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BAC Restores Historic Chicago Building page 14

EN FRANÇAIS! p. 27

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BAC HISTORY BAC Apprenticeship Works In 1966, 19-year-old Paul Sprung was homeless, broke and discouraged until he found a new way of life through joining the Union’s bricklayer apprenticeship program in Hackensack, New Jersey, as a member of BAC former Local 23 New Jersey, now Local 4 New Jersey. Brother Sprung had been on his own since the age of 10 when his mother passed away. His dad, almost blind, ran a small newsstand in New York, barely making enough to support himself. Though Brother Sprung graduated from high school and received a $500 scholarship to continue to college, he realized that it was far from enough. Then BAC Local 23 NJ President Joseph Rinaldi noticed the scholarship news about Brother Sprung and contacted him. During his apprenticeship training, Brother Sprung worked on projects while attending evening classes in college. A year after he joined BAC, he bought a second-hand car, maintained a B average in school, and excelled as a bricklayer on the job. The story of Brother Sprung is an old one, but it still speaks its truth today. Our union apprenticeship and training programs are second to none. That is why we are called “the Best Hands in the Business.” How important has the BAC apprenticeship been to you? Please help us protect our apprenticeship system (see President’s Message on page 1).

IN THIS ISSUE

Journal BAC

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President’s Message IRAP Comment Form Mensaje Del Presidente Members At Work Organizing News in Brief IMI & IMTEF Safety & Health Legislative & Political IPF International Funds MAP Canada Local Compass In Memoriam


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Protect Our Apprenticeship and Training Programs Our BAC members are the most highly skilled craftworkers in the world. We are the “Best Hands in the Business,” because our members go through a rigorous education and training system – our Apprenticeship and Training programs. We are very proud of these programs because they provide state-of-the-art comprehensive skills and safety training, with a combination of classroom and work-based instruction. Our Apprenticeship system is collectively bargained and jointly managed by the Union and management. It is the gold standard for education and training. That is why we have been concerned about efforts to expand the Apprenticeship model in a way that could lower standards and lack accountability. Our programs are Registered Apprenticeship programs under the National Apprenticeship Act. They are subject to the stringent standards and oversight of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Apprenticeship or a recognized State agency. We have been watching closely as the Trump Administration has moved forward in developing Industry-Recognized Apprenticeship Programs (IRAPs). The IRAP proposal is designed to expand the Apprenticeship model to new and emerging industries, and industries that have not been successful using the Registered Apprenticeship system. In the rule, the Department of Labor proposed excluding the construction industry and military from its IndustryRecognized Apprenticeship Programs (IRAPs), at least for the time being. After a 60-day public comment period, a final rule will be announced that could reverse the initial decision to exclude the construction industry. On June 25th, the U.S. Department of Labor posted a proposed rule on IRAPs in the federal register. The public has been given 60 days to submit comments on the proposal. Those comments will be considered before the rule goes final. The Building Trades Unions have had more than 100 years of experience in running Apprenticeship programs for the various trades in construction. We always work together with our employers to ensure that our training programs meet the needs of the industry and provide BACWEB.ORG

our members with a pathway to a career with fair wages, good benefits and a secure retirement. Any new rule must protect the integrity and high standards of the existing construction industry Registered Apprenticeship system. As indicated above, the Department of Labor is accepting comments on the proposed rule. Comments are due on or before August 26th. We urge all BAC members and family members to submit comments on the proposal. The primary issue to comment on is the exclusion of the construction industry from the IRAP system. It is critically important that this exclusion is included in the final rule. You might want to include your own personal story on how important the Registered Apprenticeship system has been to you. IRAP issues: • The Construction Industry must be permanently exempted; and “construction” must be broadly defined. • IRAPs are a poor, potentially dangerous imitation of our collaborative union-contractor apprenticeships and are designed to cut corners, weaken standards, lower quality and reduce wages so that unscrupulous contractors get rich and participants don’t. We cannot allow IRAPs to undercut our proven model of training and safety. • IRAPs do not require union or employee representation. An entirely employer-controlled system may completely ignore the worker’s perspective. • IRAPs do not require that apprentices be paid well or receive periodic increases, the only requirement is that they receive the minimum wage. Please submit your comments about this proposal on page 2 by mail to Adele Gagliardi, Administrator, Office of Policy Development and Research, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Room N-5641, Washington, D.C. 20210. You can also submit your comments via email: OIRA_submission@omb.eop.gov or on our website at: saveBACapprenticeships.org.

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Comments on Proposed Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs (IRAP) Rule RIN 1205-AB85

Organization: International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers (IUBAC) First Name (Nombre de Pila) Last Name (Apellido) State (Estado) IUBAC Local (Sindicato Local) Craft (Oficio) Comments (Comentarios)

Please submit your comments by mail to: Adele Gagliardi, Administrator, Office of Policy Development and Research U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Room N-5641, Washington, D.C. 20210

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MENSAJE DEL PRESIDENTE

The Official Journal of the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers

Proteger nuestros programas de Aprendizaje y Capacitación (issn 0362-3696) l ISSUE 2 / 2019

Nuestros miembros del sindicato de Albañiles y Constructores Aliados (Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers, BAC) son los artesanos más cualificados del mundo. Somos las “mejores manos en el negocio” porque nuestros miembros pasan por un riguroso sistema de educación y capacitación: nuestros programas de Aprendizaje y Capacitación. Estamos muy orgullosos de estos programas porque brindan destrezas integrales y capacitación de seguridad de vanguardia, con una combinación de instrucción en el aula y en el trabajo. Nuestro sistema de aprendizaje está negociado colectivamente y es administrado conjuntamente por el Sindicato y la gerencia. Es el estándar de excelencia para la educación y la capacitación. Es por eso que nos hemos preocupado por los esfuerzos para expandir el modelo de Aprendizaje de una manera que pueda disminuir los estándares y carecer de responsabilidad. Nuestros programas son Programas de Aprendizaje Registrados conforme a la Ley Nacional de Aprendizaje. Están sujetos a los estrictos estándares y la supervisión de la Oficina de Aprendizaje y Capacitación del Departamento de Trabajo de los Estados Unidos o de una agencia estatal reconocida. Hemos seguido muy de cerca cómo la Administración de Trump ha avanzado en el desarrollo de Programas de Aprendizaje Reconocidos por la Industria (Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs IRAP). La propuesta de IRAP está diseñada para expandir el modelo de Aprendizaje a industrias nuevas y emergentes, e industrias que no han tenido éxito usando el sistema de Aprendizaje Registrado. El 25 de junio, el Departamento de Trabajo de los Estados Unidos publicó una norma propuesta sobre los IRAP en el registro federal. Al público se le han otorgado 60 días para enviar comentarios sobre la propuesta. Esos comentarios se tomarán en cuenta antes de que la norma sea definitiva. Los Sindicatos de Oficios Construcción tienen más de 100 años de experiencia en la ejecución de programas de aprendizaje para los diversos oficios de la construcción. Siempre trabajamos junto con nuestros empleadores para garantizar que nuestros programas de capacitación cumplan con las necesidades de la industria y brinden a nuestros miembros una trayectoria hacia una carrera con salarios justos, buenos beneficios y una jubilación segura. Cualquier norma nueva debe proteger la

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integridad y los altos estándares del sistema de Aprendizaje Registrado existente en la industria de la construcción. Como se indicó anteriormente, el Departamento de Trabajo está aceptando comentarios sobre la norma propuesta. Los comentarios deben entregarse antes del 26 de agosto. Instamos a todos los miembros del BAC a enviar comentarios sobre la propuesta. La cuestión principal a comentar es la exclusión de la industria de la construcción del sistema IRAP. Es de vital importancia que esta exclusión se incluya en la norma final. Es posible que desee incluir su propia historia personal sobre la importancia que ha tenido para usted el sistema de Aprendizaje Registrado. Cuestiones de los IRAP: • La industria de la construcción debe estar exenta; y el término “construcción” debe estar definido de manera amplia. • En la norma, el Departamento de Trabajo propuso excluir a la industria de construcción y al ejército de sus Programas de Aprendizaje Registrados por la Industria (Industry-Recognized Apprenticeship Programs, IRAP), al menos por el momento. Luego de un período de 60 días de comentarios públicos, se anunciará una norma final que podría revocar la decisión inicial de excluir a la industria de construcción. • Los IRAP no requieren representación sindical ni de los empleados. Un sistema completamente controlado por el empleador puede ignorar completamente la perspectiva del trabajador. • Los IRAP no requieren que los aprendices reciban buena paga ni aumentos periódicos, el único requisito es que reciban el salario mínimo. Envíe sus comentarios sobre esta propuesta en la página 2 por correo a la Oficina de Información y Asuntos Reglamentarios a la atención de: Adele Gagliardi, Administrator, Office of Policy Development and Research, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Room N-5641, Washington, D.C. 20210. También puede enviar sus comentarios por el correo electrónico: OIRA_submission@omb.eop.gov o a través de nuestro sitio web: saveBACapprenticeships.org.

Executive Board James Boland President Timothy Driscoll Secretary-Treasurer Gerard Scarano Executive Vice President Carlos Aquin Executive Vice President Regional Directors NORTHEAST Al Catalano IU Regional Director, Northeast 304 Kenwood Avenue, #4 Delmar, NY 12054 (518) 439-6080 SOUTH Ed Navarro IU Regional Director, South 6201 S.E. Beaver View Rd Lawton, OK 73501 (580) 357-3048 NORTH CENTRAL Keith Hocevar IU Regional Director, North Central 7640 White Pine Ct. Mentor, OH 44060 (440) 534-1108 WEST Raymond Keen IU Regional Director, West P.O. Box 230460 Las Vegas, NV 89105 (702) 254-1988 CANADA Craig Strudwick IU Regional Director, Canada 2100 Thurston Drive, #3 Ottawa, ON K1G 4K8 (613) 830-0333 Editorial Staff: Brian Kennedy, Yin Yin The BAC Journal (ISSN 0362-3696) is published quarterly for $1.50 per year in advance, postage paid, for the U.S. and Canada ($1.75 per year in all foreign countries belonging to the Postal Union) by the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers. Periodicals class postage paid Washington, DC, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to the BAC Journal, International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers, 620 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20004. Canadian Postmaster: Send address changes to PO Box 503, RPO West Beaver Creek, Richmond Hill, ON L4B 4R6 Published for Bricklayers, Stone Masons, Plasterers, Tile Layers, Marble Masons, Cement Masons, Mosaic and Terrazzo Workers, Finishers, Pointers, Cleaners, and Caulkers.

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MEMBERS AT WORK

Ohio-Kentucky Administrative District Council

Rebuild America’s Public Schools, One at a Time Nearly 100,000 public schools across the country are crumbling – leaking roofs, peeling walls, poor air and water quality, mold, broken toilets and rodents. As the public urges members of Congress to support the Rebuild America’s Schools Act, members of BAC Locals are taking action to rebuild them, one school at a time. Revere High School, located at the intersection of Revere and Everett Roads in Richfield, Ohio, is one of these schools. Built in 1951, the school is ranked as one of the top 1,000 high schools in America, but it is starting to show its age. Over the decades, it underwent various building additions and modifications to adapt to the needs of teaching and learning. In November 2016, voters approved a bond issue that will pay for the new high school and other school buildings in the area. The $4.66 million project includes demolition of the old school, new construction and remodeling of a new school. Eight bricklayers of BAC Local 6 and 7 Ohio, employed by BAC signatory contractor Valentine Contractors Inc. (North Canton, OH), have been working on the project since late January. According to Mike Bichsel, Safety Officer of Valentine Contractors, a total of 118,964 brick and 129,762 blocks are expected to be laid on the job. An estimated 5,833 bags of mortar and 746 cubic yards of grout will be used and 15.2 miles of Durawall will be built. The job will generate 4

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at least 24,000 work hours for BAC members, according to BAC Local 7 OH Field Representative Noah Carmichael. Carmichael said, “We will have more than 20 BAC bricklayers working on the job in a few months. Our skilled bricklayers are performing quality work and our contractor has been satisfied with our work.” A BAC signatory contractor for nearly 50 years, Valentine Contractors has built 48 schools across northern Ohio between 2008 and 2019 alone, including 23 schools built in the last 5 years. Bichsel told BAC Journal the company has a great working relationship with BAC Locals in Ohio. “We are currently building another five schools. Our company has 135 employees, including 85 bricklayers. We expect to have up to 110 bricklayers working for us in July. We perform work in six BAC Locals and are looking forward to expanding this number in the next year,” Bischsel said.

In 1970, Mike Bichsel’s grandfather Jim Valentine joined BAC former Local 23 Ohio and founded Valentine Contractors. Jim is a well-known contractor in the Canton, Ohio area and has always believed in the Union. “Since the early 1970s, he has done work on everything from schools, municipal buildings, federal government buildings, commercial office buildings, shopping plazas and major universities in Ohio. Throughout his career, he has contributed in shaping the industry standard on how bricklayers perform work on the job,” said Mike Bichsel. “He started as a union bricklayer and hired union bricklayers as a union contractor. Three of us, all his grandsons, John Bichsel, Hunter Daniels and me, will be his successors. Our company has always been and will always be a union contractor.” The new school is on schedule to open for the beginning of the 20202021 school year. t

From left, BAC Local 6 OH member Shane Eash, Laborer William Bailes, Local 6 OH member and foreman Jake Heminger, Laborer members Nate Hofstetter and Chad Hofstetter, Local 7 OH member and job steward Demar Gibson, Local 6 OH member John Hunt, Local 6 OH member Jesse Loveday, Local 7 OH member Fred Campana, and Local 7 OH member Blake Lewis.


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A. From left, BAC Local 6 OH member Shane Eash, Local 6 OH member and foreman Jake Heminger, Laborer member Nate Hofstetter, Local 7 OH member and job steward Demar Gibson, Local 6 OH member John Hunt, Local 7 OH member Blake Lewis, Local 6 OH member Jesse Loveday, and Local 7 OH member Fred Campana. B. Block walls of the new Revere High School are going up. C. Jim Valentine, founder of Valentine Contractors, a BAC signatory contractor for nearly 50 years. D. BAC Local 6 OH member and foreman Jake Heminger, left, and Local 7 OH member and job steward Demar Gibson. E-F. BAC Local 6 and 7 OH members working on the jobsite.

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ORGANIZING Construction Organizing Membership Education Training Continues Graduating More Members The Union is undertaking a number of organizing initiatives, including Construction Organizing Membership Education Training (COMET). COMET is a focused three-hour educational training program delivered to rank and file members. Many BAC Locals and ADCs have recently completed COMET. The program generates membership support and participation in organizing. Since 2017, BAC members throughout the country are participating in COMET sessions to learn how to be more actively involved in their Local/ADC’s organizing efforts. Our past issues of the BAC Journal have featured our members’ participation in COMET. This issue continues highlighting their engagement in this training (see pictures). t

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A. Local 13 Nevada, B. Local 3 Arizona/New Mexico, C. Local 7 Colorado, D. Local 1 Utah, E. Local 3 California

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BAC Local 2 New York/Vermont Signs SVT Masonry BAC Local 2 New York/Vermont recently signed SVT Masonry, a contractor located in Bennington, Vermont. Before joining BAC, the company mainly focused on private, residential and small commercial work. The owner of the company, Reuben Harrington, has always wanted to be a signatory contractor, according to Local 2 NY/VT President Pat Tirino, “We stayed in contact with Harrington periodically over the past five years as the company was gaining capital and expanding its business. This year the company was awarded prevailing wage work, but Harrington was concerned about workers for their projects. We met with him and convinced him that the company would need BAC’s help to supply highly skilled craftworkers for these projects.”

Local 2 NY/VT officers also met with seven masons employed by SVT. Four of them signed up right away. The other three joined after learning about the benefits of being a Union member. “We will continue to work with SVT to ensure they get qualified masons for their projects,” said Local 2 NY/VT Secretary-Treasurer Kevin Potter, who was instrumental in this organizing success. BAC Organizing Director Steve Nelms praised our Locals’ ongoing organizing efforts. “President Tirino and his team played the patient long game with this contractor. It is that commitment that makes Local 2 and other Locals’ organizing efforts bear fruit.” t

Local 2 NY-VT signing new contractor SVT Masonry. From left, BAC Local 2 NY/VT President Pat Tirino, SVT Superintendent Marty Brady, SVT owner Reuben Harrington, BAC Local 2 NY/VT Secretary-Treasurer Kevin Potter, and Field Representative/Organizer Woody Miller. BACWEB.ORG

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NEWS IN BRIEF BAC Executive Council Continues Focusing on Union Growth Organizing and growth have been the Union’s first, second, and third priorities for the past three years. At the recent BAC Executive Council meeting in March, BAC President James Boland announced that BAC Locals and ADCs signed over 80 new contractors in 2018. “That doesn’t include contractors who were already signed in Local unions or contractors who signed PLAs or one-job agreements, or about 20 new companies who have yet to report hours. No, that’s over 80 signatories who are completely new to BAC, who are paying wages and benefits to our members today, and who were brought in by your efforts,” BAC President Boland said to the Executive Council in his opening remarks. “Let’s keep up the good work, let’s keep organizing, and let’s show the industry that BAC is here to stay.”

defend the laws on the books and invest in infrastructure that includes public school construction," Senator Baldwin said to the BAC Executive Council. “Even though my recent election is behind me, I pledge to continue working on the presidential race, working on the Senate races across the country, and working with all of you, so we can have the change we need to see so that we finally reward and respect the dignity of hard work.”

we can to register our families, our friends, our coworkers and our neighbors to vote, we will continue to be a target. That’s what the immigrant community is working against now and that is what the organized labor is working against now…When you have more champions of getting working people to register to vote and cast their votes easily, it will make a big difference for the policy priorities and the agenda for working families across the country.”

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla emphasized the importance of voting, “If we don’t get involved in politics and don’t do everything

U.S. Representative Pete Aguilar (D-CA) praised the efforts that BAC members are making in advocacy, “I am here to listen to you and to

The Council also welcomed a line of honorable guest speakers, including U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin (DWI); U.S. Representative Pete Aguilar (D-CA); California Secretary of State Alex Padilla; AFL-CIO SecretaryTreasurer Liz Shuler; Dr. David Weil, Dean of the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, and Thomas Frank, Author of Rendevouz with Oblivion: Reports From A Sinking Society. U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) spoke to the BAC Executive Council. “To reward and respect the working people with dignity, we must

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AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, the first woman elected to this position, holding office since 2009, addressed the Council, “When workers are coming together collectively, we win.” Shuler cited the Wall Street Journal’s comment saying that 2018 was the biggest year for collective action in 30 years. “It’s the incredible moment for working people and we should be putting our shoulder into the wheel.”


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hear what your priorities are. You are represented incredibly well in Washington, D.C. and your team has been amazing to communicate to our Democratic Caucus on the priorities of your members.” The Council also joined BAC signatory contractors for the Joint

Labor Management meeting where attendees heard from a line of inspiring speakers, including IMI President Caryn Halifax; IMI Co-Chair Mike Schmerbeck; Bob Arnold, IMTEF National Director of Apprenticeship and Training; Anirban Basu, Chairman

BAC President James Boland giving opening remarks at the BAC Executive Council meeting in March.

and CEO of the Sage Policy Group; David Williamson, Managing Director of Bernuth & Williamson; and Darrell Roberts, Executive Director of Helmets to Hardhats. t

Pictured from left, BAC President James Boland, Senator Tammy Baldwin, BAC Executive Vice President Gerard Scarano, and Secretary-Treasurer Tim Driscoll.

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla emphasized the importance of voting at the BAC Executive Council meeting in March. Padilla said, “When you have more champions of getting working people to register to vote and cast their votes easily, it will make a big difference for Dr. David Weil, Dean of the Heller School for Social Policy and the policy priorities and the agenda for working Management, defended working people’s basic legal rights in this country. “There are certain fundamental rights that a person families across the country.” in a working situation should be assured. If you work, you get paid,” said Dr. Weil.

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William Galston, the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Governance Studies Program, told the BAC Executive Council, “We need a new fiscal contract for the American people. Our leaders have to tell the truth about the actual cost of the government that the American people want. And then we have to have a frank discussion about how we going to pay for that government.”

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NEWS IN BRIEF

BAC President James Boland Receives the Prestigious David L. Clendenin Award On May 21st, BAC President James Boland received the prestigious David L. Clendenin Award from the Workers Defense League (WDL) for his distinguished service to workers’ rights and the labor movement. The WDL was founded in 1936 by Norman Thomas, David L. Clendenin, and others, to defend union organizers who were being legally and sometimes physically attacked in Florida, Indiana, and elsewhere. A close ally with labor unions, the WDL has fought good fights for free speech, decent working conditions, civil rights, and the right to organize. “Under Jim’s guidance, BAC is firmly dedicated to organizing new members and contractors working in the trowel trades across North America, ensuring that future generations of masonry craftworkers enjoy the benefits and protection that union representation brings,” BAC Secretary-Treasurer Tim Driscoll said in his introduction to President Boland at the event. President Boland thanked the WDL for being a strong partner and fighting side-by-side with BAC for almost a century. He also acknowledged the support from BAC Local unions and staff at the International Masonry Institute (IMI), many of whom attended the event. He further recognized the other two brothers and honorees at the event – Brother Gregory Floyd, President of Teamsters Local 237 and Brother Dennis Trainor, Vice President of CWA District 1 – for 10

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their distinguished service to the labor movement. He pointed out, “It has become almost a cliché to say that we should thank unions for things we now take for granted: like weekends, collective bargaining, Social Security, minimum wages, child labor laws, overtime pay, pensions, unemployment benefits, workplace safety laws and more. In fact, you can find memes to that effect on social media. It may seem cliché, but it also happens to be the truth.” Though we have achieved many milestones in labor history, President Boland also reminded attendees of the challenges we are facing. “We see

nominations to the National Labor Relations Board and federal courts of people who seem committed to doing everything they can to attack the rights of workers. At the State and local levels, we must deal with constant efforts to attack prevailing wage laws, enact anti-worker rightto-work laws, and take away any protections that workers have,” he continued. “We must always remain vigilant because protecting the rights of workers is always a battle, but it is a battle we are proud to engage in. It is a righteous battle, and one we will win. No one can win a battle alone, but together we shall prevail.” t

BAC President James Boland, center, receives the prestigious David L. Clendenin Award from Workers Defense League (WDL). From left, BAC Secretary-Treasurer Tim Driscoll, President Boland, and the WDL Executive Director Jon Bloom.


NEWS IN BRIEF

BAC Family Members Awarded 2019 Union Plus Scholarships Union Plus recently awarded $170,000 in scholarships to 108 students representing 34 unions, including two winners of BAC family members. This year’s group of scholarship recipients includes university, college, and trade or technical school students from 31 states plus the District of Columbia. The BAC winners are Selma Gezlev, daughter of BAC Local 1 New York member Cemil Gezlev and Gavin Jackson, son of BAC Local 5 Oklahoma/Arkansas/Texas member Patrick Jackson. Each winner has been awarded a $1,000 scholarship. A 2019 graduate of Massapequa, New York, Selma plans to major in civil engineering at Hofstra University and hopes to specialize in structural engineering. Last summer Selma interned with a restoration company, where she learned about the estimation process along with aspects of drawing and specs. The BAC membership is not this family’s only union affiliation: Selma’s mother, Meltem Gezlev, is a member of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT). Selma learned the value of union membership in 2012 when Hurricane Sandy destroyed her family’s home. “Our union leaders came through for us and have become like family,” Selma said. “Being a union member is about job security and protection, but for us, it is so much more than that. It is about having a bond that connects us forever.” Gavin is a mechanical engineering major at Tulsa Community College (TCC) in Oklahoma and expects to complete his associate degree in 2020. Thereafter, he plans to pursue a dual bachelor’s degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering, with an eye toward a career in the air and space industry. Gavin is a 2018 graduate of Oklahoma’s Skiatook High School (SHS) and attended Tulsa Technology Center’s STEM Academy during his junior and senior years. Jenny Hodges, Associate Professor of Mathematics at TCC, said Gavin was an excellent student and achieved one of the top two grades in her Calculus I class. “Gavin’s hard work demonstrates his grit, as well as his focus on his goal of becoming an engineer,” Hodges said. “His work

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experience has helped prepare Gavin for success in his schoolwork and, ultimately, in his career.” “The entire team here at Union Plus is so proud to be able to offer this scholarship program to help union family members offset the high cost of college education,” Union Plus President Mitch Stevens said. “This year’s group of 108 winners are all incredibly talented, motivated, and deserving students taking an important step to further their education and build the foundation for future success.” t

IU Launches New Website to Better Serve Members, Signatory Contractors The IU has launched its new website (bacweb.org) in March to better serve current and potential members as well as signatory contractors. New features of the website include: • A responsive and friendly design for mobile devices; • The addition of featured projects; • Consolidated FAQs for easy-viewing and filtering; • Filterable list of Locals and Regions with contact information; • Filterable news and BAC Journal articles; • New “Support” section for Members, Officers and Contractors; • Consolidated information behind member login. Each member can create their own login account to access information. From there you can login to the Member Portal with the same username and password; • New “BAC Tool Sales” section gives members a more convenient shopping experience. The IU welcomes you to its new website bacweb.org. Please contact askbac@bacweb.org if you have any comments or questions. t

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NEWS IN BRIEF

Motorcycle Rides Benefit Members and Families Affected by Natural and Other Disasters

BAC members participating in the Disaster Relief Ride that has raised $36,915 since its inception.

The first Disaster Relief Ride held in West Virginia in August 2015 raised more than $8,600 to provide assistance to members and families in need.

Driven by the love of motorcycling and commitment to Union service, officers and members of several BAC Locals and Administrative District Councils, including West Virginia ADC, Ohio-Kentucky ADC, Eastern Missouri ADC, and Local 2 Michigan, are raising funds through motorcycle rides. The annual event, “Trowel Trades Relief Ride,” which will celebrate its 5th anniversary this summer, has raised $36,915 that it used to benefit BAC members and their families who are affected by natural and other disasters. The Trowel Trades Relief Ride directly contributes to BAC’s Disaster Relief Fund, which was established in September 2005 to assist members and families affected by Hurricane Katrina. Since then, the Fund has distributed over $356,000 to more than 700 BAC members who were affected by Hurricanes Katrina, Sandy, Harvey, Irma and Maria, and wildfires in California. BAC Executive Vice President Gerard Scarano expressed the Union’s appreciation for the members’ support. “We thank brothers and sisters who have made donations to this Fund to help our fellow members in need. We also want to thank our retirees who continue to assist fellow members through their IPF deductions,” said Scarano. The fifth Annual Disaster Relief Ride will be held in Amherst, Ohio on Saturday, August 10th. Donations can be made to BAC Community Service, 21031 Ryan Rd., Warren, MI, 48901. For more information, please contact Tammy Tansey of Ohio-Kentucky ADC at 440-986-3300. t

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BAC Journal


IMI & IMTEF Cleveland Job Corps Grad Finds a Career That’s Given him the Life He Always Dreamed of “This career has provided me with the things I’ve always wanted in life,” says Steve Householder, PCC specialist and bricklayer with the BAC Ohio-Kentucky Administrative District Council (OH-KY ADC). “I love being outside and working with my hands. There’s a skill to our craft. Plus, I have a good wage, a pension, and healthcare. I have a house now and a family I can provide for. I’ve been fortunate to stay busy working throughout my time in the union.” When Householder entered the Cleveland Job Corps Center ten years ago, he was still making his way. “I was actually going to school for nursing, and it wasn’t for me. A friend of mine at the time was a marble mason – he eventually switched over to brick restoration like me. But he was the one that first got me interested in the trade,” Householder explains. Currently working for OH-KY ADC signatory contractor H.M.H. Restoration, Householder takes pride in helping to preserve some of the state’s landmark structures. “One of the most memorable buildings I’ve been a part of was the Standard Building in downtown Cleveland with H.M.H. We were restoring the old terra cotta. I was up on a swing stage 280 feet in the air grinding, replacing brick and terra cotta, and demoing.” The high-rise, which originally opened in 1923, functioned as both the Standard Bank and office space for the Brotherhood of BACWEB.ORG

Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen, until it was sold off to Weston, Inc. in 2014. Union workers like Householder helped transform the historic union building into luxury apartments. Through Job Corps and BAC’s training programs, Householder has gained the expertise he’s needed to grow his career. It was his Job Corps instructor, Salvatore Filippelli, now IMI’s Regional Job Corps Director, who influenced him to choose brick as his specialty craft. “Sal was a great teacher. He saw that I could do the work and encouraged me. He also taught me the importance of a good work ethic,” says Householder. When he finished his apprenticeship, Householder cross-trained in PCC, and in his current role with H.M.H., he works across both crafts. The Cleveland Job Corps Center has helped introduce countless young people like Householder to the trowel trades, including, most recently, local high school students. IMI Director of Technical Education Tom Elliott is a mentor with the ACE Mentor Program, which inspires high schoolers to pursue careers in architecture, engineering, and construction. ACE is growing their efforts to promote the building trades to students, and with the help of Elliott and Filippelli, ACE students from Max S. Hayes, an area vocational high school, got to participate in a hands-on masonry day at the Cleveland Job Corps

Center. The experience gave the students a taste at laying brick and block, while showcasing BAC, IMI, and IMTEF’s quality training programs. IMI operates Job Corps brick and tile training programs across the country, employing BAC instructors who provide classroom and handson training. Funded by the U.S. Department of Labor, Job Corps helps eligible 16-24-year-olds build careers and independence. The program offers a viable pathway to a career in the trades. For more information on IMI Job Corps programs, visit http://imtef.org/jobcorps-program. t

Householder (left) working on the exterior restoration of the Standard Building.

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IMI & IMTEF

BAC Contractors, Members Help Save Chicago Building on National Register of Historic Places Chicago’s Cook County General Hospital is getting a second chance at life with the help of BAC Administrative District Council 1 of Illinois (ADC 1 IL) members and signatory contractors. The 105-year old Beaux Arts building – made of brick, granite, and terra cotta – has been sitting vacant and neglected for over a decade, despite its historical significance in both the architectural and medical communities. “The building is one of Chicago’s crown jewels,” explains Hector Arellano, PCC Director at ADC 1 IL. Over the last year, Arellano and Jeff Diqui, IMI Director of Industry Development, together with Roy Ingraffia, IMI National Director for Partnerships and Strategic Initiatives, have been working to expand the union’s relationship with Landmarks Illinois, a nonprofit dedicated to raising preservation awareness and saving important historic structures throughout the state. Landmarks Illinois led the effort to add the Cook County General Hospital to the National Register of Historic Places, a move that made the project eligible for federal historic tax credits – and that stopped it from being razed. “They’re always looking for historical landmarks to preserve, and these are huge projects that create thousands of manhours for our members,” says Arellano of Landmark Illinois. This spring, IMI and ADC 1 IL put together a special program in conjunction with the organization at

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BAC Journal

Photo courtesy of Eric J. Nordstrom of Urban Remains Chicago

the District Council Training Center to showcase BAC and IMI’s restoration expertise. “They can see how we train our apprentices and journeyworkers – how we continually teach new techniques and new materials,” says Arellano. “They also see the quality of the educational seminars that IMI provides for the architects and engineers that they work with on restoration projects. So, they have confidence now that we’re trained in the right techniques when it comes to preserving these landmarks. BAC and IMI are in a unique position to help Landmarks Illinois achieve its vision to protect important historic spaces.” When the exterior restoration construction documents were released, ADC 1 IL signatory contractors were invited to submit bids, and two were awarded contracts: Mark 1 Waterproof & Restoration and MBB Enterprises of Chicago, Inc. In addition to their experience working on many of Chicago’s iconic historic structures, the contractors employ BAC members that have

received IMI’s Historic Masonry Preservation Certificate (HMPC), a recognized credential for craftworker restoration expertise. The project crews are working with some of the building’s original design plans, and the scope includes terra cotta repair and replacement, grinding and pointing mortar joints, brick cleaning, and replacement, and flashing installation. All in all, the façade work includes $12 million in masonry repairs. General Contractor (GC) Walsh Construction, architect Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (SOM), and Chicago developer John T. Murphy and Murphy Development Group worked together as a design-build team to respond to Cook County’s 2015 RFP to reimagine the hospital’s use. The $1 billion, four-phase project is set to be transformed into 345,000 square feet of mixed-use space, including offices, a hospital museum, and two Hyatt hotels. The project team hopes to save some of the historic showpieces inside the building, like the Works Project


IMI & IMTEF

Administration (WPA) tile murals and terrazzo flooring. Walsh Construction knew it could turn to IMI for support in leading the restoration of such a massive scale project. Angelo Trapani, Director of Quality at Walsh, reached out to his long-time contact Diqui to request specialized restoration training for the project’s superintendents. The ADC also invited the project signatories to attend, bringing the GC and subcontractors together

for a full-day program covering preservation issues appropriate for the work to be performed on the hospital. The seminar, presented by Amy Lamb Woods, IMI Director of Technical Education, covered condition assessments, masonry materials, and wall system construction and performance. Suitable masonry material repairs were also discussed, including appropriate unit replacement, cementitious patching options, mortar analysis,

and composition, as well as cleaning approaches and methodologies. “The Cook County project perfectly exemplifies how developing partnerships with like-minded organizations can benefit our common goals,” says Ingraffia. “We’re constantly working to build relationships that help us secure more union masonry work for our hardworking members and signatory contractors.” t

IMTEF’s New Tile Curriculum Prepares BAC Apprentices to Meet Industry Installation Standards The tile industry has undergone a rapid transformation in the last decade with continual innovations in materials and installation methods. The International Masonry Training and Education Foundation’s (IMTEF’s) new tile curriculum, now available at BAC training centers across the country, gives BAC apprentices and craftworkers a competitive advantage by teaching them the skills to successfully install in-demand products using the latest techniques. The course, Tile Training for BAC Craftworkers: Volume 1, also helps craftworkers understand the “why” behind what they do in the field, providing in-depth information on the American National Standard Specifications (ANSI) and the Tile Council of North America (TCNA) Handbook. The guidelines and standards also cover important day-to-day field and installation requirements, including substrate requirements, grout joint size, patterns, mortar types, and mortar coverage. “Having that knowledge gives our tile workers power in the field,” says Gavin Collier, Tile Apprentice Coordinator at the District Council Training Center of Illinois (DCTC IL), who helped develop the new curriculum. “If something isn’t right, or they feel the wrong methods are being used, they can point to the standards and handbook and actually have something in writing to show, that, for example, ‘this mortar doesn’t meet the specifications we need in order to put the tile down.’” Bob Arnold, IMTEF National Director of Apprenticeship and Training agrees, adding that, “If you don’t install the substrates and tile materials correctly, it can lead to failures. It’s a big plus for our contractors to have workers who have the knowledge and skill to be able to raise potential problems.”

BACWEB.ORG

That’s not to say all the responsibility falls to the BAC tile layer, but that their expertise can be critical in preventing costly mistakes. “Even though at times it may seem as though [the architect, interior designer, or specifier] knows what needs to be specified, they may miss specifying a material,” the curriculum explains. “At that point, it is up to the project manager (PM) to question the architect. If it gets past all of them, then it is up to the installers to raise a red flag and bring it to the attention of the general contractor (GC) and to the attention of the PM in charge of that particular project.”

In addition to codes and standards, the new curriculum covers covers critical skill areas like layout and installation for walls ceilings, and floors; membranes; substrate prep, cutting, and drilling; and grout.

The program includes both classroom and hands-on modules, and is packaged with an instructor guide, presentation slides, and student manual to provide a consistent learning experience.

BAC tile journeyworkers interested in upgrading their skills can request training on any of the topics covered in the new curriculum through their ADC or local training center. The DCTC IL, for example, recently offered a journeyworker course on Gauged Porcelain Tile (GPT) based on information in the new curriculum. GPT – offered in sizes as large as 60”x120” – presents a new set of installation challenges and techniques for tile workers to master. “Our industry has changed so much, even in the last ten years,” said Collier. “Installation methods can quickly become outdated. The new curriculum covers the most current methods and is extremely thorough…The more educated our workers are, the better it will be for our industry in the end.” t

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IMI & IMTEF

INTERNATIONAL MASONRY TRAINING AND EDUCATION FOUNDATION

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES - FALL 2019 The John J. Flynn BAC/IMI International Training Center 17101 Science Drive • Bowie, Maryland 20715

Train-the-Trainer Courses August 27 - 30 November 11 - 15 September 30 - October 2

OSHA 510 OSHA Standards for the Construction Industry - FOR INSTRUCTORS

OSHA 500 Trainer Course in OSHA Standards for Construction - FOR INSTRUCTORS

OSHA 502 Update for Construction Industry Outreach Trainers - FOR INSTRUCTORS

Continuing Education Courses September 16 - 24 September 24 - 27 October 28 - November 1

Refractory Class size is limited to 16.

MSHA New Miner Allows BAC Members to work on MSHA-governed construction sites.

JAHN/Edison Coatings/Conproco/Lithomex ABAA Air Barrier Certification

September 30 - October 2

September 10 - 25 October 1 - 16 October 22 - November 16 September 30 - October 5 October 14 - 19

`

Air Barrier Association of America (ABAA) requires $250 for ABAA Certified Installer License Fee (1st year) and $100 annual renewal fee payable to ABAA by the installer to receive and maintain their Installer Certification Card.

Welding Welding class size limited to 8 students. A $100 equipment fee is required.

Historic Masonry Preservation Certificate Must have 5 years of BAC Journey-level craftworker experience. 6 full days including 3 evening classes with travel in on Sunday

September 10 - November 22

Cross-Craft Training Upgrade Training Pre-Job Training

September 9 - 13 September 16 - 20 September 23 - 27 October 7 - 11

ICP Year 2 ICP Year 3 ICP Year 4 ICP Years 1 & 5

Please contact your local officer or your training coordinator to register early as class sizes for these courses are limited. Local Officers/Training Coordinators: To enroll your members for training or receive information on additional courses, contact Serenia Holland • (301) 291-2105 • sholland@imtef.org

Union Masonry Craftworkers Contractors & Consultants

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BAC Journal


SAFETY & HEALTH Working Together to Reduce Strain & Sprain Injuries: New SAfety Voice for Ergonomics Apprenticeship Training Program Back and shoulder strain and sprain injuries are common in the construction industry and in the masonry trades. These types of soft tissue injuries impact a worker’s wellbeing on and off the job and are a leading cause of disabling injuries. Providing contractors and workers with the information and resources to prevent them has been a focus of the Masonry r2p Partnership since it was established – first with the ChooseHandSafety.org website and most recently with the release of the SAVE apprenticeship training program. This new program, which was developed through a research study funded by CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training (see 2019 Issue 1, p. 19), is designed to teach masonry brick and block apprentices about the risks for ergonomic injuries and how to prevent them. It also teaches them how to speak up and who to go to with concerns about these and other safety and health hazards. “[Working with the Masonry r2p Partnership] was a great way to do research… [because] it helps make the research more meaningful,” said Dr. Dan Anton the leader researcher on the project. Developed with direct input from IMI trainers, signatory contractors, and brick and block apprentices, the 7 interactive 30 minute training units

can be taught individually over time or as a single 3 ½ hour session. Each unit contains slides and a brief video with pauses for discussions, activities and quizzes. There is an apprentice workbook to use with the units as well as a SAVE Instructor Manual and Orientation Video to help instructors deliver the training. All of the materials can be found through cpwr.com/safety-voice-ergonomicssave. To learn more about the development and use of the SAVE Program, watch this 45 minute webinar https:// youtu.be/7wF5nstdHtI on-demand, presented by SAVE researchers Dr. Dan Anton and Dr. Jennifer Hess, along with Masonry r2p Partnership facilitator and IMTEF North Central Regional Director and National Safety Director, Dave Wysocki.

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What’s in the Program?

SAFETY & HEALTH

Best Built Plans: Preventing Injury & Improving Productivity by Improving Materials Handling on Job Sites CPWR and the Masonry r2p Partnership are tackling preventing strain and sprain injuries in a number of different ways. In addition to the ChooseHandSafety.org website and the new SAVE program, the Best Built Plans program provides a series of practical tools to help contractors plan for safe and productive material handling from the bid to completion of a project, and training and coaching resources that can be used by trainers and workers on and off the job to reinforce safe practices. First featured in Issue 2 of last year’s BAC Journal, the program has received several updates over the last year based on user input, including: • Creating an App version of the program for use on iPads/iPhones/ Tablets and Android devices to make it easy to access the program from the jobsite or on the road.

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• Translating the contractor planning tool and related training resources into Spanish. • Developing a short video on how the planning resources can be used with a project. • And a new comprehensive Ergonomics Training program that incorporates the program’s resources and makes the connection between the importance of preventing injuries and pain up front to preventing addiction risks in the future. Recognizing that everyone has a role to play, this new program, which is currently in development, includes a training program for workers, a trainthe-trainer program, and a program for contractors. Find the full program – including related smart phone games at www.bestbuiltplans.org. t

Developed with input from labor, trainers, researchers, and contractors, including ones identified by ICE, Best Built Plans includes: • A Site Planning Tool that includes planning and training materials to use at each project stage: questions to consider; pre-set spreadsheets, material weights, storage and lifting options, daily checklists, toolbox talks and supervisor training resources. • The Training Resources and Coaching Resources are interactive and designed to introduce equipment, work practices, and exercises to reduce the risk for injury. They can be used in a class or you can use them on your own to test your knowledge. • Two free games available on major mobile app stores in Spanish and English. The first game, Lift Coach – Plan Your Lift, focuses on safe lifting and moving practices. The second game, Plan Your Route, reinforces the importance of planning for how materials will be lifted and moved. Players will have to make decisions about whether to lift an object alone, use lifting equipment or get help from a co-worker, and will need to make sure there’s a clear path to move the materials. As a player progresses through the game,the jobsite becomes more complex.


SAFETY & HEALTH

Staying Safe and Healthy When Working Outside this Summer Summer weather means more work, but it’s important to remember that the sun, heat, and thunderstorms come with their own risks. Working either outdoors in direct sunlight or in hot, enclosed spaces puts you at risk for heat stroke and related illnesses. Sun exposure can damage your skin and cause skin cancer. Thunderstorms can come up quickly and create wind and lightning risks. Make sure you know how to recognize the risks and work safely! In addition to heat-related hazards, working outside at any time of year means exposure to jobsite hazards like silica dust, noise, and chemical exposures. Find information about the risks and prevention at: • Silica-safe.org • ChooseHandSafety.org • CPWR Noise & Hearing Loss Prevention Training Concerned about a different hazard? Check out CPWR’s new A-Z search feature at https://www.cpwr.com/a-z-index t

Your Harness Can Save You from a Fall, But What Happens Next? This year the Campaign to Stop Construction Falls focused attention on the importance of having a rescue plan for workers that use harnesses. Before you begin work, make sure the lanyard attached to your harness is in good shape and the right length to protect you if you fall, and check with your supervisor to learn what to do if you or one of your co-workers falls. t

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LEGISLATIVE & POLITICAL Every Week Should Be Infrastructure Week During the 7th annual Infrastructure Week on May 13-20th, brothers and sisters of the North America’s Building Trades Unions (NABTU) stood together with U.S. House of Representatives on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., to push for the $2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan that includes investments in building public schools, hospitals, roads, bridges, transit projects, and more. U.S. Representatives Donald Norcross (D-NJ), Brendan Boyle (D-PA), and David McKinley (RWV) spoke alongside NABTU President Sean McGarvey and many other union leaders. “There has been talk about infrastructure investments in Washington, without real, agreedupon actions to build,” said Congressman Norcross, who pointed out that the work of the Building Trades Caucus is to invest our greatest resource: the American worker. “There is no better way to lift up workers, boost our economy and make our communities safer than building for our future.” The Congressional Building Trades Caucus, started by Congressmen Norcross and McKinley in March 2016, aims to bring members of Congress together from both sides of the aisle. Both Representatives have a background in construction. Norcross was a trained electrician and McKinley previously worked on construction sites as an engineer. 20

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“I understand how America’s construction and building trades helped build this great country,” said Congressman McKinley. “In March, we had more than seven million job openings; 30% of those were construction related. Without adequate funding and a trained workforce, our infrastructure will continue to crumble.” NABTU President Sean McGarvey expressed solidarity with the Building Trades Caucus as well as the members of Congress, “All of us know that the time for bipartisan action is now. Today’s event showed there is the political will and bipartisan support to do it.” BAC stands in solidarity with brothers and sisters of NABTU, the Building Trades Caucus, and the members of Congress in addressing the outdated infrastructure crisis throughout the country. Public schools are public infrastructure. Over 100,000 public schools throughout the nation are on average 44 years old. As BAC

President James Boland stated in supporting the Rebuild America’s Schools Act, “It is critically important that we rebuild our crumbling school facilities now so that our students are able to attend schools that are conducive to learning and that our teachers can do their important work in safe and healthy environment. And when we rebuild our schools, we must rebuild them with our skilled trades workers.” This year’s Infrastructure Week ended on May 20th, but our work to advocate for rebuilding our future must continue. According to the U.S. Department of Education, there will be 68% more job openings in infrastructure-related fields than there are people training to fill them in the next five years. We must also invest in our apprenticeship and training programs, helping more people learn about the building trades and encouraging them to join the skilled workforce. Every week should be Infrastructure Week. t

NABTU President Sean McGarvey spoke at the podium, advocating for the $2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan, along with other union leaders and members of the Building Trades Caucus.


LEGISLATIVE & POLITICAL

NABTU Legislative Conference Prioritizes Infrastructure Investment This April, the North America’s Building Trades Unions (NABTU) hosted its annual Legislative Conference in Washington, D.C., where Union leaders, members, and members of Congress met to address key issues surrounding infrastructure investment. NABTU President Sean McGarvey told union brothers and sisters that “we need to get the infrastructure bill on the president’s desk.” Trump’s latest infrastructure bill neglected to include many projects, including public schools, which would stimulate the economy and create nearly two million good-paying jobs for skilled building trades workers. Speaker Nancy Pelosi addressed the conference and stated her support for all of the 14 organized unions. “Building a better future means building up the human infrastructure of America. You set the gold standard of apprenticeships and workforce training – which help American workers climb the ladders of opportunity,” said Pelosi. “The House applauds your quality registered apprenticeship initiatives, which ensure that no worker is left out or left behind in the 21st century.” NABTU also welcomed Democratic presidential candidates to address the conference, including Senator Elizabeth

Warren of Massachusetts, Senator Kamala Harris of California, Representative Tim Ryan of Ohio, Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey. Warren, who comes from a military and union family, stressed the importance of keeping unions alive, “Unions aren’t going away. Not today, not tomorrow, not ever.” She also voiced her support for the Infrastructure Bill. “That’s two trillion dollars to build a real future, not just for the rich and powerful, but two trillion dollars to build a future for all of us,” Warren said. In addition to the workshops, BAC delegates participated a luncheon with U.S. Representatives Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) and Harley Rouda (DCA), both of whom strongly support infrastructure investment and co-sponsored the Rebuild America’s Schools Act. BAC delegates also visited Capitol Hill to meet with their Representatives and demand Congress pass a robust infrastructure investment package, promote workforce development, and uphold strong labor standards for working families. t

From left, BAC Local 2 NY/VT Field Representative Woody Miller, South Regional Director Ed Navarro, Local 2 NY/VT President Pat Tirino, U.S. Representative Antonio Delgado (D-NY), and Local 1 NY Field Representative Mike Clifford. BACWEB.ORG

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BAC delegates visiting Capitol Hill to demand Congress pass a robust infrastructure investment package.

BAC South Regional Director Ed Navarro meeting with U.S. Representative Lizzie Fletcher (D-TX).

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From left, BAC Local 2 NY/VT Field Representative Dale Stehlin, U.S. Representative John Katko (D-NY), Local 2 NY/VT Field Representatives Luke Renna and Martin Dillon.


IPF Take Time to Review Your Last (Paper) IPF Annual Statement The International Pension Fund is mailing the 2018 IPF Annual Statements to all active U.S. and Canadian participants shortly. These documents provide critical information regarding hours reported and updates on Service Credit and beneficiary information. They are also the last paper version of these statements for those who have opted to receive electronic versions via the BAC Member Portal. As of May 2019, over 6,100 BAC Members have opted for electronic communication through registration with “ecomm” service in order to receive Annual Statements and other publications through the Portal. Keep the following in mind while reviewing your statements. • Social Security/Insurance Number For your security, the first 5 digits of your Social Security/ Social Insurance number have been suppressed. • Future Service Credit Hours (IPF Statements) The Annual Statement shows members detailed 2018 hours in addition to all hours reported to IPF on their behalf by year. This includes hours worked outside a member's home Local, including those worked prior to the date that their home Local first participated in IPF. Participants may request a more detailed report of total hours reported to IPF on their behalf by month and may provide information on any missing hours or periods of disability which are not reflected in the Fund's records. Periods of disability may qualify a participant for a disability exemption for an apparent break in service. IPF processes hundreds of thousands of transactions each year. In 2018 alone, the Fund office processed more than 710,000 report transactions from more than 10,000 contributing employers. This mailing is comprised of 40,000 Annual Statements with more than 4,700 Statements being sent electronically to members via the Portal. If you find a discrepancy in your hours or a possible delinquency, please notify the Fund office by contacting IPFAnnualStatements@ipfweb.org, and provide the office with Local or employer records or check stub copies that document the missing hours, along with a copy of your statement. Hours reported or adjusted in BACWEB.ORG

2018 will appear on the statement in detail, showing the work month and name of employer. If detailed hours for a year earlier than 2018 appear on the statement, the hours were either reported late or originally under an incorrect Social Security/Insurance number. • Past Service Credit (IPF Statements) Past service credit estimates shown on the Annual Statement consider many factors. This includes the member's initiation date, date of participation, the Local's date of participation, the participant's home Local (the Local in which the majority of a participant's employment in the IPF has occurred), and any apparent breaks in future service, which can cancel service credit. A participant may request to have their past service estimate verified as part of a pension status report. This request must be made in writing. A final determination of a participant's eligibility for past service can only be made at application for retirement. • Beneficiary Information Your statements only show IPF and BAC SAVE beneficiary designations received by the Fund office. Designations made for the International Union or a Local plan will not appear. Any beneficiary changes related to IPF must be made on an IPF enrollment card or IPF change of beneficiary card. Any beneficiary changes related to BAC SAVE must be made on a BAC SAVE card. Participants whose statements do not show a beneficiary will receive a separate mailing from IPF or BAC SAVE requesting that designation. If a member’s ex-spouse appears as a beneficiary on an annual statement, a new designation must be made. A divorce decree does not automatically revoke the ex-spouse beneficiary designation. t BAC Membership information is ready when you need it, and now where you need it with BACMobile — Your New Member Portal App for Smartphones and Tablets. Go to member.bacweb.org and begin receiving IPF and RSP statements and much more electronically on your computer, smartphone, or tablet. For questions or concerns, please send an e-mail to IPFAnnualStatements@ipfweb. org. To notify the Fund in writing of any discrepancies, please write to: David F. Stupar, Executive Director, International Pension Fund, IPFAnnualStatements@ipfweb.org, Fax: 202-347-7339

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INTERNATIONAL FUNDS

BAC CARES International Health Fund International Health Fund Introduces BAC Cares Statin Heart Disease Prevention Program According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans, with stroke close behind at number 5. Your risk depends on a number of factors including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking status, age, diabetes, family history, and whether you have already had a heart attack or stroke. Many people do not know they have high cholesterol because there are no symptoms, but a simple blood test performed by your physician can check your levels during your annual physical exam. When your body has too much cholesterol, it can build up on the walls of your blood vessels. This build-up is called “plaque.” As your blood vessels build up plaque over time, the insides of the vessels narrow. This narrowing blocks the blood flow to and from your heart and other organs. When blood flow to the heart is blocked, it can cause angina (chest pain) or a heart attack. When blood flow to the brain is blocked, it can cause a stroke. By living a healthy lifestyle, you can help keep your cholesterol in a healthy range and lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. Taking your medications as prescribed is just as important as making healthy eating choices, maintaining a healthy weight, and getting regular physical activity. Additionally, smoking increases your risk for heart disease, so if you don’t smoke, don’t start. If you do smoke, quitting will reduce your risk.

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The most commonly prescribed medications to treat high cholesterol are called statins. Statins work by reducing the amount of cholesterol made by your liver and by helping your liver remove cholesterol that is already in your blood. Research shows that taking statins as prescribed may lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. Statins can decrease cholesterol levels by up to 60%, making them very important for the prevention of heart disease and stroke. The BAC International Health Fund (IHF) knows that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure and is focused on making prevention affordable for all. In a continuing effort to provide high-quality, cost-effective services, Sav-Rx and the BAC IHF will offer select statins at NO COST to members effective August 1, 2019. It may interest you to know that the following generic prescription statins will be available to you at no cost: Lovastatin, Simvastatin, and Pravastatin. If you are interested in this benefit, we suggest that you discuss these options with your physician at your next visit. For more information, contact the BAC IHF at 1-888880-8222. t


MAP Responding Proactively to Sexual Harassment in the Workplace In 2017, the #MeToo movement, a grassroots campaign against sexual harassment and assault, achieved significant national and international approval and support. #MeToo empowered victims of sexual harassment to speak up, step forward, report harassment, and prevent its reoccurrence. Sexual harassment typically involves unwanted sexual advances, including demands for sexual favors, offensive sexually-charged comments, or demeaning remarks based solely upon a person’s gender. Specific examples include making sexually suggestive comments or jokes, staring or leering, sending sexually explicit text messages, images, phone calls or emails, making uninvited physical advances, such as hugging, kissing or cornering, and intrusive comments or questions about a person’s private life or physical appearance. As Union members, and as lawabiding people, BAC members have a moral and legal obligation to help eliminate all forms of discrimination and harassment that might make it difficult for women to either join BAC or remain as members. The International Union Constitution states, “No member shall discriminate against any other member on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, age or national origin.” Discriminating against or harassing others is against the bedrock principles of solidarity and dignity on the job upon which our Union was formed. BACWEB.ORG

can we do collectively, in solidarity, to combat sexual harassment?

Most people recognize that sexual harassment is wrong. Yet, serious problems with sexual harassment continue unabated. Many harassers fail to recognize that sexual harassment causes severe psychological harm to their victims. Some victims feel forced to suffer in silence and continue putting up with chronic sexual harassment. Others may quit their jobs, or even commit suicide, to escape the associated psychological humiliation and torture. Sadly, while more than 75 percent of women report experiencing sexual harassment, the vast majority do not report it because they fear retaliation or not being believed. If we are to make significant strides in combating and quelling sexual harassment in the workplace, it is important to gain a greater understanding of what perpetuates such inappropriate, demeaning behavior. Questions to consider: What makes it so tough to respond to sexual harassment? Why do bystanders often say nothing rather than getting involved and taking a stand? What causes victims to take on the shame associated with sexual harassment when it is the perpetrator who should bear this burden? What

BAC has adopted a strong anti-sexual harassment policy to protect union members from abuse. Harassment may subject a member to internal union charges. Fear of personal and professional retaliation often prevents people from formally reporting sexual harassment; however, international and local union policies are there to offer solid protection and to call a halt to harassment and further victimization. Transition from Victim to Advocate In many instances, harassers strike when a person is isolated and not within earshot of others. Many survivors of harassment fear not being believed, or becoming embroiled in a “he-said, she-said” situation in which they have no proof that sexual harassment has taken place. The anxiety, embarrassment, and stigma surrounding sexual harassment often prevents survivors from stepping forward to report the abuse. Similarly, survivors may endure weeks, months, or years of abuse before being confident enough to risk reporting the perpetrator. By then, however, many survivors who have suffered in silence may also be struggling with harmful sexual harassment effects, including clinical depression, anxiety and panic, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Many survivors require counseling to begin the healing process so that they feel

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emotionally sturdy enough to rally against their perpetrator(s). When sexual harassment claims are not handled promptly, professionally, ethically or discreetly, harassers may misinterpret this mishandling as affording them a “green light” to ramp up renewed harassment. Ignoring a report of harassment or retaliating against someone for filing a report is illegal. While many mistakenly believe that “boys will be boys,” or “no harm was meant,” sexual harassment is extremely harmful to its victims. Lingering sexual harassment gossip that mischaracterizes a survivor as a “troublemaker” can tarnish a person’s personal and professional reputation and cause severe psychological injury. Bystanders/onlookers can combat sexual harassment: 1. Remind yourself how you would feel if your sibling, parent or close friend were being sexually harassed, and respond accordingly. 2. Refrain from participating in sexual harassment by declining to engage in mocking someone’s gender, laughing at lewd jokes or gossiping about survivors of abuse. 3. Recognize the courage it takes for a survivor of abuse to step forward and be respectful of that person. 4. Report observed sexual harassment to job supervisors and local leaders as a caring, concerned bystander. 5. Offer the survivor of abuse to be a witness of what took place. 6. Remain vigilant to guard against using sexually inappropriate language or gestures that could be offensive to others.

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BAC Journal

7. Take a stand by talking to a coworker about his/her offensive language. Simply say, “That kind of talk makes me uncomfortable.” 8. Remind the harasser that sexually harassing talk or behaviors can cause disciplinary action, e.g., “That kind of talk (or doing that) is sexual harassment and can get you in trouble.” Suggestions for Survivors of Sexual Harassment: How to seek support for sexual harassment: 1. Be aware that the law requires employers to maintain a workplace free from discrimination and harassment. Our BAC collective bargaining agreements generally require employers to do the same. 2. Report harassment without delay to job supervisors. It is the employer’s responsibility to prevent and remedy harassment on the job. 3. If the employer fails to act swiftly and decisively, contact your BAC representative. 4. Save harassing emails, notes, texts or voicemail messages, but do not respond. Document harassment, along with names of witnesses, etc. 5. Call the BAC Member Assistance Program (MAP) for free, confidential information, resources, and guidance by licensed mental health professionals for emotional support and to combat or treat anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Federal law protects the privacy of anyone reporting sexual harassment to a MAP professional. MAP will not discuss your claim with anyone without your written permission.

What to Say to Sexual Harassment Perpetrators: While there are no pat answers on the best way to respond to sexual harassment, it helps to adopt a proactive stance in advance. Being assertive and knowing how to respond empowers victims so they can address abuse head-on. Suggestions: 1. Project confidence and calm, while maintaining a firm, serious demeanor. 2. Be assertive by maintaining eye contact, and speaking in a strong, steady voice. 3. Identify the behavior and explain why it is wrong. For instance, state, “Do not touch my butt, that is sexual harassment,” or “Stop whistling at me, that is sexual harassment.” 4. Tell the harasser what you need. For example, say, “Stop touching me,” “You are standing too close,” or “Stop making comments about my body.” 5. Name the perpetrator in a clear voice. “John, stop,” or “Man in the blue shirt, stop…” For anxiety, depression or PTSD related to sexual harassment, you may call BAC MAP for free, confidential assistance toll-free at 1-888-8808222. Calls generally are accepted from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST MondayFriday. Afterhours assistance is often available upon request via the BAC MAP website page. If struggling with suicidal thoughts, please call 911 or report to your local hospital emergency room. t


CANADA BAC Local 1 Newfoundland and Labrador Receives $2.4 Million Federal Funding When it comes to diversity in the building trades, Newfoundland and Labrador is well ahead of other provinces in Canada. On May 24th, Ken McDonald, Member of Parliament for Avalon, NL announced that BAC Local 1 Newfoundland and Labrador is receiving $2.4 million federal funding for its education and training program. As a result of this investment, more apprentices will be able to develop their skills, complete their training and find good, well-paying jobs. “The funding not only gets more people interested in the trades looking into the trades as careers, but also helps keeping craftworkers currently in the trades stay and allowing them to upgrade their skills to be specialized in their fields,” said McDonald. In addition to the training funding, BAC also receives funding to purchase equipment and better train apprentices. BAC Local 1 NL Business Manager John Leonard said, “We’ve been focusing on diversity for many years now… we have over 70 women craftworkers in our Local right now. With this funding, we are hoping to get more indigenous people to our union and skilled trades training.”

Un financement fédéral de 2,4 millions $ pour la section locale 1 de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador du BAC En matière de diversité dans les métiers de la construction, Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador possède une bonne longueur d’avance par rapport aux autres provinces canadiennes. Le 24 mai dernier, Ken McDonald, député à la Chambre des communes représentant la circonscription d’Avalon (TerreNeuve), a annoncé que la section locale 1 de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador du BAC recevrait 2,4 millions de dollars du gouvernement fédéral pour financer son programme de formation et de perfectionnement. Grâce à cet investissement, plus d’apprentis pourront perfectionner leurs compétences, terminer le programme de formation et trouver de bons emplois bien rémunérés. « Ce financement, en plus d’amener plus de gens à envisager une carrière dans les métiers de la construction, contribuera à maintenir un bon taux de rétention parmi les travailleurs de la construction actuels en leur permettant notamment d’améliorer leurs compétences et de se spécialiser dans leur domaine », se réjouit M. McDonald. En plus du financement pour le programme de formation, le BAC recevra également une aide financière pour acheter de l’équipement et mieux former les apprentis. « Depuis plusieurs années, la diversité est au cœur de nos priorités. Actuellement, nous comptons plus de 70 travailleuses dans notre section locale. Avec ce financement, nous espérons attirer plus de membres des Premières nations dans notre syndicat et dans notre programme de formation pour les métiers spécialisés », explique John Leonard, directeur administratif de la section locale 1 de Terre-Neuve-etLabrador du BAC.

BACWEB.ORG

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LOCAL COMPASS A.

B.

Local 3 California A. Local 3 California Gold Card member Kent Jones, left, receives his service award from Local 3 CA Secretary-Treasurer Troy Garland. Local 4 California B. Gold Card member Ronald Brennan, right, receives his service award from Local 4 CA President Lupe Aldaco. Ohio-Kentucky Administrative District Council C. From right, Gold Card member and late brother Art Habel, Gold Card members Art Baas, Chester Harp, and Jim Reid, pictured with their apprenticeship instructor Jerry Richmond.

C.

D. BAC Local 44 Ohio 25-year member Kevin Wightman, right, receives his service award from OH-KY ADC Field Representative Don Mays.

D.

28

E.

BAC Journal

E. From left, BAC Local 44 Ohio President Mike Campbell, 25-year member Cass Dalton, and OH-KY ADC Field Representative Don Mays.


LOCAL COMPASS

Local 8 Southeast

F.

G.

H.

I.

F. BAC Local 8 Southeast Gold Card member Arnold Pesterfield, Sr., receives his service award from Local 8 SE President Glenn Kelly. G. Gold Card member Dick Murphy of BAC Local 8 Southeast, left, receives his service award from Local 8 SE President Glenn Kelly. Eastern Missouri Administrative District Council H. BAC Local 18 Missouri Richard Hanlon, right, receives his 40-year service award from Local 18 MO President Mike Weber. I. Forty-year member Gerald Knapp of BAC Local 1 MO receives his service award from Director of Eastern Missouri ADC Brian Jennewein, left, and Secretary-Treasurer John Hopkin. J. From left, Eastern Missouri ADC SecretaryTreasurer John Hopkin, 25-year member Chad Matschiner, and Director of Eastern MO ADC Brian Jennewein.

J.

BACWEB.ORG

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LOCAL COMPASS

K.

Local 6 Illinois K. From left, Gold Card members Bob Carlson, Art Ernat, Jim Schott, Dan Welch, Jerry Creger, and Don Klobes, 40-year member Jim Sullivan, Gold Card members Howard Kruse and Jim Paulsen, and 40year member John James.

M.

L.

L. Local 6 IL Field Representative Marco Ramirez, Gold Card member Bruce Nygren, 25-year member Josip Bilich, Gold Card member Norman Taylor, and Local 6 IL President Richard Boyd. M. From left, Field Representative Eric Mrowicki, Local 6 IL President Richard Boyd, Gold Card member Leonard Surprenant, and 25-year member David M Leriger.

N.

N. From left, 25-year member Bradley D Christopherson, Gold Card member John Lannert, Local 6 IL President Richard Boyd, Gold Card member Essex Higgins Jr., and 25-year member Robert W. West. O. From left, Field Representative Eric Mrowicki, Gold Card member Dave Fusinato, Local 6 IL President Richard Boyd, Gold Card members Terrence J Corrigan and Fred J Pike.

O.

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BAC Journal


IN MEMORIAM – FEBRUARY Death Benefit Claims for February 2019 Total Amount Paid $133,300.00 Total Union Labor Life Claims $3,400.00 Total Death Benefits $129,900.00 Total Number of Claims 74 Average Age 83.46 Average Years of Membership 56.54 MEMBER - LOCAL UNION Babcock, Donald L. - 04, IN/KY

BRANCH OF TRADE B

BRANCH OF TRADE

YEARS YEARS OF OF AGE MEMBERSHIP

Layman, Clarence W. - 06, WV

B

46

Lodoen, Sr., Lars P. - 01, MN/ND/SD

B

65

Luna, Augustino R. - 04, NJ

B, CM, P

56

Marinucci, Pasquale - 01, MD/VA/DC

TL

29

Materazzi, Aldo A. - 02, MI

FN

30

McCaffrey, Francis M. - 08, SE

B

1

McKenzie, Herbert R. - 04, IN/KY

TLK

68

Mears, Lawrence D. - 01, PA/DE

TL

71

Montemayor, Rodrigo R. - 02, MI

PC, W, CM

43

Moore, John T. - 03, CA

B, M

71

63

Newborgh, Arthur W. - 56, IL

B

70

B

60

YEARS YEARS OF OF AGE MEMBERSHIP 85

MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

Baudy, Jr., John J. - 07, NY/NJ

FN

91

30

Nickel, Edmund - 01, PA/DE

Berkau, Arthur F. - 01, PA/DE

B

77

57

Olivo, Neil J. - 05, OH

B

61

TL, M, MM

68

Brun, Valentino J. - 01, PA/DE

FN

85

30

Oxley, Tommie J. - 04, CA

Buss, Edward J. - 21, WI

B, M, P

91

58

Paige, Donald W. - 03, CA

TL

56

B

68

Buzard, Richard T. - 06, OH

B

94

69

Pavan, John - 03, CA

Cancil, Charles D. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

83

61

Radke, Wayne D. - 01, MD/VA/DC

M

37

B, M

61

Cardascia, Felix P. - 05, PA

B, CM

87

69

Robison, Billy G. - 04, IN/KY

Carlson, Roger H. - 01, MN/ND/SD

B

80

61

Reno, Jr., Carmel - 04,CA

B

62

TL

1

Champion, Richard D. - 04, IN/KY

B

89

62

Rudzki, Marek - 13, NV

Chesler, Robert J. - 01, MO

B

83

64

Schmidt, Richard W. - 01, MO

B

58

B

61

Coda, Grady C. - 09, WV

B

89

70

Shortt, Robert A. - 02, ON

Colasante, Saverio - 07, CN

B

84

54

Singer, Jack F. - 04, IN/KY

B

71

B

57

Craig, Leonard G. - 52, OH

B

83

51

Snyderbum, Robert P. - 05, OH

Cusano, Jr., Angelo M. - 04, NJ

B, P

90

70

Spina, Anthony C. - 03, NY

B

58

B

41

Delbene, Mario - 01, NY

B

83

63

Springman, Jr., Carl E. - 04, IN/KY

Drennan, Richard E. - 08, IL

B

76

53

Stampone, Frank N. - 04, NJ

B, CM, P

70

B

60

Fitti, Thomas A. - 01, PA/DE

B

81

63

Strauch, Hans - 21, IL

Foster, Paul J. - 01, MO

B

90

67

Sylvia, John A. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

M, B, CM

67

B

71

Galassi, Anthony - 09, PA

B

86

68

Szulczewski, Sr., Frank T. - 04, IN/KY

Gray, Leslie O. - 02, MI

P

84

63

Tarascio, Vincent S. - 01, NY

B

68

B, CM, P

78

Gusman, William - 01, HI

M

78

49

Touw, William P. - 04, NJ

Habel, Arthur W. - 18, OH/KY

B

67

50

Vanda, Michael E. - 01, MN/ND/SD

PC

38

B

19

Hagnere, Christian A. - 03, CA

TL

82

50

Vaughn, William F. - 09, PA

Holpit, Rudolph R. - 05, OH

B

87

67

Villalonga, Joseph - 04, NJ

M, B, CM

61

B

21

Huskic, Abdullah - 01, AB

B

84

47

Wabsis, Sr., John R. - 02, MI

Janisch, Ervin - 21, IL

B

91

72

Walsh, James W. - 01, PA/DE

B

68

B

76

Joienille, Jr., Lionel H. - 08, SE

B

91

72

Wigglesworth, Ira L. - 08, SE

Jordan, Doyle J. - 03, WI

B

95

53

Williams, John A. - 04, IN/KY

TL, M, MM

60

B

43

Kisicki, Theodore J. - 15, MO/KS/NE

B

88

69

Williams, Richard A. - 03, CA

Koeser, Arno W. - 11, WI

B, P

88

59

Zerkowski, David E. - 03, NY

PC

50

65

Zitarosa, Arthur - 01, NY

B

65

Krippner, Junior M. - 01, MN/ND/SD

B

88

IU Death Benefit Claims must be filed within one year of the member’s death. BACWEB.ORG

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IN MEMORIAM – MARCH MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

Death Benefit Claims for March 2019 Total Amount Paid $219,600.00 Total Union Labor Life Claims $3,000.00 Total Death Benefits $216,600.00 Total Number of Claims 121 Average Age 83.14 Average Years of Membership 54.12 MEMBER - LOCAL UNION Althenn, Jr., John G. - 05, PA Anderson, John W. - 01, MN/ND/SD Atkins, John A. - 01, PA/DE Bachand, Donald H. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI Baggett, Charles E. - 74, IL Baggs, Joe A. - 08, SE Baird, Reginald - 11, WI Beck, George - 05, WI Biffoni, III, Lawrence J. - 01, PA/DE Brambrink, Richard E. - 01, MN/ND/SD Buerke, Harold E. - 01, MN/ND/SD Caparco, Richard L. - 02, NY/VT Capuano, Sr., Joseph N. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI Carolla, Anthony - 09, PA Censori, Renato - 01, NY Cooper, Philip P. - 05, NJ/DE/PA Corso, Joseph V. - 01, MD/VA/DC Crispell, John R. - 05, PA Crumley, Jr., David N. - 05, OK/AR/TX Day, Ralph J. - 03, CA DiEmedio, Joseph A. - 01, PA/DE Dillon, Joseph D. - 04, NJ Doberstein, Norman A. - 03, NY Donatelli, Sr., Gilbert F. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI Eggen, Jimmy R. - 01, MN/ND/SD Enger, Gerald A. - 01, MN/ND/SD Farabell, Stephen R. - 03, NY Ferrarini, Aurelio D. - 05, OH Fierro, Louis A. - 04, NJ Finato, Mario - 21, IL Finos, Robert D. - 02, MI Gailus, Gerhard - 03, CA Gary, Orville M. - 05, OK/AR/TX Haberler, Darrel D. - 05, NJ/DE/PA Hamilton, Jr., William R. - 01, PA/DE Harrison, William C. - 01, NY Hart, Richard D. - 09, PA Haywood, Howard M. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI Henry, Elias - 04, NJ Hess, James M. - 05, OH Hindman, Larry D. - 08, SE Hino, Stanley Y. - 01, HI Hunt, Ernest R. - 09, PA Hurst, Edward J. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI Ientile, Joseph - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI Janusko, Edward M. - 09, PA Johnson, Robert C. - 21, IL Kaoni, Alfred H. - 01, HI Kinne, Samuel M. - 04, IN/KY Kopatsch, Johann - 01, NY Kucinski, Robert P. - 21, IL Langford, Walter F. - 03, NY Larnhart, Larry D. - 03, OH

BRANCH OF TRADE B B B B, CM, M B RE, P B, M, P TL M, W TL MM B, CM, P M, B B B B B, M B, M B, M B, M B B, CM B B, CM, M B B B, CM B B MW, TW B B, M B B, CM, M, P B B B B B, P B B M B B B B B CB B B TW CM B

YEARS YEARS OF OF AGE MEMBERSHIP 93 82 81 78 86 57 99 78 76 93 80 81 84 91 91 84 82 70 93 78 98 86 83 95 84 88 67 91 100 93 81 90 84 81 87 93 92 78 76 86 71 77 90 88 80 88 91 75 90 94 77 91 81

67 65 65 49 51 4 71 41 59 56 30 50 61 68 67 62 51 48 64 57 59 59 60 77 41 63 39 63 64 61 62 56 67 60 52 49 66 54 48 66 46 52 67 53 53 52 52 29 67 58 19 69 52

Lear, Paul E. - 09, PA Levien, James - 05, OK/AR/TX Lipshaw, Scott A. - 05, PA Lommel, Leroy H. - 01, MN/ND/SD Lowmaster, Lloyd L. - 08, SE Luz, Hans O. - 05, NJ/DE/PA Martin, Arnold C. - 09, WI Martin, Thomas E. - 04, IN/KY McGinley, James J. - 01, PA/DE Mecham, Donald J. - 01, UT Moulton, Sr., Donald F. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI Murillo, Luis A. - 01, NY Murphy, Robert J. - 02, NY/VT Nakamura, Norman B. - 01, HI Napier, Lee K. - 04, IN/KY Nicolato, Dominick D. - 05, WI Nida, Erwin T. - 04, CA Niemi, Raymond R. - 02, MI Notaro, Vincent - 01, NY O’Connell, Patrick G. - 05, NJ/DE/PA Olson, Orvis M. - 01, OR Otto, Dennis E. - 04, IN/KY Pacini, Urbano V. - 03, NY Pavlinch, Richard J. - 09, PA Peach, Colin A. - 03, CA Pelley, Douglas W. - 08, SE Perissinotti, Onorino - 06, ON Pizzicarola, Peter - 01, NY Prince, Oscar E. - 08, SE Quinque, Golfredo - 09, PA Raffa, Dennis J. - 01, PA/DE Roberts, Norman L. - 08, WI Rose, Jr., Erwin A. - 08, WI Rosensteel, James L. - 09, PA Rustman, Gerhard G. - 03, CA Salmen, Eugene G. - 21, IL Salvador, Alfonso - 05, ON Sardo, Onofrio C. - 01, ON Sartore, Luigi P. - 01, AB Scascitelli, Luigi - 01, CT Shean, John W. - 04, IN/KY Shouldis, George - 01, NY Skinner, Jr., Morrison M. - 08, IL Smith, David B. - 01, PA/DE Snipes, Billie F. - 08, SE Stenslien, Orin C. - 01, WI Stevens, Edwin C. - 09, PA Stupegia, Robert L. - 21, IL Sturrock, Charles F. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI Stutzman, Thomas D. - 03, NY Swanson, Richard - 21, IL Tentoni, Angelo - 02, MI Thomas, William R. - 02, WA/ID/MT Thompson, Leonard L. - 04, CA Thompson, Lynn S. - 56, IL Todey, Robert - 21, IL Tramontin, John D. - 02, MI Tremain, Sr., Robert L. - 04, IN/KY Tucci, Sr., Robert J. - 06, OH Ulrich, Raymond F. - 21, IL Vawter, Kevin G. - 04, IN/KY Verdecchio, Guida A. - 01, PA/DE Vincent, Jr., Attilio E. - 36, OH Wallin, Blaine B. - 01, MN/ND/SD Wentzel, Harold G. - 04, IN/KY Wilhelmson, Charles M. - 06, IL Williams, Eugene L. - 08, IL Wright, Thomas D. - 16, OH

IU Death Benefit Claims must be filed within one year of the member’s death. 32

BAC Journal

BRANCH OF TRADE B M, MM B B B, M B B, M B B B B B CM, B CB, M B, M GP TL B, CM B B TL B B, CM, M, MM B, TL B, M B B B B B B B B B TL TL TW B B B, CM, M B B, M, PC B, M B B, M B, M B, TL B PC, CH B B TL B B B, W B TL TL, B, M, MM B B B B TL B B B B CM

YEARS YEARS OF OF AGE MEMBERSHIP 84 93 48 86 85 85 92 66 83 84 72 41 93 96 75 92 78 84 87 77 78 78 82 87 85 67 82 86 97 88 72 86 89 78 88 96 92 94 82 83 81 60 90 51 84 81 92 86 77 75 88 91 93 94 62 88 83 92 92 89 46 92 87 88 76 87 88 73

64 67 23 25 56 55 63 44 63 61 48 16 68 57 57 19 48 61 38 37 54 58 64 68 55 46 62 64 69 63 39 67 41 49 33 70 62 65 59 56 61 39 58 20 59 39 72 69 54 34 63 51 69 72 39 64 63 70 62 64 12 61 62 66 30 64 63 34


IN MEMORIAM – APRIL MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

Death Benefit Claims for April 2019 Total Amount Paid $158,400.00 Total Union Labor Life Claims Total Death Benefits $158,400.00 Total Number of Claims 84 Average Age 82.40 Average Years of Membership 55.11 MEMBER - LOCAL UNION

BRANCH OF TRADE

YEARS YEARS OF OF AGE MEMBERSHIP

Acord, Robert D. - 55, OH

PC, B

85

55

Andersen, Raymond L. - 04, IN/KY

B

58

39

Baum, Adolph R. - 06, IL

B

85

47

Boyd, Norman D. - 09, PA

B

78

52

Brooks, Jr., Virgil O. B. - 08, SE

PC, CH

84

40

Carl, Robert J. - 01, PA/DE

B, M

82

64

Cobler, Charles L. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

74

53

Cook, Albert - 21, IL

B

81

49

Deaton, Ronald J. - 07, CO/WY

B

81

43

Demeulenaere, Willy A. - 02, MI

B

83

64

DeVerna, Stanley E. - 02, MI

B

89

63

DiMarco, Mario - 02, ON

B

88

55

Dininno, Michael A. - 09, PA

B, M

89

60

Doyle, Edward A. - 01, NY

B

87

70

Egelske, Vincent P. - 04, IN/KY

B

75

56

Fisher, James A. - 04, IN/KY

B, M

92

72

Foster, Sr., Earl W. - 08, SE

B

101

67

Freund, Daniel C. - 01, MO

B

60

38

Garcia, Salome - 07, CO/WY

B

97

72

Gildemeister, Horst F. - 02, BC

B

84

53

Gladden, Marion H. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

98

50

Goodrich, Edward R. - 03, NY

B, CM, M

80

47

Grossi, Rocco - 06, ON

B

86

51

Harris, Frederick J. - 08, WI

B, M

75

54

Hash, William M. - 04, IN/KY

B, M

86

68

Hazelwood, Roger D. - 08, IL

B

62

3

Hens, Hans W. - 01, NY

B

89

63

Hiens, Donnie J. - 01, MD/VA/DC

TL

82

47

Hippert, Charles K. - 05, PA

B, M

87

68

Hunsberger, Addison B. - 08, SE

B

84

62

Iafrate, Guido - 02, MI

CM

90

60

Janes, Robert P. - 07, WI

B, M

74

53

Jensen, Rodney K. - 13, WI

B, M

72

53

King, Jack M. - 02, AZ/NM

B

92

67

Kirkpatrick, Kelly R. - 21, IL

B

67

48

Knapp, Paul E. - 05, OH

B

92

70

Kros, Orie - 04, NJ

B, CM, P

94

72

BRANCH OF TRADE

YEARS YEARS OF OF AGE MEMBERSHIP

Lewis, Richard D. - 15, WV

B

83

64

Lipshaw, Scott A. - 05, PA

B

48

23

Lockhart, Charles L. - 08, SE

TL, MM

79

52

Major, Louis - 04, NJ

B, CM

87

63

Martone, Ralph L. - 09, PA

B

92

68

Mazzarini, Sr., Daniel J. - 09, PA

B, M

96

70

McIntyre, Thomas J. - 03, MA/ME/NH/RI

B

87

67

McNie, Arthur H. - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B, CM, P

79

53

Monti, Frankie P. - 08, SE

B, M

86

39

Mosley, C. L. - 15, MO/KS/NE

B, M, MM

86

70

Nappo, Sr., Vincenzo - 01, NY

B

82

60

Nawrocki, Johannes E. - 05, ON

B

97

62

Neuber, Guenther - 07, CO/WY

B

89

55

Null, Steven O. - 06, WV

B

65

42

Panetta, Donato A. - 03, NY

B

91

63

Payne, Anthony C. - 01, AB

B

73

34

Pepe, George E. - 03, NY

B

78

58

Pesek, Richard J. - 01, OR

B

89

64

Powell, Carlton R. - 04, IN/KY

TL, B

73

40

Presley, Peter Y. - 03, CA

B

82

55

Rame, Arthur L. - 01, MN/ND/SD

B

83

62

Rhodes, Robert - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B, CM, P

89

55

Rizzi, Nicholas A. - 01, MD/VA/DC

B

89

55

Rolio, Jr., Joseph A. - 04, NJ

B, CM, P

91

54

Sandelius, Carl B. - 21, IL

B

88

57

Sanders, Ronald V. - 15, MO/KS/NE

B

84

62

Santos, Fernando C. - 01, NY

B

70

20

Schemmerling, Adolf K. - 01, CT

B, CM, M, MM

79

54

Schneider, William W. - 05, OK/AR/TX

B

84

56

Selmon, Jr., Herman J. - 05, NJ/DE/PA

B, CM, P

76

58

Shores, James F. - 01, MD/VA/DC

B

90

55

Sons, Ronald - 21, IL

TL

62

34

Speckle, John A. - 01, MN/ND/SD

B, M

78

55

Sperdute, Felix A. - 09, PA

B, M

86

58

Stefans, Ewald - 21, IL

B

89

63

Tarica, Eugene A. - 08, OH

B

90

69

Terralavoro, Richard H. - 01, NY

B, CM

78

55

Tosadori, Robert R. - 09, PA

FN

93

33

Trusz, Eugene P. - 01, AB

B

82

63

Vincenti, Jr., Attilio E. - 36, OH

TL

87

62

Wade, Robert W. - 08, SE

B

74

53

Wellman, Sr., Paul E. - 01, MO

B

73

53

Wiltsee, Edward L. - 04, IN/KY

PC

91

66

Wytovich, Robert J. - 05, PA

CM

63

50

York, Allen C. - 22, OH

B, M

84

61

Yukovich, Frank J., - 09, PA

TL

91

62

Zeleny, William L. - 15, MO/KS/NE

B

73

54

IU Death Benefit Claims must be filed within one year of the member’s death. BACWEB.ORG

ISSUE 2

33


WIRELESS DISCOUNTS

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BAC Journal

CREDIT CARDS

FLOWERS & GIFTS

MORTGAGE PROGRAM

Journal BAC

ISSUE 2 l 2019

BAC l 620 F STREET l NW l WASHINGTON, DC l 20004

BAC Journal Issue 2, 2019  

BAC Journal Issue 2, 2019