Page 1

PULSE

THE

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF BROKEN ARROW HIGH SCHOOL

|

BROKEN ARROW, OKLAHOMA

|

BAHSPULSE.COM

Leading the way, together Students attend third annual retreat in Dry Gulch By Ally Coldwell and Gracelyn Basinger Pulse Staff Writers The third annual Leadership Retreat was held at Dry Gulch, USA on Oct. 1-2. Over 200 students attended as well as around 25 teachers. “The experience inspired all of us to want to change our lives and everyone else’s,” senior Andra Fauvell said. “It made us want to have a more positive school and life outside of school.” Throughout the retreat, students participated in many team building and trust activities. Some of these activities include icebreaker games, meeting new people, bonfires and a trust building activity called “Cross the Line,” during which students were asked to respond to different questions or instances in one of three ways: choosing not to answer, standing in place or crossing the line. As the activity went on, these questions or instances got deeper and more intimate, urging students to open up to fellow classmates. “The icebreaker games helped bring me out of my comfort zone and get to know upperclassmen that I had never met before,” sophomore Madison Foster said.

LETS GO SURFING NOW Senior Corbin Knox crowd surfs during an impromptu dance party at the third annual leadership retreat. (Photo by Gracelyn Basinger)

During the retreat, many new friendships were made and previously established friendships were made stronger. Some of the games focused on students digging deeper into themselves and opening up to people they haven’t before by sharing information about themselves that they normally wouldn’t share with others. “I had an amazing experience at the retreat by getting to know so many different people and hearing their life stories,” junior Cole Gillean said. “I also learned so much about people I

thought I already knew pretty well.” A bonfire was held Saturday night and lasted around two hours. At the bonfire, seniors were encouraged to stand up and share their wish or hopes for the underclassmen and the future of the school. “My message at the bonfire was to the underclassmen. I told them to live it up and enjoy everything high school has to offer,” senior Isaac Bullen said. “I mentioned that this year is a bunch of firsts and lasts for myself and I would do anything to have an extra year or

two to enjoy some of the best times of my life.” The goal of the retreat was to promote a positive environment while bringing students closer together, and reinforcing the importance of community on campus. Students interested in attending the retreat next year can visit the Student Union desk for more information.

More Photos on Page Four

Principal Burns: the face behind the voice By Cloey Patton Pulse Staff Writer

TECHNOLOGY

Roles reversed: Sophomores are teachers By Cheyenne Pauls Pulse Staff Writer

Broken Arrow High School’s newest sophomores have taken up an interesting job along with moving up a grade: Chromebook coaches. Canvas is an online program that connects every student to every class they attend. It opens up more opportunities for teachers in assigning homework and grading previous assignments, as well as allows parents to see their student’s assignments and what the student turned in. Sophomores have begun aiding juniors, seniors and teachers alike with Chromebooks and Canvas since they used them in the test run of their freshman year. “Teaching teachers, seniors and juniors isn’t bad,” sophomore Payton Shreve said. “The seniors and juniors usually ask the teacher, and the teachers ask a lot about using Canvas.” With the high school’s new education program, Canvas, teachers were unprepared to transfer their classes

into the online school. The teachers didn’t quite understand the use of the Chromebooks but the sophomores were quick to offer help. “It’s great having sophomore students who have experience with Canvas,” Language teacher Shelley Mashburn said. “I’ve had one of them help me upload a document to submit an assignment. At least once a week they teach me something new and fix a mistake I made.” The teachers weren’t the only ones with the new device introduced to them. Seniors and juniors were given Chromebooks this year to keep track of their assignments and gain access to Canvas in their classes and at home. “The sophomores helped me figure out how to use my Google drive and how to turn in my homework,” senior Gracie Basinger said. So far the first few weeks of school have been a learning period for students and staff alike, and with the sophomores teaching fellow classmates and teachers classes have begun running smoothly again.

Elizabeth Burns is a person that is not always seen, but always heard. Burns is most known by students from her daily announcements over the intercom. Though she’s known for her voice, there’s a lot more to her as a person. Burns joined the high school staff as principal for the 2015-16 school year. She was a teacher for 20 years before becoming an administrator. Starting off, Burns taught for five years at BAHS and Choir Director Justin Rosser was one of her former students. “I remember specific assignments that we had to do in her class, and I remember her being a very fair, engaging and funny teacher,” Rosser said. “When I first started teaching in Broken Arrow, I was still a young teacher. She was not only my employer, but also my mentor. After many years as her employee, our relationship continues to evolve.” Broken Arrow High School’s 2015 Teacher of the Year Mary Fowler also taught beside Burns during Burns’s time as a BAHS teacher. “I respected her as a colleague and teacher back then,” Fowler said. “I continue to respect her as a colleague and principal now. I am very proud to call her my principal and my friend.”

Principal Elizabeth Burns

Burns spent 13 years teaching at a middle school as well as two years as a missionary teacher with Southern Baptist Church in Taiwan, Asia. “I taught English to Chinese students, schools, churches and businesses,” Burns said. “I did that when I was a young teacher. I only had two years of teaching experience when I went overseas.” When Burns can find the time outside of the busy bustle of her job, she gravitates towards reading, music and going to see theatre

See “Burns” Page Two


THE PULSE

B R O K E N

A R R O W

H I G H

S C H O O L

Pride invited to play Rose Parade By Shaelyn Disotell Pulse Staff Writer

Last year the Pride of Broken Arrow deemed the title Grand National Champions and in reward for all of their hard work, they have been invited to the Rose Parade this upcoming January in Pasadena, California. “I am looking forward to marching in the Rose Parade this coming January,” senior colorguard member Abby Cha said. “I’m excited to take on this once in a lifetime opportunity and proudly represent our band, school and state.” This past weekend at the BA v.s. Owasso football game, during half time, the Rose Parade President, Brad Ratliff, presented the pride with the Rose Parade flag and formally invited them to the 2017 Tournament of Roses Parade. “The fact that the Rose Parade president flew all the way to Broken Arrow to formally invite the Pride to the Rose Parade is so humbling to say the least,” senior bass clarinet player Camden Crittenden said. “None of us realize how much impact we have and the amazing opportunities we are given, and I think Mr. Ratliff flying

here really showed how much we are appreciated and I was beyond honored that he would feel highly enough of us to travel here.” Ratliff came to not only invite the Pride to the parade but also to see what being in Pride is all about. He got a clear picture after spending the weekend in Broken Arrow and interacting with the members. “They’re the best field show/ half time show band in the country right now,” Ratliff said in a interview with News on 6. Members are happy that all their hard work paid off and are excited to go to California. “It’s a really awesome feeling to be able to go to the Rose Parade after a year full of extremely hard work,” Cha said. “It’s nice to be rewarded with a fun trip at the conclusion of our season, and I’m excited to see what’s in store for our band program in the coming years.” The Pride of Broken Arrow has put in countless hours of hard work over the years and marching in the Rose Parade this December is a well deserved and exciting reward for all their hard work.

I’m excited to take on this once in a lifetime opportunity and proudly represent our band, school and state. -Abby Cha, senior

DO IT WITH PRIDE Pride performs their show during halftime of the Yukon home game. (Photo by Ashley Spencer)

Seniors make a mark on campus, paint parking spots By Dominique Potter Pulse Staff Writer

One of the changes within the high school is reserved parking for seniors. If a student bought one of the $35 reserved parking spots, along with the $20 parking permit, that means they were allowed to paint the spot. Students customized their own parking spots to make it represent them and the things they enjoy. As long as the painting was school appropriate, the possibilities were endless. From quotes to recreations of famous paintings, students expressed themselves on their parking spot. Amy Largent, an administration assistant in the main office, developed a proposal for the seniors to be able to paint their parking spots with all of the money benefiting Project Graduation. “The event should raise about $10,000 of the $35,000 needed for Project Graduation,” student activities director Jason Jedamski said.

The school searched for others schools that allow their seniors to paint their parking spots to set the idea of how they were going to organize the event. Students were only allowed to use water-based latex paint to create their masterpieces. They could only paint the designs they had submitted to be approved by the school. Dozens of students gathered in the school’s parking lots to put their creativity to use. Students, however, could spend a little more time on their work with the makeup day on Labor Day weekend. “I used up all of my time and even stayed late to finish it,” senior Bethany Jones said. Some students used this opportunity to create messages for other students and others used it to express themselves on the concrete. “I think it’s a great idea and I hope they will continue to do it for seniors,” senior Liana Jackson said.

BASH SESSION Senior Taylor Thompson works on her personalized parking spot. (Photo by Gracie Basinger)

Burns (Continued from Page One)

IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS Seniors Casey Herrera and Garrett Jensen add details to their personalized parking space during the planned painting day on Aug. 28. (Photo by Gracie Basinger)

productions. After Taiwan, Burns still enjoys traveling. “I particularly have enjoyed opportunities to travel overseas, but I really enjoy being able to see parts of the United States as well,” Burns said. It was while teaching yearbook at the high school and running the yearbook business organization that Burns became interested in becoming an administrator. “I had my administration certification for a number of years, and I thought I might be interested in going into administration. I applied and was chosen to be an assistant principal at Haskell Middle School,” Burns said. She was the assistant principal for two years at Haskell before moving on to be principal at Childers Middle School for 15 years. “I had really thought that I would probably retire at that job. I loved it and enjoyed working with the kids, but our superintendent of schools called me in the spring semester and asked me if I would be interested in coming to

the high school to be principal,” Burns said. “After a lot of thought I decided that I would love to do it. I would love the new challenge of it.” Teachers and other administrators alike appreciate Burns’s work ethic. “She is a teacher at heart, and that’s what makes her a unique and highly effective principal,” Rosser said. “I hope our working relationship continues for many years, and I know regardless of when that relationship will change, we will remain lifelong friends.” Students on campus have grown to expect Burns’s voice to begin their day even if they’re unsure of what makes her as a person. “No one has accused me of not liking to talk and it has been suggested that I become a talk show host, so maybe that’s a possibility for after retirement,” Burns said.


B R O K E N

A R R O W

H I G H

THE PULSE

S C H O O L

ATHLETICS

Cade Yeager plans to lead Tigers to state By Hunter Grim Pulse Staff Writer Starting quarterback Cade Yeager is now heading into his senior season and has worked extremely hard this off-season to make himself a better player. Yeager is a huge influence to multiple players including the younger players at his position, mainly junior Peyton Ross and sophomore Peyton Thompson. “Cade sets an excellent example for the younger guys and has become more vocal over the following summer,” Ross said. Yeager has a big year ahead of him as he plans to lead the Tigers back to the highly coveted state championship game in which they placed second behind the Jenks Trojans. “Playing in the championship last year was an amazing experience,” Yeager said. “I learned a lot about myself after the game.” Over the summer, Yeager has made multiple strides to improve his game. “I’ve improved this summer by just throwing with the new wide receivers and working on my footwork. I’ve also gained about 20 pounds so I could get above 200 pounds and take more hits in games,” Yeager said. All that hard work is now starting to pay off, as Yeager is beginning to

LISTEN CLOSELY Senior starting quarterback Cade Yeager listens closely as his coach gives instruction on the field. (Photo by Allison Black)

receive interest from colleges like Missouri State, Pitt State, and the University of Montana. He has also received offers from Northeastern State University and South Eastern

Oklahoma State University. “My personal goals are to win state, and to throw for over 3,000 yards,” Yeager said. This young quarterback begins his

senior season and plans to help lead the Tigers back to the infamous State Title game.

BAVC brings home fifth consecutive state title By Ally Coldwell Pulse Staff Writer

#FIGHTFORFIVE The varsity co-ed cheer squad hits a pyramid during their state routine. (Photo by Ally Coldwell)

Broken Arrow Varsity Cheer made history this weekend when they brought home their fifth consecutive state championship win. The team competed Saturday, Sept. 24 at The Gallagher-Iba Arena in Stillwater. The team went in with a positive mindset and was ready to #fightforfive. “Since it was my senior year, I felt a lot more pressure because we had to lead the rest of our team, but when we won it felt that much more exciting because I knew we had accomplished our goal that I hadn’t stopped thinking about since state last year,” senior Piper Pittman said. “As soon as our routine ended I knew we hit because of our coaches reaction, and I, along with most of my teammates began to cry because we were so happy.” Broken Arrow competed against nine other teams in the 6A Coed division, with the team unanimously agreeing that Bixby was their biggest competitor. Bixby took second in qualifications for state at regionals the weekend before, right behind Broken Arrow who took home the first place trophy.

“This year, I think our biggest competition was Bixby. They were so sharp and they definitely wanted nothing else but to beat us,” junior Reina Mckee said. “After the routine was over I was so proud of my team. I knew everyone put everything they had into that routine to make it the best we could.” Broken Arrow Varsity Cheer was well prepared to take on this competition thanks to their head coach, Amy Howe. They started preparing for state in June and started practicing every day in August to pull the entire routine together and perfect it. “As a coach, you are always nervous of how your team is going to do on the mat. Once you get to that day, you cannot do anything else as a coach. It’s in their hands,” Howe said. “You just have to have faith that you have given them a routine they can do, they just have to do it. After they hit that last pyramid element towards the end, I knew they had performed a winning routine.” Now that BAVC has state out of the way they can start getting ready for their UCA Nationals competition in February.

Volleyball is finding their groove as season closes By Drew Watske Pulse Staff Writer

The Broken Arrow girls varsity volleyball squad kicked off their season on a good note this year. The Lady Tigers hold a 19-10 record heading into the latter part of the season, and head coach Ian Bullen is optimistic that his team is prepared to finish the year strong. “We will rely on senior leadership to push the entire team to work hard and stay hungry for success,” Bullen said. Broken Arrow is bringing back five seniors from last season, and that amount of experience earned the team a preseason ranking of #7 in the state. The Lady Tigers have gone 3-0 over the past two weeks as the team starts to find a rhythm midway through the season. “We are good, but really need to push harder to be an elite team. All four of the teams who have beaten us are currently ranked higher [than] we are,” Bullen said. “In order to be one

of those elite top ranked teams we will have to rack up a few wins vs that kind of team.” One thing Broken Arrow volleyball always strives to have is solid teamwork. Senior defensive specialist Julia Bercher is a leader on the court and knows how valuable good teamwork can be. “We are all very positive and uplift each other in every moment,” Bercher said. The Broken Arrow team thrives on encouragement and enthusiasm in their games, and that positive attitude always lifts the teams level of play. Isabelle Hua, another Broken Arrow senior, knows the team’s uplifting spirit is invaluable to their success. “The team is full of talented and hard-working individuals and we help each other to the best of our abilities,” Hua said. Broken Arrow took home first place in the Bishop Kelley tournament, doing so for the first time in school history.

SERVE IT UP Junior Makina Wratten serves the ball during a match against Booker T. Washington earlier this season. (Photo by Cloey Patton)


THE PULSE

B R O K E N

A R R O W

H I G H

S C H O O L

Retreat (Continued from Page One, photos by Gracie Basinger)

Leadership Retreat held Oct. 1-2


B R O K E N

A R R O W

H I G H

THE PULSE

S C H O O L

Caleb Ricketts crowned Mr. BA By Cheyenne Pauls Pulse Staff Writer

On Sept. 20, Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center hosted the annual Mr. BA competition for 19 high school students representing their clubs where Caleb Ricketts took home the crown and title as Mr. BA for thespian club. The competition gives out five different awards including Mr. B.A., Fan favorite, Best of Athletic, Best of Talent, and Best of Formal Wear. Ricketts’ was inspired to compete this year thanks to competing in the competition in 2015. He came up with the talent portion of his performance from his love for Queen and Freddie Mercury. “It was a massive surprise when I heard I won,” Ricketts said. “Surprise quickly turned into being overwhelmed because of picture after picture. But I am honored to represent the soul of BA.” Senior representative of Volleyball, Drew French, took home the title of being Fan Favorite FIND ME SOMEBODY TO LOVE Senior Caleb Ricketts performs the Queen song “Find Me Somebody to Love” with his all-around performance in dressed as Freddie Mercury for his talent. Ricketts was later crowned the winner. (Photo by Anna Stoner) Athletic Wear, Talent and Formal wear. French has wanted to compete since last year when he watched the competition. “I was actually surprised at Cass King, Tigettes winning fan favorite, but I am happy I did,” said French. Lane Boroughs, Girls Soccer Chase Gaddis, the representative Miller Godwin, Creative of the Breakfast Club was awarded Writing Best of Athletic Wear. Gaddis chose Drew French, Volleyball tennis wear for sports due to him Chase Gaddis, Breakfast Club recently taking up the sport. He Noah Osborne, Student signed up to represent the Breakfast Council Club since he is one of the clubs Jacob Taylor, NHS founders. Zack Rodgers, Jungle Squad “The whole thing was ridiculously fun,” Gaddis said. “I was really Jacob Bosch, World Lanhappy to win Best of Athletic Wear guage because I worked super hard on my Grady Coppage, Varsity tennis look. Plus doing funny poses Cheer in front of my friends was fun.” Noah Haynes, BAHS Dance DECA (Distributive Education Jelani Pearson, DECA Clubs of America) representative, Zach Marcheselli, Football/ Jelani Pearson was able to take Wrestling home the title of Best of Talent for Joseph Williams, Mock Trial his performance of dancing to the song Revolution by Diplo. Aaron Mauricio, TSA (Tulsa “I felt good about winning my Tech) category because I could show Caleb Ricketts, Thespian everyone that I could dance,” Club FIERCE COMPETITION Choir Director Justin Rosser address the crowd. Pearson said.

Mr. BA Contestant List

Senior Noah Osborne sings for his talent. (Photos by Anna Stoner)

Noah Harris, Soccer

Seniors elect officers By Bailey Hill Pulse Staff Writer

Each year the senior class of Broken Arrow High School elects new class officers. The voting for class officers was held Sept. 21 through Sept. 22. The presidential candidate winner was Lexi Bagrosky, the vice president winner was Lorance Washington, and the treasurer winner was Gracelyn Basinger. The senior class is sponsored by sophomore English teacher Shelly Swisher. “Being a class officer is a tremendous honor. However, it’s also a big responsibility. The success or failure of all events rides solely on the shoulders of the officers and board members,” Swisher said. Campaigners were told to keep the campaigning relatively cheap to avoid buying votes. Posters were placed around the school with catch phrases. Chalk was also used around the school’s sidewalks to help catch the eyes of the students. As president, Bagrosky has multiple responsibilities such as designing the senior t-shirts,

planning the senior skit and creating new activities for the senior class. “I feel so honored to be class president, and I hope to give the class of 2017 the very best senior year Broken Arrow has ever had,” Bagrosky said. Lorance Washington was elected senior class vice president and he has multiple ideas and activities planned for this year. His responsibilities also include planning the meetings with the senior board members. “I just want to add events to the school year so seniors can have an enjoyable and memorable final year in high school,” Washington said. Lastly, the elected senior class treasurer is Gracelyn Basinger. Basinger used verbal tactics and social media to promote her campaign. “During my time as treasurer, I really hope I can make everyone’s senior year as memorable and important as possible. Being in charge of events like project graduation and the senior skit among other things, it is our job as officers to ensure these events are as creative and successful as they can be,” Basinger said. Officers will meet twice a month, once being with officers only, then once with the entire board.

ELECTED BY PEERS Seniors Lorance Washington, Gracelyn Basinger, and Lexi Bagrosky were recently elected vice president, secretary and class president, respectively. (Photo by Cloey Patton)


THE PULSE

B R O K E N

A R R O W

H I G H

S C H O O L

Lights up on the talent of Tigers By Kaylie Swatsenbarg Pulse Staff Writer

On Tuesday, Sept. 13, 29 students took the stage at the Broken Arrow performing arts center to showcase their special talent in front of the school. The event was a fundraiser for the drama department and was hosted by the theater production students. For $1 attendees could vote for their favorite act. Junior Addyson Nowell loves to sing, she is in Tiger Mystique show choir. For the show she decided on singing “Love in the Dark” by Adele. She was excited to audition and participate in the talent show because she loves singing for others. Aside from the excitement of her own performance, she also enjoyed seeing the other acts. “My favorite act was Gabe Jones’ dancing,” Nowell said. She hopes to pursue music after high school. One host of the night was senior Torri Jordan. She stood on the stage with fellow theater production student, senior Lauren Young. The duo told jokes and announced the acts of the night, as well as presented the audience favorites, senior Noah Osborne and sophomore Rachel Osborne, with their prizes. “My favorite act of the night was Olivia Woodrich’s pointe routine

to ‘You Can’t Stop the Beat’ from ‘Hairspray,’” Jordan said. Jordan was thrilled to be a host and enjoyed her time announcing the acts. Senior Chloe Lawrence attended the talent show. She was most excited to see sophomore Emma Cornell and senior Connor Blakely perform “Toxic” by Britney Spears. “Emma and Connor were my favorites because they performed with their whole hearts and it really moved me,” Lawrence said. She enjoyed supporting her fellow choir students who were performing as she truly loves what people can do and the impact it can have on others. The drama department decided to put together a slideshow of toddler pictures of all the performers as well as the theater production students. The slideshow played before the talent show and as the votes for the favorite act were counted. “We decided the toddler pictures would be a good way to fill time,” Jordan said, “but it also allowed people to see who was in the talent show.” The money raised from the talent show will help the drama department get the appropriate sets, costumes, makeup, and traveling equipment.

FULL TALENT SHOW CAST Erica Baker Jace Belknap Connor Blakely and Emma Cornell Jacob Bosch and Trenton Smotherman Adriana Fonseca and Olivia Serra Jada Holliday Gabriel Jones Ginger Kaseman Sam Locicero Taylor Malonson Renee Martin Chyna Mayer Brianna McGhee Chloe Neufeld Namera Newaz Addyson Nowell Noah and Rachel Osborne Kendall and Emory Parris Caleb Ricketts Noah Schatz Hailey Scott Emily Tucker Olivia Watkins Olivia Woodrich Ms.McCall’s Dance Troupe

TALENT SHOWCASE Students of all ages showed off their talents during the high school’s annual talent show, which was held on Sept. 13 at the Broken Arrow PAC. Senior Noah Osborne and his sister, sophomore Rachel Osborne (pictured at top) were named fan favorite. (Photo by Aylin Facundo)


B R O K E N

A R R O W

H I G H

S C H O O L

THE PULSE

Homecoming Dance is a success ‘Around the World’ theme brings animals to visit By Ally Coldwell Pulse Staff Writer

Saturday, Sept. 24 around 1500 students showed up to the high school campus for the annual homecoming dance. The dance was held in the main building, and the theme of the dance was “All Around the World.” “Over the summer we decided the theme, chose a venue and found a DJ, then we decided on what food to have, to have animals or not and what the decorations would look like,” senior Johna Pulliam. “I just thought that high school kids loved animals and it kind of tied to the theme.” The dance was planned out months in advance by the activities director Jason Jedamski, applied leadership teacher Whitney Nolen, the student union secretary Amy Stecker, English teacher and Student Council teacher Diana Phillips and the whole STUCO class. “The student’s effort and hard work was inspiring. They worked

for weeks on decorations, worked all day putting them up and stayed late taking them down,” Phillips said. “Johna Pulliam’s vision for the dance was extraordinary and my favorite part of the dance was seeing it come to life.” The dance had a DJ, an ice sculpture, catering from Ted’s, and exotic animals, provided by Extreme Animals, such as a lemur, a baby kangaroo named Kanye West, a baby crocodile, a hedgehog, a tarantula, a bearded dragon, a fox, a turtle and a couple snakes. “My favorite part of the dance was getting to hold some of the animals,” sophomore Hadley Giager said. “I loved them because they were soft and cute.” Despite a couple small interruptions, the dance went off without a hitch and at the end of the night district video manager Greg Spencer announced that they were going to film a portion of the lip dub at the dance. Pulliam was all in all happy with the way the dance turned out.

Like mother, like daughter

pretty neat being crowned alongside Iman, because I have known her for a long time.” It was a big moment for senior Iman Knox was shocked to win Tigette representative Iman homecoming queen. She never Knox when she was announced even thought she would be on homecoming queen at the football homecoming court. After finding game on Friday. The moment, out she was voted however, was on to homecoming I was extremely much more court, she was cherishable shocked when they hoping she would considering her be able to carry mother Trudi on the tradition called my name. Knox, had the that her mom had exact same -Iman Knox, senior started, but had moment in no idea that she 1985 when she would actually was crowned win. homecoming queen at her school, “I was extremely shocked when Oak Park High School. they called my name,” Iman said. “I was totally flabbergasted when “I thought it was fake or I was just Iman won homecoming queen,” imagining it, then I realized my Iman’s mother, Trudi Knox said. team was screaming as well as my “As I watched her get crowned all I parents. It was so unreal.” could do was scream and run toward my baby. I just kept thinking I can’t believe she won. I just wanted to run on the field and tackle her, pick her up and kiss her.” Iman Knox was crowned homecoming queen alongside fellow senior and Jungle Squad representative Marshall Hatfield, the 2016 homecoming king. “Bring crowned homecoming king was a great experience and I A TEARFUL MOMENT Seniors Iman Knox and Marshall Hatfield react to was in total shock. It was an unreal hearing their names called as queen and king. Tigettes cheer in reaction to feeling,” Hatfield said. “It was the announcement. (Photos by Allison Black) By Ally Coldwell Pulse Staff Writer


THE PULSE

B R O K E N

A R R O W

H I G H

S C H O O L

Students remember friend, Travor Brown painted in his honor, a Hawaiian shirt hanging in the newspaper room and some of his friends growFour thousand students at this ing out their hair like he did. school and the hallways still sound The tattoos worn by Howard, seincurably empty without the quiet nior Noah Osborne, and BAHS strum of a ukulele coming from the graduate Noah Bagley feature an direction of a tall blonde boy with 11:42, the time Brown passed away, a heart of gold and a smile that was along with a cross. The parking spot contagious. After a tragic accident that belongs to senior Miller Godthis summer, the high school cam- win was painted by him and fellow pus started the school year with a senior Becca Wheeler, and features little less joy this fall due to the loss a quote from Brown’s Twitter, “now of an irreplaceable friend. howl at the moon like a man.” AnTravor Brown had a tremendous other set of parking spots belong ability to impact lives and touched to Osborne and Howard, and they just about every student that at- feature a joint 11:42 and a cross in tended BAHS, Brown’s honor. whether you “I picked my fawere a close Travor has taught me vorite quote from friend, an acTravor’s Twitter for quaintance, or how to be my own my parking spot simply just a because he’s such a passerby in the person and to express huge part of Becca hallways. I’s lives,” Godit, to not care what and “Travor has win said. impacted my Brown was also others think of you. front life greatly and and center I wouldn’t be at almost every who I am to- -Jacob Howard, senior school event. He day if it wasn’t loved to have fun for our close and in turn, everyfriendship,” senior Jacob Howard one around him had fun too. Brown said. “Travor has taught me how to talked to anyone and everyone and be my own person and to express it didn’t matter how well you knew it, to not care what others think of him, he made everyone feel as if you.” they were his best friend. Brown was very involved in the “Travor taught me how to love; he drama department. He was also a taught me that everyone deserves to talented musician, often bringing a be treated fairly,” Osborne said. “I guitar or ukulele to school and play- want other people to remember the ing in the hallways or in his truck. legacy he left and the positive attiHe wrote songs and wanted to trav- tude he always had. I want them to el around the country bringing his remember how he loved everyone music to other people and sharing regardless of who they were.” his passion. Osborne set up a candlelight me“Travor was truly kind; it sounds morial the night before school startsimple, but it may be a rarer trait ed to honor Brown and let everyone than people think,” drama teacher start the new year in remembrance Jana Ellis said. “He taught me about of their friend. freedom, freedom of self doubt and Brown’s legacy continues to shine inhibition.” and he will forever be remembered Brown’s impact can be seen all by his famous quote, “If anyone’s inover the school with tattoos on the terested, I’ve got some free love to wrists of his friends, parking spots give.” By Ally Coldwell Pulse Staff Writer

Jasmine Marble excels By Shaelyn Disotell Pulse Staff Writer

Junior Jasmine Marble is most well known for being a band kid, participating in the Wind Ensemble and the Pride of Broken Arrow. Most people, however, don’t know that she is also an artist. Being in the Pride of Broken Arrow doesn’t allow much time for Marble to work on art outside of school, so she takes art as an elective during the school day. Marble has been taking art classes since the 7th grade, and is currently in ceramics and sculpting. “I really enjoy unconventional expression,” Marble said. “You can convey anything that you want in any way that you want and I admire that. There is no right way or wrong way with art.” Because of her love of art, Jasmine plans on pursuing an art career in graphic design and animation. “I want to pursue art because it never grows old, and there are no

boundaries or limits to what you can do,” Marble said. “I think it’s an amazing thing to be able to turn mere ideas into unique creations.” Although she doesn’t talk about her art very much, Marble’s talent does not go unnoticed, and her friends see what a fantastic artist she is. “Jasmine Marble is not only my best friend but one incredibly talented artist,” junior Victoria Colon Estrada said. “I fully believe she is capable of anything she puts her heart and mind to. There isn’t a certain genre of art she is good at, because she is unbelievably superb at everything.” Marble’s teachers can also see the potential and talent within her. “Jasmine’s art not only shows how talented she is, but also how versatile,” art teacher Brett Gray said. “Whether it is clay, drawing in pencil, charcoal, pen ink, it doesn’t matter. She always impresses.” If you want to see more, look for IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS Junior Jasmine Marble poses with her Marble’s art throughout the year in the clay piece, which is her take on a mandala. (Photo by Shaelyn Disotell) glass display cases in the art gallery.

STAFF

Adviser: Ashley Spencer, aspencer@baschools.org

Ally Coldwell, Shaelyn Disotell, Stone Freeman, Hunter Grim, Bailey Hill, Taylor Lanning, Cloey Patton, Cheyenne Pauls, Dominique Potter, Dylan Rivera, Kaylie Swatsenbarg, Haleigh Tallant, Drew Watske, Caleb Willis The Pulse welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be delivered to room MN106. The Pulse is a student-produced publication produced by the newspaper class of Broken Arrow High School, which also provides written content for bahspulse.com. Notice of Non-Discrimination- There will be no discrimination in the District because of race, color, sex, pregnancy, gender, gender expression or identity, national origin, religion, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, age, or genetic information in its programs, services, activities and employment. The district also provides equal access to the Boy Scouts of America and other designated youth groups.

The Pulse- Oct. 5, 2016 Issue  

The Pulse-The Official Student Newspaper of Broken Arrow High School in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you