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City Plan 2013-2017

Banyule’s Council Plan A Partnership between Council and Community


City Plan

Page

Mayor’s Introduction

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CEO’s Overview

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About Banyule

6

Our localities

6

Our Community

7

The Council

8

City Plan Framework (Vision, Objectives and Key Directions) 10 Community Engagement and Social Research

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Summary of Strategic Framework Terms

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Objectives and key directions

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People: Community strengthening and support*

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Planet: Environmental sustainability*

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Place: Sustainable amenity and built environment*

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Participation: Community involvement in community life*

50

Performance: Use our resources wisely*

60

Strategic Resource Plan

60

Financial Resources

71

* Each objective incorporates a list of supporting plans and a set of strategic indicators

Council’s four year City Plan, incorporating the Strategic Resource Plan 2013/2014-2016/2017 The City Plan is Banyule’s Council Plan as required by Section 125 of the Local Government Act 1989.


Mayor’s Introduction

The People objective focuses on our community’s needs at all life stages. It provides the fundamental blueprint for Council’s role in improving our community’s health and wellbeing. The Planet objective demonstrates Council’s commitment to supporting organisations and community groups dedicated to helping our local environment, and encouraging a new generation of environmental stewardship. Council continues to work in partnership with these organisations to protect and enhance Banyule’s natural environment. Banyule’s neighbourhood character is something that the community feels very strongly about. Under the objective Place, we deliver initiatives to protect, maintain and enhance our neighbourhood character and local amenity. Our Participation objective extends across all our activities. It provides innovative and easy ways for the community to participate in community life, whether it is by commenting on a strategy or policy, taking part in a community consultation workshop about a Council project, volunteering, or being involved in one of Banyule’s award winning festivals. The decisions we make now impact on our future. Banyule strives for good governance by making it easy for members of the community to play a role in the decision making process. Our Performance objective is about how well we manage our resources, provide support services, plan and manage risk. This objective together with our financial resources shapes our strategic resource plan, outlining how we will manage our resources to achieve Council’s objectives. Despite external pressures of cost shifting and the State Government’s introduction of the fire levy, Council will be moving forward with a bold new program that ensures a range of new Council facilities, an emphasis on renewal of existing assets and the delivery of quality services that meet community demand. In this plan we will:

On behalf of Council, I am pleased to present Banyule’s City Plan for 2013-2017. With a new Council on board, we have undertaken extensive community consultation to inform this plan, other key supporting plans and the Banyule Community Plan. We were delighted with the number of people who responded (1,200) and the quality of comments and ideas that we received from residents, traders, community groups and community organisations. Council’s understanding of what the community needs and expects is based on your feedback and a broad range of other key inputs such as regular surveys, research and socio economic data and the experience of our professional staff. The city is fortunate to have five experienced Councillors and two new Councillors working together to ensure our community expectations are matched with best value.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

Our vision is based around an affordable, environmentally sound, liveable and prosperous city, sustaining a healthy and engaged community. To provide clear areas of focus to guide us, the City Plan is driven by five interlinked objectives: People - Community strengthening and support Planet - Environmental sustainability Place - Sustainable amenity and built environment Participation - Community involvement in community life Performance - Use our resources wisely The People, Planet and Place objectives are central and their success is dependent on how well we succeed with the Participation and Performance objectives.

• D  eliver stage one of the Ivanhoe Aquatic and Leisure Centre redevelopment and plan the future stages for the facility. Stage one of the project includes: -- expansion of existing gym floor by 450sqm -- new entry and reception improving customer flow and accessibility -- improved staff administration hub -- inclusion of a café facility with associated seating -- addition of lift and stairwell to help movement around Centre -- refurbishment of existing change areas and pool hall, with the addition of a change village

• Develop the master plan for the redevelopment of the Olympic Leisure Centre. • Complete the stormwater harvesting project. This project will deliver one of the largest stormwater harvesting networks in Melbourne: at Kalparrin Gardens in Greensborough, Chelsworth Park and Ivanhoe Golf Course in East Ivanhoe and at De Winton Park in Rosanna. When completed the project will capture, filter and store stormwater underground and use it to irrigate sport fields and open spaces, keeping them green all year round. As well as improving amenity for park users, local residents, sports clubs and schools, litter, sediment, nitrogen and phosphorous will be filtered and prevented from polluting waterways including Kalparrin Lake, Reedy Billabong and the Plenty and Yarra Rivers. The project will also save precious drinking water. • Extend the sustainable street lighting project. This will significantly reduce Council’s ongoing energy costs and result in a 19% reduction in overall greenhouse gas emissions, which will be a major reduction in Council’s overall emission, as part of the current Planet Policy and Strategy. • Develop and renew Banyule’s assets including sporting pavilions, sports fields, roads and footpaths to ensure they are maintained for the community. • Give confidence to the Greensborough commercial community with the detailed design of Council’s stage two office building above Watermarc. Council is currently in negotiations with the State Government to agree the purchase of three school sites in West Heidelberg. The sites are Banksia Secondary College, Haig Street Primary School and Bellfield Primary School. Council publicly raised the issue of the closure of these sites and in particular the impact of the loss of the community facilities on the local community. As a result Council has pursued the purchase of the sites with the endeavour to return these public facilities to the community. It is anticipated that the negotiations regarding the purchase of these sites will be complete by late June and provision has been made in the draft budget. Council has negotiated with State and Federal governments to provide improved children’s services through the development of the Heidelberg West Olympic Village Learning Hub – Stage 1: Child and Family Centre. This is one of the many exciting initiatives in this plan. On behalf of my fellow Councillors, I would like to thank you for all your enthusiasm and willingness to provide us with what were quite often very detailed comments and ideas. We are fortunate to have a community which is so ready to work with us – on so many levels – to ensure that Banyule remains a great place to live, work and play well into the future.

-- additional car parking. Cr Wayne Phillips Mayor

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Welcome to our brand new City Plan. This sets a clear strategic direction for Council and will ensure we continue to deliver the right services in response to the community’s expressed needs. With the majority of the previous Council returned to serve the Banyule community for the next four years, we are very fortunate to have a mix of both experience and new ideas as a guiding base for Council operations. This provides a great opportunity to build on the good work already done and offers new opportunities for Council’s future and how it might deliver to its community.

CEO’s Overview

In the 2012 state-wide Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey, 75% of our community confirmed that Banyule Council was heading in the right direction, with our overall performance significantly higher when compared to most other local councils across the State. Notable areas where you rated us highly were: waste management, town planning policy, planning and building permits, local laws and environmental sustainability. We are, however, not resting on our laurels and through extensive consultation you also told us that you remained concerned about how we communicate with you, parking and traffic and your neighbourhood character being under threat. You indicated you wanted improved local streets and footpaths. You also said that our local environment, festivals, events and leisure facilities were important to you. In response to improved communication I was pleased to see the Banyule community participate in our community consultation program leading up to this City Plan and Budget. In fact, the response was high and the issues identified far ranging. Council received feedback confirming the continued need to invest in ageing infrastructure and maintaining the quality services provided. Council has structured its City Plan and associated budget and strategic resource plan to address key financial indicators. Council will continue to align its financial objectives with the recommended parameters and key indicators as set out by the Victorian Auditor General’s Office. We also measure our performance in line with the Victorian Local Government Indicators. Our performance targets for the upcoming year are outlined against our key strategic indicators and are detailed in our budget for 2013–14. Council will continue to deliver real outcomes on the ground, particularly in the areas of infrastructure renewal and targeted services that meet the needs and priorities of the Banyule community. In fact, a substantial component of the Council’s Strategic Budget emphasises the allocation of funds towards the renewal of roads, footpaths, drains and buildings that on average are aged 50-60 years.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

In this City Plan we have included our focus areas and a range of key initiatives. The plan aims to balance the use of our resources in a way that means we continue to deliver our programs, activities and services, whilst providing a range of new initiatives that respond to community expectations. The focus areas and initiatives are wide ranging and include: • Improving preschools infrastructure • Maintaining and upgrading roads, drains and footpaths • E nsuring our natural environment and tree assets are appropriately maintained • Responding to land use planning issues in a consistent, fair and timely manner • Delivering social and economic benefits for our community • Producing quality community festivals and events across the municipality Due to changes in legislation, funding shortfalls and changes in community demand, Council services continue to face financial pressures. Areas affected include home and community care, health services, maternal and child health, and library services. Council continues to advocate to both State and Federal Governments in the areas of cost shifting and the failure of grants to keep up with increasing operating costs to reduce the burden on rate payers. Council continues to lobby both Governments for specific grants relating to sporting facilities, new infrastructure and service initiatives. Also, many issues that you see as important fall outside Council’s direct area of responsibility and these will be fed into the development of the next stage of our Community Plan. For example, transport and traffic congestion is an issue where Council will continue to work in partnership with local community groups, agencies and residents. We value our community and Council is committed to collaborating and working alongside the community to assist in the implementation of this City Plan. I look forward to continuing to deliver the objectives and key directions of this City Plan together with our Councillors and staff. Simon McMillan CEO

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About Banyule NILLUMBIK WHITTLESEA

1 St Helena

2 Eltham North 3 Briar Hill 4 Greensborough 5 Watsonia North 6 Bundoora 7 Watsonia 8 Macleod 9 Yallambie 10 Montmorency 11 Lower Plenty 12 Viewbank 13 Rosanna 14 Heidelberg West 15 Heidelberg Heights 16 Heidelberg 17 Bellfield 18 Eaglemont 19 Ivanhoe 20 Ivanhoe East

DAREBIN

MANNINGHAM

YARRA

BOROONDARA

Banyule in the context of Greater Melbourne

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

Banyule is the active resident’s dream place to live, with many excellent community leisure facilities including indoor aquatics and fitness centres at Ivanhoe, West Heidelberg and Watsonia and the brand new facility at Greensborough – WaterMarc. Greensborough also has a synthetic athletics track, while a hockey centre and indoor netball stadium can be found at Bellfield and Macleod respectively. There are other playing fields, tennis and bowling clubs throughout the municipality. Cycling and walking through Banyule are popular pastimes, made enjoyable by the many kilometres of bicycle and pedestrian trails throughout the city, particularly along the Yarra and Plenty Rivers and the Darebin Creek. The city is primarily a residential area and retaining the character of individual neighbourhoods is important to the local community. While separate houses dominate, increasing numbers of semi-detached houses, townhouses and units are being built. Over two thirds of homes are privately owned or being purchased, with most of the rest being rented. Banyule has a number of commercial centres, the largest being the Greensborough Principal Activity Centre, with Heidelberg and Ivanhoe designated as Major Activity Centres. There are significant industrial areas in Heidelberg West, Greensborough, Briar Hill and Bundoora. The City is home to a number of large institutions such as the Austin Hospital including the Olivia Newton John Cancer Centre, the Mercy Hospital for Women, the Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital and the Simpson Army Barracks.

Our Localities

Our Community

Banyule is located between seven and 21 kilometres northeast of central Melbourne and is made up of 20 suburbs. The City covers an area of approximately 63 square kilometres. The Yarra River runs along the City’s south border while the west is defined by Darebin Creek.

Council recognises the habitation of this land by the Traditional Owners, the Wurundjeri willam. Melbourne’s north-east was the homeland of the Wurundjeri willam people who belonged to the Woiworung language group and greater Kulin confederacy. The confederacy was made up of allied clans from south-central Victoria.

Banyule is renowned for its open spaces and plentiful parklands, especially along the Yarra and Plenty River valleys. There are 466 hectares of council-owned open space in Banyule, as well as substantial areas of parkland managed by Parks Victoria. These provide a wealth of recreational, environmental and tourism opportunities for the region. There are sites of botanical, zoological, habitat and heritage significance, including aboriginal archaeological sites and scar trees, and points of interest associated with the Heidelberg School of Artists.

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major commercial centres

Today, the Wurundjeri Tribe Land Compensation and Cultural Heritage Council, recognised as the Aboriginal custodians of Banyule and Kulin Nations, take care of this powerful cultural heritage. Council is committed to protecting Aboriginal heritage sites. Over fifty Aboriginal heritage sites have been identified in Banyule. Most are beside major waterways like Darebin Creek and the Yarra and Plenty Rivers.

10km

The City also has a significant European cultural heritage associated with painters of the Australian Impressionists (previously referred to as the Heidelberg School) such as Arthur Streeton, Tom Roberts, Charles Conder, Frederick McCubbin, Walter Withers, Jane Sutherland, Clara Southern and Jane Price, and architects and urban landscapers including Walter Burley Griffin, Ellis Stones and Edna Walling. Banyule has close links with the birth of the Australian Art Movement and influential artists such as Napier Waller, Albert Tucker, Sidney Nolan, Joy Hester and Norman MacGeorge, who bequeathed his estate in Fairy Hills to the University of Melbourne to encourage development of the arts. Sidney Nolan’s first art exhibition was held in Burgundy Street, Heidelberg. Heidelberg West is an area rich in history and diversity, and harbouring strong community spirit. The Olympic Village in Heidelberg West was the home of the Olympic athletes during the 1956 Melbourne Games. The village housed 4,200 athletes representing 67 countries. Shortly after the Olympic Games had finished, some of the Village housing was made available for sale, however the Village was largely converted to public housing and tenanted by the then Housing Commission of Victoria. The Olympic Village today is similar to the original village. Minor variations exist in the road network and in the types of housing provided, but the area remains largely in its original form. In 2000, the Village hosted the Olympic Torch Relay for the Sydney Olympics. Banyule has a diverse community of more than 120,000 residents from over 50 countries. A significant number of residents have European ancestry, and there is an increasing population of people with Asian and African ancestry. This diverse population brings a cultural richness to our community. Although the number of people living in Banyule is expected to increase in the next decade, our population is expected to age, with the greatest growth occurring in the over 60 age group. However, recently the population of under 4 year olds has grown, as Banyule, along with the nation as a whole, has experienced a mini ‘baby boom’. Banyule’s main industries are health care, retail, education, manufacturing and professional and scientific services. A large number of the jobs available in Banyule are filled locally.

Local residents

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44000

39% of total workforce

dwellings

7


DAREBIN

The Council

Council has seven democratically elected ward Councillors who have overall responsibility for providing services and facilities for the community, improving and developing the municipality and governing the local area. YARRA

BOROONDARA

MANNINGHAM

Council Wards

Cr Wayne Phillips Mayor. Beale Ward Elected 2005 Current Term Expires 2016 Mayor 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010 Deputy Mayor 2011, 2012

Beale

Grimshaw

Cr Wayne Phillips

Cr Rick Garotti

Bakewell

Cr Mark DiPasquale

Cr Craig Langdon

Cr Steven Briffa

Cr Mark DiPasquale

Deputy Mayor. Olympia Ward

Hawdon Ward

Bakewell Ward

Elected 2011 Current Term Expires 2016

Elected 2008 Current Term Expires 2016

Elected 2012 Current Term Expires 2016

Ibbott

Olympia

Cr Tom Melican

Hawdon

Cr Steven Briffa

Cr Craig Langdon

Griffin

Cr Jenny Mulholland

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Cr Rick Garotti

Cr Tom Melican

Cr Jenny Mulholland

Grimshaw Ward

Ibbott Ward

Griffin Ward

Elected 2012 Current Term Expires 2016

Elected 2003 Current Term Expires 2016 Deputy Mayor 2007, 2008 Mayor 2009, 2012

Elected 2000 Current Term Expires 2016 Mayor 2003, 2004 Deputy Mayor 2005, 2010

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

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City Plan Framework Council’s role is to locally govern for all residents, visitors and ratepayers, and provide a range of programs and services that meet the needs of our community. Our City Plan provides a roadmap for us to follow in this important role. Underpinned by our vision and principles, the Plan’s objectives give us clear areas of focus for the four-year period and guide us to achieve the best we can for our community.

The following diagrams give an overview of Council’s objectives, key directions and strategic indicators.

PLACE Sustainable Amenity and Built Environment

Objectives Principles

VISION Strategic Indicators

Performance Use our Resources Wisely Key Directions

• Develop and deliver best value services and facilities • Provide responsible financial management and business planning processes • Enable good governance and accountability with minimal risk • Create a productive and engaged workforce • Maintain and strengthen corporate information and innovation • Plan and manage the systems and assets that support Council’s service delivery

PEOPLE Community Strengthening and Support

Vision (What we strive for) Banyule, a green, liveable and prosperous city, sustaining a healthy and engaged community.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

• Maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live • Strengthen local activity and employment areas • Support thriving commercial and retail activity • Enhance Banyule’s public and open spaces • Support sustainable transport

The core principles that help us achieve our Vision are:

Principles

• • • • • •

PLANET Environmental Sustainability

• Protect and enhance our natural environment • Conserve water and improve stormwater quality and impact • Deliver appropriate action on climate change • Avoid waste generation • Act as environmental stewards

Promote and support health and wellbeing Provide services for people at important life stages Develop and promote safety and resilience in our community Celebrate and promote Banyule’s diversity and heritage Support people to achieve their economic potential Plan and prepare for emergency events

Participation Community Involvement in Community Life • • • •

Provide outstanding communications and customer service Encourage diverse and inclusive community participation Engage meaningfully with our community Advocate on behalf of our community

• Sustainability for our future • Community wellbeing • Community participation • Fairness in all we do • Maintaining our community’s trust

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What success looks like to us…

Participation

Community Involvement in Community Life

Key directions: 4.1 Engage meaningfully with our community 4.2 Encourage diverse and inclusive community participation 4.3 Advocate on behalf of our community 4.4 Provide outstanding communications and customer service

People

Community Strengthening and Support

Key directions: 1.1 Promote and support health and wellbeing 1.2 Provide services for people at important life stages. 1.3 Develop and promote safety and resilience in our community 1.4 Celebrate and promote Banyule’s diversity and heritage 1.5 Support people to achieve their economic potential 1.6 Plan and prepare for emergency events Strategic indicators: CSI - Recreational facilities Attendance at Council aquatic centres % of people who feel they ‘belong’ in Banyule CSI - Disadvantaged support services Performance - People: Health & Wellbeing Action Plan # of library borrowings by Banyule residents CSI - Family support services CSI - Elderly support services Key Ages & Stages: participation rate for 3.5 year visits Delivered meals: unit cost to Council; # of meals; % of recipients satisfied % of people who feel safe in Banyule; Performance - Safer Banyule Action Plan CSI - Art centres & libraries CSI - Community & cultural activities Attendance at Banyule festival # of economic development events delivered in partnership with other organisations* Participation level (attendance) at Council operated/ hosted economic development events CSI - Emergency & disaster management Completion of emergency management exercises

Performance

Planet

Environmental Sustainability

Key directions: 2.1 Protect and enhance our natural environment 2.2 Conserve water and improve stormwater quality and impact 2.3 Deliver appropriate action on climate change 2.4 Avoid waste generation 2.5 Act as environmental stewards Strategic indicators: CSI – Environmental sustainability # of tree plantings (Council tree plantings in streets and parks) Performance - Planet: Environmental Sustainability Action Plan CSI - The appearance of public areas Council’s water use Council’s greenhouse gas emissions CSI - Waste management % of waste diverted from landfill % of ‘consumer waste’ diverted from landfill (ie excludes greenwaste) Attendance at Council’s Rethink Centre waste education programs

# Community nominations for Banyule volunteer awards # of significant issues Council has advocated on behalf of the community (as reported in the six monthly advocacy reports to Council) Average time taken to answer telephone call enquiries; % of customer requests actioned in specified timeframes Visits to website

Place

Sustainable Amenity and Built Environment

Key directions: 3.1 Maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live 3.2 Strengthen local activity and employment areas 3.3 Support thriving commercial and retail activity 3.4 Enhance Banyule’s public and open spaces 3.5 Support sustainable transport Strategic indicators: % of planning applications completed within statutory timeframe (60 days) CSI - Council’s general town planning policy VLG infrastructure indicator: renewal ratio CSI - The condition of local streets and footpaths in your area MAV Insurance (overall score) – compliance with road management plan CSI - Planning and building permits CSI - Business and community development and tourism # of economic development events delivered in partnership with other organisations *(eg. neighbouring Councils, State and Federal Government, Regional Development organisations, traders associations, etc) Participation level (attendance) at Council operated/ hosted economic development events # of businesses participating in special rates schemes % of people who feel safe in Banyule CSI - The appearance of public areas CSI - Parking facilities CSI - Traffic management Linear metres of shared paths/ trails renewed, upgraded and new

Use our Resources Wisely

Key directions: 5.1  Develop and deliver best value services and facilities 5.2 Provide responsible financial management and business planning processes 5.3 Enable good governance and accountability with minimal risk 5.4 Create a productive and engaged workforce 5.5 Maintain and strengthen corporate information and innovation 5.6 Plan and manage the systems and assets that support Council’s service delivery

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Strategic indicators: CSI - Overall performance of Council; CSI - Customer service; CSI - Informing the community; CSI - Community consultation and engagement; CSI - Lobbying on behalf of the community % of people who feel they ‘belong’ in Banyule Amount distributed through Council’s Community Grants programs

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

Strategic indicators: CSI - Overall performance of Council; CSI - Customer service; CSI – Informing the community Visits to website Average time taken to answer telephone call enquiries % of customer requests actioned within specified timeframes Performance - Workforce Strategy and Action Plan (Human Resources Strategic Plan) % Freedom of Information requests responded to within statutory timeframes (45 days) % core IT systems availability % projects in year 1 of 10 year capital works program completed on time

Maintain full certification for all services to the most recent National/ International standards in Quality, Occupational Health & Safety, and Environmental Management MAV Insurance state-wide audit ranking / overall score WorkCover premium as a percentage of payroll CSI - Emergency and disaster management; CSI - Enforcement of local laws % official Council & Committee meetings attended by Councillors where a quorum was achieved Achievement of the budgeted result or better NB CSI denotes Community Satisfaction Indicator

Community planning and City planning The purpose of Council’s City Plan 2013-2017 is to set the strategic direction for Council responsibilities over the next four years. It establishes the vision, objectives and key directions guiding Council’s work under themes including people, planet, place, participation and performance. It outlines priorities and helps guide the services that we provide to the community. The City Plan is informed by and used by Councillors, Council staff, community members, relevant stakeholders, agencies, the State Government, and residents.

What is ‘The Banyule Community Plan’? The Banyule Community Plan, developed in 2009 after extensive consultation, sets out the community’s vision to the year 2020. In doing so, it identifies the things that need to change to achieve that preferred future, as well as what should be retained. An important feature of the Community Plan is its development and ownership by the community. Residents, community groups, local organisations and Council work together on a variety of projects under key themes: safe and clean city; free moving city; diverse, cohesive and happy community; comprehensive range of services and facilities; sustainable city; vibrant local economy; treed city; active, involved community; valued heritage.

Our Plan relationships The City Plan differs from the Community Plan because the City Plan’s focus is on: • Greater alignment of Council services with community expectations. • Articulating the direction and nature of Council priorities. • Responsive allocation of resources. • Providing a communication link between Council and our community. • Setting the ongoing direction of the Council. Many sources of information have helped shape the development of this City Plan 2013-2017. These extensive information sources have also provided valuable input for the next stage of the Banyule Community Plan. This engagement and participative approach to planning with and for our community will continue. Genuine engagement allows us to learn from people’s experiences of living in Banyule. Council uses this to plan better and continuously improve service delivery. Appropriate engagement gives the community an opportunity to discuss and respond to key issues affecting their experience in Banyule.

The Community Plan includes some actions and initiatives that are outside the scope of traditional local government responsibility. Some actions may fall into the domain of other agencies such as Victoria Police, Department of Education, Department of Human Services, or public transport and telecommunications authorities. However, local government plays an important advocacy or linking role on behalf of the community.

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Community Engagement and Social Research An overview of our consultation approach During the recent community engagement program Council asked its community how we can make Banyule an even better place to live, work and play. More than 1,200 people told us their ideas through surveys, forums, through community groups, and directly at various festivals and events.

The final type of feedback relates to issues that do not come under Council’s sole responsibility, for example addressing traffic concerns. These issues feed into the Community Plan process. We will work on an implementation process for the Community Plan where Council works in partnership with local and community organisations and residents on issues of concern such as improving transport, community safety and the natural environment.

Other consultation and research methods We have also included people’s responses and suggestions from other consultation and research that we have done, or had access to. This adds to the robustness of our consultation and information on which decisions are made. This data mining and research widens the ways that we can hear from and represent people’s views. This is especially true for those who do not like going to meetings or completing surveys. Other research included in the consultation findings are the following:

In addition to the standing networks and committees mentioned above, short-term working groups of community members are established for specific projects. These can range from organising a festival to giving community perspective on major works.

Statutory Procedures Under the Local Government Act 1989 Council is required to call for formal submissions on matters such as proposed discontinuance of roads, special charge schemes and adoption of local laws. This is also the case for the lease of Council facilities.

The consultation process involved extensive partnership and collaboration across Council. Numerous service units have been involved and engaged with their respective customer groups in the consultation. In addition to the City Plan and Community Plan, the consultation gathered information for the Arts, Recreation, Open Space, and Early Years Plans.

Phase two - feedback As a result of the comments received from the consultation process we produced this draft City Plan document available to the community via the web, Council Service Centres, libraries and Neighbourhood Houses during mid to late April.

• Banyule City Council Household Survey, 2011 • City of Banyule Local Area Community Safety Profile, 2012

Individual Feedback

As well as the 1,200 people who told us their ideas, we have included the findings of other research and consultation conducted with the Banyule community over an extended period of the last three years. This adds to the variety of voices and views on how we can make Banyule an even better place.

A clearer link to the outcomes of how we have responded to the community engagement findings is articulated in the City Plan through the inclusion of key initiatives. These initiatives reflect the intent of Council to provide a comprehensive suite of services to its community and are highlighted to clearly demonstrate the actual manifestation of the strategic intent. This allows our community to comment in detail on whether Council has fairly represented the priorities and needs of its community.

• Demographic data, Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011

Community members are encouraged to keep Council in touch with their views at any time. Community feedback can be made via a provided return paid postcard, letter, telephone, website or email.

What our community told us The consultation asked a range of questions including how people felt about Council’s Key Directions and Focus Areas within the City Plan, and whether they could suggest changes and additional priorities. People were also asked more open-ended questions such as: “what do you like most about your neighbourhood?” and “what would you like to see in your neighbourhood?”

More detailed information about how we received feedback from the community As different methods appeal to different people, we used a range of ways to hear from the Banyule’s diverse population, as outlined in the table below:

Results There was overwhelming support for our City Plan Key Directions and Focus Areas, with 85% of survey responses saying that they thought the Focus Area was either very important or important.

How people have had their say Surveys (online & paper)

Responses 340

However, many of the comments and feedback relate to specific activities that come under the City Plan objectives. Therefore, the information we feed back to our community includes examples of what action is occurring under each Key Direction and Focus Area.

Short 5 minute survey: –– conducted at community events and festivals, including: Malahang Festival, Lunar New Year Celebrations, Greensborough Film & Food festival, playground launches and swimming pools

Some of the issues identified in the consultation relate to specific actions or requests. Where appropriate, these have been fed into the Customer Request Management (CRM) system for action by the relevant area of Council.

Blackboard comments –– ‘What I like about my neighbourhood?’ and ‘What I’d like to see in my neighbourhood?’

209

Discussions with community groups and local organisations

183

Consultation Forums

81

Total

462

• Banyule Municipal Early Years Plan consultation, 2012

• H  eidelberg West Neighbourhood Renewal – 2011 community survey summary • M  ulticultural policy and Action Plan, Banyule City Council, 2011 • Older Persons’ Consultation, 2011 • P  arent/Guardian Survey Analysis - Banyule Municipal Early Years Planning, 2013 • Seniors Forum Report, 2011 • T  op twenty data sources for describing community wellbeing in Victoria, Victorian Department of Planning and Community Development, 2012 • Youth Fest Youth Services Survey Results, 2012

Additional sources of data that inform Council decision making Council uses a variety of methods for involving our community in the decisions we make. These include public forums such as workshops, advisory committees, surveys, focus groups, and community comment mechanisms, email feedback via our website and individual feedback such as formal submissions.

Networks, Advisory Committees and Working Groups

1275

Networks, reference groups and advisory committees provide independent comment for Council and officers on various policies and strategies that are developed and implemented. They cover the areas of leisure and sport, culture, and environment and consist of a broad base of interested people within the community.

Surveys Council conducts surveys during the development of policies, service reviews or for monitoring community satisfaction with Council’s services. The size of the survey can range from a local neighbourhood to the entire municipality. One-on-one personal interviews are often conducted with traders in the development of shopping centre strategies. Focus groups are another research method used from time to time to strengthen existing or proposed services. Examples of these include: • ‘Have a say in your community - Are you an older adult who wants to have your say in your community?’ • Central Park Greensborough – Master Plan Public Meeting • Community Workshops and Information Sessions – Draft Ivanhoe Structure Plan • Planet Policy and Strategy stakeholder consultation survey and meetings

Regular Community Consultation In addition to specific community consultation projects undertaken as part of individual Best Value service reviews, Banyule also conducts community consultation and stakeholder forums prior to developing or revising corporate policies and strategic plans. We also draw on other current community consultation data sources such as: • State Government Annual Community Satisfaction Surveys. • Key Council plans and strategies (e.g. People: Health and Wellbeing Policy and Strategy, Planet: Environmental Sustainability Policy and Strategy, Municipal Strategic Statement, Cultural Strategy and the Recreation Strategy). • Demographic information on residents and businesses.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

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• A comprehensive Household Survey conducted in April 2008 and 2011, which has added to our knowledge of our community. • Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities; in conjunction with the Migrant Resource Centre, focus groups were held with identified community groups to better understand particular needs and the delivery of Council’s services. • Greensborough Project - extensive consultation and information sessions conducted in relation to assessing and developing this project with community input and feedback. • Industry benchmarking exercises • The Banyule Community Plan - It involved extensive community consultation and input (during the period July 2008 to December 2009) from individuals and local community groups – more than 2,000 people participated in the development of this plan. The purpose of a Community Plan is to identify the community’s vision for its city as we move towards 2020. In doing so, it seeks to articulate the things that need to change to achieve that preferred future, as well as the things the community values now that should be retained for the future. An important feature of the Community Plan is its ownership and development by the community, and that the community accepts responsibility for its implementation. Local government can contribute to an important advocacy or linking role in this regard. • A review of the corporate Communications Plan – this involved internal consultation with staff, and a desktop review of strategic documents, customer research (survey) reports and on-line presence. This will assist with future communications, consultation and community engagement. • The initial stages of a review of the Customer/ Community Charter – this involved consultation with our community (residents and businesses) via telephone and focus group meetings, and is currently undergoing internal consultation across the organisation. The charter sets out our commitments and customer service standards, and also details feedback mechanisms for the community to provide comment or suggestions on service improvement. • A number of surveys were undertaken with customers by the Banyule Leisure Facilities Management (BLFM) team to ensure that the services provided at Council’s aquatics centres are meeting their needs, and the team has also conducted an Ivanhoe Aquatic and Fitness Centre Masterplan Survey. BLFM established a Steering Committee and conducted a community consultative survey in proposing the draft Masterplan for Olympic Leisure Centre.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

• Banyule’s Neighbourhood Character Draft Policy and Plan. • Activity Centre Car Parking Policy and Strategy. • Banyule Residential Parking Permit Policy, and proposed amendment to the Planning Scheme. • The review of a range of leisure and cultural activities, including: consultation with residents, visitors and stakeholders for the Boulevard Lights event, development of a Malahang Festival Community Reference Group, and establishment of four key community consultation groups for arts and culture. • Service planning and consultations conducted to develop a draft Multi-Cultural Plan for Council. • Consultations and actions undertaken with partners as part of Council’s Revised Statement of Commitment to Indigenous Australians for Council’s Reconciliation Plan. • The review of a range of early years services, including: the schematic design for the Olympic Village Learning Hub and the development of the feasibility study and concept design for the Watsonia Community Hub were both completed after extensive community consultation. The Maternal and Child Health service surveyed customers and received strong satisfaction levels and identified opportunities for improvement. • The development of a Youth and Family Services Citizenship Framework – this was developed to help inform our practice in ethical consultations, and complements the Banyule Youth Charter. The Youth and Community Partnerships team also co-ordinated the successful Banyule Youth Express event, which involved 120 young people representing 15 schools, and resulted in key recommendations (relating to young people and safety) for Council consideration. A Young People’s Participation Network was established following the event and has been receiving ongoing support from the Youth and Community Partnerships team.

Local Government Planning and Accountability Framework Banyule City Council adheres to the Local Government Planning and Reporting Better Practice Guide in the development of its strategic planning process: “Effective planning and reporting by councils is essential for ensuring transparency and accountability to the community and other levels of government as to how public money is being spent and the quality of services delivered. The Local Government Act 1989 and Local Government (Finance and Reporting) Regulations 2004 contain a number of requirements to ensure councils use resources efficiently and effectively and are accountable to their local community. The following diagram shows the relationships between the key statutory planning and reporting documents that make up the planning and accountability framework for local government.

Planning and Accountability Framework Time horizon

Medium term

Planning

Council Plan > Strategic objectives > Strategies > Strategic indicators

Reporting

Stakeholder & community engagement

Jan-Jun

Feb-Jun Strategic Resources Plans > Standard statements > Non-financial resources Mar-Jun

Demographic resources Much of our decision making is based upon demographic information and forecasting tools which enable us to look forward and plan appropriately for our community. These include • ABS census data • ID data analysis of 2011 Census information for the Banyule census collector districts

Timing

Annual Budget > Standard statements > Activities and initiatives > Key strategic activities Short term

Annual Report > Report of operations > Financial statements > Standard statements > Performance statement

Jul-Sep

• Community Indicators of health and wellbeing from the Department of Health.

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Role of the Victorian Auditor General

Community Plan:

These include:

Planet Themes

The Victorian Auditor-General has powers under Section 16 of the Audit Act 1994 to prepare and table a report to the Victorian Parliament outlining the result of the local government audits. This report provides a summary of audit opinions on the statements contained in each of Victoria’s 79 council annual reports, addressing the timeliness of their financial and performance reports, their financial sustainability and aspects of how they manage their budget processes and outsourced arrangements. This closes the loop in the accountability framework by ensuring councils are subject to independent scrutiny in relation to their performance.

Councils should take a leadership role in developing and facilitating community engagement and involvement in the preparation of their council plan. Although not a legislative requirement, the council plan can also be informed by long-term plans such as a community plan. A community plan typically describes the community’s long-term vision and aspirations and is a way of directly involving the community in the council plan preparation process. Council plans are typically nested within each long-term community plan”.

• The building of a strong and vibrant community

• Protecting and managing trees, native vegetation and open space (public and private)

Key Documents Victorian councils are required to prepare a number of key documents under the Local Government Act 1989 and as prescribed in the Local Government (Finance and Reporting) Regulations 2004. These are: • Council plan: this is council’s medium-term planning tool which should reflect the wishes of the community and other stakeholders. The council plan must describe the organisation’s strategic objectives, strategies for achieving the objectives, how progress will be measured and the resources required to implement the council plan for a period of at least four years. • Strategic resource plan: the strategic resource plan is a rolling plan of at least four years and forms part of the Council Plan. The strategic resource plan should outline the resources that council requires to achieve the objectives described in the council plan, and include the standard statements as prescribed by the regulations to outline the financial and nonfinancial resources required. • Annual budget: the annual budget should reflect the priorities and objectives of the council plan and establish performance measures and targets for key strategic activities to monitor performance against the council plan. The annual budget reflects the first year of the strategic resource plan and must contain the standard statements and a description of the activities and initiatives to be funded. It should also provide information about services and capital works, and how they will be funded. • Annual report: The annual report outlines the council’s performance as measured against the council plan, annual budget and strategic resource plan. Annual reports must contain standard and financial statements and a performance statement to report performance against the measures and targets related to the key strategic activities. Councils are also required to report on what they have achieved during the financial year in the report on operations. The annual report is acquitted in an audit by the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office at the end of the financial year.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

Note: The information above is sourced from the ‘Local Government Planning and Reporting Better Practice Guide’ and accompanying fact sheet, provided by the State Government Department of Planning and Community Development (Circular No. 5/2013).

Our Linkage between City Plan and Budget The Annual Budget has been developed within Council’s overall planning framework. This framework guides the Council in identifying community needs and aspirations over the long-term, converting these into medium (Council Plan) and short-term (Annual Budget) objectives, key directions, initiatives, activities and resource requirements. This is then made accountable through Audited Financial and Performance Statements (containing our key performance indicators) and our statutory annual report to the community. Essential in the planning and application of Council’s resources is the critical link to the community. Banyule undertakes an ongoing and iterative process of engagement across all parts of our community. We use community information along with key demographic data, our legislative context and industry benchmarks to assess the appropriate level of service for our community. We test these services against both national and international standards of quality, efficiency and effectiveness. There are direct and obvious links between the broad range of information we gather and the activities we fund to meet our strategic intent. We review this annually and re-assess our activities and areas of emphasis for our community on this basis. Through extensive community engagement and feedback, with a concentrated and targeted effort over the period November 2012 to May 2013, we have strengthened the areas of focus in our new City Plan 2013-2017 and in our Budget 2013-2014.

• Improving communication with our community so we are better informed as to things that matter • Identifying opportunities that bring social and economic benefits to the community • Developing local activity centres in an appropriate and sustainable way • Making land-use planning more consistent and see that it improves local neighbourhood character • Ensuring comprehensive transport planning and advocacy on transport and congestion issues • Continuing a strong focus on delivering quality, value for money services • Ensuring our financial sustainability and making sure we continue to deliver our services to the levels expected • Advocating to other levels of government on important community issues, even where it is not Council’s direct delivery role, and ensuring that this is done in the strongest terms to affect change for the betterment of Banyule. We have also ‘closed the loop’ by showing our community how we have directly responded to what they have said during our community engagement process. This has been captured through a series of key summary papers that showcase ‘What you said’, and ‘How we are using what you said’. This includes a summary of how the information links with the City Plan objectives. It is part of our ongoing program and commitment to communicating and engaging with our community, and responding to community needs. The extended series of themes and issues raised are as follows:

People Themes • Promoting and supporting good health for people of different ages, life stages and backgrounds • Providing a broader range of passive and active recreation opportunities • Providing open spaces, environments and facilities that encourage people to get active • Providing and advocating for services and resources that are accessible and inclusive to all • Inclusion, connection and diversity

• Conserving water and protecting waterway amenity and water quality • Delivering action on climate change through the use of Environmentally Sustainable Design, clean energy or new efficient technologies • Reducing and managing Banyule’s waste stream • Supporting, encouraging and facilitating environmental stewardship.

Place Themes • Neighbourhood character and managing growth • Transport • Retaining and protecting trees • Local services and facilities • Banyule’s identity • Local shops.

Participation Themes • Engaging, partnering with and supporting local community groups and organisations • Improving ways to get information from and about Council and other services/activities • Helping the community understand what Council does and what Council offers • Supporting people to get involved, participate and make connections with others • Increasing and expanding volunteering opportunities • Partnering with the community and making better use of community strengths • Promoting diversity and encouraging community harmony • Providing open and transparent ways for people to have a say and being clearer about what can and can’t be done • Improving and increasing consultation and engagement The full reconciliation of themes and initial responses promoted to the community can be found at http://www.banyule.vic.gov.au/future/

• Safety in local communities • Improve access to and delivery of information about key Council, health and community services and activities.

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Summary of Strategic Framework Terms Strategic Objectives

Each objective is supported by the following:

Key directions

People COMMUNITY STRENGTHENING AND SUPPORT Support and strengthen the health and wellbeing of the Banyule community.

Planet ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Conduct Council activities in a sustainable manner, and practice sound stewardship of the natural environment to ensure its diversity, protection and enhancement.

Place SUSTAINABLE AMENITY AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT Maintain and enhance the quality of Banyule’s public spaces, buildings and infrastructure for people who live, work, shop, play and move around in our city.

Participation COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN COMMUNITY LIFE Govern effectively by appropriately engaging the community in issues that affect them, and advocating for the broader interest of the community.

Performance USE OUR RESOURCES WISELY Manage the financial and non-financial resources required for the next four years to achieve Council’s strategic objectives.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

A range of key strategic directions set to achieve our objectives. These include our priority areas for the four-year period, focus areas and key initiatives: Focus areas - each key direction is supported by a more specific series of themes that Council will focus on. Key initiatives - A list of practical activities, programs and projects resourced by Council. These will deliver on our objectives over the term of this plan. These initiatives are a comprehensive but not an exhaustive list of what Council does for its community, and are reviewed on an annual basis.

Strategic indicators These indicators will measure achievements against our objectives over a four-year period. They include a mix of: –– Key data gathered by Council and other agencies to assist in evaluating community wellbeing (e.g. percentage of waste diverted from landfill). –– Community Satisfaction Indices (CSI) measured by the State Government in its annual survey of Local Governments in Victoria. Together these indicators provide a comprehensive measure of the achievement of the long-term objectives of Council and the community. The indicators chosen represent broad measures of success in areas that are within our control or of significant interest to Council. They help us to assess our efficiency and indicate effectiveness and the quality of the services we provide. They aim to monitor progress against Council’s priority areas within each objective.

Supporting Policies, Strategies and Plans Each of our strategic objectives is underpinned by comprehensive supporting policies, strategies and plans. Our key policy and strategy documents informing the City Plan are continuously reviewed to ensure relevance and responsiveness to community needs and best industry practice: Banyule People: Health and Wellbeing Policy & Strategy – provides the framework to promote good health and wellbeing at all ages within Banyule. The four-year strategy is supported by an annual action plan, and has been developed in partnership with participating agencies and our community. The combination of the relevant sections of the City Plan and the Banyule People: Health and Wellbeing Policy & Strategy represents and satisfies the statutory requirements for a Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan as required by the Victorian Health and Wellbeing Act 2008.

Banyule Planet: Environmental Sustainability Policy & Strategy – provides the framework for achieving environmental sustainability in Banyule. It provides guidance and direction for supporting action plans that are reported in the annual State of the Environment Report. Banyule Place Policy & Strategy – provides the framework for maintaining and improving Banyule as a liveable and vibrant place. Banyule Participation Policy & Strategy – provides the framework for Council to support community involvement, by appropriately engaging with our community on issues that affect them, encouraging participation and advocating on behalf of our community Banyule Performance System: Strategic Resource Plan, Strategic Budget, 10 year Capital Works Plan, Banyule Management System - our ‘Performance’ objective is underpinned by policy context and strategic intent that is informed by a strong legislative framework, using industry best practice guides (eg. Reporting guidelines for local government budgets in Victoria, provided by The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia), and our Banyule Management System (BMS). The BMS is based on meeting the Best Value Principles of service delivery to our community, and incorporates a certification program against three key National and International Standards in Quality, Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Management.

Strategic Resource Plan The Strategic Resource Plan, included in this document, details the financial and non-financial resources required for the life of the City Plan to achieve Council’s strategic objectives. The Strategic Resource Plan as set out by legislation consists of the following: • The ‘Performance – Use our resources wisely’ objective. This includes key directions for achieving the objective, and focus areas for the next four years • The Financial Resources section, which includes information on financial position, financial statements and commentary on these.

Our City Plan’s Relationship with the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan The City Plan and the Banyule People: Health and Wellbeing Policy & Strategy also meet Banyule’s obligation for a Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan under the Victorian Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008.

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‘P’ is for

People

Objective: 1. PEOPLE: COMMUNITY STRENGTHENING AND SUPPORT Support and strengthen the health and wellbeing of the Banyule community. 22

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

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“Our People, our community remains the most important reason for us being on Council. All we do and how we do it remains focussed on improving the lives of people in our community. This includes protecting our environment, improving services, getting good value for our rates and supporting the social and cultural needs of the city.” Cr Craig Langdon

‘People’ is about our desire for optimal health, better living conditions and improved quality of life. Good health is the state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease. Health and wellbeing can be supported at any age through individual and public policy measures. Wellbeing is fundamental to quality of life, quality of human relationships and the capacity to participate in education, work, recreation and the community. We are committed to improving the health of our community and identifying and minimising threats to public health. This is a shared responsibility for which we have delegated legislative responsibility, and we undertake this in conjunction with other agencies and partners, such as the Department of Health, with whom we work closely.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

We will support health and community wellbeing through the following key directions: 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6

Promote and support health and wellbeing Provide services for people at important life stages Develop and promote safety and resilience in our community Celebrate and promote Banyule’s diversity and heritage Support people to achieve their economic potential Plan and prepare for emergency events.

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Key directions for achieving our people objective:

1.1 Promote and support health and wellbeing Good health and wellbeing is fundamental to quality of life, quality of human relationships and the capacity to participate in education, work, recreation and the community. Good health and wellbeing can be supported at any age through individual and public policy measures, such as promoting age friendly environments.

Our focus areas We will: 1.1.1 Develop passive and active recreation, leisure and arts Key initiatives include: • Develop a policy for the use of temporary spaces (Council owned or managed empty shops, unused sites etc.) to support place making and community engagement activity.

The importance of a healthy lifestyle, including regular physical activity, in improving health and wellbeing is well established. Regular quality exposure to nature has also been shown to be important.

• Maintain active community engagement programs to encourage greater use of leisure centres by Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) and Indigenous communities:

We are committed to providing accessible, safe and appealing sport, recreation and community activities. We will achieve this through direct service provision, support of organised community based recreational groups, advocacy, and planning with the community and key stakeholders.

• Consult with the community in the development of community facilities

Our role in public health focuses mainly on health promotion and prevention activities. We also play a role in the minimisation of disease, illness and injury, reducing health and wellbeing inequalities, and supporting health-focused behaviours and conditions. This is particularly important given the recent emergence of new public health risks such as the impact of climate change and the spread of swine flu during 2009.

-- Develop a targeted soccer program for groups in West Heidelberg from a CALD background

• Arts and Cultural strategic plan development and implementation: -- Continued provision of an extensive arts, culture and festival and events calendar

1.1.3 Foster communities that support and create opportunities for people to live healthy and fulfilling lives.

Provide services for people at important life stages

-- Introduction of Movies in the Park

Key initiatives include:

Banyule’s population is changing and growing every year. Banyule has a significant ageing population; however, similar to the nation as a whole, it is also experiencing a ‘baby boom’, with a strongly increasing number of 0 to 4 year olds. There is a slight decrease in the number of dwellings occupied by traditional family groups. The locations where high numbers of children and young people live are changing. An increase in the overall birth rate, multiple dwelling sites and a slight growth in migrants coming to Banyule are contributing to our overall growth.

• Continue the support and development of Council’s facility managed by Macleod YMCA • Adopt and implement a Play-space plan that provides a strategic vision for appropriate play spaces for our community to meet and recreate at. 1.1.2 Protect the community against preventable diseases and hazards associated with food, water and the environment Key initiatives include: • Review, implement and promote Council’s public health programs and services • Promote access to healthy foods by implementing programs and services that maximise food safety, access and nutrition • Continue Council’s program for water quality monitoring of public pools • Co-ordinate and deliver immunisation services to protect children from communicable diseases • Undertake educational and enforcement activities to reduce the health impact of tobacco on the community • Respond to emerging and future preventable disease outbreaks and public health risks though education, promotion and advocacy.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

1.2

• Support Neighbourhood Houses to provide community and education programs: -- Support an additional portable classroom for Watsonia Neighbourhood House • Support community groups with community grants and access to buildings • Support the resurfacing of the lower ground at the Montmorency Bowling club • Explore the feasibility, costs and operational impacts of a possible Council-facilitated service that would assist our senior citizen organisations in the set-up and pack-up of tables, chairs and other furniture for their meetings and gatherings • Work towards making Banyule an ‘Age Friendly’ place to live, including: -- Celebrate and co-ordinate activities for seniors during the October ‘Seniors Month’ • Plan and deliver services, activities and information to support seniors in living a full and independent life in Banyule • Advocate on behalf of disadvantaged members of our community in Council related services and appropriate areas of need affecting their life in Banyule • Review the Banyule Electronic Gaming Machine Strategy.

To enjoy health and wellbeing, people need strong social connections to family, friends and the wider community. Such connections support the development of mutual trust, shared values and more cohesive communities. We will advocate for and support the development of services and resources for people of all ages, genders, abilities, cultures and household types in Banyule. This involves planning, developing and delivering appropriate services and resources in partnership with the community, other levels of government and key stakeholders.

“As a father with a young family I have first hand experience of both the needs and pressures that face our important community services. Council is constantly balancing the challenge of increasing community demand, cost pressures and cost shifting from other levels of Government.” Cr Mark DiPasquale

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Key directions for achieving our people objective:

Our focus areas We will: 1.2.1 Promote healthy development of children, young people and their families Key initiatives include: • Provide a responsive maternal and child health program that meets required standards of practice • Provide high quality and responsive early childhood services, supporting high needs groups and community based care • Continue to implement the Youth Strategic Plan, advocating for improved services and support

1.3

1.4

1.5

Develop and promote safety and resilience in our community

Celebrate and promote Banyule’s diversity and heritage

Support people to achieve their economic potential

People want to feel safe in their homes, streets, shopping centres, public and open spaces. Perceptions of safety and experiences of crime or accidental injury can have significant effects on health and wellbeing.

Banyule’s population is represented by a diverse range of people’s backgrounds, cultures and heritage. Past and current cultures play a strong role in determining values, aspirations and meaning to peoples’ lives. The Banyule community has been shaped by a rich legacy of past and current artistic and cultural influences. Council recognises, respects and celebrates the ongoing cultural heritage and connection to this land of the Wurundjeri willam people. The heritage and cultural expression of Banyule’s many migrant groups is also significant for the continued development of the City’s distinctiveness and sense of identity.

Accessing economic opportunities and having the capacity to participate in the economy are important contributors to people’s overall wellbeing. Fulfilling economic potential can increase resilience to change and provide a strong foundation for increasing the robustness of other wellbeing factors, such as mental and physical health.

We will advocate for and work in partnership with the community, other levels of governments and key stakeholders to enhance and maintain safe social, built and natural environments in Banyule. This involves promoting and supporting individual and community safety in Banyule within the limits of Council’s influence and responsibility to our community.

-- JETS creative arts hub

Our focus areas

-- LINK-U outreach program

We will:

Together with our community and other key stakeholders, we will develop accessible and relevant cultural and arts activities to celebrate our cultural heritage, express identity and create social connection.

1.3.1 Support, address and advocate for community safety

Our focus areas

Key initiatives include:

We will:

• Develop a cross-council approach to graffiti management

1.4.1 Support leisure, arts and cultural activities that strengthen connection to place, heritage, diversity and community

• Deliver innovative programs for young people, such as:

• Implement Early Years Infrastructure Developments, including: -- Olympic Village Learning Hub in Heidelberg West Stage 2, detailed design and construction of a Child & Family Centre -- Pre-Schools redevelopment program - Audrey Brooks, Morobe St, Winston Hills, and Interlaken.

• Implement year two of the Community Safety Plan • Implement traffic safety improvements outside of: -- Montmorency South Primary School

1.2.2 Support older people to live independently Key initiatives include: • Plan and deliver sustainable aged and disability services in line with Home and Community Care guidelines, to support people to live independently at home • Continue Council’s integrated and inclusive program and facility planning to maximise use by older people • Provide a delivered meals service (‘meals on wheel’) that supports eligible community members and meets their nutritional needs • Prepare and reorientate Council’s Aged services to address current National Aged Care Reforms.

-- Watsonia Primary school.

Key initiatives include: • Promote WW2 Heritage links with the West Heidelberg community through a flags and interpretive signage program • Develop an Aboriginal art-sculpture trail and native garden along the walkway from Catalina Street to Northland • Implement year one actions of the Arts and Recreation strategic plans • Develop and implement opportunities to increase cultural tourism in Banyule, e.g. Heidelberg School Artist trail, Impressionist lab, and Napier Waller House preservation • Improve the preservation of the Banyule art collection assets • Implement year one of Hatch Contemporary Arts Space business plan.

Council will continue to work with small businesses, including start-ups, to provide access to support and advice, networking and training opportunities and group delivery programs. As Banyule’s population diversifies, more women return to work and retirement age increases, Council’s programs will change and adapt to meet local needs. Improving business development and supporting the establishment and growth of businesses in Banyule will contribute to local employment opportunities and a sustainable local economy. Council will also continue to work in partnership with federal, state and regional bodies to create pathways to employment, training and other learning initiatives. We will help local small businesses succeed by providing them with skills, knowledge and resources to establish and grow, contributing to Banyule’s economic development and providing greater potential for local employment opportunities. Our focus areas We will: 1.5.1 Encourage and assist the development of small business Key initiatives include: • Deliver small business support by: -- Providing networking and training opportunities that respond to local business needs -- Working in partnership to provide one-to-one advice and planning sessions -- Continuing to develop and deliver on our Banyule Business website (Your Gateway to Business in Banyule) a dedicated link for businesses in Banyule including a focus on how they can access the tender opportunities available with Council • Communicate with business to promote business excellence and provide up to date support and advice.

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Key directions for achieving our people objective:

1.5.2 Review Council’s procurement guidelines with a stronger emphasis on the support of local employment, social and environmental impacts. Key initiatives include: • Increase the percentage of locally produced or provided goods and services purchased by Banyule.

1.6 Plan and prepare for emergency events As the closest level of government to our community, we have a responsibility for, and commitment to, their ongoing wellbeing. We have an important role under Victoria’s emergency management arrangements as we hold information about our community and vulnerable people. We work with emergency services, agencies and the community to facilitate emergency planning, support emergency response and coordinate emergency relief and recovery. Our municipal emergency planning strives to reduce risk whilst strengthening our community, increasing safety and resilience. Through community engagement we will promote emergency awareness and preparedness amongst our residents. We will continue to maintain our operational readiness and review arrangements in conjunction with business continuity planning, to improve our capacity to respond to emergency events.

Strategic indicators

Key supporting policy and strategy

1.6.1 Strengthen community resilience

How we will measure our performance against this objective:

This objective is underpinned by the following primary policy and strategy framework:

Key initiatives include:

• CSI - Recreational facilities

• Continue to implement requirements of the Vulnerable Person in Emergencies Program

• Attendance at Council provided aquatic centres

• Banyule People: Health and Wellbeing Policy and Strategy, 2013-17

• Develop and implement Council’s strategic plan for disaster resilience, including:

• CSI – Disadvantaged support services

Our focus areas We will:

-- Educate and prepare the community for emergency events such as bush fires, heatwaves and pandemics. 1.6.2 Maintain operational readiness Key initiatives include: • Continue to prepare Council for emergency response, relief and recovery

• Percentage of people who feel they ‘belong’ in Banyule • Performance against People: Health and Wellbeing Action Plan (% actions completed on time) • Total number of library borrowings by Banyule residents • CSI - Family support services • CSI – Elderly support services • Key Ages and Stages: participation rate for 3.5 year visits

• Develop and implement the emergency collaboration project with other North and West metropolitan municipalities

• Unit rate cost to Council for delivered meals

• Monitor changes to emergency management requirements and advocate in the best interests of the Banyule community.

• Percentage of delivered meals recipients satisfied with the service (rating the service as excellent, very good or good)

• Total number of delivered meals

Supporting plans This objective is also supported by a range of current plans including: • Banyule Arts Plan (in development) • Banyule Recreation Plan (in development) • Banyule Emergency Management Plan • Safer Banyule Plan • Banyule Positive Ageing Plan (in development) • Banyule Youth and Family Services Strategy • Banyule Early Years Plan (in development) • Banyule Aboriginal Heritage Study

• Percentage of people who feel safe in Banyule

• Banyule Heritage Places Study

• Performance against Safer Banyule Action Plan (% actions completed on time)

• Banyule Art Collection Policy

• CSI – Art centres and libraries • CSI – Community and cultural activities • Attendance at Banyule festival • Number of economic development events delivered in partnership with other organisations (eg. neighbouring Councils, State and Federal Government, Regional Development organisations, traders associations, etc)

• Banyule Library Redevelopment Study • Banyule Public Art Strategy • Banyule Youth Strategic Plan • Banyule Electronic Gaming Machine Plan (in development) • Banyule Graffiti Management Plan (in development) • Banyule Economic Development Plan (in development)

• Participation level (attendance) at Council operated/ hosted economic development events • CSI – Emergency and disaster management • Completion of scheduled emergency management exercises as part of Councils Municipal Emergency Management Plan (Note: CSI – Community satisfaction indicators measured by the Department of Planning and Community Development survey for Local Governments)

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

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‘P’ is for

Planet

Objective: 2. PLANET: ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Conduct Council activities in a sustainable manner, and practice sound stewardship of the natural environment to ensure its diversity, protection and enhancement.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

Although bulldozers are not usually associated with environmental projects, here at Chelsworth Park in Ivanhoe they were critical in preparing the way for our $6 million stormwater harvesting project. The project – also at Kalparrin Gardens, Greensborough, and DeWinton Park, Rosanna – enables harvesting of 138 million litres of stormwater annually to irrigate these parks and their sporting grounds, saving more than 30 Olympic swimming pools of tap water which would otherwise have been used. Pollutants will also be removed, improving water quality and biodiversity.

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‘Planet’ is about the natural and formed environment and the ecosystems that sustain the community. Our community is an integral part of the environment and together we are the custodians of our shared home. “As a Council we need to protect our natural environment and seek to live sustainably in everything we do. We must continue to seek solutions to our transport congestion issues and act locally on environmental protection”. Cr Tom Melican

To develop a sustainable environment we will focus on the following key directions: 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

Protect and enhance our natural environment Conserve water and improve stormwater quality and impact Deliver appropriate action on climate change Avoid waste generation Act as environmental stewards

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Key directions for achieving our planet objective:

2.1

2.2

2.3

Protect and enhance our natural environment

-- Work towards further establishing and building the profile of urban forestry in Banyule and supporting action on canopy enhancement in the public and private realm

Conserve water and improve stormwater quality and impact

Deliver appropriate action on climate change

Banyule’s passive and active open spaces, bushland reserves, and broad tree cover are key features of the municipality and are strongly supported by community values. The enhancement and maintenance of Banyule’s parks, reserves and private gardens is paramount in contributing to sustainability and a sense of wellbeing in the community.

-- Continue to build on research and measurement of management innovations and the way our landscapes are planned and designed into the future, ensuring appropriate engagement with the local community

The conservation of water and energy is a priority for the development of a sustainable community. This is a major focus for us in planning and delivering services and infrastructure, preserving and enhancing areas of high conservation significance and promoting environmental stewardship.

We recognise the threat to all ecosystems and communities from climate change.

We are committed to protecting and enhancing the diverse land and water-based ecosystems in our municipality. We will strive to create and maintain additional habitat areas that are ecologically sustainable, and which will encourage our community’s connection with nature. We will focus on the protection, enhancement and maintenance of our significant bushland reserves to promote biodiversity. This involves managing our parks, reserves and urban forests as key environmental assets for the benefit of our community. Our focus areas We will: 2.1.1 Protect wildlife corridors and enhance waterways and wetlands Key initiatives include: • Complete a strategic environmental and operational management plan for Wilson Reserve • Deliver a heritage and environment study for Banyule Flats • Work with other stakeholders, including the Victorian State Government, to advocate for the ongoing protection and conservation of Gresswell Forest Nature Conservation Reserve. 2.1.2 Protect and plant trees and appropriate vegetation Key initiatives include: • Guide development decisions that protect and enhance our treed environment through Council’s Statutory planning service area • Raise community awareness of Banyule’s Urban Forest through initiatives including: -- Develop an Urban Forestry Policy and Strategic Plan to improve the quality and quantity of the city’s urban forest

-- Work with the Banyule community to broaden our understanding of the benefits and importance of our urban forest, and increase our connection to them. • Continue the work of our arborists and Council’s planning enforcement area to protect our treed environment in private places • Inspect and protect our treed environment in public places through Council’s Parks and Gardens service area, including collection of scientific data on the City’s public realm trees to assist the maintenance and protection of our urban forest • Develop parks, gardens, reserves and bushland facilities, including:

We will provide leadership on water conservation and water sensitive urban design and will explore innovative models for water management for our operations and the community. We will improve Council water use efficiency and develop alternative sustainable water sources and re-uses. This will lower operating costs and provide a positive example to the community, which will help influence community practices. We undertake direct works and work with relevant authorities to improve stormwater quality and lessen its impact on waterway ecology and biodiversity. Our focus areas

We will advocate and seek to reduce Council energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and associated operating costs, and work with the community for further emissions reduction, with the eventual target of carbon neutrality. We will assess and respond to the impact of climate change on the community and Council’s service and infrastructure. We are committed to working with community organisations and other levels of government to pursue environmental sustainability for Banyule. We will explore innovative models for water and energy management in active and passive open spaces to meet community aspirations. We will continue to deliver our services consistent with the International Standard for Environmental Management AS/NZS ISO 14001:2004.

-- Andrew Yandell reserve staircase

We will:

-- St Helena Rd and Yandell Close entrances

2.2.1 Increase Council’s water use efficiency

Our focus areas

-- Reserve Fence Replacement program

Key initiatives include:

We will:

• Complete construction of stormwater harvesting projects at Chelsworth, Kalparrin and DeWinton Reserves that replaces tap water irrigation of sports grounds and filters out waterway pollution

2.3.1 Reduce our impact on climate change by reducing Council’s energy consumption and waste

• Protect our important tree assets by an enhanced tree management and maintenance capability, including: -- Routine Street Tree Pruning - through the existing Tree Management Contract, and assessment and works on 75,000 street trees -- Tree Planting - replace trees lost to drought and enhance Banyule’s urban forest population on nature strips, road reserves, parks and reserves -- Comply with new Electricity Safety (Electric Line Clearance) Regulations 2010 (tree removal and pruning) • Major vegetation strategies: -- Substantial Tree Strategy in the Planning Scheme – complete the public exhibition and planning panel process for vegetation overlay Schedule 5. 2.1.3 Improve the policing of litter and waste dumping Key initiatives include: • Develop strategies to strengthen the enforcement of litter and illegal dumping of items and goods • Increase community awareness of our hard rubbish and green waste collection programs to minimise illegal dumping

• Provide ongoing development and maintenance of warm season grassed playing surfaces, including: -- Yulong Reserve East • Provide maintenance of oval and sports field irrigation, including sprinkler and drainage replacement, irrigation flow sensors, and technology renewals. 2.2.2 Improve our urban drainage and stormwater management

Key initiatives include: • Improve streetlight energy efficiency. This will significantly reduce Council’s ongoing energy costs and result in a 19% reduction in overall greenhouse gas emissions • Seek government funding to install solar hot water at Council buildings • Deliver a continued certification program against ISO14001 Environmental Management Standards • Continue Council’s energy efficiency initiatives toward carbon neutrality.

Key initiatives include: • Deliver an evidence based 10 year Capital Works Plan for Council’s stormwater drainage network, including: -- Improved stormwater infrastructure - including the Rosanna Parklands Davis street drain, Mountainview Parade drainage and implementing the emergency drainage works response program.

• Finalise a waste minimisation plan including litter prevention and dumping of waste.

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Key directions for achieving our planet objective:

2.4

2.5

Avoid waste generation

Act as environmental stewards

Strategic indicators

Key supporting policy and strategy

We need to ensure that what we consume in our community today does not disadvantage future generations. By developing strong partnerships with our community we can work together to become more sustainable.

The ecological footprint of a municipality is a measure of the ‘load’ on nature imposed by its population. Council and the community need to continue to work together to identify and address opportunities to reduce Banyule’s footprint.

How we will measure our performance against this objective:

This objective is underpinned by the following primary policy and strategy framework:

• CSI – Environmental sustainability

• Banyule Planet: Environmental Sustainability Policy and Strategy, 2013-17

We will establish policies that support a reduced environmental impact for the Banyule community. We will provide leadership and advocacy to manage resource consumption and minimise environmental impact.

We will continue to deliver and support environmental education programs that promote biodiversity, water and energy conservation and waste avoidance.

Our focus areas We will: 2.4.1 Discourage waste to landfill Key initiatives include:

We will promote community participation to leverage change within the community, and continue to advocate for the use of sustainable transport, practices and products. We are committed to supporting community and friends groups in their efforts to protect and enhance the environment, reduce waste, and live sustainably.

• Number of tree plantings (Council tree plantings in streets and parks) • Performance against Planet: Environmental Sustainability Action Plan (% actions completed on time)

Supporting plans

• CSI – The appearance of public areas • Council’s water use

This objective is also supported by a range of current plans including:

• Council’s greenhouse gas emissions

• Biodiversity Plan (in development)

• CSI - Waste management

• Weed Management Strategy

• Percentage of waste diverted from landfill

• Public Open Space Strategy • Water Plan (in development) • Environmental Stewardship Plan (in development)

• Develop and implement a new Waste Management Plan

Our focus areas

• Deliver Council’s current best practice waste management services

We will:

• Percentage of ‘consumer waste’ diverted from landfill (ie excludes greenwaste)

2.5.1 Manage recreation and open spaces in an environmentally sustainable way

• Attendance at Council’s Rethink Centre waste education programs

Key initiatives include:

(Note: CSI – Community satisfaction indicators measured by the Department of Planning and Community Development survey for Local Governments)

2.4.2 Identify and implement viable recycling opportunities Key initiatives include: • Investigate and cost new business opportunities for recycling and waste collection for sporting clubs, community facilities and leisure centres • Continue to manage Council’s significant recycling services, seeking further opportunities for diversion from the waste stream.

• Continue to provide priority weed control to bush reserves and waterway reserves involving friends groups and community groups

Key initiatives include:

• Finalise and implement Council’s Planet: Environmental Sustainability Policy and Strategy

• Advocate to other levels of government to reduce the cost shift burden of higher waste costs resulting from landfill levies.

• Banyule City Council Electrical Line Clearance Management Plan.

• Manage sporting users to ensure the ongoing viability of sports playing surfaces. 2.5.2 Support community and business to protect and enhance the environment

• Continue implementing waste avoidance programs to the broader community, schools and community groups

• Best Value Plus Program – Environmental Management System

• Deliver on open space strategy and reserve master plan priorities

2.4.3 Advocate for increased use of environmentally beneficial technologies and services in the community • Develop education tools to empower Banyule’s community to avoid waste

• Energy Plan (in development)

Key initiatives include:

• Finalise and implement 5 Planet Plans: Biodiversity Plan, Water Plan, Energy Plan, Waste Plan, and the Environmental Stewardship Plan • Continue stewardship programs that educate the community about environmental sustainability including: -- Wildlife Corridor program -- Environmental Sustainability Grants -- Home Harvest -- Positive Charge • Consult our community and seek expert advice in relation to the development of a Council position on urban agriculture (including Community gardens and nature strip planting).

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Objective: 3. PLACE: SUSTAINABLE AMENITY AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT Maintain and enhance the quality of Banyule’s public spaces, buildings and infrastructure for people who live, work, shop, play and move around in our city.

‘P’ is for ‘P’ is for

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‘Place’ describes the buildings, structures and spaces in which we live, work, shop and play. It is about our surroundings, how we interact with and move about within them. ‘Place’ also shapes our interactions with others and influences the quality and frequency of our social and economic activities. ‘Place’ is dynamic and influenced by many factors, most notably the aspirations of landowners and statutory approval systems that are governed through State and sometimes Federal decision making.

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“The nature of the places we live in, how they are formed, protected and developed affects the way we all experience our local community. Banyule is committed to improving where we live, protecting our community assets and creating the right environment for sustainable economic growth.” Cr Steven Briffa

To help improve the liveability of Banyule we will focus on the following key directions: 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5

Maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live Strengthen local activity and employment areas Support thriving commercial and retail activity Enhance Banyule’s public and open spaces Support sustainable transport

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Key directions for achieving our place objective:

3.1 • Maintain the WaterMarc building and plant assets

Maintain and improve Banyule as a great place to live

3.1.2 Encourage greater diversity and sustainability of housing

The neighbourhood character of many of our suburbs contributes to the ‘liveability’ and local lifestyle of Banyule.

• Implement Environmental Sustainable Design (ESD) practices within our statutory planning assessment process

People in Banyule value their natural environment, in the form of parks and open spaces, and the trees and vegetation that contribute to the green and leafy character of many residential streets and public spaces. Planning policy and guidelines help to protect and improve these areas, their vegetation and residential amenity.

• Complete planning for environmentally efficient design guidelines in the planning scheme

-- Street signs and furniture

• Implement and expand Council’s Liveable Housing Guidelines to improve the accessibility of new housing

-- Sports field and reserve Lighting

We will protect, maintain and enhance Banyule’s preferred neighbourhood character within the extent of our authority by encouraging development that is sympathetic to the environment and community needs. We will continue to refine local planning policy and guidelines to promote the preferred character of neighbourhoods. We will work proactively with the community to enhance local vegetation and contribute to a greener Banyule.

• Ensure compliance with state and federal sustainable building codes through Banyule’s Building Control Service.

We will also strive to direct future housing growth and development towards areas close to public transport, shops, business and community facilities, with good connections to other local services and facilities. We will encourage and promote improved design that considers accessibility and sustainability and contributes to overall liveability. Council is committed to act as a diligent steward of our community’s physical resources. We will ensure that our assets are maintained and provided in a form that meets the service and infrastructure needs of our community now and in the future. Our focus areas

Key initiatives include:

• Improve residential housing accessibility

• Deliver Infrastructure Asset Renewal Programs, including asset plans, Renewal GAP physical works, condition surveys and maintenance programs for: -- Traffic management -- Sports field surfaces (including synthetic) and irrigation, -- Trees (street, bushland, parks, facilities) • Look to maintain and improve our local road network infrastructure through our Local Roads Re-sheet and Rehabilitation program, including:

3.1.3 Promote the improved design of local neighbourhoods to enhance ease of movement and access to goods, services and employment

-- St Helena Road - Glen Katherine Drive to Maxine Drive

Key initiatives include:

-- Princes Street - Watsonia Road to Ladd Street

• Ensure appropriate and safe access to all local roads and centres through Council’s traffic engineering services

-- Nepean Street - McKenzie Court to Cul-De-Sac

• Complete the vehicle crossovers planning scheme amendment

-- Lloyd Street - Dresden Street to Waterdale Road

• Develop a program to upgrade pram crossings.

-- Sherbourne Road - Mountain View Road to Lorraine Drive

-- Wungan Street - Iona Court to Cherry Street -- Malahang Parade - Waterdale Road to Oriel Road -- Warrawee Drive - Grimshaw Street to Cameron Pde

3.1.4 Develop, renew and maintain Banyule’s public assets to defined and agreed standards Key initiatives include: • Conduct repairs to the Willinda Park staircase from the athletics track to Plenty Trail.

-- Shelly Street - Lloyd Street to Outhwaite Road -- Cleveland Avenue - Lakeside Drive to Henty Road -- Trist Street - Meakin Street to Sellars Street -- Coventry Street - Cul-De-Sac to James Street -- Fernside Avenue - Porter Street to Hyacinth Street

We will:

• Develop and implement a proactive program for street sweeping of hot spots affecting drainage

3.1.1 Promote the preferred character of neighbourhoods and preferred places for development

• Maintain and further enhance the city’s streetscapes and parkland trees for future generations

• Seek Federal Government support in local roads initiatives through the Roads to Recovery - Federal Government Funding for Road Renewal program.

Key initiatives include:

• Review Council’s Road Management Plan and continue to implement priority findings

• Deliver the New Footpath Construction Program, including:

• Guide development growth to key sites, including within Greensborough, Heidelberg, Ivanhoe and Heidelberg West

• Deliver building maintenance programs based on identified maintenance standards for Council facilities

• Deliver a long-term strategic plan for Council’s potential influence and land use planning on Watsonia station and the surrounding precinct

• Program the ongoing upgrade of Council facilities and buildings for better accessibility

• Complete planning for a cultural heritage policy in the planning scheme • Achieve appropriately negotiated outcomes for Council’s 2012 Neighbourhood Character Strategy in the planning scheme • Undertake further housing and neighbourhood character planning to consider the State’s new residential zones.

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• Continue to provide a responsive and effective cleansing service to street, drains, shopping centres and public toilets, and maintain these assets with an agreed and defined level of cleanliness • Undertake condition assessments on the path network in Council’s parks • Complete the design and commence construction of stage one of the Ivanhoe Aquatic Centre redevelopment

-- Kingsbury Drive Shared Pathway bounded by Charles La Trobe P-12 College • Ensure important high pedestrian traffic areas such as activity centres are maintained and developed for the benefit of local businesses and the safety of our local community.

3.1.5 Encourage the community to contribute to the greening of Banyule Key initiatives include: • Develop a West Heidelberg Garden Competition. • Implement the Price Park Masterplan • Develop and implement the Street Tree Strategic Plan • Work with community groups and organisations to support appropriate community-based environmental initiatives such as a tree planting days • Deliver a range of Community Gardens initiatives, including: -- Bellfield Community Centre and Johnson Reserve next to the scouts.

3.2 Strengthen local activity and employment areas Local activity areas are the hubs of community, social and economic activity in Banyule, and they play a key role in providing local employment and economic growth opportunities. We will guide growth to activity centres, and seek additional infrastructure investment to complement anticipated growth in employment, residential and retail areas. Local activity areas will be places of mixed and vibrant activity, where people can live, work, shop and play within their local area. Where a more concentrated local effort is required, we will look specifically at target areas to coordinate our approach and realise shared benefits with strategic partners and the local community. We will work with existing employment areas to promote growth and clustering of economic activity, capitalising on strengths such as proximity to learning institutions and knowledge-intensive industries. Our focus areas We will: 3.2.1 Explore funding opportunities to grow activity areas, including Greensborough, Heidelberg and Ivanhoe Key initiatives include: • Create and provide opportunities for self-funded public space community events • Develop a market at Greensborough town square

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Key directions for achieving our place objective:

3.2.2 Encourage investment that supports local jobs growth Key initiatives include: • Encourage investment in residential, commercial and industrial uses, focused on activity and employment areas. 3.2.3 Support the regeneration of Heidelberg West (3081) Key initiatives include: • Work with our community to provide a co-ordinated approach to identifying and meeting the needs of those living in postcode 3081, including: -- Addressing and advocating on social, economic and infrastructure issues -- Delivering on the postcode 3081 program (Post Neighbourhood Renewal program) • Support the development and implementation of the Banyule business incubator in Heidelberg West. 3.2.4 Create community hubs at Ivanhoe, Watsonia and Heidelberg West Key initiatives include: • Progress master-planning for the Ivanhoe Civic Precinct • Progress the development of the Heidelberg West Olympic Village Learning Hub - Stage 1: Child & Family Centre • Progress planning for the Watsonia Community hub in a way that will genuinely consider the needs and aspirations of the local community • Progress the planning for the Ivanhoe Learning Hub. 3.2.5 Develop plans that encourage investment and development opportunities for growth and regeneration of business and employment Key initiatives include: • Review and deliver the Banyule Economic Development Plan in consultation with local industry and key stakeholders.

3.3

3.4

Support thriving commercial and retail activity

Enhance Banyule’s public and open spaces

Retail and commercial businesses are the heart of our activity areas, and provide vital local goods and services across Banyule’s neighbourhoods. A strong commercial and retail mix contributes to the vitality and character of our shopping centres, as well as providing significant local employment opportunities. We will seek to increase the vibrancy of our local retail areas by marketing and promoting centres in partnership with local businesses, and continuing to support traders’ associations in directing investment to locally identified priorities. Our focus areas We will: 3.3.1 Support activity centres to enhance local retail and commercial activity Key initiatives include: • Continue to support local shopping centres through the Special Rates and Charges scheme • Explore opportunities for streetscape investment, and co-ordinate Council’s approach to shopping centre beautification such as cleaning and maintenance: -- Work toward the completion of beautification of the Watsonia shopping centre streetscape over the term of this plan • Complete the Ivanhoe Activity Centre planning scheme amendment. 3.3.2 Work in partnership with businesses to market and promote Banyule’s retail and commercial offer Key initiatives include: • Assist in building the capacity of traders’ associations to continually improve governance. • Conduct improvement works to Rosanna shopping precinct, including lighting and landscaping around trees. • Market and promote investment activity in shopping centres.

Banyule’s publicly used, locally managed spaces are important places to meet and engage in social or leisure activities. We will protect and improve these spaces and plan for renewed, new and modified spaces. We are committed to providing accessible, safe and appealing public spaces for sport, recreation and community activities. This includes non-sporting (passive) spaces such as parks, playgrounds, and trails as well as reserves where active sport is played. Our focus areas We will: 3.4.1 Provide and maintain beautiful open space across Banyule for passive and active use

• Create a fenced ‘dog off lead’ area at Malcolm Blair Reserve • Adapt, implement and promote an outdoor smoke-free areas policy • Improve tennis facilities, including: -- Banyule -- Macleod -- Rosanna • Sporting Facilities Lighting and Equipment: -- All Seasons Cricket Pitch Replacement program -- Apply for State government support for the redevelopment of Yulong Reserve and Bundoora Cricket net replacement.

Key initiatives include:

3.4.3 Provide suitable community gathering spaces and look for opportunities for new and shared spaces and facilities

• Renew Banyule’s Public Open Space Strategy

Key initiatives include:

• Develop Telfer Reserve Master Plan actions including planning and design for car park and pavilion. • Develop Master Plans for Regional Family Play spaces

• Implement the Simms Road Reserve Master Plan, including Montmorency Junior Football Club pavilion and ground construction

• Develop a Darebin Creek Master Plan in conjunction with Darebin City Council and the State Government

• Continue to implement Council’s playground replacement program

• Implement the Darebin Parklands Master Plan including contributing to signage, seats and facilities

• Develop design plans for a regional play space concept for Anthony Beale Reserve

• Investigate options to determine if part or all of the wetlands in Redmond Court in Watsonia can be converted into an open meadow for passive recreation

• Develop Banyule Reserve pavilion by extending the viewing deck, fix concrete and improving ground access

3.4.2 Provide and maintain well designed public spaces that have great public amenity, are accessible and strengthen community connections Key initiatives include: • Redevelop the Ivanhoe Library:

• Develop detailed design for pavilion developments, including: -- Ivanhoe Pavilion -- Loyola Reserve • Assess new opportunities for improving access to existing spaces and facilities.

-- Drawings for the redevelopment of the Ivanhoe Library site • Maintain Council open spaces, including: -- fire hazards -- traffic areas -- road reserves -- ovals

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Key directions for achieving our place objective:

3.5 Support sustainable transport How people move about Banyule and our ability to access what Banyule has to offer shapes our view of our city, and contributes significantly to our sense of place. Mobility and accessibility is linked to economic circumstances, such as affordability of travel options as well as physical constraints, such as disability. Our activity centres are important transport nodes, where transfers between one form of transport and another should be easy and convenient. Smooth and seamless transfer between different forms of transport encourages people to make journeys that may otherwise only be attractive by car. We will partner with key stakeholders to advocate to the State Government on behalf of the community for greater investment in local public transport infrastructure. We are committed to supporting improved public spaces and places so more people can enjoy walking and cycling safely to and through local hubs of activity. We will plan and manage transport interests for the local community for a more sustainable and integrated local transport system, where walking, cycling and use of public transport are encouraged. Our focus areas

-- Banyule - Henty Road, Viewbank (vehicle bridge) - rock beaching on both sides of piers • Plan for and deliver a major shared path bicycle link from the Plenty River trail to Plenty Road which would be a major bicycle transport link through Banyule. This will involve:

Strategic indicators

Key supporting policy and strategy

How we will measure our performance against this objective:

This objective is underpinned by the following primary policy and strategy framework:

• Percentage of planning applications completed within statutory timeframe (60 days)

• Banyule Place Policy and Strategy, 2013-17.

-- Planning and delivery of a shared path bicycle link along the power easement from Plenty River trail to Watsonia Station

• CSI – Council’s general town planning policy

-- Planning and delivery of shared path bicycle link from Watsonia Station to Plenty Road along Morwell Avenue and delivery of on and off road trail design and landscaping

• CSI – The condition of local streets and footpaths in your area

This objective is also supported by a range of current plans including:

• MAV Insurance (overall score) – compliance with road management plan

• Banyule Planning Scheme

• Continue the off-road path renewal and development of our Shared Trail (bicycle network), including: -- Bicycle path renewal - maintenance and renewal of Banyule’s off-road bicycle trail network - Darebin Creek, Plenty River, Main Yarra Extension and Plenty River Extension. -- Implement the shared trail asset management plan -- Plenty River Trail from Willinda Park to Greensborough Activity Centre. 3.5.3 Encourage walking, cycling and public transport use

• VLG infrastructure indicator: renewal ratio

• CSI - Planning and building permits • CSI - Business and community development and tourism • Number of economic development events delivered in partnership with other organisations (eg. neighbouring Councils, State and Federal Government, Regional Development organisations, traders associations, etc) • Participation level (attendance) at Council operated/ hosted economic development events • Number of businesses that are participating in special rates schemes

Supporting plans

• Municipal Strategic Statement • Housing Strategy • Neighbourhood Character Strategy • Heritage Strategy • Local Area Traffic Management Strategy • Drainage Policy • Road Safety Strategy • Asset Management Strategy • Banyule Bicycle Strategic Statement

• Percentage of people who feel safe in Banyule

• Banyule Integrated Transport Plan (in development)

Key initiatives include:

• CSI – The appearance of public areas

• Urban Design Guidelines, frameworks and concept plans

• CSI – Parking facilities

• Activity Centre Structure Plans

Key initiatives include:

• Continue the marketing of our shared trail and on road bike network • Advocate for increased investment in public transport and bike transport

• CSI - Traffic management

• Road Management Plan

• Develop a clear and succinct transport vision for Banyule which:

• Linear metres of shared paths/ trails renewed, upgraded and new.

• Streetscape plans

We will: 3.5.1 Develop an integrated transport plan for Banyule

-- Describes Banyule’s vision for transport across the city -- Sets out the actions Banyule is undertaking to realise this vision -- Identifies key actions and projects that other key stakeholders, particularly the State Government, will need to progress to help deliver this vision, including: • Greensborough multimodal interchange • Rosanna Rd • Watsonia rail station multi-level park and ride. 3.5.2 Provide shared trails that help to link key public open spaces and community facilities Key initiatives include: • Pedestrian Bridge Replacement, including:

• Advocate for improvements to public transport that will benefit local residents including: -- Orbital bus routes and the frequency, appropriateness and capacity of public transport options available in Banyule.

(Note: CSI – Community satisfaction indicators measured by the Department of Planning and Community Development survey for Local Governments)

• Public Open Space Strategy • Economic Development Plan (in development).

3.5.4 Improve parking management in activity areas Key initiatives include: • Develop parking plans for key activity areas, including: -- Activity Centre Car Parking Strategies - Heidelberg, followed by Greensborough and Ivanhoe -- Explore options for improved parking in and around Watsonia Station • Investigate improving parking management outcomes by extending paid parking within activity centres in our city.

-- Bridge handrail modifications for 20 Bridges - to insert ‘shear pins’ for flood events.

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Objective: 4. PARTICIPATION: COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN COMMUNITY LIFE Govern effectively by appropriately engaging the community in issues that affect them, and advocate for the broader interest of the community.

‘P’ is for

Participation

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‘Participation’ is central to good governance. We will strive for good governance by providing the community with opportunities to actively engage in and influence the decision-making process. We will plan for and respond to the community’s needs, advocate on its behalf and use the resources of the municipality appropriately.

“True and meaningful engagement with our community is essential for good governance and creates an environment that encourages participation in community life. Council plays an important role in community life. Community participation occurs in many fields. From our wonderful volunteers in sporting clubs, RSL’s, community service groups, trader associations and church groups, thousands of hours of unpaid work by all sorts of volunteers contributes to the intricate social fabric that is Banyule.” Cr Jenny Mulholland

Banyule’s commitment to participation will be achieved by the following key directions: 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4

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Engage meaningfully with our community Encourage diverse and inclusive community participation Advocate on behalf of our community Provide outstanding communications and customer service

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Key directions for achieving our participation objective:

4.1

4.2

Engage meaningfully with our community Banyule aspires to be a community characterised by mutual trust, goodwill and respect between Council, residents and other key stakeholders. We have supported the development of a Community Plan and have taken on board relevant information to feed into our City Plan process.

• Actively engage with our community members to understand their views and communicate with them to ensure their needs are considered, and operate in a way that demonstrates we are connected with our community’s priorities

• Work in respectful partnership with the Traditional Owners of Banyule, the Wurundjeri willam people, to value, promote and preserve their identity and culture

Some of the benefits of community engagement for Banyule include:

• Ensure that those consulted include people from diverse backgrounds, ages and perspectives

• Strengthening the capacity of communities to take action that produce positive and sustainable changes locally

• Factor in adequate time into all projects and major decisions for effective consultation and participation

• Partnerships and coalitions are formed that serve as catalysts for changing policies and practices

• Share information from consultations and ways of adapting and responding to feedback between Council services.

• Improve communication to promote common understanding and encourage the community to put ideas forward

Our focus areas

• Enabling Council to have a better understanding of local needs • Promoting and facilitating the principles of inclusiveness, respect, integrity of democratic process, and incorporating diversity

4.1.1 Engage community members in issues of local concern to develop local solutions and support community members to contribute their strengths, knowledge and capacity Key initiatives include: • Participate in and support the ‘3081 Connect’ project

• Complementing Council’s other sources of information to provide a comprehensive picture to allow for the best possible decisions and outcomes.

• Implement year one of the Metro Access Community Building Plan

We will:

• Co-ordinate and deliver a range of community grant programs

• Ensure community participation in the development of key policies and plans

• Progress the development and implementation of the Municipal Early Years Plan

• Connect with people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities, people with disabilities and their carers, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and other under-represented parts of our community

• Strengthen the delivery of Youth & Family Services through community partnerships

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

We are committed to equity for all and the development of a strong, diverse and inclusive community. This involves embedding the principles of inclusion in the provision of Council services and policy development. It is important we communicate effectively with our community, that the community understands the full range of opportunities to be connected, and we continue to act in a manner that is respectful and mindful of the requirements of the Victorian Human Rights Charter.

We will:

• Deliver the ‘Our Mall Our Place’ project in Heidelberg West

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We acknowledge that volunteers provide a valuable community resource. Volunteers create governance structures and provide human resource support in community, health, religious, educational, environmental and sporting settings within Banyule. These groups encourage an increased level of participation in community life and promote active citizenship. They are seen as vital to the enhancement of community wellbeing.

• Use diverse and multiple approaches to engage the community (including social media and online tools) and include those not accessing services

• Assisting with conflict management and resolution and the more effective use and allocation of resources and

• Provide timely and accurate information around key decisions made by Council that may affect the community, and ensure transparency in Council processes, meetings and decisions

The opportunity to participate in community life is a fundamental right of a democracy. Banyule will strive to be a city that values diversity and actively promotes and enables the inclusion of all residents in the life of the community.

• Ensure we act in a manner that is respectful and mindful of the requirements of the Victorian Human Rights Charter in the development of all Council policy, local laws and major decisions

Community engagement is the process that enables governments to govern most effectively, and citizens to exercise their rights and responsibilities fully. Local Government policy makers need to find innovative ways to address service delivery issues at a community level and to seek opportunities for community engagement that enhance policy decisions.

• Strengthening community and stakeholder partnerships

Encourage diverse and inclusive community participation

• Scope community transport needs particularly for older and more vulnerable people.

4.1.2 Listen and respond to our community, especially under-represented groups Key initiatives include: • Develop a co-ordinated framework across Council for consultation and engagement. • Engage with the community through a targeted ‘out and about’ program, focusing on sections of the community who may experience barriers to participation in civic and community life • Implement the Home and Community Care (HACC) Diversity Plan, incorporating the Active Service Model (ASM), assessment plans, and inclusion of mental health and disability considerations.

We will continue to connect with people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities, people with disabilities and their carers, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and other under-represented parts of our community. We will offer guidance and encouragement to volunteerbased community service organisations to provide these critical services within their local communities. We will celebrate and promote volunteer activity within Banyule. We will recognise and support where appropriate, local residents, community groups and businesses that have, by their actions, promoted a better understanding and awareness of the importance and benefits of active citizenship. This involves providing initiatives that encourage an increased level of participation by everyone in community life.

4.1.3 Enhance our relationship and work in respectful partnership with the traditional owners of Banyule, the Wurundjeri willam people Key initiatives include: • Build relationships with, and develop actions to engage and support, our Indigenous communities • Co-ordinate the implementation of the Banyule Indigenous Australians Commitment Plan and the action plan for 2013-14.

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Key directions for achieving our participation objective:

4.3 Citizenship is the ability of individuals and groups to express their rights and undertake their responsibilities as part of a democratic society. The key elements of citizenship at the local level include: • Respect for every person, valuing differences and diversity, and having opportunities to work together to create shared values that will make the community more supportive and inter-connected • Involvement in the life of the community • Representing the interests of the community and becoming involved in the decision making process. Volunteerism covers a range of diverse activities people undertake without payment which include: mutual aid and self-help; formal service delivery; civic engagement; and campaigning. Volunteering provides both personal and community benefits: • People can benefit from volunteering through socialising and development of skills, confidence and experience

Our focus areas We will: 4.2.1 Work in partnership with the community to promote inclusion, diversity and good local governance Key initiatives include: • Develop a human rights, diversity and inclusion framework. • Co-ordinate and implement a training and capacity building process across Council on human rights, diversity and inclusion • Create a cross-council working group to develop priorities and plans to promote and celebrate Banyule’s diverse communities through events and celebrations (e.g. IDAHO day, NAIDOC week, Cultural diversity week etc.) • Investigate the establishment of a multicultural or an inclusion advisory group to council, which would advise on the design and implementation of council policies and programs, to consider the needs of Banyule’s diverse communities.

• The community can benefit through service provision such as sporting, recreation and cultural activities, and services for children, the elderly and others. Without volunteers many of the activities and events we all value and consider important to community life would not occur.

4.2.2 Encourage people to participate in volunteer and community activities

We will:

Key initiatives include:

• Guide and develop the governance activities of associated community groups with a relationship to Banyule (which includes good governance, being inclusive and welcoming to new and diverse members) • Encourage, recognise and celebrate voluntary activity and the achievements of individuals, groups and organisations that have contributed to the richness of community life within the municipality

4.2.3 Ensure the access and connectedness of underrepresented groups to Council facilities, activities and services

• Recognise and celebrate outstanding community and civic behaviour among our residents through the creation of Banyule Citizen of the Year awards

• Develop a cross-council project plan for the Indigenous participation project with the Leisure and Culture, Parks and Gardens, and Community and Social Planning teams

• Encourage and create opportunities for community capacity building; social connectedness; civic participation; and acceptance, understanding, and embracing of diversity • Encourage collaboration between community groups • Strengthen the strategic co-ordination of volunteers across the municipality.

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

One of our key governance functions is to advocate on behalf of the community on issues they deem as important, or issues that are likely to have substantive impacts on our residents’ lives. By representing the interests of the community in a range of forums, we have the capacity to attract additional resources to the municipality and resolve complex issues that affect the liveability of the city. Advocacy can be defined as the strategic method for achieving positive social change through persuasion and diplomacy. It involves trust and relationship building, education and information, use of communication and media, and strategic partnerships. Banyule Council’s aim in advocating is to persuade and influence decision makers and leaders in all spheres of government and the private sector, to act in the best interests of the Banyule community. In advocating on behalf of the interests of its community, Banyule Council seeks to achieve:

• Use a range of approaches to advocate for and on behalf of Banyule including: -- Letters and meetings -- Social media and online tools -- Working with other coalitions, networks and organisations • Make a targeted assessment as to the method and extent of the advocacy best suited to each issue to ensure the maximum chance of achieving the desired results. Our focus areas We will: 4.3.1 Work in partnership with the community, groups, local agencies and different levels of government to advocate for improved services, infrastructure and social outcomes Key initiatives include:

• Public policy change and allocation of resources which benefit the needs of the Banyule community, particularly the more disadvantaged within the community

• Focus advocacy endeavours on transport and traffic issues as a key driver of community concern based on extensive community consultation and feedback.

• Greater visibility and understanding of the issues affecting our communities among decision makers and

• Develop a revised Community Plan implementation process together with our community representatives.

• Review all major festivals

• Participation in the agenda setting on matters which impact on our local communities.

• Co-ordinate and deliver the annual volunteer awards and celebration function

We will:

• Develop partnerships with state & federal government commercial and community organisations to develop programs, services and projects.

Key initiatives include:

• Improve access for all people to Council premises, including: -- Community Facilities (halls, neighbourhood houses, senior citizens centres, early years centre, adult day care centres, sports clubs, libraries, leisure facilities) - Modify to comply with Building Code of Australia (BCA) and Australian Standards AS1428 -- Provide accessible signage - way finding signs, Tactile Ground Surface Indicators (TGSI) and audio loops, to comply with Building Code of Australia (BCA) and Australian Standards AS1428.

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Advocate on behalf of our community

• Identify key opportunities and undertake a range of activities to advocate for the diverse needs of the Banyule community, with a focus on members of our community who are disadvantaged or under-represented. • Develop and implement strategies to combat cost shifting from the Federal and State Governments, and gain appropriate resourcing from our government partners to plan and deliver our important services. • Identify services provided by other agencies and work with them to co-ordinate efforts as part of long-term community planning to improve cost and service delivery efficiencies and effectiveness. • Advocate to other local government authorities, State and Federal Government on issues that are consistent with the City Plan and the Community Plan and affect the municipality, but are outside Banyule Council’s sphere of control.

• Continue to advocate to government agencies for the appropriate upkeep of non-council owned open space including: -- Parks Victoria land -- Vic Roads reserves -- Melbourne Water reserves 4.3.2 Identify opportunities for more equitable funding and service arrangements with state and federal government Key initiatives include: • Review aged services to identify future directions, service gaps, local issues, cost shifting and advocacy issues • Represent to our community the effects of cost shifting from other levels of government and its impact on Banyule.

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Key directions for achieving our participation objective:

4.4 Provide outstanding communications and customer service

4.4.2 Provide transparent and timely information about Council

Strategic indicators

Key supporting policy and strategy

Key initiatives include:

We are committed to providing excellence in customer service and communications, to ensure our community and stakeholders have access to quality information about Council services, activities, processes and systems.

• Ensure processes run smoothly to provide excellent customer service support

How we will measure our performance against this objective:

This objective is underpinned by the following primary policy and strategy framework:

• CSI - Overall performance of Council

• Banyule Participation Policy and Strategy, 2013-17

We will continue to deliver a high standard and consistent communication internally and externally. We will improve the way we communicate with our community by continuing to offer innovative communication means in a variety of mediums including online, visual, written and face-to-face. We will ensure appropriate mediums of communication are made available to all sectors of our community.

• Review and re-launch the Banyule Community Charter to accurately reflect community attitudes and Council’s capacity to meet those expectations • Build on the existing organisational culture to increase awareness of customer expectations and increase skills in managing and meeting the community’s expectations. 4.4.3 Seek and act on feedback on the effectiveness of our communications and customer service

Our focus areas

Key initiatives include:

We will:

• Develop a survey asking the community about its preferred methods and timing for receiving Council communication, and providing feedback and views on current and proposed communication methods

4.4.1 Improve the reach, impact and responsiveness of our communications Key initiatives include: • Develop communication and promotion strategies for specific services, including: -- Health and Aged -- Leisure, Recreation and Culture

• Develop and implement a communication plan to support the internal and external promotion of Council’s new Community Charter • Develop new, improved and consistent ways to communicate and engage with the community, including:

-- Our aquatic facilities

-- Increase use of our new website by the community

-- Development Planning

-- Launch of relevant social media (eg. Facebook, Twitter followers/friends)

• Launch our new website • Develop neighbourhood based communication methods to better explain, promote, listen and consult on our services • Continue to refine our community engagement work to ensure the best representation possible in our strategic planning work.

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BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

• CSI - Customer service • CSI - Community consultation and engagement

Supporting plans

• Visits to website • CSI – Informing the community • Percentage of people who feel they ‘belong’ in Banyule • Amount distributed through Council’s Community Grants programs • Number of Community nominations for Banyule volunteer awards

This objective is also supported by a range of current plans including: • Banyule Social Inclusion Policy and plans • Banyule Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Communications Plan • Banyule Community Charter

• CSI – Lobbying on behalf of the community

• Banyule Corporate Communications Plan 2011

• Number of significant issues Council has advocated on behalf of the community (as reported in the six monthly advocacy reports to Council)

• Youth & Family Services Citizenship Framework (inc Youth Charter)

• Average time taken to answer telephone call enquiries

• Volunteer Management Plan (Proposed)

• Percentage of customer requests actioned within specified timeframes

• Banyule Volunteer Policy

(Note: CSI – Community satisfaction indicators measured by the Department of Planning and Community Development survey for Local Governments)

• Community Grants Policy (Draft)

• Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities • Banyule Indigenous Australians Commitment Plan • Banyule Multicultural and Inclusion Plan (Draft)

-- Review the design, frequency and delivery of The Banner newsletter -- Develop a centralised subscriber base -- Review branding for Council services.

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‘P’ is for

Performance

Strategic Resource Plan 2013/2014-2016/2017 Objective: 5. PERFORMANCE: USE OUR RESOURCES WISELY Manage the financial and non-financial resources required for the next four years to achieve Council’s strategic objectives.

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‘Performance’ is about managing our resources wisely, providing organisational support services, strategic planning and risk management. We are charged with the stewardship of the resources of the municipality. The community expects that these resources will be managed in a responsible, sustainable and accountable way.

“The ability to deliver our services to our community is predicated on the fact that we must maintain and use our limited resources as wisely as possible. Council is committed to ensuring that we maintain a rigorous review on providing the best value possible to our community. We will ensure we have the right physical and financial resources in place to deliver our services, maintain our infrastructure and remain financially sustainable.” Cr Rick Garotti

Our operations are based on responsible management, risk mitigation, strong customer service, and continuous improvement. We value our staff and recognise the integral role they play in the provision of Best Value services to our community. We recognise that it is critical for us to protect and develop our nonfinancial resources to meet the needs of our community. These non-financial resources include: human resource management and organisational development; knowledge management and information services; and asset management stewardship. We also undertake a number of internal planning roles to ensure we maintain the appropriate strategic direction of our services. In addition, our ‘Performance’ objective is underpinned by an extensive policy context and strategic framework based on the following: • The Local Government Act 1989 - The LG Act includes requirements around the Council Plan, the Budget, statutory reporting requirements and Best Value • Our legal responsibilities as a business entity and employer - to adhere to all employer related legislation • Our Banyule Management System, which incorporates a certification program against three key National and International Standards in Quality, Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Management • A number of key supporting plans that provide direction in important support function areas, such as information and communication technology, human resources, records management policy, and Staff and Councillor codes of conduct • 10 year Capital Works Plan • Our organisational ‘Working Together Working Better’ values.

The Strategic Resource Plan

Our Rating Context

The Strategic Resource Plan outlines how Council will manage our financial and non-financial resources over the next four years to achieve our strategic objectives. It consists of the ‘Performance: Use our resources wisely’ objective and the ‘Financial Resources’ section, which includes information on financial position and key financial statements.

Land is a finite resource in Banyule. Our Council is committed to ensuring that the effective use of land resources benefits the whole community, as each land holding contributes to the shared infrastructure and services of Council.

In addition, the Strategic Resource Plan describes how we manage our financial resources in a sustainable manner. Prudent management enables our staffing, physical resources and community services to be maintained in a way that meets our community’s current and future needs. This includes developing sustainable income streams and financial independence, and rates that support the services and infrastructure for our community.

As such, Council differentially rates its vacant commercial and residential land to ensure an inequity in the shared contribution to infrastructure is not created through the underdevelopment of vacant land. We also strive to encourage the best use development of land. Banyule values appropriate commercial and industrial development. However, we also acknowledge an increased impact on our shared infrastructure by these developments. We choose to differentially rate these properties to ensure an equitable outcome to infrastructure costs across our community. We understand the shared value to our community of cultural and recreational lands. Council supports and encourages the development of this shared benefit by rating these properties at a lower level. We update the Strategic Resource Plan annually.

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Key directions for achieving our performance objective:

5.2 Our commitment to managing our resources wisely will be achieved by the following key directions: 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6

Develop and deliver best value services and facilities Provide responsible financial management and business planning processes Enable good governance and accountability with minimal risk Create a productive and engaged workforce Maintain and strengthen corporate information and innovation Plan and manage the systems and assets that support Council’s service delivery

Provide responsible financial management and business planning processes

Key initiatives include:

We are committed to establishing a financial framework that ensures we can maintain a position of financial sustainability in the medium to long term.

• Pursue the rationalisation of Council offices to a combined worksite in Greensborough, including: -- Develop detailed plans for the Greensborough office site -- Determine business case and change management requirements associated with a combined office move • Review efficiencies in lease arrangements and associated rental fees • Undertake a review of Waste Recovery Centre processes and charges to minimise the cost of waste disposal to customers

5.1 Develop and deliver best value services and facilities We will effectively manage our resources in a changing environment, while continuing to deliver quality and value for money services. Banyule’s commitment to a culture and practice of continuous improvement is based on our organisational Best Value Program. Banyule is committed to the Best Value Principles, which were introduced by the Victorian Government. Best Value enables councils to determine the most effective way of involving the community and providing services that are responsive to community needs and values. Best Value ensures that all services: • offer the best possible quality and value for money • are responsive to community needs • are accessible to the people they are intended for • show continuous improvement • are subject to regular community consultation. We report to our community on our application of Best Value Principles, highlights and key outcomes, which are available in our Annual Report or through the Best Value section of our website. Banyule also incorporates a certification program against three key National and International Standards in Quality, Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Management. This ensures we continue to provide quality services in a safe manner that protects people and the environment. We will encourage innovation consistent with our key objectives by providing services to a certified level against Environmental, Occupational Health and Safety and Quality Standards.

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5.1.4 Continually review service levels, especially in areas where affordable, quality delivery is challenging

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

We will continue to review our service levels to ensure best value is achieved for the community.

• Review the Workforce Strategy & Action Plan (Human Resources Strategic Plan)

We will seek opportunities for effective and prudent development of alternate income streams to offset the financial burden on our community.

• Develop a sustainable plant and equipment wash down facility at the Operations Depot.

Our focus areas We will: 5.1.1 Identify opportunities for strengthened and additional income streams Key initiatives include: • Review the policy for club contributions towards upgrade of sport and recreation facilities • Complete stage one of the Ivanhoe Aquatic and Recreation Centre redevelopment (including fit out), and review operating outcomes post construction.

• Develop an implementation plan based on the local law service review outcomes • Continue to improve asset management plans by confirming: -- Asset work programs -- Renewal priorities -- Intervention levels, and therefore levels of service. 5.1.5 Ensure evidence based decision making seeking knowledge from practice, experience and research Key initiatives include:

• Develop guidelines for shared use arrangements for sporting facilities

• Best Value Service Review Program - review and benchmark Council Services to meet quality and cost standards.

5.1.2 Actively seek non-Council sources of financial support for capital projects

• Continue with our Community Survey Program to ensure relevant up to date and effective community information and engagement

Key initiatives include: • Investigate options to increase revenue including sale of surplus Council property and commercial investments. 5.1.3 Identify potential Council investments that offer a mix of economic, social and environmental benefit Key initiatives include: • Pursue the purchase and redevelopment of the surplus state government school sites in Banyule

• Co-ordinate access to and use of, data sources to ensure evidence based decision making: -- Improved access to GIS layers to update asset information -- The review and development of key organisation performance measures and accountability framework • Review budget development and forecasting processes: unit costing output/ activity, scenario forecasting tools, review cost codes (reduce and standardise), separate business units, budgets up to co-ordination level.

We are mindful of the need to comply with the principles of sound financial management as outlined in the Local Government Act 1989, including: • Prudently manage the financial risks relating to debt, assets and liabilities • Developing a rating strategy based on stability, equity, efficiency and transparency • Consider the financial effects of Council decisions on future generations • Provide full, accurate and timely disclosure and reporting of financial information. We are committed to ensuring the most effective management of Council’s commercial assets, leases and major contracts. We will plan effectively for the use of our finite resources, strengthening the integration of our policies, strategies and plans to help us achieve our strategic objectives. We will improve our corporate and community reporting processes to help us understand our key success measures and aid us in our decision making. Our commitment, financial position, and financial statements are detailed in the Financial Resources section of this Strategic Resource Plan. Our focus areas We will: 5.2.1 Achieve a responsible budget Key initiatives include: • Review our 10 year capital works plan • Develop a comprehensive rating strategy • Participate in Local Government Industry aggregated collaborative procurement activities. • Respond to the new fire services levy rating requirements on local government • Maintain our annual budget within accepted Victorian Auditor General Office (VAGO) guidelines for prudent financial operation • Review and develop a rating strategy based on stability, equity, efficiency and transparency • Continue rating at levels that support the increasing asset renewal and service cost shifting pressures faced by Council.

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Key directions for achieving our performance objective:

5.3 5.2.2 Soundly manage Council’s commercial assets, leases and contracts Key initiatives include: • Identify and participate in aggregated procurement activities with third parties • Develop and implement partnership and license agreements with community groups and continue providing support in the delivery of services to the community. 5.2.3 Develop sound long-term plans for capital works, asset maintenance and financial management Key initiatives include: • Review funding arrangements for undertaking major repairs or refurbishment to fixed plant and equipment • Design a Council-wide, corporate IT investment and implementation planning process • Review of leisure and recreation master plans 5.2.4 Create corporate planning and reporting processes that show what we are doing and how we are performing Key initiatives include: • Introduce co-ordinated asset reporting to meet MAV (Municipal Association of Victoria) STEPS program renewal gap, State Government DPCD (Department of Planning and Community Development) and VAGO (Victorian Auditor-General’s Office) reporting - includes, renewal expenditure (capital and operating) depreciation, asset lives and condition assessment • Further utilise our corporate reporting systems to improve our corporate planning and reporting processes to support enhanced business decisions • Review the City Plan 2013-2017 (for Year 2) • Contribute to and refine relevant sections of Banyule’s Annual Report for 2012-2013 • Review corporate key performance indicators in line with state government requirements and best practice recommendations from their performance reporting framework work group.

Enable good governance and accountability with minimal risk We will continue to ensure we comply with the requirements of the Local Government Act and other relevant legislation and regulations, and fulfil the duties, powers and functions of a Council. This involves reviewing and developing support mechanisms, structures, policies and processes relating to our good governance practices, including making and enforcing local laws. We are committed to applying sound risk management principles and practices to protect our staff, contractors, volunteers, community, assets and the environment. We recognise risk management as an integral process in the planning, prioritisation and delivery of services, activities and objectives. We have a Risk Management program with measurable objectives that are in line with corporate and legislative requirements, Best Value Principles, industry best practice and Australian/ International standards. A major component of our risk management program is emergency management. Council has an integrated, best practice model of emergency planning. We have a series of comprehensive emergency management plans in place to co-ordinate our resources and response in the event of an emergency. These include a focus on business continuity planning We are committed to business continuity planning to ensure we are in a position to maintain our business resilience and long term performance. We will sustain good corporate governance, maintain Council’s customer satisfaction, reputation and public image and continue to provide services which are relied upon by the community. We will continue to integrate risk management with our Banyule Management System to improve risk management outcomes, business thinking and approaches. We will effectively manage Council’s communication, promotions and marketing endeavours to ensure the management of our reputational risk. We will continue with open and honest communication with our community

5.4 Our focus areas

Create a productive and engaged workforce

We will: 5.3.1 Ensure our local laws are enforceable and deliver appropriate community benefit Key initiatives include: • Monitor and manage customer requests for local laws enforcement requests • Commence the review of Council’s 2005 local laws in accordance with the Local Government Act 1989. 5.3.2 Apply sound risk management practices that meet defined local government industry standards Key initiatives include:

We are committed to developing our organisational culture to ensure that we continue to provide outstanding services to our community. We will develop a strong, responsive, and supportive workforce that embraces our organisational values and is focussed on achieving Council objectives. We will manage our staff resources in a way that meets the needs of delivering, supporting and developing our services, while remaining an employer of choice. We are committed to providing safety programs and workforce wellbeing initiatives designed to prevent injuries and improve workforce health and wellbeing.

• Develop mechanisms and processes to apply clear and sound risk management practices that meet local government and industry standards

Our focus areas

• Implement post-election legislative requirements (code of conduct, delegations, corporate plan)

5.4.1 Strengthen our capable, united and cohesive leadership teams

• Council Buildings Asbestos Removal Program

Key initiatives include:

• Council Buildings Major Refurbishment and Replacement:

• Continue to provide leadership development programs:

-- Replacement of old electrical switchboards in Council buildings. 5.3.3 Ensure clear and appropriate communication, media and marketing support for all Council Services. Key initiatives include: • Deliver responsive, accessible customer service in a manner that exceeds community expectations and meets industry best practice • Effectively manage Council’s reputation within the media with clear consistent and open communication.

We will:

-- Leading teams senior leadership program -- Banyule leadership network program -- Frontline team leader development program. 5.4.2 Ensure we have the right people, at the right time, in the right place to deliver quality services across the organisation Key initiatives include: • Develop and implement job rotation and secondment guidelines • Develop a Workforce Planning strategy and action plan to sustain an ageing workforce. 5.4.3 Continue to develop our workforce to ensure optimum performance, competency and skill at all levels throughout the organisation Key initiatives include: • Assist business units and provide support in consultation processes when implementing new technologies (introduction of change) • Develop a fully functioning Learning Management System (LMS) Database.

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Key directions for achieving our performance objective:

5.6 5.4.4 Ensure our staff and workplaces remain safe

Our focus areas

Key initiatives include:

We will:

• Implement the Banyule Management Systems requirements for the continued certification of Occupational Health and Safety

5.5.1 Manage and enhance information systems that heighten business and service effectiveness

• Ensure Service Unit Risk Analyses are undertaken annually for all work areas. 5.4.5 Ensure constructive workplace behaviours are modelled on the organisation’s values Key initiatives include: • Facilitate a cross functional corporate working group to review and realign the Organisation’s Working Together Working Better Values: -- to unite the workforce with common goals and objectives -- increase morale and reduce turnover rates -- engage collaboration -- promote the sharing of best practices and productivity to create a culture of accountability, success and customer service excellence.

5.5 Maintain and strengthen corporate information and innovation We are committed to developing and maintaining effective systems and practices to ensure that information is well managed and that legislative requirements are met. This will enable valuable corporate information and records to be accessible, while being preserved. We will use innovative technology and provide management tools that enable central capture and retrieval of information. This will enhance Council’s ability to access and utilise information to improve decision making and delivery of services. We will also use innovative and people-friendly communication technology to encourage participation and social connection, and improve access to and sharing of information.

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Key initiatives include: • Actively engage with service units to maximise the utilisation of Corporate Systems and Technology investment by using more and more functionalities, including: rolling out the Customer Request Management system (CRM), asset systems, work orders, hot-desking and others • Implement the new Electronic Document Records Management System (EDRMS) to replace Infovision and streamline processes and management of electronic and hardcopy information • Work with externally focused service units to build a knowledge base of relevant information, to assist customers in accessing Council and community services • Support the organisation to maintain certification of the Banyule management system • Analyse and develop systems and processes to support knowledge sharing and continue to improve performance • Work with relevant service units to streamline service deliverables, including: e-Recruitment System, Online Requisition, Online Customer Services, etc. • Conduct a review of the Public Records Office of Victoria (PROV) guidelines and standards and develop an action plan to address key priorities • Implement a disaster recovery solution (technology platform) to meet Council’s business continuity requirements as guided by Council’s Executive Management Team • Redevelop Council’s Intranet to improve departmental communication and collaboration.

Plan and manage the systems and assets that support Council’s service delivery

5.6.2 Renew Banyule’s internal support service assets according to agreed service levels and standards.

We will ensure that our technology and physical assets are maintained and provided in a form that meets the service and infrastructure needs of our organisation. This supports our service units to deliver efficient, effective and quality services for our community now and into the future.

Key initiatives include:

We will plan for the future asset needs of the organisation, including asset identification, maintenance and renewal requirements. We will continue to strengthen our foundation technology platform so that we are in a good position to prepare the organisation for future technology challenges, adapt to change and embrace appropriate new technologies. This includes our planned technology infrastructure upgrades and implementation of essential foundation technology projects. We will effectively manage Banyule’s information and communications technology systems to provide reliability, security and superior performance We will continue to investigate and appropriately implement business technology improvements and, where appropriate, provide staff with the functionality to do their job anywhere and anytime. This will help us to improve our efficiency and deliver better services to our community. It includes, providing appropriate engineering support (e.g. design, traffic management advice) to enable the best outcomes for construction of our major projects. We will also continue to provide a cost effective fleet while minimising the impact on the environment, meeting operational requirements and minimising risk to staff and community. Our focus areas We will: 5.6.1 Continue to provide a sustainable, cost effective and safe fleet Key initiatives include:

• Provide reliable and dependable IT User Management Services, including resolving user requests in a timely manner • Deliver the Electronic Document Records Management System (EDRMS) technology platform for information, document and record management • Maintain and provide a reliable and stable Information and Communications Technology (ICT) environment to the organisation, including: Authority Corporate Systems, Server and Network Hardware, Network Security patch management, systems upgrade and replacement • Continue to implement the support systems and processes for quality asset management, including: work with relevant Service Units to roll out Asset Management and CRM systems • Continue to develop the GIS system and integrate with asset inspection data. 5.6.3 Provide staff with the right tools to do their job easily and flexibly as appropriate for the task. Key initiatives include: • Investigate and develop options for new and innovative systems and technologies for use in consultation with IT and targeted Service Units, including: Health & Aged Services, Municipal Laws and others • Work with relevant Service Units to review and improve processes that support payment options and methods available for customers through our website • Develop Council’s intranet to better support knowledge sharing • Manage and maintain records service delivery to the organisation during the implementation stage of the new EDRMS.

• Investigate further opportunities to minimise fleet operating costs and emissions, and ensure maximum utilisation. • Continue to provide a cost effective and environmental fleet, supported by an efficient and responsive fleet management team and workshop.

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Financial Resources Strategic indicators

Key supporting policy and strategy

How we will measure our performance against our Performance objective (and Strategic Resource Plan):

• Banyule Performance System: Strategic Resource Plan, Strategic Budget, 10 year Capital Works Plan, Banyule Management System - our ‘Performance’ objective is underpinned by policy context and strategic intent that is informed by a strong legislative framework, using industry best practice guides (eg. Reporting guidelines for local government budgets in Victoria, provided by The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia), and our Banyule Management System (BMS). The BMS is based on meeting the Best Value Principles of service delivery to our community, and incorporates a certification program against three key National and International Standards in Quality, Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Management.

• CSI - Overall performance of Council • CSI - Customer service • CSI – Informing the community • Visits to website • Average time taken to answer telephone call enquiries • Percentage of customer requests actioned within specified timeframes • Performance against Workforce Strategy and Action Plan (Human Resources Strategic Plan) (% actions completed on time) • Percentage of Freedom of Information requests responded to within statutory timeframes (45 days)

Supporting plans

• Percentage of core IT systems availability

This Plan is supported by a range of current plans including:

• Percentage of projects in year 1 of 10 year capital works program completed on time.

• Strategic Operating and Capital Works budgets

Financial position Banyule City Council has a Financial Plan covering the fouryear period from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2017. This plan provides the demonstrated financial stability, accountability and strategy to support our proposed operations. This fouryear forecast outlines our financial strategies that support our service obligations, capital works aspirations and asset renewal objectives. Some of the key assumptions that underpin the development of the Financial Plan include: • Maintaining and continuously improving levels of service in line with the Best Value principles. • Ensuring we continue to attract appropriate skills and be considered an employer of choice. • Modelling cost movements on a Consumer Price Index (CPI) range of 2 - 3% per annum over the four years. • Setting fees and charges in line with CPI, market levels or as legislated. • Critical appraisal of Council assets to ensure the best possible return on investment is being achieved for our community

• Maintain full certification for all services to the most recent National/ International standards in Quality, Occupational Health & Safety, and Environmental Management.

• Banyule’s Best Value Plus Program

• MAV Insurance state-wide audit ranking/ overall score

• Local Government Act 1989

• WorkCover premium as a percentage of payroll

• Cultural and Recreational Lands Act 1963

• CSI – Emergency and disaster management

• Workforce Strategy & Action Plan 2010-13 (Human Resources Strategic Plan)

The four-year Financial Plan has been prepared to ensure an adequate amount is available for capital works and rate increases are set at fair and reasonable levels.

• CSI – Enforcement of local laws

• IT Strategic Plan (Technology Vision 2020 and Delivery Plan)

In preparing the Financial Plan, the Council has complied with the following principles of sound financial management:

• Achievement of the budgeted result or better.

• Banyule Corporate Communications Plan 2011.

• Prudent management of financial risks relating to debt, assets and liabilities.

• Percentage of official Council and Committee meetings attended by Councillors where a quorum was achieved

(Note: CSI – Community satisfaction indicators measured by the Department of Planning and Community Development survey for Local Governments)

• Annual Service Unit Plans • Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities

• Rating levels that support the increasing asset renewal pressures faced by Council • Providing service levels in line with reasonable community service level expectations based on community consultation.

Commentary on the Budgeted Standard Statements for the Strategic Resource Plan The Strategic Resource Plan is Council’s longer term report to our community which outlines the resources required to achieve the objectives detailed in the Council Plan over the next four years. The following four Budgeted Standard Statements for the Strategic Resource Plan form a special purpose financial report prepared specifically to meet the requirements of the Local Government Act 1989, and the Local Government (Financial Reporting) Regulations 2004. These Budgeted Standard Statements together with their explanatory notes each provide information in relation to an aspect of Council’s financial management. They should all be read in conjunction to obtain an overall understanding of Council’s financial position and management. The Budgeted Standard Statements of Income, Balance Sheet, Cash Flow and Capital Works for the Strategic Resource Plan are prepared on bases consistent with the Budget and the Financial Statements.

Commentary on the Budgeted Standard Income Statement for the Strategic Resource Plan The Budgeted Standard Income Statement for the Strategic Resource Plan shows what is expected to happen during the next four years in terms of income and expenses from all activities. The ‘bottom line’ shows the net result for the reporting periods. The Budgeted Standard Income Statement requires expenses and revenues to be separately disclosed where the item is of such a size, nature or incidence that its disclosure is relevant in explaining the performance of the Council.

• Developing a rating strategy based on stability, equity, efficiency and transparency. • Consideration of the financial effects of Council decisions on future generations. • Full, accurate and timely disclosure of financial information. The following pages present the Financial Plan for the four years from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2017. The Financial Plan takes into account the strategic objectives and key directions (strategies) as specified in the Council Plan and expresses them in financial terms.

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Financial Statements Commentary on the Budgeted Standard Balance Sheet for the Strategic Resource Plan

Commentary on the Budgeted Standard Capital Works Statement for the Strategic Resource Plan

The Budgeted Standard Balance Sheet for the Strategic Resource Plan shows a snapshot of the expected financial situation at the end of each of the next four years. It shows the total of what is owned (assets) less what is owed (liabilities). The line in this statement shown as net assets is the net worth of Council.

The Budgeted Standard Capital Works Statement for the Strategic Resource Plan sets out all expected capital investment in relation to non-current assets for each of the next four years. It also shows the amount of capital works investment that is expected to be made renewing, upgrading, expanding or creating new assets. This is important because each of these categories has a different impact on Council’s future costs.

The change in net assets from one year to another shows how the financial position has changed over that period. This is described in more detail in the Budgeted Standard Income Statement. The assets and liabilities are separated into current and noncurrent. Current means those assets or liabilities that will fall due in the next 12 months.

Commentary on the Budgeted Standard Cash Flow Statement for the Strategic Resource Plan The Budgeted Standard Cash Flow Statement for the Strategic Resource Plan shows what is expected to happen during the next four years in terms of cash. It explains the cash movements during the year, which is represented by the difference in the cash balance at the beginning and the end of the year. The net cash flow from operating activities shows how much cash is expected to remain after the cost of providing services to the community is covered. This remaining cash may be invested in things such as capital works. The information in a Budgeted Standard Cash Flow Statement helps us assess our ability to generate cash flows, meet financial commitments as they fall due (including the servicing of borrowings), fund changes in the scope or nature of activities and obtain external finance.

Budgeted Standard Income Statement For the four years ending 30 June 2017

 

Budget

Budget

 

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

 

 

 

 

 

66,862

79,214

85,687

92,606

98,412

Special rates and charges

506

548

548

548

548

Interest on rates and special charges

280

23

23

23

24

7,661

6,075

6,587

6,451

7,169

17,432

14,736

15,509

15,271

16,323

Interest income

1,814

1,556

1,443

1,261

1,080

Contributions - cash

3,749

2,336

1,115

1,118

1,122

Grants - operating (recurrent)

9,221

11,958

11,932

12,143

12,433

Grants - capital (non-recurrent)

4,422

2,356

80

0

0

Net gain on disposal of infrastructure, property, plant and equipment

4,630

954

3,670

1,889

536

Rental income

1,796

1,793

1,837

1,887

1,852

• Capital expansion expenditure extends an existing asset to a new group of users. It is discretionary expenditure that increases future operating and maintenance costs, because it increases Council’s asset base, but may be associated with additional revenue from the new user group

Income

• Capital renewal expenditure reinstates existing assets. It has no impact on revenue, but may reduce future operating and maintenance expenditure if completed at the optimum time

Statutory fees and fines

• Capital upgrade expenditure enhances an existing asset to provide a higher level of service or expenditure that will increase the life of the asset. Upgrade expenditure is discretional and often does not result in additional revenue unless direct user charges apply. It will increase operating and maintenance expenditure in the future because of the increase in the Council’s asset base • New capital expenditure does not have any element of renewal, expansion or upgrade of existing assets. It may or may not result in additional revenue for Council and will result in an additional burden for future operation, maintenance and capital renewal. The infrastructure, property, plant and equipment movement reconciliation worksheet is included to show how the Budgeted Standard Capital Works Statement figures relate to the Budgeted Standard Balance Sheet movement in infrastructure, property, plant and equipment.

General rates and charges

User fees and charges

Other income Total income   Expenses

121

95

96

97

121,670

128,526

133,293

139,596

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

Employee benefits

51,877

54,049

56,375

58,912

61,557

Materials and services

38,259

35,858

37,107

36,203

38,190

3,095

3,447

3,714

3,573

4,757

12,915

15,481

15,854

16,450

17,151

2,662

4,097

4,095

3,922

3,728

748

970

913

925

934

8,248

7,171

7,266

7,258

7,580

117,804

121,073

125,324

127,243

133,897

650

597

3,202

6,050

5,699

 

 

 

Utility charges Depreciation and amortisation Finance costs Other expenses Total expenses Surplus / (deficit) for the year   Other comprehensive income Increment on revaluation of infrastructure and property assets Comprehensive result

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

81 118,454  

Donations

72

Strategic Resource Plan Projections

 

   

   

   

0

56,000

0

62,000

0

650

56,597

3,202

68,050

5,699

73


Budgeted Standard Balance Sheet As at 30 June For the four years ending 30 June 2017

Budgeted Standard Cash Flow Statement For the four years ending 30 June 2017

Budget

Budget

Strategic Resource Plan Projections

 

Budget

Budget

Strategic Resource Plan Projections

 

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

 

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inflows

Inflows

Inflows

Inflows

Inflows

28,328

29,157

30,685

33,853

37,926

(Outflows) (Outflows)

(Outflows)

Investments

6,000

6,000

6,000

6,000

6,000

Cash flows from operating activities

Trade and other receivables

5,955

5,955

6,015

6,075

6,136

Receipts

45

45

45

45

45

1,243

1,100

1,050

1,100

1,000

41,571

42,257

43,795

47,073

 

 

 

 

Non-current assets

 

 

723 3,539

Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

   

   

(Outflows) (Outflows)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rates and charges

67,368

79,762

86,235

93,154

98,960

Grants - Operating

9,221

11,958

11,932

12,143

12,433

51,107

Grants - Capital

4,421

2,356

80

0

0

 

 

Interest received

2,094

1,579

1,466

1,284

1,104

 

 

 

Other receipts

30,653

25,061

25,076

24,756

26,495

723

730

737

744

113,757

120,716

124,789

131,337

138,992

3,539

3,539

3,539

3,539

 

 

 

 

 

1,226,939 1,312,448

1,312,375

1,375,520

1,361,833

Employee costs

(61,382)

(53,298)

(56,374)

(58,066)

(60,657)

1,613

1,743

1,640

1,495

Materials and consumables

(38,126)

(35,583)

(36,124)

(36,117)

(37,953)

Total non-current assets

1,232,692 1,318,323

1,318,387

1,381,436

1,367,611

Other payments

Total assets

1,274,263 1,360,580

1,362,182

1,428,509

1,418,718

Total Payments 

 

 

 

 

Inventories Prepayments Total current assets

Trade and other receivables Investments Infrastructure, property, plant and equipment Intangible assets

1,491

 

 

Current liabilities

 

Trade and other payables Interest-bearing loans and borrowings Provisions Other liabilities (Trust funds and deposits) Total current liabilities   Non-current liabilities

   

 

 

13,311

13,444

13,578

13,714

13,851

1,053

2,541

2,714

16,535

2,644

11,883

12,596

13,352

14,153

15,002

1,072

1,083

1,094

1,105

1,116

27,319

29,664

30,738

45,507

32,613

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

30,683

58,024

55,311

38,776

36,132

Provisions

383

421

463

509

560

Other liabilities (Trust funds and deposits)

322

318

315

312

309

Total non-current liabilities

31,388

58,763

56,089

39,597

37,001

Total liabilities

58,707

88,427

86,827

85,104

69,614

1,215,556 1,272,153

1,275,355

1,343,405

1,349,104

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings

Net assets  

 

Equity

 

   

 

 

Total Receipts  Payments

Net cash provided by / (used in) operating activities   Cash flows from investing activities

(13,271) (111,881)

2,158

20,248

20,397

25,399

27,111

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

14,459

12,901

17,427

Payments for property, plant and equipment

(25,600)

(53,329)

(21,657)

(22,802)

(14,112)

Payments for infrastructure assets

(15,045)

(5,698)

(4,794)

(5,660)

(6,098)

Payments for intangible assets

(1,491)

(220)

(250)

(42)

0

Net (purchase)/redemption of investments

(2,259)

0

0

0

0

1

7

8

8

8

(30,860)

(44,151)

(12,234)

(15,595)

(2,775)

 

 

 

 

 

Trust funds and deposits - net proceeds Net cash (used in) / provided by investing activities   Cash flows from financing activities

 

   

 

 

(2,662)

(4,097)

(4,095)

(3,922)

(3,728)

Proceeds from borrowings

0

30,070

0

0

0

Repayment of borrowings

(985)

(1,241)

(2,540)

(2,714)

(16,535)

(3,647)

24,732

(6,635)

(6,636)

(20,263)

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase / (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

(32,349)

829

1,528

3,168

4,073

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year

60,677

28,328

29,157

30,685

33,853

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

28,328

29,157

30,685

33,853

37,926

Finance costs

420,331

424,498

427,206

Net cash (used in) / provided by financing activities

Asset revaluation reserve

787,013

843,013

843,013

905,013

905,013

 

9,335

11,602

12,011

13,894

16,885

1,215,556 1,272,153

1,275,355

1,343,405

1,349,104

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

(11,755) (105,938)

15,089

417,538

74

(11,894) (104,392)

13,534

419,208

Total equity

(11,587) (100,468)

 

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment

Accumulated surplus Reserves

(12,091) (111,599)

75


Budgeted Standard Capital Works Statement For the four years ending 30 June 2017

 

Budget

Budget

 

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Roads, streets and bridges

5,625

2,963

2,197

2,163

2,667

Drainage

6,394

348

340

255

756

Parks and gardens

2,559

2,172

2,005

2,989

2,440

467

215

252

253

235

Freehold land

1,398

25,885

1,000

0

0

Freehold buildings

8,117

14,693

14,180

16,119

8,003

Motor vehicles

9,254

11,283

5,841

6,042

5,622

Plant and equipment

2,538

1,423

600

595

441

Furniture and fittings

4,278

30

21

30

30

15

15

15

16

16

1,491

220

250

42

0

42,136

59,247

26,701

28,504

20,210

 

 

 

 

 

Capital works areas

 

Playgrounds

Art collection Intangible assets Total capital works   Represented by:

Strategic Resource Plan Projections

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

10,653

25,995

553

523

16

1,491

220

250

42

0

Asset renewal

24,787

26,986

10,837

17,190

13,295

Asset upgrade

4,395

5,441

1,749

5,329

4,165

810

605

13,312

5,420

2,734

42,136

59,247

26,701

28,504

20,210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New assets New intangible assets

Asset expansion Total capital works

Reconciliation of net movement in infrastructure, property, plant and equipment

 

 

 

 

Budget

Budget

 

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

 

 

 

 

 

 

42,136

59,247

26,701

28,504

20,210

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asset revaluation increment

0

56,000

0

62,000

0

(12,915)

(15,481)

(15,854)

(16,450)

(17,151)

Written down value of assets sold

(8,904)

(14,135)

(10,789)

(11,012)

(16,891)

Net movement in infrastructure, property, plant and equipment

20,317

85,631

58

63,042

(13,832)

Total capital works

Depreciation and amortisation

76

BANYULE CITY COUNCIL CITY PLAN 2013-2017

 

 

 

Strategic Resource Plan Projections


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How to contact your council For all enquires please call

9490 4222 Fax: 9499 9475

Email: enquiries@banyule.vic.gov.au Website: www.banyule.vic.gov.au If your hearing or speech is impaired, you can call us through the National Relay Service on 133 677 (TTY) or 1300 555 727 (ordinary handset) and ask for 9490 4222. All correspondence to: PO Box 51, Ivanhoe, 3079 DX 97904 Ivanhoe Council Service Centres: Ivanhoe - 275 Upper Heidelberg Road Rosanna - 44 Turnham Avenue Greensborough - 9-13 Flintoff Street All offices are open: Monday to Friday 8.30am-5pm Rosanna - Wednesday night until 7pm Greensborough - Saturday 9am - 12noon


Banyule city plan 2013 2017