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EDITORIAL Publisher cum Editor

Rajneesh Sharma

rajneeshhammer@gmail.com

Associate Editor

Swarnendu Biswas Resident Editor

Sharmila Chand (Delhi) Ashok Malkani (Mumbai) Sub-Editor

Tapapriya Lahiri Layout & Design

Hari Kumar V. Narender Kumar Photographer

Mahendra Singh Mehta Production Controller

Vinay Goel

Production Assistant

Mamta Sharma

Advertising Sales

Delhi: Neeraj Diwan Mumbai: Rajesh Tupsakhare Subscription Sales

Dattaram Gangurde Director Sales

Sanjay Anand

Director Operations & Finance

Rajat Taneja

Editorial & Advertising Offices: Delhi:

Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 1202, Pragati Tower, 26, Rajindra Place, New Delhi-110008 Phone: 25854103 Telefax: 25854105 Mumbai:

Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 105, 1st Floor, Aarpee Centre, Gufic Compound, 11th Road, MIDC, Near Tunga Paradise Hotel, Andheri (E), Mumbai-400 093 Phone: 28395833 Telefax: 28388947

E-mail: hammerpublishers@vsnl.net © 2012 Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. No article can be reproduced in part or as whole without prior permission of the Publisher. Bakery Review is a bi-monthly magazine, printed and published by Rajneesh Sharma on behalf of Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 1202, Pragati Tower, 26 Rajindra Place, New Delhi. Printed at Swan Press, B-71, Naraina Industrial Area, Phase-II, New Delhi-110 028. Annual Subscription rate within India is Rs. 450 and overseas US $110, for surface mail. Single issue is available for Rs. 90 in India and US $25 overseas. Cheques are payable to Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

With the growing urbanisation and globalisation, spearheading health consciousness and pockets of disposable incomes, the demand for readyto-eat healthy bakery products is increasing in India, which is fostering the growth of the Indian bakery industry. This has resulted in the mushrooming of sleek retail bakery outlets in metros and other big cities of India, across malls, hotels, and restaurants. Encouraged by the demand for bakery products, many hotels and food manufacturers are coming out with bakery outlets and bakery products in a big way. However, the Indian bakery industry is not only growing in terms of market size and revenues, but is also becoming healthier in terms of its offerings and more techno-savvy in its operations with the passing days. In fact, the increasing concerns of the society towards healthy eating have led to the profusion of healthy bakery products in the market, and the growing importance towards hygiene is encouraging the Indian bakery industry to opt for technological upgradations and innovations. The strict hygiene requirements in the industry have fuelled a new generation of bakery equipment and clean environment in bakeries has in turn contributed towards longer shelf-life of bakery products. However, besides hygienic requirements and growing concerns towards food safety, the changing tastes of the consumers and the paucity of skilled manpower at affordable cost are also contributing towards the bakery industry’s increasing reliance towards sophisticated technologies. The usage of items pertaining to preventive hygiene like head gear, gloves, face mask, aprons, and disinfected towels are becoming common in the Indian bakery industry, and application of modern day bakery equipment like planetary mixers, rack ovens, deck ovens, dough moulders, hydraulic dividers are gaining currency too. Besides new-age machineries, employing new techniques to do the same work, in order to increase efficiency and reduce costs is also becoming vogue in the Indian bakery industry. Smart packaging options are another new trend in the Indian bakery industry. We discuss all these issues in some detail in the Cover Story of this issue, while exploring the global and as well as Indian trends in bakeries. The importance of bread in the bakery industry or in fact in the human history simply cannot be overstated. In this issue, we have attempted to give you some glimpses of this wonderful food item of perennial appeal, which was there in the Neolithic era and would surely survive the post-modern era. Nowadays the distinction between comfort food and healthy food items is getting blurred. Now you can have healthy pizzas and healthy breads, healthy chocolates and healthy cakes. Binging on them is now not necessarily loaded with the guilt of putting on added weight. In this issue, we explore the trendy aspects of comfort food, which we hope our readers would find interesting. Besides these, our regular sections teeming with information and insights are geared to keep you absorbed between the covers. I hereby sign off while wishing the industry a better future in this new fiscal, than it had in the last one.

Editorial Policy : Editorial emphasis in Bakery Review magazine is on

educational & informational material specifically designed to assist those responsible for managing Bakery & Confectionery business. Articles are welcome and will be published on the sole discretion of the editor.

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I N S I D E 16 COVER STORY Bakeries Becoming Tech-Savvy

20 FEATURE Breads Roll Through Time

24 DAIRY Not Just Food, it is Superfood!

DEPARTMENTS 04 Events 08 News Scan 14 Report 34 Product Preview 36 Interview

26 PRODUCT Sweetness From Bitter Source

28 PROFILE The Ingredients of Success Cover Pix: Dobla BV

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Aahar 2012: The Right Podium for the Industry Aahar 2012, the 27th international exhibition for food, food processing, hotel and restaurant equipment & supplies attracted a plethora of visitors and exhibitors from India and abroad. The mega event took place at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi, during 12th16th March 2012. Aahar 2012 took place in halls 7, 8,9,10,11,12,12A, 14, 15 & 18, spread over a gross area of 38,214 sq.m. The show expected impressive visitor participation from both India and overseas. The comprehensive show had something to offer for everybody in the food & beverage and hospitality business. Top decision makers and buyers visited this significant event for the food & beverage, bakery, and hospitality industry. The fair was being organised b y t h e In d i a Trade Promotion Organisation (ITPO), with the support of the Ministry of Food Processing Industries, Government of India, and Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA). The other organisations supporting the show were Association of Resource Companies for the Hospitality Industry of India (ARCHII), All India Food Processors’ Association, and Hotel and Restaurant Equipment Manufacturers’ Association of India (HOTREMAI). The premier exhibition was divided into two independent shows viz. ‘Food India,’ which covered food and processed foods sector, and Hospitality India, which represented hotel & restaurant, bakery & confectionery equipment and supplies. Anand Sharma, the Union Minister of Commerce, Industry & Textiles inaugurated the 27th edition of AAHAR. Speaking on the occasion Sharma said, “India’s food market is estimated at over $182 billion USD, accounting for about two third of the total retail market. The per capita packaged snack food consumption may be low in India presently but is growing, hence there is a huge market waiting to be tapped. I am sure that AHHAR will be the driving engine

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EVENTS’ CALENDER Alimentaria 2012 26-29 March 2012 Fira de Barcelona’s Gran Vía venue., Barcelona Spain www.alimentaria-bcn.com Ethnic Foods Europe 2011 27-29 March 2012 Brussels Exhibitions and Conference Centre, Brussels www.ethnicfoodseurope.com HOTELEX 2012 9-12 April 2012 Shanghai New International Exhibition Center, Shanghai,China www.hotelex.cn

of economic growth.” Sharma stressed on creating an integrated value chain in the food processing and hospitality sectors for increasing India’s shares in global exports and to face future challenges. He said that extensive efforts must be directed to save agricultural produce through creation of integrated value chains, food processing parks and institutions for maintaining global standards for processed food. The Aahar 2012 featured 565 exhibitors, including 72 foreign exhibitors from 19 countries. The foreign countries from where companies displayed at the AAHAR 2012 are Argentina, Australia, Canada, China, Denmark, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Turkey, UAE., USA, and Vietnam. The range of products on display included food products and processed food including beverages; a wide range of bakery and snack products; smill machinery and equipments; machinery related to food processing and packaging of food products; poultry, farm equipments and supplies; dairy and confectionery equipments; air-conditioning, refrigeration and cold storage systems; air and water-pollution control equipment and accessories; hotel and kitchen equipment and tableware; laundry and interiors and housekeeping; health fitness equipment; consultancy services and miscellaneous products related to food industry and hospitality supplies. AAHAR 2012 emerged as a popular event with business visitors that included foreign buyers, importers and wholesalers, overseas trade delegations, policy makers, media persons, equipment and machinery suppliers, marketing and direct selling companies, government agencies, etc.

FHA 2012 17-20 April 2012 Singapore Expo, Singapore www.foodnhotelasia.com SIAL China 2012 9-11 May 2012 Shanghai New International Exhibition Center www.sialchina.com NRA Show 2012 5-8 May 2012 McCormick Place, Chicago, US www.restaurant.org Espana Original 2012 8-10 May 2012 Ciudad real, Spain www.espanaoriginal.com Vinexpo Asia Pacific 29-31 May 2012 Hong Kong www.vinexpo.com Thaifex- world of food ASIA 12 23-27 May 2012 Impact challenger, Thailand www.worldoffoodasia.com MIFB 2012 12-14 July 2012 PWTC, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia www.mifb.com.my International Hospitality Fair 2012 by CII 20-22 Sep 2012 Pragati Maidan, New Delhi www.internationalhospitalityfair.in SIAL Paris 21-25 October 2012 Paris Nord Villepinte, Paris, France www.sial.fr Hotel Expo 2012 10-12 October 2012 The Venetian Macau, www.hotel-exhibition.com Equip Hotel 11-15 Nov 2012 Paris Expo Porte de Versailles, Paris www.equiphotel.com

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Europain 2012:

A Global Platform for Baking and Confectionery Industry Europain – Intersuc – SuccessFood, 3-7 March 2012, Paris Nord Villepinte

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uropian 2012—the world bakery, pastry, ice cream, chocolate, and confectionery trade show— is perhaps one of the most happening events in the world of baking and confectionary industry. Held between 3rd -7th March at Paris Nord Villepinte, Europain 2012 attracted almost 800 exhibitors in an exhibition area spread across 68,000 sq m. The mega event attracted 82,690 visitors from 143 countries. Out of these more than 82,000 visitors to the fair, 71 percent were visitors from France, whereas a sizeable 29 percent of them came from abroad. Excluding France, the top 11 countries in terms of visitors were Belgium, Italy, Spain, Germany, the Netherlands, Brazil, USA, Russia, Sweden, United Kingdom, and Portugal. SuccessFood and Europain were held side-by-side. The decision to hold the first SuccessFood exhibition alongside Europain proved an extremely pertinent choice. As patterns of consumption evolve and eating habits change, the restaurant and bakery sectors must break down their respective barriers. Europain brought together a representative cross-section of the baking sector as a whole, which included craft and industrial bakeries among others. The ‘Road to Success’ exhibition, which was spread across 1000 sq m, allowed visitors to view a galore of winning concepts in baking, and novel restaurant sites. The exhibitors gave live presentations. Europain Innovation trophies were awarded to some 15 exhibitors in the two

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separate categories of Materials and Products. Visitors were able to view these innovations, displayed on the innovations and new products area, close to the show entrance, as well as on the stands where many demonstrations took place. Intersuc Collections crowned 7 products in chocolate and confectionery.

Contests of Creativity Europain 2012 also hosted several contests. The Cube, the only competition space of its size, brought together three separate competition areas in a single section, measuring more than 4000 sq m. It proved the original jewel box for this new concept, underscoring the determination of Europain and SuccessFood to promote the entire range of catering professions. One of the highlights of the mega bakery and confectionery event was the 8th Bakery World Cup, comprising three days of extremely highlevel competition with 12 teams competing in three separate areas (bread, pastry and artistic creation). The podium was shared by Japan, the US and Taiwan. Europain 2012 also witnessed the 3rd International Confectionery Art Competition, with equal numbers of men and women in the participating teams. The competition has earned a place among the world’s most prestigious artistic confectionery contests. In its third edition, the teams from 16 countries brought all their enterprise and creativity to the fore in the creation of at least 13 dishes, including a pastillage showpiece, a confectionery showpiece, a chocolate showpiece and a dessert showpiece. The first prize was awarded to Japan, followed by Switzerland and France.

The Europain 2012 saw the hosting of the prestigious contest of Bocuse d’Or France. After an intense competition lasting five-and-a-half hours, the jury of the Bocuse d’Or France, presided over by Joël Robuchon, awarded the title to Thibaut Rugerri (Lenôtre). At the 7th Festival of Gastronomic Creativity, organised by the magazine Le Chef, 16 young Chefs had one hour to prepare creative recipes, with commentary by Jean-François Piège, himself a Chef and Master of Ceremonies at the 2012 event. The friendly and creative demonstration attracted a large audience. French Schools Cup had 10 teams

competing in the ‘Aspiring’ (Espoirs) category and the 8 teams in the ‘Excellence’ category. The teams demonstrated mastery and energy throughout all stages of the contest. At the forum titled ‘Baker & Designer: Expanding the dialogue’ bakers and designers came together to discuss their practices and exchange know-how. These discussions gave rise to innovative projects, involving products that are both good to eat and very healthy. For further information contact: Raj Anand Promosalons India Pvt Ltd Tel: +91-22-42604162 Fax: +91-22-42604165 email : india@promosalons.com

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Mother Dairy Brings Impulse to Bhubaneshwar This summer, the ice cream lovers of Bhubaneswar will experience new scoops from Mother Diary. The nationally renowned ice cream manufacturer has introduced its entire range of impulse & take home ice-creams which also includes the premium ‘Classics’ variety, for the people of Bhubaneshwar. Endowed with creamy milk and quality ingredients, the ice creams from Mother Dairy are expected to soothe the taste buds of diverse age groups. As per the company release, the ice creams of Mother Dairy are made of out milk fat as opposed to frozen desserts. According to Subhashis Basu, the Business Head of Dairy Products Division, Mother Dairy, “Expanding to Bhubaneshwar is an important step for our business. We are sure that the people of Bhubaneswar will enjoy the goodness of ice creams in its purest form. Mother Dairy’s ice creams offer the most comprehensive range, with flavours developed for every occasion to delight everyone in all age groups.”

BAKERY REVIEW

Swensen’s Launches a Huge Sundae The globally renowned ice cream brand Swensen’s has come out with a huge sundae, comprised of eight specially selected scoops of creamy chocolate ice creams from Swensen’s chocolate range. The sundae is named as Chocolate Earthquake (CEQ). The sumptuous delight is enclosed by swirls of whipped cream and laced with chocolate sauce, along with brownies, oreos, fudge, almonds and chocolate-crusted cherries. CEQ is part of the offering of the signature ‘Earthquake’ series from the company. According to Parwit Amtim, the Manager of International Franchisee Operations, Swensen’s, these scoops are priced at Rs. 499. Swensen’s entered India in June 2010 through a franchise model in partnership with Devyani International Limited and launched its first outlet in the country at Mantri Mall, Malleswaram in Bangalore. Presently, Swensen’s has seven outlets in Bangalore, and they are now offering Chocolate Earthquake along with wide selections of its other ice cream creations and signature sundaes that include Coit Tower, Gold Rush, Sticky Chewy Choc Fantasy, and Hot Fudge Bonanza Split among others. Here it deserves a mention that Swensen’s wide ranges of exotic and indulgent sundaes are works of art, which look as good as they taste. These delights in the Swensen’s Indian menu are supplemented with coffee. There is also a separate menu designed especially for the kids.

Milk With a Long Shelf Life FMCG major CavinKare has come up with ultra high temperature (UHT)-treated milk named Cavin’s Pure+. This milk can last for 120 days without the support of refrigerator. According to CK Ranganathan, CMD, CavinKare Pvt.Ltd., this product was a step towards consolidating the position of the company in the dairy sector. The launch of Cavin’s Pure+ follows the introduction of Cavin’s Ghee and Cavin’s Flavoured Milk in the recent past. The processing technology for this wonder milk was sourced from the Netherlands, and the packaging of the product was developed in association with a Mumbai-based packaging company. The Cavin’s Pure+ milk will be produced by the company from its facility at Bhavani, Tamil Nadu, where its production capacity is up to 100,000 litres. Initially, the company will introduce this ultra high temperature (UHT)treated milk in Tamil Nadu only. Based on the success of this milk in Tamil Nadu, the company would explore the option of launching it in other parts of the country as well. In the first year of its launch, the company is envisaging a revenue of Rs.60-65 crore from this product. . The procurement of quality milk is however, remains a challenge. The company has joined hands with 11,000 farmers living in the 50 km radius from the plant, so as to enable the milk to reach the plant in less than 3-4 hours.

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iba 2012: Showcasing Global Bakery Industry iba 2012 will be held in Munich, Germany during 16-21 September 2012. The venue of this edition of iba will be held at New Munich Trade Fair Centre. iba is held once in every three years, and attracts exhibitors and visitors from all over the world. The event is expected to attract more than 1100 exhibitors this year, who would feature the latest innovations in the baking industry. The preparations for this leading international trade fair for bakers and pastry chefs are already in full swing. Many prominent companies from the global baking scene have already registered for the show. Over 70,000 visitors are expected to be present at iba 2012. The event will attract trade and wholesale bakeries, confectioners and cafes, food retailers, catering firms, hotels, coffee shops, and the food service industry. From a range of bakery and confectionery machineries to accessories, and from baking agents to packaging options, iba 2012 is expected to cover the entire spectrum of the baking industry as well as its related areas. The iba 2012 will house an exclusive exhibition at Hall A4 titled ‘Coffee, cake & more’ where one can experience the aromatic world of coffee. Besides, the event will have various supporting programmes, seminars & discussions, which are expected to give more food for thought to the participants and visitors.

Del Monte Introduces INQ-Bake Contest to Recognise Baking Talent Del Monte, one of the largest and best known international food brands brought to India by FieldFresh Foods Pvt. Ltd., had instituted a unique engagement contest named ‘INQBake’ for bakers and confectioners across Delhi-NCR. The initiative followed the launch of high quality fruit fillings of Del Monte in India, last year. The contest entailed creation of innovative confectionery and bakery products using Del Monte’s range of fruit filling and packaged fruits. It provided a platform for bakers to showcase the versatility and usage of the product range in varied recipes. The contestants were adjudged by the prestigious panel of judges, which included Deeba Rajpal, an avid food blogger with a passion for baking and Del Monte’s Corporate Chef. Entries were received across Delhi-NCR region. The participants showcased their baking skills by creating scrumptious recipes such as pineapple cheese cake, blueberry tarts, raspberry pastries, eclair beauties with dark cherry filling, custards made from fruit cocktail. Judged on three parameters — innovation, taste and appearance, the contest was won by Theos, Noida. Angels in my Kitchen, Defence Colony stood at first runner up position and Perfect Bake, Faridabad, won the second runner up position. Speaking about the contest, Yogesh Bellani, the Business Head, Del Monte Foods, FieldFresh Pvt. Ltd. said, “Bakeries and confectionaries constitute an important part of our B2B clientele. The idea was to create a platform to engage with them and enable them to showcase their creativity using Del Monte’s fruit fillings and packaged fruits. The INQ-Bake contest is a small step taken in this direction. Based on the encouraging response received from the Delhi-NCR region, we would like to extend this further with more engagement programmes for the bakery community across India in the future.” Here it deserves a mention that Del Monte sources high quality packaged fruits and fruit fillings from various parts of the world and has a long heritage and supply side strength in processed fruit and vegetable products. Del Monte provides international quality inputs in the form of packaged fruits and fruit fillings to the bakers and confectioners for both small-medium businesses as well as large and industrial players. Del Monte was brought to India in 2007 by a joint venture between Bharti Enterprises and Del Monte Pacific Ltd. The joint venture is called FieldFresh Foods Pvt. Ltd.

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BAKERY REVIEW

Jubliant FoodWorks to Introduce Dunkin’ Donuts in India Jubiliant FoodWorks Ltd. is expected to open the first store of the US-based chain Dunkin’ Donuts in India, by June. Dunkin’ Donuts would enter India through a franchise agreement between Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc. and New Delhi-based Jubilant FoodWorks. According to Ajay Kaul, the Chief Executive of Jubilant FoodWorks, the stores of Dunkin’ Donuts in India are under construction and the menu development is also at its final stages. The maiden Dunkin’ Donuts store in India will come up in New Delhi, which will be followed up by 80-100 more Dunkin’ Donuts outlets across the country during the next five years. Kaul informed that along with the ’core’ Dunkin’ Donuts menu, the Indian outlets of Dunkin’ Donuts will also serve items which attract the Indian palate. It is expected that the competition between Dunkin’ Donuts and the soon to arrive Starbucks Corp. would heat up the corporate climate in the coming months and years. However, a mushrooming cafe market in India that is estimated to attract an annual sales of $680 million by March 2016, holds out great business potential for these new entrants. Here it deserves a mention that Jubilant FoodWorks also exclusively operates the Domino’s Pizza chain in India.

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Danone Comes With a Lassi for India Danone, the French food products multinational corporation has introduced a lassi in India. The product is tailored for the Indian tastes, and its price too is affordable. The lassi comes at Rs.15 for a 165 ml pack, and in sweet, mango and masala variants. Presently, the product has been introduced across Bangalore, Hyderabad, Mumbai and Pune. This lassi will be available across retail and modern trade outlets across these four cities. This packaged lassi is fortified with four nutrients. Earlier, the company launched dahi, flavoured yogurt, creamy yogurt Cremix, and Danette smoothies in India since 2010. Danone India will get this healthy drink exclusively produced at Dynamix, based in Baramati, Maharashtra to cater to the demands. The company has its own factory in Haryana, which was made operational in November 2011, and it produces yoghurt and chocolate milk cereal snack.

Lavazza Espression Store Launched in Bangalore With the promising growth of coffee business in India, Lavazza has unveiled its signature coffee shop named Lavazza Espression at The Leela Palace Bangalore. This is the second Lavazza Espression store in India. New Delhi has the first store of Lavazza Espression in India. These stores are expected to cater to the growing number of coffee connoisseurs across these happening cities. R Shivshankar, the Director South Asia of Lavazza said, “With numerous IT conglomerates setting up campuses in Bengaluru; a city comprising people with diverse cultural profiles, this was the right place for Lavazza Espression to set up its signature café. The cuisine and environment of Lavazza Espression is very much Italian and people in Bengaluru will savour in our offerings.” Attilio Capuano, the Asia & Pacific Director of Lavazza said, “It gives us great pleasure to launch our signature coffee shop, Lavazza Espression, in a multi-cultural and diverse city like Bengaluru. Opening our signature stores in leading metros in the country is a part of our plan to strengthen the Lavazza brand in India and to give our connoisseurs an opportunity to experience the true flavours of Italy.”

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Di Bella Aroma Spreads Starbucks to Come and Quickly Expand in India Through Mumbai Recently, the Australia-based Di Bella Coffee has opened its third outlet in Bandra, Mumbai. According to Sachin Sabharwal, Managing Director, Di Bella Coffee India, Di Bella Coffee would give the people of India “a distinct and unique coffee experience at their doorstep.” At the coffee stores of Di Bella Coffee you will find a digital menu, endowed with stateof-the-art facilities like web access and Tablet technology. Of course, the quality of the product offered complements

the quality of technology. At the Di Bella Coffee stores you would get the taste and aroma of premium blended and roasted coffee beans. The signature blends of Di Bella Coffee’s coffees are sourced from different origins around the world to achieve a distinct taste profile on each blend. Ali Reserve, a complex offering; Felici, a spicy and rich black coffee with distinct dark chocolate, and Premium are some of the Di Bella Coffee blends sought from different origins around the globe. Here it deserves a mention that after Costa Coffee, and Coffee Bean, Di Bella Coffee is the latest entrant in the premium coffee segment in India. It is offering coffees from different regions of the globe, and the coffee prices of Di Bella Coffee in India range between Rs.90 to Rs.170. Besides the existing players, it would also have to compete with soon to be launched, Starbucks Coffee.

Starbucks Corporation, an US-based international coffee company, has joined hands with India’s Tata Global Beverages Limited through a 50-50 joint venture to open 50 Starbucks cafés across India within the current year. The venture of Starbucks Corporation and Tata Global Beverages Limited is known as Tata Starbucks Ltd. The Indian operations of Starbucks will begin in Delhi and Mumbai. The first outlet is expected to be opened in either of these cities, in September of this year. The company has also envisaged to open outlets at select hospitality properties within the ambit of the Indian Hotels Company Limited (IHCL), which is under the Tata Group. These stores within IHCL properties will be co-branded as ‘Starbucks Coffee: A Tata Alliance.’ According to John Culver, the President of Starbucks China and Asia-Pacific, the company would also look at opening outlets in shopping malls, office parks, universities, airports and train stations. The growing coffee café culture in metropolitan India, induced by lifestyle changes, can give an impetus to the business of Tata Starbucks Ltd. in the country. Tata Starbucks Ltd. expects to capitalise on the increasing aspirations and affluence of many Indians, who are eager to partake of the aroma of international quality coffee. The partnership with Tata Global Beverages Ltd. will enable Starbucks to source and roast their coffee beans in India. This may improve the bottomlines of its business operations as importing coffee beans in India attracts high taxation. Here it deserves a mention that in January 2011, Starbucks had entered upon an agreement with Tata Coffee — a unit of Tata Global Beverages— to source and roast coffee beans in India. The companies will also introduce a tea for the Indian market, under the Tata Tazo brand.

Yzury Comes With an e-Boutique Yzury International Trade, the retail branch of Luxe Corp Group, has opened in India the first e-boutique dedicated to gourmet products, which is named Yzury.com. With more than 300 different references, Yzury e-boutique will not only offer its customers a delightful shopping experience but also a new way to discover and consume international cuisines at rock-bottom prices. The premier online gourmet boutique does have potential to attract foodies in India who have a fascination for gourmet foods. With an objective to make gourmet products affordable to consumers in India, Yzury.com sent its

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team all over the world with a first stop in the gastronomy capital Paris, to offer a range of gourmet products with rich flavours and vivid colours. Yzury.com has selected an impressive range of gourmet products such as truffles, flavoured vinegars, olive oils, chocolates, pate, mustard, terrines, cooked dishes, sweet and savoury biscuits, wines…and the company continues to increase its range with quality products. The carefully selected ingredients and the traditional production processes make them exceptional products, many of which are not available in the traditional supermarkets or specialty stores.

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Tradition. Innovation. Passion. iba 2012 – Your World Market for Baking.

ticket Online rom sales f 012. April 2

iba 2012 – the unmissable event for the international baking industry. Professionals from all over the world will be discovering the newest trends and innovations at iba 2012. More than 1,100 exhibitors will be presenting their current range of products to visitors. Ranging from trade and wholesale bakeries, confectioners and cafés, food retailers, catering firms, hotels, coffee shops and the food service industry – iba 2012 is the most important trade fair for the global baking industry. India Representative – Munich Fairs Indo German Chamber of Commerce Tel (Direct ) : 0091-22-66652127 Tel (Board ) : 0091-22-66652119-121 Fax : 0091-22-66652120 Feb-Mar ’12 www.indo-german.com · munichfairs@indo-german.com

Munich

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Barry Callebaut’s Drive Towards Sustainable Cocoa

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arry Callebaut, the world’s leading manufacturer of high-quality cocoa and chocolate, has launched a CHF 40 million cocoa sustainability initiative to boost farm productivity, increase quality and improve family livelihoods in key cocoa producing countries in West and Central Africa and Indonesia, over 10 years. Here it deserves a mention that with annual sales of about CHF 4.6 billion (EUR 3.6 billion/USD 5.0 billion) for the fiscal year 2010-11, Zurich-based Barry Callebaut is the world’s leading manufacturer of high-quality cocoa and chocolate – from the cocoa bean to the finished chocolate product. In the fiscal year 20112012, the company will invest CHF 5 million in farmer training, infrastructure and community education and health programs. The activities will be undertaken in cooperation with agricultural and development experts and government institutions. Barry Callebaut will focus first on large producer countries including Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Indonesia, Cameroon and Brazil, and aims to expand the initiative, called Cocoa Horizons, to other cocoa producing countries with high development potential, over the coming years.

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“The scarcity of quality cocoa is a serious concern that touches the heart of our business – because without more cocoa, we can’t produce more chocolate. Innovative and comprehensive solutions are urgently needed to reverse the overall decline in global cocoa production. We have therefore made sustainable cocoa a pillar of our company’s ambitious growth strategy, and accelerated our longtime efforts to ensure sustainable cocoa production. Our newest initiative, ‘Cocoa Horizons,’ is the most ambitious and far reaching sustainability program in Barry Callebaut’s history,” said CEO, Barry Callebaut AG, Juergen B. Steinemann. The initiative builds on Barry Callebaut’s proven Quality Partner Program (QPP) for cocoa farmer cooperatives. Launched in 2005, and currently engaging more than 40,000 farmers in Côte d’Ivoire and Cameroon, QPP was the first program of its kind to emphasise quality improvement goals for cocoa as well as farming practices. Barry Callebaut’s Cocoa Horizons initiative comprises three edifices. They are: Farmer Practices – Enabling farmers to boost farm productivity and cocoa quality through Barry Callebaut’s training programs in yield enhancement techniques and sustainable cocoa production, and to be eligible for independent certification according to multiple cocoa sustainability standards. Farmer Education – Improving access to education in cocoa farming communities and promoting a cocoa curriculum and other actions to develop the next generation of young cocoa farmers. Farmer Health – Improving access to basic healthcare and clean water in cocoa farming communities to contribute to the well-being of farming families. Barry Callebaut estimates that by 2020 the global cocoa and chocolate industry will need an additional 1 million metric tonnes of cocoa to meet the rising demand for chocolate, driven by markets in Asia, Eastern Europe and the Americas.

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Bakeries Becoming

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The bakery industry in India has been playing a crucial role in the industrial development of the country. With rapid economic growth and evolving eating habits of people, bakery products have gained popularity among the classes and as well as the masses. The sector which was typically said to consists of cakes, breads and biscuits, has adopted innovative recipes and novel products in a big way. The Indian bakery industry’s market size was pegged at $4.7 billion in 2010 and it is expected to reach $7.6 billion by 2015, according to a report titled Indian Bakery Industry (2011-15), designed by IS Advisors and published by Market Publishers. However, the rapid progress of the industry would be possible only with the further spread of new technology in the Indian bakery industry. India has taken rapid strides on this front. Indian bakery industry is being taken to adoption of new technology and new ingredients. Line baking is now the order of the day. Ashok Malkani takes a look at the latest machinery and technology in the bakery industry. 16

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BAKERY REVIEW “Baker, baker, bake me a bread….in your new computerised oven” would be the nursery rhyme that the modern school kid is likely to chime. Computerisation and other new technologies are making inroads in almost all industries and bakery sector of India is also not lagging behind in this computer age. Presently, the Indian bakery industry is the largest of the Indian food processing industries, estimated to be over Rs.7000 crore. It is experiencing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of over 15 percent. And it is common knowledge that the Indian bakery industry, despite the increasing usage of sophisticated technologies, is predominantly unorganised in character. About 75 percent of the total production in the bakery sector is accounted by the unorganised sector. Not so long ago, the bakery products were considered as sick man’s diet in India, but now they have emerged as essential food items for a significant proportion of our population. In India, the market for the bakery products had seen a big change in the later half of the 20th century. One of the reasons for this was the growing urbanisation followed by globalisation, which fostered lifestyle changes with working couples, rising disposable incomes and less and less time for cooking. All these caused an increase in demand for ready-to-eat products with not so exorbitant prices. And bakery products were and still are by and large ready-to-eat products. At the same time, the growing health concerns in the society have given a fillip to the healthy bakeries. No wonder, the last two decades have seen the mushrooming of bakery units in the metros and various other cities of India. Not only that a great many hotels, restaurants and food manufacturers are coming out with bakery outlets and bakery products.

Indian bakery industry is the growing health consciousness in the society. “With lifestyles and eating habits of the consumers undergoing rapid change, the Indian bread industry comprising wheat, multigrain and soya breads is experiencing a growth rate of 15-20 percent per annum,” asserted Pankaj Agarwal, the Operations Head, Britannia Industries Ltd. The current scenario reflects great potential for the bakery industry. But with new opportunities for growth comes new challenges too. “As the present generation are opting for new-age bakery products, which are appealing to taste as well as convenience, the Indian

S T O R Y

bakery industry is facing the challenge to update the information, technology, products and services in order to cater to the changing needs of the Indian consumers,” explained Ramesh Mago, MD, Kitty Industries, and a member of All India Bread Manufacturers’ Association. As the unorganised sector of the bakery industry often lacks the financial muscle to adopt new technology and infrastructure, they are likely to be left behind in the market, which sadly seem to be dominated by the large domestic and international bakery players, which include both retail and industrial bakeries, in the near future.

Health, Taste and Convenience Experts from the industry reveal that the Indian consumers are going in for more convenience foods and that they are now preferring healthy bakery products. One of the key factors for opting for convenience foods, according to them, is the time constraint. As discussed before, one of the factors influencing the rapid growth of the

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Hygiene Fostering Technology With the growing health consciousness spreading through the society, the importance of hygiene has also gained ground. Knowing the importance of hygiene, the bakery industry is making concerted efforts for technological innovations and new processes. The strict hygiene requirements have fuelled a new generation of bakery equipment, which are suitable for wet cleaning, and clean environment in bakeries has in turn resulted in longer shelf-life of bakery products. Recently, we are witnessing that many bakery equipment manufacturers are offering central nervous system (CNS) based bakery equipment, which are facilitating better hygienic processing conditions than before. Head gear, gloves, face mask, aprons, and disinfected towels are gaining currency in the Indian bakery industry. However, there are always two sides of the same coin. Though we are seeing more spic and span bakeries than ever before, but still the Indian bakers by and large, are not considering maintenance of hygiene in their bakery outlet/s as one of their chief priorities. Not only the changing tastes and growing importance towards hygiene among their potential consumers but also the paucity of skilled manpower have encouraged many bakery outlets to go in for new-age technologies. Along with adoption of new technologies has emerged the trend of uniformity of recipes and growing concern for food safety. NS Krishnamoorthi, General Manager, Speciality Fats Division for Nutrela Bakery Services brand of Ruchi Soya, the globalisation has led to the introduction of foreign bakery recipes in India, which are getting popular in the country. He viewed that organised players in the Indian bakery industry should help the unorganised bakers, rather than depending on the nodal agencies and government for the development of the industry.

New-Age Equipment and Technology In India, these days basic bakery equipment like spiral mixer, which include both stationery bowl spiral mixer & removable bowl spiral mixer, dough spiral mixer scrapper, folding equipment,

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BAKERY REVIEW bread deepener, check weighers, bread dough divider, carton sealing machine, horizontal flow wrap, high pressure burners for bakery ovens, bread slicer, metal detectors, laminators, dough distributors, biscuit grinders, milk spray units, cross pushers, hybrid ovens, swivel panner, among others are generating high demand. Along with these, the bakery industry of India is also adopting many modern bakery equipment like planetary mixers, rack ovens, deck ovens, dough moulders, hydraulic dividers, volumetric dividers, dough spiral mixers, etc. in not so small way. The Indian bakery industry is showing a growing preference for semiautomatic processing machines. However, modern technology doesn’t only entail new-age machineries; it also means employing new techniques to

do the same work, in order to increase efficiency and reduce costs. Along with new machinery, new techniques are also getting introduced in the Indian bakery industry. In nearly all European countries, the line production of baked products is gaining currency, while the number of traditional craft bakeries is decreasing. In the UK, line production is predominant in the bakeries, and in Germany it is fast becoming a norm among bakeries. The southern Europe countries are also showing such a trend. Is there any reason why Indian bakeries should be left behind? The growing popularity of line production has brought about modifications in traditional baking technology. The global trend in the

organised bakery sector is to process more and more ingredients through computer controlled baking systems in closed tubes, thereby generating greater demand for liquid raw materials. More and more bread improvers are already being offered as oil-based and waterbased ingredients, so that they can be automatically processed. This is the one of the reasons for industrial bakeries to replace margarine with liquid oils for certain products. The processing of liquid yeast and glucose has also become standard in industrial bakery establishments. New methods of continuous kneading are in line with the line production. Continuous kneading is mostly employed in production lines which involve a high output of a limited number of products. Deep-frozen products can be the ideal platforms to use continuous kneading process. The traditional tunnel ovens are still largely used for industrial line production but multi-level ovens based on thermooil are gaining market share in mediumsized bakeries, which are characterised by space constraint and a large range of products. In the recent years, we are seeing the emergence of fully automatic ovens which bakes according to customer demand and maintains the warmth of baked goods in a self-service display. Like most modern machines, these machines are also simple to operate and maintain. On an average, they require a very short operator handling time for each tray that is being inserted into the oven for baking. The combination of vacuum cyclocooling and vacuum enthalpy cooling, according to manufacturers, provides some decisive advantages to the bakery’s production process. It enables the adaptation of the cooling process to a wider variety of products, the separate control of the moisture content in crumb and crust, and a significant reduction in water loss. Further advantages of the new technology include its remarkably low aroma losses and reduced acrylamide. Consumer research has revealed that the most important factor which influences the purchasing decisions of consumers in bakeries is the freshness of baked goods. No wonder, we are witnessing the global trend of bake-off

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BAKERY REVIEW stations; integrated into supermarkets and bakery units. There has also been a shift towards Teflon-coated materials from the conventional silicone-coated surfaces.

Infusion of Enzymes Bread is one of the most important bakery products. As far as breads are concerned, the infusion of enzymes is increasing in the bakery industry. The enzymes are crucial elements of living processes. In order to increase the shelf-life of breads and to manufacture light high breads from various grains not usually used in bread making, the new bread making recipes are involving enzymes instead of chemicals. Maltogenic alpha amylase is a commonly used enzyme, which can enhance the shelf life of breads. It prevents recrystalisation of starch which enables the bread to stay soft for longer periods, thereby increasing its sales potential. However, the Indian breads are still not experiencing a diversity of enzymes. “In Indi, currently only one enzyme known as alpha-amaylsis is being allowed in the manufacturing of bread,” informed Ramesh Mago. The scenario in Europe and the US is vastly different. There a variety of enzymes are being considered in the bread manufacturing process. Trans-fat dilemma is also one of the major challenges of the Indian bakery industry. Thankfully, the use of transfats in bakeries is declining. This has encouraged scientists to go for trans-fat free alternatives to hydrogenated fats. With the growing health consciousness, healthy ingredients are likely to be a priority for the Indian bakers.

Smart Packaging is the Key Packaging of bakery products has also taken a new turn. It has not only been playing a significant part in increasing the shelf life, preventing mechanical damage, preserving nutrition value, and displaying food safety related warnings but also in facilitating the marketing of the products. That is, the given packaging must be attractive and economical at the same time, and needs to be closely interlinked with production, preservation, storage, transportation, and marketing of the product. Today the consumer expectations

Feb-Mar ’12

from packaging of bakery products have increased manifolds. The consumers expect the package should not only ensure the protection of the product and show its price but should also give useful information about the contents, methods of use, storage conditions, date of manufacture and the expiry date of the product, nutritional considerations, etc. These days packaging, especially the packaging of bakery products, seem to incorporate the elements of science, art and technology in its applications. These days the most common type of packaging material for bakery products like biscuits, breads and cakes is flexible packaging through laminates and wrappers. The zig zag fissures at the end

of the packs have made the packaging of these products quite consumer-friendly. Earlier with plain end packaging one needed to struggle to open the pack. Tear tape at the top of packing in some cases also enables the bakery products to be opened like a thread and facilitates the consumers to open a packet to its required length. Vertical pouches or sachets have also been introduced by some bakery manufacturers. The aluminium foil food containers in the bakery market are also getting appreciated by the consumers, as they help to deliver consumers fresh, wholesome and quickly accessible products. We all know that bakery products often get vulnerable to chemical breakdown and mould growth. Packed pastries and breads may also be subjected to fermentation. Mould growth could be prevented through preservatives and additives, and also by packaging the baked product in an atmosphere where

S T O R Y

oxygen content is minimised. Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) can increase the shelf lives, and thereby facilitates to preserve the quality of the bakery products, and makes them more cost-effective. MAP, despite being a costly proposition, is widely being used to prevent or lower the incidence of spoilage of food products, and its usage is appropriate for breads, pastries and pies. The trend of active packaging, which entails a large group of packaging modifications for increasing the shelf life of food products through modifying the environment around the food products, so as to delay and/or prevent the growth of microorganisms, is becoming vogue in the bakery industry. Examples of active packaging germane to the bakery industry include moisture absorbers, oxygen-scavenging systems, antimicrobial incorporated directly into the packaging matrix; controlled release of antimicrobials or antioxidants, etc. For example, oxygen absorbers can increase the lifespan of a white bread to 45 days. The oxygen absorbers can also enable one year storage for gluten-free breads and a shelf life extension of three times on gas packaged crusty rolls. You can have sachet-type oxygen absorbers which are based on the latest biotechnology, comprising nothing but the natural food grade components. By and large, active packaging involves introducing agents into the package which can either interact directly with the spoilage organisms or interact with the environment inside the package. One can say that bakeries in India are getting modernised with the introduction of new equipment, new range of products, new processes, and novel forms of packaging. All these have the potential to increase productivity, cost-effectiveness and quality of bakery products in India, in the short as well as long run. And at the same time, the bakeries which wouldn’t be able to keep pace with these new and fast evolving trends are very likely to lose the race, and even have to shut shop in some cases. Riding on health, hygiene and technology, the modern age of bakeries in India has arrived in a big way…

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Breads Roll Through Time Human beings have a long-lasting relationship with breads. According to many food historians, bread was first made in 10,000 BC, when human civilisation was at its infancy. Since then, with the passage of subsequent millennia, bread making techniques spread throughout the world and evolved according to the local customs, local cuisines and local grains. Today you have a wide variety of breads on your table. Many Mumbai people used to have brun (brittle rounded bread) maska (butter) for breakfast at the local Irani bakery, and many of them still do. They may have pizza or kheema (mincemeat) pao (local bread) for lunch, and possibly, Indian bread for dinner. When the first bread was baked, who would have imagined that it would, in the future, have so many varieties to choose from? Today, globally, there are over125 types of breads. Ashok Malkani takes a look at some of these breads. 20

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BAKERY REVIEW “A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread—and Thou Beside me singing in the Wilderness— Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!” So wrote Omar Khayyam, denoting the importance of a loaf of bread even in those times. The story of bread and cake began with neolithic cooks and marches through the post-modern era of the twenty-first century with hardly any sign of abatement. History has proved that civilisations are unable to continue without breads for a sustained period. Bread is a staple food, which is arrived at by cooking a dough of flour and water. Often this concoction is infused with additional ingredients. Doughs are usually baked, but in some cultures and cuisines, breads come as steamed, fried, or baked on an un-oiled frying pan. Salt, fat and leavening agents such as yeast and baking soda are the common ingredients of bread. Breads may be leavened or unleavened. Leavening is the process of adding gas to a dough before or during the baking process in order to create a lighter, and more easily chewed version

Feb-Mar ’12

of bread. Some of the oldest breads in history are the flatbreads which include pita, naan, lavash, lefse and tortillas. These delicious and versatile flat breads are quick to cook, and originated in places were there was scarcity of fuel. They are usually baked in portable clay ovens known as tandoors. Generally, a loaf of bread is made from wheat-flour dough that is cultured with yeast, then allowed to rise, and eventually baked in an oven. However, breads are also being made from the flour of other wheat species like durum, spelt and emmer, and also from rye, barley, maize, and oats, and they are usually but not always, prepared in combination with wheat flour. There is a wide variety of breads made from different grains.

Broadly Bread Types White bread is comprised of wheat flour from which the bran and the germ are being removed through milling. Milling endows a longer shelf life to white flour

through removing the bran and germ. Removing the oil in germ facilitates the white bread to be stored for comparitively longer periods than it would have been if oil was not removed. Besides, the flour used in white bread is often bleached with potassium bromate or chlorine dioxide gas in order to eliminate the presence of slight yellow colour and make

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its baking properties more predictable. Though milling process helps to enhance the shelf life of white flour, it does away with nutrients like dietary fibre, iron, B vitamins and micronutrients. Brown bread is referred to as bread made with large amounts of whole grain flour, usually rye or wheat, and sometimes with dark-coloured ingredients such as molasses or coffee. In the Canada and the US, the brown breads are mostly known as whole wheat breads. Wholewheat bread is a type of bread made using flour that is partly or entirely made from whole or almost-whole wheat grains. Here it deserves a mention that whole wheat flours that contain raw wheat germ instead of toasted germ, contain higher levels of glutathione, and thereby leads to lower loaf volumes. With the rising health consciousness spearheading through the society, the whole wheat breads are gaining popularity in India. Then there are wholemeal breads which contain the whole of the wheat grain (endosperm and bran). In North America, this bread is also referred to as whole-grain or whole-wheat bread. Wholemeal bread has comparatively higher mineral and vitamin content than the white bread, as the former doesn’t eliminate the bran and

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BAKERY REVIEW

germ from the wheat. The calorie composition for commercial whole wheat bread is as follows: Quantity served

Total number of calories

1 slice

69

100 gm

246

1oz

70

One slice of commercial whole wheat bread contains 71 percent carbohydrates, 14 percent fats and 15 percent proteins. Estimated fibre carbs for each slice of whole wheat bread is about 11.00 gm. Following are the other ‘commercial whole wheat bread’ nutrition facts, when serving size is 1 normal slice.

made from a mixture of wholemeal, white or rye flour and may contain wheat germ, honey, gluten, non-fat milk solids, cracked and whole grains of wheat and other cereals such as rye, oats, corn, barley, rice millet and triticale. Varied choices of multigrain breads can be arrived at through blending of various grains, fruits, nuts, morsels of vegetables, seeds, and spices. There are basically two types of multigrain breads —light multigrain breads and heavy multigrain breads. Light multigrain breads have an openness like that of the white breads, and is characterised with small kibbled grains, oats or other wheat mixed through the breads. The essential features of heavy multigrain breads are small volume, dense texture and a high grain content. Light multigrain breads simulate the white breads in terms of composition; heavy multigrain breads have similar or greater density than wholemeal breads. The kibbled bread has kibbled grain or the grain which has been grind into small particles. Many types of grains can be infused to get the kibbled bread. Before mixing the grains, the grains need to be soaked in water for several hours because unsoaked grain in bread doesn’t make for a pleasant chewing experience. This bread also needs extra gluten to add strength to the dough so that it can hold up the extra weight of the grains. Wholemeal bread made from rye or an amalgamation of rye and wheat flour is called a rye bread. It was first manufactured in Europe and comes in various shapes and styles. Here it deserves a mention that rye flour and ordinary flour are not the same thing. Rye flour has only small amounts of dough strengthening proteins, and thus it produces weak dough. Rye flour is also saddled with more amylase enzyme,

Name of Element

Proportion

Name of Element

Proportion

Total fat Sodium Total carbs Sugars Protein Saturated fat

1.18 gm 148 mg 12.90 gm 1.56 gm 2.72 gm 0.257 gm

Cholesterol Potassium Dietary fibre Vitamin A Vitamin C Monounsaturated fat

0 71 mg 1.9 gm 0 0 0.46 gm

As the name suggests, different types of whole grains make up for a multigrain bread. Mixed or multigrain breads are

which breaks down starch into sugars. Rye doughs involve less water than dough from ordinary flour, and as such

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BAKERY REVIEW they are tight and retain their shape. Moulding, proving and baking in rye breads also required to be modified so as to handle the weak, sticky dough. Conventionally, the making of rye breads goes through several proving stages for increasing the acidity and eliminating the amylase, which prevents the bread from becoming sticky. The sour dough method is the most popular traditional method of making the rye bread. Chapatti, naan, roti, parantha are examples of our good old Indian breads. The Indian breads comprise a wide variety of flatbreads and crepes. They are essential elements of a diverse array of Indian cuisines. While most of these breads originated in India, the origin of naan can be traced to Central Asia.

The Flat, Round and Stick Breads There are a number of other popular breads or bread-based dishes available across the globe. Some of them are given below: Pita is a soft and thin flatbread of middle-eastern origin, perhaps the oldest breads known to the humankind. They are the basis for a number of popular dishes, the most notable of them being pizza. A variety of rolled sandwiches are also based on pita bread. According to the book An A to Z of Food and Drink, “Pitta (or pita or pitah...) Is a flat, roughly oval, slightly leavened type of bread characteristic of Greece and the Middle East. Typically eaten slit open and stuffed with filling, it became a familiar sight on the supermarket shelves of Britain and the USA in the last quarter of the twentieth century.” Lavash is also a popular flat bread option. The origin of this Armenian cracker bread is also ancient. Long ago

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this bread was popular in Caucasus and the neighboring middle-eastern regions, where it still is. Its timeless recipe has undergone very less change over the centuries. This leavened thin crisp bread usually made with wheat flour, germinates from tandoor and is ideally served with kebabs. Lavash can also be partaken as wraps. It can be stored for a long period and comes in a variety of shapes. Focaccia is a flat bread option from Italy, which over the years have gained global recognition. It is an yeasted bread dough, which is often mixed with oil, herbs or onion. Topped with olive oil, spices and other products, it is believed to be an early version of modern pizza. This oven-baked bread is characterised with a fairly dense structure and can be easily served with a wide variety of additions, ranging from olives baked into the bread to rosemary sprinkled on the top. The ancient recipe of this bread, according to many food historians, did owe its origins with the Etruscans or the ancient Greeks. Bagel, which is a popular bread product in the US, Canada, the UK and in Australia, is traditionally shaped by hand from yeasted wheat dough into the form of a hand-sized ring, which is first boiled for a short time in water and then baked. The essential feature of bagel is a chewy and doughy interior, which is complemented by a crisp exterior sometimes. Often bagels are topped with seeds baked on the outer crust. Some bagels also have salt sprinkled on their surface. Though the history of bagel, like many other popular food items, is tangled in debate, but many modern food historians believe that bagel was perhaps originated in Poland, during the 17th century. However, Maria Balinska in her

book titled The Bagel: The Surprising History of a Modern Bread, traces the origin of the family of bagel-type breads to medieval Italy. A baguette is a long thin loaf of French bread generally known in English as ‘French stick’, or as ‘French loaf ’. However, this hard crusty loaf didn’t originate in France; it was invented by the bakers of Vienna during the industrial revolution. Steam ovens were responsible for the manufacturing of this type of bread.

The Enduring Appeal All said and done, you can love bread, you can hate bread but there is very little chance that you can afford to ignore this essential element of human civilisation. Since its invention, bread has become the staple food in almost every diet of the world. Bread has gone through myriad recipes, shapes and methods of baking throughout history. Wars had been fought over land which grew grains, used to make breads. The enduring appeal of the breads is perhaps because of its extreme flexibility to adopt to any diet. Breads can accommodate so many different shapes and recipes catering to every taste and needs. They can be had with every meal of the day, and could be sumptuous options to have with snacks. What about sandwiches or bread omlette for breakfast, a huge pizza or some naans for lunch, scrumptious bread rolls as evening snacks, rotis for dinner, and bread and milk for supper? I am sure the package tastes not all that bad. All of these eating options require bread. Succinctly, bread has been gracing tables across the globe since the realms of antiquity, and most probably would continue to do so in the centuries to come. Bread is often regarded as being mainly responsible for weight gain when consumed in large quantities and along with foods laden with proteins and fats. However, if bread is being prepared with certain healthy ingredients and is being had in moderate quantities in our daily diet, then it can play a huge role towards a healthy lifestyle. Breads can cover half of our necessary calorie intake. One can say that over the centuries breads are being praised and derided, but their essential role in our diets cannot be overlooked… 

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Not Just Food, it is

Superfood! By Sharmila Chand

F

irst let us begin with the basics. Yogurt, also known as yoghurt, is a dairy product generated by bacterial fermentation of milk. The bacteria used for creating yogurts are known as ‘yogurt cultures.’ These bacteria do ferment the lactose to generate lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yogurt its texture and its characteristic tang. Yogurt substitutes can be made from soya milk. Yogurt is not merely a food but can be construed as a superfood. It has a healthy base of dairy protein and calcium, teeming with billions of friendly bacteria.

The Health Benefits With the pleasant taste and creamy texture of yogurt, you also get vitamins, fibre, essential fatty acids and antioxidants. Yogurt is extremely nutritionally rich and is spruced with protein, calcium, riboflavin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12. It is one of the few edible items in the world which tastes great and is great for health as well. Yes, we all know the fact that yogurt with fruits is delicious and healthy. Even if you are unable to drink milk, you can enjoy yogurt. Even for lactose-intolerant people the enjoyment of yogurt is often without side effects. The apparent reason for this is that the live yogurt cultures contain enzymes which facilitate to break down lactose inside the intestine. It contains more calcium and protein than milk because of the presence of added cultures. As yogurt has good calcium content, it is a good food for developing strong bones. It is said that people having the risk of osteoporosis should eat at least one serving of yogurt per day. Yogurt can also facilitate to strengthen the immune system. Research has revealed that yogurt boosts and stabilises the immune system. Besides stabilising the immune system, the presence of lactobacillus in yogurt feeds the intestine, maximises nutrients that you can absorb into your constitution, and facilitates the digestive system to stay healthy. Yogurts are also good for cardio-vascular health. Studies on human beings have unearthed reduction in blood-pressure with the intake of fermented milks. Adding specific whey proteins or a unique patented grape seed extract might offer further reductions.

Add More Yogurt to Everyday Diet • You can replace mayonnaise and salad dressings with yogurt. • It is advisable to replace ice cream and milkshake with frozen yogurt and mixed fruit yogurt smoothie. • Make dips with yogurt instead of sour-cream. • Try using yogurt cheese instead of cream cheese. • Use yogurt to marinate meat and poultry.

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“The idea of making Baked Yogurt came from bhapa doi (a traditional Bengali dessert). So I enriched the milk content by adding milk powder and baked it eventually, garnishing with dry nuts. It’s a perfect recipe for summer and one can take out sugar from it for a healthier dessert option and add Stevia (a natural sweetener) to it.” By Chef Vishal Atreya, Executive Sous Chef, The Imperial New Delhi

Yogurt comes in three forms— regular, low-fat and skim. Low-fat and skim yogurt are ideal for people with a cholesterol lowering diet or who are keeping their weights in check. These yogurts do not lead to increase in the blood cholesterol levels.

The Mystery of History of Yogurt The history of yogurt is lost in the realms of antiquity. Many countries claim that yogurt was discovered by them, though there is no clear evidence of its place of origin. But there is no denying the fact that though obscure, yogurt has a rich history, which complements its rich taste. The history of cultured milk products being produced as food dates back to third millennium BC. The earliest yogurts were perhaps the products of spontaneous fermentation by wild bacteria, which existed and thrived on the goat skin bags carried by the Bulgars (or HunnoBulgars), a nomadic people who began migrating into Europe in the 2nd century AD and eventually settled in the Balkans, some five hundred years later, at the end of the 7th century.

Varieties of Yogurts Strained yogurts, which include Greek yogurt, chakka from India, and Bulgarian yogurt, are yogurts which are strained through a paper or cloth filter; traditionally made of muslin, in order to remove the whey. This makes these yogurts endow with a thicker consistency and a distinctive, slightly sour taste. Some types of strained yogurts are boiled in open vats first, so that the liquid content is reduced. Dadiah or dadih is a traditional yogurt from west Sumatra. It is sourced from water buffalo milk, and undergoes fermentation in bamboo tubes. Labneh yogurt, as the name suggests has come from Lebanon. It is a thick yogurt, which can be ideally used for sandwiches along with additions like olive oil, various green herbs, and cucumber slices. This yogurt can be thickened further and rolled into balls, preserved in olive oil, and fermented for a few more weeks. It is not infrequently had with onions, meat, and nuts as a stuffing for a variety of Lebanese pies or Kebbeh balls. Rahmjoghurt is a creamy yogurt with high milk fat content of 10 percent. It has higher milk fat content than most yogurts

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which are savoured in English-speaking countries. This yogurt is available in Germany and other countries.

Yogurt-based Drinks For yogurt-based drinks we do not have to go far. Our very own lassi is a yogurt-based beverage. Then there is a salty yogurt-based drink called ayran, which is popular in Azerbaijan, Turkey, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. The drink has a very simple recipe. It is made by mixing yogurt with water and then adding salt. However, ayran by other names is popular in other countries too. This drink is known as tan in Armenia, in Syria and Lebanon it is known by the name of laban ayran, in Jordon it is known as shenina. In South India also this drink is popular by the name of moru, and in Iraq this drink is known as laban arbil. Doogh, a similar drink to ayran, is popular in the MiddleEast; between Lebanon and Iran. The differentiating factor between doogh and ayran is that the former involves infusion of herbs, usually mint, and doogh is carbonated, usually with seltzer water. Yoghurt smoothie or drinkable yoghurt are the names under which yogurt-based beverages are frequently marketed in the US. Yogurts are also popular in Ecuador where the primary form of yogurt is bebida de yogurt.

Recipe By Chef Vishal Atreya, Executive Sous Chef, The Imperial New Delhi Name of the Dish: Baked Yogurt Ingredient

Quantity

Unit

Hung Curd

300

GM

Heavy Cream (elle&vire)

200

GM

Milk Powder

100

GM

If milk powder is not available please use condensed milk

200

GM

Saffron (optional)

Few threads

Method: 1) Take a mixing bowl and mix together the cream, hung curd and milk powder. 2) Leave it for 3-4 minutes at room temperature. 3) Transfer the mixture to a small oven proof ceramic bowl. 4) Bake in the oven at 140˚centigrade for 35- 40 minutes. 5) Leave it to cool in a chiller and serve after garnishing with fresh mint leaves, pistachio, dry nuts, etc. Note: At least 700 gm of curd is required to get 300 gm of hung curd.

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Sweetness From Bitter Source W

e all love chocolates. Whether you are young or old, rich or poor, whether you are from the east or west, north or south, there is a high likelihood that chocolates are one of your favourite things. This dark candy enjoys popularity across all age groups, region and class. One can say that chocolate has a universal appeal. However, not many know that this sweet and silky sensation has a very bitter source. It reects the irony and latent humour that life often presents us with, and which we are often unable to appreciate. The chocolates of the world owe their birth to the cocoa beans, which are dried and fully fermented fatty seeds of the cacao trees. The seeds of cacao tree are intensely bitter in taste. The cultivation of cacao can be traced back to around 1100 BC. The tropical rainforests of South America, Mexico and Central America have been the traditional cultivators of cacao tree. Though the commercial production of chocolates is a twentieth century happening, the history of chocolates dates much beyond a mere hundred years. The etymology of chocolate would reveal their rich history. The word chocolate has a Spanish origin, and it made its way to the Spanish vocabulary through a circuitous maze of history.

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Etymology and Source The original source of the word is disputed in academic circles, but one of the plausible explanations is that the word chocolate has its seeds in Nahuatl —the language of the Aztecs— the ethnic group who lived and ruled in central Mexico during 14th-16th century. It is widely believed that the Nahuatl word ‘xocolatl’ is the original source from which the word chocolate was derived. Interestingly in Nahuatl, ‘xocolatl’ meant sour or bitter water or drink. Xocolatl was a beverage among the Aztec people, and was believed to fight fatigue. The drink was bitter because it was produced from crushed cocoa beans. Xocolatl was primarily popular amongst the upper class of the populace. Since then, after much culinary metamorphosis, we have arrived at the sensually sinful chocolates of today. The kinds of cacao trees from which the cocoa beans are procured, contributes to the quality of the chocolates. Criollo trees produce the rarest variety of the perfumed beans, whereas the Forastero trees produce the most widely available variety. The Criollo trees produce cocoa beans of very high quality. They are primarily cultivated in South and Central America. However, their yield is fairly low. Criollo beans are often mixed with other varieties of cacao while making chocolate. The Forastero is widely cultivated in Africa, but is also seen in Central and South America. It caters to near about 80 percent of the global production of cacao. This tree grows faster and gives higher yield than other types of cacao. The third variety of tree, Trinitario, is

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the hybrid of Criollo and Forastero. It produces beans with aroma similar to that of the beans of Criollo and contains the characteristics of both Criollo and Forastero. The trees of Trinitario are found mostly in Central America, South America, and Asia. The chocolate makers of Switzerland have earned the reputation of using the best raw materials. Belgium is also known for producing good quality pralines (finely blended chocolates with different kinds of fillings), and chocolates all over the world. However, well equipped and knowledgeable chocolate manufacturers of any place with attention to the fine details of chocolate making are capable of producing good quality chocolates. Nowadays, there is a variety of chocolates on offer, to cater to a diversified palate. Not all chocolates are sweet. Pure, unsweetened chocolate contains primarily cocoa solids and cocoa butter in varying proportions. Sweet chocolates are mostly an amalgamation of chocolate and sugar in its most basic form. Milk chocolate is sweet chocolate that additionally contains milk powder or condensed milk. Sweet milk chocolates are the most popular among the people across India.

Preparation The process of chocolate preparation is exhaustive. Cocoa beans are fermented for two to eight days in baskets after their harvest. The fermentation process, which brings the pulp’s fruity undertones to the foreground, takes longer for producing some high quality chocolates. The beans are properly dried before shipping them to the chocolate manufacturers. At the manufacturing plants, the beans again undergo processing as they are roasted and cracked. The winnower removes the shells of the beans to separate the nibs. The nibs are then grounded and liquefied to produce chocolate liquor. Chocolate liquor is then again processed to separate cocoa butter from cocoa solids. Blending the different elements of the cocoa beans and adding sweetening ingredients, chocolate makers create chocolates of different tastes and flavours. There are however three basic types of chocolates available in the

market —dark chocolate, milk chocolate and white chocolate. Of the three, white chocolate does not contain cocoa liquor. It is a confection created by blending sugar, cocoa butter, milk and vanilla. Presence of chocolate liquor is dominant in dark chocolates. Suitable proportions of sugar, cocoa butter and vanilla are mixed to create the tastes of dark chocolates. Milk chocolates are created by mixing sugar, cocoa butter, milk powder, cocoa liquor and vanilla in right proportions. Concentration of chocolate and cocoa butter is the highest in dark chocolates, followed by milk chocolates and white chocolates respectively. Soon after the appropriate blending, chocolates undergo the process of conching and tempering. The conches grind the gritty texture of the liquid chocolate to give it a smooth feel. Depending on the desired quality, the grinding process generally takes six to seventy two hours. Before sending the conched chocolate mass for the final process of tempering, it is heated to around 45-50o C in a tank. Tempering is the final stage in the process of manufacturing of chocolates. Tempering is important for producing the right texture and flavour of the chocolate. The process of tempering makes the small crystals of cocoa butter consistent by breaking the suspension in the chocolate mass, and makes the crisp bite and glossy appearance of the chocolates possible. Pix Courtesy: Dobla BV

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The Ingredients of Success By Swarnendu Biswas AB Mauri is a global food ingredients’ company headquartered in London. Among food ingredients, AB Mauri has achieved particular distinction in the manufacturing and distribution of fresh bakers’ yeast and other wide range of fresh and dry bakery ingredients, industrial vinegar, flavours, emulsions and allied products. In fact, AB Mauri has more than 100 years of expertise in yeast extracts and specialty yeast products, and has achieved a pioneering status in the realm of manufacturing of yeast and yeast derivatives. The multinational, which has production facilities across Europe, the US, Asia and Australia, is also engaged in the blending and distribution of herbs and spices, and dry sauce mixes and its many other products in over sixty countries across the globe. The UK-based multinational operates in 64 countries, and has a fairly widespread Indian presence, with 12 sales offices and warehouses strategically located across the country to meet the demands and to ensure a constant supply of its wide range of products to the markets. The corporate headquarters of AB Mauri India Pvt. Ltd. is located in Bangalore. At AB Mauri baking is a science and an art, and a passion. This same zeal is reflected in AB Mauri India’s operations too. “The science behind the art of baking is the heart and soul of our business, where our expertise and capabilities cut across the entire gamut

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of bakery applications. Driven by our passion for bakery ingredients and based on our intimate and in depth knowledge of the bakery industry and bakery ingredients, we have perfected the art and science of baking,” elaborated Binu Varghese, the Executive Director, AB Mauri India Pvt. Ltd.

Facilitating the Bakery Industry Today, AB Mauri India, with its wide array of ingredients, flavours, seasonings, and emulsions on offer coupled with the zeal towards continual innovation and improvisation is committed to be the one-stop solution for the fast evolving bakery industry in India. “We want the Indians to enjoy high quality bakery products at par with the best of international standards available,” stated Varghese. No wonder, the fresh bakers’ yeast from AB Mauri India is benchmarked against the best yeasts available in the world. Varghese informed me that AB Mauri India supplies compressed yeast in three varieties, namely Bakers’ Yeast High Sugar, Bakers’ Yeast Low Sugar, and Distillery Yeast. “The former two have wide applications in the bakery industry,” Varghese explained. Besides compressed yeast, the company is also engaged in the

manufacturing and supplying of dry yeast in five varieties. The bread improvers/conditioners, cake mixes and bread mixes of AB Mauri India are also playing an important role in facilitating the bakery operations across the country. AB Mauri’s bread mixes are made with the very best selection of wheat for making the perfect flour that otherwise would require the knowledge and time to prepare it by hand. “AB Mauri’s cake mixes also provide an easy and readily available homemade option for chefs who are not accomplished bakers,” Varghese proffered.

The Growing Reach Some of the important clients of AB Mauri India are Britannia, ITC, Nestle, and Parle Foods. This select list is only a small sample of the huge clientele base of AB Mauri India. Haldiram’s in south India and Monginis in east India are among the important clientele of AB Mauri India. “Besides catering to a huge number of corporates, industrial bakeries, retail and stand-alone bakeries, QSRs like McDonald’s, Domino’s and Pizza Hut, hotels and restaurants, we also supply to café coffee outlets, which have mushroomed across the country in the

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is compared with the product once produced.

recent years,” informed Varghese. The reach of AB Mauri India is not limited to metropolitan and big cities only. “We have a fairly impressive distribution and dealers’ network in place that effectively covers nooks and corner of the country, which of course include small towns and villages,” he expressed. AB Mauri India had notched a turnover to the tune of Rs.180 crore in 201011, and is expecting a growth of 20-25 percent in 2011-12. “We are envisaging to increase the production capacity in all our existing factories,” pointed out Varghese, which amply indicates the demand for the company’s products across the Indian bakery industry.

Quality Research and Innovation However, AB Mauri India is not only engaged in producing and supplying quality ingredients to the bakery and food & beverage industry. “We are also engaged in providing technical assistance to the bakers and food scientists, in our endeavour to facilitate the bakery industry comprising bakers and emulsifiers to acquire the finer nuances of the art and science of baking,” asserted Varghese. It would not be an overstatement to say that the edifice of AB Mauri’s more than a century-long and continuing success story is research & development and innovation. For example, Kularomes is a unique innovation of AB Mauri that offers a single source advantage for colour, flavour and shelf life. It eliminates the hassles of achieving a perfect balance of colour and flavour, and has a unique feature of masking the off notes of other ingredients and improving the shelf life and texture of food products. To bring existing and new products with high performance and value, AB Mauri invests over US $40 million annually on research and development. This zeal towards research is also reflected in the Innovation Center in Bangalore. “We have established a R&D Centre in Bangalore two years back, where new trends and innovative ideas pertaining to ingredient preparation are being explored in great detail through our team of scientists and market analysts,” averred the corporate honcho, while displaying a remarkably unassuming personality. This Innovation Center in Bangalore reflects a great deal of creative consistency to cater

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Bakery is the Future

Binu Varghese

to the fast evolving needs of the bakery industry and is engaged in creation of new healthy ingredients. Presently, the center is working on sugarless ingredients for desserts among myriad other things. “Here we help the industry with ingredient solutions that enhance taste profiles, ensure product safety and stability, assure quality and saves cost too,” explained Varghese. Presently, the company has five production facilities in India; in Kalyani, near Kolkata, in Chiplun, near Mumbai, in Sikandrabad, near Delhi, in Bangalore, and also a spice manufacturing unit in Kochi. However, R&D is not only needed for creation of new products, but also on its existing product range. AB Mauri India’s Business Application Centre at Chiplun is engaged in R&D on the existing product range of the company. BAC, Chiplun has test bakeries manned by experts who ensure that the products of AB Mauri India perform to the industry’s expectations, assuring consistent quality, flavour & texture. This facility is well equipped with a world-class lab and R&D center. The facility facilitates to support the bakery and food & beverages industry with recipes, technical information and product application. BAC, Chiplun supports the production department by bake test of the product sample before it leaves the factory to achieve the required quality standards. These standards are regularly updated based on the requirement and feedback. The bake test is done with the control sample and the quality

I asked Varghese about the growing trend of healthy products in the Indian bakery industry, fostered by the spreading of health consciousness, rising disposable incomes and global awareness in the society. He considers it as a healthy trend, and expressed his satisfaction over the fact that AB Mauri is contributing to this trend. “We have healthy ingredients; spruced with fibre and vitamins and without unnecessary fat content, and through them we are contributing to a healthy bakery culture in India,” he opined. Varghese is extremely optimistic of the future of bakery industry in India. He rightly believes that the Indian society’s attitude towards bakery products has undergone a great change. Bakery products are no longer regarded only as the sick man’s diet in India, and the consumption of bakery products has increased manifolds over the years. In fact, in the later half of the twentieth century, the Indian bakery industry has received a great boost, largely because of the increasing demand for ready-to-eat products at affordable prices, and the momentum of that growth is continuing. According to him, bread has great potential to become a full-fledged meal in its own right. “A loaf of bread costs Rs.20, from which the whole family can derive one meal. Tell me, which other food item can provide a meal for the whole family in today’s India, at such minimal costs?” The thoughtful question from the smiling man left me groping unsuccessfully for a more affordable alternative to bread. “The present socioeconomic situation with working couples and less time for cooking demands a great role for ready-to-eat bakery products, and fed by this demand the bakery industry and the bakery ingredients industry are only expected to grow further,” explained Varghese. In such a growth scenario, it seems evident that competition in the Indian bakery and bakery ingredients industry would intensify further, and the players like AB Mauri, which thrives on research and cutting-edge innovations; expertise and quality are sure to have an edge over the competition. 

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Comfort Food Gets Haute and Healthy By Kavitha Srinivasa

C

omfort food and healthy food, which are commonly perceived as the two ends of the food spectrum, are now blending fast. All credit goes to some fine dining restaurants, high-end bakeries and fast food brands, which are merging the two with some tweaking and hints of imagination. They don’t miss any opportunity to woo the consumers as they scale up the health quotient with their unusual offerings. India is in the throes of a grand

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culinary experience, as restaurateurs and bakers are making an earnest effort to present comfort food in a lighter and healthier vein. Given the fact that woodfired pizzas are the latest addiction to a city’s foodscape, Via Milano, a finedining Italian restaurant has given the soft, easy pliable dough a healthy twist.

The Age of Healthy Pizzas The decision has predictably met with approval. “We have a customer base for whole wheat pizzas, wherein

most ingredients are nutritive and comparatively healthy. Even if we use yeast, we opt for whole wheat yeast,” said Roger Hessing, Partner, Via Milano, which has a presence in Bangalore and Hyderabad. “We make our pizza sauce from scratch by adding fresh basil, oregano, crushed black pepper, minced garlic and of course fresh tomatoes. This is the best way to ensure that it is healthy. A part skim mozzarella is used as a topping as it has less fat and fewer calories,” added Hessing. Toppings

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include fresh veggies and in case of non-vegetarian pizzas, lean meat is being used. This summer, the restaurant is planning to whip up a complete low calorie menu, as a nutritionist will be on board by then. While the pizzas will remain light and digestible, they may not have cheese at all. While pizza may not exactly be treated as health food, it certainly can be presented as a healthier option and helps keep a check on the cholesterol level and calorie count. “Pizza is generally seen as an indulgence; hence health concerns about having a pizza are generally relegated to the background by consumers and retailers. However, consumers tend to eat out more than before. In the case of convenience foods, the frequency of having that ‘one-time’ indulgence has gone up in urban India. As a result, the health aspect has now caught on with the consumers,” highlighted Pratichee Kapoor, Associate Vice-President, Food Services & Agriculture, Technopak Consultants. While the wow lip-smacking factor comes through comfort food, the ongoing gastronomic revolution holds tremendous promise for health food aficionados. Fast food brands like Domino’s have introduced healthier options to keep health conscious consumers coming to them. For instance, it launched ‘Wheat Thin Crust Pizza’ in 2010, positioned as a pizza for the health-conscious lot, with a choice of the fibre-rich, very thin and light crust versions. “Pizza Hut also has come up with a thin crust variant as part of its extensive menu,” added Pratichee. According to her, a brand that stands out in the ‘healthy fast food’ space is Subway, with its focus on fresh, low fat, healthy convenience food. During the last decade of its operations in India, the brand has grown steadily to reach 256 outlets in India. Traditionally, people have used ultra-nurturing food as an escape from stress and that is how they have gained and are still gaining weight. Most people binge on comfort food either for taste or for the sake of lifestyle. The layer, texture and buttery feel of these food products address emotional and gastronomic requirements. However, it means an expanding waistline and the thought of it leaves behind a bitter aftertaste. This is because these conventional comfort foods are either high in fat or sugar or both. Sugar and refined flour or maida are regarded as the worst forms of carbohydrate consumption. Nevertheless, with some tweaking in their product profiles, you can still satisfy your craving without unduly compromising your health.

The Right Infusions Brown bread and lettuce sandwich is always preferable to white bread with a mayonnaise spread. Yogurt with a dollop of honey is not only delicious but is also a coolant especially when the mercury level rises. And it is healthy too. Yogurt is a good source of protein, calcium, vitamin B6 and B12, and contains useful bacteria, which helps in digestion and improves the body’s immune system. “As a broad guideline, you can reduce the quantity of fat used in almost

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any dish by at least 50 percent. This can be done by adding or increasing the quantity of vegetables in the dish, so that at least some of the effects of high fat are mitigated,” felt Sheela Krishnaswamy, an independent diet, nutrition and wellness Consultant. Then, white flour or maida can be replaced with whole wheat flour, especially in breads, burger buns and pizza bases. Roasted or steamed foods can replace fried foods. “Add a salad to your plate along with the comfort food. Sugarbased sweets can be substituted with fresh fruits, served with pine nuts, apricots and a drizzle of honey,” elaborated Sheela, while sharing a tip or two. Overall, the accent is on enjoying great food without putting on a good deal of weight. Celebrity Chefs have also come out with nutritive recipes through TV shows and cookbooks. A case in the point is Seema Chandra, a well-known person in the food space who presents the Guilt Free show on NDTV. The show allows you to enjoy a little bit of everything, as Chandra dishes up something new every week. For instance, desserts are made with oats, and tiramisu can be shaped up as a low calorie variant.

Dark and Delightful As we move beyond this heady trail, we should also realise that certain kinds of

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BAKERY REVIEW chocolates too pack in quite a healthy punch. Chocolate brings to mind images of being sinfully sensuous and loaded with nuts. Many chocolatiers are endeavouring to change this mindset by creating dark and bitter variants of chocolates. The purpose is two-fold, these new-age chocolates are loaded with health benefits and at the same time satisfy taste buds as indulgent food option. Mumbai-based chocolatier Zeba Kohli, the creative mind behind Fantasie Fine Chocolates, never misses an opportunity to play the role of both a friendly host and an educator. “We conduct blind tastings of dark, milk and white chocolates with our friends and customers to gauge preferences. This helps generate awareness about the nuances of chocolates. We also focus on educating all clients, whilst placing orders, by offering complimentary samples and talk to them about dark chocolates,” explained Zeba, the Managing Director, Good Housekeeping Company Pvt. Ltd., which manufactures and markets chocolates under the brand name Fantasie Fine Chocolates. Zeba — the creative chocolatier — has developed an exquisite range of organic chocolates, just to drive home the point that chocolates can also be made in an organic form and that they are not just mood enhancers sought after for their aphrodisiac properties. “Indians have an inherent sweet tooth, and majority of them have grown up on Indian homemade sweets, which are very sweet! Our palates are usually drawn to milk and sweet desserts rather than aromatic, fragrant dark chocolates, whose flavour lingers in the mouth. It is an acquired taste but is gaining popularity in India,” explained Zeba, who has achieved the cult status in the creation of handmade chocolates. For the uninitiated, dark chocolates contain about 65 percent cocoa and bitter chocolates have approximately 70 percent cocoa. The cocoa content in these variants is more than that of the milk and sugar, which are relatively less expensive

ingredients than cocoa. This is why dark and bitter chocolates generally cost more than milk and white versions. As India is a price-sensitive market, dark chocolates are expected to have only a niche market, but in that niche market they are having promising appeal. In their own way, many enterprising choco entrepreneurs are making every effort to popularise dark and bitter versions of chocolates, which retain the characteristic delicacy of a chocolate. And for the right reason, of course. This is because dark chocolates contain substances like neurotransmitter serotonin, which acts as an antidepressant. “They contain chemicals called phenols that protect against heart disease and cancer,” highlighted Zeba, the chocolate artisan. That is not all. Dark chocolate also helps in regulating and maintaining blood pressure because of the presence of vital minerals in it like magnesium and copper. And dark chocolate has some cosmetic applications too, which this age with its great premium on looking great simply cannot afford to overlook. Dark chocolates are found to enhance the appearance and texture of skin and help protect it from sun damage, which gives a moisturised, smoother and better look. Along with independent chocolatiers, Indian branded chocolates have also created dark and bitter flavours for their discerning consumers. India’s ardent health conscious chocoholics can also check out international variants, considering the fact that foreign brands like Lindt, Hershey’s and Chocolate Stella have flooded the market with dark and bitter flavours, among others. However, being global brands they are priced higher than the locally available variants. But chocolate is now being viewed as luxury shopping and those with deep pockets are expected settle down for dark and bitter chocolates from these brands. So now is the time when you can chomp your way through a pizza teeming with delectable toppings or munch through a chocolate bar, and then top these delightful sensations with a cup of yogurt, and you are not likely to feel the weight of guilt of putting on weight. Comfort food no longer necessarily means guilt food. Welcome to the age of healthy comfort food, which is free of possible adverse health affects. 

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CHOCOLATE ACADEMY

FROZEN SNACKS

Unitas Foods is offering frozen snacks of Chinese origin. The range includes dimsums, manchurian, satay, chicken lollipops, wontons, and spring rolls. The products are manufactured in a stateof-the-art facility in Delhi. The centralised kitchen is fully automated to ensure hygienic production. All the raw materials used, with the exception of vegetables and meats, are imported from China, Singapore and Taiwan. For instant acceptance of its food in today’s brand crazy world, the

company has ensured on consistent food quality and taste. Unitas Foods Pvt. Ltd. unitasfoods@gmail.com

Craft and Social Development Organisation is a professional academy established in 1995 to master the art of chocolate making. It is really a boon

for the chocolate artisans who want to join or already are in the business of chocolates and are interested in expanding the business by acquiring the latest knowledge of recipes, cost calculation, marketing strategies, etc. The professional chocolate making course has been designed to teach all types of chocolates, plus making your own fillings — Marzipan, Fondant, Truffles chocolate decoration. Besides knowledge on details of raw materials, its root sourcing and cost dynamics are given for the right calculation of business profit. The course also covers marketing and its strategies in order to make the students reach the top in this advertising age. Recently, the new courses of Chocolate Bouquet, Chocolate Fudge and Hot Chocolate have been introduced to make chocolate business more aesthetic and creative. Craft and Social Development Organisation info@chocolateclassesandmaterial.com

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Being Continually Innovative By Sharmila Chand

Sanjay Kumar, the Executive Pastry Chef at Eros Hotel — Managed by Hilton New Delhi Nehru Place, is a graduate from Delhi University. He has rich experience of working with well-known hospitality properties such as ITC Classic Golf Resort, The Oberoi, New Delhi and The Imperial New Delhi. Over the years, he has worked hard and creatively to learn the skills and craftsmanship involved in the pastry making & bakery operations, under the guidance of senior Chefs. In his last assignment, Sanjay was the Pastry Chef at the One&Only Royal Mirage, Dubai where he was responsible for the bakery department for eighteen food and beverage outlets at the resort. Since January 2012, Sanjay is part of Eros Hotel — Managed by Hilton New Delhi Nehru Place as the Executive Pastry Chef and is demonstrating his culinary acumen and talent at the property. Together with his team, his continual endeavour is to search for the best possible ingredients to provide delicious pastries and desserts to the guests. The excerpts of the interview follow: What is the current trend in the Indian bakery industry? A number of Chefs in the Indian bakery industry now have a good international exposure and are actively involved in the upgradation of products. Emphasis is shifting from cheaper and easily available raw materials to high quality raw materials. Pre-mixed flours for different breads are used in tandem with local produce to get a good mix of products. How did you become a Pastry Chef? During my early years in the industry I was fascinated by the different products showcased by the Pastry Chefs, which could be compared to works of art. It was then that I decided that I would pursue the same profession and thus worked my way up in the pastry and bakery arena, under the guidance of many reputed stalwarts of this industry. How did you hone your skills over the years? I have had the opportunity to work with and learn from a number of Chefs, from both within the country and internationally, and I have been inspired by their practices. All of them have contributed in some way or the other in my professional development and have inspired me to continually thrive for the best. What are your hot selling bakery items? Our varieties of morning bakeries,

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macaroons and cakes are favourite among our esteemed patrons. What is your take on the Indian consumers of bakery products these days? Though there has been an increase in the guests seeking healthy alternatives in terms of whole grain and organic products, people are still not very eager to experiment in terms of their needs and wants pertaining to bakery products. What about the health quotient? How do you take care of this aspect? We ensure that we use the best possible sourcing for all our products. All our vendors are certified and we always strive to find new and better products available in the market. What is your favourite tool and why? For me, it will have to be the kitchen aid. It is a multi-utility machine, which helps me to perform various activities with the least amount of time and effort. What are the challenges a Bakery Chef or a Pastry Chef has to face in his day-to-day work? I think one of the biggest challenges for a Pastry Chef in our country is to source the right quality of ingredients, which happen to be usually imported. Either they are not available in India or just take too much time to procure.

Finding the right expertise and retention of the person with the right expertise is also a challenge. With the growth of the hospitality sector, finding the right persons to be part of the team and then to retain them is getting highly challenging. Moreover, in this industry you can never know enough and the quest for knowledge is endless. That is also quite a challenge. What do you like about your job? The fact that I have the creative freedom as a Pastry Chef and an opportunity to showcase my abilities to a plethora of guests, with varied tastes and preferences, is what I enjoy the most about my work. What you don’t like about your job? Long hours are definitely painful, but then it is an accepted fact and has become a part of my professional life. What is your strength as a Bakery Chef? My strength is my ability to innovate and see opportunities to improvise in daily operations. What are your professional dreams? I would like to see the horizon of pastry and bakery products expand wherein guests are more willing to try out innovations. I also want to see that the Indian bakery products be comparable with the best in the world.

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Bakery Review  

( Feb-Mar 2012) Business Magazine for bakery & Confectionery Professionals