ACW World Airports Supplement 8th December 21

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WORLD AIRPORTS SUPPLEMENT

ACW World Airports Supplement is sponsored by


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26/11/2021 11:00


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Your guide to the latest developments in the international airfreight industry

AIR CARGO’S VIEW OF WORLD AIRPORTS Covid-19 has accelerated change

PROTECTING THE PERIMETER

MIA will bounce back after Covid-19

ACI World: Will there be a structural change to airfreight?

ANC PASS LAUNCHES MARKED SHIFT 8th December 21


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or investing in dedicated people to deliver on that strategy. “It is my strong belief that airports, even pre-COVID-19, should play a much more important role in organising logistics processes locally. In fact, given the current challenges in the logistics world, that need has only increased. Many of today’s problems, such as congestion or digitalization, can only be solved structurally and in the long term if we go beyond the individual company. Only together can we make progress here as an industry. For many companies that only look at their own P&L this is a difficult message, but airports are ideally placed to take the lead here. Local cargo organizations or global organizations such as TIACA can also make a difference.” The Airports Council International (ACI) considers that the raising of airport charges is fair considering the losses the industry has faced. Polmans considers the position. He says: “The aviation industry in general, especially when it comes to passenger operations, has been losing money and recovery is taking time. It is not just airports. Some stakeholders in the business can more easily recharge costs than others and not everybody in the chain has such a strong position. “Unbalanced recharging of losses however is not going to help recovery in general. But airlines can also decide to reduce the number of flights to certain airports or recharge their customers for that cost. Once recovery is back, will airports again reduce costs and is it just a temporary action? Also, airports have shareholders and they are not always not-for-profit organisations, but nobody likes such big increases in general and especially not in difficult times. At the same time, let’s also not just focus on the few airports that are heavily increasing their rates, but recognise that many airports are strong partners with the rest of the industry looking for long term win-win solutions.”

Cargo stakeholders There are really good examples of airports giving the right amount of time and focus to cargo and its stakeholders, he considers. “But there are probably more not doing so or still not having found the right approach on what they could do. Cargo and logistics is a different game, and airports traditionally more focused on passenger business must find the right fit in their overall strategy for this business.

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The International Air Cargo Association (TIACA) is the unique international not-for-profit association representing and uniting all parts of the air cargo industry, including shippers, freight forwarders, ground handlers, airports, airlines, manufacturers and solution providers. Launched in the early 1990s, its roots go back to 1960, when a committee of the Society of Automotive Engineers in the USA launched the first Air Cargo Forum to explore the needs of the emerging air cargo industry. Now, while much of the global airport industry is looking to a post-pandemic world, TIACA’s chairman Steven Polmans looks at how airports might have been changed by COVID-19 and what may be coming down the line for them. He notes that with cargo operations taking centre stage this past 20 or so months, airport business models will have to reflect this going forward. He says: “Airports that were cargo-minded before have seen the benefit of even stronger operations and revenues generating from it. Others have realised it is an opportunity short- term but also long-term which could contribute to their bottom line. So although I am convinced that for most airports, not speaking about the dedicated cargo airports of course, cargo will grow in importance, it will still be the little brother of the passenger business. But not as little anymore in future as it often was in the past.” Cargo has proved its worth as a significant source of revenue for airports during the pandemic, says Polmans. He says: “It for sure gained importance, but on the other hand, cargo can also not make up for passenger business and revenue. Going forward cargo should be part of a more diverse and sustainable business model for airports, and I am sure that is no longer a discussion. But airports will have to learn how to grow cargo and make money out of it, as this is not the same as on the passenger side. “For many stakeholders in the logistics chain, cargo will become more important and part of a more diverse and sustainable business model. Cargo has been a lifeline for many companies, but there are also temporary factors that have helped, such as the current price level. It will also depend on us as an industry how good we are at helping airports that want to give cargo a higher priority. But I see a lot of hopeful signs and a lot of airports thinking about a cargo strategy

“Cargo has proved its worth as a significant source of revenue for airports during the pandemic”

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“Security has always been of great importance to airports and that has not changed”

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The biggest challenge in aviation in terms of reducing CO2 emissions lies with flying and fossil fuels. Operations on the ground and managing infrastructure such as an airport also has its challenges, but I think the ambitions there may be higher. A lot of airports today are therefore showing, and rightly so, quite ambitious plans to reduce their CO2 footprint faster. He considers that the ACI has a good programme to measure and track the CO2 footprint at airports in different steps, and a lot of airports are using it and are already well on their way to a net zero emission target today. “I think they can meet that target. COVID-19 may have temporarily limited the financial possibilities, but this will quickly recover. Moreover, many governments also invest in climate-friendly projects, and many airports can call on additional resources to invest. We can only encourage airports to do everything they can and not just what they have to do. Sustainability must not become just a marketing story for airports to maintain their “license to operate” and create support among politicians and the environment. “They really need to make it part of their business. A good example is the fact so many airports invest in solar panels. A few years ago, this was done more from an investment point of view whereas today the main drivers behind such decisions are not just financial but they do include other criteria too. “Security has always been of great importance to airports and that has not changed. Airports follow national and international regulations, they don’t make them themselves. Security is something that concerns us all, where equal status and transparency is paramount. This should not become part of a competitive model between different stakeholders in the logistics chain. However, we would encourage international regulatory agencies to focus on harmonized regulations wherever possible to enhance the passenger experience or improve cargo processes and efficiency,” he says. As a lobby group, does Polmans consider that TIACA has a voice in the airport world? He laughs: “For sure. Quite a few airports are among the most active members in our association and we also count quite a few airports within the board. We also notice an increasing interest of airports to join TIACA, which we can only welcome, considering the role airports can take locally within a community. In addition,

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we also have a very good relationship with ACI and we are looking at where cooperation is possible and meaningful and where we as TIACA can help them when it comes to cargo.”


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MIA WILL BOUNCE BACK A

“MIA is unique in a couple of ways which assisted us better than most other airports”

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According to Emir Pineda, section chief of passenger, trade and logistics development at Miami-Dade Aviation Department’s marketing division, Miami International Airport (MIA) may not have known the CPOVID-19 virus was going to hit in 2020 but it was still prepared. He says: “I don’t think anyone was prepared for a global pandemic, but as an airport community we were pretty well suited to handling it. Remember that air cargo never really stopped flying throughout the pandemic and even today it provides huge amounts of air cargo for us as well as throughout the US and globally. “MIA is unique in a couple of ways which assisted us better than most other airports. First, 80% of our cargo flies on freighter aircraft, so the grounding of passenger flights did not affect us as much as other airports. Secondly, we are a perishable and pharmaceutical hub so we continued to move large quantities of the these products since we have the infrastructure in place to handle it, such as 40,000 sq m of cooler space, and the effort of the MIAVAC19 Task Force – a joint public/private task group lead by MIA - to begin preparing helped us as a community get ready.” Will there be any long-term effects on MIA’s cargo business does he think after the ‘end’ of Covid? He considers: “The global supply chain and air cargo in general will not be the same. It has evolved to the new market conditions brought on by the Covid pandemic and will continue to as markets adjust and contract or expand. One thing for sure is the air cargo industry is highly flexible and adopts to market conditions better than most industries. “I think in general the entire world has a much higher appreciation for the role logistics/air cargo plays and its importance to global trade. At MIA, trade and logistics is one of the core pillars of our business along with passenger, maintenance and training. Air cargo is an enormous contributor to the local economy fuelling the nearly $40 billion economic impact to our community and supporting thousands of jobs in Miami-Dade County. Its profile within our cargo community has always been high, but within the greater Miami business commu-

nity and wider regional trade community the importance of logistics has never been greater.” “Our community came together months ago in preparation for the Covid19 vaccine distribution efforts, lead by airport’s MIAVAC19 Task Force we shared information from both public and private sectors and identified challenges and how best to meet them. Through this collaboration we were able to inventory our infrastructure and identify our level of preparedness. We now have a network setup in our community that can communicate any obstacles we run up against and address those in an efficient manner, thus making sure we provide the best service we can to the people who require lifesaving pharma products.”

Importance Has freight become more important to MIA’s bottom line than ever before due to the pandemic? He says: “In many ways yes and no. Cargo has always had a high profile at MIA, but it is still not as important as passenger development, which goes without saying. Cargo direct contribution was higher during the Covid period, but as soon as the passenger flights started to return (early 2021) that inverse contribution went back to normal. Today cargo contribution to MIA total revenue stream is approximately +/-10%. “The cargo community is quite dynamic and as result is constantly changing. We have had some carriers stop operating (Asiana, Cosair/ Southern Air), others have gotten into the cargo business (Eastern) where prior to Covid they were not and others have seen tremendous growth (DHL/Amazon/UPS/Atlas/Turkish/Amerijet).”

Airfreight totals Total air cargo for the airport in 2020 was +2.5%, 2.3 million tonnes versus 2.2 million in 2019. Pineda says: “If you compare just cargo airlines (probably more accurate since pax flights did not operate at full capacity in 2020) the growth was 10%. At present, 2021 YTD September


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K AFTER COVID-19

cargo tonnage is up 17% versus 2020. We are forecasting having the highest cargo volumes ever recorded at MIA in 2021. “At present the logistics business is facing some of its greatest challenges ever; with the maritime ports crisis on the west coast, directly affecting the demand for more products to go via air, capacity has never been so limited. So the air cargo airlines are doing quite well, but the capacity challenge is quite stressful as forwarders, airlines, trucking companies etc try to meet the demands of the consumers… who’s hunger for e-Commerce and now Christmas (holiday) gifts has never been higher. It’s going to be challenging for logistics companies to keep up, because along with the huge demand, they are also facing staffing storages, along with dealing with the on-going Covid pandemic and it variants.”

Find/hire/train On the whole, how have airfreight players at MIA found recruiting staff at present? He says: “It has been very difficult like all other industries. The demand is outpacing the ability to find/hire/train enough staff. I am not aware of any particular issue at MIA other than its difficult to find enough drivers. So companies are having their current staff work more hours, which only exacerbates the issue further. When it comes to the wider market I am hearing about a lot of delays, caused by everything we just mentioned: staff, port delays, lack of containers, price and so on.”

Investment MIA has had to delay investment plans for airfreight at the airport because of the pandemic. He says: “Our CIP (Capital Improvement Plan) was put on hold due to the pandemic. As you can imagine revenues fell considerably and have not returned fully yet so our ability to proceed with financing major projects was suspended. Not all projects were held back though. Those that were underway were moved forward and others that would have cost us more to stop were con-

tinued. Most cargo-related projects have been put on hold but we are working with multiple developers who are interested in developing Public Private Partnership (PPP) cargo infrastructure and we expect things to start up again next year.” Looking into the future, will MIA think of providing capacity for cargo drone activity? “Interesting question. For the time being probably not at MIA, since it is too busy (YTD Sep 272,000 operations) but it might be applicable at some of our other airports: Miami-Opa locka Executive, Miami Executive Airport or Homestead General Aviation Airport in the future. Cargo drones are developing fast and MIA is ready to facilitate their operation once approved by the FAA and other Federal Agencies.” MIA’s long term forecast estimate freight levels will reach 4-4.5 million tonnes annually.” It is difficult to measure accurately how green MIA is, accepts Pineda. “We are working with our airline, ground handlers, maintenance and other airport partners to implement sustainable business practices wherever possible. For example the airport has implemented a plan with FPL to change all the light bulbs in the entire airport to new LED lighting which is much more energy efficient. We also have a recycling programme setup with our cargo partners on the westside of the airport to assist with reducing waste materials. “One final thought regarding the enormous contribution of all the Federal Agencies (US Customs/US Dept of Agriculture/Fish & Wildlife/ Food & Drug Administration/Health Dept/etc) which assist us in clearing cargo 24/365. They do an amazing job in making sure our cargo community remains compliant and keeping us safe while still facilitating the efficient clearance of international cargo.”

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PROT E C THE P TING ERIM ETER

“A video system that is durable enough to withstand the relatively hostile environment, including harsh weather conditions and even wildlife and intruders”

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It comes as no surprise that airports, including air cargo terminals, can have a natural attraction for thieves and wrong-doers. As bad events and bad people have attacked and raided airport ground over the decades, so security has come to the fore in importance. It is not enough to have robust perimeter protection to mitigate against the threat of intrusion. Human intelligence to keep out those who try to illegally enter through the gates is also a top priority for airports. According to Lucas Young, a blogger for Axis.com, because of the expansive physical nature of most airfields, often kilometres from any centre of population, a robust video surveillance system is a must to cover all possible points of illicit and legal entry. He wrote: “A video system that is durable enough to withstand the relatively hostile environment, including harsh weather conditions and even wildlife and intruders, with the imaging capability to adapt to variable light conditions, is a must. While traditional perimeter protection methods such as fences and sensors offer a good foundation for basic perimeter protection, they are not perfect. They are prone to a high false alarm rate triggered by animals or high winds. The lack of visibility with some legacy solutions means that each alarm needs to be physically investigated, stretching limited security resources and increasing the risk of missing serious security breaches. “Adding a network video-based system to traditional security measures provides highly reliable intrusion protection for your aerodrome with 24/7 remote monitoring capabilities. A combination of thermal technology and video analytics, detects and distinguishes actual intrusion risks from wildlife and other causes of false alarms. Further, security radars and PTZ cameras track movement and identify suspects. And when integrated with network speakers, pre-recorded or live messaging can be used to deter their advance. “In addition to being highly effective, a modern video-based surveillance solution is cost-effective; one that can reduce [the airport’s] total cost of ownership (TCO) over time. To calculate the exact savings for any specific airport requires both a desk study and an on-site visit to determine equipment needs and installation costs.”

Human face of security In recent years, before becoming a transportation security inspector for TSA, Brittaney Rupert did a little bit of everything at Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG). As an airline employee, Rupert worked behind the ticket counter and at boarding gates, the ramp and operations. She interacted with TSA officers on the ramp as they checked badges that allow people to enter the secure areas of the airport. “It was that experience in aviation that aligned with my motivation to pursue a career at TSA,” Rupert said. And it was there where Rupert started talking with TSA employees about what it was like to work for the agency. A lead officer at TSA made sure Rupert knew about an opening. She applied and has worked for the agency ever since. Rupert started as a part-time officer at CVG in 2015 and worked her way up. After accept-

ing a full-time position, Rupert climbed the ladder to a supervisory officer position. A year ago, Rupert was promoted to a job inspecting cargo at John Glenn Columbus International Airport in Ohio. Rupert’s background was a perfect fit for TSA. Before coming to the agency, she earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice with a concentration in homeland security/terrorism and a master’s degree in science with a concentration in homeland security administration from Tiffin University in Ohio. Rupert is currently working alongside an indirect air carrier whose goal is to set themselves up to transport cargo. The carrier has the means, equipment and employees, but started largely out of compliance and unaware of security requirements and documentation. Rupert works with the carrier to make sure they implement appropriate compliance measures and are ready to transport air cargo. Recently, Rupert identified an error with an all-cargo international air carrier that failed to implement a required agreement. Rupert resolved the situation by coordinating with stakeholders to enhance the checks and balances process. Rupert’s role at TSA is an important one. “My goal is to advance outcome-focused security solutions that ensure regulatory compliance and reduce vulnerabilities,” she said. “My aim is to share effective measures related to regulatory compliance and transportation security. I am fortunate to be able to work alongside the individuals who comprise the industry, build co-operative relationships and work toward instituting measures that ensure compliance. “I have been extremely fortunate to have the opportunities offered to me by TSA, and I would recommend to anyone to try and get involved,” she added. “I’ve met fantastic people nationwide, many of whom I’ve kept in contact with along the way. And I look forward to working alongside others in the coming years.” The “Airport Security Technologies & Market (with COVID-19 Impact) - 2021-2026” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering. With three volumes, 673 pages, 135 tables and 145 figures, the Airport Security Technologies & Market (with COVID-19 Impact) - 20212026 report contains a thorough analysis of 5 vertical, 11 technology sectors, five regional and 20 national markets, detailing 2019-2026 market size. According to the report, the global air traffic dropped from 9.1 billion passengers in 2019 to 3.3 billion in 2020 but is forecast to rebound towards 11 billion by 2025. This 673-page market report is the utmost comprehensive review of the global Airport Security market available today. The objective of this report is to provide today’s strategic decision-makers with an expert 360-degree, time-sensitive, detailed view of this interconnected market. According to the report, the market is affected by the following drivers and inhibitors: Demand for multi-modal airport security systems; the COVID-19 pandemic changed the world. The associated 2020-21 aviation traffic decline limited the 2020-2021 airport security purchasing budgets; the 2021 covid-19 vaccination implies that the airport security market will recover by 2022; the COVID-19 pandemic is


SUPPLEMENT forcing security organisations to change the way they operate. They have to focus on the cost-performance of new airport security products and services; increasing demand for automated airport security systems, requiring less (or more sophisticated) human intervention, raises airport security equipment and systems (relative to security personnel); increasing value-added EDS systems generated by ‘soft’ elements (software, data management, processing algorithms; replacement of outdated airport security systems; China’s internal security policy; and terror and crime mitigation. Key verticals are: passengers screening; cargo security; perimeter security; luggage and cabin baggage screening and other security matters.

Anti-terrorism bollards One of the world’s leading manufacturers of anti-terrorism bollards and barriers launched its first zero-carbon product at one of the first security events to be held in person for almost two years. Safetyflex Barriers, based in Coventry, England unveiled a new crash-rated, solar-powered hydraulic raising arm gate at the International Security Expo at Olympia London in September. Safetyflex’s vertically opening gate is one of the few products of its kind on the market to be surface mounted and requires no ground fixings or power source. It is crash-tested to IWA-14 standard to stop a 7.5 tonne truck and can be installed in four hours as a permanent solution or at temporary events. The HVM gate was tested at the world-leading Horiba-Mira testing ground just a few miles from the company’s headquarters in Coventry and is also available as a battery-powered, vertically opening gate and as a manually operated swing gate. Visitors to the expo also got their first look at Safetyflex’s new fully automated crash-rated ‘coffin’ bollard which can be operated from a control panel or remotely by a remote app. It has also been crash-tested to IWA-14 standard to stop a 7.5 tonne truck and has a shallow foundation. Marcus Gerrard, director of Safetyflex Barriers, said: “The International Security Expo presented our first opportunity for almost two years to mix face-to-face on this kind of scale with contacts and potential

Organisations, including airports and airport facility owners, have a duty of care towards their personnel that should be implemented through meaningful before-deployment activities and trainings, and continuous refreshing sessions also during deployment. This will contribute to the development of security awareness among staff members and will substantially mitigate the risks of incurring in life-threatening and smaller-scale incidents while performing daily working activities. Smart Revolution Security develops employees’ security awareness through immersive experiential scenario-based simulations carried out at unique training facilities in Italy. During the training, the participants are tasked to perform a specific mission in a high-risk country, which in the company’s immersive scenario is “the Republic of Calvarinia”. After a theoretical induction, they will go through a series of challenging situations, individually and in team, and will learn how to prevent and mitigate security incidents by practicing different simulations in a safe but realistic environment. A unique combination of self-assessment, mentorship and competence validation system will set the conditions for a process of experiential learning, self-reflection and coaching.

“the global security environment ‘has entered a phase of heightened and extended volatility”

customers in the security sector. “In today’s HVM marketplace, the majority of gates require foundations and while shows have not been able to happen due to restrictions, our research and development has continued at a pace and after major investment, we are able to add a gate to our surface-mounted range, and perhaps more significantly, it is also our first fully automated product that is solar-powered. “This, and the other new product, will further enhance our reputation as one of the most innovative suppliers to the global security sector with our products in almost 20 countries in Europe and around the world.”

Extended volatility Rossella Altamura of Smart Revolution Security (SRS) commented: “As recently recognised by the United Nations (UN) Secretary-General, the global security environment ‘has entered a phase of heightened and extended volatility’. This volatility translates into greater risks and threats for personnel employed worldwide and sheds new light on the importance of developing security awareness and security management systems.”

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COVID-19 HAS ACCELERATED CHANGE “I tend to believe that COVID-19 has accelerated some structural evolutions in the consumer’s and hence in the shipper’s behaviours” 10

Didier Aujouannet, senior air freight business developer at Charles de Gaulle airport, Paris, is not a man given to future gazing. Like everyone in the industry, Aujouannet may not have been able to predict the Covid pandemic but how prepared was the airport for such a trauma? He says: “Who could pretend he was prepared to face this situation? I guess nobody. What is important is the way each and everyone reacted to it. The way we did it at CDG was by encouraging and organising communication between the members of the cargo community. At the beginning of the pandemic we had one or two video meetings each week to exchange information and take measures. Then progressively we reduced the frequency but we found these meetings so valuable that we have decided to keep them on a monthly basis. “I tend to believe that COVID-19 has accelerated some structural evolutions in the consumer’s and hence in the shipper’s behaviours. The strong increase of e-commerce is probably the most emblematic of them and it should keep going on this trajectory of a continuous increase. Other evolutions are more difficult to predict. We know for example that, to some extent, there has been a shift from the sea transport to the air transport during COVID-19. Will this continue long after the COVID-19 or will it cease when the sanitary situation will have come back to normal? “My personal belief is that COVID-19 will have highlighted the advantages of air cargo and that we should see a part of the shift become structural. As such I am very optimistic about the future of the

air cargo business for the next years.” Has the wider CDG airport community changed its opinion of airfreight operations after the last 18 months? He says: “Speaking generally, it is not only the airport community that has changed its opinion. Air cargo has been under the spotlight during the crisis and the populations in general have heard about this activity that was quite unknown for many of them before. But I am not naïve. People have short memories and they will tend to forget as quick as they have learnt.

Going forward Maintaining a high level of communication among the community is a simple, yet very important thing to capitalise on, considers Aujouannet. “We put a lot of attention on this topic by being very reactive at any enquiry from our customers or partners. “Having a dynamic cargo activity makes an airport more attractive for airlines since many of them rely on cargo for being profitable. As a consequence we consider cargo as an asset on which we bet for our development. “Many airlines switched to passenger freighter flights, and the number of those increased drastically since COVID-19 outbreak. Several airlines such as Air France, Qatar Cargo, Air Algérie, as well as many others overseas airlines, did indeed benefit from available passenger aircraft capacities grounded for obvious reasons to boost their cargo


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programs and relocate at CDG some of the formerly trucked cargo to/from other EU airports. Though, what I feel, is that the crisis has created some kind of stimulation, a kind of electroshock among the community to move forward towards more efficiency, more quality, more digitalisation and an increased preoccupation for environmental issues.”

Airfreight tonnage Because of CDG traffic pattern, and cargo being mostly carried in the belly holds before the crisis, CDG faced a decline of 17% in the tonnage in 2020 compared to 2019. By the end of 2021 it should have recovered and even surpassed the 2019 total. Morale in the airfreight community at CDG is riding high, notes Aujouannet. He says: “The morale is very good. Financial results for many of the airfreight players have increased. Some airlines have been saved from bankruptcy, some players have found new markets. “I think recruitment in the air freight industry is difficult everywhere in the world. The same goes for France. We have to be more pro-active to promote our industry towards the young generations. “Demand in warehouses is high and we still have plans to develop new facilities.

Future vision Looking into the future, is Aujouannet thinking of providing capacity for cargo drone activity? He replies: “We are clearly open to any business case in that sense, though cargo on all airports is not dedicated to last mile deliveries, but rather to overseas consolidation. Still we stay tuned with the key players. If they consider that a business model could have sense that we would of course be ready to study it with them. “As I have said before we are optimistic. We believe that the tonnage of air cargo will grow in the mid- and long-term, in accordance with the forecasts issued by Boeing. In this context of growth, our intention is to play a major role and to increase our market share in the European market.

“Demand in warehouses is high and we still have plans to develop new facilities” 11


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ACI WORLD: WILL THERE BE A CHANGE TO AIRFREIGHT?

“We estimate that $2.4 trillion in capital expenditure will be required by 2040”

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ACI World represents the collective interests of airports around the world to promote excellence in the aviation industry. It does this by working with governments, regional ACI members, experts and international organisations such as ICAO to develop policies, programmes and best practices that advance airport standards globally. In terms of what its member airports have gone through in the last 18 months, would it say the industry has gone through a stepchange or will it all go back to how it was pre-2020? According to Adam Zampini, director, communications and marketing Airports Council International (ACI) World, things may not return exactly to what had been the ‘normal’. He says: “Our latest forecast (November 2021 Economic Impact Bulletin) calls for a return to 2019 traffic level in 2024. However, there is still a possibility of a structural change (meaning that we will never reach the expected levels we projected before the pandemic) but the most likely scenario is that we will return to pre-COVID predicted levels within two decades.

Bellyhold Passenger growth has powered bellyhold growth for years. What chances does its members see for passenger travel returning to pre-pandemic levels in an era of Zoom calls? He says: “The distribution of the type of passengers will likely change with more leisure/VFR traffic and less business (as a reason for travel and not as a class/cabin) traffic. We predict that intra-company business travel will likely be affected negatively in the short and long term by the Zoom/Teams of this world, but inter-company/conference/sales business travel should see only a temporary decline. Air transport will continue to support trade, investment and business opportunities going forward.” Arguably, airfreight acquired a new prominence during the pandemic, not least because of its handling of PPE. Does its members

think this will continue? Zampini says: “The impressive growth seen by some segments of airfreight (for example, e-Commerce and online retail) will most likely slow down over the next 12 to 24 months as shops re-open and supply chain challenges subside. Some regions are still suffering from the lack of belly cargo space (the Middle East and Africa for example) and should soon see improvements as more international flights are being scheduled by airlines. Overall, we predict airfreight will continue to be strong over the next few years.”

Hiring Have ACI World members reported any great number of Covid firings or redundancies that might slow up any recovery? Zambini noyes: “Shortage of labour is affecting most sectors of the economy and the airport industry is not immune to it. The impact on the recovery is less clear, however. Some airports are struggling to hire people. This is especially true for concessions like food/beverage or car rental. “COVID-19 has accelerated the uptake of new technologies and innovation across the industry. A survey of airports that we published in March confirmed that airports had accelerated investments in technology—to aid in the recovery from the effects of the pandemic. “These investments were important for the short-term response to new health requirements, but they are also essential for the longterm sustainability of the industry. “We estimate that $2.4 trillion in capital expenditure will be required by 2040. Investments will not only address long-term capacity constraints, they will also allow us to reach net zero by 2050, a commitment that the airport industry as a whole has now adopted.”

Pushback There is a vocal pushback in some markets against passenger and


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E A STRUCTURAL freight air travel. Will this create a real issue for the airport sector or will it in reality not be an issue in the long-term? “As we continue to navigate the pandemic, our quest to return the industry to its pathway of growth and reconnecting the world must be done with sustainability and targeting net zero carbon emissions. It will be a challenge but the momentum is stronger than ever and aviation has several potential pathways to get there. “We believe that a commitment to a long-term carbon goal is essential for the growth and resilience of the industry. ACI World

have committed, through the Air Transport Action Group (ATAG), that global civil aviation operations will achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050 supported by accelerated efficiency measures, energy transition, and innovation across the aviation sector and in partnership with governments around the world. “The future of aviation depends on our commitment to the cause of sustainability and ACI will continue to work with the global aviation sector so that airports can be a strong part of the solution together.”

“We believe that a commitment to a long-term carbon goal is essential for the growth and resilience of the industry”

REGION

COUNTRY

COUNTRY CODE

CITY

AIRPORT NAME

IATA CODE

1

North America

United States

US

Memphis TN

Memphis International Airport

MEM

4,613,431

4,322,740

6.72

2

Asia-Pacific

Hong Kong SAR

HK

Hong Kong SAR

Hong Kong International Airport

HKG

4,468,089

4,809,485

-7.1

3

Asia-Pacific

China

CN

Shanghai

Pudong International Airport

PVG

3,686,627

3,634,230

1.44

4

North America

United States

US

Anchorage AK

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport

ANC*

3,157,682

2,745,348

15.02

5

North America

United States

US

Louisville KY

Louisville International Airport

SDF

2,917,243

2,790,109

4.56

6

Asia-Pacific

Republic of Korea

KR

Incheon

Incheon International Airport

ICN

2,822,370

2,764,369

2.1

7

Asia-Pacific

Chinese Taipei

TW

Taipei

Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport

TPE

2,342,714

2,182,342

7.35

8

North America

United States

US

Los Angeles CA

Los Angeles International Airport

LAX

2,229,476

2,092,003

6.57

9

Middle East

Qatar

QA

Doha

Hamad International Airport

DOH

2,175,292

2,215,804

-1.83

10

North America

United States

US

Miami FL

Miami International Airport

MIA

2,137,699

2,092,472

2.16

11

Asia-Pacific

Japan

JP

Tokyo

Narita International Airport

NRT

2,016,531

2,104,063

-4.16

12

North America

United States

US

Chicago IL

O'Hare International Airport

ORD

2,002,671

1,758,119

13.91

13

Middle East

United Arab Emirates

AE

Dubai

Dubai International Airport

DXB

1,932,022

2,514,918

-23.18

14

Europe

Germany

DE

Frankfurt

Flughafen Frankfurt/Main

FRA

1,914,285

2,091,174

-8.46

15

Asia-Pacific

China

CN

Guangzhou

Guangzhou Bai Yun International Airport

CAN

1,759,281

1,920,181

-8.38

16

Europe

France

FR

Paris

Aéroport de Paris-Charles de Gaulle

CDG

1,746,011

2,102,268

-16.95

17

Asia-Pacific

Singapore

SG

Singapore

Singapore Changi Airport

SIN

1,578,200

2,056,700

-23.27

18

Europe

Netherlands

NL

Amsterdam

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

AMS

1,456,428

1,592,221

-8.53

19

Asia-Pacific

China

CN

Shenzhen

Shenzhen Baoan International Airport

SZX

1,398,783

1,283,385

8.99

20

Europe

Germany

DE

Leipzig

Flughafen Leipzig/Halle

LEJ

1,378,157

1,227,705

12.25

21

North America

United States

US

Cincinnati OH

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport

CVG

1,300,758

1,132,643

14.84

22

Asia-Pacific

China

CN

Beijing

Beijing Capital International Airport

PEK

1,210,441

1,955,286

-38.09

23

Europe

United Kingdom

GB

London

Heathrow Airport

LHR

1,206,714

1,672,874

-27.87

24

Europe

Belgium

BE

Liege

Liège Airport

LGG

1,113,988

902,047

23.5

25

North America

United States

US

New York NY

John F. Kennedy International Airport

JFK

1,104,480

1,311,164

-15.76

RANK

TOTAL CARGO 2020

TOTAL CARGO 2019

% CHANGE TOTAL CARGO

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A

I

R

C

A

R

G

O

W

E

E

K

WORLD AIRPORTS

SBD: PANDEMIC ACCELERATED AN EXISTING TREND “This year has been a challenge for employers across the country, including airports and the tenants and customers they serve”

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San Bernardino International (SBD) Airport in sunny California is a modern airport infrastructure including first-class hangars and runway, a thriving business complex, ground support services, on-site maintenance and repair operations, as well as dedicated customer service from its airport team and FBO. SBD International Airport welcomes aircraft of all sizes and types - and the pilots who fly them - to the region. With the goal of being a good neighbour to all local residents and business owners, the airport requests that pilots follow preferred procedures (subject to weather, equipment, aircraft and pilot capabilities). According to an airport spokesperson, as the wider airport community changed its opinion of airfreight operations after the last 18 months, SBD was no different. “As the broader economy continues to evolve with accelerated growth in e-Eommerce, airfreight has taken a more prominent role in the airport community with carriers of all shapes and sizes,” the spokesperson notes.

Equal importance SBD considers each of its business lines as equally important. In recent years, air cargo has increased at the fastest rate. However

it continues to support each business line both now and into the future. The spokesperson also noted that the “pandemic accelerated an existing trend toward e-Commerce, including air cargo.” SBD has experienced strong growth in air cargo over the past five years, ranking last in the country in all-cargo freighter activity in 2017 (130th), reaching the top 60 by 2020. This rise occurred prior to Amazon Air commencing operations from its new air cargo hub at SBD (operations began in the second quarter of 2021). With the addition of Amazon Air, 2021 will be another successive record breaking year at SBD. “This year has been a challenge for employers across the country, including airports and the tenants and customers they serve. However, aviation has the added advantage over peer industries, offering interesting work environments through knowledge-based career paths that inspire minds and at competitive wage rates,” the spokesperson added. “As proven by the pandemic, logistics is not a singular mode of transportation, rather it is a connected, synchronised, highly integrated network of professionals that work and rely on one another to keep the economy moving forward.”


SUPPLEMENT

ANC PASS LAUNCHES AS MARKET SHIFTS

ANC PASS LAUNCHES AS MARKET SHIFTS ANC has been a critical airport since the beginning of the pandemic in 2020. The distribution of PPE, as well as the vaccines, by all the air cargo carriers transiting through ANC, was and still is very important to our state, and incredibly important to the US cities that need these goods. ANC was the busiest airport in the world in April of 2020. “We have not slowed down very much since then. In the month of October 2021, ANC saw over 125 wide-body air cargo aircraft land at ANC every day, with important goods to be delivered to North America,” said the airport, adding that while readers might very well know, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach continued to be logistical bottlenecks. “ANC has a solution for this! Each week, several cargo ships come from the Port of Tacoma to the Port of Anchorage, filled with goods for Alaska. Each week, these ships then leave ANC to go back to the Port of Tacoma, hauling empty containers.” According to Trudy Wassel, deputy airport manager, Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC), after an air cargo shipping study, done in partnership with the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation (AEDC), ANC Pacific-Air-To-Sea-Service (ANC PASS) was launched. It is a completely new shipping method that can help alleviate current bottlenecks in the supply chain. ANC PASS works by combining ANC’s air cargo network and the backhaul capacity of ships servicing the Port of Alaska. “Most of the goods consumed in Alaska are shipped up from the Port

of Tacoma. The containers and trailers that bring goods to Alaska mostly go back empty. Every week 151 Boeing 747s worth of empty trailers and containers leave Anchorage. ANC PASS provides an opportunity to inject more capacity into the supply chain and allows airlines to better utilise their scarce aircraft. For example, a typical Asia-Anchorage-Chicago round trip could be done three times per week and inject 300 tonnes of cargo into the supply chain. An Asia-Anchorage round trip, with items transfer to ship, could be done six times per week and inject 600 tonnes of cargo into the supply chain,” said airport director Jim Szczesniak. The ANC PASS study was conducted between 11 points of origin in Asia, four west coast ports, and seven US destinations using a variety of freight classes. The study shows that cargo from Asia can be injected into the west coast distributions facilities in as little as six to seven days, with the worst-case scenario being 15-19 days. The shipping lines servicing Alaska have their own facilities in Tacoma and are not subject to delays awaiting a dock. “ANC PASS is more than an immediate congestion relief valve, it is an entirely new shipping method. ANC PASS can offer shippers a medium speed, medium cost transpacific option. This has great potential to increase air cargo traffic through ANC by taking share from traditional ocean carriers,” said Szczesniak. “It also works in reverse providing North American shippes a way to take advantage of the backhaul capacity to Asia on the cargo aircraft that depart ANC.”

Editor:

James Graham

Feature Editor:

Yasmin Turner

Director of Operations:

Kim Smith

International Sales Director:

Rosa Bellanca

Finance Manager:

Ian Barrett

Video Director:

Michael Sales

Design & Production Manager: Alex Brown Website Consultant:

Tim Brocklehurst

Directors: Norman Bamford • William Carr • Dawn Jolley

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Whilst every care is taken, the publishers cannot be held legally responsible for any errors in articles or advertisements. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by electronic, mechanical, photographic or other means without the prior consent of the publishers. USA: The publishers shall not be liable for losses, claims, damages or expenses arising out of or attributed to the contents of Air Cargo Week, insofar as they are based on information, presentations, reports or data that have been publicly disseminated, furnished or otherwise communicated to Air Cargo Week.

AZURA I N T E R N AT I O N A L

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BOURNEMOUTH AIRPORT

Time and cost savings to London delivered.

Avoid the complexity and congestion of the major London hubs; Bournemouth Airport is ready to help you secure time and cost savings.

All-in-one handling service.

Our all-in-one product concept offers end-to-end handling from tail-to-truck, onward road transport to any point in the UK (and beyond) plus option of a Heathrow reception/delivery point. This unique oversight of the whole process also enables us to ensure quality of service delivery and industry-leading speedto-market. Avoid the inevitable bottlenecks of dealing with a chain of service delivery partners; get your cargo off aircraft and delivered to London hours ahead of a similar consignment landing at congested hub airports. With flexibility at our core, the whole Bournemouth Airport Cargo team is ready to react to your needs to ensure the successful development of your UK freight business.

The sustainable alternative.

Shorter flying times, elimination of aircraft holding delays and reduced consignment dwell time within trucks and airport warehouses also enables Bournemouth Airport to deliver tangible sustainability benefits through reduced emissions, reduced fuel burns and significantly less aviation noise impact on communities than flying into major hub airports.

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Day or night, we’re ready to support growth of your cargo business. Uniquely, Bournemouth is the only airport in Southern England capable of offering open, 24-hour slot availability for regular air cargo traffic.

Get in touch – discover the Bournemouth difference. Tel: +44 (0) 1202 364110 cargo@bournemouthairport.com Bournemouth International Airport, Christchurch, Dorset, BH23 6SE, United Kingdom

www.bournemouthairportcargo.com

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GROUPE ADP

In the heart of Greater Paris, Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport is at the crossroads of European trade l 1st economic center in Europe hosting the headquarters and offices of the top 500 global companies l Very rich transport network and 3 motorways at the gates of the airport l Catchment area of 25 million inhabitants within a radius of 200km l Airport perfectly connected to the major neighboring poles: Brussels (280km), Liège (345km), Luxembourg (370km), Amsterdam (480km), Frankfurt (580km)

Introduction.

Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport is one of the top cargo airports in the world, offering unrivaled opportunities of development for airlines and operators with important reserves of land and slots, a constant will to encourage innovation while developing a proactive approach to environmental management.

Efficiency and Flexibility.

Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport offers 24h/7 operations, with airside connected warehouses, 11 local custom offices and 500 dedicated agents.

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Cargo Capacity.

Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport offers 600,000 m² of warehouses and 300 ha totally dedicated to the cargo activity with restricted and monitored video access, 83 parking stands for freighters, 15,000 m² of controlled temperature warehouses.

Special Services.

Paris-Charles de Gaulle provides you with 4 sectors of expertise: luxury goods, fresh & perishables, e-commerce & express freight and pharmaceuticals.

Air Cargo Growth

Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport offers 140 ha of land reserves and additional slots, enabling the development of all cargo activities on the long term.

Contact Information.

Edouard Mathieu <Edouard.MATHIEU@adp.fr> Didier Aujouannet <Didier.AUJOUANNET@adp.fr> Stephan Dubois <Stephan.DUBOIS@adp.fr>

www.parisaeroport.fr/en/professionals/cargo

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HALIFAX STANFIELD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Halifax Stanfield International Airport (Halifax Stanfield) is ready to elevate the cargo logistics chain in Atlantic Canada with its new Air Cargo Logistics Park (ACLP). The facility is the largest east of Montreal, with a new, 62,000 sq. ft. building, and plans are underway for a second. The ACLP was made possible by investments from the Government of Canada ($18M), Government of Nova Scotia ($5M) and Halifax International Airport Authority ($13M).

Efficiency & Flexibility.

The ACLP has five new aircraft parking positions, in addition to three existing ones, dedicated to cargo handling. Additional airside and groundside space has also been designated for cargo logistics. These features give cargo carriers more flexibility with their schedules and increased efficiency for cargo processing.

Cargo Capacity.

The cargo apron at Halifax Stanfield can now handle aircraft as large as a B-747-400 and service multiple aircraft at once. Prior to the ACLP, 41,000 metric tonnes of cargo were processed at Halifax Stanfield. Now that it’s complete, there are significant growth opportunities.

Special Services.

There’s high demand worldwide for Nova Scotia’s fresh seafood, especially live lobster. The ACLP offers new cold chain capabilities to keep time-sensitive imports or exports fresh. With additional truck bays and a prime location on a major highway, it’s an ideal location to do business.

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Air Cargo Growth.

Air cargo has remained a bright light at Halifax Stanfield throughout the pandemic. Cargo volumes are strong in 2021. With the ACLP becoming fully operational in spring 2022, there is no better time to take advantage of the opportunity to leverage this state-of-the-art facility..

Contact Information.

Halifax Stanfield International Airport is in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Located on the east coast of the continent, the airport offers intermodal opportunities to move cargo.

Address: 747 Bell Blvd. Halifax, NS, Canada B2T 1K2 Contact: Glen Boone, Director, Cargo & Real Estate Development 902.873.3312 glen.boone@hiaa.ca

www.halifaxstanfield.ca/air-cargo

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Leipzig/Halle Airport (LEJ)

24/7 Cargo Hub Plus Leipzig/Halle Airport (LEJ) is the fourthlargest cargo hub in Europe with annual freight volumes exceeding 1.38 million tons. LEJ is the cargo-focused airport with the longest period of dynamic growth in Europe – 16 years now. Located at the heart of Europe, LEJ offers cargo flights 24/7, direct links to the trans-European road and railroad networks, generous space and capacity opportunities and comprehensive logistics services from one source.

Introduction.

Globally connected. LEJ is the home base for DHL Express, AeroLogic and CargoLogic Germany. Overall, about 80 cargo airlines connect LEJ with a global network of over 270 destinations. DHL’s largest global hub and Amazon Air’s first European airfreight center are part of LEJ’s success.

Efficiency and flexibility. LEJ offers ideal facilities: modern multimodal infrastructure, two runways (3,600 meters long and without weight restrictions) and short routes to and from aircraft. Professional, individual product solutions guarantee rapid turnaround times for all customers. Our freight handling specialist, PortGround, operates 24/7, 365 days a year.

Cargo capacity. LEJ handles 1,000+ cargo flights weekly – and counting. The airport handles all types of freight and cargo planes including the Antonov 225, which has flown in 20+ times. LEJ is growing and investing EUR 500 million for new apron areas and logistics & office buildings.

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Special services. We can handle outsized cargo, e-commerce, temperaturesensitive pharmaceutical products like vaccines, humanitarian and medical aid, transport large animals like cows or horses, offer customs clearance round the clock or connect seaports by rail – all on behalf of our customers.

Air cargo growth. Huge increases for years: freight volumes at LEJ enjoy doubledigit growth and are heading for a new record year. In October, growth was already 17 percent compared to 2020 – at approx. 1.3 million tons. A new absolute record was set in October with 141,000+ tons.

Contact information. Mario Patyk Head of Business Development Cargo/Logistics Phone: +49-341-224 1070 Cell phone: +49-176-1979 1026 E-mail: mario.patyk@mdf-ag.com

www.lej-cargo.com

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MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (MIA)

Miami International Airport (MIA), located in Miami, Florida, USA is a premier and established, yet growing global gateway for air freight. MIA continues to be the Number 1 US airport for international freight, the world’s largest gateway to the Latin American/ Caribbean region, and a high-ranking global freight/ transshipment hub. Coming off its record year for cargo volume in 2020 with 2.3 million US tons, MIA is on pace for another record year in 2021.

Introduction

MIA is a major distribution hub for perishables, hi-tech commodities, e-commerce, pharmaceuticals, textiles, and industrial machinery. As the main gateway to the Latin American/ Caribbean region, MIA handles 85% of all air imports and 80% of all air exports between the US and the region. .

Efficiency and Flexibility

MIA’s exceptional direct passenger and cargo access to all world regions enables the efficient movement of cargo to a vast number of markets. Forty-three freighter airlines and fifty-five passenger airlines at MIA provide flexibility in movement of freighter/ belly cargo between Miami and 201 different cities.

Cargo Capacity

MIA cargo facilities encompass a total of 2.8 million square feet (216,413 square meters) of warehouse space including nearly 395,276 square feet of on-airport refrigerated warehouse space. Apron space is presently 4.4 million square feet, with 44 commonuse cargo positions and 27 leased cargo positions.

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Special Services

MIA is equipped to handle a large throughput of special cargo and perishables with its CEIV Pharma Certified airport community, MIA Cargo Clearance Center, MIA Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and with the highest concentration of federal inspectors on-airport in the US.

Air Cargo Growth

Cargo volume at MIA increased +16.9% year-over-year through Q3 2021. To keep pace with this robust growth and long-term forecasted growth, the airport is carrying out an ambitious $5 billion airport-wide modernization project. MIA is your solution for moving cargo today and well into the future.

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SAN BERNARDINO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (SBD)

Just 60 miles east of Los Angeles and centered among major transportation corridors, SBD International Airport offers a strategic base of operations for air cargo and logistics companies. The Airport’s state-of-the art infrastructure supports the nation’s leading express freight carriers including FedEx, UPS, and Amazon Air, and its ideal location and competitive cost structure present a significant opportunity for companies seeking to expand in the region.

.

The fast track to everywhere

SBD is situated in the heart of the Inland Empire, a diverse region that boasts a powerhouse economy in its own right and which consistently outpaces average growth rates nationally. The Airport provides access to the region’s estimated 4.7 million consumers—many of whom live less than 30 minutes from the Airport—as well as to a vital goods movement corridor with global reach. Its strategic location is just minutes away from Interstates 10, 210 and 215, the BNSF intermodal container facility, Roadway and Yellow Freight hubs, and modern warehousing facilities.

Expansive infrastructure

SBD’s state-of-the-art infrastructure supports daily, large-scale air cargo operations and one-off flights. Its Group VI runway easily accommodates the world’s largest aircraft, while skilled staff and specialized equipment ensure quick cargo handling and efficient turn times. Should they be needed, a comprehensive range of aircraft services are available from the airport’s MRO partners.

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Enabling companies to fast-track deliveries while offering them an attractive cost structure in a highly competitive market has proved to be a winning strategy for both the Airport and its partners. Boosted by these thriving businesses, SBD now ranks as one of the country’s top airports for cargo growth. Transportation and supply chain solutions is what SBD delivers every day.

A strategic alternative

For air cargo and supply chain management companies seeking to launch or expand in the region, SBD International Airport provides an ideal geographic location in which to base operations, improve operating expenses, and benefit from an executive team committed to long-term success.

Contact: Telephone: 909.382 4100 cargo@sbdairport.com

sbdairport.com

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The fast track to everywhere

SBD SBD

CHOSEN BY CARGO GIANTS Just 60 miles east of Los Angeles and centered among major transportation corridors, SBD offers a strategic base of operations for air cargo and logistics companies. SBD’s state-of-the art infrastructure supports the nation’s leading integrated freight carriers including FedEx, UPS, and Amazon Air. The airport’s ideal location and competitive cost structure present a significant opportunity for companies seeking to expand in the region.

#1 AIRPORT IN CARGO GROWTH IN THE USA* ARE YOU WITH US? • Uncongested airspace

• Bond warehouse on airport

• Onsite, expedited customs clearance

• 10,001 x 200 runway

• The LA Basin’s lowest airport fees

• Aircraft ramp available

• Access to Foreign Trade Zone and tax incentives

• Logistics infrastructure • Strong interstate highway connections * FAA Report: CY 2020 All-Cargo Airports by Landed Weight

sbdairport.com Contact us today at 909.382.4100 or cargo@sbdairport.com San Bernardino Profile.indd 3

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TED STEVENS ANCHORAGE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (ANC)

Introduction

In addition to serving as the “gateway to Alaska” for almost 6 million travelers each year, Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC) is the fourth busiest cargo airport in the world – and we’re still growing. Centrally located on the backbone of the global supply chain, ANC is only 9.5 hours or less from 90% of the industrialized world and home to an award-winning airfield maintenance team that keeps aircraft moving 24/7/365. As the global economy continues to adapt to COVID-19, ANC cargo operations have experienced accelerated growth due to ANC’s strategic location. There are over $1 billion in new infrastructure projects in planning. Notably, ANC was briefly the busiest airport worldwide in April of 2020.

ANC Pacific Air-to-Sea Service (ANC PASS)

With maritime cargo vessels departing Anchorage for Tacoma, WA with empty containers several times a week, there is an opportunity to establish multi-modal transportation lanes between Asia and the United States through ANC. Download the full report to learn more at www.aedcweb.com/ancpass.

New Cargo Infrastructure

Among the $1 billion in new cargo infrastructure projects are: a 98-acre cargo warehouse and MRO facility; a 28-acre UPS hub expansion; a 19-acre FedEx hub expansion; a 195,000-squarefoot cargo warehouse; and a 700,000-square-foot cargo and cold storage facility.

Special Cargo Transfer Rights

ANC enjoys the most liberalized cargo-transfer rights in the nation, which allow carriers to transfer, store, or transload shipments in ways only possible with our unique mix of partners, location, and infrastructure. Collectively, these efficiencies save significant time and increase your bottom line.

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Leasing at ANC

Despite the ongoing development renaissance at ANC, more than 4,000 acres of land remain available for leasing with lease rates as low as $0.18 per square foot. Reach out to our team and discover how ANC is your company’s global connection.

Contact:

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC) 5000 W. International Airport Rd. P.O. Box 196960 (mailing) Anchorage, AK 99519-6960 1.907.266.2526

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