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WORLD ACW Digital is sponsored by AIRPORTS.COM FREIGHTERS.COM

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The weekly newspaper for air cargo professionals No. 1,053

14 October 2019

Air cargo HAS a future

Hunting hunters Forwarders can be game-changers in the fight against wildlife traffickers

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IATA, the International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations, and TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network, launched a new digital course ‘Prevention of Wildlife Trafficking’ during the FIATA World Congress 2019 in Cape Town, South Africa. The three-hour on-line digital course provides freight forwarders with essential information to detect, respond to, and report instances of wildlife trafficking. The course is available, free of charge through the FIATA Logistics Academy, and was developed in partnership with TRAFFIC with support from USAID through the Wildlife Trafficking Response Assessment and Priority Setting (Wildlife TRAPS) Project. TRAFFIC and FIATA also signed a memorandum of understanding to advance awareness-raising and capacity-building efforts for forwarders to combat the illegal wildlife trade. “Freight forwarders have the ability to be game-changers in preventing the exploitation of their businesses by wildlife traffickers. Awareness and training are critical and our new digital course will make it easy for freight forwarders to become part of the solution,” said Issa Baluch, FIATA Logistics Academy. “Wildlife trafficking is a global crisis that impacts the integrity of transport supply chains. We’re thrilled that this new course will empower freight forwarders around the world to easily and freely access critical information on the prevention of illegal wildlife trade,” said Monica Zavagli of TRAFFIC. The illegal trade of wildlife is the fourth largest black market in the world and impacts more than 7,000 species of animals and plants. Wildlife trafficking pushes species towards extinction, robs countries of their natural resources, and impacts local revenues. These crimes fuel corruption and enrich criminal organisations too. The course has been launched in English, but will shortly become available in other languages, including Chinese, Spanish and French.

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INSIDE EMERGING EUROPE’S AIRPORTS

SIX airports in emerging Europe rank among the top 10 fastest growing freight hubs over the last decade ... PAGE 2

VIVE LA REVOLUTION!

INDUSTRY veteran Robert Van de Weg has joined Paris-based ECS Group to help with its revolutionary transformation ... PAGE 3 RUNWAY REFURB HITS CARGO

FIRST half cargo volumes took a large hit at Dubai International Airport as the southern runway was closed ... PAGE 5

AIRFREIGHT ON THE HOOF

FOR more than four decades, UK-based Instone Air Line has focused entirely on the transport of horses ... PAGE 6

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Emerging Europe’s airports grow as freight hubs

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ix airports in emerging Europe rank amongst the top 10 fastest growing freight hubs in Europe over the last decade, with three – Burgas in Bulgaria and Cluj-Napoca and Timișoara in Romania – making the top five. Riga in Latvia, Bratislava in Slovakia and Vilnius in Lithuania are the three others which make the top 10. The research, by CP Cases, manufacturers of high-performance protective casing, looks into data from the European Commission between 2008 and the latest annual data in 2018 for emerging European freight markets. Burgas has seen a 699% increase in freight tonnes per annum over the past 10 years – the third highest growth in Europe, behind two Spanish airports, Zaragoza

(843%) and Valladolid (837% increase). Overall, however, Riga is currently the largest freight hub in emerging Europe (and 26th in Europe), processing 24,628 tonnes per annum. “Knowing the logistics map both of

ACWBITES

US-BASED private equity firm RiverOak Strategic Partners says it is to start to secure Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) approval for its plan to reopen Manston Airport and that the gateway could reopen in 2022 to cargo flights. Despite having one of the longest runways in the UK, debt-ridden Manston closed in 2014 after it was sold by then-owners the Infratil investment fund to transport magnate Ann Gloag for £1. BIMAN Bangladesh Airlines is to resume services between its home country and Manchester Airport in the north of England after an absence of seven years. A new service to Sylhet and Dhaka will start on 4 January next year, operated by a Boeing 787 Dreamliner. SAUDI Airlines Cargo has launched a Dry Ice replenishment services for products such as perishable and pharmaceuticals which require specific temperature requirements, which can be provided to clients 48 hours in advance prior to service delivery. GAZPROMNEFT-AERO has held the second international Aviation Fuelling Challenge (AFC), in collaboration with the IATA Fuel Quality Pool (IFQP) and The Joint Inspection Group (JIG), an international organisation for the development of aviation fuel supply standards. CHARLOTTE Bennett has been appointed group people director by UK-based freight management service provider Xpediator.

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Europe and for the international market plays a large part in what we do at CP Cases, because it helps us to ensure our products are always doing the best job when it comes to protecting valuable equipment,” said Fiona Haggerty, commercial director of CP Cases. “While we still see products being utilised to transport equipment to the major freight hubs in Europe, we’ve noticed that some key new players are becoming increasingly popular in Europe, providing a more localised option for freight logistics. “As a company we are able to create bespoke cases for all kinds of freight logistics needs, and with investment to ensure the right infrastructure is in place, we can only see these localised hubs becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to the major European freight hubs.”

Swissport to inaugurate Brussels Pharma Center ON Wednesday 23 October 2019, Swissport will inaugurate its new Swissport Pharma Center at Brussels Airport, in the presence of Alexander De Croo, Belgium’s deputy prime minister and minister of finance.

The Brussels branch is one of Swissport’s main air cargo hubs. The centre (3,620 sq m) is part of a total renovation of the existing warehouse (25,000 sq m) and administrative building by 2021 at the Belgian capital.

Peace breaks out on Nigeria-SA route

NIGERIAN airline Air Peace has gained traffic rights to operate a daily service between its home country and Johannesburg. It forms part of a bilateral air service agreement signed between the two countries at the recent Nigeria/South Africa Bi-National Commission Summit in Pretoria. Air Peace, which operates Boeing 737 passenger aircraft and two Boeing 300s, along with smaller aircraft, obtained a cargo operations licence from the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority last year.

Platt’s farewell NICK Platt, cargo head at London Heathrow and the subject of an April Fool’s story this year in ACW, has worked his last day at London Heathrow. “I’ve accepted a twoyear contract with DAA International to be the director for

cargo at Riyadh Airports Company (RAC). I’ll be based in Saudi Arabia and helping RAC develop its cargo capabilities as they work towards Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030. Keep your eye on LinkedIn for updates,” he said..


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Freight buoys Air Partner profits

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rofits on Air Partner’s freight activities have helped shore up the global aviation services group’s bottom line. Slower group charter trading, where gross profit was down 14.4%, was compensated by freight (gross profit up 22.6%) and private jets (up 10.0%). Overall, the company reported gross profits of £17.2 million in the six months to 31 July 2019, 1% down on the same period last year. Underlying profit before tax, at £3.0m, was down 29.5% but statutory profit before tax was up 6.8% at £2.8m. Gross profit was £17.2m, 1% down on the figure for 2018. The company said the results were in line with the same period last year and stronger than anticipated at time of the AGM. The decline in underlying profit reflected investment in overheads for future growth, it added. Gross profit in the US increased by 18.2% following further investment over the last year while for consultancy and training it increased by 7.6%. Chief executive Mark Briffa described the result as “a solid first half performance, despite a challenging operating environment.” He added: “It is clear from these results that our strategy to diversify by revenue stream and geography is working, with consulting

ACL Airshop and VRR launch AAY container VRR and ACL Airshop joined forces to launch the first ever collapsible AAY container at Inter Airport Europe 2019. The AAY, which weighs 280 kilos can be erected and collapsed by two people in just two minutes, is seven times smaller than normal ULDs when folded, says VRR. They can be stacked up to four high on a Boeing 737 Freighter main deck and six high on the lower deck of a wide-body aircraft.

ACWBITES AT least three people died when an AN-12 crashed at Lviv airport on October 3. The Ukraine Air Alliance aircraft was carrying cargo from Vigo in Spain, with eight people on board. PASSENGERS were evacuated from a flight at Glasgow Airport on October 4 in an emergency incident following a cargo spillage in the hold of a KLM flight from Amsterdam. FIATA has released a best practices paper to address corruption and bribery in freight forwarding produced by FIATA’s Advisory Body Legal Matters. The Corruption Perceptions Index 2018 (Transparent International) showed that more than 66% of 180 countries assessed scored badly.

and training compensating for slower trading in our Group Charter division. We are pleased with the return we are generating on our organic growth initiatives and believe there is plenty of headroom for further growth too. We continue to invest in new offices, people and processes to increase market share in all our geographies.”

CARIBBEAN Airlines is to expand its cargo network with operations to and from Curacao in the Lesser Antilles

ACL Airshop is the launch customer for the AAY container, and though it has invested significantly in Bluetooth Low Energy and track and trace, getting containers returned to their original location remains a challenge.

Van de Weg: Vive la révolution!

INDUSTRY veteran Robert Van de Weg has joined Paris-based ECS Group to help with its revolutionary transformation. The KLM Cargo, Atlas Air, Cargolux and, most recently, Volga Dnepr Group veteran says: “ECS Group represents the future of our industry – reinventing it and driving it forward. Joining ECS Group means making a contribution to the revival of this industry, and it means putting in place a clear and ambitious strategy, supported by digital technology and business Intelligence tools that can help our airline clients move forward.”

YIFFY winners revealed at FIATA Cape Town congress RUSSIAN project freight specialist Evgeniya Khokhlova, of SVH-Freight was announced as the winner of this year’s Young International Freight Forwarder of the Year (YIFFY) Award at the FIATA World Congress in Cape Town, South Africa. The other three regional finalists were Enos Chapara, of Bollore Transport and Logistics Zimbabwe; Rachael van Harmelen from DSV Panalpina, Canada; and Asia Pacific Phillip Burgess, South Island manager, Burnard International, New Zealand. The awards were sponsored by insurance specialists the TT

Club, whose senior loss prevention executive and chairman of the award steering committee, Mike Yarwood said: “The current global trade environment is particularly challenging and the forwarder’s role in adapting to the regulatory, political and economic pressures is consequently more crucial than ever. In these circumstances the training and professional advancement of our young professionals must be paramount.” Next year’s award will take place at the FIATA Congress in Busan, South Korea on 19-24 October.

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Claudia Weidenbusch, managing director of Cargogate, Munich, speaks her mind

Air Cargo has a future

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espite the general decline in air cargo volumes in the last months – mainly driven by the US-China trade war – and the predicted even deeper dive in the next months. I am convinced that the slump in the air cargo industry should be used to evaluate investments in the future. All actors of the entire air cargo supply chain should change their mindset which is to react to the present decline with rate dumping . Rate dumping – as a reaction – is merely a flash in the pan and definitely counterproductive. Cargogate decided to utilise the present drop in air cargo demand to put all efforts into a quality campaign, to create an awareness of the quality and value of its services and actors. The industry must believe in its future and not degrade itself.

“If it is free, it cannot be any good” (Albert Einstein). We must be proud of the high quality and value of services rendered and ensure the continuous training of staff, while adapting to the ever changing trends that are now leading us to a more digitised work environment, thus enhancing the future image of the air cargo handling industry. It is with this mindset that Cargogate is exploring options on how to integrate augmented and virtual reality in cargo handling processes. Based on the work of the Fraunhofer Institute in this regard, we clearly see that the cargo employee of the future is an IT specialist as much as a logistician. We need to make all players in the air cargo environment aware of the valueof air cargo handling. There can be no doubt: The entire air freight supply chain has to actively face these challenges, leveraging synergies and pooling forces in the future in order to finally develop the long overdue digital development our industry needs.

CEIV re-certification as easy as ABC

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irBridgeCargo Airlines has successfully gained its IATA CEIV Pharma re-certification following two-day audit procedures for compliance with IATA’s Center of Excellence for Validators in Pharmaceutical Logistics (CEIV Pharma) certification program. The audit, which was carried out by IATA’s representing company, was held at Moscow Sheremetyevo International Airport which serves as a cargo hub for ABC operations and also covered all internal process concerning

transportation of pharmaceutical products. Fedor Novikov, deputy general director, special products said: “Three years ago we became the first airline in Russia to get IATA CEIV Pharma certification, which served as a trigger for further dynamic development of our dedicated ‘abc pharma’ product. “We managed a more than 20% uptick in pharma shipments for the first eight months of 2019 and leveraged around 22,500 tonnes of pharma products.”

Geodis and Arkema in post-Brexit dry run crossing GEODIS, a global expert in transport and logistics, partnered Arkema, the French leader in chemicals, to take part in dry runs organised by French Customs to test future customs arrangements that will be implemented in the event of a No-Deal Brexit. The exercise will have implications for road feeder services using the route. GEODIS is now ready to support its customers for Customs and transport operations involving the United Kingdom, whatever the Brexit scenario. With the prospect of a border being restored, between the United Kingdom and the European Union, French Customs authorities have developed a computerised system, a “smart border,” which automates the border crossing for freight vehicles. GEODIS and Arkema jointly participated in operational trials on 24 September. Rémi Poteau, key account manager at GEO-

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DIS, said: “This full-scale dry run was key to guaranteeing the free flow of trade. This experience allowed GEODIS to prove that it is now ready to provide safe and reliable logistics services between France and the UK for its customers in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexit. It also demonstrated that the Group is capable of handling all Customs requirements through a range of high quality Customs solutions in compliance with regulations.”


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Emirates SkyCargo provides global links for European cargo

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mirates SkyCargo has provided businesses in Belgium and Norway with links to the world for five years. Since 2014, Emirates SkyCargo has flown over 235,000 tonnes of cargo to and from these countries, with goods including lifesaving medication from Belgium and fresh salmon from Norway. Over 60,000 tonnes of exports have been flown out of Belgium in the last five years, with freighter services being launched in Brussels

in 2015, soon after the start of passenger flights. Brussels is an important destination for the Pharma Corridors initiative that aims to provide enhanced protection for pharma cargo from origin to destination. Since the launch of Emirates Pharma, more than 6,000 tonnes of pharma cargo have been transported from Brussels. Flights from Liege have also been added in response to demand for transporting horses

to global championship events. Over the last five years, Emirates SkyCargo has operated close on 80 charters from Liege transporting more than 3,500 horses and 800 grooms. The largest charter took place in September 2018 with more than 500 horses being transported on 19 flights to and from the FEI World Equestrian Games in Tryon 2018 in the US. Bob Vandamme, cargo manager for Belgium says: “Currently our customers in and around Brussels can access up to 20 tonnes of belly hold cargo capacity on Emirates’ twice daily passenger flights operated on our wide-body Boeing 777-300ER aircraft. In addition, they can also transport their cargo on Emirates’ thrice weekly freighter flights on the Boeing 777 freighter aircraft which are capable of carrying up to 100 tonnes of cargo per flight and can also load large, outsized or heavy cargo.” Almost 62,000 tonnes of Norwegian salmon has travelled from Oslo with Emirates Sky-

Cargo on their way to customers in the Middle East and Asia. Due to strong demand, a weekly B777 freighter service was launched in October 2016. Mona Kongsvik, cargo manager for Norway says: “Since the start of our services, Emirates SkyCargo has played an important role in the export of Norwegian salmon on our passenger and freighter aircraft. “However, over the years, our freighter aircraft have also helped transport other outsized items including aircraft engines, large ship propellers weighing more than 10 tonnes apiece, horses and relief cargo for humanitarian missions from Oslo.” Emirates SkyCargo has transported over 105,000 tonnes of cargo to and from Norway since the start of operations to that country. Cool chain has also been a major part of Emirates SkyCargo’s business, with pharma and seafood being moved through hubs in Dubai and transferred onto outbound flights.

Wallenborn drives down emissions in UAE Cargo falls as runway gets rehabilitated FIRST half cargo volumes took a large hit at Dubai International Airport as the southern runway was closed for rehabilitation. The runway was closed between 16 April and 30 May, with the total number of flights down 11.6% in the first half of 2019 to 178,383. Cargo volumes were down 18.3% to 1.03 million tonnes, affected by the runway closure due to the amount being flown in the belly of passenger aircraft. The number of flights being operated at Dubai World Central (DWC) was up 37.7% to 22,127 but freight was down 5.3% due to softening air cargo demand.

The 45-day runway closure meant that the number of flights at DWC increased from 10 a day to 80 overnight. Preparations for the expansion was the equivalent of opening an airport the size of Glasgow Airport, with 600 pieces of heavy equipment being moved in preparation for the additional traffic. Paul Griffiths, CEO of Dubai Airports says: “Thanks to the planning and collaboration between Dubai Airports and our service partners including dnata, the General Directorate of Residency & Foreigners Affairs, Dubai Police, flydubai and other airlines, we were able to turn the challenge into an opportunity.”

LUXEMBOURG-BASED Wallenborn Transport launched in the United Arab Emirates in February 2013 with its first office in Dubai. Its aim was to develop a range of land transport services in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region. This expansion was followed by Wallenborn’s observation that airlines and frequencies were growing in the Gulf states and spotting a trend toward higher frequencies of smaller aircraft within the GCC. A mere eight months later it opened a second local office, this time in Sharjah. The launch in Sharjah was in response to fast growing demand for Wallenborn’s air cargo trucking services from airlines, forwarders and integrators across the UAE.

Freelance truckers The UAE transport market still remains based on freelance truckers (70%) and small companies, many of which fail to comply with international standards. In contrast, Wallenborn understands the

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needs and expectations of global customers, and is able to offer expertise, knowledge, and a compliant, high quality service at a fair price. Since then, Wallenborn has gone from strength to strength. Imports and exports are both part of Wallenborn’s scope of work. Pick-ups are primarily made at the main airports in Dubai, DXB and DWC, and goods are delivered to the customers’ hub in DWC or to the final consignee in the greater Dubai area. Exports are usually transported from the various manufacturers to the airport where the customer will forward the cargo by air. Main export locations include Sharjah Airport, DWC and DXB. With partners, Wallenborn also takes care of local distribution using smaller vehicles. This includes mall deliveries and express services. Wallenborn’s trucks and trailers in Dubai have the lowest emission standard currently in place in the UAE. In addition to ensuring emission standards are met with its fleet, Wallenborn is about to launch a few other sustainability initiatives to help reduce its carbon footprint.

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Airfreight on the hoof for Instone for 40 years

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or more than four decades, UK-based Instone Air Line has focused entirely on the transport of horses by air.. That is hardly a surprise from an airline that is credited with handling the first horse ever flown almost 99 years ago. According to Jeremy Instone, managing director of Instone Air Line: “The original airline was started by my grandfather and his two brothers in 1919. We believe the first horse to ever be carried by air was transported by Instone somewhere around 1920 on a Vickers Vimy, possibly the famous G-EASI known as ‘go easy’.” Instone says: “We design, manufacture and maintain our own Airstables and other equipment for the transportation of live animals. InstoneAir is the only UK company designing and building fully compliant EASA (European Aviation Safety Agency) certified Airstables for horses and our equipment fleet already includes more than 450 units of rigid and droptop Airstables as well as wide-bodied and narrow-bodied charter stalls. To meet growing demand for our high-quality equipment, we forecast the production of a further 50-100 new units in the next 12-18 months and

will be able to upscale this in the future with a new investment in our factory facilities.” The Airstables are designed to fit all wide-bodied freighters,

including B747, B777, MD11, A310 and B767 aircraft with left or right contoured roofs, making them extremely versatile for the transportation of racehorses, showjumping and eventing horses, polo ponies and bloodstock for breeding programmes. There are available to our customers through ad hoc or contract rentals as well as outright sale. “We are currently working on a solution which will help airline and bloodstock shipping agency customers reduce the costs traditionally associated with the transportation of horses,” says Instone. InstoneAir’s customers are primarily airlines, live animal shipping agencies and specialist livestock divisions of freight forwarding organisations. It has very longstanding relationships with most of customers as well as new customers. Approximately 80% of InstoneAir’s business are horse shipments, 10% livestock and 10% zoo animals for breeding and conservation or which are being rescued. The wellbeing of live animals during transportation is paramount to the carrier and it is highly experienced in this specialist, highly-regulated market, helping to ensure the comfort and safety of the animals using its equipment. He says: “If a customer is moving a multi-million-pound racehorse to the Breeders’ Cup in the Americas or stallions for breeding, for example, they clearly insist on working with a professional partner. We’ve earned their trust over many years. “So, we have customers which come back to us on a regular basis. In addition to regular traffic, we carry high value horses for all sorts of big events, such as the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, Royal Ascot, the Dubai Cup and the Derby at Epsom. We will be carrying racehorses in time for two big races in November; the Breeders’ Cup in California and the Hong Kong invitational event.” In addition to equipment, Instone provides fully trained flying grooms but generally bloodstock shipping agents handle veterinary documentation. The majority of animals it flies are horses, so they are always carried on the maindecks of freighter aircraft – but some animals such as pigs and zoo animals for breeding and conservation programmes fly in the bellyhold. “Because of our reputation for the safe transportation of live animals, we are often approached by zoological societies to help manage deliveries of animals for breeding and conservation programmes, including lions, tigers, elephants. We’ve moved snakes too. Probably the most unusual one many years ago was the rehoming of a whale,” recalls Instone.

Digitisation has no presence in animal transport

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very day, some 200 horses are being transported by air; this equates to some 73,000 a year. Many of these horses are loved, some are worth up to $10 million. Yet in terms of digitisation, they might as well be invisible. That is the thought of Arnaud Lambert, CEO, CHAMP Cargosystems, who considers that digitisation in live animal shipments is on a par with the wider airfreight industry: “Pretty basic,” he says. “What exists in digital form is off-line as soon as the animal is on the aircraft.” He contrasts that with what happens to pharma traffic where digital information is available in real-time to the nth degree throughout the supply chain.

High value goods

The two main reasons for moving animals by air are for work, such as racing horses, or breeding purposes. While there is an “emotional bond with animal owners” throughout the supply chain, there is a more pressing concern arising from the high value of many of these creatures. Health and safety is important but insurance costs are as important.

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A longer version of this interview will appear in next week’s ACW.


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