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School ofArchitecture Urbanism Graduate Prospectus


Welcome


Azrieli Pavilion, site of Master of Architecture studios, workshops, and exhibitions


Welcome to the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University. The 2014-2015 Graduate Prospectus invites you to explore the programs and activities that make ours a diverse and engaging place for the study and making of architecture. Located in Ottawa, Canada, a national and G7 capital, the Azrieli School is committed to advancing architecture in its civic, regional, and global complexities. Across a range of graduate studies, from a professional Master of Architecture to the PhD, and with a growing schedule of lectures, symposia, workshops, and design charettes, we are bringing together academic and public audiences


dedicated to testing the limits of architecture culture today. In these pages you will find a guide to how our students are thinking about and designing for the built environment of tomorrow. Exciting studios, cuttingedge technical courses and workshops, and advanced seminars on the history and theory of architecture offer unique spaces to develop your talent and expertise. Together, the graduate students and faculty at the Azrieli School are shaping a provocative and socially-minded space for design and debate. We hope that you will join this ever-changing experiment.


Contents

Director’s Message Associate Director’s Message Graduate Programs Master of Architecture Program PhD and Master of Architectural Studies Diploma in Architectural Conservation Design Studios History/Theory Building Technologies, Visualization and Digital Design, Professional Practice Events Resources Awards Student Services Faculty and Staff

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Director’s Message

Welcome to the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University. The 2012-2014 Prospectus presents our professional degree (Master of Architecture) as well as our research-based degrees and diplomas (Graduate Diploma in Architectural Conservation, Master of Architectural Studies, and PhD in Architecture) and outlines the academic paths that each of these unique programs follow. Housed in two distinctly opposite buildings, the evolving pedagogy of our graduate courses and programs find traction in the environments that these buildings offer. The raw industrial power of our central building, designed by Carmen and Elin Corneil with Jeff Stinson and opened in 1974, is defined by an intersection of internal streets, bridges, and studios and provides an open framework for imaginations, discussions, exhibitions as well as formal and informal teaching. The penthouse of the contemporary Azrieli Pavilion, designed by Moriyama Teshima Architects and Barry J. Hobin & Associates Architects and inaugurated in 2002, provides an alternate forum for discussion, graduate studios, multimedia presentations, and exhibitions while overlooking the Rideau Canal and the central university quad and library. While the buildings provide the framework for exchange and critical thinking, our faculty, programs, events, research clusters, and facilities enable the Azrieli School’s graduate students from across Canada and the world to set unique research trajectories for their evolving project of architecture while situated in Canada’s capital city. Our graduate programs include a Directed Studies Abroad option for students wishing to study internationally, as well as design courses here at Carleton with our international Azrieli Visiting Critic in Residence and forthcoming Canadian Architect in Residence. Our graduate faculty are second to none, each bringing unique research backgrounds, teaching styles, and pedagogy to their seminars, studio courses, and thesis students. Faculty research cuts across disciplines such as architectural design, conservation and sustainability, urbanism, history and critical theory, digital fabrication, structural deformation, materiality, digital recording and 5


The Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism (photo: Helmut Schade)

traditional construction techniques, and others. Clusters of faculty gather both within the school or join with other disciplines on projects that provide students the opportunity to work in various research positions. I invite you to explore faculty research interests in this document and on our website. Our facilities and staff provide excellent support and services to bring critical thinking and making into the realm of the built, including laser cutting, digital fabrication facilities, substantial wood and metal shops, and generous assembly areas. While this document outlines many of the opportunities and experiences we have to offer, I invite you to visit us to experience Carleton firsthand. The Graduate Exhibition and Open House, typically held in January, is an exciting opportunity to meet faculty, see our facilities, and see outstanding Master of Architecture projects. The School stages unique events that enhance the graduate curricula, including the celebrated Forum Lecture Series held at the National Gallery of Canada, which headlines both internationally renowned and emerging architects and design professionals. Please join us for these and the many events defining the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism today. Sheryl Boyle Interim Director Associate Professor 6


Associate Director’s Message

The Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism is a place for engagement, commitment, and growth in architecture. Through the research of faculty and students, we are continually shaping and re-shaping our discipline. Graduate studies at the Azrieli School offer students the instruments necessary to direct their own future. Our engaging graduate programs offer diversity and richness necessary to entering architecture with a prepared and curious mind. Through carefully crafted and always evolving curricula our students are able to find the proper path and the ways to prepare for their future professional careers in both the practice and teaching of architecture. Currently delivering a wide-ranging series of graduate programs – a professional Master in Architecture (M.Arch), a Master of Architectural Studies (MAS) in the history and theory of architecture, a unique PhD uniting research with investigation in practice, and a Diploma in Architectural Conservation aimed at developing expertise in a growing field of architecture – the Azrieli School offers a critical base for a future architecture practice. Students have access to numerous scholarships and awards, and opportunities to assist in teaching and research. In addition to its core studios, graduate seminars, and courses in digital design and building technologies, the Master of Architecture culminates in an individually tutored and a self-chosen year-long thesis project. Always dealing with real situations, real sites, and even real projects, the thesis is a unique opportunity to enter a chosen field of work by testing its present boundaries and attempting to offer new directions and ideas contributing to changing definitions of architecture. Each student leaving the School enters the field and the profession with a clear direction for their future careers. Cultural activities are built in and around student work and offer exceptional exposure to critical issues of present practice. Our teaching body is formed of both fulltime faculty and Canadian and international practitioners offering wide range exposure and opportunities from which to pick and direct an individual course of study. All visiting instructors contribute to the School’s well-known PIT Lecture Series and share the reality of their research and practice. Presently, 7


the M.Arch offers an opportunity to study abroad for a semester in Helsinki with connections to Aalto University. A yearly Graduate Symposium is a forum for reflections on a relevant topic critical to the yearly pedagogical objectives of the School. This year’s Symposium, to be held in November 2013, deals with notions on the “Comprehensive Studio” and the integration of advanced building systems, with special attention paid to practice grounded in both poiesis and technical knowledge, which are shaping the role of contemporary architects as both critical thinkers and makers. We invite you to visit the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, to come and meet both students and faculty, and to experience our rich cultural and professional environment. We will be pleased to welcome you. Federica Goffi Associate Director, Graduate Associate Professor 8


Graduate Programs


Master of Architecture

The Master of Architecture is a professional degree program committed to preparing architects for a culturally rich, technologically dynamic, and globalized world. A rigorous studio and research pedagogy invites students to take critical positions on design, culture, technology, and the city. The 8.0-credit M.Arch is aimed at students holding a four-year undergraduate degree or its equivalent in architecture. The first year is organised around design studios meant to foster thoughtful reflection on society and the contemporary built environment. The curriculum is enriched by graduate seminars and courses in cutting-edge building systems and digital design. In their second year, students undertake a detailed M.Arch thesis to make significant and original contributions to architectural and humanistic research. The resulting project is pursued either as an independent study or as member of a “research pod� organised under specific faculty interests. The thesis encourages university-wide collaboration. Students are able to draw on the important context of Ottawa as a G7 capital by engaging the many governmental agencies and non-governmental organizations based in the city. The 13.0-credit M.Arch prepares students from diverse backgrounds for careers in architecture. Core design studios introduce skills and craft essential to creative inquiry. A range of courses in architectural history and theory, buildings technologies, visual representation, digital design, and professional practice provide a disciplined approach to the fundamentals of architecture while offering latitude for individual talents and interests. Joining students in the 8.0-credit M.Arch, advanced studios focus on the complexities of public buildings, urban space, and environmental discourse. A concluding two-term Directed Research Studio encourages students to develop independent approaches to architectural design and discourse. 11


All M.Arch students have opportunities to take studios with changing Azrieli Visiting Critics, who annually bring a range of cutting-edge design and research expertise to bear on the School. Additionally, a semester-long Directed Studio Abroad (DSA) offers the chance to study with leading international practitioners in major world city. The sites of current and recent DSA include Lisbon, Berlin, Bologna, Helsinki, and Paris. The Azrieli School offers competitive funding packages including Teaching Assistantships, Research Assistantships, or Merit Scholarships based on academic history. Prospective applicants are encouraged to visit the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. A Graduate Exhibition and Open House is typically held in January.

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M.Arch program information and publications: http://issuu.com/azrielischoolofarchitecture Admissions information: http://graduate.carleton.ca Portfolio requirements: http://www1.carleton.ca/architecture/prospective-students/graduate-programs/ portfolio-requirements For more information on the Master of Architecture please contact: Graduate Administrator Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, Carleton University 202 Architecture Building 1125 Colonel By Drive Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5B6 +1 613 520 2600, ext. 8226 architecturegrad@carleton.ca Canadian Architectural Certification Board (www.cacb-ccca.ca): “In Canada, all provincial/territorial associations/institutes/orders recommend a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit Canadian professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types of accredited degrees: The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) and the Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch). A program may be granted a six-year, three-year, or two-year accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance with established educational standards. Master’s degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.”

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Master of Architecture 8.0-credit Curriculum first year, fall term ARCS 5105 Graduate Studio ARCH 5200 Graduate Seminar ARCC 5100 Advanced Building Systems

first year, winter term ARCS 5106 Graduate Studio ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar ARCC 5200 Professional Practice

second year, fall term ARCS 5909 Design Thesis or ARCN 5909 Independent Research Thesis Elective Course

second year, winter term ARCS 5909 Design Thesis or ARCN 5909 Independent Research Thesis Elective Course

Master of Architecture 13.0-credit Curriculum first year, fall term ARCS 5102 Core Studio ARCC 5096 Building Technologies 1 ARCN 5005 Architectural Representation ARCH 5010 Modern Architecture

first year, winter term ARCS 5103 Core Studio ARCC 5097 Building Technologies 2 ARCN 5000 Computer Modeling of Form

second year, fall term ARCS 5104 Core Studio ARCC 5098 Building Technologies 3 ARCC 4500 Design Economics

second year, winter term ARCS 5106 Graduate Studio ARCC 5200 Professional Practice ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar

third year, fall term ARCS 5105 Graduate Studio ARCC 5099 Building Technologies ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar

third year, winter term ARCN 5909 Directed Research Studio ARCC 5100 Advanced Building Systems

third year, summer term ARCN 5909 Directed Research Studio Elective Workshop

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Master of Architecture 13.0-credit Curriculum (beginning Fall 2014) first year, fall term ARCS 5102 Core Studio ARCC 5096 Building Technologies 1 ARCN 5005 Architectural Representation ARCH 5010 Modern Architecture

first year, winter term ARCS 5103 Core Studio ARCC 5097 Building Technologies 2 ARCN 5000 Computer Modeling of Form

first year, summer term ARCS 5104 Core Studio

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second year, fall term ARCS 5105 Graduate Studio ARCC 5098 Building Technologies 3 ARCC 4500 Design Economics

second year, winter term ARCS 5106 Graduate Studio ARCC 5099 Building Technologies ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar

third year, fall term ARCN 5909 Directed Research Studio ARCC 5100 Advanced Building Systems ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar

third year, winter term ARCN 5909 Directed Research Studio ARCC 5200 Professional Practice


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PhD and Master of Architectural Studies

The PhD in Architecture and Master in Architectural Studies (MAS) are innovative and comprehensive programs that ask students to engage critical forms of historical research and architectural practice. The programs emphasize creativity and innovation within theoretical and practical parameters. The Master in Architectural Studies (MAS) focuses on in-depth architectural research and provides a strong foundation for later pursuing a PhD. The PhD prepares graduates for practice in global academic and professional fields. The PhD and MAS are distinguished by fostering the development of multidisciplinary approaches to individual research questions. Students are encouraged to create links to the School for Studies in Art and Culture, the School of Industrial Design, and the departments of geography, literature, and Canadian Studies, among many others. The Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), a centre dedicated to state-of-the-art and hybrid forms of representation, provides an important base for doctoral projects. Carleton’s “Capital Advantage� offers a host of local resources including libraries and laboratories at the National Gallery of Canada, Library and Archives Canada, National Research Council, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, and the National Research Council, National Arts Centre, and the Canadian Museums of Civilization, Nature, Contemporary Photography, Aviation and Science and Technology. PhD and MAS projects may draw on a range of faculty research interests including. Key themes and expertise at the Azrieli School include: theories and histories of architectural representation; ethno-cultural methods of construction; phenomenology and architecture; the conservation of modern architecture; Canadian architectural modernism; informal housing and urbanization; comparative methods on architectural historiography. Broadly, the school supports detailed research on the history and historiography of modern 19


architecture and architectural practice from the Renaissance to the twentieth century, including the ways in which these aesthetic, cultural, and professional forces have engaged the so-called “non-West�. PhD and MAS students share a first year of core courses. Vitruvian Exercises introduces distinct ways of exploring practices of architectural representation. Daedalic Exercises encourages experimental forms of materiality and making. The two-part Colloquium is a forum for shaping critical ideas on research: during the first term, invited scholars present a range of research approaches and frameworks; in the second term, students learn formal research methods by, first, responding to the intellectual positions of the previous speakers and, second, undertaking grant writing. MAS students focus their second and final year on an original thesis project while completing complementary elective courses. PhD students meanwhile pursue additional Colloquia while undertaking the PhD Comprehensive Exam and the PhD Proposal Exam. Following the successful completion of the PhD Proposal Exam, doctoral candidates initiate their respective dissertations beginning in the third year. PhD candidates must have reading proficiency in a second language of their area of study. PhD and MAS students may also pursue a Graduate Diploma in Architectural Conservation. PhD students are supported by generous scholarships based on academic excellence. PhD and MAS students have opportunities to serve as Teaching Assistants and Research Assistants. All students are given office space. Prospective applicants are highly encouraged to visit the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism and to discuss their proposed research, as well as 20


precise admissions requirements, with Dr. Stephen Fai, PhD/MAS program Chair. Applications must include: Two copies of completed and signed application forms Two copies of a statement of intent (1,500 words), which explains a detailed research topic to be developed at the Azrieli School. The statement should frame the historical period of research, the critical issues to be addressed in terms of architectural practice, and the key resources, such as archives, to be consulted A portfolio of design projects and creative works, which should be understood as distinct from a professional or academic portfolio Two samples of academic writing Three letters of recommendation completed on official Referee Forms. The letters may be sent either by the referee or included in the applicant’s admission package but signed by the referee across the seal Documentation of practice and professional experience (where applicable) Two copies of original transcripts of all previous university studies (to be sent directly by the institution) Proof of English language proficiency (as per program requirements)

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Admission information for the PhD and MAS: http://graduate.carleton.ca PhD and MAS admissions information: http://graduate.carleton.ca For more information on graduate programs contact: Graduate Administrator Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism Carleton University 202 Architecture Building 1125 Colonel By Drive Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5B6 +1 613-520-2600, ext. 8226 architecturegrad@carleton.ca

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PhD Course of Study

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first year, fall term ARCH 6001 Vitruvian Exercises I ARCN 6001 Daedalic Exerercises 1 ARCH 6101 Colloquium I

first year, winter term ARCH 6002 Vitruvian Exercises 2 ARCN 6002 Daedalic Exerercises 2 ARCH 6101 Colloquium 1

second year, fall term ARCH 6102 Colloquium 2 ARCH 6907 PhD Comprehensive Exam

second year, winter term ARCH 6102 Colloquium 2 ARCH 6908 PhD Proposal Exam

third year, fall term ARCH 6909 PhD Dissertation

third year, winter term ARCH 6909 PhD Dissertation


Master of Architectural Studies Course of Study first year, fall term ARCH 5301 Vitruvian Exercises I ARCN 5301 Daedalic Exerercises 1 ARCH 5101 Colloquium I

first year, winter term ARCH 5302 Vitruvian Exercises 2 ARCN 5302 Daedalic Exerercises 2 ARCH 5101 Colloquium 1

second year, fall term ARCH 5003 Design and Culture Workshop ARCT 5909 MAS Thesis

second year, winter term ARCT 5909 MAS Thesis Elective Course

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Graduate Diploma in Architectural Conservation

Canada has close to 25,000 properties designated as architectural heritage sites. In addition, over 200,000 sites are listed on heritage inventories with an average of 2,000 properties being added each year. There is a growing demand for qualified specialists to shepherd these valuable cultural resources. Building on Carleton’s already established international reputation for excellence in this field, the Graduate Diploma in Architectural Conservation augments the existing professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch) with a focus on architectural conservation. PhD and Master of architectural Studies (MAS) students may also pursue the Diploma. To achieve the Type-II Diploma, students enter the M.Arch. In the second year, they focus exclusively on Diploma with coursework addressing the theory and practice of architectural conservation. Returning to the M.Arch in the third year, students pursue a year-long thesis project related to architectural conservation. They graduate with the M.Arch and a Diploma in Architectural Conservation. Students already holding a professional degree in architecture or a related discipline may register for the Type-III Diploma. All Diploma courses are completed within three years and students do not enrol in the M.Arch program. Diploma students engage important resources at the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), a centre dedicated to state-of-the-art and hybrid forms of representation. Among other efforts, CIMS is currently involved the creating a dynamic web-based exhibition on the Rideau Canal in Ottawa, developing the Cultural Diversity and Material Imagination in Canadian Architecture (CDMICA) project, assisting the Parliamentary Precinct Rehabilitation effort, and preparing architectural drawings for the earthen Kasbah de Taourirt in Ouarzazate, Morocco. Along with professional and research links to key government 25


agencies, including Parks Canada and Heritage Canada, Carleton’s program in Architectural Conservation and Sustainability Engineering and the Master in Heritage Conservation in the Department of Canadian Studies provide important sites for scholarly exchange and material support. Diploma enrollment is limited. Admissions information is found at: http://calendar.carleton.ca/grad/gradprograms/architecture

Diploma in Architectural Conservation Course of Study fall term CDNS 5401 Heritage Conservation I: History, Principles, and Concepts ARCH 4002 Canadian Architecture ARCH 4200 Architectural Conservation Philosophy and Ethics ARCU 5402 Workshop: Urban Studies in Heritage Conservation

winter term CDNS 5402 Heritage Conservation II: Theory in Practice ARCN 5100 Representation and Documentation in Architectural Conservation ARCH 5402 Evaluation of Heritage Properties ARCC 5401 Workshop: Technical Studies in Heritage Conservation

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DesignStudios


Master of Architecture Design Studios

The Master of Architecture centres on a rigorous studio sequence. The changing Azrieli Visiting Critics annually bring international design discourse to bear on the studio curriculum. Students may take Directed Studios Abroad offering exposure to global cities and urban cultures. Throughout the core and advanced studios, a sustained critical investigation of architecture, society, and technology prepares students for the culminating demands of either an M.Arch Thesis or a Directed Research Studio. ARCS 5102 Core Studio 1 (13.0-credit M.Arch only) The studio introduces to the sensory components and symbolic potential of architectural design. Social considerations, light, lighting, sound, sensations of heat and cold and related phenomena are studied in modest building proposals. Emphasis is placed on the conventions of architectural drawing. ARCS 5103 Core Studio 2 (13.0-credit M.Arch only) The studio develops building materials and practices within the context of increasingly complex building programs. Emphasis is placed on the social context of architecture in relation to material expression. Model-making is stressed. ARCS 5104 Core Studio 3 (13.0-credit M.Arch only) This comprehensive studio explores issues of program and site as culturally defining aspects of architectural practice. Emphasis is placed on complex urban and social situations, using difficult sites, and advancing hybrid programs. Projects are brought to a high degree of technical, formal, and graphic resolution. ARCS 5105 Graduate Studio 1 Architectural investigations are advanced by complex programs within contemporary urban settings. Projects address questions of urban life from both practical and theoretical perspectives. Relevant building technology and systems are introduced and designed as required. 29


ARCS 5106 Graduate Studio 2 The design of a large-scale and culturally significant building set within a prominent urban or natural landscape. Integrated resolution of the combined issue of site, program, and expression is expected. Relevant building technology and systems are introduced and designed as required. Emphasis is placed on research as a studio preoccupation. ARCS 5909 M.Arch Thesis Undertaken over two consecutive terms, the M.Arch Thesis advances original architectural research in a detailed written document and by appropriate means of drawn and physical representation. It is pursued either as a student-initiated project under the direct supervision of a faculty member or within a specific “research pod” organised around faculty research interests. Both independent study proposals and applications to “pods” must be approved by the Azrieli School Graduate Committee. The 2014-2015 “pods” are: Professor Manuel Baez, Re-sounding Resonant Currents: Studies in Morphology Professor Sheryl Boyle, Building Skins Professor Janine Debanné, Ottawa Modernism Professor Stephen Fai, The Digital Craftsman Professor Benjamin Gianni, Urbanization in China Professor Federica Goffi, Species of Healthy Spaces: from Exportable to Fertile Details Professor Johan Voordouw, Digital Myth ARCN 5909 M.Arch Directed Research Studio Intensive research-based design work is undertaken by a unit of students and guided by a faculty member engaged in a research project that forms the studio theme. Proposals must be approved by the Graduate Committee of the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. The 2014-2015 Directed Research Studio is: Professor Roger Connah, Towards the New Project in Architecture: From Agency to Project, from Design Research to Practice. 30


Azrieli Visiting Critics 2010 Andrew King, Cannon Design and AKA/andrewkingstudio, Montreal 2010 Arturo Frediani, Frediani Arquitectura, Barcelona 2010 Ferran Grau, XNF Arquitectes, Barcelona 2011 Teresa Sapey, Teresa Sapey Estudio de Arquitectura, Madrid 2011 Hannes Stiefel, Stiefel Kramer, Vienna 2011 Nilly Harag, Arctic Architects and Urban Designers, Jerusalem 2011 Alessandra Cianchetta, AWP Agence de reconfiguration territoriale, Paris 2012 Michael Tawa, University of Sydney 2012 Gisle Løkken and Magdalena Haggärde, 70°N arkitektur, Tromsø, Norway 2012 Halldóra Arnardóttir, Sarq Architecture Office, Murcia, Spain 2012 Javier Sánchez Merina, Sarq Architecture Office, Murcia, Spain 2013 Jonathan Hale, University of Nottingham 2013 Jaime Salazar Rückauer, Architect, Bochum, Germany 2013 Paco Mejías Villatoro, Figueiras & Mejías Architects, Alicante, Spain 2013 Diogo Seixas Lopes, Barbas Lopes Arquitectos, Lisbon 2015 Maurizio Varratta, Maurizio Varratta Architetto, Genoa, Italy 2015 Bud Brannigan, Bud Brannigan Architects, Brisbane, Australia Canadian Practitioners in Residence 2013 Maria Denegri, Denegri Bessai Studio, Toronto 2014 Tom Bessai, Denegri Bessai Studio, Toronto Directed Studios Abroad 2011 Berlin, Annette Homann, Adjunct Research Professor 2012 Bologna, Claudio Sgarbi, Adjunct Research Professor 2012 Paris, Alessandra Cianchetta, AWP Agence de reconfiguration territoriale 2013 Helsinki, Tuomas Toivonen and Nene Tsuboi, NOW Office 2014 Helsinki, Tuomas Toivonen and Nene Tsuboi, NOW Office 2015 Lisbon, Patrícia Barbas and Diogo Lopes, Barbas Lopes Arquitectos Workshops 2013 Post-Industrial Landscapes, summer workshop organized by the Architectural Association Ottawa Visiting School and the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism 31


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Advanced graduate studios aim to engage critically the aesthetic, cultural, technical, and urban dimensions of contemporary architecture. Directed Studios Abroad (DSA) offer students extended exposure to a changing venue of global cities, with attendant courses and lectures at local institutions. The Azrieli Visiting Critics, drawn from distinguished international scholars and practitioners, annually bring a wealth of design research and teaching to the School. Current and recent studios are outlined here. 2014-2015 ARCS 5105/5106 Graduate Studios: Assembly, We the People Giancarlo Mangone, Claudio Sgarbi, and Johan Voordow, Fall 2014 Assembly, We the People explores the emerging spaces of modern, Canadian society. It looks at architecture and the concept of assembly in the broadest possible terms. As such, students can explore “assembly� as a collection of people, objects, or the making of an urban industry within the framework of this comprehensive studio (which is linked to the Advanced Building Systems course). Students are required to research, design and detail a large-scale building relevant to the urban context of the Ottawa-Gatineau region. As a comprehensive studio, projects must meet the code requirements for access and life safety including an understanding of municipal bylaws and general notions of best practice. As a design studio, work should be thoughtful, socially relevant, environmentally conscious, and tectonically sound. Region + Art Bud Brannigan, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Winter 2015 Art museums are seen primarily as large boxes contained beneath one roof in urban environments, operating under pre-set internal conditions, in order to conserve contents. Occasionally, this mould has been broken, and this studio will focus on examining this exception, with students preparing new concepts for a given setting. Currently, presumption of the art museum-as-box is under scrutiny, as views have changed about a range of art museum related matters including how art is exhibited; the relationship between buildings and their broader settings; changing urban conditions; reduction in energy consumption (art museums are high energy consumers); changing art practices; visitor expectations and 33


awareness; and engagement, the relationship between the viewer and what is exhibited. Students will explore these contemporary issues through the design of a regional art museum, which, in contrast with its urban counterpart, is often at the heart of local communities, woven into the fabric of small towns, requiring special consideration of issues of scale, fit, use, and siting. They also generate involvement, provide focus, and create spark in areas other than art. In Search of the Miraculous, 2 Patrícia Barbas and Diogo Lopes, Directed Studio Abroad, Lisbon, Winter 2015 The studio will seek to take advantage of its location, Cabo Espichel, less than an hour away from Lisbon, and work in situ with specific conditions of culture, climate, landscape, and resources. Cabo Espichel stands on a high cliff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, with a breathtaking view. It is a place of archeological remains, religious cults, and a pilgrimage destination. While barren and austere, it comprises an assorted ensemble of constructions including a chapel, a church, a dormitory, a reservoir, and a lighthouse. Projects for such a site will be precise and “acupunctural,” dealing sensibly with heritage and landscape. Students shall respond to a functional brief comprising a bus stop, a residence for artists, an art school and a museum dedicated to the oeuvre of Dutch artist Bas Jan Ader (1942-1975). The aim is to work with a limited range of building technologies such as rammed earth, brick, concrete, and stucco, all prevalent in the region. Topographic and climatic conditions will be taken into account. Final results are expected to combine technical expertise, formal accuracy, and a flight of the imagination, thus demonstrating the capacity of architecture to encompass subjective and objective factors, and to address small and large scale phenomena – in short, to be a multifaceted but cohesive instance. New Elements Inderbir Singh Riar, Winter 2015 Since time immemorial, the elements – earth, water, air, and fire in classical Western thought – have structured human understanding of the world. Theories on states of transformation – for example, liquid to gas – remain central to both methods of scientific inquiry and symbols of cultural expression. These conditions, with consequent effects on technological change and sensory experience, also shaped the rise of modern architecture theory – from, say, Gottfried Semper’s 34


mid-nineteenth-century concept of shelter as organized around the hearth (fire) to twentieth-century visions of salubrious space conditioned by the perfect management of environmental forces (air). How, then, to treat the elements today? Are these notions necessarily archaic or are there ways to re-politicize such phenomena? Instead of earth, what about earthquake? Instead of water, what about drought? Instead of air, what about pollution? Instead of fire, what about a self-immolating Tibetan nun? Without automatically adopting the dogmas of “sustainability”, what could an architectural inquiry on the elements provide in terms of designing better buildings, cities, and societies? These questions, among many others, will allow reimaging new elements for new architectures of new places. Previous ARCS 5105/5106 Graduate Studios: Plagiat! Hannes Stiefel, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Winter 2011 The 2010 news cycle was affected by several particular debates on plagiarism. In the German-speaking world it was the – at first highly celebrated – debut Axolotl Roadkill by the 17-year-old Helene Hegemann that soon infuriated the guild of often elderly, mostly male, distinguished literary critics. Simultaneously David Shields and Nick Simmons aroused suspicion with their new releases Reality Hunger and Incarnate in the United States. In the meantime the specific discussions merged and led to a global polarised debate on copyright, authorship, artistic integrity, and the possible potential of a more informal handling of such terms and values. Where are the borderlines between, on the one hand, collage, sampling, intertextuality, pastiche, remix, and, on the other hand, plagiarism? The debate has not yet reached architecture, while in other creative/artistic disciplines such procedural methods are common practices. Like David Shields, who strategically engages the methods of plagiarism in order 35


Kristen Tuttle and Felipe Gonzalez, Mat-scraper, M.Arch studio, 2011 36


to create a new, authentic literary work, the studio will create an architectural plagiarism. The characteristics to be plagiarized lie well beyond the object qualities of the architectural reference. Consequently plagiarism can become a highly transformative act; it is then potentially an achievement in de- and recontextualization, and thus a translatory motion towards a new or a next, in any case towards another creation. The Subtle Substance of Architecture Alessandra Cianchetta, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Fall 2011 This studio deals with the ways in which soft systems – art, landscape, movement, night – redefine the scope of thought and action in territorial planning and the practice of architecture. We will achieve innovative forms of design based on perceptive experiences for prospective urbanism. The aim is to reveal new possible territories and to re-activate a sensual notion of desire in them, thereby bringing a state of enchantment back to the cities. The un¬stable, intangible, subtle elements and dimensions of architecture are given particular relevance along with architecture’s ability and flexibility to divert, multiply, and make things sensible and tangible. The site is La Défense, the Paris business district established by the French state in July 1951 and under a Plan de renouveau since 2005. The goal is to take pleasure in being at La Défense as one would in the centre of the city. By focusing on the in-between, the hybridations between hard and soft – times, flows, recycling urban functions, the night – are to maintain a dynamism after they are built – that is, to evolve through time and changes of use as if they had their own memory and sensations. Mind/Body Federica Goffi, Fall 2011 The Mind/Body studio seeks to contribute to a broader discussion on how architecture can affect our emotional state and especially the wellbeing of patients being treated for dementia. The medical field has acknowledged in recent years the importance of the effects of stress on healing processes, linking this with the surrounding environment. This field has been defined by medical scientists as “mind-body” medicine. Bringing this concept into the field of architecture, the student design work will uncover possibilities for architectural materials and elements, details and space, to define a sense of place that may provide comfort 37


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VEL

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GHTING

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PLAN Lower Level (+54.0)

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SECTION Highway Emergency Exit Storage

Highway Emergency Exit

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Highway Ventilation Possible interactive urban furniture

Stephanie Uy, Sophie Lamothe, and Vance Fok, Inverted Night Myopia, The Subtle Substance of Architecture studio, 2011 The Inflate Light Hair Night Garden.

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Evan Dysart, Listening Chamber 3, Octopod, M.Arch Thesis, 2012 39


and care for the residents. The design explorations are speculative in nature yet meant to challenge current standards and the implementation of ordinary details into unique places with specific needs, suggesting the possibility and the need for well-constructed details suitable for the specific design issues being further adaptable and exportable to other situations in an elegant and sustainable way enhancing the quality of life. M.Arch students will enter into an active dialogue with the scientific community and the medical and social work specialists at Cummer Lodge, a long-term care facility in Toronto, and work in collaboration with the School of Social Work at Carleton University. Cinemathèque Michael Tawa, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Winter 2012 Architecture and cinema have enduring and foundational associations in modernity. Beyond literal and metaphorical registers, the two radically different disciplines and practices share thematic and tectonic or compositional dimensions around motifs such as space and time, narrative, framing and assemblage, materiality and light. This project will work between the cinematic and the architectonic through a series of drawing and modeling exercises in order to develop a conceptual design framework for a speculative Cinemathèque. In it, the memory of Ottawa could be archived, investigated, and played out by scholars, artists, cinematographers, architects, and the general public. A set of stills or a passage from a prescribed list of films (Antonioni, L’Eclisse; Dreyer, The Passion of Joan of Arc; Herzog, Lessons of Darkness; Paradjanov, Sayat Nova; Resnais, Last Year in Marienbad; Tarkovski, Mirror; Tati, Playtime; Visconti, The Leopard) will be used to develop a sequence of diagrams and models exploring the spatiality, temporality, narrative structure, light and materiality of the film – first in two dimensions, then in relief, and finally in three dimensions. From this initial pragmatic and then metaphorical work sequence, an adaptable thematic framework is to be devised and played out through design proposals for the Cinemathèque. Enriched design skills will be found in the grain and materiality of the cinematic image-sequence, and through the materialized and embodied practices of making. Slices through Space Gisle Løkken and Magdalena Haggärde, Azrieli Visiting Critics, Winter 2012 The studio will introduce alternative methods for planning and architecture that open for discussion planning language, hierarchies, participation, and relevance. Through literature studies and exploratory research and rethinking we will gain new knowledge that enables us to approach a concrete situation in the city for a profound understanding of the context. A blog is to be used as an innovative tool to communicate the learning, to collect the findings from the process, and continuously to present design work. The studio does not demand fixed scenarios or fancy images, but it expects curiosity and an open-minded effort 40


to learn, to experience, and to express knowledge that is not obvious – and that has to be carefully investigated to be operative for the planning process. Five critical themes will organize the work: New Hierarchies (rhizome/lines of flight), Reorientations-Mapping, Vulnerability, Flexibility, and Points of Departure. The Debris of Urban Imagination Claudio Sgarbi, Directed Studio Abroad, Bologna, Winter 2012 “Il Guasto”: An urban context, a place in the heart of the historical city that is a mound of debris – resulting from the demolition of an important building, the Bentivoglio Family palace, during a popular revolt in 1506 – on top of which a public garden was created 40 years ago. The garden is well known in Bologna as Giardino del Gusto. Underneath, in-between the debris, an underground space – a bunker – was built to protect the citizen from bombing during the Second World War. This will become a place to explore and rethink, through designs, the city starting from the idea of “guasto” – ruin, waste, debris, mound of garbage, inflicted wound, leftover trash, broken things, rotten remains… that kind of disembodiment which follows a demolition of an existing building, a demolition which in this case is a tearing down of a building with a symbolic public meaning but gaining in time a new significance and use. Borderlands Inderbir Singh Riar, Winter 2012 This studio re-imagines the modern border. Its site is the frontier between Canada and the United States. Its context is the current unprecedented effort by Canadian and American governments “to enhance our security and accelerate the legitimate flow of people, goods, and services between our two countries” – a sentiment enshrined in “Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness”, the joint declaration made by Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President Barack Obama on February 4, 2011. Borderlands seeks to substitute, though not to ignore, these current political and economic arrangements (namely, security and trade) by new kinds of cultural ones. The ambition is to project a series of very, very big buildings capable of re-situating space relations among nations and peoples. These structures must operate at the critical extents of the border itself. The terrain vague of the world’s longest frontier will be seen in its properly utopian vocation as an ideal site for architectural and social experiment. 41


New Development 10

Sophie Tremblay, Mobilizing the DĂŠcarie: A 10-step Program, M.Arch Thesis, 2011 42


Re-reading Stories of Houses Halldóra Arnardóttir, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Fall 2012 Reality: ordinary life can make extraordinary architecture. The studio is built around the series of articles, “Stories of Houses”. We will deconstruct these single-family houses that are classified in architectural books as works by specific authors, and give value to the origins that belonged to cultural realities. Since these dwellings were built during the twentieth century, the meaning of the cultural concept that generated them has changed in our contemporary society. This will allow us to rethink their architecture and update through transformations, extensions, demolitions, etc. Working virtually between Ottawa and Alicante, students will return the original story and reflect in a critical manner – understanding the passing of time, from the day the house was conceived and today, and how the understanding of these cultural concepts has evolved during the past 20-30 years – what their proposals offer/add to the original house. Then, the aim will be to add a new End to the Story (based on facts acquired through research). Drawings of the action/activity, according to the requirements of this cultural evolution, will produce the architecture. The conclusion is to create a manifesto documenting methods that allow us to go beyond a formalistic approach and offering confidence when the moment comes to “improve” the architecture example. Building Emotions Javier Sánchez Merina, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Fall 2012 If the first part of the studio, Re-reading Stories of Houses, is understood as “theoretical”, then this second part is pure “production”. We will focus on executing the previously studied concepts as built spaces under the heading “Building Emotions”. In its annual report, the Spanish College of Architects announced the following reality: “Since 2007, the profession has reduced its volume of work more than 95%”. Such a brutal assessment obliges the profession to question its role. The College concludes by claiming: “We must recover our professional, social and personal dignity.” The question is: “How do you define the dignity of the professional?” Undoubtedly, architects, builders, manufacturers of building materials, and even requirements imposed by building regulations, have more techniques than ever. Thus, what is missing is not knowledge of technology. The “lost dignity” lies in the origin of our profession: throughout history we have been able to differentiate architecture from any other construction for its added value 43


Brea Mann-Lewis and Kasey Camire, Space for Dreaming, Building Emotions studio, 2012

– that is, emotions. The studio will, therefore, every week build an installation generated from the emotional qualities of our homes. By means of recreating different possible activities of social character taken place in the dwellings, we will produce 5 architectures: Area to Relax, Area to Dine, Area to Converse, Area to Welcome, Area of Dreams. Each group will not only design the event itself but, importantly, they will go beyond it to generate architecture. The aim is not to look at the installations as finished objects but as a way of thinking by producing them. Underground/Undercover/Unveiled Alessandra Cianchetta, Directed Studio Abroad, Paris, Fall 2012 The Studio addresses the multiple layers composing the urban complex of contemporary cities: urban structures, public spaces, mobility, urban nature, landmarks, times and uses. The Paris CBD-La DÊfense is to be considered in relation to the immediate surrounding context (Central Paris, Neuilly, Nanterre, Courbevoie, Puteaux), other metropolitan-scale strategies (the historical axis, de 44


la Seine à la Seine, Grand Paris, corridor La Défense-Charles De Gaulle-Orly), and broader meta-territorial scales related to transnational territories (CBDs in New York, London, Frankfurt, Dubai, Mumbai, Singapore, Beijing, and Hong Kong). Students will formulate bold, interdisciplinary proposals for a large-scale urban, architectural, and public space project located at a pivotal site in La Défense. The focus is on the multi-layered nature of the site. Attention is to be paid to the reuse of the underground spaces located underneath the dalle. The aim is to engage with the site but to deliver a radical and visionary urban proposal through detailed design. The starting points will be a series of emblematic layers, of which the first one, INVISIBLE/UNDERGOUND, will be the key theme. Why Profanations? Federica Goffi, Fall 2012 This studio will use two fast-pace architectural competitions to mediate the often unbounded “imaginary” world of studio and the “real” world of practice. It takes as its basis Giorgio Agamben’s 2005 statement, “The Museification of the world is today an accomplished fact”. The competitions – Ceci N’est Pas Un Pont (www.clevelandcompetition.com) and Unbuilt Visions (www.d3space. org/unbuiltvisions) – are thus approached by either consciously appropriating existing infrastructure as a “found object” or intervening in existing architectural projects, even unrealized historical ones. This is to challenge both the notion of designing from scratch and the practice of architectural conservation as an act of full restoration by instead advancing architectural drawings as fictional scenarios of other possible futures (where a known beginning has other possible endings). How to start “from scratch” by redesigning unbuilt works like Mies van der Rohe’s Friederichstrasse Skyscraper or Le Corbusier’s Ville Radieuse? Is it appropriate, and under what circumstances, to alter canonical buildings like Moshe Safdie’s Habitat 67? Should we radically intervene in historical spaces like Le Nôtre’s royal gardens at Versailles? The studio will break away from present habits of “museification” when dealing with culturally loaded buildings, thereby making visible – by profanation – the potential for an exquisite city corpse as a hybrid of multiple authors and beginnings. The Museum as Discursive Space Jonathan Hale, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Winter 2013 The problem of how cultural institutions can reconnect with the public and demonstrate their value and relevance in contemporary life has been at the forefront of discussions between scholars, designers, and professionals in museum studies. In recent years museums have attempted to reinvent and reinvigorate themselves in order to attract visitors and survive economic turmoil. Alongside an emphasis on the creation of large-scale spectacles, there has also been a need to reconnect with the visitor on a more intimate level and to design more personally meaningful exhibitions. Museum visitors increasingly seek 45


Khoi Nguyen, Ark City (for an Apocalypse), Why Profanations? studio, 2012

opportunities for creative expression and engagement: they want their own unique identities and interests to be acknowledged, while they recognize and connect to likeminded communities around the world. This refocusing – partly achieved by the production of exhibitions addressing key social, cultural and historical themes – allows for the elaboration of the museum as a social instrument, as a participant in a dialogue with the visitor and hence as a discursive space. The studio aims to identify a museum or gallery in the Ottawa area that offers the potential to become a “discursive museum space”. The design proposal could potentially consist of either or both an interior and exterior space; a combination of spatial, graphic or multimedia elements; or an entirely virtual reconfiguration of an existing space using mobile digital or analogue technologies. The goal is to create a space of cultural discourse where multiple dialogues can begin to take place – between the institution, the spaces, and the people within. 46


Let Us Introduce a Lifetime of Things in Design Jaime Salazar Rückauer, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Winter 2013 Look at any architectural drawing, look at any building detail. Do you miss something in them? Drawings may be exquisitely rendered, explaining many things their authors wish to express; details may be technically superb, beautifully conceived in their measurements and materials. Still, there is something lacking: time. Time advancing converts architectural drawings and architects’ arguments into true, partially true, or untrue statements. Time – “lifetime” – is a real magnitude, just like space dimensions, but it is still almost unconsidered as a fact influencing architectural design. Yet time is measurable – so, could it be made a factor of creative design? How? This will not the “time” of Sigfried Giedion’s masterful Space, Time and Architecture. The “time” to be considered is the real lifetime of objects, of buildings. The studio will follow two lines of action. First, a conceptual representation of the lifetime of buildings: a century ago, in the era of mechanics, a few brilliant artists represented perceptual time in two- and threedimensional objects; today, we will attempt to represent conceptually the real time of the life of things by our information-processing technologies. Second, to ask: What would “living” buildings look like? Let us foresee a “second nature”, a manufactured one. Its initial stage already surrounds us. What would it mean if things could “live”? If they could live, then they would pulse. To behave, things would perceive time. How could manufactured things “behave” more “naturelike”? What does this mean for sustaining human life? We are not looking for science fiction – neither utopian nor dystopian – predictions. We are looking to step beyond these images. A Map Tuomas Toivonen and Nene Tsuboi, Directed Studio Abroad, Helsinki, Winter 2013 The studio will undertake three parallel activities. First, to create a new map of Helsinki and its relevant architectural sites: in the spirit of Nolli and Piranesi, we will investigate, identify and visualise a new architectural representation of Helsinki as an archipelago of mirabilia and monuments – an urban form that contains relevant buildings, narratives, intentions, projects and historical traces. This fantastic new map, with descriptions of Helsinki’s (alternative) monuments and mirabilia, will be done in collaboration with the Museum of Finnish 47


Post-Industrial Landscapes, Architectural Association Visiting School, Ottawa

Architecture and the Helsinki Bureau of Urban Planning, and printed, published, and exhibited. Second, to attend a series of workshops arranged with the Aalto University Theory of Architecture course. Third, to produce FIN(N)ISH SAUNA on-site at Kulttuurisauna by building the Stage and Pyramid Room. Post-Industrial Landscapes Architectural Association Visiting School, Ottawa, Summer 2013 Tobias Klein (Architectural Association) and Johan Voordouw (Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism) Where has architecture positioned itself in a digital revolution that has pervaded our entire culture and transformed it into a post-industrial digital society? Today physicality seemingly plays a secondary role in a world of a billion active Facebook users and up to a million tweets an hour – we are but points in an expanding cloud. Using state of the art 3D scanning equipment from the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism and the Carleton Immersive Media Lab, the Architectural Association Visiting School in Ottawa opens with a premise to record the soft, latent movements that describe the character(s) of a site, to gain new sight. If process and product are inherently linked, then a new way of seeing should result in a new architecture. Our objective will be to project, inject, and reject the conventions of the architecture in order to point, (under)line, and form new “clouds” of discovery. 48


An Arts School, and Artist Residence, and a Museum for Bas Jan Ader Paco Mejías Villatoro, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Fall 2013 During this first part of the studio we will reflect on the conditions (the physical and the human context), the particularities of the architect’s tasks (our responsibilities and abilities, working alone and in professional teams), and minimal architectural conditions through specific statements on function and beauty (with reflections on program and architectonic shapes and spaces). Finally we will test – “live” – the contrast between the plans and the ways in which these plans change when made real, through a trip to Cape Cod as homage to the artist Bas Jan Ader (in Cape Espichel, Portugal). In Search of the Miraculous: Designing and Building Where the Land Ends and the Sea Begins Diogo Seixas Lopes, Azrieli Visiting Critic, Fall 2013 The studio continues work developed under Paco Mejías during the first half of the term. The aim is to design a multifunctional building, from preliminary concept to construction details. Students are asked to produce projects for this brief by means of drawings, renderings, and models. The projects must comply with a series of technical requirements while providing a critical interpretation of the brief. This approach seeks to encompass all aspects of the work of architecture, rather than “naïve functionalism”. Under this stance, the project must create spaces for housing, education, and culture: the multifunctional building will have a residence for artists, an art school, and a museum dedicated to Bas Jan Ader (1942-1975). The work of this Dutch artist was precise and poetic at once, namely his last project titled In Search of the Miraculous. It involved the crossing of the Atlantic Ocean on a small sailing boat that shipwrecked. The project is due to be located in Cabo Espichel, Portugal. It is a pilgrimage place sprinkled by several monuments, “where the land ends and the sea begins”. Projects must take into account climatic conditions, topography, and heritage. They must also come up with a strategy for the program. Classes will consist of design sessions supervised by the professors. Along with studio tutorials, there will be two cycles of lectures – “A Non-Linear History of Relational Design” and “Images for the Future, Today” – discussing several case studies. These examples underline that “nothing is more fantastic than precision”. 49


Sean Fright and Sammy Yehia, In Search of the Miraculous studio, Fall 2013 50


Comprehensive Building studio, Fall 2013

Comprehensive Building: A New Sprott School of Business Maria Denegri, Canadian Practitioner in Residence, Fall 2013 This year’s Gateway Studio is organized around the Carleton Innovation Forum Grant, a dynamic program that promotes interdisciplinary collaboration amongst students. Working closely with the Sprott School of Business, students will engage in the development a new program and facility to be located on the northern campus of Carleton University that responds to and supports the academic vitality of Sprott. The Business School currently offers an academic program, comprised of 1,800 undergraduate students and a graduate community of 200, and a professional program, which runs independently and fosters a strong connection to the business community. As designers, we will be challenged to develop an architectural project that provides a spatial and visual identity for the Sprott School of Business, and creates a northern gateway to the Carleton Campus. Response to site, organizational and programmatic logic, and performance and visual presence for the Sprott School will be the subject of our studio investigations. The technical program is complex and will necessitate a clear diagram in order to operate smoothly and to work as a public place. Large volume spaces and tiered floor possibilities required by the program will demand a creative approach to structure, section, and spatial organization. Through the studio’s affiliation with the Advanced Building Systems course, students will also be challenged to consider how they might take an ambitious approach to environmental responsiveness, both to enhance the characteristics and experience of the site and to optimize the environmental footprint of the building. 51


The Multiple Dimensions/Coincidences of Building Imagination in the Design of a New Business School in the Chaudiére Islands, Ottawa Claudio Sgarbi, Fall 2013 This Gateway Studio aims to design “a” “building”. In the contemporary manyfolded understanding of architecture this is an important “limitation”. This limitation must be interpreted as a challenge. The design of this building should be seen as part of an urban plan to redesign the future of this part of the city. This design contains some degrees of verisimilitude. We will have the opportunity to meet the potential client/users and discuss the general program and its implications with Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business. This design has an important interdisciplinary bias. The site, Chaudiere Islands, is a very challenging space: one of the most symbolic places in the urban history of Ottawa (and Canada). The New Business School, an institution that is part of Carleton, will be part of a larger plan to renovate (redesign-reimagine) the Chaudiere Islands, which are now partially still used for different purposes, or are in a state of renovation, rehabilitation, re-naturalization, decay, advanced deterioration. The site underwent profound transformations in history. The proposed method to develop the design, taking into consideration 7 Building DIMENSIONS or COINCIDENCES: the Placing Dimension (finding the place); the Functional Dimension (program and distribution); the Compositional Dimension (formal layout); the Structural Dimension (static equilibrium); the Material Dimension (building procedures); the Mechanical Dimension (systems and supplies); the Normative Dimension (codes and the norms). 52


The School, 1973

Instant City: Cultural Infrastructure for the Toronto 2014 Pan-Am Games Tom Bessai, Canadian Practitioner in Residence, Winter 2014 Archigram’s Instant City of 1968 proposed the radical temporary transformation of a site or location for the purpose of staging an event or happening. With the use of inflatables, truck transport, and demountable modular equipment, Instant City anticipated the mounting of temporary cultural events in a range of provisional locations, after which the equipment would be transferred to new places while leaving a backbone of permanent infrastructure as the basis of future modes of occupation. In the early 1970s, Ontario Place was created on the Toronto waterfront and heralded the arrival of radical new ideas in architecture and urban design closely aligned with utopian projects of the period, from Kisho Kurokawa’s 53


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Golnaz Karimi and Sarah Ward, Pneumatic-Hybrid Assemblies, Instant City studio, Winter 2014

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ADAPTIVE ARCHITECTURE | STUDIO 5401

ADAPTIVE ARCHITECTURE | STUDIO 5401

Metabolist experiments to the work of Cedric Price. This studio will situate the agendas of Instant City – impermanence, spectacle and adaptability – within the contemporary context of the 2015 Pan-Am Games to be held in Toronto. While the sports venues are to be located throughout the GTA, the studio will claim the now defunct Ontario Place as a hub and staging ground for all cultural events and ceremonies central to the games. Students will use state-of-the-art digital design, simulation, and fabrication techniques in the development, prototyping, and mock-up of building elements and structures that will choreograph the mounting of cultural events and lay the groundwork for future development of the site. The studio aims to precipitate the radical/theoretical re-invention of Ontario Place through integrated propositions in infrastructure, program, and architecture.


The New Academy Tuomas Toivonen and Nene Tsuboi, Directed Studio Abroad, Helsinki, Winter 2014 Education, not entertainment for the masses is the answer! I say, send back the elephants and hippopotami. (Already I see lions and elephants strolling off decks into the foothills of Africa, amazed.) No subject will be too minute. Your garbage man will address you in a dead language, barbers’ razors will describe a philosophical point. Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus (AD 15-68) The studio will run several parallel projects. A Stair Compendium I: collection of interesting stairs from the city compiled into a small publication; each student selects, documents, and describes three stairs of their own choice. Merihakaniemi: an unsolicited proposal for the transformation of the urban waterfront between the Hakaniemi Market and Kulttuurisauna. Mirabilia Helsingiensis (...continued): an expanding set of postcards depicting non-canonic architectural wonders of Helsinki in the spirit of Gianbattista Piranesi’s work on the magnificence of Rome; each student produces one postcard. A Personal Architecture: a joint studies course with Aalto University department of architecture theory. Performing Architecture Andrew King, Winter 2014 The studio will explore “Performance” and “Architecture” as a direct and critical engagement of the body in space and material, and a driver for conceptualizing and developing a critical architecture. Performing Architecture proposes strategies and criteria for the creation, representation, and interpretation of the body and its cultural implications. The studio will investigate those representations or structures that embody a relationship to movement as a way of understanding the parameters on which architecture is made. By studying the contemporary condition of the ephemeral, flux, transient, and contingent, it is 55


Tim Burwell, Tower Power, Directed Studio Abroad, Helsinki, Winter 2014 56


possible to question the modern binary opposition of form versus content (use/ form, program/space). Performing Architecture will explore the dissolution of disciplinary boundaries, as well as works or ideas that are temporary, contingent, nomadic, hypothetical, historical, and fictional conceptions of use and form. Performing Architecture will be composed of 5 Speculations: Position, Body, Device, Construct, and Production. The design process is examined and explored through the tensions between the kinetic nature of the body in space and the stasis of architectural production. The studio will inhabit this threshold. Disaster Inderbir Singh Riar, Winter 2014 Financial crisis. Environmental catastrophe. Extreme weather. Pollution. Hunger. War. Migrations. Refugees. Camps. Do architects have the means – technical, cultural, or aesthetic – to intervene in human affairs during moments of crisis and calamity? Do disasters unfold slowly (the melting of polar ice) or erupt suddenly (the upheaval of political revolutions)? Depending on the magnitude of misfortune, how can architecture propose either immediate (and necessarily short-lived) solutions or long-term (and possibly lasting) results? Is the very idea of “disaster” seen as alien to our everyday lives – or can such emergency be found and addressed much closer to home? The studio will begin by defining disaster – in cultural, environmental, political, social, and technological terms – through case studies encountered in local, regional, national, and global spheres. Students will later advance detailed architectures, at many scales, for mitigating crises, whether natural or human made, and alleviating suffering. The studio is not convened in a spirit of do-gooderism. It is, however, animated by a prophetic belief in design as the best means for spurring ideas on improving the world.

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Tzvetelina Videnova, Archi-Arctic: New Icebergs, Disaster studio, Winter 2014 58


History/Theory


History/Theory

The history and theory of architecture forms a crucial part of graduate studies at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. Lectures, seminars, and workshops allow students to develop critical positions on architecture culture and practice. Two required Graduate Seminars are taught by faculty and distinguished visiting instructors. Selected current and previous seminars and elective courses are outlined here. Not all courses are given every year; a comprehensive list is found in the Carleton University Calendar. ARCH 4002 Canadian Architecture Janine DebannĂŠ, Winter 2015 This course studies Canadian architecture from the seventeenth century to the present day including both stylistic and technological developments, with a strong emphasis on the Modern Movement in Ottawa. Building styles, methods and materials will be covered in the context of social and economic conditions. Modernism in Ottawa will serve as a lens to examine thematically Canadian architecture in the past and present. Seen as a part of a universal human activity defined by, at first, a geographical, and, later, a political reality, the practice of architecture in Canada reveals itself to be a complex phenomenon intimately connected with the common architectural culture of the western world as well as the ongoing traditions of First Nations. At the same time, over its long history, Canadian architecture has proven itself to be an important site for the emergence and development of a localized sensibility and culture. ARCH 4200 Architectural Conservation Philosophy and Ethics Mariana Esponda, Fall 2013 This seminar introduces historic preservation from the Renaissance to the present moment of contemporary world heritage. The aim is to analyze preservation 61


theories and related approaches to the material transformation of the historical buildings, especially on how philosophical theories and experimental practices make possible to redefine and to advance new conceptions of architecture. Historic buildings are seen not as isolated symbols but understood as forming part of a larger network of areas, places, towns, and landscapes. Design skills are creatively applied when fitting a new use efficiently and sensitively into an existing building and in the careful execution of details where new materials join with existing ones. The conservation of a historical building ranges from preventive maintenance and carrying out minimal repairs to significant modifications, whether partial demolition or opening up to allow a new function to thrive in an existing building. The seminar will undertake research on the changing notion of built heritage and the implications of this evolution on heritage theories, processes, practice at local, national, and international levels. ARCH 4201 History of Modern Housing Benjamin Gianni, Winter 2015 Our primary experience with architecture is with the “house” – in the form of the domestic environments with which we interacted as children. These environments exert a profound influence on us, frequently forming the basis of our decision to pursue architecture. Ironically, however, architects play a relatively minor role in the housing marketplace. This seminar will begin by looking broadly at housing as a function of social organization, demographics, and market demand. It will then explore the evolution of house form over time, tracing influences and identifying types. Next will be an examination of the evolving role of the state in provision of housing – both through direct participation (i.e. social housing projects) and by means of incentives to the private sector. Finally we will review key attempts by architects to influence the housing marketplace – promoting design as a form of social reform. 62


ARCH 4206 Recycling Architecture in Canada and Abroad Sheryl Boyle, Fall 2014 Why should we keep elements of the city that no longer function as originally intended, indeed, whose function no longer exists? This question asks us to explore why we keep anything at all? For centuries, architects have recycled buildings and their ideas. These ideologies and practices are well documented, though the language that describes them may sit outside our current understanding of “recycling”. This course explores key concepts of recycling architecture at the scale of the city, the individual building, and the material detail. The aims are: to become familiar with key architectural recycling strategies and projects in both traditional and contemporary realms; to establish a critical framework for understanding these projects with respect to their implications in theory and practice; to bring these projects to bear on an understanding of the issues, such as sustainability and growth of cities, facing contemporary architectural production and the built environment; and to demonstrate the above through research in drawn and in written forms. ARCH 4301 Post-War Architecture Janine Debanné, Winter 2014 This course examines theoretical issues in architecture from the Second World War to the present. Is “the modern project” still viable? What of this immensely influential project is to be remembered or perhaps continued in architecture today? Which aspects, conversely, demand reconsideration? How are we to understand and assess present-day architectures? How are we to recognize and assess the assumptions that permeate them and decipher between “empty promises” and projects comprising substantial proposals for our times? Rooted in an examination of the founding motivations and values of pre-war modernism, the class thematically explores reactions to and reflections upon the modern movement in architecture, primarily in Europe and America. The study of the main chapters of postmodern critique – technicism, historicism, regionalism, structuralism, post-structuralism, deconstruction, and phenomenology – offers both the understanding of and the ability to assess critically contemporary architecture. The course draws on international, national, and local examples although it does not claim to be exhaustive, and admits the inevitability of overlap and intersection of various paradigms in current architectural theory. 63


ARCH 4502 Research and Criticism Can You Fall in Love with Something You Don’t Know Anything About? How Cultural and Critical Theory Can Change Your Life Roger Connah, Winter 2015 Why is it important to know about cultural and critical theory? Was it essentially a twentieth-century phenomenon? How has it transformed critical thinking and many disciplines today? Were we ever modern in the last century? And what does it mean to be modern now on this century? Cultural and critical theory offers ways to understand, to “think the world”. The course consists of ten sessions on cultural theory and critical thinking from the second half of the twentieth century to our current moment. The notions of diachronic (across time, historical development and the passage of time) and synchronic (a section through time, at the “same” time) are used to develop what we call the student’s critical self. What is the difference between cultural theory and critical theory? How can cultural/ critical theory change/save/ruin your life? Can you fall in love with something you don’t know about? Remember: Life Goes Both Ways. ARCH 4502 Research and Criticism Postmodernism (and its Discontents) Inderbir Singh Riar, Winter 2012 Has modernism as an aesthetic, cultural, and social force run its course? Have we ever been truly modern? What new space relations, technological changes, and, indeed, worlds are imagined in the postmodern? What is the eclipse of the modern implied here? This seminar situates key instances of postmodernism in architecture within broader cultural contexts, and vice versa. Theories on postmodernism are to be historicised – that is, made to explain contemporaneous influences and resulting effects of artistic, political, and technological transformation in postwar architecture. Key architectural case studies, as written and designed polemics, are explored to see how the postmodern crystallises both inherited and entirely new cultural effects. Architecture is thus positioned as a register of ideology, as a vehicle by which social change is felt and measured. ARCH 4801B Theory of Architecture: Knowledge and Information Technologies Greg Andonian, Fall 2012 This seminar introduces the broad field of information technologies as it relates 64


to architecture and the general field of design. The course promotes debate on issues of virtual environments in designing digital space. Students will voice their independent judgment and articulate plausible positions on the challenges posed by technology in the postmodern age. The course has four aims: to gain critical insights on the issue of technology as it affects the profession of architecture and society as a whole; to promote awareness on how information transforms as it moves from the page to the screen; to advance understanding on how threedimensionality, interactivity, and time-based media work together to change the way we engage information; and to expose students to relevant and important texts on the issue. ARCU 4300 Histories and Theories of Urbanism Shelagh McCartney, Fall 2012 The traditionally marked division between design disciplines is slowly dissolving and new forms of overlap and cross-pollination have strongly emerged in the twenty-first century. This century could be characterized by the development and transformation of new urban and territorial modes of settlement. Such mergers of scales, professional fields, managerial agents, and cultural issues have further enriched the project in the city. We will examine how these new alignments have triggered innovative ways of engaging the current built environment. Individual readings of this extremely rich field of study allow for an evaluation and simulation of the distinct lines of work that are currently active in the city, and through them, help to understand the space of the “project� in relation to new urban and territorial phenomena. Understanding a complex reality by mapping and representing the city will allow the development of important skills as introduction into the field. Also embedded in these studies should be a clear understanding of the ethical compromise that we as designers have to face in order to improve the spatial conditions of a growing society in the most progressive manner. ARCU 4400 City Organization and Planning Greg Andonian, Fall 2014 The structure, form, and functioning of cities: infrastructure, facilities and networks, ecosystems, demographic and social organization, government, quality of life, urban management, development, regulation, design, planning and policy.

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ARCU 4600 Post-WWII Urbanism Benjamin Gianni, Winter 2015 The form of the City, as we now know it, emerged in the last five decades. Despite industrialization and significant demographic pressures on the city in the nineteenth century, the medieval underpinnings of most European and North American cities remained unchanged. Only after WWII was the city pulled apart, rezoned, and reconstructed to conform to emerging and competing models of urbanity. Beginning with a review of the pre-war city, the course will examine efforts to address housing shortages and rebuild the city in the 1940s and 1950s, explore urban renewal and the consequences of automobile-based suburbanization, examine gentrification and the revitalization of the “core” beginning in the 1980s, and finally address the form of the post-industrial city as it has emerged in the last two decades. This includes the “edge-city” phenomenon, New Urbanism, and concepts like sustainable urban design. Case studies will include key projects in Canada, Europe, and the United States. ARCU 4700 Urban Utopias Inderbir Singh Riar, Winter 2015 The rise of modern architecture and urbanism is inseparable from the desire to found utopia. The planning of ideal cities has been bound to the shaping of perfect societies and their citizenry. Yet u-topia is, in theory and quite literally, “no-place” or “nowhere”. It was and remains in its strictest sense a foil to the perceived uncertainties of modernity and modern life. As such, this seminar addresses how architects and planners concretised nowhere by imagining visionary architectures and cities as responses to the social, spatial, and spiritual shocks of their times. Not limited to architectural designs, the course argues that, for architects, utopia has also been “found” in quotidian or ordinary spaces. These acts of reading the city will be historicised as essential features of architectural utopianism. A concluding enquiry will ask whether the no-place of utopia remains a referent in the so-called “global city”. ARCU 4801 Selected Topics in Urbanism The Indifferent Roger Connah, Fall 2014 This workshop-seminar course is open to any student interested in what is 66


happening between architecture and the city, between architecture and the citizenry. Using the notion of The Indifferent (having no strong feelings = the neutral), we will explore current architectural/urban design scholarship, research and how social engagement, current political concerns and design thinking can be transferred into practice. What does it mean when we say a “project of architecture” rather than a “building”? Do architectural practices – small and big – still design autonomous buildings, sustainable machines? Or could the professional practice in “admirably” perpetuating its codes and privileges actually be neutralizing the environment and communal life that makes up our cities? Our aim will be to opt for micro-utopias. ARCU 4801 Selected Topics in Urbanism Urban Morphologies of Vulnerable (Slum) Settlements Shelagh McCartney, Fall 2012 The world is now urbanised. One third of that urban population lives in slums. Slum urbanisation is the single most pervasive element in the development of rapidly growing cities. Many of these areas are considered “unplanned”, which has led to inquiring whether design or planning could in any way anticipate or guide their formation or structure. Yet slums are a physical phenomenon created through spatial strategies consisting of responsive morphological forms that endure and shape urban areas. This seminar focuses on the form of “vulnerable morphologies” at different stages of growth within the pervasive expansion of fast-growing cities. In order to improve the quality of life of the urban poor, the physical spaces they inhabit must be analysed in terms of their vulnerability and urban fabric; the relevance of space and physical planning should be central in any discussion on the phenomenal settlements of the urban poor. This research on the morphologic offers opportunities to test a new research tool and to be involved in the critical debate on how to conceptualise vulnerable morphologies at the limit of our twenty-first-century cities and how intervention strategies may proactively be applied to shape cities with expected rapid growth. ARCU 4808 Debates on Suburbanism and Sprawl: The North American Frontier Dongsei Kim, Fall 2012 More than a hundred years ago, Ebenezer Howard’s “three magnets” diagram illustrated the tension between “town” and “country”. It sparked discourses on 67


how and where we should live, work, and find leisure. This tension still exists but in different forms and context. Building on a conversation on “urbanisms in the core and periphery”, the seminar surveys contemporary discourses on suburbia with a focus on North America. With an understanding that suburbia is always contingent on the notion of the urban, the seminar explores authors such as Edward Glaeser, Kenneth T. Jackson, Robert Fisherman, Joel Garreau, Andreas Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, as well as Witold Rybczynski, Dolores Hayden, Alex McLean, Robert Bruegmann, and others. Why are suburbs so often pejoratively termed “sprawl”? Why has so-called sprawl continued to proliferate in many parts of the world, especially in North America? What are the forces that produce these suburbs? What is the historical genesis? What is at stake and what other alternative models are there? Students will engage these topics from multiple perspectives and develop a critical understanding of the changing debates on suburbia over time. This process will contribute to students formulating their own critical views on contemporary urbanism. ARCH 5000w Lectures not Lectures Martti Kalliala, Helsinki Directed Studio Abroad elective course, Winter 2014 During the last decade the increase in available bandwidth, the concomitant emergence of video sharing platforms and streaming and archival video footage made publicly available by academic and other institutions have both made recorded lectures an increasingly prominent mode of communication and spawned a ‘Cambrian explosion’ of new audio-visual presentation formats. With this condition as its general framework, the course will focus on the lecture as a tool and strategy of synthesizing, performing and disseminating architectural ideas. After an introductory period of research and analysis of both historical and contemporary presentation formats (from MOOCs to video essays, from TED talks to lectures-as-performance-art and beyond) each student will produce a 10-15 minute long video lecture on, or related to, their ongoing thesis research work. The lecture will be structured around an essay-length text presented alongside a visual counterpart made up of, for example, diagrams, photos, reference images, live drawing, moving image or physical performance. At the end of the course the video lectures will be collected into an online archive through which they will be publicly available.

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ARCH 5010 Introduction to Modern Architecture Inderbir Singh Riar, Fall 2014 The emergence of modernism, modernisation, modernity, and the Modern Movement in architecture is explored from the late-eighteenth to the earlytwentieth centuries. Typical oppositions of modernity – nature versus the city, the handmade versus the machine, or the individual versus the collective – are situated in terms of their architectural consequence. Other thematic tensions – between handcraft and industrial production, structure and ornament, history and invention, the rise of the metropolis and the flight from it – are seen in terms of efforts to define new architectural languages – for example, rationalism or expressionism – in support of a “changed life” in the twentieth century, especially in the aftermath of industrial revolution and world war. ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar Acting into the World: The Nexus of Architecture, Technology and Politics Paul Holmquist, Winter 2015 Architecture has always existed at the intersection of the technical and the political. Yet the autonomy of technological objects and systems in late modernity poses crucial questions for architecture’s potential to meaningfully respond to the possibilities of “the city” as both an artefact and a political idea. This seminar explores architecture as a “politics” of making and of the made in relation to modern technology, in its capacity to constitute a common world. The agency of architectural making will be critically examined with respect to questions of aesthetics, historical consciousness, sustainability and spatial justice, as well as the challenges posed by the technical image, the apparatus, and spectacle. An engagement with texts drawn from architectural and cultural theory, philosophy and literature, as well as case studies of contemporary practice, will open up new ways of thinking about the relationship of architecture and technology to the essential human condition of the city. ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar Architecture Culture since WWII Joaquim Moreno, Lisbon Directed Studio Abroad, Winter 2015 This seminar will examine the debates, polemics and transformations of space conceptions from the aftermath of World War II to the present, through the lenses 69


of those old fashioned nodal points of any disciplinary transformation: books. The seminar will dwell on the arguments and positions each book conveys, will contextualize the debates in which they were immersed and attempt a panoramic view of such a network. Between Siegfried Giedion’s Space, Time and Architecture and Rem Koolhaas’s Delirious New York, through Robert Venturi’s Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture and beyond, this course will attempt to illustrate a brief history of ideas through its original argumentation and through its strategy of dissemination. At a time when dissemination is atomizing culture beyond what we would recognize as common, even the very assumption of a culture implied in this seminar might be already part of history, making its examination all the more urgent. ARCH 5200 Graduate Seminar Theories and Research Claudio Sgarbi, Fall 2014 There are theories of everything and also theories of nothing. Architects dedicated quite a lot of time to define principles, choices, expectations and hopes:. They did it with writings, designs and buildings. Studying different architectural theories can be relevant for contemporary architects. This will be the topic of our collective seminars, to comprehend the complexity and the indeterminacy of architectural knowledge. We will try to refine our tools of investigation, exposing themes, methods and projects, thus to create a collective ground for sharing ideas and interests. Each student will be encouraged to design some guiding lines for a possible theory of architecture. This will constitute the content of the assignment. Theories are not the prerogative of some rare academician. They are not scarce and they are a gratuitous right to exercise our freedom and our imagination. ARCH 5200 Graduate Seminar Janine Debanné, Fall 2014 This course examines theoretical approaches and research methodologies relevant to the discipline of architecture. To frame our discussions, we will focus on a series of themes addressing aspects of the complex and often confrontational relationship between architectural theory, history and philosophy, and the notion of architectural research proper. As any contemporary thesis in architecture will necessarily be situated within the larger discourse of post-modernity, this 70


class will revisit influential theoretical constructs from the second part of the twentieth century to the present including structuralism, post-structuralism, phenomenology, regionalism, and historicism. We will explore how these critical approaches have alternately expired or persisted by emphasizing their new formulations within contemporary architectural theory and practice, thus leading to discussions on technology, parametric design, design/build and communitybuilding paradigms, among others. ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar Adventures in Multimodal Design Graham Larkin, Winter 2014 This seminar is designed to deepen knowledge of design history and expand a communications toolkit. Students will analyze and emulate classic examples of data graphics, cartography, cinema, signage, comics, advertising and propaganda with a particular emphasis on the integration of visual, auditory, and tactile/ kinesthetic modes. In addition to critical analysis, assignments will include exercises in perceptual/conceptual mapping and storytelling. We will draw inspiration from classic practitioners and theorists of verbo-visual exposition (Galileo Galilei, Charles Joseph Minard, Edward Tufte), relevant strategies of the twentieth-century avant-garde (the Bauhaus integration of design arts, Marcel Duchamp’s boîte-en-valise, the Situationist dérive, the Fluxus event score/Fluxbox), and comics masters from Winsor McCay to Chris Ware. The amazing variety of past practices will shed light on current forms of exposition including interactive visualizations and pecha kucha. ARCH 5201 Graduate Seminar Polarization and Radicalization of Architectural Positions (and New Imperceptible Tactics) Éric Le Coguiec, Winter 2014 The neo-liberal global economy associated with the acceleration of technological change intensifies the transformation of traditional urban forms, architectural design methods, and modes of sociability. The speeds of information flow and movement of peoples accelerates the fragmentation of space. This heterogenization produces both polarization and radicalization of architectural postures. On one hand, New Urbanism remedies this territorial dislocation by discovering 71


cultural signifiers; on the other hand, Rem Koolhaas’s “junkspace” proposes an almost pragmatic acceptance of this ongoing spatial transformation. Though conceptually and formally opposed, these two architectural currents meet in the art of manipulating images and concepts by implementing, each in their own way, strategies of emotional control complicit with the general spectacularization of the real. Alongside these two opposing currents (otherwise both heirs to typical Western cultural references), a multitude of theoretical and/or practical initiatives are currently abandoning assumed regimes of visibility. These non-hegemonic and critical approaches trouble the founding principles of architectural design. This seminar addresses the concepts that drive these new architectural tactics, which may be named as relational/situational architecture, diffuse creativity, interstitial actions, collective subjectivity, rhizomatic, alterotopia, among others. ARCH 5200 Graduate Seminar Between Utopia and Aporia: Theory, Practice, and the Making of a Common World Paul Holmquist, Fall 2013 This course is an introduction to thinking critically about architecture in posing a central question: what is the relationship of architectural theory and practice in post-modernity to the political task of a making and sharing a world in common? Consequently, what modes of agency, thinking, and making are available outside the utopian model and the instrumentality of technology and representation? In effect, how can architecture engage a politics of making without itself “making politics”? Following from Hannah Arendt’s theory of action and Martin Heidegger’s critique of technology, the course examines a range of theories and modes of practice that begin to recognize this possibility particularly in relation to aesthetics and language, historical consciousness, everyday action and imagination, as well as ephemerality, play, and festival. Also considered are the specific challenges posed to architectural thought and practice, and the possibility of any politics, by the theories of spectacle, the technical image, and the apparatus. These topics are explored within a broadly phenomenological and hermeneutic philosophical perspective and anchored by specific architectural writings, works, and practices, through discussions centred on lectures and student presentations.

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ARCH 5200 Graduate Seminar Introduction to Critical Thought in Architecture Kelly Crossman, Fall 2013 This course examines theoretical approaches and research methodologies relevant to the discipline of architecture. To frame discussions, the seminar will focus on a series of themes addressing aspects of the complex and often confrontational relationship between architectural theory, history and philosophy, and the notion of architectural research. Following a brief introduction to the seminar theme, the class will be introduced to a sequence of select readings by means of weekly lectures and small, faculty-directed discussions. The objective of this seminar is twofold: to develop skills in research and writing preparatory to work on the final thesis; to develop an understanding of architecture as an intellectual and theoretical discipline in its own right and the possibilities the contemporary world holds for the ideal of critical practice. ARCH 5101/6101 Master of Architectural Studies/PhD Colloquium The Importance of Questions: Insights from Phenomenology and Hermeneutics Alberto P茅rez-G贸mez, Winter 2015 This colloquium builds upon issues discussed during the fall term while adding some specific perspective from phenomenology and hermeneutics. The aim will be to find a question or set of questions central to doctoral research, questions that may be both meaningful to students and relevant for the contemporary state of architecture. How can we grasp the crucial importance of questions, over and beyond issues of mere innovation or discovery? This is a position best understood through hermeneutics, foregrounding the importance of looking out in order to find oneself, establishing a genuine dialogue with material that we recognize as potentially significant. We will also revisit questions about the nature of theory and practice through history and the contemporary world. Such questions are obviously crucial to characterize our own work. Theory and practice have mutated profoundly throughout history: while readings will be primarily philosophical, we will attempt examine transformations that have taken place in our discipline, from the time the Greeks invented techne (art) and theoria (theory) to our own often problematic and confusing reductions of the terms. The Colloquium is organized around a series of readings, individual meetings and group seminars. The aim will be to have students present a series of critical texts and create a response to these readings as it relates to their developing dissertation. 73


ARCH 5101/6101 Master of Architectural Studies/PhD Colloquium Defining a Present Condition: PhD Research in Architecture Federica Goffi, Fall 2014 This colloquium aims to foster a greater understanding of what constitutes research in architecture in our contemporary context. It is organized around a series of interviews with key figures whose research fields fall into history, architecture history and theory, architectural conservation, and history of music. The interviews are meant to offer not just a forum for the discussion and germination of new ideas but also to leave a tangible memory through transcriptions of the audio recordings. The colloquium inquiries will center on key questions such as: What is the balance between theory and practice in architectural research today? What is the difference between history and theory of architecture? What research methods have been used in the recent years and where should we be going with contemporary research in architecture? What is the difference between theory and practice, and how are they joined in PhD research? What are the mediums of work and thinking within architecture today? ARCH 5101/6101 Master of Architectural Studies/PhD Colloquium Time Travellers, World’s Fairs, Spectacles, Architectures Inderbir Singh Riar, Winter 2014 World’s fairs – cauldrons of social transformation, technological innovation, and aesthetic experimentation – are inseparable from the advent of modern architecture. Emerging in parallel to the rise of Western cities as economic, political, and artistic centres during the nineteenth century, world’s fairs materialised the advance of science, education, and communications by gathering and displaying the cultural and technical wealth of nations and empires. These exhibitions created spaces for the “world” to enter the city. Central to the spectacular and didactic ambitions were architectural experiments governed by a curious injunction: all world’s fairs were necessarily temporary – ephemeral events standing apart from everyday life as alternative futures for the built world while serving as catalysts for the instant and permanent rebuilding of the existing city. As such, the course will explore world’s fairs as types of utopia: strategic withdrawals into an inner realm, where the logic of modern life was confronted by the use of advanced techniques of display, the creation of specialised disciplines of collecting, and the rise of utterly novel architectural forms.

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ARCH 5301/6001 Vitruvian Exercises I Stephen Fai, Fall 2014 The course investigates the graphic intelligence of architects. Architectural modes of research are explored via a survey of first- to sixteenth-century architectural treatises. ARCH 5302/6002 Vitruvian Exercises II Louis Brillant, Winter 2015 A focused study on the fabrica of architectural theory situated within the theory and practice of construction. Attention is paid to architectural treatises of the sixteenth to twentieth centuries. ARCH 5402 Evaluation of Heritage Properties Winter 2014 The cultural, political, economic, and legal factors that shape our definition of heritage architecture. Processes for and implications of heritage designation, cultural value and costs associated with restoration and ongoing preservation. ARCN 5100 Representation and Documentation in Architectural Conservation Christian Ouimet, Fall 2014 An in-depth study of the conventions and history of heritage recording including traditional field survey, photogrammetry, laser scanning technologies, and hybrid representations. ARCN 5301/6001 Daedalic Exercises I Stephen Fai, Fall 2014 Readings in contemporary philosophy and theory as well as experimental mediation, materiality, and making. ARCN 5302/6002 Daedalic Exercises II Louis Brillant, Winter 2015 Readings in contemporary philosophy and theory as well as experimental mediation, materiality, and making. ARCT 5909 Master of Architectural Studies Thesis A scholarly written thesis supported by methods of two and three-dimensional 75


representation. Research undertaken by the student is expected to engage a topic in the culture of architectural practice. Proposals must be approved by the Graduate Committee of the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. ARCU 5402 Workshop: Urban Studies and Heritage Conservation Jim Mountain, Fall 2014 The course will review and discuss approaches to community-based visioning and planning (urban and small towns), urban design with the community’s perspectives and input at the forefront of design considerations, and conservation of the physical elements of a place, with both natural and cultural heritage components of a place being priorities for future planning. The workshop takes the approach that the historic and physical qualities of “heritage resources” are cared for within the context of community interests, economic considerations, and long-term preservation goals. Students will work as a multi-disciplinary team and examine principles and practices that shape the sustainability and conservation of our built environment by focusing on interaction with case study areas – the “clients” are communities in the City of Ottawa and Ottawa Valley region. Our work is to be informed by practices and knowledge from other North American and international examples. ARCH 6907 PhD Comprehensive Examination Students must demonstrate to their thesis advisory committee a sufficiently broad background in the theoretical and topical area literatures and constructions relevant to their individual projects. ARCH 6908 PhD Proposal Examination Students must demonstrate to the thesis advisory committee their ability to link theory to a work or practice of architecture. The examination requires a comprehensive bibliography, review of the subject literature, dissertation outline, and, as appropriate, drawings and models situated within a theoretical framework. ARCH 6909 PhD Dissertation The dissertation will be comprised of two critical modes of investigation of equal importance: a speculative project and a research text. The speculative project is realized using specific traditional and non-traditional media as deemed appropriate. 76


Building Technologies Visualization DigitalDesign Professional Practice


Theories and methods of building technologies and their relationship to the built and the natural environments are fundamental to the study and practice of architecture at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. The study of architectural representation and digital technologies situates architectural design in an expanded field of applied and speculative techniques. Hand drawing and physical modelling are explored alongside digital design and fabrication, which are supported by significant computer facilities and machine technologies. A mandatory course in professional practice links methods of design and construction to project management and ethics. ARCC 4300 Building Materials Workshop Mariana Esponda, Winter 2013 Students will examine how treatises of construction have influenced systems of construction. The methodology includes an analysis of several traditional treatises of construction including those by Alberti, Palladio, Serlio, Perrault, Blondel, Viollet-le Duc, and Ruskin. Emphasis is placed on consideration of the relationship between architecture and the constructive knowledge, the evolution of techniques and building materials, the illustrations and constructive details that encapsulate the treatise’s presentation of an approach to a constructive manual of the time, and the origin and the influences of the way to build with traditional materials and systems (lime, brick, stone, iron and wood). We will compare how the knowledge of traditional treatises of construction was transferred to the construction system of Canada, using buildings in the village of Ashton, Ontario, as an example. Students will learn to understand the structural behaviour of traditional building materials and to represent the geometry, joints, tools and essential details of how they were built. The research will culminate in an examination of the main damages, conditional assessment and pathologies of traditional building materials, and the various alterations made to the constructive 79


envelope of the original building at junctions between new and old materials and techniques. The primary objective is to develop an understanding of the quantitative and qualitative values of these traditional methods of construction as the essence for an inclusive cultural memory. ARCC 5096 Building Technology I Case studies of vernacular buildings from different climatic regions: issues of human comfort, construction, and materials. Site orientation, foundations, structure and envelope in terms of their response to local climate: sun (light and heat), wind, moisture. Final projects developed in conjunction with design studio. ARCC 5097 Building Technology II Technical issues involved in architectural design of buildings from ancient times to the present. Technological innovation and materials related to structural developments, and the organization and design of structures. Basic concepts of equilibrium, and mechanics of materials. Final projects developed in conjunction with design studio. ARCC 5098 Building Technology III Wood frame, post and beam, steel and concrete systems and construction techniques. Structural systems and building envelope principles and practice are explored in conjunction with mechanical and electrical systems in small buildings. ARCC 5099 Building Technology IV Medium-scale steel and concrete structured buildings as case studies to explore approaches to site resources, building envelope, daylighting design, water supply, HVAC, electric lighting, room and environmental acoustics, fire protection, with focus on sustainable design strategies. 80


ARCC 5100 Advanced Building Systems Giancarlo Mangone, Fall 2013 The course introduces advanced design in building technology and systems integration. Leading edge building materials, technologies and philosophies will be explored through intensive case study research and analysis, comparing, and critically evaluating, traditional methods with current computer modeling and analysis techniques. ARCC 5200 Professional Practice This course introduces the practice of architecture. It provides an understanding of the broader social framework within which buildings are built. We will discuss the issues involved in becoming an architect and setting up a practice, including the architect’s responsibilities through the stages of design and construction. The course is broadly organized on three themes: the structure of the profession, laws and conventions which govern business and construction; factors affecting the development of design in an office, and different contractual approaches to construction; the requirements of professional registration, the challenges facing the profession, and some alternative forms of architectural careers. ARCN 4103 Digital Theory and Fabrication Johan Voordouw, Fall 2014 This workshop explores the theoretical and practical breadth of emerging digital and fabrication technology. The lab conveys basic to intermediate knowledge of different computational platforms, from modelling to visualization. The projects include a series of iterative works that require students to learn various modes of fabrication such as CNC, laser cutting and 3D printing. Using contemporary projects at a range of scales, the course uses current spatial production as the context for critical appraisal. Lectures explore ideas such as labour, ethics, tectonics, and new modes of production and are a vital opportunity to discuss issues that increasingly define architectural academia and the profession. ARCN 5000 Computer Modeling of Form Johan Voordouw, Winter 2014 The digital is becoming increasingly pervasive both in practice and in education, 81


Alison Bailey, Andrew Bako, Kaveh Baradaran, David King, Richard Li, and Chrissy Taylor Digital Theory and Fabrication Workshop, 2013 82


The School, 1973

leading to an increased need for computational skills as part of the educational environment. However, like all new modes of production, each new development in technology demands a corresponding change in methodology. If process and production are linked, then a change in the means by which we create, think, and explore architecture should lead to a new architectural “product”. This change is only experienced if we extend to the very limit of our tools and our own abilities. Therefore, this course is a continual, open dialogue that asks students to question critically the direction of architecture and to understand the role/connection of technology to both architectural process and production. ARCN 5005 Theory and Practice of Architectural Representation Yvan Cazabon, Fall 2012-2014 The course addresses the relationship between architectural intentions and their appropriate representation. This focus will demonstrate the relationship between the “reading” of architectural propositions and the projected spaces they propose. The exercises will rely on the evolution of ideas and techniques and, at times, challenge the visually biased reading of architectural drawings by engaging other senses. The weekly exercises are meant to build on skill and technique while considering their effectiveness and appropriateness. Students are introduced to increasingly complex architectural projections from conventional 2D drawings (plans, sections, elevation) to 3D renderings (perspective, axonometric, collage). The term is structured around weekly exercises using various techniques and media complemented with presentations, mini-workshops, and lectures relating to the subject matter. ARCN 5100 Representation and Documentation in Architectural Conservation Christian Ouimet, Fall 2014 An in-depth study of the conventions and history of heritage recording including 83


Ryan Fogarty, Clement Gosselin, Hanson Mak, and Ekaterina Tchouprikova, BIG Build, Problems in Computing Workshop, 2012

traditional field survey, photogrammetry, laser scanning technologies, and hybrid representations. ARCC 5200 Professional Practice Christopher Knight, Winter 2014 This course introduces the practice of architecture. It provides an understanding of the broader social framework within which buildings are built. We will discuss the issues involved in becoming an architect and setting up a practice, including the architect’s responsibilities through the stages of design and construction. The course is broadly organized on three themes: the structure of the profession, laws and conventions which govern business and construction; factors affecting the development of design in an office, and different contractual approaches to construction; the requirements of professional registration, the challenges facing the profession, and some alternative forms of architectural careers. ARCC 5200 Design Economics Topics include: principles of building economics; determinants and prediction of building costs; uncertainty and investment economics; creative cost control for buildings during schematic design, design development, construction document preparation and construction; economic evaluation during all phases of design process; emphasis on sustainable strategies.

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Events


The Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism maintains that architecture is a matter of public concern. The Forum Lectures, established in 1968 and held at the National Gallery of Canada, bring renowned local, national, and international architects and thinkers to educate students, faculty, and the public on the artistic expression and social impact of architecture and design. Each term, the Pit Lectures invite visiting practitioners and professors to present their work and research to the School. A growing series of in-house seminars and workshops allow students to explore design theory and techniques with cuttingedge architects, artists, and researchers. 2014-2015 Forum Lectures Hedwig Heinsman, DUS Architects, Amsterdam Gregory Henriquez, Henriquez Partners Architects, Vancouver Douglas Cardinal, Douglas Cardinal Architect Inc., Ottawa Maurizio Varratta, Maurizio Varratta Architetto, Genoa, Italy Daniel Libeskind, Studio Daniel Libeskind, New York, Milan Michael McClelland, ERA Architects Inc., Toronto Gilles Saucier, Saucier + Perrote Architects, Montreal 2011-2014 Forum Lectures Bruce Kuwabara, KPMB Architects, Toronto, and Barry Padolsky, Barry Padolsky Associates Inc. Architects, Ottawa Martha Schwartz, Martha Schwartz Partners, Cambridge MA and London UK David Leatherbarrow, University of Pennsylvania Dorte Mandrup, Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter, Copenhagen Antoine Picon, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University Alex Rankin, Griffiths Rankin Cook, Ottawa, and Raymond Moriyama, Moriyama & Teshima, Toronto 87


Emmanuel Combarel, ECDMarrec Architects, Paris, and Tania Concko, Tania Concko Architects Urbanists, Amsterdam Paul Goldberger, Parsons The New School for Design; Vanity Fair Eva Jiricna, Eva Jiricna Architects, London and Prague Kenneth Frampton, Ware Professor of Architecture, Columbia University Russell Acton, Acton Ostry Architects, Vancouver Vesa Honkonen, VHARC, Helsinki Gisle Løkken, 70°N arkitektur, Tromsø, Norway Gregory Burgess, Gregory Burgess Architects, Melbourne Johanna Hurme, 5468796 Architecture, Winnipeg Bernard Cache, Archilab, Paris Didier Faustino, Paris and Lisbon Edouard François, Maison Edouard François, Paris 2011-2015 Pit Lectures Bud Brannigan, Bud Brannigan Architects, Brisbane, Australia Dan Pitera, Detroit Collaborative Design Center, University of Detroit-Mercy Katsuhiro Miyamoto, Katsuhiro Miyamoto & Associates, Takarazuka, Japan Andrew King, Andrew King Studio and Cannon Design, Montreal Diogo Seixas Lopes, Barbas Lopes Arquitectos, Lisbon Maria Denegri and Tom Bessai, Denegri Bessai Studio, Toronto Claudio Sgarbi, architect, Modena, Italy Paco Mejías Villatoro, Figueiras & Mejías Architects, Alicante, Spain Jaime Salazar Rückauer, architect, Bochum Jonathan Hale, University of Nottingham Marjan Colletti, The Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London Javier Sanchez, Sarq Architecture Office, Murcia, Spain Halldóra Arnardóttir, Sarq Architecture Office, Murcia, Spain 88


Gisle Løkken and Magdalena Haggärde, 70°N arkitektur, Tromsø, Norway Michael Tawa, University of Sydney Alex de Rijke, dRMM de Rijke Marsh Morgan Architects; Royal College of Art, London Alessandra Cianchetta, AWP L’agence de reconfiguration territoriale, Paris Nilly Harag, Arctic Architects and Urban Designers, Jerusalem Teresa Sapey, Teresa Sapey Estudio de Arquitectura, Madrid Hannes Stiefel, Stiefel Kramer, Vienna Graduate Exhibition and Open House Typically held in January, the Graduate Exhibition showcases cutting edge work produced in the Master of Architecture program. The Open House invites prospective applicants to the Azrieli School for design presentations and opportunities to meet faculty members and current students. Urbanization in China: A Panel Discussion October 1, 2014 The event brings together a number of key experts to examine challenges associated with China’s rapid urbanization. Among the issues to be discussed are the so-called ghost city phenomenon (where housing and infrastructure are built in advance of population increases), the conservation of existing historically significant urban fabric in the face of immense pressure to intensify, the shift to high-rise living, and the changing landscape of public participation in urban development within China’s evolving political and social milieu. Participants: Carol Agocs (Western University), Huhua Cao (University of Ottawa), Qin Shao (College of New Jersey), Neil Yan (architect, Toronto), Randolph Wang (Planning and Growth Management Department, City of Ottawa), Benjamin Gianni (Carleton University) 89


Graduate Symposium: Comprehending Building November 13, 2013 What do we mean by “comprehensive design” of a building in our cultural context? How far, how deeply, is it possible to comprehend building in the educational and research program of a school of architecture? Western ways of building may have reached dramatic levels of inefficiency, paradoxes, and unsustainability to the point of being perceived as dangerous threats to our environment. The symposium critically addresses and creatively interprets notions on “building”, “comprehensiveness”, “scale”, “climate/site”, “comfort”, and “culture”, as well as technologies, program, envelope, structure, details, and mechanical systems, in order to comprehend building as a moral purpose or even an ethical mandate. This is an unavoidable task in the education of an architect. Speakers: Claudio Sgarbi, “Comprehending a Building”; Morgan Carter, “From Structure to Systems”; Tom Bessai, “Model, Prototype, Mock-up – Iteration and Material Testing”; Maria Denegri, “Comprehending Building – A Paradox?”; Lucie Fontein, “The Architect as Narrator”; Federica Goffi, “Reflections on the Ceiling. Navigating the Contemporary Cosmos of Building Systems”; Diogo Lopes, “The Politics of Bricolage. From the City Back to the Doorknob”. Towards a Critical Phenomenology – A Symposium February 8, 2013 From the tragically hip to the tragically uncool, phenomenology in architecture has struggled to maintain the critical significance it attained from the 1960s to the 1980s. Did it collide with Post-Modernism as recent new scholarship maintains? Does this indicate a historical takeover for a (critical) minority of theoreticians, academics, and practitioners, or is this critical hindsight useful for scholars but – as usual – not practitioners? Do practitioners still find the concept of the phenomenological “spooky” but useful, if the language and codes can be 90


used to support intuition and the invisible? We are thus left to ask whether the poetic act – the invisible and unknown, that moment just a little beyond our reach and comprehension – is still considered essential to a resistant process in architecture. . Speakers included Jonathan Hale (University of Nottingham), Paul Emmons (Virginia Tech), Sam Ridgway (University of Adelaide), and Donald Kunze (Pennsylvania State University), Roger Connah (Carleton University). Spaces Speak – Are You Listening? October 12, 2012 In collaboration with Artengine, Ottawa, and the 2012 Electric Fields festival, this multidisciplinary symposium explores key ideas on the built environment and the sonic experience. Participants: Barry Blesser, independent scholar and consultant, pioneer of digital audio; Linda-Ruth Salter, New England Institute of Technology; Paul Theberge, Canada Research Chair in Music and Interdisciplinary Studies, Carleton University; David Lieberman, John H. Daniels School of Architecture, University of Toronto; Halldóra Arnardóttir, Sarq Architecture Office, Murcia, Spain; Mohammed Al Riffai, Moriyama & Teshima Architects, Ottawa. Migrating Landscapes January 23, 2012 Johanna Hurme and Sasa Radulovic, 5468796 Architecture, Winnipeg

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Resources


The Azrieli School offers a range of fabrication tools, machines, and labs as well as multiple audiovisual and printing facilities. Digital design is a growing part of the curriculum and the School maintains a laser cutter and CNC router to further exploration in these fields. Dedicated technical staff members manage the shops and labs and provide group tutorials as well as one-on-one assistance. Wood and Metal Shops The large wood and metal shops offer equipment and assistance for constructing architectural models and 1:1 objects. Separate areas are equipped for woodworking (with a full range of machine and hand tools), sheet metal work, machining (complete with lathes and milling machines), and welding (including MIG, oxyacetylene torches, cutting and brazing, and metal cutting). The shop hosts a 75-watt Universal laser cutter. CNC Lab The CNC Lab hosts an AXYS 4008 Router for large-scale models and 1:1 objects. Model Assembly Room A large workspace dedicated to building models and 1:1 prototypes. Audiovisual Lab The School is equipped with excellent photographic and audiovisual facilities. A 12-station darkroom provides a full range of black-and-white photographic practices. A separate photographic studio is equipped with backdrops, lights, copy stand, and a vacuum easel for drawing and model reproduction. A 12-station IMac digital photo/video editing lab is supported by the following equipment: an Inkjet printer, two Epson flatbed scanners, three Microtex flatbed scanners, three Nikon slide scanners, four Analog/digital video converter, four 95


Data projectors, an Apple A/V connector kit, two Fostex mobile speakers, two Panasonic video mixing decks, four Videonic Digital video mixers, a Photovix slide-to video transfer, two VHS/DVD/CD players with 26� monitor mobile units. An equipment loan pool provides students with a wide selection of 35mm and digital photographic equipment, video cameras, and tripods as well as four 8mm, two Hi8, two digiatl8, two VHS-C, and two VHS camcorders. The facilities also offer computer, video, and photographic instruction. Computer Labs Computer labs (open 24 hours a day except holidays) are maintained with a total of 56 i7/Windows 7 and 12 Quad-core/Windows 7 desktop computers. All labs are equipped with 11x17 black-and-white printers and 12x17 scanners. Computers run the following software: Revit, AutoCAD, 3ds Max, Rhinoceros, Grasshopper, V-Ray, ArchiCAD 16, SketchUp Pro 8/Podium Renderer, ArcGIS, Map3D, Google Earth Pro, Adobe Master Collection CS6 (Photoshop, Premiere, InDesign), and Microsoft Office Suite. Printshop The Printshop provides printing and graphics services to all students. Among its services are: colour laser printing on a variety of papers; dye-sublimation printing, 8x12 gloss paper; large-format printing; large-format scanning. Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) www.cims.carleton.ca CIMS is a research centre dedicated to the advanced study of innovative, hybrid forms of representation that can both reveal the invisible measures of architecture and animate the visible world of construction. As part of the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, CIMS explores and develops innovative 96


symbiotic relationships between the digital and fabricated 2D and 3D modes of representation. The mandate includes the advancement and development of the tools, processes and techniques involved in the transformation of data into tangible and meaningful artifacts. Key areas of work and technology include High Performance Visualization, 3D Imaging and Modelling Protocol, and New Media Tool Development. Graduate students have opportunities to pursue research in CIMS. Additionally, CIMS maintains a 3D printer for student use. Technical Data Room (TDR) The TDR maintain a significant library for student use and research. Collections include the history and theory of modern architecture, architectural monographs, technical manuals, and subscriptions to current magazines. The TDR recently acquired the Gil Sutton collection, with its important holdings on post-war architecture and the history of landscape architecture. Books in the TDR are catalogued on computer available to visitors. Building 22 www.building22.ca Building 22 is an annual student-run publication showcasing design work at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. Graduate and undergraduate 97


projects are published with a view to critical and captivating explorations. Building 22 is distributed internationally to architectural schools, offices, bookstores, and galleries. Azrieli Architecture Students’ Association http://archiblog22.wordpress.com http://azrieliarchitectureinteractive.tumblr.com The AASA is registered with the Carleton University Students’ Association as the student society of the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. The AASA represents Azrieli architecture students to other architecture schools across Canada. MacOdrum Library www.library.carleton.ca MacOdrum Library is the main research library at Carleton University and contains a collection of more than two million items – books, microfilms, tapes, CDs, government documents, maps, periodicals, and archival materials – as well as study space, reading rooms and café. The Library maintains a significant collection of books and periodicals on architecture, art, and urbanism.

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Building 22 is the student-run annual of design work at the Azrieli School of Architecture of Architecture and Urbanism

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Awards


Master of Architecture students are eligible for prizes decided by either the Azrieli School Awards Committee or independent juries. Additional awards may be opened during the school year. A partial list appears here. Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Medal The RAIC Medal is awarded annually at each Canadian school of architecture to a graduating student (in a professional program) who, in the judgement of the faculty of the respective institution, has achieved the highest level of academic excellence and/or completed the finest final design project/thesis for that academic year. Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Honour Roll Certificates A maximum of four individual students, from the top ten percent of the graduating class in the professional degree program, shall receive RAIC honour roll certificates, in addition to the top student who shall also receive the RIAC medal. American Institute of Architects Henry Adams Medal The American Institute of Architects awards an engraved medal and certificate of merit to the top-ranking graduating student in each architecture program accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. It is awarded annually to a student for outstanding academic achievement and professional promise. American Institute of Architects Certificate of Merit The American Institute of Architects awards a certificate of merit to the secondranking graduating student. It is awarded annually to a student for outstanding academic achievement and professional promise. 103


Azrieli Scholar Awards The Azrieli Scholar Awards are given annually to in-progress and highly developed developed Master of Architecture Thesis and Directed Research Studio projects. Awards are granted on the originality of research and design. Page & Steele/IBI Group Architects Scholarship Awarded annually to an outstanding student enrolled in the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University. The Scholarship was established by Page & Steele/IBI Group Architects, formerly known as Page and Steele Architects. Jacques and Helene Sabourin Memorial Scholarship Jacques and Helene Sabourin Memorial Scholarship awarded annually, on the recommendation of the Director of the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, to the student showing the greatest proficiency in a course devoted to lighting for architecture. Donated by the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and its members in memory of Jacques and Helene Sabourin who were active in the field of illumination and who tragically lost their lives in an automobile accident in 1984. Steel Structures Education Foundation Scholarship Steel Structures Education Foundation Scholarship is awarded annually, to an undergraduate student in the fourth year of the Bachelor of Architectural Studies or a graduate student in the Master of Architecture studying the use and design of steel products. Eligible students must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada (landed immigrants or protected persons). Should the recipient be a graduate student, the scholarship will be awarded by the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, on the recommendation of the Director of the 104


Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. The Award was established in 2007 by the Steel Structures Education Foundation (SSEF). Architecture Directed Studies Abroad Award Architecture Directed Studies Abroad Award is awarded annually, when merited, by the Director of the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, to an undergraduate or graduate student participating in the Directed Studies Abroad (DSA) program. Preference is given to a student with high academic standing and who requires financial assistance to participate in the DSA (as determined by the School Director). Should the recipient be a graduate student, the bursary will be awarded by the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research on the recommendation of the School Director. Endowed in 2006 by Architecture ’86 in honour of their 20th reunion. Teron Scholars Given annually by William and Jean Teron, the award challenges students to hone skills toward becoming multidisciplinary leading architects. Winners are chosen based on design excellence and with a view to their future ability of challenging architectural teams on physical, social, environmental and economic levels. Allan Buchanan Scholarships The Allan Buchanan Scholarships are awarded annually, on the recommendation of the Dean of Engineering and Design, to outstanding students proceeding from one year to another in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Systems and Computer Engineering, Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, and the School of Industrial Design. The Scholarships were endowed in 2005 by the family of Allan Raymond Buchanan in loving memory of his strengths as husband, father, and grandfather, as well 105


4.2 C

4.1 The4.2ARK container carries the B materials for the building but will then be adapted to create the structural frame of the building itself.

4.2 D

3.1

2.2

2.4 B 2.4

2.3

4.1 A

ARK CONTAINER UNFOLDING

ARK CONTAINER PLACED ATOP SPACE FRAME

A

4.2 C

3.3

2.4

4.2 B

4.4 The structure of the individual units allows for stackability and a certain malleability. The units can be rearranged 4.2 to suit the terrain or program.

Unmoved location of wall panels

Former location of wall panel

2.3

4.1 B

ARK CONTAINER UNFOLDING 4.2 B

4.4

Former location of roof floor panels

Re-location of corner wall panels

New location of wall panels

New location of

floor panels Vance Fok, Arctic roof Centre for Research and (on ground level) Knowledge (ARK 1), Borderlands studio, 2012, RE-LOCATE WALL PANELS (PLAN) RE-LOCATE FLOOR PANELS (PLAN) 4.2 Teron Scholar winner C

4.2 D

RE-LOCATE

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as in recognition of his contributions to the Ottawa community as a professional engineer, entrepreneur (co-founder of Lumonics Inc.), innovator, life-long learner, informal “educator�, and concerned Canadian citizen. Maxwell Taylor Scholarship This scholarship, endowed in 1998 by a bequest from the estate of the late Mabel Leona Taylor, is awarded annually to a student in his/her final year of the Master of Architecture program who incorporates building technologies into his/her thesis project. The recipient is chosen by the Director of the School of Architecture. The John Adjeleian Graduate Scholarship in Structural Design The John Adjeleian Graduate Scholarship in Structural Design is awarded annually to an outstanding graduate student pursuing research in structural design. Eligible students will be in the first year of their Master of Architecture thesis project. The Dean of Graduate Studies and Research will select the recipient upon the recommendation of the Director of the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism and the Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The award, which will be given in alternate years to students in the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, recognizes excellence in the art of structural design and celebrates the professional accomplishments and academic contributions of Dr. John Adjeleian. The award was endowed by Dr. John Adjeleian, Professor Emeritus of Engineering, Carleton University, in 2002. Cyril M. Leeder Prize in Urban Design The Cyril M. Leeder Prize is awarded annually to students making an outstanding contribution to Urban Design who are either in the third or fourth 107


Joshua Armstrong, Adam Johnston, Benôit-Simon Lagacé, and Jessica MacDonald, Babel Léger, First Prize, 2010 Canadian Centre for Architecture Inter-university Charrette

year of the Bachelor of Architecture program or in the first year of the Masters of Architecture program. John Ruddy Architecture Scholarship Awarded annually, on the recommendation of the Director of the School of Architecture, to one or more outstanding students proceeding from one year to another in the Architecture program. The scholarship was endowed by John E. Ruddy, B.Arch ’75, in 2004. The scholarship is a member of the Carty family of awards. 108


Z. Matthew Stankiewicz Bursary Awarded annually to a deserving student entering or is enrolled in the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University and requiring financial assistance. Donors: Friends, relatives and associates. The Power Corporation of Canada Awards, Canadian Centre for Architecture The Power Corporation Awards encourage students to take part in a collaborative project at the Canadian Centre for Architecture Study Centre in Montreal. All students currently enrolled in professional and post-professional Master of Architecture, Master of Landscape Architecture, Master of Environmental Design, or Master of Urban Design programs in Canada are eligible for this award, regardless of citizenship. Three recipients will be selected. The Award provides a stipend to cover the travel, housing, and living expenses of each recipient for a three-month summer residency. For more information, visit: http://www.cca.qc.ca/en/study-centre/power-corporation-of-canada-awards The Canadian Centre for Architecture Inter-university Charrette The Inter-university Charrette, inaugurated in 1994, brings together students and recent graduates from a range of design disciplines to solve a problem relating to the urban environment. Participants come from programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, graphic design, environmental design and design art at various universities. The Charrette takes place over three days, typically in February. For more information, visit: http://www.cca.qc.ca/en/ education-events/526-inter-university-charrette Canadian Architect Student Award of Excellence The Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism nominates up to four graduating Master of Architecture students as candidates to the Student Award 109


of Excellence given annually by Canadian Architect magazine. Nominees are selected based on demonstrated excellence in their respective M.Arch Thesis projects. Canada Council for the Arts Prix de Rome in Architecture for Emerging Practitioners The Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism nominates one exceptional graduating Master of Architecture student as candidate to the prestigious Prix de Rome in Architecture for Emerging Practitioners, awarded annually by the Canada Council for the Arts.

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Student Services


Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs 512 Tory Building 1 613 520 2525 carleton.ca/fgpa International Student Services Office 128 University Centre 1 613 520 6600 carleton.ca/awards Awards and Financial Aid 202 Robertson Hall 1 613 520 3600 carleton.ca/awards Co-op and Career Services 401 Tory Building 1 613 520 6611 carleton.ca/career Student Academic Success Centre 302 Tory Building 1 613 520 7850 carleton.ca/sasc Paul Menton Centre for Students with Disabilities 500 University Centre 613 520 6608 carleton.ca/pmc 113


The School, 1979

Student Affairs 430 Tory Building 1 613 520 2573 carleton.ca/studentaffairs Student Experience Office 430 Tory Building 1 613 520 7595 carleton.ca/awards Health and Counselling Services 2600 Carleton Technology and Training Centre 1 613 520 6674 carleton.ca/health Campus Safety 203 Robertson Hall 1 613 520 3612 114


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Faculty Greg Andonian, M.Arch (Yerevan Polytechnic), M.A.Sc., PhD (Waterloo), MRAIC, Professor Manuel Báez, B.Arch (Cooper Union), M.Arch (Cranbrook), Associate Professor Sheryl Boyle, B.Arch (Carleton), M.Arch (McGill), Associate Professor Yvan Cazabon, Dipl.A.T. (Algonquin), B.Arch (Carleton), M.Arch (McGill), MRAIC, Associate Professor Roger Connah, B.A. Arch Hons. (Bristol), Dip. Ed. (Cantab), Associate Professor Janine Debanné, B.Arch (Carleton), M.Arch (McGill), Associate Professor Mariana Esponda, B. Arch (UNAM México), PhD (UPC Barcelona), Assistant Professor Stephen Fai, B.Arch (Carleton), B.A., M.A., PhD (Ottawa), MRAIC, Associate Professor Lucie Fontein, B.Arch (Toronto), M.Arch (McGill), OAQ, Associate Professor Benjamin Gianni, B.A. (Pennsylvania), M.Arch (Yale), Associate Professor Federica Goffi, Dott. Arch. (Genoa), PhD (Virginia Tech), Associate Professor Paul Kariouk, B.Sc.Arch (Univ. Virginia), M.Arch (Columbia), Associate Professor Giancarlo Mangone, BDes Arch (Florida), M.Arch (Univ. Virginia), PhD Candidate (Delft), Assistant Professor Shelagh McCartney, B.Arch (Waterloo), M.Des.S. (Harvard), D.Des. (Harvard), Assistant Professor (on leave, 2013-2015) Inderbir Singh Riar, B.A. Hons. (McGill), M.Arch (Columbia), PhD (Columbia), Assistant Professor Johan Voordouw, B.Env.D. (Manitoba), M.Arch (Bartlett UCL), Assistant Professor 2012-2015 Instructors Halldóra Arnardóttir, B.A. (Essex), M.Sc., PhD (Bartlett UCL) Patrícia Barbas, Dip.Arch (FAUTL Lisbon) Tom Bessai, B.A. (U. Alberta), B.Arch (UBC), M.Arch (UCLA) Bud Branigan, BArchDes (Queensland), B.Arch (Queensland) Louis Brillant, B.Arch (Carleton), M.Arch (McGill) Morgan Carter, BEDS, M.Arch (Dalhousie), M.Arch II (Harvard) Alessandra Cianchetta, Dott. Arch. (La Sapienza, Rome), M.A. (UPC Barcelona) Maria Denegri, B.A. (UBC), B.Arch (UBC), M.Arch (UPC Barcelona) Jonathan Hale, B.Sc. Hons., B.Arch Hons. (Bath), M.Sc. (Penn), PhD (Nottingham) Paul Holmquist, B.A. (UCLA), M.Arch (Sci-Arc), M.Arch (McGill) Martii Kalliala, M.Arch (Helsinki University of Technology) Dongsei Kim, B.Arch Hons. (Victoria University of Wellington), MSAUD (Columbia), MDesS (Harvard) Andrew King, BEDS, M.Arch (TUNS) Christopher Knight, B.A. Hons. (Carleton), M.Arch (University of Toronto) Graham Larkin, B.A., M.A. (Queens), Graduate Diploma (Courtauld), PhD (Harvard) 119


Éric Le Coguiec, D.P.L.G. (ENSA Bretagne), PhD (UQAM) Jay Lim, B.Tech (Ryerson), M.Arch (Syracuse), MSAUD (Columbia) Diogo Seixas Lopes, Dip.Arch (FAUTL Lisbon), PhD (ETH Zurich) Joaquim Moreno, Dip.Arch (FAU Porto), M.Arch (UPC Barcelona), PhD (Princeton) Jim Mountain, B.A. Hons. (York) Alberto Pérez-Gómez, Dipl.Eng.Arch. (Nat.Pol.Inst.Mexico), M.A., Ph.D. (Essex) Jaime Salazar Rückauer, B.Arch (UPC Barcelona) Javier Sánchez Merina, B.Arch (Valencia), M.Sc. (Bartlett UCL), PhD (UPC Barcelona) Claudio Sgarbi, Dott. Arch. (IUAV), M.Sc. (Pennsylvania), PhD (Pennsylvania) Michael Tawa, B.Sc., B.Arch, PhD (New South Wales) Tuomas Toivonen, M.Arch, M.Sc. (Helsinki University of Technology) Nene Tsuboi, B.A. (Kyoto City University of Arts), M.A. (University of Art and Design, Helsinki) Jack Vandenberg, B.Eng., M.Eng. (Carleton) Paco Mejías Villatoro, M.Arch (Valencia), M.Sc. (European University, Madrid) Technical Staff Mike Getz, Information Technology Administrator Mark MacGuigan, Woodshop Administrator Rob Wood, Woodshop Technician Administrative Staff Tiffany Douglas, School Administrator Stacey Fox, Acting Undergraduate Administrator Ewa Mroz, Graduate Administrator Yvonne Sicard, Financial Accounts Administrator

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middle earth 3

Azrieli Pavilion, site of M.Arch studios, workshops, and exhibitions 125


Šazrieli school of architecture and urbanism, carleton university 2012-2014 graduate prospectus Design and Editing: Inderbir Singh Riar Set in Arial, Scala, and Zurich BT. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, Carleton University. The Graduate Prospectus is for guidance only. The Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism and Carleton University reserve the right to vary or to omit all of the facilities, tuition, activities, and programs of study described herein, or to amend the same for which students may have enrolled. Students shall have no claim against the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism or Carleton University regarding any alteration made to the programs, courses, and content herein. Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism Carleton University 202 Architecture Building 1125 Colonel By Drive Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1S 5B6 t. +1 613 520 2600 f. +1 613 520 2849 e. architecturegrad@carleton.ca www.carleton.ca/architecture http://issuu.com/azrielischoolofarchitecture

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Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism Carleton University 202 Architecture Building 1125 Colonel By Drive Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1S 5B6 t. +1 613 520 2600 f. +1 613 520 2849 e. architecturegrad@carleton.ca www.carleton.ca/architecture http://issuu.com/azrielischoolofarchitecture

Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism Graduate Prospectus 2014-2015  

The 2014-2015 Graduate Prospectus introduces graduate programs in the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University. H...

Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism Graduate Prospectus 2014-2015  

The 2014-2015 Graduate Prospectus introduces graduate programs in the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University. H...

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