tax incentives sparked a downturn in 2015. Those tax incentives have since returned in a modified form And the positives can still be seen in businesses like the local Crafty Apes visual effects company, which has worked recently with Steven Spielberg, and the big-budget Tom Hanks war drama Greyhound, which filmed he e in 2018.

Katie Pryor

Executive director, Baton Rouge Film Commission filmbatonrouge.com 15 years ago: Was a year out of college and working in marketing and public relations What were your hopes when you joined the film commission? “I started in April 2017, before the new tax incentives for film p oductions went into effect in July. It was kind of a nail-biting time. Since then, my goal has been to make young people aware of opportunities and how to approach them, because you can get a degree in film but you can also work on a set and work your way up. We also have to make sure filmma ers are

aware of their access to the tax incentives. We need to support locals who want to work in the film industry and lower the threshold for local filmma ers to be a part of this.” What’s been the most surprising thing during your tenure? “A lot of my film work in the beginning was in New Orleans. I didn’t realize what a community of film the e was in Baton Rouge until I got into it a bit more. The incentive program was incredible because of what it did to reinvest in the community.” 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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C U LT U R E / /

RI CH

Managing artistic director, Theatre Baton Rouge theatrebr.org

IE

Jenny Ballard

IN LL CO

COLLIN RICHIE

COURTESY THE WALLS PROJECT

15 years ago: Was an artistic and education director in Knoxville, Tennessee

A young participant in Walls Project’s MLK Day cleanup and beautification activities

California street artist Chor Boogie painted this piece at Myrtle Walk in 2013.

Walls Project and street art get taken more seriously (2012) BACK IN 2008, 225’s “Ugly Award” feature called out graffiti and st eet art as a nuisance more associated with gang activity than legitimate art. Then something changed. The Walls Project launched in 2012 with Saliha Staib and Clark Derbes’ geometric design on the side of a law firm o f Third Street. Soon, every property owner downtown with a blank wall wanted in on the action. Meanwhile that same year in Old South Baton Rouge, art aficionado evin Harris was quietly orchestrating a beautifi cation project of his own. Through his Museum of Public Art, he funded some of the biggest street artists in the world to leave their marks on dilapidated buildings along Myrtle Walk and nearby blocks. While Harris’ endeavors have since slowed down, the Walls Project has blossomed into a community nonprofit with p ograms for young people, an urban farming arm and the MLK Fest, which keeps its street art origins alive.

What was something you hoped to do as a member of the Baton Rouge arts community back then? “When I joined Theatre Baton Rouge in 2014, I wanted to grow our younger audience base. I thought it was important to get students involved. We have gotten a lot of younger volunteers and actors. Another objective has been to diversify the theater. Historically speaking we have not been. We recently created a diversity, equity and inclusion committee during the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement to serve all people.” What’s been the most surprising thing you’ve seen happen in the local arts scene? “I think the positive surprise that came out of the pandemic was how quickly we were able to adapt and pivot. We as a community and theater showed resilience. This September, when we did American Son, we sold out every show. The community was very willing to come to the theater. I’m always surprised at how overwhelming the support is from our community. We live in a place with very lovely people who have proved theater in Baton Rouge is necessary.”

Baton Rouge Little Theater becomes Theatre Baton Rouge (2013)

Fairleigh Jackson Executive director, Preserve Louisiana preserve-louisiana.org

How do you see the Baton Rouge arts scene growing in the next 15 years. How do we thrive? “I see it growing to expand what we recognize as culture, beyond just our visual and performing arts or preservation, to include the stories of our communities. That is what we strive to achieve in historic preservation. By celebrating the stories of our artists and culture-bearers, we can then strengthen pride in our community. Included in that is diversity, and celebrating all the different cultures we have as artists. We need more business investment in the arts and culture communities. We need businesses to realize the very real economic impact that arts and culture has on our community, and maybe that is a silver lining of the pandemic. When our cultural entities suffer, the community suffers. They are the incentives for people coming to visit, relocate or stay here. It’s a really important part of what makes the community appetizing. I think we need our businesses to step up, and we need support on the local level, from our mayor and Metro Council.”

LOCALS CAN BE forgiven for still referring to it as Baton Rouge Little Theater—it had that name since 1951. But the local theater company proved it wasn’t so little anymore with a name change in 2013 that reflected its p ominence and popularity in the community. It’s now one of the oldest community theaters in the country, and consistently brings crowd-pleasing big-stage musicals, such as Newsies and Cabaret, along with more intimate plays to eager audiences every season.

Strolling the neighborhood at Ogden Park Prowl

Ogden Park Prowl launches (2013) THERE’S NOTHING LIKE a neighborhood party, and the Ogden Park neighborhood in Mid City proved that in 2013. Homeowners opened their yards to artists to set up booths and sell their wares, or let local musicians stage concerts on their front porches. That fall weekend has become a must-do event for not just the neighborhood, but people across the city who stroll down Bedford and Beverly drives all afternoon and afterparty it up at Radio Bar later.

Spring festival season gets legit (2013) JORDAN HEFLER / COURTESY BATON ROUGE BLUES FESTIVAL

What did Preserve Louisiana look like in 2005? “It was the Foundation for Historical Louisiana, and was doing much of the same work that we are doing now. But in the past 15 years, it’s expanded to be a more inclusive approach to preservation, telling the full narrative, and working on preservation for all communities. We’ve also expanded our work in the Old Governor’s Mansion.”

FILE PHOTO

15 years ago: Living in Asheville, North Carolina, working full time as a ceramic artist

THOUGH THE BATON Rouge Blues Festival began in the 1980s, it really came into its own in the 2010s with the likes of Buddy Guy and Mavis Staples headlining jam-packed weekends of blues music across multiple stages downtown. When the Crest stage at Galvez Plaza was completed in 2013, downtown festivals became a force to be reckoned with underneath the canopy of the stage’s futuristic sculpture. With the addition of the Third Street Songwriters Fest in 2014 and the Arts Council’s FestforAll becoming Ebb & Flow Festival in 2017, April became a month of nonstop music in Baton Rouge.

Attendees at a previous edition of the Baton Rouge Blues Festival

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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o you have a skincare routine? Oh sure, you’ve bought the products, but do you actually follow a daily routine or just fall asleep and forget about your skin? If you want gorgeous skin 30 years from now, developing a skincare routine is important. Since your skin plays such an important role in protecting your body, do a little every day to keep it as healthy as you can. To celebrate [225] Magazine’s 15th anniversary, the Dermatology Clinic shared 15 easy ways to keep your skin looking and feeling its best. There’s no time like the present to develop a personalized skin care routine that works for you and can keep your skin looking and feeling beautiful for years to come. Schedule a consultation with a dermatologist or aesthetician today at the Dermatology Clinic and find the skincare products best suited for your skin. Visit thedermatologyclinic.com or call 225.769.7546.

5 MORNING MUSTS

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CLEANSE CORRECTLY. Gently wash away oil build up and any residue left by your nighttime products to start your day with a clean slate. A great go-to is Revision Brightening Facial Wash, but you can schedule a consultation with a dermatologist to find out what’s ideal for your skin. TAKE YOUR VITAMINS. Apply a serum with Vitamin C and antioxidants to reverse damage from the sun and environmental pollutants. Try a dermatologist favorite, Revision’s Vitamin C Lotion, to brighten dull skin and reduce the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles and loss of firmness. PEPTIDES FOR PERFECT PLUMPING. A good peptide cream promotes collagen and elastin production, helping to reduce fine lines and improve elasticity.

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MINERAL PROTECTION. Choose sunscreen with mineral ingredients like zinc oxide or titanium dioxide and a minimum SPF 30. The Dermatology Clinic carries several options like Revision Intellishade, containing antioxidants to slow aging and improve collagen production. MAKE UP FOR LOST TIME. Look for makeup marked noncomedogenic, meaning they won’t clog pores. The Dermatology Clinic carries a full line of Jane Iredale high-performance, cruelty-free, skincare makeup to enhance natural beauty and nourish skin. Jane Iredale’s makeup and skincare products are free of parabens, talc, phthalates, synthetic fragrance and GMO ingredients, so it’s perfect for sensitive skin.

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5 NIGHTTIME NECESSITIES CLEANSE AND TONE AT THE END OF THE DAY. Remove oil, dirt, grime and impurities to leave your skin feeling refreshed and perfectly cleansed.

5 BONUS TIPS

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DITCH THE DEAD SKIN. Exfoliate your face once or twice a week to keep cells healthy and regenerated. Try ZO Exfoliating Polish MOISTURE MATTERS. Retinol can leave skin dry, so applying your moisturizer first can pre-hydrate your skin.

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REMEMBER RETINOL TO BOOST CELL TURNOVER. Retinol is a synthetic derivative of Vitamin-A, and it effectively treats and prevents acne and skin cancer while improving the skin’s tone and texture. Best to get one that targets your unique issues, the Dermatology Clinic can prescribe a more effective brightening cream specifically for your skin’s needs.

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BRIGHT EYED AND BEAUTIFUL. Use a daily eye cream like Neocutis Micro Eyes to visibly reduce the appearance of sagging, wrinkles, redness and hooding around the eye area and eyelid.

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HELP YOUR NECK TO AGE GRACEFULLY. Tighten up crepey skin on the neck with Revision’s Nectifirm. A breakthrough formula packing in five peptides, plant extracts, antioxidants and unique biotechnological blends that work cohesively to create a smoother, younger-looking neck, décolletage and jawline. For prevention and reducing early to moderate signs of aging on the neck. FEED HEALTHY SKIN FROM THE INSIDE OUT. A diet that is high in carbs and refined sugars can cause acne. Eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains while choosing water over soda will give you a marked lift in your glow. DON’T MISS THESE SPOTS. Apply a sunscreen moisturizer to hands, arms, neck and ears to retain youthful elasticity and combat melanoma and skin cancer. REMEMBER YOUR POST-WORKOUT ROUTINE. It is important to cleanse your face well and just re-apply your sunscreen postworkout. Pores can easily clog and shift the skin’s natural oil balance if left unwashed after exercising. GET SOME SLEEP! When you don’t get enough rest, the shifts in cortisol can cause breakouts. Work your bedtime skincare into a relaxing routine to help you relieve stress and give your skin time to rest and refresh.

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Jamie Wax

This Baton Rouge rapper knows how to make a hook. With catchy songs like “2 Phones,” “Satellites” and “Posed To Be In Love,” Gates went from selling mixtapes in town to topping the hip-hop and rap charts nationwide.

RT ES YA TLA NTIC RECORDS

TO

E FIL

Cale Saurage has become a TikTok sensation.

This pop artist is based in New Orleans now, but around 2007, she had set up her fledgling studio in the erkins overpass area. These days, her eye-catching and bold paintings, such as her iconic portrait of the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, have been shown across America and Europe and have been featured in publications such as Vogue, Elle and Forbes.

PH O

TO

Randy Jackson

Ashley Longshore

E FIL

Then Sarah Ashley Longshore, the superstar painter was a Baton Rouge fixture in the early 2000s, seen here from a March 2006 story.

PH O

This former Baton Rougean is taking the professional world by storm. Since moving to New York, she has worked as the head of advertising at Refinery29 the global chief business officer o Thrive Global and now is the owner of Franklyn West, a business consulting group.

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Ashley Miles

E FIL

THEN: Christopher John Rogers was featured in the September 2012 issue as a recent high school grad starting to show his designs at Baton Rouge and New Orleans fashion shows.

FEbRu aRy

2009

FREE

GIFT - 44 DELICIOuS GuSTaV’S Day - 69 TO SEE THE HE LIVED - 80 INSPIRaTION CLaSSICaL in a city the guys are doing .” “The things you are remarkable size of Baton Rouge Chess Records exec, former —Dick LaPalm, page 83 Jazz Coalition, on the River City

20 YEARS LATER

you in ’s

n Soderbergh Inside Steve from journey igh to

U-H Hollywood

Before the Oscar-winning director was making films li e Ocean’s 11 and Erin Brockovich, he was a U-High student popping into after-hours filmmaking classes t LSU. His 1989 drama Sex, Lies, and Videotape, shot in Baton Rouge, put him on the map and won him top honors at Cannes.

LLE

Steven Soderbergh

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COLLIN RICHIE

PH O

Who would have thought the next American Idol would be from Louisiana? In 2019, the down-to-earth, country and rock singer from Livingston Parish won American Idol Season 17.

This Baton Rouge native went from sharing videos on Vine for fun to being viewed by thousands online. Landon Romano, a social media influencer and acto , has more than 1 million followers on Instagram. Since moving to Los Angeles, he has grown his social media following and started experimenting in film and music

Cale Saurage

Laine Hardy

After graduating from Southern University in 1979, Randy Jackson became a traveling musician playing with everyone from Kenny G to Aretha Franklin. He was most known as a host on American Idol from 2002-2014, where his catchphrase “It’s a no for me, dawg” quickly caught on.

She might not be a household name, but we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to recognize a superstar of the science world: LSU professor of physics and astronomy Gabriela González. She was part of the team at LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory in Livingston that confirmed the first detection o a gravitational wave in early 2016. We featured her in our January 2017 “People to Watch” issue. Later that year she shared the Nobel prize in physics for the discovery. We like to think we predicted the future accolades.

Kevin Gates’ 2016 debut album hit No. 2 on the Billboard 200 chart.

Landon Romano

RT COU

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Y

NOW: Rogers has become the “it” designer in New York, dressing everyone from Lady Gaga to Michelle Obama.

Just a few years ago, the most popular apps were Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat. Now, TikTok is taking over the social media world and a Baton Rouge native is part of the movement. Cale Saurage has racked up more than 4 million followers on the video sharing app. His most popular videos include him dancing and acting as different personas in comedic skits.

Eric Vosburg

When this former Baton Rougean started doing makeup on himself as a teen, he never imagined how far it would take him. The now-New York-based makeup artist has been published in GQ, Vogue Taiwan, Elle India and Esquire Mexico and Esquire Latin America.

Youngboy Never Broke Again

Kentrell DeSean Gaulden, also known as YoungBoy Never Broke Again, grew a cult following locally and nationally before getting signed to Atlantic Records in 2017. Gaulden’s 14th mixtape, Al Youngboy 2, debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 in 2019.

Christopher John Rogers Not every fashion designer gets to dress Michelle Obama, Cardi B, Lizzo or Rihanna. The Baton Rouge native rose to fame in the Big Apple by designing original, chic, madeto-order clothing.

Kaci Yoder

Before she was a New York Times bestselling author and Goodreads Choice Award Winner for Best Debut and Best Romance of 2019—under the pen name Casey McQuiston—this LSU alumni was the staff writer at 225 from 2015-2018. The rights to her successful debut novel Red, White and Royal Blue were bought for a movie with Amazon Studios, and her followup, One Last Stop, is due next year.

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PRESS

Kevin Gates

U CO

AV ID

—CYNTHEA CORFAH

One of the last times 225 wrote about this Baton Rouge native, he was selling out his one-man comedy show, Goin’ to Jackson at Manship Theatre in 2007. Now, Jamie Wax can be seen on TV as a correspondent for CBS News.

D

THE BEST THINGS come from Baton Rouge. Think about it: crawfish, the legendary Human Jukebox, Raising Cane’s chicken fingers, LSU Tigers, jigging music and the list goes on. While the rest of the world may recognize the Red Stick for our food or music, there’s so much more that Baton Rougeans have created, infl enced and impacted. There are hundreds of Baton Rouge athletes, musicians, chefs, authors, actors, scientists and creators who have made a name for themselves around the world. Here are just 15 noteworthy people who have helped put Baton Rouge on the map.

Far out

The Baton Rouge funnyman now interviews headlinemakers for CBS News.

How does it feel to grace the pages of Sports Illustrated and work with stars like Cindy Crawford? This Baton Rouge native knows. Brooks Nader won a 2019 Sports Illustrated open model casting call that culminated in her being voted the magazine’s “Swimsuit Rookie of the Year”— and her life changed forever.

ST. MARTIN’S

Are you really from Louisiana if you aren’t familiar with this Baton Rouge rapper? He is most known for making Southern club anthems like “Wipe Me Down,” “Set it Off” and “Loose as a Goose.”

U CO

Brooks Nader

COURTESY

15 artists and creatives who have put Baton Rouge on the map

Boosie Badazz

RT ES YJ AM IE

Notable natives

WAX

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C U LT U R E / /

Ann Connelly

Director and owner, Ann Connelly Fine Art annconnelly.com 15 years ago: Was in the gallery’s second location on Christian Street, 15 years into the business

FILE PHOTO

What was something you hoped to do for the Baton Rouge arts community back then? “Just connecting with other creatives. It was a little bit of a closed door with different organizations not being super connected. We were outsiders because we started our business in Europe and didn’t really know the local scene. Sometimes it’s blissful to be ignorant, and we really did shake hands with a lot of different cultural institutions in trying to get into what they were doing. ”

A nighttime glow at the Mid City Makers Market

Mid City Makers Market grows the creative community (2016)

What’s important now for the arts community to thrive? “We need to continually bring our best, along with all of the creative partners that are informing people about the best of who we are and what we have. The more we say it, the more buy-in takes place, and the better community we can build.”

WE LIKE TO say 225 sort of provided the origins of Mid City Makers Market. Our November 2016 cover story on Baton Rouge’s creative makers scene led several of them—including de facto leader Madeline Ellis of Mimosa Handcrafted—to join forces that same month for a small pop-up on Eugene Street. A year later, and the Makers Market had become a monthly event with dozens of vendors, food booths and live music. It’s now the main spot to see what the Capital City’s young and hip creative class is up to, and the results are beautiful.

Jody Hanet

Executive director, Kids’ Orchestra kidsorchestra.org

Baton Rouge Ballet’s version of ‘The Nutcracker’ celebrates 25 years (2016)

COURTESY BATON ROUGE BALLET

THERE’S NOTHING MORE synonymous with the holidays in the Capital City than Baton Rouge Ballet’s Louisiana take on The Nutcracker. Setting the classic tale on the bayous might have seemed like an obvious choice, but the results are still stunning today with elaborate sets, world-class dancers, the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra and plenty of young local talent. While it’s been a jumping-off-point for talented area dancers who have gone on to Broadway and national dance companies, it’s also a showcase of generations of dancers who now watch their own children perform in the production.

15 years ago: Was living in Scottsdale, Arizona, raising her two boys, cantering at a church, and wishing she was involved in music education

Lavish sets such as this one inspired by the Old State Capitol, help make Baton Rouge Ballet’s The Nutcracker a memorable experience.

COLLIN RICHIE

COLLIN RICHIE

Comedy and improv continue to draw laughs (ongoing)

After four years at places like Phil Brady’s, LATCo. opened its own space at the beginning of 2020.

REMEMBER THE INFERNO’S comedy nights downtown? While the Third Street spot later became a Raising Cane’s, that doesn’t mean the laughs have stopped. Family Dinner Comedy Troupe is still as fresh as ever, and new groups have sprouted around the city, too. NO Show Comedy began hosting its improv nights in 2016 in front of packed houses at the former Guru space behind The Market at Circa 1857. Around the same time, LATCo. Comedy formed and brought its popular improv shows to Driftwood Cask & Barrel and Phil Brady’s. LATCo. found a permanent home earlier this year in Ogden Park where it was hosting improv classes and shows pre-COVID. Both LATCo. and NO Show have kept the laughs going with virtual events since then.

What was something you hoped to do for the Baton Rouge arts community back then? “Fifteen years ago I would come home to Baton Rouge, and I always scanned the media to see what was happening in the world of music, because I was a graduate of LSU School of Music. What I noticed was, ‘What’s happening with the kids?’ My thought was that I would love to get down here and start making an impact on children, because there’s just so many opportunities. Now, I’ve certainly had that opportunity, not only as an educator, but also as an executive director at Kids’ Orchestra over the last almost eight years.” How do you see Kids’ Orchestra growing in the next 15 years? “Our mission is to build a community of creative, confident socially engaged students through music education. Our vision is to bring Louisiana together through music. Right now, we are celebrating our 10-year anniversary. We’re excited we’ve been sustainable for that time. So we see, in the next 15 years, great expansion. We want to see growth across the state.”

Kris Cangelosi

Artistic director, Cangelosi Dance Project cangelosidanceproject.com 15 years ago: Had recently moved back to Baton Rouge, was freelancing as a teacher, choreographer for nearby studios and traveling to cities on the weekend teaching dance conventions and judging dance competitions How do you see your organization growing in the next 15 years? “During this pandemic, I have had the time to rethink the growth for dance students and future opportunities in performing. I will continue to intensify the dance program and enrich students on their best path for a dance career.” What’s important now for the performing arts community to thrive in Baton Rouge? “A strong leader who can direct local talent, develop resources, provide opportunities for artists, and educate the community on the performing arts. We need less over-talked art programs that go nowhere.”

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C U LT U R E / / FREE OC TOBER 2019 •

CORN MAZES 25 GOVERNOR’S RACE 36

225 SCHOOL GUIDE on page 97

LAUREN DAIGLE 90

Eric Marshall

Executive director, Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra brso.org

MEET LAINE HARDY, ’AMERICAN IDOL’ WINNER & LIVINGSTON NATIVE

15 years ago: Was in Erie, Pennsylvania, as an undergrad student at Mercyhurst University What was something you hoped to do when you came to Baton Rouge? “I have only been part of the Baton Rouge arts community for a little over a year, since May of last year. One of my goals was to introduce the symphony to a much broader audience. We’ve made strides online, but COVID has had a huge impact on our plans. But we’re on our way to some of the things we planned, such as bringing in more diverse performers, performances and venues. Going into different places across town really helps us expand our footprint and really falls along with the mission of the organization. We want to be accessible to everyone.” How do you see the Baton Rouge culture scene growing in the next 15 years? “There are similar organizations to the symphony that have done a great job with breaking out, but I think there are still a lot of silos in Baton Rouge. With some of the leadership we have now, there’s a lot of room for those silos to come down and the Baton Rouge community to come together.”

LAINE Laine Hardy brings ‘American Idol’ to Livingston (2019) THERE COMES A point in every American Idol season when the final contestants visit their hometowns with a full came a crew in tow. For Livingston native Laine Hardy—who at that point in season 17 was already a favorite to win—the hometown celebration was one for the books. In May 2019, the rural community was overrun with Hardy fans for a parade and outdoor concert that showcased his south Louisiana roots to millions of viewers. That made Hardy’s win just as sweet, and he returned in September 2019 for a true homecoming concert and festival at the Livingston Parish Fairgrounds—this time as a bonafide supersta .

A year that tried the arts scene the hardest (2020) MUCH HAS ALREADY been said about COVID-19’s impacts on Baton Rouge, as well as the racial tensions that occurred this summer. But it’s hard to overlook how 2020 dealt a heavy blow to the arts community. Without physical audiences, local theater and dance companies, art galleries and musicians all had to jump on the virtual bandwagon as quickly as possible. Some sought to give families something to do during the shutdown, like Baton Rouge Gallery’s online Flat Curve Gallery or Playmakers of Baton Rouge’s virtual variety show. Others, like Theatre Baton Rouge and New Venture Theatre, hosted Zoom discussions on diversity and inclusion in theater. Our favorite local bands still found ways to share music with livestreams from their homes on social media. It all provided a reminder of the important role the arts play in our lives, why it’s so important now to keep supporting them, and how eager we all are to get out and celebrate our local talents and creatives again.

—Q&AS AS TOLD TO JULIA-CLAIRE EVANS,

Issue Date: August proof #3LEGER CYNTHEAAd CORFAH AND BENJAMIN

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Editor’s note: Q&As were edited for brevity and clarity. See all of the answers at 225batonrouge.com/our-city.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

OVER 55 YEARS of doing what we do BEST!

ORDER YOUR TURKEY WITH ALL THE FIXINGS TODAY!

Restaurant BEST BREAKFAST two years in a row! 17425 AIRLINE HWY • 225.673.8876 | 8353 AIRLINE HWY • 225.926.5977 | FRANKSRESTAURANTLA.COM • 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #4

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

CALENDAR //

November

Where play aro to Baton R und o this monuge th C ompiled b y Maria Mars h

all month

MOVIES AFTER 5 Enjoy the fall weather with a free outdoor movie on the lawn of The Capitol Park Museum on Sundays. Before the 6:30 p.m. screenings, the festivities begin at 5 p.m. with live entertainment and food and drinks from Memphis Mac, Plant Based Treats by Lotus and Jolie Pearl Oyster Bar. Watch Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (Nov. 1), The Karate Kid (Nov. 8), The Goonies (Nov. 15) and Black Panther (Nov. 22) with your friends and family. Find the event on Facebook

JORDAN HEFLER

Caring for Women Creating Life

Preparation is key for a healthier COVID-19 pregnancy experience

all month

| (337)356-2516 • Please respond byACARINGSEASONDOULA.COM e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

S YV TU IL DY ST S S LE VI UD TU TU L YV DY DY STU STU LE IL VI VI DY DY ST ST L L L U UD S E S LE LE VIL VIL DYV YV TU TU ST STU LE LE I IL DY DY UDY DY ST ST LLE LE VI VI U V V U ST LLE LLE ILL ILL DYV DYV IL IL UD S S E E YV TU TU ST STU LE LE IL DY DY UDY DY L E V I V IS V V ST UD S S T L L E L TL UE D I L LS I L L T T YV U UD ST YVI E UD E D I Y Y L ST S S L E V I S T S T V IS T U D L L E Y V I UD TU TU L Y L U L Y V D Y D Y S T U S T U L E D Y V U D Y L UE D Y V I L S T L E U IL VI VI DY DY ST IL VI VI LE D ST Y ST L L L S U L L L U U D S E S L E L E V I L TVUIDL DSY V E S L E L E S T U V I L D Y Y V T U T U S T S T U L E YLVE T UI L T U S T S T D Y L E V I L I L D Y D Y U D Y D Y S T I LS T D YL E D Y U D U D V I S T L E LE VI VI V V U L EU V I V Y V Y V L L U S T L L E L L E I L L I L L D Y V DSYTV L L E I L L E I L L I L L E S D Y V I L UI L T E E UD S IL S E E Y V T U T U S T S T U L E D YLVE S T U S T U S T S T U D Y L E IL DY DY UDY DY IL DY DY UDY UDY VI LE VI VI LE VI VI V V V V LL ST LLE LLE ILL ILL ST LLE LLE ILL ILL E E E E E UD UD YV YV IL IL LE LE

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

STUDYVILLE A C A D E M I C W O R K S PA C E

P R I VAT E

SUPP ORT

TUTORING

COLLEGE

COOL

W O R K S PA C E S

ACT

HOMESCHOOL

UD

COUNSELING

ST

14

RUN RUN RUN Run your heart out for a good cause at the 15th Annual Zoo Run Run. The event includes a kid’s half-mile run and a full 2-mile run for other participants, both around BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo. All proceeds support the zoo and international cheetah conservation efforts. brzoo.org

PREP

MEMBERS

20 RA N

HOMEWORK

GEAUX TEAM It’s another month of LSU football, with some of the biggest games of the season. LSU takes on Alabama in Tiger Stadium Nov. 14; plays at Arkansas Nov. 21; and travels to Texas A&M Nov. 28. lsusports.net

OR YL TA

M

O

ON THE ROAD NEW ORLEANS

SCAN TO LEARN MORE

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KRISTIN SELLE

Consulting & Training Services • Doula Support Services

Issue Date: Oct 2020 Ad proof #1

NOV. 6: New Orleans Film Festival neworleansfilmsociety.org

SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESS White Light Night is back! One night a year, Mid City lights up with businesses and vendors lining Government Street. Artists, chefs and shop owners show off their products while bringing the Baton Rouge community together. It’s perfect for all ages—and a great way to support local businesses this holiday season. midcitymerchantsbr.org/whitelightnight

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NOV. 14: Friendsgiving Trivia Pub Crawl, Find the event on Facebook

NOV. 7: Autism Speaks Louisiana Walk, Find the event on Facebook

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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CALENDAR //

ALSO THIS MONTH ALL MONTH Every Wednesday, the Heron Downtown offers yoga free for residents and $10 for the general public. The event is open to all skill levels. Bring your own mat. Find the event on Facebook ALL MONTH In-person wine tasting at The Gregory is back! Each Thursday offers a different wine from around the country or world. Slots are limited. Find the event on Facebook NOV. 7 Baton Rouge Orthopaedic Clinic presents the 2nd Annual Wine and Rock. Enjoy wine stations, a bite to eat, and a live performance by ’90s alt-rock cover band Blue Verse. The event will be at Audi Baton Rouge, and all proceeds go to the BROC Foundation. brortho.com/broc-rock-wine NOV. 8 Gonzo’s Smokehouse and BBQ is having a pop up at Tin Roof Brewing Co. The menu will be released a few weeks prior to the event. Find the event on Facebook NOV. 15 The Baton Rouge Epicurean Society Fête Dine series does a fourcourse brunch. Roux 61 and Chef Joshua Hebert will host, complete with mimosas and a wine pairing for adults. bresbr.org/fete-dine

MUSIC BEST BETS ALL MONTH The Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge has brought back Sunday in the Park, a free, family-friendly concert series. This month’s lineup includes the Mixed Nuts on Nov. 1; The Original Pinettes Brass Band on Nov. 8; and Curley Taylor on Nov. 15. artsbr.org/sunday-in-the-park NOV. 6 The Texas Club hosts countrymusic singer Tyler Farr. Farr has multiple country hits including, “A Guy Walks into a Bar” and “Redneck Crazy,” and he’s also co-written songs with singers like Joe Nichols and Cole Swindell. thetexasclub.com NOV. 6 Manship Theatre, Long Law Firm and Bandito Fest present a live performance of New Orleans rock band Dash Rip Rock at Beauvoir Park. The outdoor venue is only selling 100 tickets, so get yours while you can. manshiptheatre.org NOV. 27 Legendary rock guitarist Bill Kirchen returns to Red Dragon Listening Room for a night of legendary jams. Find the event on Facebook

LAFAYETTE

NOV. 4: Bikes, Brews, and Omelettes Two, Find the event on Facebook

ARTS BEST BETS ALL MONTH The LSU Museum of Art showcases “Southbound: Photographs Of and About the New South,” a series of 56 photographers’ works that tell stories about the history and culture of the South over the first few decades o the 21st century. lsumoa.org NOV. 12 The BRSO String Quartet will stage a number of classics. Borislava Iltcheva, Aaron Farrell, Christopher Lowry and Molly Goforth will perform works by Caroline Shaw, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and Robert Schumann. brso.org NOV. 16 Luncheon With Leanne is the first o a virtual concert series from Opéra Louisiane. The series offers the chance to have lunch with singers across the country and Opéra Louisiane’s General Director Leanna Clement and Artistic Director Michael Borowitz. Enjoy cocktails, a concert, and a meet and greet with the soon-to-be-announced performer. operalouisiane.com/lunchwithleanne NOV. 15 + 29 Baton Rouge Ballet Theatre presents a three-part virtual series, “The Nutcracker—A Tale From the Bayou.” But it’s much more than just a performance. The online events offer storytelling, instruction on the dances watched, and treats that correspond with parts of the show. batonrougeballet.org/nutcracker-sweets

337 NOV. 29: Mimosa Crawl Lafayette, Find the event on Facebook

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NOV. 14: Artwalk at Wurst, Find the event on Facebook 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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Issue Date: November Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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WRITE ON //

Birthday wishes fl wlessly. Our interns are the lifeblood A FEW DAYS after my 27th birthday, of our e-newsletters, and I’ve been so I moved to Baton Rouge for this job. I proud to also watch them fearlessly didn’t know it then, but that move was tackle big projects like cover stories, the best gift I could have asked for. style shoots and LSU football. Editorial The ironic thing: That gift director Penny Font has infinite wismanifested itself, at first, as one of the dom, and is the best sounding board most challenging years of my life. I could ask for. And, of course, I can’t Back in 2015, I was living outside of forget staff photographer Collin Richie my home state of Florida for the first and contributing stylist Elle Marie, time, in a place where I knew virtually who I often pester with no one. I had been ready my presence at shoots— to move away from home. but who really don’t But I’d underestimated need me there at all. I how hard the growing feel fortunate to collabopains would be. rate with all of them. It’s much easier to I will forever be gratemake friends in your early ful to publisher Julio 20s, when you’re living Melara and our leader in a dorm room with Rolfe McCollister for three other girls, than it taking a chance on a girl is in your late 20s. On top from Florida, trusting of my loneliness, I was her with their magazine. battling health issues and By Jennifer Tormo When I look back at a general feeling that I early issues of 225, I’m didn’t fit in anywhere. intimidated by how good the stories Things eventually got better—and it have always been. Chronicling the hiswas largely because of this magazine. tory of our community is the biggest I met a friend, Emily, at a 225 event. responsibility I’ve experienced. She’d become one of the most supI’ve often said the best part of being portive forces in my life—and later, a a journalist is meeting people and bridesmaid in my wedding. 225’s forsharing their stories. But I have never mer senior graphic designer Carolyn gotten to tell such memorable stories Valentine Blakley would become a as the ones I’ve encountered here. close friend, who later designed my When the 2016 flood swamped dream invitations for my wedding. Baton Rouge, I was living on Millerville But the biggest game-changer was Road. I’ll never forget hearing the dogs working alongside 225’s team to put howl in the middle of the night, as the together this magazine. Every day over murky water rushed into their houses. the last six years, I’ve gotten to work One of my coworkers lived nearby, and with the most creative people I’ve her home was fl oded. That afternoon, known. People who inspire me. I held her hand while she cried, terriManaging editor Benjamin Leger is fied for her family and her dogs, who the best editor I’ve met and the key were being rescued by boat. reason 225’s stories read as well as In the days afterward, our team they do. He has an incredible visual would take our notepads and cameye and may be the only person who’s eras all over town, trying to record pickier than I am when it comes to the strength of our city at its darkest writing, photography and design. moment. Our October 2016 cover story Former staff writer Kaci Yoder and was full of harrowing stories of water current staff writer Cynthea Corfah rescues and neighbors with hammers both breathed life into our team, each in hand, helping each other rebuild. a breath of fresh air in every meeting We called that story “Hope in High we have—and brilliant writers, at that. Water.” And that’s what I found in Graphic designer Melinda Gonzalez those fl od waters, too. Afterward, prepares our cover stories, and Baton Rouge became part of me Ben and I often gasp when we see forever. I wasn’t homesick anymore— her finished designs. She is such a because it was my home. visionary. Our art director Hoa Vu Happy birthday, 225. You changed has designed every single issue of 225 my life. You were the greatest gift since its inception and probably knows to me. And I can only hope to keep the magazine better than anyone. repaying the favor by making this He’s been so patient with all of our magazine a gift to others, too. crazy ideas and pulls them together

REACH JENNIFER TORMO AT JENNIFER@225BATONROUGE.COM.

Enjoy an oasis in the heart of the city. Stroll through the beautiful gardens and walk the many trails of the LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens and Windrush Gardens. Step back in time to 19th century rural Louisiana at the open-air LSU Rural Life Museum.

Upcoming Events 50th Anniversary Exhibition Series

A Yardman's Art: the Inspiration of Steele Burden September 18-November 20 . 8 a.m.-5 p.m. LSU Rural Life Museum

Rural Life Alive!

Living History and Artisan Demonstrations Wednesdays and Fridays . October 7-November 20 10 a.m.-2 p.m. LSU Rural Life Museum Visit our website for a schedule of topics: lsu.edu/rurallife

Wine & Roses: A Remote Raffle Affair An extraordinary online raffle of wine, roses, art and other unique items.

September 14-November 23 LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens

Learn more at LSUAgCenter.com/BotanicGardens

Poinsettia Show & Sale

November 28 . 8 a.m.-2 p.m. LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens

A Rural Life Christmas

December 6 . 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. LSU Rural Life Museum Learn more at lsu.edu/rurallife

Arbor Day at Burden

January 23 . 9 a.m.-1 p.m. LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens

Due to COVID-19, events are subject to change. For details about these and other events, visit our website or call 225-763-3990. Admission may be charged for some events.

Burden Museum & Gardens . 4560 Essen Lane . DiscoverBurden.com . Baton Rouge Open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily . 225-763-3990 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] November 2020 

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FRAMED //

In every issue of 225, you’ll find a f ee print on this page. FRAMED celebrates life and art in Baton Rouge, each one featuring a local photographer, place or graphic designer. Cut it out to hang in your cubicle, or frame it for your home gallery wall. Show us where you hang them by tagging them on social media with #225prints.

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ILLUSTRATION BY CHRISTINA BROWN FOR ‘225’ GET FEATURED We love collaborating with local photographers, artists and designers for this page! Shoot us an email at editor@225batonrouge.com to chat about being featured.

[225] November 2020  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: November 2020 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

AD V ERT IS EM ENT

A Passion for Preserving Quality of Life Dr. Kevin McCarthy has provided modern quality and comprehensive

at Wayne State University, where he graduated in the top 20% of his

spinal care at this facility for over a decade. The Spine Center, in

class. He completed his residency at Tulane Medical Center in 2004

cooperation with The Spine Hospital of Louisiana, offers the latest

while receiving multiple distinguished awards. He started at the

and most technologically advanced treatment options including

Bone and Joint Clinic in 2005, and then began The Spine Center as

robotic spine surgery, endoscopic spine surgery, laser spine surgery

a subsidiary of this practice in 2007. Today, patients often ask how

and all forms of minimally invasive spine surgery. McCarthy’s

Baton Rouge competes with other cities when comparing quality and

fondness for science is what drew him to become a surgeon and help

technology of spinal care and surgery. Dr. McCarthy explains that

others. When pondering career choices, he was initially attracted to

while Baton Rouge is considered a relatively small city in the U.S.,

engineering and computer programming because of his dedication to

its spinal treatment offerings are only seen in major metro cities

science. But he is also a people person and has always been called

outside the state. As new technology develops steadily, Dr. McCarthy

to interact with and help others. McCarthy became intrigued with

is recognized as a leader in minimally invasive spine surgery. Most

orthopedic surgery specialty because he liked to use his hands and

people will experience back pain and nerve pain at least once in

was intrigued by the medical knowledge needed to reconstruct parts

their life, because the spine was not designed to last. Spinal care

of a patient’s injured body. He was fulfilled by the idea that he could

was a natural fit for McCarthy because of his passion for preserving a

immediately impact a person’s quality of life and get them back to an

person’s quality of life.

active lifestyle. McCarthy began his journey as an orthopedic surgeon

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HELLO, LIFE.

Back pain affects every part of your life —

and the Spine Center of Baton Rouge is here to help. From minimally invasive spine surgery to proven pain management therapies, our experts offer the latest advances in spinal health, so you can get back to pain-free living. BATON ROUGE • PRAIRIEVILLE • WALKER spinecenterbr.com | ph. 833-SPINEBR

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WITH

PROUDLY PHYSICIAN-OWNED

10/16/20 4:07 PM

Profile for Baton Rouge Business Report

[225] Magazine - November 2020  

[225] Magazine - November 2020