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Feb-Mar ’18

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

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NEW

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line allows to produce a great variety of products and considers the different food preferences on the market.

Anoop Bector, Managing Director Bector‘s Food Specialities Ltd

KOENIG BAKING MACHINES YOUR PARTNER FOR LARGEST PRODUCT VARIETY For more than 50 years it has been our main objective to support bakers in their daily work. Our intention is for our machines, lines and ovens to produce high quality products while at the same time retaining their artisan character. Our machines and lines allow you to respond to your customers’ regional eating habits. You define the required products, we compile the technical solution! The product variety and your creativity in the production of bread, bread rolls and pastry know practically no bounds. Koenig is your specialist for planning and equipping your entire production: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

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Koenig Laminiertechnik GmbH | Mr. Rudolf Straetker 91550 Dinkelsbühl | GERMANY | M: +98 919 724 7840 Aug-Sep ’18 rudolf.straetker@koenig-rex.com | www.koenig-rex.com

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E d i t o r i a l

Publisher cum Editor

Rajneesh Sharma

rajneeshhammer@gmail.com

Associate Editor

Swarnendu Biswas Resident Editor

Sharmila Chand (Delhi) Ashok Malkani (Mumbai) Layout & Design

Hari Kumar. V Abhishek Singh Rathore Production Assistant

Mamta Sharma

Advertising Sales

Delhi: Debabrata Nath, Sumesh Sharma Director Sales

Sanjay Anand Mobile: +91 9811136837 Director Operations

Rajat Taneja Mobile: +91 9810315463 Editorial & Advertising Offices: Delhi:

Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 206, Samrat Bhawan, Ranjeet Nagar Commercial Complex, New Delhi-110008 Phone: 91-11-25704103, 45084903, 45093486 Mumbai:

Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 105, 1st Floor, Aarpee Centre, Gufic Compound, 11th Road, MIDC, Near Tunga Paradise Hotel, Andheri (E), Mumbai-400 093 Phone: 022-28395833

E-mail: info@hammer.co.in © 2018 Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. No part of the publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher. Bakery Review is a bi-monthly magazine, printed, edited, owned and published by Rajneesh Sharma from 206, Samrat Bhawan, Ranjeet Nagar Commercial Complex, New Delhi. Printed at Swan Press, B-71, Naraina Industrial Area, Phase-II, New Delhi-110 028. Editorial Policy: Editorial emphasis in Bakery Review magazine is on educational & informational material specifically designed to assist those responsible for managing Bakery & Confectionery business. Articles are welcome and will be published on the sole discretion of the editor. Disclaimer: The editor and publisher believes that all information contained in this publication are correct at the time of publishing. Content published not necessarily are the opinion or view of the editor and publisher. Editor and publisher declines any responsibility for any action taken based on the information contained in this publication, including liability for error or omission.

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ometimes old heritage can also be of very much topical interest. Revamping our past can often make for smart business sense. One such rich heritages of our multifaceted F&B industry comprise the segment of Irani cafes and bakeries. It is lamentable that many of them have dwindled from Mumbai’s fast-paced streets, but it is heartening that some illustrious Irani cafes and bakeries are still continuing to serve their delectable treats, and carrying forward an important gastronomic legacy in the process. Yes, even amidst the incessant expansion of the multinational QSR players. What is more heartening that in the recent years, the appeal of Irani cafes and bakeries are spreading beyond Mumbai and Pune and reaching other parts of the country too. Irani cafes and bakeries as a market segment seriously deserves a brand new success story, which can be fostered by intelligent amalgamation of tradition and innovation. In the Cover Story, we have attempted to briefly explore some iconic Irani cafes and bakeries, and also the beginning of the process of resurrection of this niche segment in our evolving F&B industry. The Business Story deals with the impressive market for chocolates in India, a market whose potential can easily exceed its present. Brief outline of the production, segmentation and application of chocolates is also provided, as also the trends pervading through India’s chocolate market. The feature on flour analysis, which can greatly facilitate bakery operations, can be quite useful for the bakers and confectioners, as do the feature on natural sweeteners. The role of imagination and dexterity in cake designing has increased manifolds over the years, which reflects the continual evolution in our consumers’ tastes. Cake designing is now serious business in India’s bakery and confectionery industry. In fact, it is as serious as the taste of the cake. Cakes with fascinating themes, wedding cakes and tiered cakes are discussed in the feature on cake designing. The application of fruits and nuts in bakeries, and the role of food additives in bakery and confectionery industry can also make for interesting reading. The growing trend of premiumisation in the India’s biscuits market is another of the industry relevant topics covered in this issue. Overall, we have endeavoured to make the issue a comprehensive and engrossing one, which can interest our esteemed readers. We hope they would, like always, find the issue enriching. With expectations of continued readers’ support, I am herewith signing off while wishing you all sweet business in the forthcoming festive season. A festive season where chocolates are expected to play their sweet role prominently, as they are doing during the recent years.

Annual subscription rate within India is Rs. 500 and for overseas it is US $110, for surface mail. Single issue is available for Rs. 90 in India and US $25 for overseas. Cheques are payable to Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

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Aug-Sep ’18


18 COVER STORY

Irani Cafes are Not Yet History

24 BUSINESS

Sweet Business of Dark Delights

30 FOCUS

Flour Analysis for Bakery Operations

32 INGREDIENT

departments

Fruits and Nuts in Bakery

04

Event

12

News Scan

38

Product

40

Trend

42

Additive

48

Product Preview

52

Interview

44 INDUSTRY

Aug-Sep ’18

Premium Biscuits Gaining Currency

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E V E N T

BAKERY REVIEW

China Wins the iba-UIBC Cup of Bakers Zhou Bin and Peng Fudong from China are the winners of the iba-UIBC Cup of Bakers.

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he international competition, in which the best in the field face off against each other, takes place every three years in Munich at iba, the world’s leading trade fair for bakery, confectionery and snacks. At this year’s cup, twelve teams from twelve countries competed for the gold medal. The winners were honoured and celebrated on 17th September 2018 at iba. For three days, the tensions were high in the four showcase bakeries in Hall B3, at iba in Munich. From 15th to 17th September, they served as the stage for the ‘iba-UIBC Cup of Bakers,’ which many consider to be the world championships for master bakers. Every day, four national teams consisting of two members each, competed against each other. This year’s participants included Japan, the Netherlands, Korea, Russia, Norway, Peru, the US, France, Germany, Turkey, Spain, and China. The theme of this year’s competition was ‘Universe,’ and competitors had to conjure up appropriate breads, biscuits, party pastries, Danish pastries, as well as their own baked showpiece. For participants, the ‘iba-UIBC Cup of Bakers’ formed the culmination of months of preparation. “Their skills had to be honed to the highest precision for the competition – and they were,” said Michael Wippler, President of the German Bakers’ Confederation. “To prevail

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in this competition, bakers must deliver an outstanding performance, as the time is short, the tension is extreme – every movement needs to be just right,” the P res i d e nt co nt i n u e d . Th e t ra d e fa i r audience at iba was able to witness the competition live, since it took place in fully-equipped and open showcase bakeries in Hall B3. Quite a few people did not want to miss the opportunity to look over the shoulders of the twelve teams and cheer them on. “We are thrilled by the extraordinary ta l e nts p res e nte d to u s a n d to t h e audience during the competition,” said Wolfgang Schäfer, Board Member of the German Bakers’ Confederation, Hessian State Guild Director and Chairman of this year’s jury panel at the ‘iba-UIBC Cup of Bakers.’ The jury included Jack Hazan (Israel), Founder and CEO of ‘Jack Bakes.’ Werner Huerlimann (Switzerland), Head of the Bakery Department at the Richemont specialist bakery school in Lucerne, Guether Koerffer (Sweden), Vice Chairman of the Swedish Bakery and Confectionery Association, Erwin H eft b e rg e r ( A u s t r i a ) , M as te r B a ke r and Lecturer at the Higher Technical Education Institute for Food Technology, and Wolfgang Schäfer himself. For the first time, a public assessment of the first contributions took place on every day of the competition, at 1:00 pm at the iba. “This not only enabled transparency in the evaluations but also attracted major crowds,” said Jury Chairman Schäfer. The award ceremony was of course the ultimate highlight of the show and the two winners were welcomed by loud cheers as they accepted the coveted prize, which was presented by Michael Wippler and Wolfgang Schäfer. In addition to their overall win, the Chinese team also

received the prize for the best showpiece. Daniel Plum and Maximilian Raisch from Germany followed in second place; they also won in the category ‘Best Bread.’ Third place was awarded to Ivar Bakke and Nikolai Meling from Norway, who also received the prize in the category of ‘Best Biscuits and Party Pastries.’ The award for the best Danish pastries went to Myeong-Kyeom Kim and Sung-Chul Lim from Korea.

EVENTS’ CALENDER The Hotel Show 2018 16-18 September 2018 Dubai World Trade Centre, Dubai www.thehotelshow.com Annapoorna World of Foods India- 2018 27-29 September 2018 Bombay Exhibition Center Mumbai, India www.worldoffoodindia.com SIAL Paris 21-25 October 2018 Paris Nord Villepinte Paris, France www.sial.fr HPMF Annual Convention & Awards 2018 25-27 October 2018, Hotel Taj Ganges Varanasi, India http://www.hpmfindia.com HOSTECH by Tusid 2018 24-28 October 2018 Istanbul, Turkey www.hostechbytusid.com Equip Hotel 2018 11-15 November 2018 Paris Expo Porte de Versailles Paris, France www.equiphotel.com

Aug-Sep ’18


Aug-Sep ’18

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E V E N T

BAKERY REVIEW

Junior Pastry Indian Cup 2018 I

n year 2019 at its 40th edition, ‘SIGEP’ 2019, acknowledged as the world’s most important shows in the artisan gelato sector, a primary European showcase for artisan Italian confectionery and is also strengthening its position in the artisan bakery field, will be hosting “Junior Pastry World Cup” during 19-23 Jan 2019  at Rimini, Italy.  Bakery Review magazine published by Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. will be organising “Junior Pastry Indian Cup 2018”, 2nd Edition - to shortlist the National Team from India to compete at the event in SIGEP 2019. All Indian Pastry Student/chefs aged below 23 years are eligible to take part in the qualifying competition. The participants must be born on or after 20 Jan 1996 – on or before 20 Jan 2001.  Its’a Team Event and each Team comprises of - two Competitors  & One Mentor. The Mentor will also be a part of JURY- Member for Junior Pastry Indian Cup 2018.

Theme of the Competition - FLYING The Indian selection of the competition will be held on 29-30 September 2018 at  School of European Pastry (SEP), 603, Wall Street, Chakala, Andheri-Kurla Road, Andheri East, Mumbai, Maharashtra – 400093. Teams must explore new shapes, trace original lines and innovative decorative effects to give full rein to their imaginations, thinking outside of normal boundaries to create products of the required type, i.e. a sugar sculpture (Participating chef should have a good exposure in Sugar Art - which includes Boiling of Sugar, Casting, Pull Sugar, Blown Sugar, Ribbons, Figurines, Flowers, Pastillage) and a Chocolate Sculpture, Chocolate Pralines, the contemporary Chocolate Baked Cake, Mini Pastries, the Dessert on a Plate & the

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Dessert in a Glass. Contestant Team will have to Create Sugar Show Piece, Chocolate Show Piece, Individual Chocolate Bonbons, The Felchlin Chocolate Cake, Dessert on a Plate, Dessert in a Glass, Mini Pastries with CSM flour Competitors will be judged on Artistic expression and technical skill, Professional ethics and hygiene and taste. There are strict guidelines and parameters on which the chefs will be judged at every stage. The Pastry Event will be Mentored & Supervised by Jury Committee which includes Chef Avijit Ghosh, Corporate Pastry Chef-Hotel Leela Ventures Ltd & Chef Vikas Bagul – Director & Teaching Faculty – School for European Pastry. The Indian winning team (2 Contestant & Mentor) will be sent to Italy, with all expenses paid for Airfare & Stay.  They will represent India in Junior Pastry World Cup 2019. According to Mr. Sanjay Tandon, Managing

Hospitality Partner

Director, Epicure Frozen Food & Beverages Pvt. Ltd. offering Elle & Vire in India “Being a Pastry chef is a wonderful career choice for anyone who is artistic and logical, practical and creative. It’s a career with rich opportunities. Junior Pastry Indian Cup is our effort to motivate young generation to opt pastry chef a serious  career.  The competition will provide the young Pastry Chefs to practically demonstrate their skills, and also allow them an opportunity to pick up new nuances of Pastry making which is

so important to grow in the profession”. Says Mr Sanjay Anand, Director, Hammer Publishers Pvt Ltd, the event organiser “The objective the Junior Pastry Indian cup is to set up a training ground for large international events, while making it entertaining and showcasing the talents and future of younger generation pastry-chefs. By spotlighting them, we hope to engender a sense of belonging and valuable feelings of goodwill, quality, passion, creativity, collaboration and respect for colleagues. All are part of the ethics underpinning the sector, giving it solid roots and a constructive vision for the future. It will be an opportunity to share experiences and a platform for growth for young people who represent the future of the international pastry-making sector. It is the Pastry event with a vital role to play in achieving a career at the highest of technical standards.” According to Mr. Vikas Bagul, Director, School for European Pastry, “The time has come for our pastry chefs to showcase their skill at the international level. With globalization of Indian economy now more focus is on India, thus it offers an opportunity to all verticals of industry to be part of this growth trend, and why not culinary & pastry art. We have world class chefs now in India recognized at international levels. JPIC is a wonderful effort towards the same and I congratulate them for stupendous work they are doing for the pastry fraternity, since last 5 years.” About SIGEP: SIGEP is the International Trade Show of Artisan Gelato, Pastry, Bakery and the Coffee World, now at its  40th edition. It is an exclusive showcase anticipating all of the latest trends and innovations for the operators of the five supply chains on show. SIGEP has 1250 exhibitors acquiring

Aug-Sep ’18


Jury Committee

129,000 sqm of exhibiting area, showcasing the very best of the global scene of raw materials, ingredients, technology and equipment, furnishings and services. SIGEP is a show that enhances and rewards global excellence, presents new formats, supports global networking and promotes the growth of companies and professional operators. About SEP School For European Pastry (SEP) is a world class Pastry Institute based in Mumbai offering multiple courses in Pastry skill development. SEP believes that a good pastry tells a story of a perfect blend of sheer craftsmanship, thoughtfully selected quality ingredients and the fine aesthetics of art. With their sustainable, world’s finest ingredients, one can discover several facts of pastry making through an entire spectrum of flavours and textures. Chef Anil Rohira, Chef Vikas Bagul and Dhiraj Dama are the founders and cornerstones of this wonderful school. Chef Anil is internationally renowned for his brilliant creations while maintaining his indigenous spirit. His passion and devotion to the art of pastry making underscores a rich history of exceptional standards forged through decades of practice and experience. Chef Vikas’s zeal for exploring art and his endless experimentation to always create something unique, Chef Vikas has made an influential difference to the world of pastry making. Dhiraj Dama’s experience, vision and business acclaim is the underlying of the philosophy at the SEP About Bakery Review: Bakery Review - the first and only bimonthly magazine exclusively focussed on Bakery Industry. It presents the trends and the changes undergoing the bakery industry in present day India. Much awaited information flow exclusively for the baker’s is the hallmark of Bakery Review. The magazine covers information from milling to the loaf on the self at the bakery with special emphasis on technology, recipes, equipments, new trends and the superstars that make it happen. It focuses on new products, developments and launches. Latest news, features, business stories and technical know how from the world of bakery. The qualified recipients are individuals who have titles of Executive Pastry Chef, Pastry Chef, Senior Sous Chef – Patisserie, Chocolatiers, Managers and Owners of bakeries.

Aug-Sep ’18

Chef Vikas Bagul Director & Teaching Faculty School for European Pastry He is currently the Director & Teaching Faculty at ‘School for European Pastry’ at Mumbai. In 2016 he was voted as the ‘Pastry Chef of the Year’, India. In 2015, as Skills Expert he represented India at the World skills competition, conducted by the National skills Development Corporation of India (NSDC India). An initiative by the Ministry of skills development of Indian government, was invited by Honorable Prime Minister Mr. Narendra Modi to be a part of his initiative programme

“Skills India”. He represented India in 2015 at the Oceania World skills competition in pastry at New Zealand, as a mentor and coach for a candidate selected by NSDC. The candidate won the silver Medal. He represented India at Brazil Sao Paulo for the World Skills competition as a coach & mentor selected by the NSDC India (August 2015). He was the winner of the title for “India Chocolate Master” 2012-2013 and 2014-15, was selected to represent India at Taiwan for the World Chocolate Master’s 2015 Asia Pacific selection. In 2011 he was the first Indian Pastry Chef to represent the country at World Chocolate Masters at Asia Pacific selection held at Taiwan. He also crafted the award winning chocolate show piece at the Great Indian Culinary challenge held at B.K.C in Mumbai. In 2010 he was Gold medal Winner for the chocolate show piece at the bakery and pastry challenge held at the World Trade Center Mumbai and Gold medal winner for petit fours at the Great Indian Culinary challenge held at B.K.C Mumbai. He was the Team leader of the group that won award for the “Best Hotel Culinary Arts” (2006) - The Oberoi Hotels & Resorts Mumbai. He was also the winner of ‘All lndia Pastry Championship’ by IFCA & H/C Category (Petit Fours) and Category (pastry show piece). In 2005 he was conferred an Award “Humare Sitare” for star performance for the year 2004 - 2005 by Mr. Rattan Keswani, President The Oberoi Hotels & The Hilton Towers Mumbai. He won Gold medal in All India Pastry Championship by IFCA & H/C Category (Pastry Show Piece). He won First runner-up Trophy in 2004 at ‘National Association of Bakery in India & I.H.M MTIMBAI’ in Category - Cake Decoration. He regularly won Medals at ‘Nestle Young Star Chef of the Year’ Category (Cake Decoration) in 2001 (Silver), 2002 (Gold) & 2003 (Silver).

Chef Avijit Ghosh Corporate Pastry Chef Hotel LeelaVenture Ltd. A Gastronomic Mastermind Chef Avijit Ghosh specializes in Pastry, Bakery and Chocolates, having immense work experience of 25 years in his field. Chef Ghosh started his career as a kitchen trainee at the Oberoi School of hotel Management, New Delhi. He has worked with the Oberoi group since in Kolkata, Bangalore, New Delhi for 20 years. Trained at “Le Notre” a renowned Pastry school in Paris, he is one of the best in his field. He is also brings in wide international exposure with his association with Chef Mikeal Azouz, Patissier and Chocolatier from France, Chef Luc Eyrie of Valrhona Pastry school, France. Currently Chef Ghosh is associated with the Leela Hotels Palaces and Resorts since last 5 years, as their Corporate Pastry Chef, taking care of all the Leela hotels based out of Leela Palace Bangalore. He is also a brand Ambassador for Callebaut Chocolates of Belgium.

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PARTICIPATING TEAMS TEAM 1 Academy of Pastry Arts India - Gurgaon PARTICIPANT Sakshi Grover

She is currently Intern at Academy of Pastry Arts India, Gurgaon, engaged in assisting the chefs in classes. She is capable of handling and preparing a variety of bakery and pastry products and is proficient in the use of bakery equipment and skilled in fondant decoration, icing decoration and aesthetic skills.

PARTICIPANT Sonali Tandon

She is currently Intern at Academy of Pastry Arts India, Gurgaon, engaged in assisting the chefs in classes. She is capable of handling and preparing a variety of bakery and pastry products and is proficient in the use of bakery equipment and skilled in fondant decoration, icing decoration and aesthetic skills.

MENTOR Eureka Araujo

She is currently Pastry Chef at Academy of Pastry Arts India, Gurgaon. She did her Bachelor of Science through the Institute of Hotel Management, Catering Technology and Applied Nutrition, Goa. She is the Winner of Second edition ‘Pastry Queen India’ Competition 2017 held at the Academy Of Pastry Arts, Gurgaon.

TEAM 2 Academy of Pastry Arts India - Bangalore PARTICIPANT Vandana Konidala

She is currently Asst. Pastry Chef Academy of Pastry Arts India, Bangalore. She assited Chef Mukesh Singh Rawat at Asian Pastry Cup Singapore 2018. She is Graduate of Advanced Diploma Program in Pastry and Bakery Arts from Academy of Pastry Arts Bangalore (APAB) 2017.

PARTICIPANT Kush Jadav

He is currently Asst. Pastry Chef Academy of Pastry Arts India, Bangalore. He did his diploma in pastry and baking and advanced diploma in pastry and baking at Academy of Pastry Arts, Bangalore. He also won Junior National Pastry Cup (PreSelection) at Junior National Pastry Cup.

MENTOR Mukesh Singh Rawat

He is currently the Executive Pastry Chef at Academy of Pastry Arts India, Bangalore. He has vast experience in Pastry arts and specialise in pre-opening teams as Pastry Chef of various leading hotels in India. He has 3 yrs. Diploma ITI in “Bakery & Confectionary” Govt. ITI College, Bangalore

TEAM 3 Whitecaps International School of Pastry - Bangalore PARTICIPANT Akshay Gowda D.

He is currently ‘Assistant Pastry Chef’ at White Caps International School of Pastry. After completing Diploma in Hotel Management from IHM Bangalore, he did his Training from Sheraton Grand, The Oberoi and Leela Palace, Bangalore. He did his Diploma in Pastry from White Caps International School of Pastry.

PARTICIPANT Dharnesh R

He is currently Intern at White Caps International School of Pastry. He did his Craftsmanship Certification in Food Production & Patisseries form Institute of Hotel Management Catering Technology & Applied Nutrition. He did Diploma in Pastry & Chocolate Art form White Caps International School of Pastry.

MENTOR Arvind Prasad

Chef Arvind Prasad entry into pastry wasn’t actually intentional. He joined Hotel management in 1998 and decided to be chef. His love for eating dessert and sweet tooth made him choose Pastry as a career. In 2014 he received the title for “Best Chocolate Showpiece” in the country, in World Chocolate Master.

TEAM 4 Rustomjee Academy for Global Careers Pvt. Ltd. - Mumbai PARTICIPANT Abhishek Patil

He is currently a student at Rustomjee Academy for Global Careers Pvt. Ltd. He did his ‘Diploma in Hotel Operation’ from Rustomjee Academy for Global Careers. He also worked at Sahara Star Hotel as Bell Boy and Steward. He participated in World Skill Competition and stood second in Maharashtra state.

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PARTICIPANT Rushi Upadhyay

He is currently a student at Rustomjee Academy for Global Careers Pvt. Ltd. He did his ‘Diploma in Hotel Operation’ from Rustomjee Academy for Global Careers. He completed his training at ITC group of Hotels, Vapi in Bakery, Housekeeping and Food & Beverage department.

MENTOR Rajesh Patel

He is currently Senior Faculty (Bakery & Confectionery) at Rustomjee Academy for Global Careers Pvt. Ltd.

Aug-Sep ’18


SPONSORS Epicure Frozen Foods & Beverages Pvt. Ltd. Epicure Frozen Foods & Beverages Pvt. Ltd. started by Sanjay Tandon in 2005 is a well-known name in the field of ambient and temperature-controlled food products. Today, they are one of the leading importers of ambient and temperature-controlled food products. To strengthen its foothold in the market, Epicure continuously upgrades its list of ambient and temperature-controlled foods and beverages. At present, they are importing 500 supreme quality products, manufactured by 30 different renowned brands of America, Europe and Australia. Their product portfolio includes a wide range of Cheese, Creams, Butter, Frozen Fruits & Purees, Beverages, Bakery Ingredients, Chocolates, Pasta, and Confectionery. The leading brands include Elle & Vire, Milkana, ILE de France, Tartare, Saint Agur, Coeur de Lion, Chavroux, Le Rustique, Giovanni Ferrari, Friesland, Grandma Singelton, Delaktis, Daily Dairy, Mammen OST, Sterilgarda in temperature control category. For ambient products they represent Torani, Sacla, Granini, Villars, Bonduella, Veliche, Grands Moulins, St. Michel, Peanut Butter & Co. The company is patronage by ITC Hotels, Taj Hotels, Radisson, the Leela, Shangri-La, Marriott, The Claridges, Starbucks along with leading gourmet retail chains like Nature’s Basket, Le Marche, Foodhall & Food Bazaar. Epicure distribution network is spread all across India and with large number of reliable and distinguished distribution and channel partners in the cities such as: Delhi, Bangalore, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Chennai, Kolkata, Pune and Goa. To sustain high growth rate, they have constituted state-ofthe-art warehouses in New Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai and Jaipur. Elle & Vire Elle & Vire was established in 1947 by the Elle & Vire Dairy Cooperative (‘Elle’ and ‘Vire’ are names of two small rivers in the Normandy region of France). The brand received international acclaim as a manufacturer of fine quality dairy products and by 1975 the Elle & Vire Cooperative was France’s leading exporter of dairy products. Today, the brand is France’s No. 5 dairy brand, with more than one out of two French consumers purchasing at least one Elle & Vire product a year, and virtually everyone being familiar with the brand (92% awareness rate). At the international level, Elle & Vire sells dairy products as varied as milk, butter, cream, desserts and cheese. Elle & Vire is renowned as one of the most innovative brands of dairy products (the first UHT milk in France in 1960, the first UHT cream in 1973, the first UHT dairy dessert in 1985, the first French spreadable butter in 1992), and is regularly awarded by professionals and consumers. Elle & Vire is present in more that 120 countries around the globe, in both the retail and food service sectors. The Elle & Vire Brand in the Foodservice Sector Elle & Vire offers food service professionals a complete range of top quality, high-performance dairy products. The result of ongoing research and innovation, Elle & Vire products meet the needs of the most demanding Chefs. Elle & Vire is a standard-setter, accompanying restaurateurs, hoteliers, Pastry Chefs and other food service professionals throughout their careers. An official supplier to the Bocuse d’Or, one of the world’s most prestigious culinary competitions, the brand also maintains privileged relationships with some of the greatest cooking and pastry-making schools: the Institut Paul Bocuse, the Ecole du Grand Chocolat Valrhona and the Ecole Lenotre in Paris.

Aug-Sep ’18

Delta Nutritives Delta Nutritives is one of the leading suppliers of dessert ingredients and equipments for ice cream manufacture. Understanding the market needs and its growing demand for new and innovative products, the company regularly update its product portfolio, to satisfy the expectations of their customers. Today Delta Nutritives is one of the most reliable suppliers in its product category. They import, manufacture and supply a huge range of dessert ingredients. They have integrated ingredients and their expertise, to offer many of the industry’s trusted brands. Their product range includes Belgium Chocolates from Callebaut, Ice Cream ingredients from Mec3, Italy, Frozen Berries and Purees from Dirafrost and Ravifruit and fruit fillings from Dawn Foods, Belgium. They also manufacture cake premixes, glazes, pastry fillings and fruit fillings for the bakery. To complement its wide product offerings, they have introduced wide range of decorations and accessories, edible colours and velvet sprays, chocolate moulds and industrial blenders, slush machines and machines for dispensing hot chocolate drinks, transfers sheets. To provide end to end solutions for the Ice Cream industry they have tied up with Carpigiani and ISA to manufacture premium ice cream. Junior Pastry Chef The company represent CSM Bakery Solutions, an international leader in the baking industry, producing one of the industry’s broadest ranges of products for customers in more than 100 countries. CSM is dedicated to developing and providing solutions that drive customer growth and success. They offer a broad, innovative portfolio of premium quality bakery ingredients, finished products and services for retail and foodservice markets as well as artisan and industrial bakeries JENDAH Windsor The Windsor Chocolatier is the new masters of art of making chocolate since 2013. They are making couverture (Real) handmade chocolates, developed after extensive research and passion. Windsor brand has been created by Rhea Gupta, an ambitious entrepreneur who learnt chocolate making from renowned chocolatiers in over 15 countries. Most of the chocolate companies in India, settle for low cost compound chocolate since compound is low cost, easier to handle and easy to transport. Windsor had created its niche in high end premium quality chocolates, manufactured in India. The ingredients used are mostly natural and sourced from leading brands across the world. They add no preservatives, artificial colours or aromas in the chocolate. Though this increases the cost and limits shelf life but being fresh, consumers still prefer them. It does come in varied formats & designs and fancy packing to create advantage for consumer depending on occasion. Since Indians are now big travelers, they are exposed to high end chocolates manufactured in developed chocolate eating countries. Thus the demand for premium chocolates is increasing. Windsor mission is to offer its consumers premium chocolates, infusing art and science prevalent world over. The company has installed large capacity and has imported machines to meet the demand of fresh chocolate, especially during the high seasons like festivals, marriages and corporate functions. The company wants to be the largest chocolate company in premium chocolate category in coming 5 years. The company holds 2 ‘Limca Book of records’ - For making heaviest 651 kg of chocolate bar named ‘Eleanor’ and the tallest Macaron Tower in India of 11 feet height. They also created largest Chocolate Painting of 8 feet height & 20 feet length, which they have applied for next issue of ‘Limca Book of Records 2019’.

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SPONSORS Nestlé Professional Nestlé Professional is committed to inspire its partners’ growth. The company’s vision is “To be an inspiring growth partner that delivers creative, branded food and beverage solutions, enabling operators to innovate and delight their consumers.” As part of the world’s largest food and beverage company, Nestlé Professional are passionate about supplying branded solutions that are creative, customized and commercially viable. With over 100 years of knowledge and experience in food and beverage, they share skills with operators and advise them, using its authentic market and industry knowledge, and scientific and technological know-how. Partnering with trusted brand like Nestlé Professional reaps the rewards for operators and help in growing their business. At Nestlé Professional, they use their global consumer insight to create and deliver profitable new business solutions that are right for operator’s channel. They bring brands that customers trust and love. They also offer the service and training needed to maximize customer satisfaction, efficiency and profitability. In an increasingly competitive and demanding market, they consistently deliver excellent products that customers can trust. With extensive research, development and qualitative analysis, they aim to create many such innovative products to help operators differentiate their foodservice establishment from the competitors. Nestlé Professional helps operators to create appealing menu and be on-trend with the recipes. Nestlé Professional helps in developing culinary business offering time and labour saving solutions. It creates business sustainability through global insight into customer preferences. Nestlé Professional provides free advice through their food and beverage professionals, and from marketing, merchandising and sales experts. Felchlin Fair, direct, sustainable cocoa with the best manufacturing practices, to produce premium couverture is the core competence of this company. Established in 1908, Felchlin is based in Schwyz, Switzerland. Sourcing quality beans from over 15 origins from around the world. These beans are their most precious resource and they accompany them from their blossoms in the deepest jungles to becoming quality chocolate in the heart of Switzerland. Felchlin produces a diverse range of Grand Couvertures, fillings and nut products with complete traceability to the origin. Their manufacturing process like a slow long roast, conching for 72 hours in the traditional longitutude conche is what elevates this company’s products above the rest. Exporting to over 42 countries, Felchlin’s passion is completely focussed around their products, customer service and innovations. Accompany Felchlin on their journey and learn more about their passion and Enthusiasm with which they transform cocoa to Chocolate. Commercial foodservice and food processing equipment Based in Taiwan and founded in the mid 1970’s as a bakery oven factory, JENDAH has engaged in design, manufacture, and sale of bakery, commercial foodservice and food processing equipment for more than 40+ years. Developed from a local factory to an international company, JENDAH has partnered with a number of leading food equipment providers to sell and support its products. Today, JENDAH is renowned for high quality products and provide a wide selection of quality solutions such as deck ovens, rotisserie, and countertop baking

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machines for the bakery, foodservice operations, restaurant, pizza shop, and hypermarket worldwide. It is represented in India by Mod Kitchen Equipment Pvt. Ltd., Popularly known as “MOD”. Based out of New Delhi, MOD Specialises in Turnkey kitchen projects. MOD is a regular supplier of Bakery & Catering equipment to Hotels of International repute, Bakeries, Coffee Outlets, Restaurants, Educational institutions and Industrial units all over the country. AKSAI Creations From the interior design to the presentation of the tabletop, customers expect a lot more from the dining experience. Integrating cutting edge design and stateof-the-art manufacturing with over three decades of experience in tableware for the hospitality industry, AKSAI offers the product performance and service needed to meet the exacting standards of today’s hospitality environment. Aksai offers complete range of products including Kitchenware, Buffetware, Glassware, Barware, Cookware, Pots & Pans, Knives, Flatware, Holloware, Pastry Utensils, Tabletops, Light Kitchen Equipment and Hospitality Accessories. The leading brands represented by Aksai in India are Schott Zwiesel, Villeroy & Boch, Revol, Rosenthal, Robert Welch, Sambonet Paderno, Indel B, Dudson, Carlisle, Cambro, Le Creuset, Robot Coupe, Caddie, Impulse, APS, Tablecraft, Blanco, Waring, WNK, Polyscience, Spring, Hatco, Neumarker. The company is already supplying its range of products to leading Hotels & Foodservice and Bakery institutions in India. The accuracy and precision of the equipments offered help great deal in developing new techniques to provide innovative tastes and culinary experiences. Aksai offers products designed to help professionals make their operations run smoother, more efficiently and more profitably. The Baking Lab The Baking Lab offers multiple services in Innovation, Concept & Design Development, Project Management & Delivery, Restaurant Consultancy and Support Systems. They also offer services for Private Dining, Culinary Workshops, Video Recipes and Live Cooking Demonstrations. The Baking Lab is a complete hospitality consultancy company for the Bakery & Confectionery industry and Patisserie Management services. They have over 10 years of experience working with clients and developing their dreams into a reality. They offer support to achieve increases in revenue, identify expansion opportunities, and utilize their resources to assist hotel and resort owners with all aspects of property management. Their Executive Team brings decades of combined experience and expertise in the areas of marketing, operations, and positioning to ensure the clients are staged for long-term success. Their goal is to provide a high level of support for bakery and confectionery professionals, and other hospitality management team members looking for business development services in today’s competitive marketplace. They provide services for variety of properties including: Commissary kitchens, Standalone Bakeries, Chain of patisserie retail, Boutique hotels, Restaurants, Banquets & Catering, Up gradation of present infrastructure. They think in sync with entrepreneurs and encourage associates to take a similar approach when solving problems, developing solutions, and implementing strategies. They encourage hotel management team members to implement independent initiatives when appropriate and develop strategies that work for their unique properties. Their operations approach is based on time-tested strategies and input from their associates.

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BAKERY REVIEW

Kapil Grover Appointed as Chief Marketing Officer of Domino’s Pizza Food services major Jubilant FoodWorks Limited recently appointed Kapil Grover as the Chief Marketing Officer of Domino’s Pizza. Jubilant FoodWorks Limited has the exclusive right to operate and develop the Domino’s Pizza brand in India. Grover brings with him a rich experience of 18 years and will be responsible for leading the marketing strategy for the brand. “We are confident that Kapil will use his immense experience to deepen Domino’s connect with its customers and to drive growth,” Pratik Pota, CEO and Whole-time Director, Jubilant FoodWorks Limited said on Grover’s appointment. Before joining Jubilant FoodWorks Limited, Grover was associated with Burger King India as Chief Marketing Officer. He had also worked with KFC India, Radico Khaitan and Luxor Writing Instruments, in his previous stints.

McDonald’s Introduces Rice Dishes in South and West India Globally renowned for its burgers, the fast-food major McDonald’s has now rolled out rice dishes at its restaurants in southern and western parts of India with the introduction of two variants — spicy rice and cheesy rice. McDonald’s said it would continue to build a rice platform and introduce new ricebased offerings over time. “The consumer insights showed that consumers want a familiar and a filling meal especially during lunch and dinner. Rice is a common staple for people across the country and fits in very well as a meal option after bread and naan,” The Hindu quoted the company as saying in a statement. The rice meal served by McDonald’s includes layers of basmati rice, bulgur and vegetables such as carrots, onions, zucchini, peas and corn. People who love to eat non-vegetarian food would also not be disappointed as the rice meals come with non-vegetarian variants as well.

New QSR for Egg Lovers Launched in Mumbai If you are fond of eating eggs, there is much to rejoice. There is now a quick service restaurant (QSR) chain in Mumbai that brings for egg lovers 50 different ways of preparing eggs. EggOmogo recently opened three outlets in Mumbai – one each in Khar, Powai, and Goregaon, MTI News reported on 7th August. The restaurant chain, supported by consultancy firm DNY Hospitality, said it was planning to add 50 more dishes on their menu, taking the variety of egg dishes in its outlets to 100. “All the dishes are egg-based and we have designed some unique recipes in curries, sandwiches, burgers, biryanis and other options. The most favourite meal item on the menu, the egg, is now served here in over 50 different types and we have the aim to offer 100 different varieties of egg-based dishes,” Vijay Dalwani, Chairman of DNY Hospitality, was quoted as saying. “After launching many more outlets in other parts of Mumbai and Thane, we will be expanding to Pune and gradually to all major cities in India,” Dalwani pointed out.

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The World Café Launched Asia-Pacific Ketchup at WTC, Bengaluru Market Set to Witness Robust Growth In association with Brigade Hospitality, Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway recently launched The World Café. Located in Bengaluru, at the World Trade Center, the cafe is spread across 2,300 square feet. The combination of glass and chrome interiors contributes to the cafe’s relaxing and welcoming ambience. The bistro-style café is designed with simple colours with a modest décor that make the background artful. Great music contributes towards creating an ideal atmosphere. The World Café features signature items like single origin coffees, smoothies and quick bites. Some of the world’s most famous single origin coffees such as Ethiopian Sidamo, Brazilian Santos, Costa Rica Tarazu, and Jamaican Blue Mountain feature in the menu. Apart from exclusive coffees, the café also offers wide varieties of sandwiches such as Belgian mitraillette, Aussie vegemite, Canadian smoked meat rye for breakfast, as well as evening snacks like grilled vegetable pesto, lamb pepper fry, chicken jalapeno. They are amply complemented by decadents such as baked cheese cake, sacher torte and opera pastry, among others. The menu includes coffees with unique flavours; a selection of crafted teas such as Chamomile, Earl Grey, Moroccan mint tea, Oolong Prestige and Vanilla bourbon, among others. Cappuccino, Americano, Latte and Mocha are among the delightful cold coffees which are on offer.

While Europe and North America have been the main consumption regions for ketchup in the world during the past few years and the same position is expected to remain in the next few years, the market size of Asia-Pacific region will grow fast in the following years, according to a new study by market research firm QYResearch. Ketchup is a sweet and tangy sauce, typically made from tomatoes, a sweetener, vinegar, and assorted seasonings and spices. Seasonings vary by recipe, but commonly include onions, Allspice, clove, cinnamon, garlic, and sometimes celery. Tomato ketchup is often used as a condiment with various dishes that are usually served hot, including chips/fries, hamburgers, sandwiches, hot dogs, eggs, and grilled or fried meat. Ketchup is sometimes used as a basis or ingredient for other sauces and dressings, and is also used as an additive flavouring for snacks such as potato chips. Original ketchup is the most widely used type which took up about 69.83 per cent of the market in 2016, the report said. The downstream industries of ketchup products are family consumption and food services market. Ketchup is a staple with traditional fast food items, but the agreeable flavour of tomato ketchup has also boosted its use with local fast food items in emerging regions. The consumption increase of ketchup has been obvious in the foreseeable future. The ketchup products will show an optimistic upward trend, according to the report which includes data from various countries, including India.

Keventers Appoints Tarun Bhasin as CEO Dairy brand Keventers recently appointed Tarun Bhasin as its Chief Executive Officer. Bhasin brings to the new role over 22 years of experience in the quick service restaurant industry. “The food and beverage industry in India is growing exponentially and I am ecstatic to be a part of a brand that has contributed significantly to this growth. In a short span of just three years, Keventers has become a household name in India, and is slowly expanding its footprint across the globe. I am excited to join the vibrant team at Keventers and look forward to a fruitful association,” Bhasin said on his appointment. Prior to joining Keventers, Bhasin was associated with Jubiliant FoodWorks for over 22 years. During this long stint, he occupied several key leadership roles, including President & CBO (Chief Business Officer) of Dunkin Donuts and President & COO (Chief Operating Officer) of Domino’s Pizza, India.

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Puratos Sanskaar Foundation School hosts its 3rd Graduation Day Ceremony Graduation Day Ceremony of the third batch of bakers from Puratos Sanskaar Foundation School, a non-profit bakery school run by Puratos India, was held in Navi Mumbai on 5th July 2018. This year 19 underprivileged students from diverse background received their certification in Bakery, Patisserie and Chocolate. During the intensive two year study program, here the students learn the art of baking simple breads to complex desserts. Each of these graduating students has been assisted for job placements with leading bakeries in India. Peter Deriemaeker, Markets Director – APMEA, Puratos shared, “Within Asia, India is under a special spotlight for many sectors. Bakery, Patisserie and Chocolate is one such segment with a high demand from all kind of cities. At the same time, we realised a shortage of specialised professionals. With this endeavour, we wanted to bring in our international expertise to the Indian market and make a difference to everyone in the bakery value chain from bakers, employers, employees to the ardent bakery consumers.” Ashish Seth, MD – Area Director, Puratos Food Ingredients India

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Pvt. Ltd., said, “Given India’s burgeoning love of bakery, patisserie & chocolate items, there can’t be a better time than now to meet this demand and give to the bakery world those trained professionals who love what they do and know the exact nuances of their work. With a batch graduating for the third consecutive year, we are sure to add the right value and fill the skill void that existed in the industry for all these years,” he added. Puratos India is a subsidiary of Belgium-based Puratos group one of the world’s largest bakery, patisserie and chocolate ingredients manufacturers. Puratos Sanskaar Foundation School premises are f u l l y e q u i p p e d a n d offe r tes t bakery, and classrooms with all the necessary bakery training essentials. The teachers at the school are selected based on their experience in the bakery and patisserie industry. Marking the school’s inauguration in 2014 as Puratos’s commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR), this was the first school established in India by Puratos Group. The school is aimed at minimising skilled manpower shortage in the hospitality industry and helping youngsters earn a livelihood.

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BAKERY REVIEW

Irani Cafes are Not Yet History While cities like Rome, Venice, Paris and New York have vibrant café culture, Mumbai too boasts of its unique Irani bakery/café culture. The cafes and eateries set up by immigrants who came to India from Iran have popularised food products that was not heard of in India till they set up shop here. Many of these cafes went on to become iconic destinations and an integral part of Mumbai’s F&B culture. Sadly, these cafes, which were the centres of Mumbai’s illustrious eating out culture, have not been able to keep up with the changing scenario and most of them have closed down. But Ashok Malkani finds that all is not lost for Irani cafes as new ventures of similar character, with a slight tweak, are now coming up not just in Mumbai but also in other parts of the country.

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ne of the most important must-do things that a foodie should do, when he/she visits Mumbai, is to visit one of the city’s popular Irani cafes. There aren’t many of them left but few still dot the city’s landscape as a reminiscent of good old days. Though Mumbai is famous for its vada pav and dabbawallas (tiffin carriers), but for a genuine Mumbaikar Irani cafes are the classic symbols of Mumbai. A true Mumbaikar would never like to miss the Irani or Persian-styled cafes. It has been said often, and in many different ways, by people of all castes and creeds that ‘There is no bigger culinary celebration of Mumbai’s cosmopolitanism than the city’s many Irani cafes.’ Some of them are still there; churning out mouth-watering fare for almost a century now. Many die-hard customers continue to drop in there for the delectable dhansak, kheema pav and patrani machhi, to mention a few. In the bakery section they yearn for the crisp butter kharis, layered salted biscuits, and the Irani cha, a thick overly milky, sweetened tea, delicately flavoured with cardamom. A city that once boasted of 400 Irani cafes, now has only about 25-30 cafes of such character. There has been a tremendous decline in the number of these cafes, which is mainly due to the fact that multinational players like McDonald’s, Dunkin’ Donuts, et al have muscled into the market and tweaked their menus to cater to Indian tastes. And, as everyone knows, India is an attractive market for fast food chains due to its large population of young people, who typically are more open to trying new food products.

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of the documentary named Cafe Irani Chai, claims that the Irani cafes were the outcome of a long caravan of people, who escaped the great famine of Persia, in 1890s. They crossed the Hindukush mountain range – a distance that would, today, encompass four countries and two continents, to seek their fortune in what was then called as Hindostan. Haji Mohammed Showghi Yezdi, a young man from the Yezd province in present-day Iran, was one of those who made the journey. He eventually reached the shores of a city then known as Bombay after a treacherous eight-month journey. With no work, no money, no home or family, Haji followed in the footsteps of his countrymen who had made the same journey before him. Carrying a large sigdi (a tumbler with flaming coals at the bottom to maintain heat), he would sit at Apollo Bunder, the port area of Bombay, by the Gateway of India, and sell Irani chai (tea) to workers and passersby. This was the beginning of the Irani tea and, subsequently, the Irani cafes, claims Mansoor, who is the grandson of Haji Mohammed. “This is our root”, he says. By the beginning of the 20th century, Irani cafes had sprung up on almost every prominent street corner in Bombay, P u n e a n d H y d e ra b a d ; b e c o m i n g a symbol of Iranian cultural integration and distinctiveness.

Classic Features of Irani Cafes These rather quaint establishments with their high ceilings had – and still have – a nostalgic European décor, meshed with

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Persian icons and artifacts. High bent chairs, wooden tables with marble tops and glass jars that allow you to have a peek at the goodies inside them are essential parts of their ambience. The huge glass mirrors on the walls create a feeling of space. The characteristic outlook of these cafes can be easily distinguished from those around them. The features that set them apart from the other food service establishments are: Bent Wooden Chairs: These chairs, which are the distinctive mark of an Iranian café, are manufactured by steaming the wood, bending it into a curved shape and pattern before allowing it to harden. Marble Top Tables: The white marble top tables are usually in square shape. However, these are being replaced, in some places, by wooden tables with table cloth underneath a glass top. Under the glass top you will find the menu. Chequered Table Clothes: Almost all Irani cafes have a red, blue or green chequered table cloth, similar to the fabric worn by the Iranians. Chandeliers: Adding quaintness to these cafes are the chandeliers which can be found in most of the Irani cafes. These chandeliers give these Irani cafés a preindependence ‘continental’ flavour. Family Rooms: While some of the Irani cafes have removed them, most of the cafes still have these cubicles with wooden swing doors, for providing privacy to courting couples. These family rooms were so popular in the 70-80s that they were also featured in several Bollywood movies, including Raj Kapoor’s superhit Bobby.

History The history of Iranian cafes can be traced back to the Zoroastrian Indians who came to India in the 19th century. They were in search of livelihood. There they met the already Parsi community, who migrated to India, more precisely to Gujarat, during the 8th century. A few of those Iranians worked in Parsi homes and, in the evenings, they met to discuss about the life that they had left behind and their future. On one of those occasions, a man served them some tea and charged them for the beverage. And that gave birth to a new business idea: Serving tea! Mansoor Showghi Yezdi, the Director

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About the Cafes The oldest Irani café of Mumbai, which is a well-known landmark of the metropolis, is Kyani & Co. at Marine Lines. Founded by Khodamrad Merzeban in 1904, the café still retains its original atmosphere with red chequered table cloths, large glass cabinets full of jars of jujubes, cookies, biscuits and other savouries — the true image of a typical Irani cafe! Farokh Shokriye, who took over Kyani in 2000, was not sure if his humble Parsi chicken patties and traditional mawa cakes would withstand the competition from Big Mac. But they did! Farokh recalls that his father Aflatoon Shokriye took over the shop in 1959 with his brother-in-law. “Since then we have been running the show,” he stated. Here you might notice a portrait of Aflatoon done by legendary MF Hussain, who was a regular at the café. Britania &Co is another much-loved Mumbai restaurant. Started by Rashid Kohinoor in 1923, it was subsequently run by Merwan Kohinoor, till May this year, when he expired after a long illness. Now his brother, Boman along with the third generation, continue the tradition of serving one of the best crème caramels in the city. As you consume this delicacy and sip fresh lime soda – a quenching mixture of lime juice, salt, sugar and fizzy aerated water, life-sized cutouts of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge smile down at you from the dining room’s slightly slanting balcony. On a wall, one can find a painting of Queen Elizabeth II next to a portrait of Mahatma Gandhi, both hanging beneath a gilt-framed picture of Zarathustra, the Zoroastrian prophet worshiped by the Parsis. The decor at Britania has remained more or less the same over the years, including the ‘Bentwood furniture imported from Poland’ during its early years. An important item on the menu here is berry pulav. The authenticity of this dish is maintained by importing the berries from Iran. For all those in a rush and wanting to grab a quick brun maska (a crusty bunshaped bread with butter) or bun maska and chai, there is no better option than B. Merwan & Co., located just outside Grant Road railway station. When you enter this 104-year-old café, the wafting aroma of fresh mawa cakes will entice you to not only order for them but also for mawa puff, jam puff and all kinds of biscuits

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and breads. The mawa cakes are finished within hours after they are made! The bakery which was established in 1914, did shut for a few weeks in 2014, for some patchwork and repair work. It still maintains its old-world charm as it continues with its century old Milton tiles, wooden chairs and marble tops. Bomi Hormazji Irani, who runs the bakery, says that things haven’t changed in the café since his grandfather, Boman Merwan, established the café in 1914. Another popular landmark for foodies is Café Military, located in the back lanes of Fort. This place delights its patrons with its kheema pav (mince meat and bread). Established in 1933, it has stayed frozen in time with its lovely old tiles, wooden tables with checkered tablecloths, chairs, fans, et al. The airy, brightly lit café has the ambience that would introduce an outsider to the real Mumbai. Its name could be attributed to the fact that Fort area, in the 1800s, happened to be full of army men. Sheriyar Khoshravi, who runs the café, owned by his father and mother – Behram Khoshravi and Shireen – says various celebrities came to the café during his father’s time; one of them being MF Hussain. He claims that film personalities like Madhubala, Sharmila Tagore, Nutan along with her mother Shobhana Samarth (a Bollywood actress who was quite popular during 1930s and 1940s) as well as music composer Vanraj Bhatiya were frequent visitors during his father’s time. Every day from the time the shutters go up, at the Sassanian Restaurant and

Boulangerie at Dhobi Talao, to the time of its closure at 10 pm, Meheraban sits behind the counter, where he keeps a framed photograph of his much-adored partner Sharookh Yezdabadi, who passed away in 2015. The over a century old café, set up by Rustom K. Yazdabadi in 1913, continues to retain its old furniture. The Polished brentwood chairs, which are put out in the sun once every month to prevent them from getting infested with bugs, are in impeccable shape because they are polished once every two years. S ass a n i a n , b es i d es b e i n g fa m o u s for mawa and plum cakes as well as for chicken puffs, is also known for its dhansak, and salli chicken. Several celebrities, including film stars, politicians and academicians swear by the food and charm of this place. Meherban claims that actresses Mumtaz and Helen, late Shiv Sena leader, Pramod Navalkar and the former DG of police, Arvind Inamdar had visited the bakery (Boulangerie). There are some other Irani bakeries, cafes and restaurants that still are operative and loved by not only Mumbaikars but by also those foodies who visit the city on regular basis. But with the closure of Bastani, opposite Kyani, in 2004, which was a huge loss to the city’s cultural and culinary heritage, there was a general consensus that the younger generation of Zoroastrians was not interested in preserving the legacy of Irani cafes and bakeries in their traditional format. Farokh Shokriye of Kyani’s has candidly

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stated that the new generation was not interested in taking it up. He also believes that for preserving this culinary heritage, the government must rethink its taxation policy. He disclosed that if things were to be analysed the government was 50 percent partner in business…with 33 percent income tax, 5 percent VAT and 122.5 percent service tax. However, Mansoor Showghi Yezdi avers that new innovations and initiatives by enterprising entrepreneurs are beginning to turn the tide for Irani cafes.

The Resurrection Yet, like this writer those who have grown sipping Irani chai, and savouring brun maska and mawa cakes, there is no need to despair and dread for despite the dwindling of Irani cafes from Mumbai’s landscape, there is also the parallel trend of their resurrection across India. Yes, these parallel and even conflicting trends are one of the main reasons which makes India’s food service industry so interesting and worth exploring. AD Singh, who has a string of successful ventures – old and new – across the country to his name (Olive Bar & Kitchen, the Monkey Bar and The Fatty Bao among others), decided three years ago (in 2015) to open a new chain of Irani food restaurants under the brand SodaBottleOpenerWala, which, besides the popular Irani dishes, does serve up a large dose of nostalgia. “There are wonderful stories about Irani cafes. Take the case of Leopold in Mumbai and how it has evolved over the years; so will these SodaBottleOpenerWala outlets will evolve,” declared Singh. Presently, SodaBottleOpenerWala has presence in Gurgaon, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Delhi, and Bengaluru. And there is little doubt that this is

BAKERY REVIEW

going to be the game changer. Irani cafes, once the domain of Mumbai and Pune, cafes which were on the verge of extinction till recent past, perhaps have been given a new lease of inspiration to continue by SodaBottleOpenerWala. AD Singh and his wife seek to position SodaBottleOpenerWala as the modern day neighbourhood Irani restaurant with a difference. The reason for its fast expansion could be attributed to the fact that, like so many other restaurants, it is tapping into the trend of recreating nostalgia by way of crockery. SodaBottleOpenerWala’s menu too is dotted with elements of nostalgia. It creates a wealth of wonder around the sumptuous Parsi fare. It draws from the stereotypes of both, the commercial cafés and the private Parsi homes, and gives you the essence of what the Mumbai Parsi food is all about. The new found popularity of Irani restaurants, which are spreading across the country, is perhaps mainly due to their authenticity. Most of them are set up like a typical Irani café in Mumbai with checkered floors, large mirrors, fuss-free furniture, and high ceilings. Here, it may be added, that in days when the Irani restaurants-cum-bakeries started in India, functionality was the reason behind all the décor. The mirrors were put up to keep an eye on the staff and customers, the floor was made of sturdy kota and kadappa stone, so that it did not get damaged easily, high ceilings ensured the place stayed cool. Today all these elements have become a necessary part of décor. What is heartening that the aroma of Irani bakeries and cafes has even spread to places like Jamshedpur. Café Regal has become the favourite haunt of the young and the old of Jamshedpur.

Hot Bakery Items Irani bakeries and cafes in India have become popular not just for brun maska but for several other food items. Here are a few of them which are relevant for the bakery and confectionery industry. Any entrepreneur thinking of launching an Irani bakery or café must include these delectable items in her/his future endeavour. Brun Maska & Bun Maska: Brun or gutli pao is a local bread that is germane to the Irani bakeries and cafes of Mumbai.

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It is crisp and hard and crumbly on the outside but delectably soft on the inside. The brun is sliced and butter is applied liberally. Dip this in the sweet tea for a heavenly delicacy. In bun maska the butter is layered in a sweet bun. Chai: Tea in Irani cafes and bakeries is prepared with extra milk and masala to give it a typical taste. Khari Biscuit: These fresh crispy salted biscuits are dipped in paani kam chai (strong Irani tea) to give a heavenly feel. Mawa Cakes: This is a popular item sold in Irani cafes/bakeries. They are soft and buttery, infused with cardamom and rolled in wax paper. It is believed that these cakes were the outcome of circumstances. In the early 1900s, milk in India was not pasteurised and there was no refrigeration available. In order to prevent it from getting spoiled it had to be boiled at regular intervals. This frequent boiling of milk resulted in the milk turning into mawa at the end of the day. An Irani café owner experimented with it by adding it to a cake. And thus was born this teatime cake, which has become a ‘must have feature’ in Irani bakeries and cafes. Kheema Pav: Mince meat with bread. Simply delicious fare for non-vegetarians! Akuri:  Rated as one of the great Parsi dishes, every family has its own special way of making this breakfast meal. Akuri is usually made by scrambling eggs with onions, tomatoes (or even raw mangoes when in season), red chilli powder, green chillies and topped with fresh coriander. Others add milk, cumin powder, curry leaves and even ginger and garlic paste to arrive at akuri. With so many tasty dishes to choose from what are you waiting for? If you are in Mumbai, make a beeline for the nearest Irani cafe and have a delectable breakfast, or even a great lunch and dinner for that matter! n

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Sweet Business of Dark Delights

Whether it is the Valentine’s Day or any other special occasion, chocolates are sure to win over the hearts of the recipients. As a gifting option chocolates take the cake! Chocolate comforts us and brings people closer. Besides, the cocoa present in chocolate is also known for its health benefits. This makes one want to binge more on chocolates. For entrepreneurs, the chocolate market in India is brimming with sweet opportunities. Ashok Malkani views the market for chocolates in India and also the production, segmentation and application of chocolates.

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hocolates satiate the sweet tooth of almost all ages. There is nothing like chocolate products to lift up your mood when you are feeling down in the dumps. There is no doubt that Indians love chocolates. Even during festivals, a portion of the market of traditional mithais (sweetmeats) has been now taken by the chocolates. However, the misconception about chocolate being harmful to health has proved a deterrent for some health conscious people. Chocolate has received a lot of bad press due to its high content

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of sugar and fat. Acne, obesity, high blood pressure, coronary artery and diabetes have been associated with this delicacy. However, according to a review of chocolate’s health effects published in the ‘Netherlands Journal of Medicine,’ the authors point to the fact that cocoa, the key ingredient in chocolate, contains biologically active phenolic compound. Res e a rc h i nto h ow c h o co l ate ca n impact aging and conditions such as oxidative stress, blood pressure regulation and atherosclerosis has been changing people’s views on consumption of chocolate.

Chocolate’s antioxidant potential could have an array of health benefits. The higher the cocoa content, as in dark chocolates, the more benefits there are. In fact, eating chocolate may have benefits like lowering of cholesterol level, preventing cognitive decline and reducing the risk of cardiovascular problems. So satiating your sweet tooth through these dark delights need not be full of guilt. And everyone is aware of India’s love for sweets! This is one of the reasons that is going to push the demand for chocolates in India, in the near future.

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Chocolate Production For a person who wants to enter chocolate production it may be mentioned that chocolate production starts with harvesting cocoa which comes from tropical green cocoa trees. The seed pods of cocoa are collected; the beans are selected and placed in piles. These cocoa beans are then ready to be shipped to the manufacturer for mass production. The beans have to undergo fermentation process during which the beans turn brown. This process takes about 5-8 days. After fermentation, the cocoa seeds must be dried before they can be scooped into sacks and shipped to chocolate manufacturers. Once the cocoa beans have reached the machinery of chocolate factories, they are ready to be refined into chocolate. The first thing that chocolate manufacturers do with cocoa beans is roast them. This develops the colour and flavour of the beans into what our modern palates expect from fine chocolates. After roasting, cocoa nibs are ground into ‘cocoa liquor’, which is also known as unsweetened chocolate or cocoa mass. The cocoa liquor is mixed with cocoa butter and sugar. Chocolate comprises of chocolate liquor, cocoa solids and cocoa butter. Chocolate liquor is a paste made from ground cacao beans and gives the chocolate its core flavour. Chocolate liquor is composed of cocoa solids suspended in cocoa fat. The name liquor refers to the warm chocolate’s liquid state. When chocolate liquor hardens, it is commonly known as unsweetened chocolate. Cocoa solids are particles of fiber, protein and starch, suspended in cocoa butter. Cocoa solids impart flavour to the end product while fat makes it smooth. Cocoa butter is the naturally occurring fat in cacao beans. It impacts the chocolate’s texture, shape, and melting qualities. It is often added during manufacture of the chocolate.

Segmentation and Application Edible chocolates which we find in market could be segmented by the different ingredients used into three divisions – milk chocolate, white chocolate and dark chocolate. Milk chocolate contains as little as 10 percent cocoa while dark chocolate has more than 60 percent cocoa with very little or no milk. The ingredients of milk chocolate are sugar, milk or milk powder, cocoa powder, cocoa liquor, cocoa butter, Lethicin and vanilla. White chocolate contains sugar, milk or milk powder, cocoa liquor, cocoa butter, Lethicin and vanilla. Plain dark chocolate contains cocoa powder, cocoa liquor, cocoa butter, sugar, Lethicin and vanilla. But when one speaks of chocolate being much in demand in India, one is not merely referring to chocolate bars and slabs but also chocolate confectionery items like chocolate cakes and chocolate drinks. There are even chocolate laddoos. From brownies to birthday cakes to mousse, chocolate is playing a leading role in today’s Indian bakery & confectionery industry. Let us examine the applications of various types of chocolates being used in bakery and confectionery production. There are seven types of chocolates which are used in baking, namely baking chocolate, dark chocolate, milk chocolate, white chocolate, chocolate morsels, chocolate flavoured coating,

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and cocoa powder. Baking chocolate comes in a bar. But don’t even think of taking a bite from it because it contains no sugar, and is extremely bitter! Basically, it is 100 percent solidified chocolate liquor (the center of cocoa beans ground to a liquid). It is primarily used in recipes like brownies, fudge icing or cakes. These are recipes which call for sugar; which will bring out the flavour and sweetness of the chocolate. A word of caution: Do not use baking chocolate in recipes that don’t include sugar. Dark chocolate should have an ideal balance of cocoa liquor, cocoa butter and sugar. It imparts a rich colour and flavour to the end product. It can be eaten out of hand or used in recipes. It can be used for fillings, for which more flavourful chocolates with high cocoa percentages are required. Milk chocolate contains higher percentage of fat due to the milk. It is commonly made by adding dry milk solids (like powdered milk) to the chocolate. However, its high sugar content makes it sensitive to heat; so it may burn if you try to substitute it in recipes that call for semisweet chocolate. It is easiest to handle milk chocolate in no-bake recipes such as sauces, as a topping for already-baked treats, or as fillings or icings. It is mainly used as flavouring and in production of candies and moulded pieces. White chocolate has sugar as its main ingredient. It has no cocoa liquor but only cocoa butter. It is used mainly as a flavouring in desserts, and in production of candies and cookies. Chocolate morsels are also used in bakery production. They are tiny morsels which are stirred into cookies. Morsels are not meant to melt entirely. They are meant to hold some shape so that they form chips in your cookies. Chocolate flavoured coating is type of candy coating. Since it melts well and is rather malleable and can be easily moulded, it can be used in moulds. It is often used for coating truffles, cake pops and other treats. Cocoa powder is made when the cacao liquor is pressed to remove the cocoa butter, resulting in a fine, unsweetened powder. It comes in two forms viz natural and Dutched. Natural cocoa powder retains the cacao’s natural acidity, while Dutched is neutralised with an alkali chemical and hence it is less acidic, having a darker colour and more mellow flavour.

The Impressive Market According to the global market intelligence

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agency Mintel, the country’s chocolate market is expected to touch Rs. 32,000 crore by 2020, up from Rs. 12,000 crore in 2015. Mintel stated in 2017 that India was now one of the world’s fastest growing chocolate confectionery markets. “India’s chocolate confectionery market has had a strong CAGR (compound annual growth rate) of 19.9 percent, in retail market value, between 2011 and 2015, and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 20.6 percent from 2016 to 2020,” Mintel stated. A s fa r a s t h e I n d i a n c h o c o l a t e co nfe ct i o n e ry m a r ket i s co n ce r n e d , according to the industry reports, it has registered a double digit volume growth in 2017. Marcia Mogelonsky, the Director of Insight at Mintel Food and Drink, has, in a statement, said, “Our research indicates that consumers in India believe chocolate to be beneficial and convenient—seemingly the key reasons behind the growth of the country’s chocolate confectionery market, both in value and volume.” According to Mintel, the sales of chocolate confectionery in retail markets grew by 13 percent between 2015 and 2016 in India, followed by Poland which saw sales growth of 2 percent during the same period. In comparison to the rest of the world, Poland and India were the only two markets to see sales of chocolate grow in 2016. One can say that the chocolate market in India has a positive outlook primarily due to the growth in India’s confectionery industry, rising per capita income and growing gifting culture in India. Of course, there are other reasons too for the impressive growth of the chocolate market in India. According to the estimates of Mintel’s research, India consumed 228 thousand tonnes worth of chocolate in 2016, which

was 50 percent higher than 152 thousand tonnes of chocolate consumption in India during 2011. According to TechSci Research’s report titled ‘India Chocolate Market Forecast & Opportunities, 2020’, chocolate market in India was projected to surpass 17 billion USD by 2020. The report was published in September 2015. “Product innovations, strong marketing strategies and increase in variety of products are driving consumer chocolate sales in India,” observed the report. The findings of ValueNotes also indicate a promising future market for chocolates in India. According to the research report of ValueNotes titled Chocolate Industry in India 2014-2019, the chocolate industry in India was valued at Rs.58 billion in FY 2014. It was estimated by ValueNotes that the industry would be worth nearly Rs. 122 billion by FY 2019, growing at a CAGR of 16 percent. “Increasing disposable income, changing lifestyle, rising trend of gifting chocolates instead of traditional Indian sweets, and a surge in the sale of dark chocolates are expected to drive the industry growth,” noted the report. Here it deserves a mention that ValueNotes is a market and competitive intelligence firm, based in Pune, Maharashtra. The above-mentioned report by TechSci Research maintained that over the last decade, chocolate market in India had been growing at a significant rate, on account of expanding middle class population and increasing use of chocolates in various confectionery products. It opined that expansion of organised retail industry in India and rising disposable income levels of consumers had been further propelling growth in the country’s chocolate

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market. The report by TechSci Research pointed out that manufacturers were luring consumers by expanding their product portfolios and increasing availability of chocolates in various price ranges.  No wonder the per capita chocolate consumption in India has increased from 50 gm in 2005 to 120 gm in 2013. But still it is much less. For example, an average Indian shopper presently buys less than 150 gm of chocolate a year, while a typical UK shopper buys more than 6 kg of chocolate every year.  The fact that still the per capita consumption of chocolate products is much less in India as compared to that of many developed western countries also indicates a huge potential for the growth of chocolate market in India, in the backdrop of the present day socio-economic scenario of the country.

Players and Potential With such low per capita consumption of chocolates in the country, and with socioeconomic condition being conducive to the growth in chocolate consumption, India provides a huge opportunity to the marketers. There is huge untapped potential for the growth of India’s chocolate market, which the entrepreneurs can explore well. No wonder, several prominent players in chocolate business have forayed into the Indian market. Some of the international players who have already entered the Indian market are Ferero, Mondelez, Hersheys, Mars, Nestle, Kraft. These companies have already made their mark in the global chocolate market. The Indian chocolate market is full of opportunities for enterprising people, not only for manufacturing chocolates but also chocolate confectioneries. India’s chocolate market is expected to touch Rs. 122 billion in 2019. Among the international players ruling India’s chocolate market, Mondelez India, Ferrero and Nestle India are expected to have significant impact. However, despite its presence in the country since 2008, Ferrero India doesn’t have a significant share in India’s chocolate market as compared to Mondelez, which still dominates with a 65 percent share of the chocolate segment in the country. Homegrown brand Amul is also slowly trying to gain the momentum in India’s chocolate business. ChocOn, another Indian brand, which started manufacturing chocolates in 1998 and has not looked back since then, is also worth watching. ChocOn Coconut, ChocOn milcreme are some of their brands.

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Chocolate Trends The latest trend in India is towards dark and sugar-free chocolates. Companies like Mondelez and Nestlé have already successfully introduced their dark chocolate brands such as Bournville and Nestlé Dark Chocolate in to the Indian market. Manufacturers are also coming up with new chocolate products, which they claim are antioxidant and have low/no/reduced trans fat and calories. The market growth in this segment is expected to be positive. For the calorie-conscious customers, there are now handmade chocolates which are guaranteed high on taste and low on calories. With increasing health consciousness in India during the recent years, there is now ample scope for the growth of this segment. Health consciousness is also responsible for introduction of sugar-free chocolates in India. Globally the market (in volume) for sugar-free chocolate is estimated to grow at the rate of about 6.85 percent from 2017 to 2023. Global sugar-free chocolate market is highly dominated by America due to high production capacity and cultivation of cocoa in the region. The production of sugar-free chocolates from the European region is also anticipated to grow at a high rate in the upcoming years. In India, though this market is miniscule, the scope for its growth is immense. Another trend is that of pricey chocolates. According to Mintel, the entire chocolate market in India is booming, but pricey chocolates are especially in demand as the country’s growing middle and upper class develops a taste for luxury goods. This is an

opportunity for luxury chocolate makers in the US and some other countries to break out from a crowded home market and expand into the fast growing emerging market of India. Th e Re s e a rc h & M a r ket s ’ re p o rt titled ‘India Chocolate Market Outlook, 2022,’ states that affluent urban Indian consumers are now demanding premium chocolates, irrespective of their price. The manufacturers, keen to tap this section of consumers, are thus introducing premium or higher-priced products, which are fast becoming a trend in the urban markets. Looking at India’s swelling population of chocolate lovers, some US manufacturers like Brown & Haley are planning to come to India but high import taxes, paucity of modern supermarkets and a distribution network that is still primitive compared to the west, is making them hesitate, according to Brown Haley’s Chief Operating Officer, John Melin. Chocolates being presented as gift items during festivities and other forms of celebrations are also gaining currency in urban India. Now how can chocolate products’ market share in the total sweet market of India be enhanced in the near future? Besides bolstering of infrastructure and moderation in pricing, enhancement of consumer consciousness in relation to chocolate products is also needed to increase the market of chocolates in the country even faster, as well as further and deeper. Succinctly, unless the industry makes a sincere endeavour to educate the palates of its chocolate products’ consumers and potential consumers, and unless our cold chain infrastructure gets bolstered, we cannot hope to develop the Indian chocolate industry in real sense, despite its current impressive growth rate.

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Flour Analysis for Bakery Operations By Rudolf Strätker

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he pre-eminence of wheat in the production of bread, small baked products and fine pastry is based upon its gluten formation capabilities. Wheat gluten is formed from the flour protein substances gliadin and glutenin that ‘gelatinise’ during kneading and upon addition of water, and create a threedimensional network. During the kneading process, wheat gluten absorbs and binds up to 2-3 times its own weight in water. The swollen, elastic gluten gives the dough a bond. It makes it expandable and pliable, makes it rise and gives it leavening ability. During baking, the wheat gluten congeals and together with the gelatinising starch forms the crumb structure. The baking behaviour of wheat flour is determined first of all by its physical dough properties. For this reason, the emphasis during wheat flour analyses has to be not only on the determination of the quantity and quality of the ingredients, but above all, on examining the dough characteristics during the kneading process. In contrast to wheat flour, rye flour only has a low level of gluten-forming properties. For this reason, rye flour dough has a lower gas retention capacity. Rye

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flour is characterised by its large volume of water-binding mucilage – pentosan – that makes it possible to achieve much higher dough yield. Rye flour also contains more starch with lower gelatinisation temperatures (50-70°C) than wheat flour (60-90 °C). As the enzymatic optimum lies within the rye flour’s gelatinisation temperature range, a major part of the rye starch can be broken down into dextrins and soluble sugars. These are now no longer in a position to retain the formerly bound dough water. This breakdown of starch in the course of the baking process can take on a serious dimension in the case of very large enzymatic activity and lead to bread

faults such as water stripes and an inelastic crumb. Rye flour analyses concentrate primarily on an assessment of enzymatic activity and starch gelatinisation.

Moisture Content The storability of flour is closely linked to its moisture content. The oven drying method (ICC Standard no. 110/1) is generally used as analysis method to determine the moisture content of a particular type of flour. With this method, a precisely weighed quantity of flour is subjected to a specific drying time and temperature. The moisture content of the flour (in percent) is determined from the drying loss which is established through

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F ocus

weighing. The moisture content can be determined more easily with quick analysis methods such as ‘Aqua-Part’ or ‘NIR’ methods. High moisture contents shorten the storage life of flour and reduce its dough yield. Flour with a high moisture content tends to go lumpy. The moisture content of the flour should therefore not be higher than 15 percent.

Type Number According to DIN 10355, milling products from bread cereals may only be marketed according to specific types. The flour type is the measurement index for the mineral content (formerly ash content) of the flour that remains after incineration and is in close relationship to the milling yield / extraction rate. To determine the type number, the flour is incinerated in a furnace (muffle furnace) at 900°C for as long as necessary until there remains a white flowing residue consisting of minerals (ICC Standard No. 104/1). The type number indicates how many grams of minerals and/or ash are there in 100 kg of water-free flour. The minerals can mainly be found in the rim areas of the cereal grain. The volume of minerals increases more and more in line with the intensification of milling. At the same time, there is an increase in the content of proteins, dietary fibres, fats and enzymes, whilst the gluten and starch content decreases proportionately. In practice, dark, high mineral-content flour is characterised by high water absorption and enzyme activity. In comparison with lighter flour with lower mineral content, it achieves a smaller baking volume. Coarse

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wholemeal contains all the components of the cereal grain with the exception of the wheat germ and the outer shell. For this reason, wholemeal, as very coarse milling product, has the highest type number. Whole-grain flour contains all the components of the cleaned, whole grain – including the wheat germ. For this reason, it is not subject to type rating. The grains

may be separated from the outer shell prior to processing. The author is the MD of König Laminiertechnik GmbH. He is a Food Technologist with 35 years experience in bakery technology.

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Fruits and Nuts in Bakery By Swarnendu Biswas

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he role of fruits, dry fruits and nuts in bakeries is difficult to overemphasise. Walnuts, pecan nuts, hazelnuts, almonds, cashew nuts (cashew nuts are actually seed, scientifically speaking), mangoes, bananas, oranges and apples are extensively used in a variety of bakery operations. The fruits and nuts often significantly enhance the quality and nutrient value of the bakery and confectionery products. Besides contributing to the taste and h e a l t h of b a ke ry a n d co nfe ct i o n e ry products, fruits and nuts also contribute to the colour, flavour and texture of bakery and confectionery products.

Applications and Health Examples Take the example of raisins. Raisin cake can be a wonderful delicacy as can be the cinnamon raisin buns. Oatmeal raisin cookies are also delightful. Raisins can have application in puddings, muffins, and salads too. In Indian desserts like kheer and halwa, the role of these tiny delicacies should not be underestimated. Raisins are not only great to taste but are endowed with wonderful health benefits. They are high on energy, low on sodium and are devoid of cholesterol. For mountaineers and backpackers, these dry fruits are added into high-energy food supplements. Their rich carbohydrate content has the potential to make them a good post-workout snack. If you want to put on some healthy weight without getting laden with unnecessary cholesterol, raisins should be the part of your diet. M o re ove r, ra i s i n s ca n

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prevent or give relief from constipation as they are good source of dietary fibre, and can counter anaemia. Raisins are rich in iron and potassium. A handful of raisins can give you healthy dosages of B vitamins, iron and potassium. Potassium can reduce the blood pressure and tension of blood vessels, and iron can fight anaemia. Therefore it is not surprising that recent scientific findings have shown a positive correlation between reduced hypertension and consumption of this delicious dry fruit. Th e n l et u s ta ke t h e exa m p l e of pomegranates. In Turkey, pomegranate sauce is used as a salad dressing or to marinate meat. In Azerbaijan, a sauce is derived from pomegranate juice, which is named as narsharab. It is generally served with fish and tika kebab. In fact, this sauce can complement many meat and fish dishes. Pomegranate jam and jelly can also be enjoyed at breakfast tables. It is about time pomegranate jam and/or jellies become more abundant in the Indian bakery & confectionery industry. Similarly, though pomegranate juice is commonly known but

bakery cafes can surprise the guests with pomegranate shakes. Infusing of bananas in this uncommon shake would add to its taste. Pomegranate smoothie is a delightful beverage. Pomegranate juice can be used to make delicious cakes too. Dried pomegranate seeds can have application in granola bars, or can be used as a topping for yoghurt and ice-cream. At the same time, pomegranate seeds are spruced with several health benefits. According to Wikipedia, a 100 gm serving of pomegranate arils provides 12 percent of the  daily value for  Vitamin C, 16 percent daily value for Vitamin K and 10 percent daily value for folate. Besides that, pomegranate seeds are richly endowed with dietary fibre and have moderate calories. Dietary fibre facilitates digestion. What is more, pomegranate arils are devoid of cholesterol and saturated fats. Pomegranate in diet can facilitate weight reduction and keep the cholesterol in check. Regular intake of pomegranate gives an impetus to your immunity. P i n e a p p l e i s a n ot h e r f r u i t w i t h wide applications in the bakery and confectionery industry. Pineapples are used in fruit salad, and are also used as pizza toppings and as grilled ring in hamburgers. Pineapple jam and jelly are common items in breakfast tables and the use of pineapple in ice-cream and yoghurt is also not that uncommon. Pineapple bread can also be a delicacy at the breakfast tables, and it is about time more bakeries in the country place it on their shelves. Pineapple cake is however, quite rampant in its usage across bakeries.

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Pineapple is endowed with several health benefits. Raw pineapple is an excellent source of manganese and Vitamin C. It is also rich in copper and potassium. Potassium facilitates controlling heart rate and blood pressure, whereas copper helps in red blood cell synthesis. Pineapple is also spruced with impressive content of soluble a n d i n s o l u b l e d i e t a r y f i b re like pectin. The pineapple fruit has a mixture of proteolytic enzyme named bromelain  that facilitates in digestion of food by breaking down protein. The b ro m e l a i n co nte nt of raw p i n e a p p l e gives a sore mouth like feeling which is often experienced while eating the fruit. Bromelain is also characterised by anti-inflammatory, anti-blood clotting p ro p e rt i es a n d ca n h e l p to p reve nt cancers.  Bromelain also facilitates the health of heart. Studies have shown that intake of pineapple on regular basis also helps to tackle indigestion and arthritis.

Factors to Consider But some precautions should be adhered to for maintaining the quality of many of these fruits and nuts in bakery operations. For

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example, for all walnut lovers the brownie with walnuts is a delight but when once in a while a bad walnut explodes in the mouth it gives a despicable taste and takes a while to be rinsed out! O n ce a c u l i n a ry ex p e rt s a i d t h at “Walnuts in the shell should be stored in a cool, dry place. One needs to be more careful with the shelled walnuts because walnuts contain high percentage of oil, which can easily turn rancid. Exposure to light, moisture or heat will reduce their shelf life. Once opened, walnuts are best stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. For long-term storage, one can also freeze shelled walnuts in airtight

plastic bags; they thaw quickly at room temperature.” Retaining moistness of cakes that use nuts in generous proportions is also an issue worth exploring. “In the case of a dry fruits cake it is always good to bake at a low temperature and use a water bath in the bottom shelf of the oven which helps to keep the cake moist too. Also to make sure nuts don’t sink to the bottom thereby making the end product bottom heavy, it is advisable to coat the liquor soaked nuts with flour. Honey as part replacement for sugar in the recipe is also one technique that can be used, as on account of its hydroscopic property it helps draw moisture from air,’ added the said expert. Similarly, while using cashew nuts in bakery recipes, their high moisture and oil content should be taken care of. The sogginess of cashew nuts needs to be avoided. It can be done so by wrapping the cashew nuts in icing sugar and then roasting them in oven. Soaking of nuts in liquor is recommended for anything from 12 hours to 24 hours but if you leave them longer – it might not be harmful to the nuts; though might not give increased improvement in the result. n

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F

Naturally Sweet

or quite some years, sugar has been blamed for the many health related problems that affect our lives and lifestyles. The popular belief is that eating too much sugar or intake of good amount of sugar in diet can cause diabetes and obesity. But according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA),  eating too much sugar alone doesn’t cause diabetes, but it may be a contributing factor in some cases. However, according to a

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website (www.diabetes.org.uk) “though we know sugar doesn’t directly cause Type 2 diabetes, you are more likely to get it if you are overweight. You gain weight when you take in more calories than your body needs, and sugary foods and drinks contain a lot of calories.” The said website also said that sugar doesn’t cause Type I diabetes. The debate rages on…Meanwhile, there is no denying the fact that the role of sugar in the bakery and confectionery industry, despite the emergence of sugarless cakes

and desserts, is still all pervasive. Sugar plays a crucial role towards the taste, texture, and even in the appearance of baked products. Despite the powerful ‘health conscious wave’ propelled by frequent overseas travel, lifestyle changes, growing impact of media, and the rise in disposable incomes among the middle and upper middle income segments of our urban population in the recent times, sugar still remains one of the chief ingredients of India’s bakery

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industry. However, at the same time, the usage of natural sweeteners also seems to be on the rise in the industry. With health consciousness in the post-modern Indian society gaining ground, there has been l ots of ta l k re g a rd i n g u s a g e of natural sweeteners as sugar substitutes in t h e co u nt ry ’ s fo o d & beverage industry, which of course includes India’s bakery and confectionery industry too. Raw honey, maple syrup, dates, stevia and coconut sugar are some examples of natural sweeteners, which can reduce the usage of sugar and artificial sweeteners in dessert preparations.

The Sweet Leaf Stevia, also called meethi tulsi in Hindi, is a natural, plant-based sweetener with very less calories. Stevia, a wonderful natural sugar substitute, is extracted from the leaves of the plant species named Stevia rebaudiana. This plant is native to Paraguay in South America.

According to Wikipedia, the active compounds of stevia are steviol glycosides (mainly stevioside 

and rebaudioside), which have up to 150 times the sweetness of sugar,  are heatstable,  pH-stable, and not  fermentable. Despite being so sweet, stevia doesn’t adversely affect the blood sugar levels of humans. The beginning of the usage of stevia rebaudiana can be traced to the Guarani peoples of South America, and to 1500 years back. The stevia rebaudiana leaves have been in usage in Brazil and Paraguay for many centuries, for the purpose of sweetening local teas and medicines. Stevia can be found in three forms, which are Whole Leaf Stevia, Stevia

Leaf Extracts, and Altered Stevia. These different types of stevia are based on levels of stevia’s processing. The whole leaf stevia is the least processed form of stevia, which is 30-40 times sweeter than sugar; but it is also slightly bitter. It is not approved for food and beverage use because of lack of enough safety studies. Stevia leaf extracts are 200- 400 times sweeter than sugar and are less bitter than whole leaf stevia. Altered stevia is highly processed and has GMO ingredients. Its sweetness can vary between 200-400 times of sugar. Stevia is endowed with several health benefits. It can regulate blood sugar levels in human body. Thus stevia can be a convenient replacement for sugar, e s p e c i a l l y fo r d i a b et i c a n d ca l o r i e conscious population. Stevia also has an impressive content of antioxidant compounds, and thus its intake can be helpful for prevention of various types of cancers. Glycoside compounds in stevia can facilitate to do away with free radicals in the body, a process which can help prevent germination of cancer cells.

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Stevia can also play its role in regulating blood pressure and thus it can facilitate prevention of heart attacks and strokes. As stevia is extremely low in calories, its intake would not lead to weight gain. Today stevia is used as a sweetener in more than 16,000 food and beverages around the globe, including soft drinks, juices, waters, flavoured milks, yogurts, baked goods, cereals, salad dressings, sauces, confectionary, tabletop sweeteners and more. It is apt time for India’s food & b eve ra g e i n d u s t ry to u s e stevia more abundantly to cater to the growing wave of health consciousness among sizeable numbers of its consumers. The replacement of sugar with stevia can also counter the huge incidences of lifestyle diseases in urban India. As Indians are generally very fond of sweets, India can be a sizeable market for stevia infused beverages and desserts, which would enable the consumers to enjoy sweets without the risk of diabetics looming over them. Given the new socio-cultural dynamics in post-modern India, the market for stevia in the country seems bright. However, awareness about the market benefits of stevia is necessary among India’s farming community at large for getting them engaged in stevia production in a big way.

Honey for Health Another example of an important natural sweetener is honey. Owing to its high fructose content, honey is sweeter than sugar. Thus bakers need less honey than sugar to attain the desired sweetness. It does have wide application in the bakery and confectionery industry. Honey can infuse great flavours in bakery products. Cakes, breakfast cereals and breads are few of the many bakery products where honey can produce delicious results. Honey not only tastes great but is also spruced with vitamins, and also minerals. Some of the minerals found in honey are calcium, iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, potassium, phosphorus and zinc. Honey also contains amino acids and micronutrients. According to the USDA, honey contains about 64 calories per tablespoon. As compared to that there are only 15 calories

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i n o n e ta b l es p o o n of sugar. Therefore honey can be used as a source of energy. Furthermore, honey can facilitate to maintain blood sugar levels and regulate the quantity of insulin in the body. Besides these, h o n ey i s e n d owe d with anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and antioxidant properties. Honey comprises nutraceuticals, which p l ay effe ct i ve ro l e towards the removal of free radicals from t h e b o d y. H ow eve r, honey shouldn’t be given to children below 12 months old.

The Right Syrup for Bakeries Maple syrup is another wonderful natural sweetener used in bakery operations. It is a syrup, which is generally derived from the xylem sap of sugar maple, red maple, or black maple trees. Although preparing this syrup from other maple species is also being done. It plays a very tasty role in pancakes, donuts and waffles. It can also be used in your morning coffee, instead of sugar. Maple syrup can also contribute towards the preparation of s u m pt u o u s m u f f i n s and chocolate truffles. Besides these maple syrup ca n b e u s e d i n many other applications fo r t h e b a ke r y a n d confectionery industry. M a p l e sy r u p i s a l s o endowed with s e v e ra l h e a l t h benefits. This fluid has several minerals such as calcium, potassium, iron, zinc and

manganese. Here it deserves a mention that maple syrup has impressive quantity of manganese, which is a crucial factor in energy production and antioxidant defenses. Manganese is needed for normal brain and nerve function. However, maple syrup, like honey itself got high sugar content. Maple syrup is also a good source of antioxidants. According to an expert on maple syrup, “The health benefits of maple syrup are renowned. It has 54 disease-fighting antioxidants which together contains anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and antidiabetes properties. It has polyphenols that can help in keeping blood sugar levels in check. 100 percent pure maple syrup has sweetness of sugar without the side effects. It is spruced with vitamins and nutrients, and is gluten-free.” “Interestingly, compared to the other sweeteners like honey, cane sugar, corn syrup or table syrup, maple syrup always contains a higher rate of natural benefits. For example, 60 ml of maple syrup contains 160 mg of potassium and 56 mg of calcium w h e n 60 ml of honey contains 45 mg of potassium and 3 mg of calcium. Maple syrup contains also manganese, riboflavin and zinc. And it is lighter on calories than your average sweetener,” he stated further. Molasses, corn syrup and fruit juices are some of the other natural sweeteners which can be used in bakery operations. So for bakeries thinking of significantly lessening their role of sugar, there are a lot of healthy forms of natural sweetener alternatives to adhere to. It can be safely assumed that with health consciousness in urban Indian society gaining momentum, the usage of natural sweeteners in bakery and confectionery products in India’s bakery and confectionery industry would increase in the near future. n

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Ragi is Right for Bakeries

agi or finger millet is native to the Ethiopian and Ugandan highlands. It arrived in India around 2000 BC. Ragi is a drought tolerant crop, though a moderate rainfall is conducive to its cultivation. The heat tolerance level of finger millet is also impressive. In India, ragi is generally grown in the Himalayan region. R a g i ’ s u s a g e i n I n d i a ’ s k i tc h e n s h a s b e e n q u i t e a l o n g o n e. M a n y Kannadiga households begin their day with a wholesome ragi dosa and ragi malt. However, even a decade ago, the consumption of ragi was mainly confined to the south of India. But today ragi is increasingly attracting the diversified Indian palate, in breakfast, lunch and dinner. Ragi is enriched with several health benefits. It is a good source of fibre and facilitates in lowering cholesterol level. As

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ragi has good quantity of dietary fibre, a diet with the right amount of ragi (say ragi bread) can keep the stomach full for long intervals and prevent untimely hunger pangs. A special amino acid, Tryptophan, which is present in ragi, facilitates in prevention of frequent rearing up of appetite. This in turn contributes towards weight loss or keeping the weight in check. Thus if you want to slim down, chances are you would have success in such an endeavour if you have a ragi enriched diet. Ragi i s g l u te n - f re e a n d thus is suitable for people who have gluten

intolerance. It is also suitable for people with lactose intolerance. Ragi is also richly endowed with calcium. According to the National Institute of Nutrition in India, 100 gm of ragi contains 344 mg calcium. Thus if you want healthy bones, it would be an intelligent option to include ragi in the daily diet. Ragi can also address brittle bones, and osteoporosis. 

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Furthermore, ragi has low glycemic index, and thus consumption of food infused with the right amount of ragi prevents blood sugar from going out of control. The inclusion of ragi in formulations helps in lowering the glycemic index in a product, which is one of the desired characteristics for diabetic food. Ragi is also rich in iron, and thus is good for people with anemia and those with low haemoglobin levels. Ragi also facilitates in maintaining a youthful skin. Ragi comprises amino acids like Methionine and Lysine which make the skin tissues less susceptible to wrinkles, thus delaying the ageing process. Ragi is a natural source of Vitamin D too. Therefore the bakery cafes in India can market their ragi cookies or ragi walnut breads by promoting this facet as the craze for a beautiful appearance has also gone up appreciably in urban India during the last one decade or so. Not only that, regular intake of ragi can help address anxiety and depression. With health consciousness in urban

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India gaining momentum, ragi has the potential to gain popularity in India’s food service and food retail industry. Today, the wholesome flavour of ragi is being used to give cookies, breads, pasta and noodles a healthy quotient. Ragi can be used to prepare a good many healthy and tasty bakery

p ro d u cts . Fo r exa m p l e, bakeries can serve ragi cakes and ragi cookies with evening tea, and ragi and whole wheat breads or ragi breads spruced with walnuts for breakfast. One can also have ragi chappatis in lunch and ragi porridge for breakfast. Thankfully, the immense benefits of

ragi are now being used by India’s food retail industry in an increasing way. Ragi cookies are gaining popularity. For example, Britannia’s multi-grain bread, according to the company’s website, contains ragi among many other healthy ingredients. Nutrichoice Essentials is the brand of diabetic-friendly biscuits from Britannia. They are available in oats and ragi variants in on the go convenient packs. Then there are Unibic’s Multigrain Breakfast Cookies, which also have ragi among its constituents. Our food service industry should also enhance the usage of ragi in their offerings. More stand-alone bakeries as well as bakery café chains in India can come up with ragi infused cakes, breads, biscuits and cookies. They have good chance of getting appreciated and consequently getting popular as the people in India are getting more aware about their health and physical appearance than they were before. n

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Designing Your Cake

owadays cake is not only a tasty confectionery item, which is savoured by all age groups. In today’s bakery and confectionery industry, many cakes are also positioned as works of art. In urban India nowadays, the imagination or fantasy, and wish of the clientele is/are often reflected in customised cakes in the form of fascinating edible designs. Cake simulating a car, a guitar, a forest, a boat, a superman, a battle tank and many other real or imaginary manifestations are featuring in people’s celebrations these days. The photo printed cakes are the apt examples of customised cakes. Here edible photos of a person can be seen engraved on the cake. Ove r t h e l as t d e ca d e - a n d - a - h a l f, the market for customised cakes has grown impressively in India’s bakery and confectionery industry, which can be attributed to several reasons such as significant increases in disposable incomes in select but sizeable pockets of urban Indian society during the last decade-and-ahalf, the growing influence of globalisation, and the evolution of consumers in India’s bakery and confectionery industry through greater exposure to television, Internet and overseas travel. Now the consumers for cakes in India, especially the upwardly mobile consumers of cakes in big cities of India, have become more evolved than before, which is reflected in growing demand for customised cakes in India’s bakery and confectionery industry.

Cakes with Theme These customised cakes can add value to the birthday celebrations, theme parties, in a corporate event or even weddings. Many a time, the customised cakes correspond to a particular theme. The themes of these customised cakes often vary according to the nature of the celebrations. For example, a small boy during his birthday celebration

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may opt for an aeroplane shaped cake, whereas a guitar shaped cake may be apt for a happening college farewell party. One can see that the themes of customised cakes can be as varied as one’s imagination. These designer cakes are the product of specific inputs by the consumers and the creative expertise of the bakers, with the thread of vivid imagination tying these both ends. Of course, these wonderfully designed cakes require quite a lot of innovation and creativity from the bakers and confectioners. However, along with innovation and creativity, a precise understanding of the client’s requirements is also often needed for developing custom designed cakes. Though the appeal of these customised cakes with fascinating themes are still limited in India among our upper echelons, but their popularity is soon expected to cover the middle classes in our metros and even those middle classes who reside in the tier-II and tier-III cities of the country, in a big way.

Wedding Cake Decoration Wedding cakes have also gained currency

in India. They may be customised; they may not be, they may have a theme; they not have any such particular theme, but they should ideally reflect the glamour and glitter that people generally associate with a wedding ceremony. Thus decoration often plays a crucial role in wedding cakes. There are several elements in the decoration of wedding cakes. Piping is one of the simple ways of decorating cakes. In piping, “The icing is squeezed through a narrow opening. It can produce an astonishing array of details — ruffles, swags, swirls, bows, petals, leaves, shells, dots, zigzags — depending on the techniques you use. Butter cream, royal icing, and meringue all perform well with this method,” pointed out an expert. Fresh fruits can not only add nutritious value to the cake. They also play their role in decoration of cakes. Strawberries, blueberries, and currants are particularly suitable in the decoration of the cake, and they can be creatively used in wedding cakes. Fruits work best if left whole, since slicing will cause their juices to run, adding unwanted colour to the icing. Gum paste or pastillage, a sugary dough that dries very hard, is also used for wedding cake decoration. Marzipan is also used for delicious embellishments on cake. Edible flowers, such as violets, pansies, and roses, if grown pesticide free, can also be used to decorate cakes. However, toxic flowers shouldn’t be used on or near the cake.

Tiered Cakes Besides cakes with imaginative themes, tiered cakes in India are also gaining popularity. They can add the sense of extravaganza to the event. They are very much relevant for weddings. Tiered cake can be an apt wedding cake. In fact, it is believed that it was love that triggered the imagination of the tiered cake

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T R E N D

by a baker in Britain, in the late 18th century. “The story goes that William Rich set up as an apprentice in Ludgate hill and fell in love with his boss’s daughter. When he asked her to marry him he wanted to impress her with a large, beautiful cake and his inspiration came from the spire of St Bride’s church. However, there are no surviving records of this cake,” Catherine Gee of The Telegraph wrote. The popularity of the tiered cake shot after the marriage of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in 1840. They became less common during the wars that followed in the next century, but after the Second World War ended and when economies of most countries returned to normal, the tiered cake came into vogue once again. And ever since, it has not seen much of a slide in popularity. In India, the tiered cake began catching the imagination of the well-to-do class after the increased integration of the global economies and also of cultures from the 1990s. The penetration of Hollywood movies and other foreign language films into India’s cinema landscape also contributed to the growing popularity of the tiered cakes. Cutting a tiered cake has now become a common sight even in Indian weddings and the ritual is becoming increasingly common to mark other big celebrations. And with significant numbers among the Indian population (though their percentage in the total Indian population is much less) experiencing prosperity with the growth of the economy driven by the service sector, it can only be expected that the celebrations with tiered cakes would only grow bigger in our country.

Look, Feel and Filling A great deal of what makes a great tiered cake depends a lot on the visual appeal. Apart from making perfectly aligned layers, one should also make sure that the layers are of equal heights. When the frosting spills out a bit from the sides of the layers, the cake looks a lot more sumptuous. Another opportunity to make the cake look irresistible arises with the topping, the options for which are almost limitless. But how about the taste? Experts feel that the key to making a great tiered cake is maintaining a fine balance between the cake and the fillings. All the flavours you want to introduce should also come ideally in equal proportions. One should also be careful not to indulge too much in the sweet quotient, especially in these health conscious times. The combinations of fillings that one can choose while making a fluffy towering tiered cake are almost infinite. But some combinations have stood the test of the time. Some of these traditional tiered cakes are: German Chocolate: Chocolate cake filled with coconut-pecan. Black Forest: Chocolate cake with cherries, kirsch and whipped cream. Brooklyn Blackout: Chocolate cake filled with chocolate custard and cake crumbs, and frosted with chocolate icing. Red Velvet: Red-coloured cake layered with cream cheese icing or ermine (cooked butter cream). Hummingbird: Banana-pineapple cake with cream cheese icing. Princess Torte: Sponge cake with fruit preserves, pastry cream, and whipped cream, blanketed in a layer of marzipan. Lane Cake: Butter cake filled with a bourbon-raisin-coconutpecan filling and layered with meringue icing. Boston Cream Pie: Yellow butter cake filled with custard or cream and topped with chocolate glaze. n

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BAKERY REVIEW

Myriad Functions of Food Additives

The global market for food additives, which has various applications in bakery and confectionary, beverages, dairy and frozen products, sauce and dressings, among others, may surpass 115 billion USD by 2024 By Jyotismita Sharma

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ood additives, which refer to the substances added for maintaining or improving the freshness, safety, taste, texture, or appearance of food, have been in use since millennia. Acco rd i n g to t h e E u ro p e a n Fo o d Information Council (EUFIC), a non-profit organisation that provides information on food and health, the Egyptians learned the use colours and flavourings long ago. The Romans also knew how to preserve food and improve their appearance with the use of saltpetre (potassium nitrate), spices and colours. Similarly, many homes across the world have been traditionally using baking powder as raising agents and thickeners for sauces and gravies. Even our great grand parents knew that adding salt could preserve their dried fish or meats for a long duration. Similarly, the use of other additives, such as sugar in marmalade, or sulfur dioxide in wine, are hardly of recent origin. What has changed over the years is the scope of application for food additives. Their usage has become more widespread in the post-modern inter-connected economies. The use of food additives has grown by leaps and bounds during the recent times due to various factors, including lifestyle changes, increased popularity of processed food, and higher health consciousness among consumers.

Importance of Additives To meet the needs of food production, a large variety of food additives has been developed over time. This is largely due to the fact that making food on a large scale is quite different from making them on a small scale at homes. These additives play a pivotal role in

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Food additives can be derived from natural sources such as plants, animals, or minerals, or they can be synthetic. The WHO, together with FAO, groups food additives into three broad categories based on their functions.

Flavouring Agents

facilitating that processed food remains safe and in good condition throughout its journey from farm to fork. But the food industry can only use those additives that get regulatory approval. Only those additives get approval which are safe for human use and serve a well-defined technological function, such as to preserve the nutritional quality of the food or enhance the stability of the food. Some key raw materials used in the production of food additives include soybean, sunflower, rapeseed, palm oil, glycerol and sugarcane. JECFA is an international scientific expert committee administered jointly by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and WHO. JECFA is the international body responsible for evaluating the safety of food additives. The organisation has been meeting since 1956, to evaluate the safety of food additives, contaminants, naturally occurring toxicants and residues of veterinary drugs in food.  National authorities, either based on the JECFA assessment or a national assessment, can then authorise the use of food additives at specified levels for specific food products. In India, it is the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) that regulates the use of food additives.

These additives are used to improve the aroma or taste of the food. The flavouring agents make up the largest number of additives used in food, and as such there are hundreds of varieties of flavourings used in a wide variety of food products, ranging from confectionery and soft drinks to cereal, cake, and yoghurt, according to the WHO. Natural flavouring agents include nuts, fruits and spice blends, as well as those derived from vegetables and wine. In addition, there are flavourings that imitate natural flavours.

Enzymes These are types of additive that may or may not end up in the final food product. They are primarily used in baking (to improve the dough), cheese manufacturing (to improve curd formation), as well as in wine making and brewing (to improve fermentation).

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Used as alternatives to chemical-based technology, enzymes are naturally occurring proteins that can be obtained by extraction from plants or animal products or from micro organisms such as bacteria.

Other Additives Other food additives include preservatives, colours and sweeteners, among others. While preservatives can help maintain the quality of the food by preventing food contamination and by slowing decomposition caused by mould, air, bacteria, or yeast, colours can improve the visual appeal of food products. Used as an alternative to sugar, non-sugar sweeteners contribute fewer or no calories to food.

Food Additives Market According to a research finding released in September this year by Market Study Report, a platform for market intelligence products and services, the global market for food additives, which has various applications in bakery and confectionary, beverages, dairy and frozen products, sauce and dressings, among others, may surpass 115 billion USD by 2024. The role of food additives in the bakery and confectionery industry cannot be over emphasised. Food additives are today widely used in various bakery and confectionary applications which include cakes, biscuits & cookies, chocolates, sandwiches and breads. They enhance the volume and texture of baked goods. Food additives market from bakery and confectionery application is projected to reach over 35 billion USD by 2024, according to the forecast. The Asia-Pacific food additives market, led by Japan, South Korea, India and China, is likely to reach 40 billion USD by 2024, the research forecasts. The demand for food additives in this region is driven by rising awareness about high nutritional diet and increasing need to impart ethnic taste. The expected buoyancy of the Indian food processing industry in the coming years would be another primary growth driver of the food additive market in the region, the research showed. Rapid expansion of technology in the industry pertaining to consumers’ demand for healthy and organic food product options will positively influence the market growth for food additives, the report said. Consumers believe that low-calorie sweeteners will be effective for various purposes which include weight reduction, weight maintenance, management of diabetes and reduction in the risks associated with obesity, thereby driving the industry growth. Food additives derived from natural sources are easily available at minimal cost, which is providing a cost advantage to the manufacturers, the report said, adding that the Asia-Pacific natural sweetener market is likely to witness a significant gain at over 4.5 percent during the forecast timeframe. Natural sweetener increases the stability of the products and is also used in milk formulations to increase the bioactive calcium. The market for food emulsifiers, which are widely used in processing and also to maintain freshness and quality of the food products, may witness a significant gain at over four percent during the forecast timeline. The research also warned that the fluctuating prices of various raw materials used in the production process of food additives may impact the food additives market price trends. n

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Premium Biscuits Gaining Currency By Swarnendu Biswas

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ndia’s bakery market is estimated to be worth Rs.16500 crore and it is growing impressively at 7.5 percent per annum. Biscuits and breads comprise the major segment of India’s bakery industry, accounting for 82 percent of all bakery production in the country. It indicates that though the Indian bakery industry has of late been flooded with fashionable lifestyle products like croissants, muffins, designer cakes and high-end chocolates, it is still predominantly need-based. Though of imported origin, over the years, breads and biscuits have graduated to become the needs of middle income and even lower middle income households in urban India. Biscuits became an integral part of India’s snacking habits during the latter half of the last century, and today India is the third largest producer of biscuits in the world, with only the US and China ahead of us in this regard. The immense role of biscuits and cookies in time-starved post-modern India’s snacking options cannot be overlooked. Today biscuits have high acceptance in India, across a gamut of socio-economic and demographic profiles

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and has significant penetration in rural India too. India is the largest biscuit consuming nation in the world. Most of the biscuit and cookie consumption in the country takes place in the east and north India.

Portending Impressive Growth And the biscuit market in India is only expected to increase in the near future. According to a TechSci Research’s report titled ‘India Biscuit Market by Product Type (Plain Biscuit, Cookie, Sandwich Biscuit, Center Filled Biscuit & Others), By Sales Channel (Supermarket/Hypermarket, Convenience Store & Others), Competition Forecast & Opportunities, 2012 – 2022,’ India’s biscuit market stood at 3.9 billion USD in 2016, and was projected to grow at a CAGR of 11.27 percent in value terms,

during 2017-2022, to reach 7.25 billion USD by 2022. The report was published in July 2017. “Rising number of health conscious consumers,  expanding working population and  increasing urbanisation  are boosting the country’s biscuit market. Moreover, augmenting disposable income along with changing lifestyle, increasing awareness regarding healthy diet and change in food consumption pattern are some of the other factors expected to propel demand for biscuits over the course of next five years,” the report observed. According to ValueNotes, India’s biscuits and cookies industry was valued at Rs.145 billion in FY2014 and it was expected to grow at a CAGR of 14 percent to reach Rs. 279 billion by 2019.  According to a market research report titled India Biscuit Market  Overview, 2 01 7 - 2 0 2 3 , t h e b i s c u i t market of India is anticipated to grow with a CAGR of more than 6 percent during the forecast period of FY 201718 to FY 2022-23. “ Ta s t e p refe re n ce of c o n s u m e rs , d e m a n d of convenience food, concerns for health and wellness are

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some of the factors which are expected to drive the biscuit market over the forecast period. Moreover, improving distribution network, attractive packaging and e-retailing will also help in the overall growth of India’s biscuit industry. Additionally, promotional advertisements for biscuits also attract a lot of young children and youth which is also a factor behind the increasing number of biscuit consumers,” observed the report.

I N D U S T R Y

ValueNotes observed three years ago that the glucose segment, one of the most economical segments of India’s biscuits and cookies industry, was expected to decline and account for only 15 percent of the industry by FY 2019, compared to 25

Growing Premiumisation Traditionally, breads and biscuits co m e u n d e r t h e p u rv i ew of products of mass consumption, and still most of the breads and biscuits in India are mass co n s u m pt i o n p ro d u ct s , b u t healthy multigrain breads and premium biscuits have emerged in the market in the recent times in a big way, and have become part of lifestyle choices of upwardly mobile India. Sugar free biscuits, oats biscuits, wheat biscuits, multigrain biscuits, chocolate biscuits, or biscuits with tasty fillings are now abundantly seen adorning the market shelves across urban India.

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percent in 2014. “On the other hand, the premium segment – like cream, health and sweet biscuits and cookies – is seen to have a better growth potential. Manufacturers are now offering their premium products in smaller packs, making them affordable to all strata of society,” stated ValueNotes. However, the premiumisation trend in the Indian biscuits industry is not only visible in

upwardly mobile and elite India. People with lower incomes are also seen upgrading their consumer preferences from the affordable glucose biscuits to cream biscuits and cookies. Yes, cookies, which some years ago, were a niche product in India, are now rampantly seen across the shelves. During the recent years, the Indian biscuits industry is showing a marked shift towards premium offerings, which can be attributed to increased disposable incomes, not only in metros but also in small towns of India, the growing wave of health awareness spearheading across the society, and also to the influences of globalisation through Internet and television. Now many Indian consumers are not content with Glucose and Marie biscuits, and are seen opting for more premium and healthy biscuits. Along with the growth in disposable incomes in small towns, the growth of the mall culture and the spread of big retail chains like Big Bazaar in tier-II and tier-III cities are also contributing towards the increased demand for premium biscuits and cookies in the country. The increased

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BAKERY REVIEW

Marie segment would continue to decline in the same market.

Health with Taste One of the facets of premiumisation in India’s biscuits and cookies business comprises biscuits and cookies spruced w i t h h e a l t h y i n g re d i e nts . N owa d ays health conscious consumers of India are preferring to have snacking products which merge taste with health and this is reflected in our biscuits and cookies market too. For example, Nutrichoice oat cookies from Britannia Industries include oats with crunchy almonds and zesty oranges, which make these healthy oat cookies tasty too. Similarly, Britannia’s NutriChoice Digestive Biscuits are packed with the goodness of whole wheat and fibre. It is a biscuit that

exposure to global lifestyles has also led to evolution in India’s consumer preferences, which pertain to biscuits and cookies too. Now we are seeing a profusion of premium biscuit and cookie brands operating in India’s vibrant snacks market. Whether it is Oreo cookies from Mondelez India, Hide & Seek, Milano, Parle Platina from Parle Products; whether it is the Dark Fantasy, and Sunfeast Farmlite Digestive from Sunfeast of ITC; or whether it is Britannia Industries’s Britannia NutriChoice or the same company’s super premium offering named Pure Magic Deuce, we can see that the premiumisation in the biscuits and cookies segment is a trend embraced by all the giants in India’s biscuits and cookies business. Britannia’s Pure Magic and Good Day brands also cover super premium biscuits. Sunfeast Dark Fantasy Choco Fills presents an exquisite co m b i n at i o n of l u s c i o u s chocolate filling enrobed within a

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perfectly baked rich cookie outer. Sunfeast Farmlite Digestive Oats provides the goodness of oats as healthy & tasty biscuits. These health-filled biscuits have high oats content, are made from Aashirvaad atta and are available in three tasty variants — almonds, raisins & chocolate. One can easily infer from the market trends that the premium biscuits and cookies in India are expected to gain even more popularity in urban India’s market in the years to come, and the share of Glucose and

is not only healthy but tasty as well. Th o u g h o n l y a p p rox i m ate l y 2 0 percent of the biscuits market in India is unorganised but there also you can see delicious handmade atta biscuits. Many of their biscuits can be part of the trend of premiumisation of biscuits and cookies in India. If the unorganised sector of India’s biscuits and cookies industry is being given adequate finances and technical support from the government, they too can compete with the multinationals and have a pan India presence, and come up more exquisite premium offerings.

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BAKERY REVIEW

Professional Ovens at Your Service

Presenting Multipurpose Bread Roll Lines

Th es e ove n s of L i ves to c k Induction Solution include a wide range of simple, reliable, agile and versatile models. They are ideal for small restaurants which require a compact and easy to use tool for fast cooking. They also have applications in bars, pastry shops, food trucks and small kitchens. Thanks to the ovens of this line, one can warm brioches and even bread, prepare cakes or simple dishes easily. Livecook Induction Solution mishhoreca@gmail.com

Koenig multipurpose line offers a uniquely modular line for high versatility of products. Not only hamburger, hot dog buns, fruit brioche and pav, but also tin bread and rusk bread; crusty on the outside and soft on the inside, with an optimised and homogeneous pore structure and a most compact tin shape, can be produced with Koenig multipurpose line. The modular line features extreme flexibility. The multipurpose line is available in semi-industrial and industrial executions. The semi-industrial line offers an hourly capacity of 9,000 pieces at 6-row operation. With the dough divider and rounder Rex Futura Multi, a weight range of 17 to 245gm is possible. The industrial version of the Koenig multipurpose line features higher performance with the same high product quality. From dough dividing up to retracting, the entire line is dedicated to increased strokes per minute in a stable design. This enables a capacity of up to 30,000 pieces per hour. Aside from the makeup line, Koenig also offers subsequent modules, such as tray proofer and tunnel oven for automated, low-maintenance and centrally controlled production line from one supplier. Due to its customer-friendliness, ongoing innovations and highly skilled employees, Koenig has emerged into the world leader in the manufacture of bread roll lines. König Maschinen yusuf@autobakeproductions.com

The Italian Job Chef’s Forno Authentic Italian pizza can only be made in traditional oven offering the right process and temperature to create a perfect pizza. Chef’s Forno a innovation by Chef Gurmit Singh Grover, created ripples in pizza making technology by introducing a pizza oven offering the near perfection of pizza making, to the Chef’s satisfaction. After completing IHM from Bhubaneswar and having specialisation from IHM Pusa Delhi, he joined his father’s kitchen equipment business but wanted to create innovative products for the ever changing food service industry in India. Chef’s Forno can create an authentic Napoleon / Florence pizza in just 90 seconds and retain the real flavour of pizza. It provides perfect burn marks on pizza dough as well as cheese in smaller time of baking. The refractory stone used in oven base and tomb, absorbs large amount of heat in a small period of time, whereby consuming less gas, thus reducing operational cost. The company also provides special wood chips to provide perfect flavour to the pizza. The specially designed burner provides equal heat inside the oven, thus ensuring proper baking in minimal time. Traditional pizza ovens weigh 800-900 kg whereas Chef Forno weighs only 450 kg. Thus it can be easily installed and moved around. This feature gives good reason for caterers to use it more often too. Chef’s Forno is a perfect alternative to any Italian or imported pizza oven. It is more economical and easy to handle and service. With pan India service, company offers easy spares and service to its customers. The oven is available in different colour options to match the interiors of the property. The oven has already been installed at Radisson, ITC, Leela, Amici, Monkey Bar, Toast & Tonic, Olive Bar & Kitchen, The Coffee Shop, Fatty Bao, Wine Company, The Grid among others. Allied Metal Works allied@alliedmetalworks.com

Advancing Technology Pride equipment is one of the leading suppliers of commercial food service equipments for hospitality Industry in India. Its objective is to provide the best product and service to satisfy the needs of its clients. The company has been dealing in both imported and fabricated kitchen equipments and a wide range of F&B service items. The professional team of the company has vast experience and In-depth knowledge of the hospitality industry. It believes that advanced technological resources and a clear client-based focus are essential to meet the future demand of hospitality service professionals. Its partners have an average experience of 20 years in the industry. The company's mission is to distribute and manufacture top quality equipment & accessories for the food service industry, based on its experience, know-how, specialised manufacturing potential and market research. Pride Equipment info@prideequipment.in

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

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I N D E X

Advertiser’s Inde x Company

Page No.

ADANI WILMAR LTD.

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AKASA INTERNATIONAL

33

ALLIED METAL WORKS

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Autobake production

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APPLE bAKERY MACHINERY PVT. LTD.

16

bunge india pvt. ltd.

17

combi craft

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cremica food industries ltd. BIc DELTA NUTRITIVES PVT. LTD.

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European foods india

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FI ASIA

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FOOD ISTANBUL-CNR EXPO

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frigorifico allana private ltd.

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Goodlife technologies pvt. ltd

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Jendah Food Machinery Co. Ltd.

11

neena enterprises

14

rans technocrats (INDIA) PVT. LTD.

23

remington steel arts

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RICH GRAVISS PRODUCTS PVT. LTD.

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salva industrial SA.

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SELMI CHOCOLATE MACHINERY

13

SIGEP 2019

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Solutionz consulting

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stec hotelware

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tropilite foods pvt. ltd.

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veeba foods

fic

WINDSOR CHOCOLATE

bc

product preview

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BAKERY REVIEW

Delighting Guests with Innovations By Sharmila Chand Chef Jaydeep Kumar Nayk, Pastry Chef, Hyatt Regency Amritsar, has an experience of more than 16 years in bakery and patisserie. He has worked with leading hospitality brands like Taj, The Oberoi Group, Accor and Marriott during his illustrious career. The Chef’s strength lies in French bakery, chocolate work, wedding cakes and ornamental cakes to name a few. The excerpts of the interview with him follow:

What is/are the current trend/s in India’s bakery and confectionery industry?

What about the health quotient? How do you take care of that aspect?

Tall cakes with glaze and mirror glazed cakes are in trend. Moreover, nowadays consumers are preferring whole wheat breads, multigrain breads, cupcakes, glutenfree breads and desserts. There is an increased emphasis on gluten-free products like gluten-free breads and desserts. Another popular trend in the bakery space in India’s bakery and confectionery industry is ‘fusion’. Tarteria at Hyatt Regency Amritsar offers you some of the most innovative ‘fusion’ bakery items, which are very popular among our guests. Our fusion delights, especially Ladoo Cheese Cake, and Doda Barfi Tarts, are pretty popular among Amritsari residents as well as among our inhouse guests.

We offer the finest of bakery products using the freshest of ingredients. Our products are baked and served fresh. Keeping in mind the health-related needs and requirements of patrons we offer sugar-free and gluten- free products among other healthy products.

How did you become a Pastry Chef? Ever since I was a child, I had a fondness for sweets. Bakery items, especially cakes, always left me fascinated. So, after completing my schooling, I decided to pursue a career in bakery and become a Pastry Chef.

Who are your idols, who all have inspired you? I admire Chef Pierre Herme a lot. Another Chef whom I admire and who has inspired me a lot is Chef Vikas Bagul. Their mastery over their craft and their innovative spirit are very inspiring.

What are your hot selling bakery items? Some of the hot sellers at Tarteria at Hyatt Regency Amritsar include Fresh Fruit Cake, Non-Veg Puff, Tarts, and Chocolate and Coffee Pastry. ‘Tarts’ are specialty at Tarteria at Hyatt Regency Amritsar as we not only sell freshly baked tarts but also offer patrons a unique opportunity to bake their own tarts.

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What is your favourite tool and why it is so? My favourite tool in bakery and patisserie is chocolate dipping fork and my palette knife.

What are the challenges a Pastry Chef/Bakery Chef in India’s bakery and confectionery industry has to face in his/her job? One of our challenges is that it is very difficult to find proper ingredients, especially in the tier-II and tier-III cities of India. Finding organic products is another challenge for the Pastry Chef/Bakery Chef working in tier-II and tier-III cities of India. Strong connect with the delivery chain and detailed advance planning are two ways to address this challenge. Also, working on delicacies which involve locally produced/ available high quality ingredients is important. The art lies in innovating with limited resources and coming out with fancy end products which are of high quality.

What do you like the most about your job? What I like the most about my job is the opportunity to delight guests with my innovations. Being a Pastry Chef allows me the scope to come up with products which can excite the guests, put a smile on their face and be a part of their celebrations. Getting to be a part of their happiness through my creations gives me a lot of happiness, contentment and satisfaction.

My job allows me to create items which add happiness to people’s lives with my creations being a part of their celebrations.

What is your strength/s as a Pastry Chef? I believe my patience is my biggest strength which allows me to face any challenge thrown my way with a cool head and clarity of thought. This helps me come out with the best results.

What is your work philosophy? My work philosophy is to work with passion and give my very best. For me, my work is my worship and I do it with utmost honesty, sincerity and passion.

What are you passionate about besides baking? Other than baking, I am very passionate about reading. I like to read books on different topics, both related and unrelated to my line of work.

How do you like to de-stress? In my case, playing with chocolate in my kitchen is my favourite way to de-stress. When in stress, I like to prepare chocolate garnishes. Preparing chocolates, other desserts and cakes gives me a happy high.

What are your dreams? I aspire to be the finest Pastry Chef in India. Our country is famous for its traditional sweets. While truly excellent in their original form, these sweets also offer a lot of scope to innovate. It is this space where I want to explore. I want to work on fusion delights; create innovative bakery items by fusing them with traditional Indian sweets. It is my desire to present these fusion innovations on the global stage and make the world go crazy about them. n

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