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16 Thursday, November 15, 2012

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FOOD

MEALTIME IDEAS AND RECIPES FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY

Great turkeys need great classic sides By ALISON LADMAN Associated Press

The turkey may be the centerpiece, but a classic Thanksgiving dinner simply isn’t complete without a bevy of traditional sides. To accompany our cider-brined bird, we went with a gently sweet cranberry sauce cooked with peaches for a delicate texture and fruitiness to balance the tart berries. For the mashed potatoes, we kept it basic — sour cream, butter and chives — but delicious. And because you can never have enough carbs at Thanksgiving (Stuffing! Mashed potatoes! Rolls! Cranberry sauce!), we added a second variety of potatoes — herb-crusted sweet potatoes.

Sour Cream and Chive Mashed Potatoes Start to finish: 45 minutes Servings: 8 4 pounds red potatoes 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature 1 cup sour cream Salt and ground black pepper 1/3 cup chopped fresh chives Peel half of the potatoes. Place of the potatoes in a large pot, then add enough water to cover them by 1 inch. Cover the pan and set over medium-high. Bring the water to a simmer and cook until tender, about 20 to 25 minutes. Thoroughly

drain the potatoes, then return them to the pot. Set the pot over low heat and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, shaking or stirring the potatoes to dry them. Using a masher, roughly mash the potatoes, then stir in the butter and sour cream. Season with salt and pepper, then stir in the chives.

Herb Crusted Sweet Potatoes Start to finish: 45 minutes Servings: 8 4 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices Salt and ground black pepper 1 cup panko breadcrumbs 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, melted Heat the oven to 350 F. Coat a large casserole dish or a 9-by-13-inch baking pan with cooking spray. Place the potatoes in a large saucepan and add enough water to cover by 1 inch. Add 2 teaspoons of salt and bring to a boil. Cook until firm-tender, 12 to 15 minutes. Drain the potatoes, then spread them in an even layer in the prepared casserole dish or baking pan. In a small bowl, combine 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, the panko, thyme, rosemary and sage. Sprinkle over the sweet potatoes. Drizzle the melted butter over the crumbs and bake for 30 minutes, or until golden brown and tender.

Matthew Mead/AP Photos

THE TURKEY may be the centerpiece, but a classic Thanksgiving dinner simply isn’t complete without a bevy of traditional sides. Pictured is a dinner plate of cider brined turkey with sage gravy, peach cranberry sauce, sour cream and chive mashed potatoes, sausage pecan stuffing, arugula pear salad with pomegranate vinaigrette and and herb crusted sweet potatoes.

Peach Cranberry Sauce Start to finish: 15 minutes Servings: 6 12-ounce bag fresh cranberries 10-ounce bag frozen peaches, chopped

Zest and juice of 2 oranges 3/4 cup sugar Pinch salt In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine all ingredients. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the cranberries pop and the mixture has reduced to a thick sauce, about 10 minutes. Allow to cool.

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THE SEVEN-MONTH North Sixth Street project is nearing an end. Barricades will come down and the road open to traffic at 5 p.m. Friday.

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By Elvyn Jones

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Elvyn Jones/Staff

North Sixth Street to open Friday evening ejones@theworldco.info

      

Baldwin City motorists frustrated with driving out-of-route gravel road miles to get to Lawrence will have an early reason to be thankful Friday with the removal of barriers on North Sixth Street. Terese Gorman, engineering division manager for Douglas County Public Works, said North Sixth Street would be opened to traffic at 5 p.m. Friday with the removal of barriers on the street blocking access to the projects third and final phase. That phase improved the street from just north of the Annunciation Catholic Church driveway to Douglas County Route 12. The opening will mark the substantial completion of the project. Keith Browning, Douglas County public works director, said work on the actual street was completed Friday and Saturday when contractor R.D. Johnson Construction took advantage of unseasonably mild weather to put the finishing final lift of asphalt on the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entire length from U.S. Highway 56 to Douglas County Route 12.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We jumped through a lot of hoops to get that final slip of asphalt applied,â&#x20AC;? Browning said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The contractor went to extraordinary means to accomplish that.â&#x20AC;? However, there are a handful of tasks still to be finished on phase 3, including seeding, mulching, fertilizing, the placement of permanent signs, some sidewalk installation and backfill for the sidewalk work. The final section could not be opened to traffic until road signs were in place and that had to wait until the sidewalk installation and backfill was finished, he said. Gorman said some remaining work would require the posting of a 25 mph construction speed limit until the tasks were completed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There will be closed lanes as crews continue to work,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now a three-lane road now, so there will be two-way traffic.â&#x20AC;? The county and Baldwin City split the cost of the $2.18 million project, which added a turn lane, curbs and guttering to North Sixth Street, which is also Douglas County Road 1055, from U.S. 56 to Douglas County Route 12. The city is spending another $185,000 to add sidewalks along the route.

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Thursday, November 15, 2012

|9

Baker provides stability to local economy Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note: This is the first in a series of three articles on the economic impact of Baker University on the Baldwin City community. By Sara Bell and Jordan Dolbin Special to the Signal

When a group of Methodist ministers settled in eastern Kansas in 1858, they had no idea how founding Baker University would influence the city that now surrounds it. Although a number of Baldwin City businesses have closed in recent months, those that thrive are dependent on business generated by people affiliated with the university. The College of Arts and Sciencesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 936 students and 237 faculty and staff members, who earned more than $5.4 million in 2011, inject much of that payroll into Baldwin Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. Of employees, 124 live in town and many of the 121 students living off campus rent in Baldwin City. Students, faculty and staff members also add to the community economically through the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1.25 percent local sales tax. Baldwin City Administrator Chris Lowe, who has served in the position since September 2011, said Baker provides more of a cultural than economic impact to the community. However, of the six local businesses interviewed, the percentage of profits related to customers affiliated with Baker ranged from 20 to 40 percent. Martha Wright, owner of Whitneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creative Hair Design, said her father brought the family-owned business to Baldwin City in 1952 because of the university, and today about 40 percent of her cliental are involved with Baker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I used to hear Dad talk about â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;If Baker wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t here, we wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be here. It would not be a business. We couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Wright said. Wright is not alone in believing the Baker community has a large economic impact on Baldwin City. Chamber of Commerce President Greg Kruger said he could not fathom what the town would be like without Baker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes folks do not understand

Jordan Dobbin/Submitted photo

MARTHA WRIGHT, owner of Whitneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creative Hair Designs, styles and colors Sue Cranstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hair. how much Baker does for our community,â&#x20AC;? Kruger said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are kind of our silent partner and do quite a bit for us.â&#x20AC;? Although the majority of Baker students live on campus with meal plans, three of four students interviewed said they use Baldwin City services two to three times a week. Senior Alex Graber, who goes to the Kwik Shop at least three times a week, said students are attracted to the business because of its hours and customer service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a great relationship with all of the people working there,â&#x20AC;? Graber said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And also the aspect of being open later than everywhere else in Baldwin because we always go in

there so late.â&#x20AC;? While determining the exact economic impact of Baker on Baldwin City is difficult, the multiplier effect formula helps explain how a percentage of money spent at local businesses will stay within the community. David Proctor, CEO of the Center for Engagement and Community Development at Kansas State University, said of every $100 spent locally, $45 remain in the community and circulate through the town. If $100 is spent in chain restaurants or stores, only $14 remains in the area. Proctor said the effects of money circulation are more important in smaller towns, such as Baldwin City, because they rely on locally owned

businesses. Although students living on campus do not pay property taxes, 1.25 percent of every purchase made in Baldwin City is kept locally to improve general infrastructure and complete other improvements to the city. In addition to students acting as patrons to area businesses, faculty and staff make a difference in Baldwin Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commerce as well. Baker is the second-largest employer in town, behind the Baldwin City school district, which helps contribute to Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic impact on the town. Lowe, the city administrator, said even though Baker would make a Please see CITY, page 10

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| Thursday, November 15, 2012 .

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City looking to keep more student dollars at home CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

greater impact if more students were allowed to live off-campus, he is personally fond of Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rule to keep students on-campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important that they stay and have that structure,â&#x20AC;? Lowe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If somebody was building apartment complexes to house Baker students that would impact our tax roll. The question is how much of the problems associated with that type of growth are you willing to take on?â&#x20AC;? However, Lowe added students living oncampus could slow down local businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of two sides to the same coin,â&#x20AC;? Lowe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cause us a lot of problems, but in some ways because of the meal plan and the way they are structured in terms of living on campus, I think that Baker kids tend to end up going to Lawrence when they really want to spend some money.â&#x20AC;? Lowe believes this problem is one of the largest challenges for the city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to foster business that will attract Baker students off of that campus,â&#x20AC;? Lowe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not

a beautiful place to be, but I certainly donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want Baldwin City to always remain where they went to college â&#x20AC;Ś and the memories they created are in Lawrence on downtown (Massachusetts Street). If thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true for the next 10 years, we will have failed.â&#x20AC;? The city is working to draw students into local businesses and developing ways to promote residency in the town upon graduation. Although Lowe believes warehouse jobs will not attract Baker students, he said some think this is the direction Baldwin City is headed with Edgerton as the site of the BNSF Intermodal Facility. Kruger said the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reliance on Baker is key because it makes the economy more stable than it would be if it were based around the success or failure of one industry. Kruger said the university is not only beneficial to the Chamber of Commerce but the community as a whole because in its absence the population and number of services people enjoy would decrease. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without Baker do we need that big of a grocery?â&#x20AC;?

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Health department cautions whooping cough on rise The Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department urges residents to take precautions against pertussis, also called whooping cough, as it has seen a resurgence of activity especially in the Baldwin City area. The health department reported 23 cases of pertussis in October, and it is investigating additional cases. So far this year, there have been 84 cases compared to 17 cases in 2011. The department has responded by providing treatment and prevention recommendations to the ill, their possible contacts and area physicians. It has been working closely with local school districts, Kansas University and Baker University. Statewide, there have been 588 pertussis cases so far this year, compared to 52 in 2011. Pertussis is a contagious, respiratory disease caused by bacteria. It is spread by coughing or sneezing in close contact with others. The symptoms of pertussis begin much like a common cold: â&#x20AC;˘ Runny nose or congestion â&#x20AC;˘ Sneezing â&#x20AC;˘ Occasionally a mild cough or fever â&#x20AC;˘ Infants and children with the disease may cough violently and rapidly,

over and over, until the air is gone from their lungs and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re forced to inhale with a loud â&#x20AC;&#x153;whoopingâ&#x20AC;? sound. In rare cases (one out of 200), pertussis can cause death, especially in children age 1 or younger. To stop the spread of pertussis, the health department recommends: â&#x20AC;˘ Contacting your physician by phone if you have any symptoms. â&#x20AC;˘ Be sure to take all medication if recommended and isolate yourself. â&#x20AC;˘ Stay home when you are ill. â&#x20AC;˘ Cover your cough. â&#x20AC;˘ Be sure that you and your children are up to date on immunizations for pertussis vaccine (Dtap or Tdap). The Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department offers pertussis vaccines through its walk-in clinic, 200 Maine. Some adults may be eligible to receive the pertussis vaccine at a reduced rate if they meet certain income guidelines. For clinic hours, visit the health departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.ldchealth.org/contact. If you have any questions, please contact your physician or the health department at 785-843-0721 and ask for a communicable disease nurse.

                

      

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| Thursday, November 15, 2012 .

VOICES

QUOTEWORTHY â&#x20AC;&#x153;Play in the exultation of the possible.â&#x20AC;? Martin Buber

SUBMIT LETTERS TO EDITOR@BALDWINCITY.COM

COMMENT

Musing from the Hill How well I remember those long ago days of the Vietnam War. I fail to understand why the returning veterans of what, in the opinion of many, was a misguided conflict were looked down upon when they returned. The draft was enforced but exceptions were made if one could afford to attend college. I, and many others, did not understand why the war was necessary. The French, who were chased from their former colony in the 1950s, warned us against going. They understood that the war was a losing proposition. Thousands of young men were killed or wounded. I immediately joined â&#x20AC;&#x153;Another Mother for Peaceâ&#x20AC;? and was ostracized by my in-laws. The above comments are the often-suppressed sentiments of many and could be repeated today. Why? The United States and neighboring Canada maintain the longest peaceful border between nations in the world.

It took two wars, the American Rev- Communities throughout our country olution (when Canada belonged to benefited by the repair and building Great Britain) and the War of 1812 to of bridges, dams, stadiums and also achieve this. We finally decided to cabins were erected in many national set aside our differand state parks. Latences and become er, when the recesJUNE JEWETT good neighbors. sion was over, we I heard on Nationspent several enjoyal Public Radio that able weeks in a CCC the jobless rate for cabin in Parvin State returning veterans Park in New Jersey. is 10 percent. This We were happy to is not acceptable. pay for the privilege. Some issues I do not I imagine the initial believe can be adcost of the cabins was dressed by the private sector. Presi- repaid many times. Free charity â&#x20AC;&#x153;handdent Franklin Roosevelt saved many outsâ&#x20AC;? were replaced by various governfamilies in the Great Depression. ment agencies. Instead of free charity The Civilian Conservation Corps handouts, the Works Project Administaught many a man a trade and good tration was enacted and kept many a work habits. Part of their pay was sent family afloat. home to support their families. HomeAfter WWII (another war to end less did not freeze to death while wars?) the GI Bill providing help for sleeping under bridges, but had three veterans to attend college was enacted. meals a day and a warm place to sleep. Many believe we failed the vets of the

Vietnam War. Let us not repeat this error for a new crop of returning veterans. When Bob Dole, badly wounded and unable to walk, returned to Kansas, he was determined to walk again. In his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Storyâ&#x20AC;? he wrote that the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Never Walk Aloneâ&#x20AC;? from the Rogerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Hammersteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1945 musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carouselâ&#x20AC;? took on a whole new meaning for him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I determined to walk for my buddies who went out that morning near Castel dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Aiano, up Hill 913 with me â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for the doctors and nurses in the hospitals, the thousands of other men and women who had laid it all on the line to win that war ... Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d all be there, cheering me on. No, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never walk alone. I would walk â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not just for myself, then for all of them, too.â&#x20AC;? Thank you, Senator Dole, and all the brave veterans of all our wars. Let us hope the dream of no more wars will finally be realized. .

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Thursday, November 15, 2012

SPORTS

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ALL-STATE Baldwin High School soccer players Mason Bandre and Nick Joslyn were named to the 4A All-State team, while Russell Cloon and Austin Kraus were honorable mention selections.

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TAKE CHARGE GUY BAKER UNIVERSITY soccer coach Nate Houser used his student experience at the university as a springboard to a professional career and a return to the college to head its soccer programs. Submitted photo

Baker coach’s student days provided leadership class By Shawn Deegan Special to the Signal

Many freshmen have an adjustment period once they reach college, but few go on to have a career like Baker University’s head soccer coach, Nate Houser. A National Professional Soccer League championship as a player for the Kansas City Attack in 1997. A Baker University Athletic Hall of Fame inductee in 2007. Coach of the year in 2011, for both men and women soccer teams. Even a casual sports fan would find this partial list of accomplishments intriguing. These are just some of the highlights of Houser’s career. While he may dismiss the idea that his story is special, the series of accomplishments certainly says otherwise. However, each triumph comes with a journey and lessons learned along the way. It took Houser some time to develop into the man that he is today. Even at the high school level, Houser’s home state of California offers some essence of Hollywood. Poway High, where Houser played soccer, was no exception. Tony Gwyn Jr., son of the Hall of Fame baseball player for the San Diego Padres, spent his high school career at Poway High. Phil Plantier was another ball player for Poway who spent some time in

the major leagues. Tom DeLounge, lead “They really got after me to not setguitarist and vocalist for the punk band, tle and stop screwing around. To be Blink-182, is one of the school’s more fa- better,” Houser said. “They said, ‘You mous former students. With so many tal- need to understand the rest of your ented and standout students, it was easy life is going to come.’” to get lost in the crowd. The impressions Houser’s professors “You’re not fohad of him as a cused on it, but I remember at one point in freshman were you’re trying to mixed, to say the time telling him, ‘You’ve got keep up with that,” a couple of choices here. You least. Professor Houser said. “We’d can continue to go along and be of Business and go run and I was Economics Lee the skinny, California pretty-boy Green and head never last, but I was who does enough to skate by in men and womnever first. Top eight. Not having a the classroom so that you can en’s golf coach perspective of what play soccer. Or you can wake up Karen Exon were else is going on all and have a V-8.’ ” two of Houser’s over the place, you main motivators just kind of think — Karen Exon, Baker golf coach during his time that’s who you are. as a student. I’m guy five or six.” “Nate was a Because of the skinny kid from environment, Houser fell into the role California,” Exon said. “I could tell right of a follower, a far cry from the position away he was innately intelligent, but he of leadership he holds today in his head certainly wasn’t living up to his potential.” coach. It wasn’t that Houser was a followHouser coasted for a while, making ing type. He simply never felt his opinion decent grades and doing enough to rewas needed or valued. So, he followed. main eligible to continue to play socNot until he came to Baker Univer- cer. But Exon demanded more of him. sity in 1990 was he was asked to be “I remember at one point in time more assertive. He was challenged, telling him, ‘You’ve got a couple of as he had never been before, by both choices here: You can continue to go coaches and professors on Baker’s along and be the skinny, California, campus. To simply be a follower was pretty-boy who does enough to skate not acceptable if you were a Wildcat. by in the classroom so that you can

play soccer,’” Exon said. “Or you can wake up and have a V-8.” Green was another professor who recognized Houser’s intelligence and ability, but also thought he needed to be pushed. “He was your kind of typical freshman,” Green said. “He came here from California, highly recruited soccer player, so he had some of the same learningcurve challenges as any freshman does.” At 9:30 a.m. on a hot Thursday early in the semester, Houser took his place with his soccer mates in the back of the narrow classroom for Business Law. Houser leaned his chair back, rested his head against the wall, and fell asleep by 9:35 a.m. At 10:45 a.m., once class had concluded and the students began to put their supplies away, Houser woke and moved to leave. However, Green had other plans for the young Californian. “I always like at the beginning of the semester to kind of set the tone of expectations in classes,” Green said. “So I said, ‘Ok, we’re done. Everybody can head out now. But I feel bad for Nate, because he’s been asleep for basically the entire class back there, and I don’t want him to miss out on this topic that we covered today. So Nate, how about if you stay behind … so just move up to the front row and I’ll repeat the whole lecture for you.’” Please see Houser, page 13


12

| Thursday, November 15, 2012 .

Baker University football team earns NAIA playoff berth KANSAS CITY, MO. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; For the first time since the 2008 season, the Baker University football team has earned a spot in the 2012 NAIA Football Championship Series Playoffs and the No. 11 seeded Wildcats will travel to Fort Wayne, Ind., to take on No. 6 ranked University of St. Francis. The 8-2 Wildcats will face off against the 8-2 Cougars at 12 p.m. Saturday inside Bishop John Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Arcy Stadium. With a four-game winning streak to finish regular-season competition, the University of Saint Francis is No. 6 in the final regular-season NAIA Football Coachesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Top 25 giving USF 166 consecutive Top 25 poll selections, the longest current streak in the NAIA. This will be USFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12th NAIA FCS qualification in the 15-year history of the program. USF has qualified for the NAIA FCS in 12 of the last 13 seasons

and this is the Cougarsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; third consecutive invitation. USF was tri-champion of the MidStates Football Association Mideast League, which has three teams in the NAIA Top 6. St. Xavier, tri-champion along with Marian and USF, will get the leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s automatic berth in the NAIA FCS since SXU is the highest ranked team of the three at No. 4. USF won its final regular-season game on Saturday 44-7 at Lindenwood University-Belleville (Ill.). The Cougars are 2-2 against NAIA Top 25 teams this season. Baker has also won four straight and defeated Graceland, 40-7, Saturday on senior day. This will also be the 12th appearance for Baker in the NAIA Football Playoffs and the last time Baker appeared was back on Nov. 22, 2008 in a 65-27 loss at Morningside.

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Wildcats fall to Pittsburg State PITTSBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Baker University menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team hit the road on Tuesday night for a tough test against NCAA Division II Pittsburg State University in an exhibition game in which the Wildcats fell to the Gorillas, 88-67. The game did not count against the Wildcats overall record, as they still stand at 3-1 on the year, but the contest was the season opener for Pitt State, as they open up 2012-13, 1-0. Rico Pierrevilus scored 18 of his game-high 20 points in the first half while A.J. Adams and Kaleb Porter combined for 25 second-half points to lead Pitt State at John Lance Arena. The Gorillas led by as many as 19 points

at 56-37 with 11:59 to play in the game but the Wildcats used a 17-5 run over the next 4:36 to trim the margin to 61-54 on Corey Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-point play. Adams and Porter combined to score the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next seven points and Marky Nolen completed a 9-0 Pitt State run to push the Gorillas back in front 70-54 with 5:24 remaining in the contest. Anderson and E.J. Carter led Baker with 12 points apiece and Brandon Moore added 10 with two three-point makes. Ben Steinlage led Baker with five assists and point guard Julian Mills had four. Baker struggled from the floor, shooting 22-of-60, but was stellar from the free-throw line, going 19-of-22.

Friends ends BU womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning streak The Baker University womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team saw its four-game win streak come to an end on Tuesday night in a 56-49 loss at Friends University. The Wildcats fell to 4-2 on the year, while Friends improved to 4-1. During the first half, both teams struggled to get shots to fall, as the Falcons shot only 22 percent from the field, compared to just 16 percent for the Wildcats. Baker knocked down only five shots in the first half, shooting just 15.4 percent from beyond the arc at 2-of-13. After 20 minutes of play the buzzer

sounded with the score tied 18-18. The Wildcats doubled the amount of field goals made in the second frame shooting 10-of-28. Rece Huddlin had a strong game for Baker with a double-double 13 points and 10 rebounds. Alisha Fanshier didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t struggle from the field with her 3-of-5 night from behind the threepoint line and a team-high 15 points. BriAnna Garza had a game high five assists and seven points and Baker kept a good handle on the ball with just 12 turnovers.

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Thursday, November 15, 2012

|5

Elvyn Jones/Staff

CAST MEMBERS of Baldwin High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fall musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything Goesâ&#x20AC;? wave bon voyage during a dance number in the play.

BHS presents â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Anything Goesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; By Elvyn Jones ejones@theworldco.info

For Baldwin High School English teacher Kathy Cook, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a simple reason to choose â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything Goesâ&#x20AC;? for the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fall musical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cole Porter,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cole Porter. You have great roles for males and females. It has great dance scenes and classic musical numbers.â&#x20AC;? Cook, stage director of the fall musical, said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything Goesâ&#x20AC;? also appealed to her because of its large cast, which was expanded for the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production. Cole Porter wrote the now standards tunes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything Goes,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the Topâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Get a Kick Out of Youâ&#x20AC;? for the 1934 musical Russel Crouse and Howard Lindsay adapted from Guy Bolton and P.G. Wodehouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book. The plot concerns the quest of stowaway Billy Crocker (Tyler Cawley) to woo heiress Hope Harcourt (Madeline Miley) on an ocean liner bound to London from New York. He is helped or hindered in the that quest by such

characters as his boss and Wall Street heavyweight Elisha J. Whitney (Ben Foster), public enemy No. 13 Moonface Martin (Ian Kirk) and his sidekick Bonnie (Cassidy Markley), Hopeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother Mrs. Wadworth T. Harcourt (Sammy Weiss), evangelist turned nightclub songstress Reno Sweeney (Regan LaTessa) and Hopeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fiancĂŠ Sir Evelyn Oakley (Sam Huntington). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun,â&#x20AC;? said junior Kirk of the musical and his role as Moonface Martin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get to have an accent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get into quite a mess and get offended in the end.â&#x20AC;? LaTessa said she liked the song and dance numbers in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything Goes.â&#x20AC;? The senior who has been in musicals all four of her high school years said each play was a new experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a lot of new people out this year, so the cast in different,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like working with my friends.â&#x20AC;? The musical will be performed at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Performing Arts Center at Baldwin Junior High School. Tickets are $5 for children and students and $6 for adults.

DEATHS HANNAH FAITH ALLEN Infant, Hannah Faith Allen, was born and died November 6, 2012 at Lawrence Memorial Hospital. She is the daughter of Joslyn Ingram and Jacob Callie Allen. Services and burial were Saturday Nov. 10 at Oakwood Cemetery.

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CALENDARS | COMMUNITY CALENDAR |

11/15 | THURSDAY

Boy Scout Troop 65 meeting, Scout Cabin 341 Fremont St., 7 p.m.

Daily Exercises, Vintage Park, 321 Crimson Ave., 10 a.m. Bingo, Vintage Park, 2 p.m. Book Talk, Baldwin City Public Library, 7 p.m.

11/20 | TUESDAY Election day, polls open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Coffee Talk, Vintage Park, 9 a.m.

11/16 | FRIDAY

TOPS meeting, Baldwin Community Library, 9 a.m. Daily Exercises, Vintage Park, 10 a.m.

Coffee Talk, Vintage Park at Baldwin City, 321 Crimson Ave., 9 a.m. Daily Exercises, Vintage Park at Baldwin City, 321 Crimson Ave., 10:30 a.m. Bingo, Vintage Park, 2 p.m.

11/17 | SATURDAY Community food pantry, Baldwin First United Methodist Church, 8 a.m. to noon Free kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; yoga workshop, Lumberyard Arts Center, 10 a.m. Kids theater , 10 a.m. to noon, Lumberyard Arts Center

11/19 | MONDAY Coffee Talk, Vintage Park at Baldwin City, 321 Crimson Ave., 9 a.m. Daily Exercises, Vintage Park at Baldwin City, 321 Crimson Ave., 10 a.m. Bingo, Vintage Park, 2 p.m. Lions Club, Vintage Park, 6:30 p.m. USD 348 Board of Education meeting, District Office, 6:30 p.m. Baldwin City Council, American Legion Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Sing-a-long with Pastor Bud, Vintage Park, 10:30 a.m. Baldwin City Business and Professional Women meeting, Vintage Park, 6:30 p.m.

Group fitness, BESPC South Gym, 8:30 a.m. Lunch bunch, Big Boppers Dominoes, BCRC office, 715 High St., 1 p.m. Tops, Baldwin Senior Center, 5 p.m. Pickleball, Vinland Elementary School, 6:30 p.m.

11/16 | FRIDAY Early Morning Boot Camp. Baldwin Junior High School, 5:45 a.m. Coffee, BCRC, 9 a.m. Group fitness, BESPC South Gym, 8:30 a.m. Pinochle, BCRC office, 715 High St. noon

11/17 | SATURDAY Pokemon League, Baldwin City Public Library, 1 p.m. Biddy Basketball Breakfast with Santa

11/18 | SUNDAY Elementary open gym, BESPC South Gym, 1 p.m. Junior high open gym, BHS, 2 p.m.

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Chicken Noodle dinner, Ives Chapel United Methodist Church, 5 to 7 p.m.

11/21 | WEDNESDAY Story time with Miss Barbara, Baldwin City Library, 10 a.m. Rotary Club, Harter Union, noon Blood pressure clinic, Baldwin Rehabilitation and Health Care, 1223 Orchard Lane, 2 to 3 p.m.

11/22 | THURSDAY Thanksgiving

11/23 | FRIDAY Coffee Talk, Vintage Park at Baldwin City., 9 a.m. Daily Exercises, Vintage Park at Baldwin City, 10:30 a.m. Bingo, Vintage Park, 2 p.m.

| BCRC CALENDAR |

11/15 | THURSDAY

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11/19 | MONDAY Eary morning boot camp, Baldwin Junior High School gym, 6:45 a.m. Group fitness, BESPC South Gym, 8:30 a.m. Pinochle, BCRC office, 715 High St. noon Yoga, BESIC, 4:15 p.m. Zumba, BESIC, 5:30 p.m.

11/20 | TUESDAY Group fitness, BESPC South Gym, 8:30 a.m. TOPS, Baldwin City Library, 10 a.m. Pitch, BCRC office, 715 High St, 1 p.m.

11/21 | WEDNESDAY Early morning boot camp, Baldwin Junior High School gym, 6:45 a.m. Group fitness, BESPC South Gym, 8:30 a.m. New restaurant day trip Zumba, BESIC, 5:30 p.m. Martial arts, BESIC, 6:30 p.m.

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Thursday, November 15, 2012 13

Houser thankful for Baker experience CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

As there were no classes scheduled, a blushing Houser was forced to move to the front row and listen to the lecture once again. This time, Houser was attentive, took notes and even thanked Green for taking the time to go over the class subjects with him again. It ended up being a very positive experience for both Houser and Green. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It actually ended up being a lot of fun,â&#x20AC;? Green said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fond memory I have of Nate.â&#x20AC;? Houser took the lessons he learned from his professors and used them on the field of play. The hard work paid off. He was drafted by the Wichita Wings in 1993 and then traded the next day to the Kansas City Attack. In 1996, he was part of the Kansas City team that won 18 games in a row, a franchise record. He played 11 seasons with the Attack, winning a championship in 1997. After never even making it to the final game in college, Houser found validation in a championship as a professional. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was freeing,â&#x20AC;? Houser said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was kind of like that last little bit of, yeah, your ideas work and you can compete with the best that there are and be in that pond and be successful.â&#x20AC;? In 2003, as his playing career wound down, Houser got a call from Ron Pulvers, Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head coach for menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer at the time, offering him the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer head coaching position. Houser accepted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was totally unprepared,â&#x20AC;? Houser said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I jumped into managing a team full of women. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know anything about managing women â&#x20AC;Ś I mean, I had somebody leave to go rescue a dog

in Arkansas the day before a game.â&#x20AC;? In 2008, Houser would expand his role to include menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head soccer coach. He hired Davey Philips, now the associate head coach for Baker soccer, to be his assistant. The first time the two met was in an alumni game when Phillips was a freshman at Baker. The alumni game was typically a laid-back event in which former players tend to tone down their intensity. However, Phillips had other motivations in mind. He put two hard tackles on Houser during the game. The first simply resulted in some choice words between Houser and Phillips. The second tackle from Phillips came from the side, resulting in Houser landing on top of him. Houser proceeded to push Phillipsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; head into the ground, as he helped himself to his feet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My first impression was top 10 jerks of all time,â&#x20AC;? Phillips said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I came back to coach in 2008, he brought that up, and he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know it was me.â&#x20AC;? During his time with the program, Philips has seen Houser grow, as both a coach and a man. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think he realizes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than just about soccer,â&#x20AC;? Phillips said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s changed the way heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treated people, but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of let the guard down a little bit to let people in.â&#x20AC;? Now a confident, successful coach, Houser wants to show his appreciation for the opportunities Baker gave him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every day, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s giving back. At least thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way I look at it,â&#x20AC;? Houser said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can never repay for what Baker gave me the opportunity to do. Or helped prepare me for the opportunities that I had for 13 years.â&#x20AC;?

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KANSAS CITY, MO. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Baker University womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer team earned the No. 14 seed in the NAIA Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer National Championship tournament and will host unseeded Bellevue University (Neb.) Saturday at Liston Stadium for the NAIA Opening Round match. This will mark the third time in program history the Wildcats have earned a spot in the NAIA National Tournament. The Wildcats enter the tournament, 12-6-1 and earned the No. 3 at-large spot. Bellevue is 13-3-1 on the year and won the Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference championship to qualify for the postseason. Ironically, Baker and Bellevue are the only two teams paired in the opening round that have played previously in the national championship. The two sidesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lone meeting came in the opening round of the 2011 national championship. There will be 30 teams playing at 15 campus sites on Nov. 17. The 15 winners of the National Championship Opening Round matches, as well as host Mobile (Ala.),will advance to the 29th annual national championship final site from Nov. 26 to Dec. 1 in Orange Beach, Ala. Top seed and four-time defend-

ing national champion Lee (Tenn.) will host first-time qualifier Montreat (N.C.). The Lady Flames, who enter the tournament riding a 20-match championship win streak dating back to 2008, own the third-most all-time tournament wins (26) and are 4-0-0 in Opening Round matches. Montreat, who qualified by winning the Appalachian Athletic Conference Tournament, is 1-of-8 programs appearing in their first-ever national championship. Twenty-four teams earned an automatic berth into the field of 31 by winning their respective conference/ independent/unaffiliated group tournament or regular season. Championship newcomer Faulkner (Ala.) also received an automatic spot as the Southern States Athletic Conference Tournament runner-up. The Eagles will travel to seventh-seeded EmbryRiddle (Fla.). The six at-large teams were selected based on the final official NAIA Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer Modified Ratings Percentage Index. The MRPI consists of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modified winning percentage, their opponentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; winning percentage and the cumulative ratings points from the NAIA Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer Coachesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Top 25 Poll. Each of the three values has a weighted percentage calculated in the MRPI.

 

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14

| Thursday, November 15, 2012 .

State keeps watchful eye on vanity plates By Alex Parker aparker@ljworld.com

Want to proclaim your individuality on your Kansas license plate? Be careful what you say, state officials warn. Looking to pimp your ride with plates that say â&#x20AC;&#x153;BITEMEE,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;KZMIAZâ&#x20AC;&#x153; or â&#x20AC;&#x153;AWSHIFTâ&#x20AC;?? Forget it. Think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re â&#x20AC;&#x153;2HOT4Uâ&#x20AC;?? Too hot for Kansas vehicles. Does driving make you say â&#x20AC;&#x153;AAAAHHâ&#x20AC;?? Other drivers will never know. Are you a hockey fan? â&#x20AC;&#x153;PUCKUâ&#x20AC;? is out of bounds. Hoping to celebrate your birth year of 1969 on a plate? Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out of luck. In all, nearly 1,800 combinations of words, numbers and phrases are banned from Kansas license plates, according to a list maintained by the State Department of Revenue and obtained by the Journal-World. Not surprisingly, the list is full of variations on sexual references, drug slang and ethnic or racial epithets â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re cleverly misspelled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a known list that if those

come up, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let them go on the street,â&#x20AC;? said Donna Shelite, the Department of Revenueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director of vehicles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are more combinations that may come across â&#x20AC;Ś that may cause some phone calls from the public.â&#x20AC;? It costs $46 to purchase a vanity plate for a Kansas-registered truck or automobile, and Sheliteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s department gets more than 61,000 applications annually for the custom plates. Most requests are innocent and easily approved. But even some innocuous-sounding plate proposals are prohibited for various reasons, ranging from potentially mistaken identity to association with notorious crimes or brand names. The banned list includes words such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;THRILED,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNKNOWN,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;KBI,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;BTKâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;VIAGRA.â&#x20AC;? Sometimes applicants try to pull a fast one. For instance, one applicant requested the plate MYA55, explaining that it was for a 1955-model vehicle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clearly that was not the intent,â&#x20AC;? Shelite said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You get some people that think those combinations are

fun to have on their vehicle.â&#x20AC;? As in most other states, Department of Revenue employees review vanity license plate applications, looking out for combinations that fall outside the legal guidelines for vanity plates. About 300 are rejected a year, adding to the prohibited plate list. Drivers applying for personalized tags have the opportunity to explain why they are requesting a certain alphanumeric combination or phrase, if state officials question their application. But sometimes, vanity plate requests slip by when they contain phrases with which the monitor is unfamiliar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are some that have come across and been denied, and when I ask about them, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actual slang,â&#x20AC;? Shelite said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the street, it may mean something totally different than I deem it.â&#x20AC;? Occasionally, that means legitimate requests are denied. In one case, she said, an application that appeared to contain slang was flagged, when in fact the phrase was a familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surname. Af-

ter an appeal, the plate was allowed to stand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Application folks have to keep up with slang,â&#x20AC;? Shelite said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to continue to grow as people get more creative and put more things on a plate just to stand out.â&#x20AC;? Complaints from the public about distasteful license plates are rare. Shelite said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s received only two since she began her job in April 2011. But there is formal complaint process. Jeannine Koranda, public information officer for the Department of Revenue, said people should write down the seemingly offensive tag number and county and call the division of vehicles. If the plate is deemed offensive, local law enforcement officials are asked to get the plate off the streets. Drivers whose plates are denied or taken away can apply for a new vanity plate or settle for a standard plate. But no doubt, Shelite said, the list of forbidden Kansas license plates will continue to grow as drivers try to express themselves on the road.

Baldwin City woman to stand trail for blackmail attempt By Shaun Hittle shittle@ljworld.com

Douglas County District Court Judge Peggy Kittel ordered a 31-year-old Baldwin City woman to stand trial for allegedly blackmailing a convicted Lawrence sex offender.

Janice Boline faces one count of blackmail after she allegedly threatened a registered sex offender that she would publish his photo and name in a magazine unless he paid her $5,000. The man â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who manages a local business â&#x20AC;&#x201D; testified Tuesday at a preliminary hearing that Bo-

line approached him in September. She allegedly told him he could keep his name and photo out of an October magazine if he agreed to pay her the $5,000. The name of the publication was not released during Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s testimony.

The man emailed Boline later about the offer, and turned those documents over to police. Boline was arrested Sept. 26 and released on a $2,500 bond. Blackmail is a level 7 non-person felony, punishable by up to 34 months in prison, depending on someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s criminal history.

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Thursday, November 15, 2012

|3

First dinner train cars arrive in Baldwin City By Elvyn Jones ejones@theworldco.info

Monday morning in a rock quarry north of Ottawa, a crane operator gently picked a 75-foot red dining car from the back of a semitrailer to place on two sets of wheel assemblies already on railroad tracks. The car was pulled later in the day to Midland Railwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Baldwin City yard, where it will be part of what is now called the Kansas Belle Dinner Train. The use of the quarry site for the transfer was the latest adjustment the owners of the dinner train made to move their business from Fremont, Neb., to Baldwin Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Midland Railway. Last week, they found there wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough room at the Baldwin City yard to transfer the first car, a 65foot long baggage car equipped with a generator that powers the dining cars when on the move, from its carriage behind a semitrailer to the railroad tracks. All went well Monday, and Bob Eveland, manager and co-owner of the Kansas Belle Dinner Train, is hopeful that the remaining inventory of five dining cars and one caboose can be moved by Thanksgiving to Baldwin City and operating on Midland Railwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 21-mile line in time to salvage some of the holiday season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to be operating at least part of December,â&#x20AC;? Eveland said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an important month.â&#x20AC;? Eveland started exploring the move

to Midland Railway more than a year ence that included a ride and meal on ago out of concern the Fremont and its four primary dining cars. Elkhorn Valley Railroad, a 15-mile exEveland isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alone in anticipatcursion line that had been the dinner ing tourists will find their way to the trainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home for 24 years, might not be dinner train. The Baldwin City Counproperly maincil and the Douglas tained with its County Commission It will enable people to see recent sale. have helped bankroll scenic parts of Douglas and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken the move because of this long,â&#x20AC;? he Franklin counties from a din- that potential. said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When ing car â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a part of railroad hisMidland Railway we started talkofficials are also ing, Midland tory that I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think is offered excited about the Railway was anywhere else in Kansas.â&#x20AC;? prospect of the dinat a point they ner train adding to felt it would â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mike Fox, president of Midland Railway the 20,000 visitors enhance their Historical Association it draws annually. overall finanThe railway will recial operation ceive payment from and provide their customers with the dinner train for the use of its more options. tracks and locomotive, but the Kanâ&#x20AC;&#x153;We needed a place to live. The sas Belle also will showcase a side of scenery is good. The railroad is in railroading history Midland Railway good shape. The location is good.â&#x20AC;? hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been able to offer, said Mike Although the uncertain future of Fox, president of the Midland Railthe Fremont and Elkhorn Valley Rail- way Historical Association. road prompted the move, Eveland â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another leg on the stool,â&#x20AC;? he also thinks the dinner car business said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will enable people to see will benefit from moving from a site scenic parts of Douglas and Franklin dependent on the Omaha and Lincoln counties from a dining car â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a part markets to one that taps into the Kan- of railroad history that I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think sas City metropolitan area. is offered anywhere else in Kansas.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair to say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a superior loThe Midland Railwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunday excation,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the same time, cursion train schedule would need weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re close enough we think custom- to be tweaked next spring, but there ers weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had over the years will find would be no real conflicts with its a good reason to come down to Kan- existing late morning and afternoon sas.â&#x20AC;? trips on Thursday, Saturdays and The dinner train was at its peak be- Sundays with that of the Kansas Belle, fore the recession; more than 10,000 Fox said. tickets a year were sold for the experiEveland said the plan was for the

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KANSAS BELLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUBLIC FINANCING By Elvyn Jones ejones@theworldco.info

A number of public economic development financing tools made the move of the Kansas Belle Dinner Train to Baldwin City possible. Among them were: â&#x20AC;˘ A $5,000 Baldwin Economic Development Grant. â&#x20AC;˘ A three-year, $15,000, low-interest loan. The loan payments will be forgiven on an annual basis if the dinner trainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owners can demonstrate through ticket sales and Kansas sales tax records that the din-

ner sold 6,000 tickets and collected $5,000 of sales tax revenue in 2013, sold 6,500 tickets and collected $5,500 in sales tax in 2014, and had 7,000 paying passengers and raised $6,000 in sales tax revenue in 2015. â&#x20AC;˘ A $25,000 Entrepreneurship Communities loan from the NetWorks Program, which makes money available for business opportunities in smaller Kansas communities. â&#x20AC;˘ A $54,000 heritage grant from Douglas County to help build a short spur line equipped with utilities on which dinner cars will be parked when not in use.

Kansas Belle to duplicate the dinner trainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nebraska schedule with Friday and Saturday evening runs and early afternoon Sunday trips. The Friday and Saturday trips will feature five-course meals. Formal attire is encouraged. Sunday outings are more informal, geared for families, with childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menus available. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be from the low- to mid-$60 range for the evening meal,â&#x20AC;? Eveland said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sundays are a little less.â&#x20AC;? Meals on cars offering entertainment will cost more. As in Nebraska, customers will have the option of buying tickets on cars featuring mysteries, melodramas, recreations of World War II USO shows and other musical offerings, Eveland said. Unlike the Midland Railway, which runs seasonally from April though November, the heated and air-conditioned dinner cars run 12 months a year. Eveland said it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet known, though, whether the three-day a week scheduled would be maintained in the coldest, postholiday months. The Kansas Belle Dinner Train would hire roughly 15 part-time employees as waiters, bartenders, office clerks and custodians, Eveland said. It will also provide work for the caterer, who prepares the meals for the 70 people who purchase tickets for each trip, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on that,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m coming down this week to start getting that in place.â&#x20AC;?

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BHS SINGS COLE PORTER Students performing ‘Anything Goes’ for fall musical, Page 5

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Baldwin UMC taking orders for Elementary science fair Nov. 15 The Baldwin Elementary CSO will have a Science Fair open house and pancake supper from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Nov. 15 at the Baldwin Elementary School Primary Center. The event will feature science projects of kindergarten through fifth-grade Baldwin elementary students.

Number of railroad cars the Kansas Belle Dinner Train is moving to Baldwin City.

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Chris Cakes will provide the pancakes for the all-you-can eat price of $3.50 for children 8 years old or younger and $4 for adults.

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Reader services Reader services To send The Signal a news tip, call (785) 760To send The Signal a news tip, call (785) 7606841 or by email, ejones@baldwincity.com. For 6841 or by email, ejones@baldwincity.com. For questions about delivery of The Signal, subscripquestions about delivery ofcall TheChris Signal, subscriptions or requests for copies Bell, circulations or requests copies callorcirculation at tion director, (800)for 578-8748, e-mail cbell@ 800-578-8748. theworldco.info. Have a news tip or news release? Contact us. By phone: 785-760-6841 By email: editor@baldwincity.com

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File photo

A FORMER TONGANOXIE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT donates blood in this file photo taken during a Community Blood Center drive at the THS gymnasium.

TIME TO DONATE Stann Tate, marketing director with the Community Blood Center of Greater Kansas City, discusses the need for blood donations. Q: How has Superstorm Sandy affected blood donation needs? A: We did not have much of a request from the East Coast to help with Superstorm Sandy. The Community Blood Center supplies 70 hospitals in the Kansas City area. We did send donations to CBC of the Ozarks following the Joplin tornado. Q: Is there a time of year when blood donation is needed more? A: Yes. It is very hard for us to collect blood coming up toward Thanksgiving. This time of year, people have got to get ready for family coming, Christmas shopping and holiday planning. A lot of times, people put donating blood on the back burner with the colder weather. Q: How often can people donate

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blood? A: Whole blood every 56 days; platelets every 14 days. Q: How long after blood is donated can it be used? A: Shelf life of blood is 42 days, the first five committed to testing. Platelets’ shelf life is only five days, the first two reserved for testing. We always need people to help not only CBC, but coworkers and family who need blood. One day it may be you who needs blood. Q: What can folks do to organize a blood drive? A: You can give our recruitment staff a call to help throughout the entire process, 816-753-4040 or visit savealifenow.org. We provide you with all the materials, signage and electronic messaging to make sure you hold a successful blood drive.

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SPEAK OUT Registered users of baldwincity.com can comment on any story that appears in The Signal and on its website. Share your opinions today!

WINTER SPORTS Look for BHS winter sports previews at baldwincity. com.

For more information, contact Science Fair Chairwoman Kelley Bethell-Smith at kjbethell@hotmail.com or 785-418-4051.

City starts email billing option Baldwin City residents now have the option of receiving city utility bill by email, which will not only allow residents to receive bills sooner, but will reduce the city’s cost and be more environmentally friendly. Those interested can sign up at City Hall or by calling 785-594-6427.

Santa making visit to BESIC on Saturday Baldwin City Parks and Recreation will have a Breakfast with Santa at 9 a.m. Saturday the BESIC. There will be picture opportunities, crafts and a pancake breakfast. Tickets are $6 in advance and $8 at the door.

Community garden seeks bagged leaves The Baldwin City Community garden is accepting bagged leaves again this fall. Residents can bring them to the site at Seventh and Lincoln streets or call 594-3832 for pick up. No brush, please.

LAC holiday art sale starts Nov. 24 The Lumberyard Arts Center’s holiday arts sale starts from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24, at the arts center, 718 High St. The sale will continue during regular art center hours through Dec. 22.


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BALDWIN CITY SCENE

STUDENTS OF BALDWIN HIGH SCHOOL ARE SHIPPING ON THE S.S. AMERICAN TO PRESENT THE 1934 MUSICAL ‘ANYTHING GOES’ FRIDAY AND SATURDAY AT THE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER.

BHS SENIOR Regan LaTessa as evangelist turned nightclub diva Reno Sweeney and her Angels vamp before the S.S. American sets sail in the musical “Anything Goes.” Elvyn Jones/Staff

Elvyn Jones/Staff

Elvyn Jones/Staff

IAN KIRK as Moonface Martin, public enemy No. 13, and his sidekick Bonnie sneak aboard the S.S. American with the gangster disguised as a man of the clothe.

TYLER CAWLEY as Billy Crocker and Madeline Miley as Hope Harcourt share a romantic moment in the moonlight topside on the S.S. American.

  

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SIXTH STREET TO OPEN FRIDAY/PAGE 8 THURSDAY NOVEMBER 15, 2012 VOL. 14, NO. 38 75 CENTS

fyi Baker jazz festival starts tonight By Sara Shepherd sshepherd@ljworld.com

The 15th annual Baker University Invitational Jazz Festival, featuring the Baker Jazz Ensemble, is this week. A concert is planned for 7:30 p.m. today and a day-long competition will take place on Friday in Rice Auditorium on the Baker campus. Both events are free to the public. This eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concert will feature the Jazz Ensemble with guest artist Ken Watters, a trumpeter from Huntsville, Ala. J.D. Parr, professor of music, will direct the concert. On Friday, Watters and four professional jazz musicians from the Kansas City area will adjudicate 18 high school bands, which will receive a rating from the judges and a clinic conducted by one of the jazz artists. Outstanding soloists and one â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exemplary Performerâ&#x20AC;? award winner will be announced after the competition. Watters, who studied jazz at the University of North Texas and the Manhattan School of Music, has also worked privately with Wynton Marsalis and Joe Lovano. He placed first in the International Trumpet Guild Jazz Improvisation Competition, has received numerous Downbeat Magazine Music Awards, and has performed, recorded or toured with celebrities such as Carlos Santana, Frank Sinatra, Natalie Cole and Gregg Allman.

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Richard Gwin/Staff STEPPING DOWN from a dining car, Ira Schreiber, a part owner of the Kansas Belle Dinner Car restaurant relocating to the Midland Railroad in Baldwin City, looked over a dining car Monday at the completion of its move from Fremont, Neb. TOP: Old advertising sheets in the dining car show what it was like during the carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heyday. Look for the story on page 3.

    

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