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November 2019

THE HOW-TO PUBLICATION

BAR BUS NESS MAGAZINE

Pick A Present 2019

Holiday

gift guide

TUNE IN

How screens affect your aesthetic.

Crafting Cocktails How to plan your menu.

barbizmag.com


ARE YOU LOSING MONEY?

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*Source Impact Databank 2018. RumChata®. Caribbean Rum with Real Dairy Cream, Natural & Artificial Flavors, 13.75% alc/vol. Agave Loco Brands, Pewaukee, WI. Please Enjoy Responsibly. RUMCHATA and CHATA are Registered Trademarks of Agave Loco, LLC.


Contents How Tos

18 20

Rethinking Restrooms

Recent data on restrooms reveal its importance to the customer experience.

Tuning Up: Tune In To TV

What you show on your screens affects your bar’s aesthetic.

Departments

4

From the Editor

6

On Tap

A letter from our Editor Ashley Bray. Industry news & announcements.

12

Behind The Bar

16

Happenings

In-depth analysis of beer, wine, & spirits.

November

6

2019 Holiday Gift Guide We’ve taken the guesswork out of finding the perfect gift for your favorite industry insider (or yourself)!

Important dates for the month.

32

Inventory

36

Q+A

Featured product releases. Yavonne Sarber, Founder, Agave & Rye

Features

24

Crafting a Cocktail Menu

28

La Dolce Vita…In Liquid Form!

Things to consider when assembling your cocktail menu. Italian Prosecco and its cousins can bring extra fizz and lift to your menus.

Cover Photo: Shutterstock Contents photo: Shutterstock/ Fascinadora

barbizmag.com

November 2019

Bar Business Magazine

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THE HOW-TO PUBLICATION

BAR BUS NESS MAGAZINE

November 2019

Vol. 12

No. 11

Bar Business Magazine (ISSN 1944-7531) is published by Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corporation 88 Pine St 23rd Fl., New York, NY 10005

subscription department 800-895-4389

executive offices President Arthur J. McGinnis, Jr. Publisher Art Sutley 212-620-7247 asutley@sbpub.com

editorial

Editor Ashley Bray 212-620-7220 abray@sbpub.com Contributing Writers Elyse Glickman, Christopher Osburn, Giorgia Giove

art

Art Director Nicole D’Antona Graphic Designer Hillary Coleman

production

Corporate Production Director Mary Conyers mconyers@sbpub.com

circulation

Circulation Director Maureen Cooney mcooney@sbpub.com

advertising sales Art Sutley 212-620-7247 asutley@sbpub.com

Bar Business Magazine (Print ISSN 1944-7531, Digital ISSN 2161-5071) (USPS#000-342) is published February, April, June, August, October, and December. January, March, May, July, September, and November will only be offered in a digital format at no charge by Simmons-Boardman Publ. Corp, 88 Pine St. 23rd Floor, New York, NY 10005. Printed in the U.S.A. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and Additional mailing offices. Pricing, Qualified U.S. Bar Owners may request a free subscription. Non-qualified subscriptions printed or digital version: 1 year US $45.00; Canada $90.00; foreign $189.00; foreign, air mail $289.00. 2 years US $75.00; Canada $120.00; foreign $300.00; foreign, air mail $500.00. BOTH Print & Digital Versions: 1 year US $68.00; Canada $135.00; foreign $284.00; foreign, air mail $384.00. 2 years US $113.00; Canada $180.00; foreign $450.00; foreign, air mail $650.00. Single Copies are $10.00 ea. Subscriptions must be paid for in U.S. funds only. COPYRIGHT Š SimmonsBoardman Publishing Corporation 2019. All rights reserved. Contents may not be reproduced without permission. For reprint information contact: Art Sutley, Phone (212) 620-7247, or asutley@sbpub.com. For Subscriptions, & address changes, Please call (US Only) 1-800-553-8878 (CANADA/INTL) 1-319-364-6167, Fax 1-319-364-4278, e-mail barbusiness@stamats.com or write to: Bar Business Magazine, Simmons-Boardman Publ. Corp, PO Box 1407, Cedar Rapids, IA. 52406-1407. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Bar Business Magazine, PO Box 1407, Cedar Rapids, IA. 52406-1407. Instructional information in this magazine should only be performed by skilled craftspeople with the proper equipment. The publisher and authors of information provided herein advise all readers to exercise care when engaging in any of the how-to activities published in the magazine. Further, the publisher and authors assume no liability for damages or injuries resulting from projects contained herein.

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Bar Business Magazine

November 2019 barbizmag.com


Tobin Ellis, founder and CEO of BarMagic.

Imagine bar equipment conceived by a renowned bartender, and built by Perlick Perlick’s new Tobin Ellis Signature Cocktail Station is a breakthrough achievement in underbar design resulting from an ambitious collaboration between 6-time national bartending champion and celebrated bar designer, Tobin Ellis and the award-winning engineering team at Perlick.

“Together, we’ve built a cocktail station that’s perfect for everything from craft cocktail bars to high-volume nightclubs and 5-star/5-diamond hotel environments. It’s the tricked-out station every serious bartender has dreamt about and every savvy operator has hoped for.”

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from the editor

From The Editor

It’s not only a well-appointed room and a knowledgeable concierge that guests remember— it’s often the experience they had at the on-site restaurant or bar - Joel Montaniel, CEO of SevenRooms

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he holiday season is upon us, and with that comes a lot of travel. The bar culture can be incredibly important to travelers, and this is where hotel and airport bars come into play. SevenRooms, a data-driven hospitality platform that combines operations, marketing, and guest engagement tools, recently released its “Checking In For F&B” report, which uncovered the most important things to today’s traveler when it comes to food and beverage at hotels. The study, conducted with third party research firm YouGov, examined over 1,200 people’s preferences around hotel restaurants and bars, uncovering that F&B holds quite a bit of weight. In fact, nearly 1 in 3 (31%) Americans think hotels with great restaurants are more memorable than those without. According to the data, 51% of Americans would choose one hotel over another if that stay included a complimentary drink or meal upon arrival. “When you think about hospitality, hotels are regularly the first thing that comes to mind. But what many don’t consider is that it’s not only a wellappointed room and a knowledgeable concierge that guests remember—it’s often the experience they had at the on-site restaurant or bar,” said Joel Montaniel, CEO of SevenRooms. “Hotel brands, especially those with locations in various cities around the world, have a unique opportunity to build loyalty with customers through their F&B offerings.” And it’s not just travelers that hotels can cater to. With the demand for more

local experiences, hotels can also provide valuable experiences for those in the surrounding area by providing excellent service, serving unique and diverse food and beverage options, and showcasing local talent. These traits can also make locals more likely to consider booking with the same brand when traveling. In addition to hotels, airports should also consider the traveler’s experience. I make flight connections frequently at Chicago’s Midway airport, which recently opened new bars in the center of its concourse hallways. The bars, which sit right outside the gates, include a mezcal and tequila bar as well as a prohibitionstyle bar, both offering craft cocktails. I visited the prohibition-era bar on a recent layover, and a craft vodka cocktail made my wait more enjoyable. I also saw some hand-formed burgers and thick-cut steak fries being served. Seats were hard to come by at the bar, so my guess is that Midway is on to something and travelers are responding to the higher-end food and beverage options. Speaking of the holiday season, if you’re looking for unique gift ideas for the bartender or bar manager in your life (or maybe even yourself), check out our annual holiday gift guide on page 6.

Ashley bray, Editor

November 2019 barbizmag.com


GIFT GUIDE

Grand Cru from Glenfiddich

$299.99; glenfiddich.com

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Bollinger 007 Limited Edition, Vintage 2011

The Bollinger 007 Limited Edition, Vintage 2011 in celebration of Bond 25 is the perfect gift for champagne and James Bond enthusiasts alike. Since Roger Moore ordered Bollinger on-screen in 1973’s Live and Let Die, the bubbly has been featured in 14 Bond films. The fruit for the 2011 Vintage is sourced from a single grand cru vineyard in Aÿ, Champagne and marks the first time Bollinger has created a cuvée solely from this historic cru. After being vinified in oak barrels and aged for seven years under cork, it’s hand riddled and handdisgorged. Golden in color with glints of copper, it boasts aromas of honey, hard candy, and yellowfleshed fruits. On the palate, rich notes of stewed fruits are expressed with a beautiful round texture, elevated by a finish of mineral notes evocative of flint. The gift box includes a Bond-style opening mechanism. $230; champagne-bollinger.com

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Bar Business Magazine

We’ve taken the guesswork out of finding the perfect gift for your favorite industry insider (or yourself!). Take a look at the gift guide below, and get shopping!

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Hennessy X.O NEW Ice Experience Gift Pack The new Hennessy X.O Ice Experience pack contains one limited-edition 750mL bottle of Hennessy X.O in a one-of-a-kind ice-inspired gift box. The gift box transforms into an ice bucket with tongs and a recipe book for holiday celebrations. Created in 1870 by Maurice Hennessy for the enjoyment of his family and friends, Hennessy X.O was the first “Extra Old” Cognac ever invented that established the category. $200; hennessy.com

November 2019 barbizmag.com

All Photos: Shutterstock.com.

Grand Cru is an exclusive expression that’s been matured for 23 years. The new offering fuses together the finest flavors from Scotland and France to create a true taste of luxury. Through the art of experimentation, the rich whisky, already intense in flavor thanks to long maturation in American and European oak casks, is finely finessed with influences from French cuvée casks. Every drop of Grand Cru is the result of up to six months finishing time, adding new layers of luxury with a myriad of aromas, from apple blossom to candied lemon and freshly baked bread. Rich vanilla, sweet brioche, sandalwood, pear sorbet, and white grape build a harmony of flavors on the palate; enhanced by a long, opulent finish.


Gift Guide

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Crown Royal XR The second addition to the Crown Royal Extra Rare Whisky Series, Crown Royal XR is a limited-edition whisky crafted from one of the final batches of whiskies that were saved from the renowned LaSalle Distillery (located on the island of Montreal), opened in 1924 by the Bronfman family. While the distillery closed in 1993, this piece of its history continues to live on, but for a limited time only. Crown Royal XR is full bodied and incredibly smooth with the aroma of pear and complementary floral bouquet notes. The honeyed pear maintains upon first taste and is joined by tones of dried apricot and raisins midpalate. The finish is exquisite with an elegant touch of cocoa and brown sugar. $129.99; crownroyal.com

Don Papa Rum Sherry Cask Finish

5

Don Papa Rum has released Sherry Cask Finish, an exclusive limited-edition rum. Sherry Cask Finish is distilled on the island of Negros ( just like Don Papa 7 and 10 Year) where the volcanic soil and tropical climate allow for the growth of Noble Cane, the original species of sugar cane high in sucrose. Sherry Cask Finish brings a full-bodied yet delicate sweetness with an intriguing range of flavors such as plum, dark chocolate, and ripe figs. Produced from molasses and column distilled in Bago, Don Papa Sherry Cask Finish is first aged for four years in American Oak ex-Bourbon casks at 63% ABV followed by 18-24 months in four different types of Sherry Casks: Fino, Pedro XimĂŠnez, Palo Cortado, and Cream. The rums are then carefully blended and bottled at 45% ABV to further enhance its singular taste. $69.99; donpaparum.com

barbizmag.com

November 2019

Bar Business Magazine

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Gift Guide Sweet Wine Club

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Sweet Wine Club offers sweet red and white wines from the Riboli Family Wines of San Antonio Winery. Each box features three wines, including a selection of Stella Rosa wines, crafted wines from San Antonio Winery, food pairing recipe cards, and other gifts. $49.99; sweetwineclub.com/our-wines

Johnnie Walker A Song of Ice and A Song of Fire Do you have a Game of Thrones fan in your life? Honor the enduring legacy of the show and gift them with Johnnie Walker A Song of Ice and A Song of Fire whiskey blends. These new, limited-edition blends are inspired by the dynamic relationship between the iconic and powerful houses of Westeros—House Stark and House Targaryen. Winter is coming, so be sure to snatch up these limited-edition offerings. $36; johnniewalker.com

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November 2019 barbizmag.com


Gift Guide

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Brockmans Gin Gift Pack Brockmans Gin is bringing back its gift carton with a 750ml bottle. The stylish black gift tube is designed to mirror Brockmans’ distinctive, tactile bottle. “Brockmans Gin is the quintessential spirit to celebrate with this holiday and a perfect centerpiece for any celebration,” says Neil Everitt, Co-Founder and CEO of Brockmans Gin. “Our gin is a contemporary reinterpretation of gin that is so smooth, it can be enjoyed neat, over ice, or in a range of cocktails making it the ideal choice for the season’s intimate and festive celebrations alike.”

J. Rieger & Co. 2019 Holiday Edition KC Whiskey Label Now in its third year, Rieger’s Kansas City Whiskey Holiday Edition label is perfect for hosts/hostesses or a stocking stuffer. This year’s label is a vintage collaboration with local clothing company Charlie Hustle, a Kansas City designer. Elements of an original 1910 advertisement from the pre-Prohibition distillery in Kansas City depict a wintery forest scene of evergreens and falling snow with a festive red 2019 Holiday Edition banner on the outside label. Fans of the Charlie Hustle brand will recognize the “KC Heart” in the center, a signature of the designer’s vintage line. The interior label reveals Santa holding bottles of the Rieger’s Monogram Whiskey with the tagline, Rieger’s Good Cheer.

$34.99; brockmansgin.com

$34.99; JRiegerCo.com

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November 2019 barbizmag.com


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Behind The Bar: Rum

Let’s talk

Forget everything you know about rum. BY Ashley Bray

T

he conversation about rum is changing as brands and on-premise establishments alike aim to shift perceptions surrounding this spirit. Some facts remain unchanged—rum is a distilled spirit made by fermenting then distilling sugarcane molasses or sugarcane juice that is then aged in barrels. Most rums are produced in Caribbean and American countries. From there, the market is opening up to view rum in all-new ways. Ten to One Ten to One Rum launched earlier this year in New York City with the goal of

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Bar Business Magazine

changing the narrative about rum. “While seemingly every other spirit— vodka, tequila, mezcal, gin—has followed a similar ‘arc of premiumization’ in the U.S. and beyond, rum has seemingly stood alone. And for far too long, I think the category has suffered from an overly narrow and somewhat caricaturized and uninspired positioning,” says Marc Farrell, Founder of Ten To One Rum. “As someone who is born and raised in the Caribbean [Trinidad], I really believe we have an enormous opportunity to further elevate the conversation around rum— not only by introducing a high-quality spirit to market, but by broadening both the current narrative around rum, and

November 2019 barbizmag.com

Photo: Ten to One.

RUM


Behind The Bar: Rum

Photo: Bully Boy Distillers.

the occasions for which it might be considered the spirit of choice.” Ten to One sees many of those occasions as celebratory. “Central to this new narrative is our desire to offer a unique window into the Caribbean art of celebration, unlike any that has been seen in market before,” says Farrell. Ten to One chose to include all of the Caribbean in its two rum blends versus focusing on just one area. “We wanted to tell a pan-Caribbean story with our product and reflect the different cultures, communities, and perspectives celebrated by Ten To One,” says Farrell. “Simply put, we’re choosing to tell a different story, focused on bringing to life a much more contemporary view of Caribbean culture, expressed through the lens of an elevated and versatile spirits brand.” The brand’s dark rum expression is a combination of column still Dominican, Trinidadian, and Barbadian rums finished in aged American Oak ex-Bourbon casks and combined with high-ester Jamaican pot still rum. “Our dark rum can be sipped neat, on the rocks, or with a splash of soda or even tonic, but also has the requisite character and intrigue in its flavor profile to provide a great foundation for mixologists,” says Farrell. The white rum aims to challenge consumer perceptions about what a white rum can really deliver while being the ultimate companion for mixologists. At 90 proof, the white rum is higher proof with a more pronounced ester content, based on a blend of Dominican column still rum with high-ester Jamaican pot still rum. Neither of the two blends contains any added sugar, colors, or flavorings. Ten to One expects to be in new markets in early 2020, and continue to broaden distribution from there. Bully Boy Distillers Bully Boy Distillers in Boston, Massachusetts also aims to premiumize the rum category with its first blend, The Rum Cooperative, which features authentic, super–premium rums. Volume One sources rums from five regions: Panama, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad, Jamaica, and Boston. Volume Two, released in late barbizmag.com

October, features five different rums from Mexico, Martinique, Puerto Rico, Panama, and Columbia. “There are lots of blended rums out there, but few of them disclose the fact that they are blends. We wanted total transparency,” says Bully Boy Co-Founder and Head Distiller Dave Willis. “There has been a movement in the rum world towards transparency. With transparency comes credibility, which the category needs. “We not only tell you the rums in the blend, we tell you the percentage of each rum used. It’s a way for rum fanatics to parse the blend and really dig into what each rum brings to the table.” Volume One of The Rum Cooperative begins with 45% Panamanian rum featuring lighter notes of fruit, oak, and leather, and 36% Dominican rum providing the delicate, light–bodied notes. The rich undercurrents of flavor come from 8.1% Trinidadian rum, which imparts a smooth, silky finish while the funky notes of 0.9% Jamaican rum carry the perfect amount of mystique and depth. Lastly, the addition of 10% of the previously unreleased eight-year-old expression of Bully Boy’s flagship Boston Rum mellows the robust flavors and rounds out the blend with nuanced notes of toasted nuts and caramelized fruits. “We’ve crafted a complex patchwork of flavors and aromas that not only express the rum’s various origins, but work harmoniously with each other,” said Willis, in a press release. Swizzle Rum Bar & Drinkery It’s not just brands that are looking to change the conversation about rum; on-premise locations are also getting into the mix. Danilo “Dacha” Bozovic and Partners Jesus Perez, Milos Velickovic, Jason Tune, Strahinja Marjanovic, and Nikola Dragojevic—the same team behind Employees Only Miami—opened The Swizzle Rum Bar & Drinkery in Miami this past September. The intimate and sophisticated craft cocktail bar includes a selection of over 150 rums in a venue that evokes a small and hidden rum bar during the 18th and 19th century port life. “Swizzle Rum Bar & Drinkery is a preprohibition concept that emphasizes on

wood, brick, leather, and classic and contemporary cocktails,” says Bozovic. The bar honors the legacy of rum with a Florida Rum Tasting option, which includes four, two-ounce pours of local Florida rums along with a walkthrough of the tasting notes and the history of the different rums. The establishment also features a small rum museum with pictures depicting the history of sugarcane, rum, and molasses. The bar will also host guest lectures, classes, and demonstrations that will be available to the public. Returning Rum to the Spotlight On the heels of more premium options and a changing narrative, rum is poised for its turn in the spotlight. “Rum is an amazingly versatile spirit, it’s cocktail friendly, and can be enjoyed straight. Not to mention the impact it has had on the cocktail culture with the daiquiri and mojito, and both are still popular with consumers,” says Bozovic. “I see brands are really caring about what they present to the public. Aged rum and singlebarrel rum is also starting to pick up. “I think rum is making a comeback in a very strong way. Its diversity is incredible—from light, to aged, and single barrel—it’s a gem.” Farrell urges brands and on-premise venues to take action in bringing about a comeback for rum. “Whenever discussing a potential ‘rum renaissance’ or renewed consumer interest in the spirit, however, November 2019

Bar Business Magazine

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Behind The Bar: Rum

The Mulled Cooperative 1½ oz Bully Boy Rum Cooperative 1 oz Local apple cider ¾ oz Simple syrup ½ oz Lemon juice 2 dashes Angostura Bitters Pinch Black pepper 1 tsp Vanilla extract Shake ingredients with ice and pour into an ice-filled glass. Garnish with orange peel. Adrian Navarro, Lead Bartender, Bully Boy Distillers

Mamey Swizzle

Shake ingredients with ice and pour into an ice-filled glass. Swizzle Rum Bar & Drinkery

El Presidente 1½ oz Cruzan Single Barrel Rum ¾ oz Common Vermouth Blanc ¼ oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao ¼ oz Pomegranate molasses 2 dashes Angostura Bitters Shake with ice. Strain into coupe glass. Garnish with lemon peel. Swizzle Rum Bar & Drinkery

Old Money 2 oz Coconut Cartel Rum Barspoon Hibiscus liqueur 8 Dashes Angostura Bitters Stirred cold and over large ice. Garnish with lemon twist. Coconut Cartel

Swords & Monkeys 1½ oz Ten to One Dark Rum ¾ oz Bowmore ½ oz Mr. Black Coffee Liqueur ¼ oz Giffard Banana ½ oz Coconut mix (2 parts Coco Lopez: 1 part Coconut Milk) ½ oz Lime juice Whip shake with pebble ice. Dump into chilled snifter glass. Fill with pebble ice. Garnish with absinthe-spritzed umbrella. Ali Martin, The Up & Up, New York City 14

Bar Business Magazine

Swords & Monkeys

I’m always quick to point out that this isn’t something that those in the category can just sit back and wait to have happen,” says Farrell. “Instead, it requires a sustained effort to modernize the positioning of the category, an investment in consumer education, and an expansion of the number of occasions for which rum is considered the spirit of choice.” So how do you get guests to return to rum? For one, promoting rum as a sipping spirit may change perceptions. “We believe that finding opportunities to introduce customers to the spirit in its purest form is always of tremendous benefit to cultivate loyalty and affinity,” says Farrell. When it comes to presenting rum in cocktails, don’t be afraid to experiment. Rum twists on classics often work well. “[We] have found a great deal of enthusiasm for leveraging our rum to create some cocktail classics ‘with a twist,’” says Farrell. “Whether a rum old fashioned, rum negroni, rum martini, or more, bartenders have a number of great choices to showcase the quality and versatility of the spirit amongst some already-known commodities to consumers.” Willis agrees and sees rum as a nice surrogate for gin as well. “If you drink gin and tonics during the summer, try rum and tonic. It’s just as refreshing, and I think it makes

for a more interesting drink. Rum tends to be aged in used cooperage, typically ex-bourbon barrels, which makes for a more gentle, less barrelforward flavor profile. Because it’s less woody, it’s a really versatile spirit. Take advantage of the versatility,” he says, also advising to stay away from overly sweet or citrusy cocktails. Bozovic agrees. “I think the biggest thing to overcome with rum is guests being afraid that the cocktail is going to be too sweet,” he says. “There is such a diversity of styles, one can make a sour style cocktail or a stirred Manhattan-like drink. If the person likes vodka, they can enjoy a lighter rum style cocktail, and if someone likes bourbon, rye, cognac, or brandy, one can suggest an aged rum.” Complementary flavors authentic to rum’s history can also be successful. “We are in constant conversation with our partners in trade sharing learnings from consumers in the market and highlighting any emerging preferences in ingredients or consumption that we’ve seen find success with consumers in market, while also feeling authentic to the heritage and provenance of rum,” says Farrell. “Examples here would be coconut water (a foundational mixer for rum in the Caribbean) and hibiscus (known as sorrel in Trinidad/ Jamaica), which are both very authentic ingredients that can be used to greatly elevate rum cocktails.”

November 2019 barbizmag.com

Photo: Ali Martin.

1½ oz Havana Club Añejo ½ oz Bruxo Mezcal ¾ oz Fresh lime juice 1 oz Mamey Ginger Falernum Top up Jamaican bitters


ATTEND. CONNECT. EXPERIENCE. REGISTER EARLY & SAVE 50% USE CODE: BARBUSINESS vinexponewyork.com/attend Offer ends Nov. 30, 2019 Discount off full on-site price.

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Happenings December 2019

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December 31 National Champagne Day Raise a glass and then turn to page 28 for our feature on all things prosecco.

December 13 National Cocoa Day Chocolate is the flavor of the season. Kick it up a notch by adding liqueurs, flavored whiskey, or another spirit.

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December 24 Christmas Eve Santa’s on his way and your drink specials should be too! Line up a special menu for the most magical night of the year.

Need a gift idea? Check out our holiday gift guide on page 6.

December 21 Winter Solstice Celebrate the arrival of the snowy season with all-white cocktails like a Ramos Gin Fizz, spiked eggnog, or shots of Rumchata.

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November 2019 barbizmag.com

All Photos: Shutterstock.com.

December 8 National Bartender Day


Happenings

Upcoming

December 18 Bake Cookies Day

EVENTS

Turn to the flavors of cookies for cocktail inspiration today.

DECEMBER craft beverage expo December 3-5, 2019 Louisville, Kentucky

craftbeverageexpo.com

December 1 National Eggnog Month Rum is a popular spirit used to spike eggnog. Turn to page 12 for more recipe ideas and a look at a few brands.

JANUARY san antonio cocktail conference January 15-19, 2020 San Antonio, Texas

sanantoniococktailconference.com

Hotel, motel, & restaurant supply show

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December 8 National Brownie Day Dessert anyone? Mix up a batch of actual brownies or a cocktail that just tastes like one.

January 28-30, 2020 Myrtle Beach, South Carolina hmrsss.com

march International restaurant & foodservice show of New york March 8-10, 2020 New York, New York

internationalrestaurantny.com

New England Food Show March 22-24, 2020 Boston, Massachusetts

newenglandfoodshow.com

December 12 Poinsettia Day Decorate your bar with this seasonal plant or create some cocktails with a vibrant red hue.

barbizmag.com

nightclub & Bar show March 30-April 1, 2020 Las Vegas, Nevada ncbshow.com

November 2019

Bar Business Magazine

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How To

How To: BATHROOM CLEANING

Recent data on restrooms reveal its importance to the customer experience.

RETHINKING Restrooms 18

By GIORGIA GIOVE Bar Business Magazine November 2019 barbizmag.com


R

How To: BATHROOM CLEANING

Photos (left to right): Unsplash.com; Shutterstock/ Panyawat B.SILP.

estrooms have the power to make or break a customer’s experience at a restaurant and can even overshadow excellent service and food. In fact, according to a recent survey of over 2,000 U.S. adults commissioned by Sofidel and conducted online by Harris Poll, 71% of Americans say encountering a clogged toilet would negatively impact their perception of a restaurant. Understanding the role that restrooms play can help owners and managers transform their approach to restroom maintenance and cleanliness. Enriching Experiences Restroom cleanliness, functionality, and the availability and quality of paper products, all shape the customer experience. Restaurants should focus on the following tasks to ensure their restrooms always look their best. Curtail toilet clogs. A clogged toilet quickly flushes away any hope of a positive restroom experience. According to the poll quoted above, three-quarters of Americans have experienced a clogged public restroom toilet. Clogged toilets are not only unsightly, they are unsanitary and cause lingering odors. Busy restaurant employees may not have time to regularly check each stall for clogs. Today, however, restaurants can stock toilet paper that is specifically designed to fight clogs. Managers should look for toilet paper that activates non-pathogenic, environmentally safe microorganisms once it comes into contact with water. These microorganisms eat away at dirt inside pipes to reduce the risk of clogs. Pick paper towels. Various research argues that using paper towels is the most hygienic way to dry hands in a public restroom, as hand dryers can blow previously accumulated bacteria back into the air and onto guests. Public opinion is also on the side of paper towels. A 2017 study of over 2,000 U.S. adults by Cintas Corporation, conducted online by Harris Poll, showed 69% of Americans think paper towels dry hands more effectively than air dryers. Go for touch-free dispensers, which limit the spread of germs and waste by minimizing overuse of paper towels. barbizmag.com

Toilet paper. According to a 2019 survey from Sofidel conducted online by Harris Poll, strength, absorbency, and softness are the triple threat for toilet paper in public restrooms. The survey found that nine in 10 Americans value both strength and absorbency as very or somewhat important, while more than four in five (84%) consider softness to be very or somewhat important. A survey by Just the Facts, Inc. among 800 restaurant managers in the U.S found that most managers (58%) rank quality, not price, as the single most important attribute of the toilet paper they buy. Digging into Online Reviews The Just the Facts survey also found that 91% of the restaurant managers strongly agree that restroom cleanliness has an impact on customer satisfaction. A Chatmeter analysis of more than 8,900 online restaurant reviews, all of which mentioned restrooms, showed 78% of them discussed restroom cleanliness or dirtiness—underscoring that the cleanliness of a restroom leaves an impression on overall customer experience. Of the reviews discussing the state of restrooms, 58% contained negative comments. More specifically, nearly one-third (32%) of the 5,000-plus negative reviews discussed a “dirty” or “filthy” restroom appearance, unpleasant smells, or out-of-stock products. A 2018 poll from Sofidel, conducted online by Harris Poll, demonstrated how online reviews affect readers’ impressions of brands. It found that 89% of

Americans would not visit a restaurant based on negative online reviews about its restrooms. A majority of customers agree that two factors within reviews—clogged toilets and foul odors—would greatly affect their willingness to try a restaurant. Two-thirds of customers said the mention of restroom odors in a review would be reason to avoid that business, while a clogged toilet would influence 63%. A lack of toilet paper, soap, and paper towels mentioned in an online review would deter nearly half (46%). Data-driven Decisions Developing thorough training programs and adopting best practices for cleaning and stocking restrooms is a good first step to minimize the occurrence of negative reviews about restrooms. Managers should also monitor online reviews across platforms and respond thoughtfully and without hostility to any complaints. If trends emerge from negative online reviews, managers can conduct re-training and make necessary changes. Data-driven action can favorably shape public perceptions of one restaurant, or even an entire chain, if management implements better restroom maintenance on a larger scale. Giorgia Giove is the Marketing Manager for the Away From Home business at Sofidel, a world leader in the manufacture of paper for hygienic and domestic use, including its Papernet brand. For more information, visit papernet.com/americas. November 2019

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Tuning Up

How To: TUNE IN TO TV

HOW TO

Tune in to TV What you show on your screens affects your bar’s aesthetic. elevisions play an important role in the overall bar aesthetic. And more than ever, bars and restaurants are cutting the cord on traditional cable in lieu of curated music videos, viral videos, social media, and engaging content—all with the goal of creating an entertaining and exciting

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venue for customers. “Entertainment is a key part of customer engagement in any business,” says Adam Hirsen, Co-Founder and CEO of UPshow. Consumers are constantly bombarded by ads. As a result, they’ve become experts at tuning out marketing materials and promotions. “Providing an

engaging in-venue experience is key to drawing those customers back in, so that they are paying attention when you do choose to market to them,” says Hirsen. It’s important to learn exactly what companies offer in terms of products and services when it comes to televisionbased entertainment. You can find three different companies below.

November 2019 barbizmag.com

Photo: Loop Media.

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By Christopher Osburn


TUNING UP

To create a stellar guest experience, you can’t afford to ignore TV entertainment.

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managing up to three separate zones of music video/signage and 22 zones of overhead/background music from a single device. “The product philosophy behind both offerings is simplicity for the busy operator,” says Miller. Loop services all types of businesses from smaller venues operated by independent owners to some of the largest multi-million-dollar buildout hospitality groups in the world. “We encourage anyone interested in our service to see it in action at one of our many locations,” says Miller. “Better entertainment keeps guests in the buying process longer and creates brand advocates who love talking about their experience, which now more than ever is crucial to bringing new business and keeping repeat visitors coming back.” Loop empowers clients to tailor their music and video service to match their brand identity. This offers operators a high degree of flexibility to ensure the right content is in rotation on the right screens, at the right time. “Whether that be the genre of music and video content playing fits their demographic, using their screens primarily for marketing, showcasing hilarious comedy content, or making Loop’s content visible on just a handful of TVs during a big sporting event to entertain guests who may not be that into sports,” says Miller. “We always make a point to get to know our

clients and their customers, and we all learn something in the process.” UPshow Upshow was founded in 2015 as a screen-based consumer engagement platform that uses TVs and customers’ smartphones to engage and improve the overall experience. “UPshow gives bars total control over the content that appears on its TVs with a comprehensive entertainment and marketing offering,” says Hirsen. “This includes hyperlocal channels that cover every team (pro/college/local) and topic that matters to guests, as well as trivia and the world’s best viral video channels.” Upshow’s newest feature includes the ability to track the performance of on-screen marketing materials, proving that screen-to-mobile engagement can be a key revenue driver to businesses. “We’re also excited to offer a dynamic sports betting experience in states where it’s legal,” says Hirsen. UPshow believes that cable isn’t the only option anymore, and it definitely shouldn’t be the only thing on a bar’s TVs. “Most of the time, playing national programming risks showing irrelevant or inappropriate content to your guests, or worse, exposing them to advertising from your competitors,” he says. “Replacing or complementing cable with a customizable engagement

November 2019 barbizmag.com

Photo: Control Play.

Loop Media Loop Media prides itself on offering premium entertainment options. They do this by offering clients on-screen music videos, interactive programs, and viral videos. The design is to create word-of-mouth brand promotion for your bar as well as help create a system of exciting guest engagement. Loop offers access to the most comprehensive music video and audio catalog in the world. This comes with multiple custom-curated playlists that are created for each individual brand. “Additionally, clients have the ability to insert their brand’s digital signage within the entertainment programming to drive sales,” says Jeremy Miller, Director of Business Development for Loop Media. Delivered through an inexpensive streaming player, Loop TV gives clients the ability to control their playlists, digital signage, and more from a web-based “business portal” or via remote in-venue. “Future features include the option for guests to influence the playlists and share their experiences on social media,” says Miller. “The guest has a great time, the business gets more organic social exposure and can reward brand advocates with special deals via push notifications.” The company’s store-forward ScreenPlay service is designed for casinos, hotels, and other large properties and is now capable of


platform increases the control your venue has over what your customers see and grants you the opportunity to drive the outcomes that matter most from some of your biggest in-venue assets.” Major brands like Buffalo Wild Wings, Wendy’s, and Chick-fil-A are using the UPshow platform to entertain their guests. “Wendy’s cut the cord on its TV service in almost 100 locations,” says Hirsen. “One of its largest franchises (Hamra) adopted a branded ‘Social TV’ platform that provides hyperlocal, social media-powered content feeds from Instagram and Twitter, with hundreds of location and interest-based social feeds.” Control Play Control Play is a full-featured entertainment solution built specifically for the foodservice industry. “It’s a software and service that provides the best music and music video playlists as well as digital signage and aims to help subscribers exceed their guests’ expectations,” says Adam Lumley, Director of Communications & Marketing at Control Play. The company’s goal is to create that “wow” factor in your venue as soon as a guest walks in—ensuring that they’ll come back again and again. Control Play offers a massive library of both current and classic music videos in the highest quality possible. “We also provide digital signage templates built into our player so bars can easily display animated, HD advertisements and promotions,” says Lumley. “The service also grants access to our team of creative professionals who can custom

build digital signage ads for you based on your specifications.” They’ve also added other interesting features over the past few years. “Visualizers, video text, and live RSS feeds from Twitter make it easy to add a little something extra to the on-screen experience,” says Lumley. “The software even allows subscribers to upload the same content they’d use on their social media pages, so all messaging and visuals stay consistent and on-brand.” Their software is constantly being upgraded to make it easier to use and dynamic in execution. “It features an offline mode that ensures your entertainment keeps playing even if your internet connection suddenly gets cut off for a bit,” explains Lumley. “New music is automatically added every day so you can give your guests the ‘you heard it here first’ experience. If a popular artist releases a new song or video, you can expect it to be in our player on the day it drops.” Those who understand just how important entertainment is to bars serve as the differentiator between successful and unsuccessful venues. “Today, guest experience is about way more than just serving up drinks or food; there’s got to be an experience there,” says Lumley. “Anyone can get quality menu items from just about anywhere; they leave the house to get more than that.” That’s why it’s important to consider all the details of their venue, including the audio/video setup and what’s playing on it. “If you want more in your guest experience and more out of your customers, you can’t afford to ignore it,” says Lumley.

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Menus

Crafting a

Cocktail Menu By ASHLEY BRAY

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Menus

Photos (left ot right): Shutterstock/ klublu; Juniper and Ivy.

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Things to consider when assembling your cocktail menu.

he cocktail menu you place in front of guests should have something for everyone—a cocktail for those who love the classics, something for the adventurous types, and today, even a drink for those abstaining from alcohol. So how do you pull that off? Balance. “Putting together a balanced cocktail menu is harder than it seems. I think having a direct and shaken cocktail for those popular spirits is the best route. Know your clientele as well—what might be a balanced menu to you, might not be popular with your guests,” says Corey Tighe, Bar Manager of Juniper and Ivy, a Michelin Star-awarded restaurant in San Diego, California. “Not everything on your menu has to be cutting edge. You need those approachable cocktails so the guest begins to trust you and your skills.” Marina Holter, Head Bartender at The Whistler, a trendy bar with nightly live music acts in Chicago, recommends featuring a variety of spirits on your menu. “I think having a diversity of spirits that are represented on the menu is definitely advantageous because certain base ingredients are going to steer you toward other things too,” she says. As for trending spirits, Tighe has seen demand for Japanese whiskies while Holter sees a rise in the availability and use of low-ABV products like sherries, vermouths, and amaros. “It’s a lot easier to play off some of the savory, saline qualities you might get from certain vermouths or sherries,” says Holter. “Even different amaros layer in a lot more bitterness that can create a lot of these different, unexpected flavors.” Tighe has also noticed a rise in savory flavors in addition to aquavit and aquafaba cocktails. In fact, when it comes to food, Tighe works closely with Juniper and Ivy’s chef. “Our chef team is constantly creating new dishes depending on what is in season, so I try to mirror that mentality when creating the cocktail menu,” he says. Food also plays a big role in Holter’s cocktails—even directly influencing the barbizmag.com

flavors. She draws inspiration from her favorite snacks, dishes from her travels around the world, and recipes from her upbringing in a Brazilian-American household. Utilizing fat-washing methods and house-made tinctures, syrups, and spirit infusions, Holter adds buttered popcorn sherry, soy sauce tinctures, Peruvian sweet peppers, and more to shake up savory cocktails. Using buttered popcorn as her inspiration, Holter recently created the Opening Credits martini. Fat-washed, popcorn-infused Fino sherry gives the cocktail a strong buttery taste and mouthfeel. Dry vermouth and honey salt is added to balance out the butter flavor, giving it a salty and slightly sweet finish. Holter says unique cocktails are the norm at The Whistler, which gives her greater creative freedom behind the bar. “People have done weird, obscure cocktails here since day one, and I think that’s kind of the beauty of the space,” she says. “The more I get to lean on flavors that they’re not familiar with,

The Great Pumpkin...Fizz 1½ oz You and Yours Winter Gin 1 Egg white ½ oz Roasted pumpkin puree ½ oz Lemon ½ oz Maple syrup 2 dash Regan’s Orange Bitters 2 dash Bittermens Tiki Bitters Sortilege Maple Add all ingredients to a Boston shaker except Sortilege Maple. Dry shake, add ice, shake, and double strain into a fizz glass. Top with soda water. Spritz the top of the cocktail with Sortilege Maple. Serve on B&B plates with a napkin. Garnish with a pumpkin cookie. Corey Tighe, Juniper and Ivy

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Menus the more ready they’re going to be for that next bartender’s drink with flavors they’re not used to.” Creativity is key to keeping a menu fresh, but it’s also important not to stray too far from what customers want. “Stay true to your concept and not your personal preference,” says Tighe. Speaking of customer demand, both Holter and Tighe note that spirits from

local distillers have been especially popular. “I think people are trying to make a push to know their ingredients, their booze, and whether it’s local or not,” says Holter, noting that brands with ties to sustainability have also been in demand. Finally, both Holter and Tighe acknowledge that non-alcoholic options must appear on your menu. “There has been an increase in N/A

beverages. I believe that even though someone is not drinking alcohol, they should still have an opportunity to have the experience of receiving a wellcrafted refresher,” says Tighe. “I think bars shouldn’t let a non-alcoholic menu fall by the wayside.” Holter agrees. “There was a day last week where over 10% of total sales were all non-alcoholic cocktails,” she says, noting the bar’s non-alcoholic cocktails are riffs on old Whistler classics. “We always have the stuff to make them, they’re always consistent, and they’re definitely a little more different.” Above all, be sure to focus on quality. “We all just want to be making really good drinks,” says Holter.

Buck Hunter 1.5 oz Toasted Corn Scotch .5 oz Butter-washed Velvet Falernum .75 oz Pumpkin/burnt sugar syrup .75 oz Lemon 1 bs Allspice Crushed ice, bamboo Tiki Angostura float, Grated cinnamon & insert Shake all ingredients and pour over crushed ice. Add Angostura float. Garnish with grated cinnamon and stick.

Photo: The Whistler.

Marina Holter, The Whistler

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Mixed Up: Prosecco

La Dolce Vita

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rench champagnes (and sparkling wines made in the methode champenoise) get a lot of attention this time of year as customer demand starts leaning towards the celebratory. Of course, some places are tailored for the finest luxury labels such as Ruinart, Dom

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Perignon, Veuve Clicquot, and Perrier Jouet. If your venue falls into the fourand five- “$” category, some of these should be in stock for your choosy clientele. Beyond the luxury tier, however, Italian prosecco can add sparkle to your beverage program and bottom line. While most buyers and managers

gauge their choice of bubbly by their budget, they know cheap sparkling wines won’t pop among increasingly sophisticated clientele. This is precisely why prosecco is a go-to choice. As dishes of every description and ethnic origin find their way into formal multi-course dinners, laid back family-style meals

November 2019 barbizmag.com

Shutterstock/ Yulia Grigoryeva.

In Liquid Form!


Mixed Up: Prosecco

Italian Prosecco and its cousins can bring extra fizz and lift to your menus.

Photo: Disaronno.

By elyse glickman

(brunch), buffets, and passed hors d’oeuvres events (think clients’ office Christmas parties, holiday networking mixers, and New Year’s Eve), a sparkling wine needs to be all things to all people. It should be priced to be served in large quantities, pairable with different kinds of food, and adaptable for bartenders barbizmag.com

and customers with varying palates. However, it is also important to consider that unlike champagne, prosecco is made to drink soon after it is made, and does not improve with age. Krista Drew, Director of Public Relations, Digital & Events for Pernod Ricard USA’s Wine & Champagne Portfolio, offers a few common-sense storage tips to keep profits bubbling up: • Don’t store it in the fridge unless you plan on serving it in the next few days. The cold temp can shrink the cork and allow air into the bottle, which can cause the bottle to lose its fresh quality. • Conversely, don’t store wine/ sparkling in any really hot area or somewhere there is too much light. • The best storage place is a cool, dark location. A place that doesn’t have wide variations in temperature is best. “Prosecco is versatile and definitely works outside of its traditional arenas,” says Sarah Mengoni, Lead Bartender at Los Angeles’ Double Take. “Not only does it take to the sweet fruit that is present in most cuisines, it also mixes well with many types of spice. Ethiopian food? Try mixing it with some delicious fermented honey wine. Chinese food? How about a syrup made with mandarin oranges and five spice? Mexican food? Try mixing it with pineapple juice and adding a rim of spicy tajín!” Erin DeMara, VinItaly Academy Italian Wine Ambassador and Certified Wine Educator at 1821 Fine Wines & Spirits in Florida, points out that prosecco is made in a style that not only makes it more affordable than champagne, but that style of softer bubbles and a generally fruitier taste means that prosecco is easier to drink. “The Glera grape, upon which prosecco is based, gives very pleasant primary aromas and flavors of fruit like peaches, pears, and citrus to the wine, along with hints of white flowers and almonds,” she explains. “Good prosecco can be found in the range from $15 to $25 per bottle, but quality and sweetness levels can vary widely so choosing a respected producer is as important as with champagne.” While Elizabeth Sammuri, Sommelier and Beverage Director of Flagstaff House Restaurant in Boulder, Colorado, and Adam Sweders, Wine Director for

Chicago’s DineAmic Hospitality, have embraced the best output from France’s great champagne houses and California’s producers, they agree the right prosecco can be a better fit for many different holiday menus and programs. “Prosecco is most often found on wine lists and in wine shops for the fraction of the price of champagne,” says Sammuri. “While both are sparkling, they have many differences that beverage buyers should be aware of. Prosecco is often lighter, sweeter, fruitier, and easier drinking than most champagne. “Champagne has more richness, acidity, and is often drier, with the exception of sweeter bottlings. These differences are mainly due to the production methods.” Sammuri also points out that authentic expressions come from the Italian regions of Veneto and Friuli, and that those making beverage program decisions should be cautious of some of the bigger brands mass-producing prosecco as educated consumers can make out the difference between a good quality wine and an inferior one. However, bars or restaurants interested in focusing on domestic wines are in luck, according to Drew. “American sparkling wine is a no brainer for any holiday cocktail menu,” she says. “Mumm Napa Brut Prestige and Brut Rose are crowd pleasers at an affordable price point, especially as the name is highly rated and has the brand awareness that people recognize. It’s also a great conversation starter to point out to customers that many French champagne

Disaronno Sparkling November 2019

Bar Business Magazine

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Mixed Up: Prosecco

Pistachio Prosecco Collins

1½ oz Dry gin 1 oz Salted pistachio orgeat ¾ oz Fresh lime juice 2 oz Zonin 1821 Cuvée Brut Prosecco For the flavored orgeat, add pistachio paste at 5:1 ratio to almond orgeat syrup. Add pinch of sea salt to taste. Strain for smoothness. For cocktail, pour ingredients in champagne flute and gently stir. Brett Hart, Executive Bourbon Steward and Certified Sommelier, Sweet Water Bar & Grill, Florida

1½ oz Campari Cask Tales 1 oz Fresh lemon juice ¾ oz Simple syrup 3 oz Zonin 1821 Cuvée Brut Prosecco Pour ingredients in champagne flute and gently stir. Brett Hart, Executive Bourbon Steward and Certified Sommelier, Sweet Water Bar & Grill, Florida

Ginger & Honey Collins 1 2/3 oz Chase Oak Smoked Vodka ½ oz Lemon juice 1/3 oz Honey Top with Ruggeri Argeo Prosecco DOC Brut Mix vodka, lemon, and honey. Add cubed ice. Top with ginger ale and stir. Garnish with a slice of lemon or fresh ginger. Zonin Prosecco

Disaronno Sparkling 1 oz Disaronno 2-3 oz Perlage Sgàjo Vegan Prosecco DOC Extra Dry ½ oz Orange simple syrup

Pour ingredients in champagne flute. Stir. Zonin Prosecco

Summer Solstice Spritz 1¼ oz Jardesca White Aperitiva ¾ oz KOVAL Rosehip Liqueur 2 oz Prosecco 1 oz Soda water Mix all ingredients in a wine glass filled with ice. Garnish with edible flowers. Sarah Mengoni, Lead Bartender, Double Take, Los Angeles 30

Bar Business Magazine

houses directly set up wineries in Napa/Sonoma as they were deemed excellent grape growing regions for the chardonnay and pinot noir grapes, which are the most predominate in champagne cuvée make ups.” Drew also cites versatility in American sparkling wines, which she points out is one of the fastest growing wine categories. Small format bottles with single servings are a great option for different food genres as they allow guests to get a fresh glass of sparkling and not commit to a full bottle. Sweders notes that even though tastes in wine and cocktails are shifting toward less sweet flavor profiles, the extra sugar resulting from the prosecco producing method enables a good product to be used in a variety of contexts—on its own and as part of a classic cocktail, especially those that may be batched, such as Bellinis, Mimosas, and Kir Royals. “Don’t be tempted to mix up your prosecco cocktails too much ahead of time, however,” says Mengoni. “You don’t want to lose those fun bubbles! Batch the other ingredients for highvolume environments and add the prosecco at the time of service.” Sweders also advises skipping fine champagnes when using them in cocktails. “You’ll want to serve a fine champagne for higher-end multicourse dinners on its own to compliment sophisticated dishes. However, when you’re making

cocktails for something like a Christmas or New Year’s Brunch, you are not going to want to use a highend champagne,” he says. “I could come up with five variations on the same cocktail, but finish and serve them with an ounce of cava, prosecco, or US Sparkling alongside one with ‘Dom.’ If I were to serve them to five or ten sommeliers, chances are none of them would be able to tell you which one had the ‘Dom’ in the recipe and which ones had the prosecco, cava, or other sparkling wines.” As quality counts, Sweders recommends seeking out prosecco from Conegliano Valdobbiadene, located in the Veneto, and more specifically, the small sub-region of Cartizze, known as the best area for the production of prosecco. He adds better proseccos lend themselves to festive cocktails as a bartender can, “get that grape juice element with the carbonation that adds something to orange juice, Chambord, or something for an original recipe.” DeMara, meanwhile, enjoys prosecco wines produced by the Zonin family. Although it produces larger quantities, quality expresses itself in the way the winemakers ferment and bottle wine throughout the year so the bubbles and flavors are always as fresh as possible. For holiday events drawing customers in with value propositions such as bottomless glasses of champagne or mimosas, prosecco fits

November 2019 barbizmag.com

Photos (left to right): Shutterstock/ Yulia Grigoryeva; Palm Bay.

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Mixed Up: Prosecco the bill as it allows management to offer customers something that’s good quality while keeping their costs down. Mengoni has observed numerous distributors offer trade multiple case discounts as their clients tend to go through a lot of it. However, if mixology is part of the bar’s identity, Sammuri and Mengoni advise the bar staff give themselves plenty of time to play around with different spirits and seasonal ingredients. “Prosecco goes with a lot of different ingredients, and it can be fun to come up with a few different cocktails,” says Sammuri. “When in doubt, keep it simple, as prosecco is great with a seasonal fruit, such as pomegranate or cranberry, and can harmonize with a liquor of some type. Prosecco is also a great way to add bubbles and flavor to a drink without increasing the alcohol content like a spirit would. An Italian restaurant can use prosecco with a fun Italian Vermouth, while a Sushi bar can incorporate sake or a plum liquor with prosecco.”

DeMara suggests bartenders and staff understand that although prosecco is crafted differently from champagne, its sweetness is measured in a manner like champagne, where the grams of sugar per liter of wine are categorized in ranges: from Extra Brut being the driest, to brut, extra dry, dry, demi-sec, and then sec/ dolce being the sweetest. She recommends a brut prosecco, such as the The Zonin 1821 Cuvee, as an ideal choice for mixing in cocktails as it has just enough fruity sweetness to add flavor without adding too much sugar to a drink that might often have other sweet ingredients. “Use cocktail ingredients that compliment the flavors of prosecco, like fresh tree fruits, citrus, or berries,” says DeMara. “Use quality spirits and fresh ingredients as the Italians do, and consider prosecco as a substitute for soda water, tonic water, champagne, and experiment a little to find new and interesting twists on traditional cocktails. However, don’t cover up the light flavors of prosecco by using

particularly strong flavors in the cocktails, such as darker or overproof spirits, or use too many ingredients. Also bear in mind that common holiday flavors, such as pumpkin spice or cinnamon, can overwhelm the fruity components. Let prosecco be a lifting element to a simple cocktail.”

Ginger & Honey Collins

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Inventory Prairie Organic Spirits Launches Small Batch Collection Organic Navy Strength Gin

Prairie Organic Spirits, the nation’s leading organic spirits brand, announces Organic Navy Strength Gin as the brand’s first small batch collection release and the first U.S. organic navy strength gin. With a 57% alcohol by volume (ABV), the 114-proof bold gin has citrus notes of lemon zest, floral notes of angelica root, and proprietary spices with a peppery finish. Similar to all Prairie Organic expressions, the gin is gluten free, distilled to taste, and made from non-GMO, USDAcertified organic corn. “We wanted to create a new expression for gin lovers who appreciate the full taste of the spirit, are looking for flavor enhancement in their cocktails, and enjoy doing good by drinking organic,” says Mike Duggan, Prairie Organic Spirits CEO.

New Craft Spirit from The Pacific Northwest Headwind Vodka

Made in the Pacific Northwest, Headwind Vodka is a corn-based spirit distilled six times and twice filtered. The first filtration smooths and rounds out the liquid, while the second, through timber indigenous to the Pacific Northwest, provides a final polish for a soft finish. The added distillation steps and choice of filtration materials impart subtle characteristics to this craft vodka. Headwind Vodka’s eye-catching packaging designed by Cue, Inc. is another nod to the Pacific Northwest. The packaging reflects the color palette seen in the region’s natural landscapes and sophisticated urban centers, with dark blue, forest green, and silver throughout. The primary label is an authentic birch wood wrap with unique grains and textures on every bottle. “Headwind speaks to the grandeur of the Pacific Northwest,” says Headwind Vodka Founder Jason Dyke. “We wanted to create a smooth craft vodka that communicates the beauty of the region to local and national vodka drinkers.” headwindvodka.com

prairieorganicspirits.com

Extra-Aged Tequila Celebrates the Art of Tequila-Making El Tesoro™ Extra Añejo

El Tesoro de Don Felipe® Tequila and Master Distiller Carlos Camarena are proud to introduce El Tesoro™ Extra Añejo as a permanent addition to its award-winning tequila portfolio. This tequila has been patiently aged in ex-bourbon barrels for four to five years. The process begins with the 100% estate-grown blue agave, the brand’s most precious asset, which grows for up to eight years in the mineral-rich soil of the Jalisco highlands. The terroir gives El Tesoro a more rounded, fruity, and floral taste, and each agave harvest brings unique character and complexity to the liquid. Once the agave reaches peak maturity, it is harvested by hand, cooked in old-fashioned hornos (ovens) for three days, then crushed solely using the two-ton volcanic rock tahona stone. It is then double-distilled to proof before the tequila is rested in American oak ex-bourbon barrels for four to five years, longer than most extra añejo tequilas. The result is a smooth, well balanced tequila with coffee and dark chocolate notes followed by dry fruits and roasted almonds. It finishes with a hint of pepper and oak. eltesorotequila.com

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Inventory

SunBriteTV Updgrades its Signature Series displays

Have Your Cupcake and Drink it Too! Baileys Red Velvet

Baileys Red Velvet is a limited-edition offering created with Georgetown Cupcake. Featuring the flavor of the shop’s number-one selling cupcake, the liqueur has aromas of freshly baked red velvet cupcakes, sweet cream, and buttery icing. Baileys Red Velvet tastes like fresh chocolate cake, topped with cream cheese frosting and a hint of cocoa powder.

SunBriteTV Signature Series Displays

SunBriteTV, a SnapAV brand, announced its upgraded Signature Series displays with IP control and OvrC remote management capabilities. SunBriteTV’s Signature Series is designed for permanent outdoor installation in partial-sun areas. OvrC is SnapAV’s cloud-based remote monitoring and management platform designed specifically for integrators and professional installers. With OvrC, IP control, and HDBaseT capabilities, the new Signature Series will streamline outdoor display installation, monitoring, and management in commercial applications. Additional new features include 4K HDR for striking color contrast, a brighter 700-nit screen with more aggressive TruVision antiglare technology, a sleek new thin-bezel design, and the class-leading outdoor performance and reliability of SunBriteTV. The new Signature Series will be available in 43-, 55-, 65-inch models with a 75-inch model expected later this year.

baileys.com

Featured

PRODUCT

sunbritetv.com

Copper & Kings American Brandy Co. Extends its Apple Brandy Line-up Copper & Kings American Apple Brandy

Louisville-based Copper & Kings American Brandy Co. has extended its apple brandy line-up with a new 92-proof iteration, aged in Kentucky bourbon and new American white oak barrels. The apple brandy is distilled exclusively from apple wine fermented from fresh-pressed apple juice in Vendome American copper pot stills. The apple brandy is unadulterated with boisé (oak flavor or infusion) and has no added apple flavors or essences. The spirit is non-chill filtered for added body, rich mouthfeel and natural flavor, and a natural deep honey color. American apple brandy is the second permanent apple brandy in the Copper & Kings stable, and it joins the 100-proof Floodwall, aged in Kentucky bourbon barrels and sherry casks. “This is a very clean, fresh expression,” says Master Distiller Brandon O’Daniel. “It has a beautiful natural apple nose and is nicely structured with a good backbone. It’s an easy drinker, even at 92 proof, and works just great in a highball, a classic cocktail, or simply on the rocks.” copperandkings.com

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November 2019

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Ad Index

Company

Contact

Inventory COMPANIES

21

AMI Entertainment

amientertainment.com

baileys baileys.com

8

cogobuzz

cogo.buzz

copper & kings copperandkings.com

8

ez-squeeze

ez-squeeze.com

el tesoro eltesorotequila.com

g&g closed circuit

GGCCEVENTS.com

headwind vodka headwindvodka.com

11

heineken usa

EnjoyHeinekenResponsibly.com

Prairie Organic Spirits prairieorganicspirits.com

10

multi-flow

multiflow.net

sunbritetv sunbritetv.com

perlick corporation

perlick.com

rumchata

rumchata.com

To Advertise in Bar Business Magazine, contact Art Sutley

9

shift4

TafferSmartPos.com

5

sunkist growers

sunkistequipment.com

10

tablee

tablee.co

31

tater kegs

taterkegs.com

23

twisted alchemy

TwistedAlchemy.com

15

vinexpo

vinexponewyork.com

C4

Western Foodservice

westernfoodexpo.com

23

wonkyware

wonkyware.com

26

3 C2

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212-620-7247 Asutley@sbpub.com

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November 2019

Bar Business Magazine

35


with Yavonne Sarber Co-Founder of Agave & Rye (Covington, Kentucky)

Y

avonne Sarber, together with her husband, founded Agave & Rye in 2018. Sarber worked as a designer before transitioning to the restaurant industry, where she spent 20 years in fine dining. Her tequila and bourbon hall offers guests a vibrant menu of tacos, appetizers, and desserts. Close to 90 varieties each of tequila and bourbon grace the menu, alongside cocktails and select wines and beer. Agave & Rye now includes three locations with more to come including Louisville early next year, and five more opening further south in 2020.

What makes Agave & Rye unique?

We were in fine dining for the first 20 years of being involved in the restaurant business. We put our heads together and determined that it seemed as though many of today’s millennials and even people older and a little bit younger were looking for a little less pretention, a little more fun, something a little more approachable. We thought, “why not put fine dining in a taco?” We take proper French technique with the confit, the kangaroo, the truffle lobster mac and cheese, and so on, and we put it in a taco. Then we add your more traditional Latino Mexican favorites.

2

Why focus on tequila & bourbon?

As in most cities and towns in Kentucky, bourbon is definitely something that the people who live in the area take quite seriously, so we definitely wanted to include it in what we were doing. And tequila is such a fun, approachable spirit. So we wanted to bring that to what we were doing but really treat it like people treat bourbon. We actually now have about 90 varieties of each, and it appeases our guests from the Kentucky area, but then it also invites that fun side.

3

How do you select tequilas/bourbons?

With our tequilas, what we tend to go towards is the añejo, reposado, and silver from each category. That makes it fun for people when they want to do flights and taste what the difference is between the three with aging and

The second location opened in Lexington, Kentucky.

36

Bar Business Magazine

whatnot. We also will do a lot of research on what’s trending and what people are going after. I find with tequila a lot of times it’s how pretty the bottle is. And now that people are exposing themselves to tequila more, they’re actually enjoying the mezcal quite a bit. [Agave & Rye has a number of mezcals as part of their selection.] With bourbon, you have your tried and true. People typically aren’t as adventurous with bourbon.

4

Tell us about the venue’s aesthetic.

I was a designer for 20 years before I decided this restaurant industry had a hold of me. I had so many resources at my disposal, including some of the best artists. For each location, the artist actually travels with us. Giovanni Santiago does all our fine art murals, Colleen Scott does all of our canvas work, and Alison Stittsworth-Hall does all of our finishes on the walls.

5

Any advice for bar owners?

You really do need to determine if you love this business, which means you can work 24 hours, but it can’t really seem like work. If you can’t wait to come in, if you can’t wait to design the next dish or cocktail, if you love that experience you can make for that guest, if you are dedicated to enriching your employees’ lives— you have to really think about that, and if the answer is not an overwhelming yes, then reconsider what you’re doing.

The new Liberty Township location opened in October.

November 2019 barbizmag.com

All Photos: Agave & Rye.

Q&A

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H-Club Jarmans Bar, Los Angeles. CA

CO N G RAT U LAT I O N S

HUDSON SANDERS

Western Foodservice & Hospitality Expo in LA was host to Hip Sip’s Battle of the Modern Bartender. This year it was a Tequila & Mezcal showdown looking for the best bartender in the region. Top bartender finalists were judged on creativity, use of product, taste and presentation.

Congrats to Hudson Sanders being crowned the winner.

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www.westernfoodexpo.com

La Mujer Amada 2 oz Yola Mezcal 1 oz Ancho Reyes 1 oz fresh Lime juice 1/2 oz Plantation 5 Year Barbados Rum 3/4 oz Agave Orgeat 2 dashes Jerry Thomas Decanter Bitters Absinthe rinse Process: Chill your desired glassware in the fridge so it is nice and cold. Add your bitters to the tin first, and add remaining ingredients as you see fit. Retrieve your glassware from the fridge, it should ve nice and cold, and rinse it with 1/4 oz of absinthe. Let rest while you shake. Fill your tin with medium sized ice cubes and shake hard, but with an even tempo, for 12 seconds. Toss your absinthe, or drink it (im not telling). Double strain into glass and top with a dehydrated lime wheel. Sip at your leisure, by the pool or during dinner. La Mujer Amada is great for both.

Profile for Bar Business Magazine

Bar Business November 2019  

This issue features stories on rum, menus, prosecco, and TV entertainment, as well as our annual holiday gift guide.

Bar Business November 2019  

This issue features stories on rum, menus, prosecco, and TV entertainment, as well as our annual holiday gift guide.