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ABSOLUTELY AWESOME SOUTH AFRICA will intrigue you, make you laugh, astonish and astound you. Absolutely Awesome South Africa brings you more of the entertaining fun, facts and trivia that we all loved in Awesome South Africa. This engaging coffee table book has the same colourful and vibrant format with completely new content and design on every page. Absolutely Awesome South Africa captures the heart and the soul of this magnificent country. What others said about Awesome South Africa: ‘An extraordinary book, not what you would expect. It’s intriguing and reverent. It’s an absolute winner.’ - Jenny Crwys-Williams, Radio 702 ’It’s hysterical, it’s wild! It truly is lots and lots of fun.’ - Nancy Richards, SAFM ’Awesome South Africa is so filled with facts and pictures and gee-whizzery that one is left feeling decidedly and genuinely good about South Africa and about being a South African. I just wish I could afford to see that every South African and visitor gets a copy. Overall this is a remarkable book that will delight South Africans and gobsmack visitors.’ - James Clarke, The Star

y l e t u l o s b A


CONTENTS

ROYALTY 12 MADIBA 30 SLAVERY 48 what if 70 IS IT TRUE 86 SHIPWRECKS 112 WHO THEY WERE 134 GREAT JOURNEYS 150 ANGLO-BOER WAR 172 TROUBLE STIRRERS 196 GONDWANA LAND 204 THE WORLD AT WAR 218 THE GOOD, BAD AND UGLY 308 POPULATION CHANGERS 318 APARTHEID EXPOSED 320

IN THE PAST

RUGBY 22 SOCCER 40 CRICKET 62 FISHING 76 CYCLING 100 SPORTING TRIVIA 124 SPORT RECORDS 142

SPORT

MAPUNGUBWE 16 RICHTERSVELD 34 DRAKENSBURG 54 ISIMANGALISO 72 VERDEFORT DOME 88 CAPE FLORAL KINGDOM 116 CRADLE OF HUMANKIND 130 ROBBEN ISLAND 148

world HERITAGE sites


WINE 24 TRIVIA 42 BILTONG 60 THE BRAAI 82 MENU ITEMS 104 SA PRODUCTS 120 UBUNTU GIRL 138 COVER GIRLS 154 PLACE NAMES 162 WHAT KIDS SAY 190 MY SOUTH AFRICA 212 SOUTH AFRICAN TALK 302 INSPIRING THE WORLD 310 THE MAN I ENVY 316

GOLD 18 LISTS 36 TOP 10 58 MONEY 74 STATISTICS 92 SANDTON 136 DIAMONDS 152 INVENTIONS 170 INDUSTRIES 192 COMPARISONS 202 UNIVERSITIES 214 TRADITIONAL HEALING 300 BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS 306 DID YOU KNOW 314

DAILY LIFE

FACTS AND FIGURES

YOUTH DAY 14 HERITAGE DAY 32 FREEDOM DAY 50 WORKER’S DAY 68 HUMAN RIGHTS DAY 90 RECONCILLIATION DAY 114 WOMEN’S DAY 132

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

ABC 20 BLUNDERS 38 COMEDIANS 56 WILD ANIMALS 78 WHEN YOU IN SA 102 DRIVING IN AFRICA 110 SHOPPING SA STYLE 118 HARD DAY IN AFRICA 128 WHAT OTHERS THINK 160 AFRICA NOT FOR SISSIES 168 AFRICA - WHY I LIVE HERE 174 LOADSHEDDING 208

HAVE A LAUGH

SPACE 28 MEERCATS 46 POACHING 64 CONSERVATION 84 BARBERTON 108 CAMOUFLAGE 126 BARN SWALLOWS 146 NATURAL RECORDS 158 TABLE MOUNTAIN 176 NATURAL DISASTERS 198 BLYDE RIVER CANYON 206 WEATHER PHENOMENON 216 COLOURS OF THE RAINBOW 304 THE LION KING 312

NATURE

THE FLAG 26 RELIGION 44 LITERATURE 66 MUSIC LYRICS 80 THE ANTHEM 106 LANGUAGES 122 TOWNSHIPS 140 IMMIGRANTS 156 MUSIC GENRES 164 THE COAT OF ARMS 178 NATION THAT CARES 194 NATIONAL SYMBOLS 200 NGUNI TRIBES 210

CULTURE


Mandela Mr Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, referred to by many names, each with its own special meaning and story...

Nelson

- the name given to him on his first day at school by his teacher, Miss Mdingane.

Rolihlahla - his birth name, the colloquial Xhosa meaning meaning is “troublemaker”.

Mandela - his family surname. Madiba - This is his clan name and refers to his

ancestor. Madiba was the name of a Thembu chief who ruled in the Transkei in the 18th century.

Tata - An isiXhosa term of endearment meaning “father” as he was a father figure to many.

Number 466/64- the number assigned to him whilst in prison on Robben Island.

sy of Duncan

Hull

tes: ison Inma Island Pr RobbenAhm Mbeki, an Gov aba, Mhl ond Raym , rada ed Kath

Image courta

Walter Sisulu, geani. Denis Goldberg was Elias Motsoaledi, and Andrew Mlan because he was white. also convicted but sent to Pretoria

n The life of an inspiration and Ico 1918 1934

1937 1939 1940 1942 1942

Born at Mvezo in the Transkei on July 18 Undergoes initiation; Attends Clarkebury Boarding Institute in Engcobo Attends Healdtown College at Fort Beaufort Enrols at the University College of Fort Hare, in Alice Expelled from the University of Fort Hare Completes BA through the University of South Africa Informally attends African National Congress meetings

1943 1944 1948 1951 1952

Enrols for an LLB at Wits University Co-founds the ANC Youth League (ANCYL) Elected national secretary of the ANCYL Elected President of the ANCYL Defiance Campaign begins. Convicted with Sisulu and 18 others for violating the Suppression of Communism Act; Sentenced to nine months imprisonment, suspended for two years; elected first of ANC deputy presidents; opens South Africa’s first black law firm with Oliver Tambo


Mandela’s Family:

D id y o u know?

Evelyn Ntoko Mase: married 1944 – 1958 . They had two daught ers and two sons: Thembikile; Makaziw e; Makgatho; Makaziw e. Nomzamo Winnie M adikizela: married 19 58 - 1996. They had two daught ers: Zenani and Zindz iswa. Graca Machel: marr ied in 1998 on his 80 th birthday.

Nelson Mandela International Day It is more than a celebration of Madiba’s life and legacy. It is a global movement to honour his life’s work and act to change the world for the better. The day was launched in recognition of Nelson Mandela’s birthday on 18 July, 2009 via unanimous decision of the UN General Assembly. It was inspired by a call Nelson Mandela made a year earlier, for the next generation to take on the burden of leadership in addressing the world’s social injustices when he said that “it is in your hands now”.

1953 1956 1960 1961 1962

1963

1964

Devises the M-Plan for the ANC’s underground operations Arrested for treason with 155 others All are acquitted The ANC is banned, a State of Emergency imposed Goes underground; Umkhonto weSizwe is formed Leaves the country for military training; returns to report back to ANC president Chief Albert Luthuli; Arrested in KwaZulu-Natal and sentenced to five years for incitement and for leaving the country illegally Sent to Robben Island; returned with nine others to Pretoria for the Rivonia sabotage trial Makes his famous speech from the dock in which he says he is “prepared to die” for a democratic South Africa

rested Mandela was ar asions on several occ l four and stood tria times

Madiba Inauguration speech (1994)

?

? ?

Mande offer fro la declined an mP for cond W Botha in 198 5 itional re lease prison b ecause h from not prep e was a violence red to renounc e and viole nt prote as a mea s t, ns to brin g about change in South Africa

We understand it still that there is no easy road to freedom. We know it well that none of us acting alone can achieve success. We must therefore act together as a united people, for national reconciliation, for nation building, for the birth of a new world. Let there be justice for all. Let there be peace for all. Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all. Let them know that for each the body, the mind and the soul have been freed to fulfil themselves. Never, never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world. The sun shall never set on so glorious a human achievement. Let freedom reign. God bless Africa.

1982 1985 1986 1988 1989

1990 1993 1994 1999 2004 2008 2013

Transferred with others to Pollsmoor Prison Rejects president PW Botha’s offer to release him if he renounces violence Begins talks about talks between the National Party government and the ANC Hospitalised for tuberculosis then moved to Victor Verster Prison Meets PW Botha; then Botha’s successor FW de Klerk. Graduates with an LLB from Unisa President De Klerk unbans all political organisations; Released from prison Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with De Klerk Elected as president Steps down after one term as president Announces he is stepping down from public life Turns 90-years-old

Dies at the age of 95


n

pyright unknow

Š Mariana de klerk Photography

ok co Source Facebo


Eish! Hard day in Africa.

Š Bianca Preusker


y a w y m C B ...A is for

Aikona! - “no never” we cry.

is for

is for

gogos

is for

is for

is for

is for

kaalgat - if you dare to go bare,

moegoe - a fool in his prime,

jol

hadeda - our South African dove.

- a good party we know!

is for

is for

dinges - to explain “that thing”.

fundi - the one who knows more. is for

- the grannies we love,

izit - when saying “is that so”, is for

babbelaas - too much drink at the braai.

- food fit for a king.

eina - when it hurts really sore.

is for

is for

chow

is for

lekker - a tasty affair.

now now

- we’re on African time!


is for

is for

sies - when it’s really not nice,

ubuntu - compassionate and kind, is for

is for

is for

is for

quarter bunny - Durban’s favourite meal,

is for

is for

oke - that dude over there,

is for

is for

is for

pas op

rock up - so pitch when you feel.

tune - when we give you advice.

voetsek - for dogs not mankind.

walkie talkies - chicken feet and the beak,

Xhosa - who “click” when they speak.

yebo

- a definite yes,

is for

- you had better beware.

zebra - in spectacular dress.


th

27April

Freedom Day

ent instituted th vernm e Gr o g oup as separate e r a heid n A r ea i t e v r from s Act. to li pa a d e Under this law, w c e r h h i m o o r t f t h f r e t e a f c s i t d e s. a y e n t r 0 d a l i mits from othe 5 s we hite situ w 9 n e o r n a r t c i o e n l n 1 e s. This e d b la tional e cks we was In whit reas w in na t re not allowed e h t a e o n d v A f h r t i e c u a a o S o y – t o in 199 all ad n w hi r t as held in o 4 when the first u lts, ir d nr days. On thi r u an tion w o e f l s f p o e No s day d ctive of c n perio their race, could in 1 9 ow c ele ra many human d e e 9 n i v 7 r to crati e , h o right s the new o s. nt en llot constitution cam e a m m b ocu de heir is d t h first time wit T t s . d for the h th ca ffect e 19 o du ce r t e n i 94 e u o t S h e s A m o f a r a c i e c lectio t b a w ’ s firs in y dela n. Exile n c a t a M s returned from d r n d e e o c e f h n t m a e p o o t a a s o r r l c b t e h e r l m a e e t c N e i i d cally e D and op le nd lected president. the b y pe da commit to ensuring vo e r a a y d e e o g h t i s i T r n n i . n g b ing of and th a frica democracy in livin On th A u g o e qualit S y for all.

OCRACY M DE

HOPE


The truth is that we are not yet free; we have merely achieved the freedom to be free, the right not to be oppressed. We have not taken the final step of our journey, but the first step on a longer and even more difficult road. For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The true test of our devotion to freedom is just beginning. Nelson Mandela

UALIT Y EQ

TRUTH


! G N I N R WA

r o f t o n s SA i sissies!


Š Armand Grobler


our

A n theM

While Die Stem was being sung as the anthem of an apartheid government, Nkosi Sikele’ iAfrika gained its popularity as a struggle song. In 1994 Die Stem van Suid Afrika (The Call of South Africa) and Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika (God bless Africa) were combined and proclaimed as the official South African anthem.

NKOSI SIKELEL' IAFRIKAGOD BLESS AFRICA (English Translation)

Nkosi Sikele’ iAfrika is a hymn, a prayer that calls for God’s blessing on the land and its people. The first two stanzas were written and composed by Enoch Sontonga in 1897. Sontonga was a distinguished poet and school choirmaster. The amaXhosa poet, Samuel Mqhayi, wrote seven additional stanzas for the hymn and by 1925 it had become the official song of the African National Congress. Nokutula Dube, a musician, and her husband John Langalibalele Dube, worked tirelessly as fundraisers and promoters of African education. Part of their effort led to the popularisation of Nkosi Sikele’ iAfrika.

Lord, bless Africa; May her horn rise high up; Hear Thou our prayers And bless us.

Chorus Descend, O Spirit, Descend, O Holy Spirit. Bless our chiefs, May they remember their Creator. Fear Him and revere Him, That He may bless them. Bless the public men, Bless also the youth That they may carry the land with patience and that Thou mayst bless them. Bless the wives, And also all young women; Lift up all the young girls And bless them. Bless the ministers of all the churches of this land; Endue them with Thy Spirit And bless them. Bless agriculture and stock raising Banish all famine and diseases; Fill the land with good health And bless it. Bless our efforts of union and self-uplift, Of education and mutual understanding And bless them. Lord, bless Africa. Blot out all its wickedness And its transgressions and sins, And bless it.

DIE STEM THE CALL OF SOUTH AFRICA (English translation)

Die Stem van Suid Afrika, part of which is included in the current anthem, was the only official anthem of South Africa from 1957 to 1994. It is a poem written by C.J. Langenhoven in May 1918. The music was composed by the Reverend Marthinus Lourens de Villiers in 1921. A recitation of Die Stem by Afrikaans actress, Hermione Faure, made a great contribution to its acceptance.

Ringing out from our blue heavens, from our deep seas breaking round; Over everlasting mountains where the echoing crags resound; From our plains where creaking wagons cut their trails into the earth Calls the spirit of our Country, of the land that gave us birth. At thy call we shall not falter, firm and steadfast we shall stand, At thy will to live or perish, O South Africa, dear land. In our body and our spirit, in our inmost heart held fast; In the promise of our future and the glory of our past; In our will, our work, our striving, from the cradle to the grave There’s no land that shares our loving, and no bond that can enslave. Thou hast borne us and we know thee. May our deeds to all proclaim Our enduring love and service to thy honour and thy name. In the golden warmth of summer, in the chill of winter’s air, In the surging life of springtime, in the autumn of despair; When the wedding bells are chiming or when those we love depart, Thou dost know us for thy children and dost take us to thy heart. Loudly peals the answering chorus: We are thine, and we shall stand, Be it life or death, to answer to thy call, beloved land. In Thy power, Almighty, trusting, did our fathers build of old; Strengthen then, O Lord, their children to defend, to love, to hold That the heritage they gave us for our children yet may be: Bondsmen only to the Highest and before the whole world free. As our fathers trusted humbly, teach us, Lord, to trust Thee still : Guard our land and guide our people in Thy way to do Thy will.


then and now South Africa’s national anthem, known as Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika, was born out of conflict but today celebrates peace and unity in diversity. It expresses gratitude for the blessing of its people and unites South Africans of all professions and religions.

The Official National Anthem Nkosi sikelel' iAfrika Maluphakanyisw' uphondo lwayo, Yizwa imithandazo yethu, Nkosi sikelela, thina lusapho lwayo. Morena boloka setjhaba sa heso, O fedise dintwa le matshwenyeho, O se boloke, O se boloke setjhaba sa heso, Setjhaba sa South Afrika - South Afrika. Uit die blou van onse hemel, Uit die diepte van ons see, Oor ons ewige gebergtes, Waar die kranse antwoord gee, Sounds the call to come together, And united we shall stand, Let us live and strive for freedom, In South Africa our land.

English Translation Lord, bless Africa May her spirit rise high up Hear thou our prayers Lord bless us. Lord, bless Africa Banish wars and strife Lord, bless our nation Of South Africa. Ringing out from our blue heavens From our deep seas breaking round Over everlasting mountains Where the echoing crags resound. Sounds the call to come together, And united we shall stand, Let us live and strive for freedom, In South Africa our land.

DID YOU KNOW It is the only anthem in the world that combines two national anthems and five out of eleven official languages (isiXhosa, isiZulu, Sesotho, Afrikaans and English).


! g n o t l i B

e k a m o t w ho

Learning how to make biltong (the South African way) is an immensely gratifying process. Not only will you save money and win friends, you’ll also experience the unmistakable bubbling sensation of patriotism

: d e e n l l i You w

Step 1:

Meat Selection

2 kg lean silverside or sirloin steak

Remove excess fat (leave just enough for flavour)

Coarse salt and ground black pepper Coarse ground coriander Vinegar (preferably apple-cider vinegar)

Cut 20cm lengths of meat

Optional spices (paprika or cloves)

Slice into 10cm thick strips with the grain Remove any sinew or gristle

DO’S eat Always use fresh m ent and surfaces Sterilise all equipm ickest part on top Hang the meat th keep flies away Keep covered to Avoid humidity

Don’t Leave on too muc h fat fatty meats are m ore likely to spoil during the dr ying process Don’t let the mea t touch the sides of the bo x Don’t let the piec es of meat touch each other

EXPERIMENT AND BE ADVENTUROUS


The History of Biltong The word BILTONG is derived from the words “BIL” (BUTTOCK) or meat and ‘TONG” or strip. So it is just a strip of meat.

Difference between ky Biltong and BeehfthJicer ker uc

Biltong meat is m

and the drying The vinegar, spices re give it more textu process of biltong , jerky. Unlike jerky and flavour than oked biltong is never sm

BILTONG as we know this delicacy today, is a rich inheritance from pioneering South African forefathers who sun dried meat during their trek across the African Subcontinent The indigenous Khoikhoi, preserved meat by slicing it, curing it with salt, and hanging it up to dry. After European settlers arrived in the early 17th century, they improved the curing process by using vinegar, saltpetre and spices including pepper, coriander and cloves. The abundance of wild game provided the voortrekkers with needed stock supplies of meat for their migration from the Cape Colony.

Step 2:

Step 3:

Meat Preparation

Drying

Sprinkle with salt and leave to stand

Hang biltong in your biltong maker

Brush meat with vinegar. Hold meat up to drain off excess vinegar Sprinkle with ground pepper and ground coriander

How to make a Biltong Box

Use a seale d box (woo cardboard d or even can even b holes in the e used) wit h sides. Add a 60w lightb on the insid ulb e towards th e bottom a insert dowe nd l sticks in th e top from which to hang the meat.

If you don’t have a biltong maker then an isolated dry and warm environment with adequate ventilation will suffice

Leave for anything from 24 hours to 10 days

b ox h o o ks spiced meat fa n

li g h t b u lb

... and wa -la !

Step 4:

Eat and

enjoy!


Flower Safari when the West Coast explodes like fireworks into fields of colour

Unesco’s World Heritage Committee declared the 553 000-hectare Cape Floral Region to be of “outstanding universal significance to humanity”, describing it as “one of the richest areas for plants in the world”.


The Cape Floral Region contains more plant species per square metre than anywhere else on our planet.

Cape Floral Region, Western Cape

Did you know

10% of the world’s flowering species are found in South Africa. South Africa has the third highest level of biodiversity in the world. The Cape Floral kingdom is one of the eight world heritage sites in South Africa. Is the smallest but richest of the six floral kingdoms in the world. These species include the unique Fynbos and Renosterveld vegetation. The Cape Floral Kingdom stretches from Cape Point to Grahamstown and up to the Olifants River. South Africa is the only country in the world with an entire plant kingdom inside our borders. It is one of the biodiversity hotspots in the world as almost 70% of all the plant species are endemic and only found within our borders. South Africa is home to the world’s smallest succulent plants (less than 9.9 mm) and the largest (the baobab tree, around 20 metres tall). Table Mountain National Park in the Western Cape has more plant species in its 22 000 hectares than the British Isles or New Zealand.


d e r e v o C t i t o g e ’v y e h T

4

ng the world. South African Women stunni Believe in women power! 2 1

Candice Swanepoel

This Mooi River model had the privilege of opening the first Victoria’s Secret retail store in Canada and in 2013 claimed the coveted cover model title of the Victoria’s Secret Swim Catalogue. She has received several accolades including being: placed 10th on the Forbes top-earning models list; listed in FHM’s annual “100 Sexiest Women in the World” poll; and voted number one on Mazim’s “Hot 100” list.

Rolene Strauss

Studying medicine at the University of the Free State is not the only thing that’s impressive about this brunette beauty with brains. She also holds the title, not only of Miss South Africa 2014, but Miss World 2014. She was the second South African woman to win the Miss World pageant and the first South African crowned Miss World in 40 years.

3

Bonang Matheba

Bonang is a presenter on Top Billing, a Radio DJ on Metro FM and a Television Host on Mzansi Magic. But that’s not all there is to Bonang Matheba. She’s: been a cover girl for magazines like FHM and Elle; won a number of prestigious awards; and launched a clothing range, a handbag range and lingerie range. On top of all this, she also finds time to be a Global Brand Ambassador for Revlon Cosmetics.

Charlize Theron

This South African beauty is now an award-winning actress in Hollywood. She is the first South African to win an Oscar for Best Actress. In 2005 she received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and in 2006 was listed as one of the highest-paid actresses in Hollywood. Theron has her own production company and also started The Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project (CTAOP). She is actively involved in women’s rights organisations and in 2008 was recognised as a United Nations Messenger of Peace.

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1

2

5

Phuti Malabie

“As a businesswoman my feminine side isn’t a weakness, it’s an absolute strength.” Phuti Malabie is the chief executive officer of the Shanduka Group. She was listed in the Wall Street Journal as one of the “Top 50 women in the world to watch in 2008” and was recognised by Forbes Woman Africa as “Businesswoman of the Year” in 2012.


6

Charlene Wittstock

Charlene first became famous for representing South Africa as an Olympic gold-medalist in swimming. Her participation and success at the Olympics has led to her being named a Global Ambassador for the Special Olympics. However, the former swimming champion is now best known as the Princess of Monaco. This has seen her becoming involved in numerous humanitarian organisations, becoming an associate of the Nelson Mandela Foundation and being named co-patron of the Giving Organisation Trust - a group of South African Charities.

7

Basetsana Kumalo

Some may remember her being crowned Miss South Africa in 1994 but nowadays you may know her as a television personality on Top Billing. Basetsana also started the accredited production company, Tswelopele Productions, and holds the title of President of the Businesswomen’s Association of South Africa. She: was voted 74th on the list of “100 Greatest South Africans� in 2004; was the face of Revlon Realistic Hair Care Range and a Revlon spokesperson; contributed to the book Woman at Work; and is the editor-at-large of the Top Billing Magazine.

8

Lira

This multi-platinum-selling and eight-times-South-African-music-award-winning vocalist has really made her mark in the South Africa music industry. She has also: performed at the 2010 FIFA World Cup Kick-off Concert alongside international artists; been a cover girl for over 30 magazines worldwide; claimed awards from grassroots organisations, outreach groups, and advocacy programmes; made her cinematic debut as the support lead role in The Italian Consul; and been an ambassador for several major brands.

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th er

24ptemb

Se

Heritage Day

Heritage Day found its origins in being known as Shaka Day – a day when the Zulu people of KwaZulu Natal would commemorate the death of the Zulu King, Shaka. In 1994, when parliament rejected Shaka Day as a public holiday, the Inkatha Freedom Party, who held a large Zulu membership, argued for it. Eventually a compromise was reached and today we celebrate it for completely different reasons. Heritage Day is now a public holiday that finds its foundation in the identity of South Africans. It’s a day when South Africans can take a moment to recognise their diversity while appreciating the unity that can still exist. This day is about all racial groups and genders. It highlights and commemorates the histories of everyone in the country and celebrates the contributions from various men and women toward the heritage and culture of the nation. On this day, it’s a great idea to visit heritage sites and celebrate the diversity of South African culture

Definition of Heritage: the features belonging to the culture of a particular soc iety, such as traditions, languages, or buildings, that were created in the past and still hav e historical importance.


I am an African. On 8 May 1996 Thabo Mbeki gave a moving and eloquent speech in Parliament on the Constitution Bill, Utas volori dolorio molupti asit velicit iorrum erum litiunt, conem aut hiciis eium dolenda ilitia voluptae. I owe by being to the hills and the valleys, the mountains and the glades, the rivers, the deserts, the trees, the flowers, the seas and the ever-changing seasons that define the face of our native land. My body has frozen in our frosts and in our latter day snows. It has thawed in the warmth of our sunshine and melted in the heat of the midday sun. The crack and the rumble of the summer thunders, lashed by startling lightening, have been a cause both of trembling and of hope. The fragrances of nature have been as pleasant to us as the sight of the wild blooms of the citizens of the veld. The dramatic shapes of the Drakensberg, the soil-coloured waters of the Lekoa, iGqili noThukela, and the sands of the Kgalagadi, have all been panels of the set on the natural stage on which we act out the foolish deeds of the theatre of our day. At times, and in fear, I have wondered whether I should concede equal citizenship of our country to the leopard and the lion, the elephant and the springbok, the hyena, the black mamba and the pestilential mosquito. A human presence among all these, a feature on the face of our native land thus defined, I know that none dare challenge me when I say - I am an African.

I owe my being to the Khoi and the San whose desolate souls haunt the great expanses of the beautiful Cape - they who fell victim to the most merciless genocide our native land has ever seen, they who were the first to lose their lives in the struggle to defend our freedom and dependence and they who, as a people, perished in the result. Today, as a country, we keep an audible silence about these ancestors of the generations that live, fearful to admit the horror of a former deed, seeking to obliterate from our memories a cruel occurrence which, in its remembering, should teach us not and never to be inhuman again. I am formed of the migrants who left Europe to find a new home on our native land. Whatever their own actions, they remain still, part of me. In my veins courses the blood of the Malay slaves who came from the East. Their proud dignity informs my bearing, their culture a part of my essence. The stripes they bore on their bodies from the lash of the slave master are a reminder embossed on my consciousness of what should not be done. I am the grandchild of the warrior men and women that Hintsa and Sekhukhune led, the patriots that Cetshwayo and Mphephu took to battle, the soldiers Moshoeshoe and Ngungunyane taught never to dishonour the cause of freedom. Being part of all these people, and in the knowledge that none dare contest that assertion, I shall claim that - I am an African.

be an African to d o o g ls e fe it ay Tod


t s e g ig t ever b e th ice hi f f o box H the SOUT ND BEHI AFRICAN ORY THE ST d e renowne

The

of Circle Lif e

The eps ” Sle ungle Lion itled “In the J a, from

n Lind song t iginal olomo opyright for r S o y e b h T s ec 1939 ng wa ver th ritten ned o inal so ,000 ig ig was w s r o o id the ll 100 nd wh Zulula thing. It is sa record to se me. A a o n n a o wide f Afric next t ted world e first d h t e umen v c ly b achie er do it g s r proba n w o n s g o St e . The d son Rolling copies n author an e d h e t s u in Africa ey had uation h Disn ed over the sit South f g o u o y h it su equ r, alt suit en r was the in reafte , a law e. The h tte in it a z a a f m g ma good . The g in ’s n g o s n ryone f the the so to eve lties o d a le y t o t r ly se the quent ction. subse satisfa

r showca has to offe a ic r f A t a wh ul plains to if t u a e b m fro fe. The li d il w ic t s ty the maje fe the reali r li o t s g in r story b lance of ou a b e t a c li e of the d interaction d n a e c n e exist ther. with eacho he story ed in t t c i p e ” as d sed. f Life e abu o b ony. e o l t c t r i d ha r m o “C lance ft, n g i a g b n s o r. in es nothe her, ciou e to a ; Th a pre t toget f i l g i new son h is alk ives t a e a r t us t w g s t i u on s m nj die ha time ings hing t h e et gt e’s or m t on livin f som h i at ha all uc Mufasa: Everything you see exists m nd t hat y th o t h together in a delicate balance. As king, si s tal a ” is sop k or life ilo you need to understand that balance and m of t ph le gh respect all the creatures, from the crawling ant to ou the leaping antelope.

Elt o hig n Jo h h Th ligh n’s m ei t Th mp s tha emo is s or on tan t no rabl g p ce on e t r o re e se f th is ac im nt e st “ he circ th

orake is th “Lebo M” M music. Born Lebohang of the film’s ch u m ine to d in h be ol at age n composer he left scho in Lesotho a US , 4 6 9 1 in le in Soweto Whist in exi nged performer. nt and arra le ta is h become a d e is n ol of g o co ch r re ngton S ambassado e Duke Elli h is th ic d h n w e e tt a ic iconic vo for him to is H . n to n g ashin nt, “Na ts Music in W scene’s cha g in n e p o e nonymous heard in th s become sy a h a” m ya Ingon on King. with The Li

Disney’s Lion Kingbest of ses the

Simba: But, Dad, don’t we eat the antelope? Mufasa: Yes, Simba, but let me explain. When we die, our bodies become the grass, and the antelope eat the grass. And so we are all connected in the great Circle of Life.

the

Lion


lessons fr om the

WORLDW ID SUCCESS E

lion king

Septemb e the top-e r 2014 saw The L ion King a become worldwid rning title in box -office h e gross o istory wit f $6.2 bil Lloyd We ha lion d bb record is er’s The Phantom isplacing Andrew for both o f the Op stage pro cumulati ductions era. This ve world and film w ide box o Lion King s, ffice plac way ahe es The ad of his grossing to film, Ava tar, as we ry’s topand the ll as Titan individu ic a Harry Po l Star Wars or tter titles .

Hakuna Matata This is one of the most memorable lessons to take away from the movie. “Hakuna Matata” is Swahili for “there are no worries” and in short, teaches us not to sweat the small stuff. We only live once and need to make the most of every day!

learn from the Past Just as Simba discovers that he is unable to escape the effects of his father’s death, we learn that the past will always be a part of us and makes us who we are. Although we cannot run from the past, we can learn from it and allow it to help us move forward.

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we can accomplish great things All we need is the realization that anything is possible. Although Simba doubted himself, with the help of Samba and Rafiki he was able to defeat his uncle Scar, rise to greatness and achieve his true potential.

. day rs a 000. ou 21 -4. 0h ut d 2 abo is 3 bs roun s at cu d a on t for stan . f li s ay r o s re now e on and itt i l d, 75 19

d ca h igh fro as lo is 81 km t is be m 8 st u ki / p to t ho ver ween lome 80 - 90 t s 15 % hort 0 a ers ( of d n i the d 5.0 st lio ance 227 mile np kg s) s op  aw ula In t  tio he A l n sin wil ce

Unlikely acquaintances make the greatest friends Timone and Pumba are an unlikely friendship - physically they could not be more different, but this meerkat and warthog become the best of friends. Proving that it is what is on the inside that counts and that the greatest friendships come in the most unexpected forms.

Treat others as you wish to be treated No matter what a person’s position or accomplishments are, everybody is significant and adds value to the world in unique ways. Mufasa explains that even though the lion is “king of the jungle” and on top of the food chain, every animal must be respected for their own dignity and contribution.


FROM THE DUTCH

y e n Mo

TO THE BRITISH QUEEN

TO VAN RIEBEEK

TO MANDELA

The Rand comes from Witwatersand (translated “White Waters Ridge”) the ridge upon which Johannesburg is built and where most of South Africa's gold deposits were found. When the rand debuted in 1961, it traded at R2 to the pound and 72 cents to the dollar.

1782

Dutch Governor introduces hand written paper money in rixdollar and stiver currency

1877

First imperial bank, the Standard Bank of British South Africa Ltd., opened its doors

1793

First state bank is opened

1961

1803

Printed notes with a Government fiscal hand stamp are introduced

Currency changes from pound sterling to rands with Jan van Riebeeck on the banknotes

1837

First private bank in South Africa opens

1966

First 5 rand note is introduced

1882

Over 30 private banks each issue their own paper money

1978

A new series of bank notes are introduced, still with Jan van Riebeeck’s image

The Big The term “Big Five” was coined by big-game hunters and refers to the five most difficult animals in Africa to hunt on foot. The Big Five are included on the bank notes.

RHINO There are two species of rhino in South Africa, the Black and the White rhino. Rhinos are actually neither black nor white in color, they are all grey. The white rhino’s name derives from the Dutch “weit,” meaning wide, a reference to its wide, square muzzle adapted for grazing.

AFRICAN ELEPHANT The largest mammal in the world weighs in at 12,000 lb’s and can be over 14 feet tall and 30 feet wide. They drink 30-50 gallons of water and consume up to 375 lbs of vegetation every day. Their rumbles can be picked up 6 miles away.


Mystery Face The face that appeared on South African bank notes for many decades is Van Riebeeck, the man credited with discovering the Cape in 1652. Historians say there are no verified images of the first settler and the South African Reserve Bank is investigating the recent debate which suggests that this is not in actual fact the face of Van Riebeek. RIXDOLLAR AND STIVER

POUNDS AND SHILLINGS

1984

The R20 and R50 banknotes are introduced for the first time

2003

The R5 coin is changed to a bi-metal coin to prevent fraud

1990

The R1 coin replaces the R1 banknote Notes with images of the Big Five and the country’s top industries are released

2005

Notes are changed to include all eleven official languages of South Africa

1992

Coins replace the R2 and R5 banknotes

2010

The R200 banknotes are withdrawn when counterfeit notes are found in circulation

1994

The R100 and R200 banknotes are introduced for the first time

2012

Banknotes bearing Nelson Mandela's image are released

AFRICAN LION The king of the sub-Saharan savannah is an excellent hunter although they will happily scavenge given the chance. Man, as well as a reduction in habitat and prey, have resulted in their numbers declining by 30% in the past two decades and being placed on the IUCN threatened species list

CAPE BUFFALO These large animals stand 4-6 feet tall and males weigh around 700 kg’s Even lions don’t dare take a chunk out of this beast unless they have friends helping them. When left alone they are quite placid but they are said to have killed more big game hunters than any other animal in Africa and are one of Africa’s most dangerous animals.

RANDS AND CENTS

AFRICAN LEOPARD These shy and modest cats are nocturnal and can climb and swim and run at speeds of over 35 mph. A leopards’ only predator is man and is on the IUCN’s “near threatened” list by reducing the leopards’ habitat, depleting its prey and hunting it.


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