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SEPTEMBER 11 The Philanthropic Response

Contributors RICK SCHOFF, EDITOR SARAH COLLINS ELIZABETH CUCCARO MIREK DROZDZOWSKI KATHYE GIESLER CHRIS HURT

CHRISTINE INNAMORATO CHERYL LOE REBECCA MACLEAN LESLIE MARINO MITCH NAUFFTS LOREN RENZ

THE FOUNDATION CENTER


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The Foundation Center Mission The Foundation Center’s mission is to strengthen the nonprofit sector by advancing knowledge about U.S. philanthropy. To achieve our mission, we: • Collect, organize, and communicate information on U.S. philanthropy; • Conduct and facilitate research on trends in the field; • Provide education and training on the grantseeking process; • Ensure public access to information and services through our Web site, print and electronic publications, five library/learning centers, and a national network of Cooperating Collections. Founded in 1956, the Center is the nation’s leading authority on philanthropy and is dedicated to serving grantseekers, grantmakers, researchers, policymakers, the media, and the general public.

The Foundation Center has documented private philanthropy’s response to the September 11 terrorist attacks. Using our experience in collecting and analyzing giving data, we constructed a comprehensive picture of giving by foundations and corporations in the aftermath of 9/11, as well as tracked contributions by intermediaries and direct-service providers. We presented news and in-depth interviews concerning the philanthropic response to 9/11 in the Foundation Center’s online journal, Philanthropy News Digest. All of these have been reproduced in September 11: Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy, vols. I and II. To learn more, please visit our Web site at www.fdncenter.org. We are grateful to the following for their support of our Philanthropy’s Response to 9/11 Project: the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Annie E. Casey Foundation, ChevronTexaco, Citigroup Foundation, Ford Foundation, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Lumina Foundation for Education, Morgan Stanley, Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, New York Community Trust, and Rockefeller Brothers Fund. The ideas expressed in September 11 are those of the authors alone and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the funding organizations.

Design by Apicella Design. Copyright © 2004 by The Foundation Center. All rights reserved. Library of Congress Control Number: 2004116950 ISBN: 1-59542-045-2


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Contents

PREFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vii INTRODUCTION:THE REAL LESSONS OF SEPTEMBER 11 FOR AMERICAN CHARITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lester Salamon

THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE TO SEPTEMBER 11: LESSONS FROM RELIEF AND RECOVERY IN NEW YORK CITY . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Tom Seessel

PERSPECTIVES FROM THE FIELD OF PHILANTHROPY . . . . . . . . .69 A list of the 33 interviews that were published in September 11: Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy, vols. I and II

SEPTEMBER 11: A TIMELINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71

GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11: FINAL UPDATE ON THE FOUNDATION AND CORPORATE RESPONSE . . . . . . . .85 PHILANTHROPY AND SEPTEMBER 11: A BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . . . . . . .105

SEPTEMBER 11: GUIDE TO RELIEF AND RECOVERY GRANTS FOUNDATIONS AND CORPORATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 LIST OF FUNDERS BY TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135 INDEX OF GRANT RECIPIENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231 INDEX OF SUBJECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243

BY


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The Foundation Center’s multi-year project Philanthropy’s Response to 9/11: Creating the Record and Telling the Story brings into focus the role private philanthropy played in relief, recovery, and rebuilding in the aftermath of September 11, 2001.While we as a people and as individuals continue to live with the consequences of September 11, publication of this compendium volume brings the Foundation Center’s specific effort to a close. It has been a long, often painful passage from September 11, 2001, to this point more than three years later. The tragedies for many and the stresses on everyone have been detailed elsewhere, but impressions created by media ephemera cannot serve as a comprehensive record. For that, the facts about private philanthropy’s relief effort needed to be compiled and recorded. It has been amply documented, by the Foundation Center and others, that private philanthropy played a critical role in filling a variety of needs created by the events of September 11, 2001. In the immediate aftermath of the attacks, private funds were quickly made available by foundations, corporations, and

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individuals and distributed to a wide range of community organizations that understood how to best reach and serve various affected populations.This was accomplished even as it was becoming clear that the experience and planning of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provided little direction for the near-term response to the unprecedented circumstances. In addition, private philanthropy’s ability to take a longer view of social problems helped identify the full range of needs to be met. In spite of this, and the effort made by many charities to safeguard sufficient funds for ongoing needs, the pressure to distribute funds rapidly, particularly to victims’ families, was intense. Having been stung by the criticism that relief funds had not been distributed quickly enough, these same charities would regard the September 9, 2004, New York Times story entitled “With Funds Winding Down, Questions Remain About Longer-Term Needs” with considerable irony. The commentary by Lester Salamon that introduces this volume presents perhaps the longest view. Salamon suggests that alleviating the social conditions that give rise to murderous terrorism is one of the proper — and historical — roles of philanthropies such as the Ford and Rockefeller foundations. He goes on to describe the growth of international civil society that is being advanced by the development of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) around the world, and warns that post-9/11 security concerns and policies may have a dampening effect on these activities. We also present in this volume an edited compilation of Tom Seessel’s reports prepared for the Ford Foundation. Seessel presents a thorough account of 9/11 relief and recovery activities — not only the important work of private philanthropy, but also the complex array of government programs through which federal aid was and continues to be distributed. A key point about FEMA’s difficulty with individual-assistance programs is made as Seessel quotes one agency official: “FEMA’s big role is to help governments, not people, recover.” We have also included a timeline of the events of September 11 and their aftermath outlining the responses of philanthropy, government, and the media to the unfolding drama. This provides context for the other commentaries and reports in this volume and conveys the rush of events and the emotional environment within which 9/11 recovery took place, a major factor determining its course. To create the record of the 9/11 philanthropic response from September 2001 onward, the Foundation Center tracked the flow of contributions made by institutional funders and the distribution of gifts from all private sources by relief funds. Through a series of research reports we analyzed 9/11 giving patterns and placed 9/11 funding in the context of U.S. philanthropy. We issued a comprehensive report on the activities of the relief funds, 9/11 Relief and Regranting Funds: A Summary on Funds Raised and Assistance Provided, in 2003. Giving in the Aftermath of September 11: Final Update on the Foundation and Corporate Response, included here, is the final research report on 9/11 giving by institutional donors, based on data compiled through September 2004.

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The Foundation Center told the story of 9/11 by publishing interviews, articles, and commentary by leaders in the field of philanthropy. These originally appeared in our online journal, Philanthropy News Digest (PND). That work resulted in the publication of two volumes of September 11: Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy, one issued in September 2002 and the second in September 2003. We include here a complete list of these enlightening interviews with people involved in 9/11 relief and recovery. Those two publications were designed to accompany this volume. To assist those seeking additional resources about 9/11 relief and recovery, we have included a bibliography of 9/11 resources available in Foundation Center library collections, as well as a comprehensive directory of relief and recovery grants made by foundations and corporations through September 2004. We are grateful to the following foundations for making this project possible: California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Annie E. Casey Foundation, ChevronTexaco, Citigroup Foundation, Ford Foundation, John S. & James L. Knight Foundation, Lumina Foundation for Education, Morgan Stanley, Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, New York Community Trust, and Rockefeller Brothers Fund. The ideas expressed in this work are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of the funding organizations.

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Introduction The Real Lessons of September 11 for American Charities

Much has been made of the response of American charity to the events of September 11, and for good reason.The misguided terrorists who crashed civilian airliners into unarmed buildings on that fine September morning did not, it turns out, assault a nation lacking the capacity to respond. But that capacity extended well beyond the conventional instrumentalities of federal, state, and local government that have attracted so much attention in the press. In small towns and large cities, from Bangor to Burbank and Sarasota to Seattle, Americans rushed forward to help. In part, the responses were spontaneous and unstructured. But in even larger part, they were orchestrated and guided through the largely invisible social infrastructure that comprises the nation’s private, nonprofit sector. Like the arteries of a living organism, nonprofit organizations carry a life-force that has long been a celebrated part of the American character: a commitment to individual initiative in the LESTER M. SALAMON DIRECTOR CENTER FOR CIVIL SOCIETY STUDIES JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY AUTHOR GLOBAL CIVIL SOCIETY (KUMARIAN PRESS, 2004) THE RESILIENT SECTOR (BROOKINGS INSTITUTION PRESS, 2003)

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public good. What 9/11 demonstrated convincingly, among other things, is that this commitment is still very much alive and well. With relatively little prompting, Americans responded to the events of 9/11 with an outpouring of charitable support. At last count, voluntary contributions to 9/11 relief and recovery totaled a whopping $2.8 billion — $1.1 billion of it from institutional donors like corporations and foundations and the balance from private individuals.1

. . . it is time for American charities to consider the deeper implications that September 11 holds for America’s nonprofit organizations and the philanthropic institutions that help support them. . . .

In the early aftermath of 9/11, commentary within the nonprofit world understandably alternated between celebrating this charitable response and worrying about its potential negative impact on the revenues of other charitable institutions. Now that some time has passed, however, it is time for American charities to consider the deeper implications that September 11 holds for America’s nonprofit organizations and the philanthropic institutions that help support them, for those implications are enormous. Three such implications in particular seem especially important to recognize, and act on.

THE PERILS OF GO-IT-ALONE PHILANTHROPY In the first place, the 9/11 experience holds important lessons for the operation of charitable organizations. In particular, it points out the perils of “go-it-alone philanthropy,” the view that philanthropy and the state should operate independently of each other, that philanthropy is a substitute for state action, and that collaborations between charity and government are fraught with peril for charitable institutions. This view gained considerable currency in the early celebrations of charity’s response to 9/11. This response demonstrated the value that a robust charitable sector can add to a society’s handling of social crises, even one as devastating as 9/11. Charitable resources began flowing quickly, in many cases more quickly than government’s. Charities were also more flexible, providing aid to far more than the direct victims of 9/11 and dispensing with many of the need-based restrictions that tied government support in knots for months.The charitable response also carried psychological advantages, signaling the nation’s collective sense of grief and transmitting this to the direct victims of the disaster in a way that must have brought emotional as well as financial comfort. No one can claim, therefore, that the response of American charity was in any sense superfluous to the 9/11 recovery. Yet neither can we claim that it was adequate to the task. To the contrary, what began as an inspiring demonstration of the capacity of old-fashioned American voluntarism to cope with a major social cataclysm quickly became a demonstration of its inherent limitations as well. One of these limitations is essentially structural in character. The very pluralism and diversity that gave the charitable response its flexibility and innovativeness also significantly limited its coherence and coordination. Despite some notable collaborative ventures, such as the September 11th Fund formed within hours of the tragedy by the New York Community Trust and the United Way of New York City and the United

1

2

Loren Renz and Leslie Marino, Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11: 2003 Update on the Foundation and Corporate Response. (New York:The Foundation Center, December 2003), p. 2.


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Services Group formed some months later, the charitable response was splintered and diffuse. At least 369 separate organizations entered the 9/11 relief field.2 While the preponderance of these were new funds created by existing organizations as opposed to wholly new organizations, the sheer number made the task of coordination difficult, especially given the long-standing nonprofit penchant for autonomy. Families in need therefore had to navigate a maze of organizations, each with its own eligibility criteria and specific forms of aid. Inevitably, delays and inequities occurred: many people fell through the slats, while others benefited from multiple sources of support. What is more, misunderstandings arose between donors and nonprofit groups over how contributions were to be used, and these misunderstandings tarnished the reputation of the philanthropic effort in ways that are still being felt. Beyond its structure, the charitable response to 9/11 also suffered from limits of scale. At the end of the day, American charity, for all its effort, was able to supply only 10 percent of the resources ultimately made available to cope with the 9/11 disaster. The remaining 90 percent — approximately $27 billion out of the $29.8 billion total — came from government.3 Charitable resources comprised a slightly larger share of the victim compensation aid, but even here it constituted only $800 million out of the $5.8 billion ultimately made available.4 Philanthropy did carve out some unique niches not addressed by government support, such as ensuring the continued viability of New York’s important nonprofit arts institutions as well as of hundreds of other nonprofit organizations in the disaster area. Still, the scale of the response was dwarfed by the enormity of the need.

Increasingly, the scale of our public problems calls out not for a government or a charitable response, but for a response that marries the advantages of both and engages the business sector as well.

In this, however, the response to 9/11 is emblematic of a broader challenge to American charities, and to their governmental partners as well. Increasingly, the scale of our public problems calls out not for a government or a charitable response, but for a response that marries the advantages of both and engages the business sector as well. Regrettably, however, despite extensive interaction between government and nonprofit groups, our systems for achieving such effective partnerships remain under-developed at best. This certainly was the case in the 9/11 response, which suffered from the start from inadequate coordination between public and private authorities, and among private ones themselves.5

2

Loren Renz, Elizabeth Cuccaro, and Leslie Marino, 9/11 Relief and Regranting Funds: A Summary Report on Funds Raised and Assistance Provided (New York:The Foundation Center, 2003), p. 7.

3

Jeff Jacoby, “Why the 9/11 Fund was a Mistake,” Boston Globe (September 26, 2004); U.S. General Accounting Office, September 11: Overview of Federal Disaster Assistance to the New York City Area (Washington, DC: General Accounting Office, October 31, 2003); U.S. General Accounting Office, September 11: Federal Assistance for New York Workers’ Compensation (Washington, DC: General Accounting Office, September 8, 2004).

4

Tom Seessel, “The Philanthropic Response to September 11: Lessons from Relief and Recovery in New York City” in this volume.

5

See, for example: C. Eugene Steuerle, “Preparing for the Next Emergency: Some Lessons for Charities from September 11,” Emerging Issues in Philanthropy (Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, n.d.).

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If one lesson of September 11 for America’s charities is the limitation of “go-it-alone philanthropy,” a second is the need to re-energize the social-justice mission of the charitable world.

Revealingly, the charitable community’s own comprehensive assessment of private institutional giving in response to 9/11 barely mentions this challenge of public-private collaboration in the 9/11 relief effort.6 Indeed, aside from a footnote reference to the Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) network organized by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, this assessment barely acknowledges that the public sector was involved in 9/11 relief.Yet such coordination is imperative. While neither sector can afford to wait for the other to move on important issues, neither can they make effective headway operating in splendid isolation. Building effective collaborations, and perfecting the habit, and the skills, of partnering are the keys to gaining real traction on the kinds of problems that now confront us, and this is one of the central lessons we should take away from 9/11.

CHARITY’S SOCIAL JUSTICE MISSION If one lesson of September 11 for America’s charities is the limitation of “go-it-alone philanthropy,” a second is the need to re-energize the social-justice mission of the charitable world. “Terror,” Martin Luther King once reminded us, “is the last expression of the voice unheard.” Terror is fueled, more than anything else, by humiliation, by a sense of powerlessness in the face of unacceptable conditions.7 The best way to respond to terrorism is thus to relieve the humiliation that lies at its core and to project hope to terrorism’s would-be recruits. This suggests that the war on terror is not just a military conflict, but at least equally a battle of ideas and ideals. In this battle of ideas, however, the ideal of freedom, which has recently been advanced by our government as its justification for military action in Iraq, may ultimately not suffice. Given the gross disparities in resources and life-chances that exist in much of the world, freedom can have a hollow ring for those on the bottom, suggesting more a license to exploit on the part of the powerful than real opportunity for the millions without. The commitment to freedom must therefore be joined with an equal commitment to social justice, to helping those left behind. This was the message that President Franklin Roosevelt conveyed in his “Second Bill of Rights” towards the end of World War II, as legal scholar Cass Sunsteen has recently reminded us.8 “Essential to peace,” Mr. Roosevelt observed, is not just the cessation of hostilities, but “a decent standard of living for all individual men and women and children in all nations.” A similar insight, it would seem, applies to our effort to secure the peace in a world threatened with terror. To date, however, the American response to terror has taken a different course. Instead of promoting social justice and responding to the voice unheard, our government has emphasized the hard power of military action over the “soft power” of American ideals. In

4

6

Renz, Cuccaro, and Marino (2003). This assessment does report that 56 percent of the charitable relief funds claimed to coordinate their relief activities with those of “other agencies,” but the particular challenges of coordinating with public authorities were not singled out.

7

Jessica Stern, “Beneath Bombast and Bombs, a Caldron of Humiliation,” Los Angeles Times (June 6, 2004), p. M1.

8

Cass Sunsteen, The Second Bill of Rights (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004).


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the process, it has surrendered the moral high ground that may ultimately be the best defense against terror. I saw a powerful demonstration of this in March of 2003, when I found myself in Morocco as American warplanes began their assault on Iraq.To my amazement, the hotel in which I was staying suddenly began to fill up with dozens of American young people on their way home. But these were not casual vacationers. Rather, they were America’s front-line soldiers in the battle of ideals: our Peace Corps volunteers, who were being pulled out of the Arab world as our troops went in. We thus replaced the idealism of American youth with the might of the American military as our face to the Arab world’s disadvantaged millions, reinforcing rather than relieving the sense of humiliation they must feel. And this was just one facet of a broader retreat from the promotion of social justice that has recently characterized American policy, as the September 11 Commission and other critics have recently observed.9 What has all of this to do with American charities? I believe a great deal. The nonprofit sector and philanthropy are America’s institutional embodiment of the ideal of social justice. To be sure, the sector has not always lived up to this ideal, nor does it have a monopoly on it. Yet, uniquely among our social institutions it can lay claim to a historic commitment to this ideal both in its rhetoric and its action. This is, after all, the sector that has nurtured the succession of social movements that have extended human rights and broadened the American commitment to social justice over two centuries, beginning with the anti-slavery movement in the nineteenth century through the women’s suffrage movement in the early twentieth century to the succession of civil rights, women’s rights, gay rights, environmental, consumer, pro-life, pro-choice, and conservative movements of recent years.

The nonprofit sector and philanthropy are America’s institutional embodiment of the ideal of social justice.

Regrettably, however, the social-justice voice of the charitable world has in some respects grown more faint in recent years.Thus, while charitable giving has grown substantially over the past 30 years, the share of that giving flowing to human services has actually declined, from 12 or 13 percent in the early 1970s to less than 9 percent in the 1990s, and less than 8 percent today.10 Internationally, the record is even more bleak. Official U.S. international aid as a share of gross domestic product has long lagged far behind that of other advanced countries while the share of private giving that goes for international relief and development as well as for all other international purposes, despite absolute growth, remains stubbornly below 2 percent of all giving. In fact, international aid organizations report a drying up of donations for overseas relief despite an escalation of international relief crises. In the wake of September 11 and in the face of a quite different governmental response, I believe American charities should make a concerted effort to renew charity’s social justice mission, both at home and abroad. Such a recommitment does not in any sense condone or justify the 9/11 attack. But it does acknowledge the very real grievances and sense of hopelessness that afflict millions in the Arab world today, and the special obligation of the 9

Robin Wright, “U.S. Struggles to Win Hearts, Minds in the Arab World,” The Washington Post (August 20, 2004), p. Al.

10

Giving USA (New York: AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy, 2003), p. 198.

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charitable sector, given its background and traditions, to respond to these unheard voices, and to raise the banner of social justice at least as high as the banner of military might. This, it seems to me, is one of the unique contributions that American philanthropy can make to the 9/11 response and therefore part of the special message that 9/11 holds for the charitable sector.

America’s success in eliminating Islamic terrorism may ultimately depend . . . on the persistence of our efforts to foster alternative vehicles through which would-be extremists can contribute to their societies.

Fortunately, some charitable institutions have moved in precisely this direction. One striking example is the Ford Foundation’s Social Justice Philanthropy Project, which is consciously seeking to promote charitable giving for social justice causes overseas. Another is the Gates Foundation’s commitment to assault the global AIDS crisis. But these examples need to be multiplied many times and a major effort launched to re-position American charitable organizations at the center of a global campaign to achieve the “decent standard of living for all individual men and women and children in all nations” that Franklin Roosevelt pledged 60 years ago.This would be a lasting legacy of 9/11 indeed.

PROMOTING CIVIL SOCIETY A final long-term message American charities could usefully take out of the September 11 tragedy is the special obligation they have to help promote the civil society sector in the Arab world. America’s success in eliminating Islamic terrorism may ultimately depend, after all, less on the precision of our military strikes than on the persistence of our efforts to foster alternative vehicles through which would-be Islamic extremists can contribute to their societies. And civil society organizations are one of the most promising of these alternatives. This, at any rate, is one of the major lessons of the recent history of Latin America and Central Europe, where such organizations have played vital roles in the battles for democracy and economic progress. While the social and cultural life of the Arab region may offer a less hospitable clime for the flowering of such organizations, the circumstances may not be all that different. After all, at the time of the last major cataclysm to strike the West — the Castro Revolution of 1960 — much of Latin America, too, was ruled by a narrow oligarchy propped up by a conservative religious elite. Although the initial reaction to this cataclysm, too, was military (the Bay of Pigs invasion), ultimately the West pursued a quite different, and more successful, course: the promotion of local development and the active encouragement of grass-roots nonprofit organizations. Thus, for example, the Latin American Catholic Church, freed by the Second Vatican Council from conservative control in the mid-1960s, began dispatching clerics into the Latin American hinterland to form Communidades Eclesasis de Base, or Church Base Communities, through which the rural poor could take some control of their lives. Over 100,000 such organizations are said to have been created in Brazil alone. The U.S. government contributed to this effort as well through the Peace Corps and a little-known agency called the Inter-American Foundation, which delivered critical capacity-building assistance to grass-roots non-governmental organizations and the networks that supported them. U.S. foundations like Ford, Rockefeller, and Kellogg also joined in this effort, providing additional critical support to the emerging Latin American civil society sector.

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Interestingly, many of the activists in the resulting non-governmental organizations came from social strata quite similar to those of the 9/11 terrorists. They were doctors, lawyers, engineers, and other educated professionals frustrated by the grinding poverty and inequality of their region and determined to make a contribution to the life-chances of their peoples. Thanks in part to the support they received, however, they were able to channel their passions not into building terrorist cells but into helping impoverished peasants and urban squatters create micro-enterprises and marketing cooperatives, build village water systems, and establish health clinics. In the process, they fostered democratic norms, trained a new generation of community leaders, created hope, and gave tangible meaning to abstract concepts like self-determination. NGOs played similar roles in the recent democratic breakthroughs in Central Europe and South Africa, channeling the energies of local activists into positive political and economic change, and nurturing habits of reciprocity and trust. Charter 77 in Czechoslovakia, the Hungarian social services cooperative LARAS, the Polish Environmental Circle, and Solidarnocz itself are just a few examples of this vibrant organizational scene. Indeed, the dramatic political events that led to the collapse of the Communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe in 1989 were preceded by two decades of change beneath the surface of Central European society, and voluntary organizations were very much at the center of them. Here, again, moreover, outside support was quite important, including support by philanthropic institutions such as the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. Whether similar possibilities exist in the Arab world is open to reasonable doubt. Church and state are far more fused in Islam than in the West, leaving far less space for organized private action. Beyond this, radical Islam has already filled much of the space that exists with its own organizations that blend social aid with religious indoctrination. Some of these, we have now learned, may even have functioned as conduits for charitable support of terrorism. Finally, the ethos of individual initiative so central to the NGO concept is far less prominent in Arab culture.

. . . the dramatic political events that led to the collapse of the Communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe in 1989 were preceded by two decades of change beneath the surface of Central European society, and voluntary organizations were very much at the center of them.

But these are more excuses than explanations. In truth, a vibrant associational revolution is under way throughout the Arab world today just as it was in Latin America and Central Europe two decades ago.11 Some 15,000 associations are operating in Egypt alone and the number recorded in Morocco is reportedly twice that. Pakistan now boasts a rich array of secular welfare organizations like the All Pakistan Women’s Association and the Hilal-eAhmer Society, religiously affiliated service agencies such as Al-Khidmat, and large foreign-aid-financed organizations like the Orangi Pilot Project and the Aga Khan Rural Support Corporation that offer important alternatives to radical religious movements and terror cells as routes to a better life for the rural poor. As in America, many of the Arab world’s nonprofit organizations have deep religious roots, but not all are controlled by fundamentalists. Islam has a potent tradition of charitable 11

See, for example, chapters on Egypt, Morocco, Lebanon, and Pakistan in Lester M. Salamon, Wojciech Sokolowski, and Associates. Global Civil Society: Dimensions of the Nonprofit Sector (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian Press, 2004).

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endeavor embodied in its concept of zakat, which creates a religious obligation to devote a portion of one’s income to the community; and the religious principle of tsadakah, or giving aid to those in need, which is mentioned no less than thirty times in the Quran.This provides a powerful religious grounding for the region’s nonprofit organizations.

As the carriers of the American civil society tradition, American charities should react to September 11 instead by redoubling their commitment to promoting civil society in the Arab world, and by encouraging the government to do likewise.

While U.S. charities and governmental authorities have hardly been blind to the emergence of a vibrant civil society sector in the Arab World,12 U.S. government support for the Arab region’s non-governmental organizations has been uneven and narrow, and U.S. foundation support, so crucial in Latin America and Central Europe, has been far less in evidence. Worse yet, the PATRIOT Act and subsequent regulations promulgated in the wake of 9/11, far from encouraging support to the civil society sector in the Arab world, have put a serious chill on it. These regulations authorize the government to freeze the assets of any U.S. charity that aids an organization found by the Executive Branch to be associated with terrorism. But the definition of what constitutes association with terrorism is quite vague and the burden of ensuring that supported organizations are not so associated is left to the charities.13 Under the circumstances, it is no wonder that charities in the Arab world are finding their external support dwindling, thus weakening Arab civil society at precisely the time when its presence is most urgently needed. As the carriers of the American civil society tradition, American charities should react to September 11 instead by redoubling their commitment to promoting civil society in the Arab world, and by encouraging the government to do likewise. This would apply to the Arab region the lesson that Alexis de Tocqueville taught us 170 years ago, and that the Inter-American Foundation and Vaclav Havel reiterated more recently: in the battle against terror and the despair that gives rise to it, it may be less in our command of military might than in our mastery of “the art of associating together” that our true competitive advantage may lie.

CONCLUSION The time for celebrating charity’s response to 9/11 or worrying about how this response is affecting the flow of charitable resources to other nonprofit organizations is well past for America’s charitable sector. Foundations and nonprofit groups must now turn their attention more fully to the deeper implications of 9/11 for America’s charities. This will require committing, or recommitting, themselves to building cross-sectoral partnerships, promoting social justice, and encouraging the growth of global civil society, especially in the Arab region.These hold the real meaning of September 11 for the nonprofit world and those it serves.

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The Ford Foundation, for example, has maintained an office in Egypt for years through which it has channeled important support to Arab NGOs, and the U.S. Agency for International Development has also delivered important aid to Egyptian NGOs.

13

Day, Berry, and Howard Foundation, Inc. Handbook on Counter-Terrorism Measures:What U.S. Nonprofits and Grantmakers Need to Know (June 30, 2004).


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The Philanthropic Response to September 11 Lessons from Relief and Recovery in New York City

The terrorist strikes of September 11, 2001, were the worst attacks on U.S. soil by a foreign enemy since the War of 1812. At the World Trade Center, the toll was 2,823 dead or missing. The attack on the Pentagon resulted in 184 people dead or missing, and 40 died in the airplane crash in Pennsylvania. Some 25 million square feet of downtown New York office space (about two and a half times the total amount of office space in Buffalo) was destroyed or severely damaged. About 700 downtown New York small businesses were destroyed and over 7,000 residents were evacuated.The New York City Partnership and Chamber of Commerce estimated that the city lost 125,000 jobs in the last three months of 2001 as a direct result of the attack. The nation was tragically unprepared for the nature and scope of the attacks. As a result, governmental, private, and philanthropic organizations were forced to create, in the midst of turmoil and grief, new procedures to respond to the disaster.

TOM SEESSEL THOMAS EDISON STATE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY

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Philanthropic organizations . . . responded with unaccustomed speed and agility.

Americans and people throughout the world responded generously to the worst terrorist attacks in U.S. history. Independent Sector, a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the work of nonprofit and philanthropic groups, in a survey taken in midOctober 2001, found that 58 percent of Americans had given money to a 9/11-related cause, and the Internal Revenue Service reported that 262 new tax-exempt charitable organizations had been created. There was such an outpouring of donations that the American Red Cross stopped soliciting for its 9/11 Liberty Fund on October 31, 2001, having raised $543 million, by far the largest amount ever contributed in the aftermath of one disaster. Despite cessation of fundraising, another approximately $424 million was contributed by June 2002. To respond to the widening tangle of interrelated problems, on the afternoon of September 11 two leading New York City philanthropic organizations, the New York Community Trust and the United Way of New York City, announced formation of a new joint venture, the September 11th Fund, and within less than two weeks donations totaling more than $115 million had been received. Within four months, the September 11th Fund received contributions totaling about $425 million from more than two million donors in all fifty states, three U.S. protectorates, and 150 countries. The response was so large that the fund announced on January 16 that it no longer wished to receive contributions, but by July 2002 another approximately $76 million had been donated. This report, commissioned by the Ford Foundation and conducted under the auspices of Thomas Edison State College of New Jersey, examines the philanthropic response to 9/11 and focuses on key aspects of the relief and recovery efforts in New York City. It draws on interviews with more than one hundred individuals conducted in 2002 and 2003, including the chief executives of major independent and corporate foundations, the largest relief charities and uniformed rescue workers’ funds, leading nonprofit service providers and intermediary organizations, government officials, and individuals and businesses affected by the disaster. The report goes further by attempting to place philanthropic programs in a larger context through a closer look at the scope, coverage, and difficulties of government programs in 9/11 relief and recovery in New York City. It seeks to increase public understanding of lessons learned in the overall government-philanthropic relief effort, highlight unresolved public policy issues arising from the 9/11 experience, and suggest an approach to enhancing our preparedness for future similar events. The September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center caused widespread suffering and disrupted life throughout the city and tri-state region. It occurred at a time of worsening economic conditions characterized by job cuts, city and state budget reductions, and decreases in philanthropic donations. Despite lack of a reliable roadmap, philanthropic organizations, including donors and service providers, responded with unaccustomed speed and agility to the urgent humanitarian needs in both the immediate vicinity of the attack and in the wider New York region. Providing for the short- and long-term financial needs of families of people who died or were seriously injured was a major part of the philanthropic response. This was facilitated by Congress’ extraordinary action opening the way for victim compensation payments by exempting charities from the long-standing requirement that recipients of charitable funds be financially needy.

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Private philanthropic responses were launched well before it was known what assistance would be available from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the lead federal disaster organization. Foundation and corporate grants financed a diversity of activities addressing every known consequence of the calamity, ranging from providing immediate cash assistance for families who lost their primary breadwinner or were displaced from their homes, to therapy for grief and post-traumatic stress; these activities also maintained continuity of critical nonprofit service provision and public broadcasting, and helped very small businesses and their low wage workforces. There was intense media scrutiny of philanthropic organizations, prompted by the record amount of donations.The focus of attention became a comparison between how much had been contributed and how much had been distributed, which depicted philanthropy as a frictionless conveyer belt that speedily moves money from donors to recipients. The reputation of charitable organizations was not helped by the decision of the American Red Cross to allocate a portion of the Liberty Fund for other than 9/11 purposes after its fundraising appeals had implied that all contributions would be used for 9/11 relief.

Foundation and corporate grants financed a diversity of activities addressing every known consequence of the calamity. . . .

Charts showing a gap between receipts and expenditures frequently failed to point out that a part of the difference between the two figures represented items such as scholarship funds, which are paid out over a period of more than twenty years. The focus on spending compared with receipts, without digging deeper into the challenges of allocating philanthropic money wisely and effectively, was evident in every type of media. On the philanthropic side, some donors, including the Lilly Endowment, which contributed $30 million, did not issue press releases on its support for 9/11 relief. Some agencies, such as the American Red Cross in the first few months, appeared to feel it was not necessary to answer questions about their work and antagonized reporters with what may have seemed to be evasiveness, flip-flops, or stonewalling. On the other hand, the lowkey Salvation Army got a break from the New York Times when a reporter learned that the Army’s antiquated computer system could generate only a fraction of the enormous volume of checks it was committed to issuing to cover basic needs such as food and rent and agreed to hold the story until the computers had been upgraded. Philanthropists are not accustomed to doing their work in the glare of the media spotlight, and many bristle at not being appreciated for their good works. The combination of media over-simplification and philanthropic thin skins produced an unhappy interaction. Only a few organizations, most notably the September 11th Fund, invested significant time and resources in trying to explain the dilemmas, excruciating choices, and nuances of philanthropic decision-making to the media, and those that didn’t follow this lead suffered for it. The story line implied that the philanthropic organizations were at best inefficient and slow moving, at worst venal and self-serving. By neglecting the public relations aspects of its work, much of philanthropy did little to counteract this image. Research and interviews for this report suggest a different version of reality, one that the following pages seek to convey.

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Philanthropic planning was complicated by the proliferation of new charities created to address 9/11 relief and recovery. . . .

Normally, foundations spend months studying problems before settling on a program strategy. In the wake of 9/11 they felt the need to respond quickly, so that victims and their families could know what help was available. Fundamental questions of philanthropic purpose, efficacy, fairness, accountability to donors, and efficiency needed to be addressed. Is the main purpose of philanthropy in the wake of such an unprecedented disaster to provide cash gifts in an effort to compensate people for the lost lives and income-earning potential of loved ones? Is money the most effective form of assistance? What are the criteria for who gets how much? Should survivor families be supported in their customary standard of living, or should all families receive equal amounts? What portion of donations should be earmarked to respond to problems that would only later become apparent, such as financial need after expiration of health insurance and unemployment benefits and treatment for post traumatic stress syndrome? How could charities prevent fraud in the distribution of funds and services without creating burdensome red tape and delays? Overlaying all these questions was uncertainty about what and how much would be provided by federal and state government, when, and for which groups of victims. Philanthropic planning was complicated by the proliferation of new charities created to address 9/11 relief and recovery, many of which had inexperienced leadership and vaguely defined plans. New victim relief funds, such as those established by firms that lost large numbers of employees in the Twin Towers, faced the problem of how to make their payments in compliance with long-standing federal law governing tax-exempt entities requiring that these payments be made to individuals only upon a determination of financial need. Many 9/11 victims did not qualify under this standard. To be able to accomplish their purpose of providing financial help to the surviving families, organizers of victim relief funds, including fire and police unions, persuaded Congress to pass the Victims of Terrorism Tax Relief Act of 2001, which included a special one-time exemption from this rule for payments to victims of terrorist and anthrax attacks occurring between September 11 and December 31. Congress added a new pool of resources by enacting an open-ended program of financial benefits, the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, which provided compensation to families of persons killed or physically injured as a result of the attacks and who agreed to waive their right to bring lawsuits against the airlines or any other public or private entity.1 Awards from the Fund would ultimately reach a total of about $5 billion, for approximately 3,200 eligible claimants, including nationals of sixty-one different countries. The $5 billion sum is about twice as much as the total philanthropic amount donated for all 9/11-related purposes.

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The fund was established by Title IV of the Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act of 2001, commonly referred to as the airlines bailout bill. In the view of some, creation of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund may have been motivated as much by a desire to protect the carriers from potentially ruinous lawsuits as it was by humanitarian concerns.


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Foundation information and networking organizations activated mechanisms through which grantmakers could learn what was being done and planned by others. The Foundation Center, the nation’s leading source of information about foundations, began collecting detailed information about the philanthropic response and posted the data on its Web site. The Foundation Center also maintained an updated online chronological log of key 9/11-related events and spotlighted the philanthropic response to 9/11 at its 45th anniversary meeting on November 12. The Carnegie Corporation of New York convened a meeting September 28 that was attended by leaders and other representatives of over fifty corporations, foundations, and government agencies to encourage the sharing of information on the philanthropic response. The New York Regional Association of Grantmakers, a nonprofit membership organization, hosted a meeting October 5 at the Ford Foundation for the exchange of information and published, in early 2002, the first comprehensive report on special relief funds established to respond to 9/11. Ford Foundation president Susan V. Berresford organized an informal group of her counterparts in about fifteen large independent foundations to keep each other informed of their plans and grant commitments. This process began with informal consultations and then an October 1 conference call, after which the foundation executives updated each other through regular e-mails consolidated and distributed through Thanksgiving by Berresford’s office.

The improvised responses that helped thousands of people also exposed significant flaws in our public-private approach to disaster relief.

Citigroup Foundation president Charles Raymond initiated a series of meetings with other groups raising funds for scholarship programs that led to formation of the September 11th Scholarship Alliance, a consortium of philanthropies that created a $100 million fund administered by the Citizens’ Scholarship Foundation of America. Informal affinity groups, such as a group of funders for children’s causes that met at the Hasbro Children’s Foundation September 25, also began conferring. Corporate foundations set up an e-mail communication network through the Conference Board, a worldwide nonprofit business organization. The Better Business Bureau Serving Metropolitan New York posted on its Web site information on charities that were offering 9/11 aid, and the New York State Attorney General and the Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York did the same. The improvised responses that helped thousands of people also exposed significant flaws in our public-private approach to disaster relief. Public and voluntary agencies moved quickly to establish one-stop disaster assistance centers with personnel from key agencies. However, they were slow to develop common intake forms and procedures as well as coordinated case management, which could have saved time and maximized assistance for grief-stricken and traumatized individuals. The experience of the 9/11 United Services Group, described later in this report, offers useful lessons in coordinating the efforts of different agencies and developing a unified case management system for victims.

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PRECEDENTS AND THE ROLE OF FEMA Not since the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 had a catastrophic event in this country produced such a widespread impact on the densely populated economic and social fabric of a city. There were inevitable comparisons with the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, which claimed 168 victims. However, as a FEMA official put it, “That was child’s play compared to the World Trade Center.”

. . . by narrowly interpreting the law, FEMA officials failed to take into account the widespread economic impacts . . .

There was a difference not only in the death toll, but also the relative ease with which Oklahoma City victims could be confirmed dead. And there was almost no economic ripple impact from the Murrah Building bombing.That building was in a low-density area, and the five nearby buildings that were destroyed all housed branch offices of large organizations that could readily find new locations for their employees. No uniformed officers died trying to rescue people in Oklahoma City. In Oklahoma City, it was relatively simple to gather the approximately 25 to 30 important public and private philanthropic agencies around one table for joint decision-making. In New York City — whose foreign-born population alone exceeds Oklahoma City’s total population by a factor of 5.7 to 1 — there are an estimated 10,000 to 20,000 nonprofit human service organizations that have carved out their own niches defined by services offered, geographic area, and ethnic client base. Many of these agencies have substantial contracts with city and state government to deliver a wide range of health and social welfare services to vulnerable groups and individuals. Nor was FEMA’s experience from other disasters very helpful. In numerous meetings and other communications with officials of philanthropic organizations in New York City, FEMA officials repeatedly said that the “historical role for private funds is in long-term recovery, as responsibility for recovery moves from government to the community.” But this was an over-simplification and implied that FEMA, the major source of federal government disaster aid, would provide immediate assistance to meet human needs. Yet FEMA programs such as mortgage and rental assistance soon became bogged down in confusion and delays. In addition, by narrowly interpreting the law, FEMA officials failed to take into account the widespread economic — as opposed to immediate physical — impacts of the attacks. Philanthropy was able to move quickly to meet the mounting needs. In the first six months after the attacks, FEMA distributed only about $81 million through its entire individual and family assistance programs in New York City, and, with rare exceptions, undocumented workers were not eligible.

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14

Total FEMA financial aid covering all purposes for the World Trade Center disaster in this sixmonth period was $923 million, and all except the $81 million for individual and family assistance was allocated for public infrastructure repairs, debris removal, and reimbursement of certain New York City and State expenses such as environmental remediation, overtime payments, liability insurance for contractors working on the clean-up, and lump-sum payments made to beneficiaries of New York City firefighters who died in responding to the attack.


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FEMA’s $81 million paid for temporary housing, mortgage and rental assistance, individual and family grants, disaster unemployment insurance, victim compensation, crisis counseling, and disaster food stamps.2 In May, FEMA made a $132 million grant to New York State’s Project Liberty for crisis counseling “to help people understand their current situation . . . [and] move forward with their lives.” Much greater amounts had been made available by FEMA for individual and family assistance in the wake of other recent calamities: $1.4 billion for the Northridge, California, earthquakes in 1994 and $1 billion for Hurricane George in Puerto Rico in 1998. Curtis Carleton, chief of FEMA’s community and family services branch, explained that the wide disparity was rooted in FEMA’s mission and capacities. “Most disasters,” he said in an interview, “are floods and don’t result in the loss of jobs. FEMA is geared to reimburse people for things like homes and automobiles that are swept away. The mortgage and rental assistance program is little used, because in a typical flood there are no businesses affected and therefore no income interruption.” In New York City, by contrast, the impacts were much more widespread and diverse, and a philanthropic response was needed to help meet these challenges.

“FEMA is geared to reimburse people for things like homes and automobiles that are swept away.”

After months of criticism and Congressional pressure, during which FEMA justified its low rate of expenditures in part by saying that private philanthropy had acted too generously and too quickly, on June 28, 2002, FEMA announced a liberalization of its mortgage and rental assistance program guidelines, to help lawful U.S. residents who suffered at least a 25 percent income loss as a result of the attack avoid eviction from their dwellings. Residents who lived or worked anywhere in Manhattan and suffered financially “may be eligible,” the carefully worded FEMA press release said. (Under FEMA guidelines up to that point, applicants for mortgage and rental assistance needed to meet the more stringent test of demonstrating that their income loss was the “direct result” of the attack.) The June 28 announcement also said that people whose residence or place of business was not located in Manhattan, but who had “economically dependent relationships with firms in Manhattan, and consequently suffered financially, may be eligible.” By July 17, FEMA reported that it had approved 5,147 applications out of 11,202 that were submitted, for a total of about $32 million in mortgage and rental assistance payments. In March, Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-NY) announced that the total FEMA commitment for the World Trade Center disaster would ultimately reach nearly $10 billion, most of which would be for similar purposes as the initial $923 million. The total federal commitment for New York City’s recovery is estimated ultimately to reach a total of $25 billion, with the non-FEMA $15 billion allocated principally for various lower Manhattan business and residential incentives and rebuilding mass transit, roads, and telecommunications and energy infrastructure. This sum dwarfs the estimated $2 billion to $2.5 billion total made available through all philanthropic resources for all locations that suffered 9/11 losses.

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VICTIM COMPENSATION FUNDS

Despite their unmatched largesse, all of the victim compensation funds drew bitter criticism. . . .

By far the largest category of both government and philanthropic aid for individuals and families was the unprecedented programs for victim compensation. These provided payments, without regard to financial need, to the families of the approximately 3,200 people who died or were severely injured. About $5 billion of a total $6.8 billion in federal humanitarian aid was for this purpose, through the Victim Compensation Fund. Beneficiaries were required to waive their right to sue the airlines, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the City of New York, or any other domestic entity. Charities gave upwards of $800 million to compensate many of the same 3,200 families, representing about 30 percent of all philanthropic distributions. To facilitate payment, Congress did away with the long-standing criterion of financial need for receipt of charitable donations. This created an impression that one of the purposes of philanthropy is to compensate for lost life, representing a departure from traditional expectations about the role of the sector. Despite their unmatched largesse, all of the victim compensation funds drew bitter criticism and many were sued by beneficiaries, who complained that the formulas were flawed in one respect or another, most often because of alleged under-payments. Although some beneficiaries argued that the awards were too low, others — such as victims of other terrorist attacks and low-wage workers — questioned why some payments were so high.

PUBLIC AND PRIVATE FUNDING FOR OTHER NEEDS Apart from the federal Victim Compensation Fund, government and philanthropy provided roughly equal amounts — approximately $1.8 billion each — for individual, family, community, and economic needs. However, the allocations for program areas differed markedly. About 60 percent of the government’s $1.8 billion was in the form of grants and low-interest loans for small businesses in Lower Manhattan and Chinatown, many of which employed large numbers of low-wage workers. Outside of victim compensation payments, the majority of philanthropy’s $1.8 billion went to human services programs and needs-based financial assistance. FEMA’s individual assistance programs have been criticized by the public, the media and Congressional representatives. FEMA’s eligibility requirements for its mortgage and rental assistance program were so restrictive that Congress enacted special legislation liberalizing the rules. Nevertheless, by extending the application deadlines several times, FEMA distributed about $87.7 million by December 26, 2002, about a month before the deadline; this was more than four times the amount it awarded in all previous disasters combined. FEMA’s individual and family grants program, administered by the New York State Department of Labor, became bogged down by its paper-based application process, prompting FEMA to dispatch a team of 150 employees to help unravel the problems. Moreover, a major segment of those in need, undocumented immigrants and most of those who arrived after August 1996, were not eligible for these and other government benefits, with the significant exception of the Victim Compensation Fund.

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To its credit, as of late December 2002, FEMA had awarded some $165 million to the state for its Project Liberty, a short-term, outreach-based crisis counseling program that operates through some sixty-eight public and private agencies at over one hundred locations.This grant amount is almost as large as the total awarded in all previous disasters combined. However, only about $65 million of this had actually been obligated as of the end of 2002, and limitations on longer term therapy prompted philanthropic sources to provide approximately $50 million to meet this need. The small business assistance programs funded with special Congressional appropriations and administered by Empire State Development, a quasi-independent state agency, were criticized for disbursing payments too slowly and for failing to cover losses adequately. Loans from another source, the U.S. Small Business Administration, require collateral, which presented difficulties for business owners who lost their business and had to secure a business loan with their home. Some observers have questioned the use of federal community development block grant funds, intended to aid low- to moderate-income neighborhoods and citizens, to induce large companies and affluent residential tenants to remain in or relocate to lower Manhattan.

The small business assistance programs . . . were criticized for disbursing payments too slowly and for failing to cover losses adequately.

MEETING HEALTH NEEDS In an example of unusual government flexibility to meet an emergency, New York City’s Human Resources Administration implemented a four-month Disaster Relief Medicaid Program with liberalized income limits, no asset test, and a greatly simplified application. This approach succeeded in enrolling about 350,000 people, about ten times as many as normally enroll in a comparable time period. The program received significant philanthropic support, from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the United Hospital Fund of New York, and the Kaiser Family Foundation. The Environmental Protection Agency released studies in late 2002 that were generally reassuring about air quality. However, in a special federally funded program, community and occupational clinicians screening on-site rescue workers found high incidences of respiratory problems and other lung-related complaints. In response to intense pressure from residents and elected officials, the EPA announced in May 2002 that it would, for the first time ever in a disaster, pay for indoor clean-up, testing, and environmental remediation for any resident south of Canal Street who requested it. EPA estimated there were 20,000 to 30,000 eligible residences. In another effort to respond to public concerns outside the boundaries of statutory disaster relief programs, the New York City and federal government cooperated on establishing a registry that will track the health status of some 100,000 to 200,000 people who lived or worked near the World Trade Center site between September 11, 2001, and June 30, 2002, in an attempt to measure short- and long-term health effects.

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LARGE INDEPENDENT FOUNDATIONS

The first three of Mellon’s grants from its fund were to intermediary “re-granting” organizations that in turn leveraged the Mellon dollars. . . .

The Foundation Center reported in February, 2002, that nineteen large independent (non-corporate related) foundations had each donated $1 million or more for 9/11 purposes, amounting to a total of about $166 million. This represented 78 percent of a total of about $212 million in donations by 215 independent foundations for which information was available. The $166 million donated by the nineteen large foundations amounted to about 3.7 percent of their aggregate annual giving in the most recent year. Two of the nineteen large foundation donors, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Lilly Endowment, contributed just under half of the $166 million, with Mellon making the largest pledge, $50 million, and Lilly giving $30 million. All of the ten large foundations interviewed for this report said that giving for 9/11 did not cause any diminution in their regular giving programs and commitments. The section below describes giving by the 13 private foundations that donated $3 million or more.

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Headquartered in New York, Mellon, which has a long-standing record of support for museums, research libraries, and the performing arts, established a $50 million fund to assist large and small New York City cultural and performing arts organizations that were affected in such ways as cancelled performances, reduced tourism, cancelled fundraising events, and, in some cases, physical damage. The Mellon Foundation also included assistance for a new group of organizations — parks and branch libraries — because, as T. Dennis Sullivan, special advisor to Mellon president William G. Bowen, explained in an interview, “These were places where people went for solace or renewal in the aftermath of the attack.” In arriving at the $50 million figure, Mellon took into account foundations’ obligations under federal law to pay out an amount equal to at least five percent of their assets annually. Mellon needed to increase its spending by approximately $18 million in 2001 to meet this federal requirement, and the staff and trustees saw the 9/11 response as an opportunity to fulfill this obligation; another $32 million was added to establish the fund. The $50 million expenditure represented about one quarter of Mellon’s usual annual giving level of $175–$200 million. The first three of Mellon’s approximately 119 grants from its fund were to intermediary “re-granting” organizations that in turn leveraged the Mellon dollars with other grants and, with the assistance of panels including outside reviewers, made awards to small resident theatres, dance companies, individual artists, and music groups. Mellon’s direct awards to larger institutions were announced in three groups: January 30, March 12, and May 21, 2002. In a departure from traditional philanthropic and government grantmaking for the Arts, Mellon-funded awards were based not on artistic merit, but rather on a dollars

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and cents accounting of actual losses. The program officer overseeing the fund, Catherine Wichterman, believes that the Mellon grants made up for about half of the documented aggregate losses of the organizations that applied for assistance.

Lilly Endowment Based in Indianapolis, Lilly, the nation’s second largest philanthropy in terms of assets (after the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), and the second-largest donor for 9/11-related purposes, has traditionally provided support for emergencies and had little difficulty in deciding on its grant strategy. On September 12 the Endowment allotted $10 million each to three of its long-standing grantees: the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, and (for the September 11th Fund) the United Way of America. Because the Endowment did not at the time maintain a Web site or issue press releases on these grants, the Foundation Center learned of the awards from the grantees. As Thomas Lofton, chairman of the Endowment for eleven years, explained in an interview, “We are more interested in doing our work than in telling the world about it.” The Endowment made a $4.4 million grant to the Salvation Army to support training of its staff and volunteers in responding more effectively to future disasters, both natural and terrorist.

Ford, one of the nation’s largest private foundations in assets, also looked to trusted organizations to become recipients of its 9/11 grants.

Ford Foundation Ford, one of the nation’s largest private foundation in assets, also looked to trusted organizations to become recipients of its 9/11 grants. This not only increased Ford’s confidence that its funds would be used well, but also shortened the “due diligence” process of understanding the operations and capacities of a prospective grant recipient. Ford Foundation president Berresford took special care on September 11 and in the following weeks, as Ford worked out its response, to involve her staff and give them the sense that they were making not only a professional but also a personal contribution to relief and recovery. Thus, when the grant award letters were sent out, they were accompanied by sheets containing the signatures of all the foundation’s staff members, who had assembled for signing ceremonies at all of the foundation’s worldwide locations. The Fund for the City of New York, a nonprofit organization that had been established with a grant from the Ford Foundation in 1968, received $1 million from Ford to augment its fund for low-cost cash-flow loans to nonprofit organizations providing critical services whose operations or finances were disrupted by the attack. FCNY leveraged Ford’s grant with new grants and loans totaling $5.5 million from other donors, and by May had made 64 loans totaling $4,670,500 to 9/11-affected nonprofits. One recipient, the Coalition for Hispanic Family Services, administers a foster care program for over 200 children, under contract with the city Administration for Children’s Services. The ACS offices, a few blocks from ground zero, were closed for two weeks, slowing payments to the coalition and other nonprofit organizations. As a result, the coalition was at risk of not being able to make its payments to foster families, thus jeopardizing the children’s basic needs. FCNY stepped in with a $120,000 cash-flow loan to avert this.

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The New York Post and Times reported that the anonymous donor had been mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg.

The Nonprofit Finance Fund, a nonprofit community development financial institution established in 1980, was given $1 million for financial and technical assistance to nonprofit organizations that suffered financial and physical damage. NFF leveraged Ford’s grant with another $6.4 million in grants from numerous groups and the resulting Nonprofit Recovery Fund became a source of grants to nonprofit and public organizations that experienced a business loss due to physical damage, extraordinary expenses in recovering from 9/11, and interruptions of earned and contributed income. By mid-June, 2002, NFF had made 129 such grants totaling nearly $7.2 million. The largest grant, $509,000, was awarded to the Borough of Manhattan Community College, which occupies several locations between Chambers Street and North Moore Street, just to the north of ground zero, and suffered the loss of a building housing over forty classrooms. Other large Ford grants included $5 million for the September 11th Fund, to which the foundation also loaned several of its grantmaking and administrative staff persons; $1.2 million for the Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers to assist nonprofit organizations handling an increased need for counseling and other support for persons affected by the attack on the Pentagon; $1 million for WNYC-New York City public radio to help replace its destroyed FM transmitter; $1 million for the Legal Aid Society for services to low-income people; $300,000 for a media-training program for Ford grantees in the human rights and international cooperation field to help them articulate, on television and in other forums, why respect for American constitutional protections, such as the right to a public trial, are not inconsistent with national security; and $1 million to Seedco for a small business and workforce retention program downtown and in Chinatown.

Carnegie Corporation of New York On September 17, this Manhattan-based foundation announced a $10 million pledge for 9/11 relief efforts, saying it “expects to support institutions and organizations that offer assistance to or work in the area of educational and social needs.” In December, before it had acted on this pledge, Carnegie received a $10 million anonymous gift for distribution to “small- and medium-sized arts and cultural organizations in New York City that are struggling in the aftermath” of 9/11. (In April, 2002, the New York Post and Times reported that the anonymous donor had been mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg.) Carnegie’s awards to 137 institutions from this gift were announced on February 13, 2002. On March 2, 2002, Carnegie announced the first grants under its original $10 million pledge, by then termed a three-year commitment by Carnegie president Vartan Gregorian, for 9/11 relief efforts: $1.85 million to assist public schools in lower Manhattan “in honor of the teachers who played such a critical role in the wake of the attack. . . .” Of the $1.85 million, $800,000 was for model libraries in two elementary schools, a use of funds evocative of the philanthropy of founder Andrew Carnegie a century earlier. On March 4, Carnegie’s second installment of $1.6 million was awarded, to support public information on 9/11-related events, to WNYC-public radio and WNETpublic television in New York City, National Public Radio, Boston’s WBUR-public radio, and PBS’ NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.

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John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation The MacArthur Foundation stayed informed about the evolving philanthropic response through the Ford Foundation-coordinated e-mail updates and concluded that there was substantial and “chaotic” funding for immediate relief and rehabilitation, and decided, according to president Jonathan Fanton, that its “efforts would have more impact if directed to other important issues” consistent with three of the foundation’s basic themes: providing analysis and information; strengthening the U.S. and the world’s response to terrorism and understanding its underlying causes; and protecting civil liberties and constitutional guarantees and promoting adherence to international law. By the time of MacArthur’s regularly scheduled board meeting two weeks after 9/11, many of the foundation’s grantees working in these areas had inquired about fresh support to focus new attention on 9/11-related concerns. The board approved a $5 million allocation, and delegated authority to Fanton and the staff to make individual grant decisions as extensions of its existing work in the three fields.

[Jonathan] Fanton stressed adhering “to your core values and grantees and program areas you know best.”

The initial $3.2 million was awarded in fourteen grants by November 12, and the $1.8 million balance in fifteen grants made by January. The largest grant, for $500,000, went to the Public Broadcasting Service’s Frontline series of documentaries on the background of 9/11. Other large awards included a $400,000 grant for National Public Radio to help with the cost of correspondents sent to cover the war in Afghanistan, and $250,000 for Human Rights Watch “in support of efforts to monitor refugee flows and the effects of hostilities on civilian populations in sensitive areas abroad.” In an interview, Fanton noted that the foundation took care to balance grants that could result in criticism of U.S. policy, such as Human Rights Watch or Physicians for Human Rights, with grants to organizations that “take terrorism seriously,” such as the Monterey Institute, which received $100,000 to assess the risk that weapons of mass destruction might move out of “weakened states and into the hands of terrorists.” Reflecting on MacArthur’s 9/11 grant experience at a Council on Foundations meeting April 30, 2002, Fanton said that his Chicago-based organization’s response would “no doubt” have been different if that city’s Sears Tower had been attacked. He also stressed to his fellow foundation executives the grantmaking principle of adhering “to your core values and grantees and program areas you know best,” and challenged his audience by saying “do not be afraid to be countercyclical — even if it is unpopular — look for the unfilled niche.”

Charles Stewart Mott Foundation The regular fall board meeting of the Mott Foundation was conducted on September 12 by conference call. Staff were invited to join the meeting, which opened with prayers and readings from the Bible. The president of the foundation, William S. White, has the authority to approve grants, and the board supported his intention to contribute to 9/11 relief efforts. One of White’s first decisions was to allocate $1 million to the New York

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Community Trust for the September 11th Fund. “We can’t figure out what New York City needs from out here,” White said in an interview, “ so I just told Lorie [Slutsky] she could use our grant for whatever she felt was necessary.”

[Steven] Schroeder recalled,“we saw the great outpouring of funds for these purposes . . . we weren’t as needed as we thought.”

There are large concentrations of Arab-Americans in Michigan, and Mott made grants to the American Arab Heritage Council in Flint, for programs “to promote better understanding and tolerance toward Flint area Arab Americans and Muslims,” and to the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services in Dearborn, “to help non-Arabs and non-Muslims better understand the Arab heritage, Middle Eastern culture and point of view, and Islam.” Mott also made four grants totaling $900,000 to local charities, such as the United Way and the Red Cross, to compensate them for donations they would have received but that were diverted to 9/11 relief. White also registered his organization’s support for national economic recovery by instructing the foundation’s fund managers to place only “buy” orders when the New York Stock Exchange reopened September 17.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Based in Princeton, New Jersey, about fifty miles south of ground zero, RWJF is the nation’s largest foundation devoted to health care. In its early senior management discussions about a response to the attacks, according to the foundation’s president at the time, Steven A. Schroeder, M.D., vice president Paul Jellinek urged a $100 million commitment as a “statement.” In a subsequent interview, Jellinek said that large portions of such a pledge would have been spent on health insurance benefits and to shore up the financial position of nonprofit health care providers, but this did not materialize. RWJF’s initial announcement of its $5 million commitment, September 21, spoke of meeting the “immediate needs of the victims, their families, and the affected communities” in coordination with the September 11th Fund and other groups. Some months later, Schroeder recalled, “we saw the great outpouring of funds for these purposes and realized we weren’t as needed as we thought.” To address the needs of low-asset individuals without health insurance after the attacks, the federal, state, and city governments created a temporary Disaster Relief Medicaid program that provided four months of benefits. There was a simplified application process with no questions asked about assets or immigration status and no documentation requirements. However, the city’s Human Resources Administration (HRA) possessed only limited capacity to implement the program quickly, and speed was the point of this emergency plan.To help move the effort forward, RWJF gave the United Hospital Fund of New York a $750,000 grant to augment HRA’s capacities for community education, outreach, and enrollment, an effort that succeeded in enrolling 70,000 new recipients. (This grant was not part of the foundation’s $5 million commitment because it was considered to be a part of RWJF’s existing program of enhancing access to the health care system for low-asset people.) The foundation also encouraged some of its existing grantees to direct attention to

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9/11-related efforts, such as Finding Our Way, a program offering a “short course on death and dying in America today,” and Faith in Action, a public education and community action program to stimulate interfaith volunteer coalitions.

Rockefeller Foundation The New York-based Rockefeller Foundation’s areas of 9/11 assistance were extensions of its pre-existing programs to assist low-wage workers, especially immigrants; to strengthen the capacity of community-based organizations in immigrant communities to help families and individuals applying for benefits; and to protect civil liberties. Meetings at the foundation with immigrant advocacy organizations, such as the New York Immigration Coalition, and labor unions, along with other funders, held in late September-early October, helped sharpen Rockefeller’s identification of needs. Two of the foundation’s largest grants under its $5 million 9/11 commitment were $500,000 to the New York Foundation, to support its Immigrant Access Project in which Rockefeller funds were re-granted to more than twenty community-based ethnic organizations, and $500,000 to the Service Employees International Union to support a “multi-language outreach and information dissemination campaign” to help affected lowwage and immigrant workers to receive benefits.

Assistance for the protection of civil rights in Arab, South Asian, and Muslim communities was provided with the help of Rockefeller grants . . . .

Assistance for the protection of civil rights in Arab, South Asian, and Muslim communities was provided with the help of such Rockefeller grants as those awarded to the Islamic Circle of North America, the Arab-American Family Support Center, and Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund. The Rockefeller Foundation also made a $350,000 grant to the New York Foundation for the Arts to support its program of expertise and advocacy for arts organizations and artists affected by 9/11, and a $60,000 grant to help support the provision of equipment for rescue workers at the site.

Atlantic Philanthropies This foundation, with offices in several countries and in New York City, made a $10 million grant to the September 11th Fund on September 16. City Meals on Wheels received $50,000 September 19, and another $100,000 on November 8.

Starr Foundation The Starr Foundation in lower Manhattan, one of the nation’s largest philanthropies, had issued only one press release in its 47-year history prior to 9/11, announcing the appointment of its president, Florence A. Davis. The second release was on Starr’s initial $10 million commitment to 9/11 relief. According to Ms. Davis in an interview, the 9/11 release was “a way of showing that the city could come back and needed help.” Of the first $10 million pledge, $8 million was donated to the New York Police and Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund, and the Police Foundation received $2 million for its mental health initiatives for police officers and their families. A gift of $250,000 was made to NYU Downtown Hospital “on the strength of an anguished phone call and no written proposal,

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because they had incurred significant unreimbursable expenses on and soon after 9/11,” Ms. Davis wrote in an e-mail. Near the end of 2001, the Starr Foundation gave “somewhere in the vicinity of $5 million” to emergency food providers and other human needs organizations whose services had been stretched beyond their resources in responding to 9/11-related problems.

In deciding on its response to 9/11 in New York, the [Casey] Foundation looked to “people who had a relationship to us who we knew could reach needy families.”

John S. and James L. Knight Foundation This Miami-based foundation initially committed $5 million over and above its expected annual grant level, and in December increased the amount to $10 million, for “secondary victims” of the attacks in the twenty-six communities participating in the Knight Foundation’s ongoing Community Partners Program, most of which are served by a Knight-Ridder newspaper. There were some 246 awards, ranging in size from $10,000 to $150,000, related to 9/11. One grant strengthened the ability of the Hunter Health Clinic, in Wichita, Kansas, to care for the increased number of patients without health insurance who had been laid off in the aircraft industry because of reduced travel after 9/11. Second Harvest in San Jose, California, received a grant to help meet the increased demand for free food resulting from the downturn in the technology sector.

Annie E. Casey Foundation Based in Baltimore and dedicated to helping disadvantaged children and families, the Casey Foundation has a New York City office that played a key advisory role in strengthening the city’s Administration for Children’s Services. In deciding on its response to 9/11 in New York, the foundation looked to “people who had a relationship to us who we knew could reach needy families,” Steve Cohen, senior associate in charge of the New York City office, said.The largest share of Casey’s $3 million commitment expended as of July, 2002, $1.18 million, was given to New Yorkers for Children (NYFC), a nonprofit organization created to work closely with ACS. NYFC leveraged Casey’s grant with a $1 million grant from the Freddie Mac Foundation and a $250,000 donation from the With Arms Wide Open Foundation, created by the rock band Creed. With these funds, NYFC set up the New York City Family Fund to make competitive grants to assist community-based organizations (CBOs) provide support for children and families affected by the World Trade Center attack. In July, 2002, the fund made its first grants, to twenty-one CBOs for services and advocacy for a broad group of victims throughout the city such as those who lost their jobs and for “community-wide convening and healing” activities.

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Lumina Foundation for Education Headquartered in Indianapolis, Lumina Foundation for Education initiated the Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund with a $3 million pledge to the Citizens’ Scholarship Foundation of America in St. Peter, Minnesota. As of July, 2002, the fund had nearly reached its goal of $100 million to provide post-secondary scholarships for children of the people who were killed or seriously injured in New York, Pennsylvania, and at the Pentagon.

CORPORATIONS According to the Foundation Center’s February 2002 report, 555 corporations, corporate foundations, and business associations pledged or donated $641.8 million, representing about 43 percent of total giving; 47 corporations gave $5 million or more. Several firms that lost large numbers of employees in the World Trade Center attack established special new tax-exempt funds to provide for the needs of the survivors. Other corporations made donations from their established foundations or corporate giving programs.

Several firms that lost large numbers of employees in the World Trade Center attack established special new tax-exempt funds. . . .

Nineteen percent of the corporate and corporate foundation pledges went to their corporate relief funds, and 43 percent was designated for large relief funds such as the American Red Cross, September 11th Fund, and the three major uniformed rescue workers funds. Some examples of corporate giving follow.

Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. This large financial services firm created the tax-exempt MMC Victims Relief Fund, to which it donated $20 million, and clients and friends contributed an additional $4 million. By June about $22 million of this had been distributed tax-free to the families of the 295 deceased employees through a formula based on number of children, years of service in the firm, and special needs, with a minimum payment of $25,000 per family. The remaining approximately $2 million was devoted to maintenance of health care coverage for three years. Survivor families also received — in addition to regular company benefits such as life insurance and pension plan distributions — taxable salary continuation through December and a taxable supplemental death benefit equal to 75 percent of the 2000 bonus.

Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc. (KBW), an employee-owned securities broker/dealer and investment bank specializing in the financial services sector, occupied offices on the 88th and 89th floors of the South Tower. KBW’s co-chairman and co-CEO, John Duffy, was driving on the West Side Highway to his office the morning of September 11 when he saw the attack, in which his son, his co-chairman/co-CEO, and 65 other fellow employees died. KBW established a tax-exempt charitable fund that raised about $11 million, including about $5 million from donated trading commissions on October 29-30. At year-end, KBW made initial payments from the fund of $5,000 for each decedent, plus $5,000 if they were married, and $5,000 for each child. Salary continuation through the end of 2001 and

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health insurance premiums, estimated at about $2 million over the next five years, are to be paid out of company profits3, and the families received cash payments for the value of their deceased’s equity share of the firm.

The September 11 Scholarship Alliance developed a central registry of eligible children, a common application form, and unified administration.

KBW decided that these payments, plus cash that was available through the Red Cross, Robin Hood Relief Fund, Safe Horizon, and other sources, were ample to meet immediate needs and will devote the bulk of the fund to long-term assistance for KBW families: about $4.8 million was set aside to finance college scholarships for the victims’ children, and a consulting firm, the Conservation Company (now called the TCC Group), was engaged to survey the families and make recommendations for how the fund can best meet their needs over time.

Citigroup Foundation The Citigroup Foundation announced on September 14 creation of the Citigroup Relief Fund to raise funds for post-secondary scholarships for the children of victims, and opened a Web site for donations on September 20. The fund was also advertised on Citigroup’s credit card statements.The Citigroup Foundation initiated the fund with a $15 million pledge over and above its usual annual giving level of about $75 million, and in the first six months some 8,000 donors had contributed about $5.2 million, including $67,000 from the citizens and volunteer fire department of Bozeman, Montana. Citigroup Foundation president Charles V. Raymond worked with other organizations raising post-secondary scholarship funds to form the September 11 Scholarship Alliance, which developed a central registry of eligible children, a common application form, and unified administration through the forty-year old Citizens’ Scholarship Foundation of America (CSFA). The Scholarship Alliance named its campaign the Families for Freedom Fund, and received the endorsement of former president Bill Clinton and his 1996 opponent, Bob Dole. As of early July, 2002, the fund had neared its $100 million goal with contributions from about twenty thousand people. William C. Nelsen, CSFA president, estimated that the $100 million would meet about seventy percent of the post-secondary education financial need of all 4,500-4,700 children whose parents were killed or permanently disabled in the attacks. (Some contributors to the fund also provided scholarships for spouses or domestic partners.)

New York Times Company Foundation The Times Company Foundation, which raises about $8 million during the Christmas season for its Neediest Cases Fund, announced on September 12 the establishment of a companion 9/11 Neediest Cases Fund, expecting to raise about $4 million. In the end,

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Another example of a company assisting surviving families directly from its profits is Cantor Fitzgerald Securities. According to an article in the New York Times, Cantor Fitzgerald committed to paying out 25 percent of the firm’s profits over five years to the families of those who were lost.


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about $60 million was contributed, causing the Times Company Foundation to look beyond its seven traditional social welfare agency recipients and create new programs, partners, and processes. In 2000, the Times Company Foundation made 351 grants, mostly in the $5,000-$10,000 range. With the unexpected resources in the 9/11 Neediest Fund, it made sixty grants, a fourth of which were for $1 million or more. Of the $60 million raised, a little over half went to the seven large nonprofit organizations that provide direct services to individuals and families and are the traditional beneficiaries of the Times annual Neediest Cases appeals. Grants averaging $2.5 million each went to three foundations representing the uniformed services and law enforcement agencies; $5.7 million and $5.5 million, respectively, were donated to organizations offering school support services and trauma treatment; $3.1 million went for retention of low-wage jobs; and the balance was for various causes including Washington, DC relief activities. As is the practice with the annual Neediest Cases appeal, all administrative costs were paid by the New York Times Company so that 100 percent of all donations were passed through to the beneficiaries.

All administrative costs were paid by the New York Times Company so that 100 percent of all donations were passed through to the beneficiaries.

Goldman Sachs This investment firm has several downtown locations, and the building it occupies at One Liberty Plaza was slightly damaged in the attack and could not reopen until October 24. The firm lost no employees, but forty-two of them lost a family member. To respond to this and other 9/11 relief efforts, Goldman Sachs established a relief fund and within a few weeks employees worldwide had donated about $6 million and the firm gave $5 million. A committee representing Goldman Sachs’ major divisions, including staff at all levels, solicited recommendations from employees for fund distributions and met frequently to determine allocations, under instructions from the chairman, Henry M. Paulson, Jr., to “get the money in and get it out quickly”; the bulk was distributed by the end of 2001. The largest share, $2.25 million, went to various charities supporting rescue workers’ funds such as the New York Police and Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund.Taxable gifts of $50,000 each were given to the families of the deceased relatives of Goldman Sachs employees, and just over $2 million went to two scholarship funds for victims’ children. The approximately $5 million remaining went to some 25 organizations, including Safe Horizon, Seedco, and the union representing restaurant workers from Windows on the World. The Goldman Sachs Foundation, a separately incorporated entity, allocated about $2 million of its annual grantmaking of $12 million for 9/11, through grants to two organizations conducting programs to enhance mutual understanding among young people on a global level.

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REGRANTING ORGANIZATIONS American Red Cross

“The Red Cross were heroes from Day 1 to Day 21.They were disaster relief at its best.The Red Cross helped us make decisions we couldn’t have made without them.”

Lorie Slutsky of the New York Community Trust echoes the sentiments of many people interviewed in saying, “The Red Cross were heroes from Day 1 to Day 21. They were disaster relief at its best. The Red Cross helped us make decisions we couldn’t have made without them.” During this initial period, the Red Cross mobilized thousands of volunteers from the tristate area and as far away as California, who helped open 12 shelters and provide food, clothing, emergency cash, and comfort to those who were physically injured, had a loved one missing, had been displaced from their home, had lost their job, or were simply overwhelmed by the enormity of the event.The Red Cross was also on the front lines, with the Salvation Army, in providing respite centers and care for the rescue workers. The Red Cross was by far the largest beneficiary of 9/11-related donations, receiving almost $1 billion out of a total of about $2 billion–$2.5 billion. In the first five months after 9/11, the Red Cross spent $80 million on relief services, including thirteen million meals for disaster workers and victims, mental health services for over 200,000, and health services for 118,000. And by January 31, 2002, the organization had given $390 million in cash assistance to families of victims, injured persons, and to those who lost their homes or jobs. (Data are for all locations affected by the attacks.) The Red Cross made special efforts to help people who were not in the mainstream of society. It opened a special tent across the street from the Pier 94 Family Assistance Center to accommodate undocumented immigrants or their families who were reluctant to enter the official site for fear of being discovered, and worked with Asociacion Tepeyac, a Hispanic immigrant advocacy and social services organization, to help undocumented workers produce necessary verifications of employment so that they could receive Red Cross and other benefits. And the Red Cross became the first national relief organization to include gay and lesbian families for survivor benefits.4 Problems for the American Red Cross began in the first week of November, when contributions reached nearly $550 million. The agency decided at this point that not all of these funds were needed for 9/11 purposes, and said that about half would be redirected into other projects and for future terrorist attacks. There were public outcries over this, because the Red Cross had been soliciting donations to the ostensibly stand-alone “Liberty Fund” for 9/11, even though the fine print said that, in keeping with customary policy, some portion of the funds might be set aside for future disasters. (This policy enabled the Red

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Although the Red Cross and other private relief agencies offered aid to undocumented workers, in order to receive dislocated worker aid the workers had to show that they had in fact been employed. Some firms where they worked were totally destroyed. In other cases, employers were reluctant to verify their employment, for fear of being prosecuted for illegally employing persons lacking the required papers.


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Cross to respond immediately to the September 11 attacks and when, on November 12, an American Airlines plane crashed in a Queens residential neighborhood shortly after takeoff, destroying homes and killing over 250 people.) In response to the ensuing firestorm of protest that donors had been misled, the American Red Cross reversed itself, and on November 14 announced in a news conference carried live by CNN that the entire Liberty Fund would be spent to care for the victims of the September 11 attacks, their families, and the rescue workers. The CEO, Bernadine Healy, was forced to resign and there were inquiries from key members of Congress about the agency’s fundraising and distribution policies. In December, former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell was appointed by the Red Cross as the Independent Overseer for distribution of the $360 million then remaining in the Liberty Fund to benefit 9/11 victims and families.5 On January 31, 2002, the Red Cross announced its plans, developed under Mitchell’s direction, to liberalize some of its programs and create new ones as vehicles for expenditure of the remaining funds. The Family Gift Program, which provided living expenses for families of the deceased or missing and persons seriously injured, regardless of financial need, was extended from three months to a full year. For the first time ever, the Red Cross made one-time outright gifts, without a showing of need, averaging about $45,000 per family, to the estates of the deceased and to the seriously injured. For the 3,300 families who were also in the Family Gift Program, this brought the average total Red Cross benefit to about $109,000. Further funds were allocated for needs-based assistance for displaced residents, economically affected persons, and disaster workers. And $80 million (later increased to $114 million as funds continued to be contributed) was set aside over a three- to five-year period for services such as health, mental health, and case management and service coordination.

Similar outrage at what was characterized as “withholding funds” and “donor deception” have attended relief efforts going back at least to the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. . . .

Outcries about 9/11 relief prompted some apparently long overdue American Red Cross policy changes. For example, the Red Cross began releasing and posting on its Web site the quarterly funding allocations for 9/11 purposes, something it had never done. For the quarter that ended April 30, 2002, $398 million had been designated, on a non-needs basis, for victims’ families and seriously injured persons; $310 million for needs-based financial assistance for displaced residents and those who lost their jobs; and $114 million for long-term services. Immediate relief had cost $105 million, and $40 million was budgeted for “Fund Stewardship.” On June 6, 2002, the Red Cross announced changes in the language used in advertising, to clarify its practice of pooling donations for use in a

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This was not the first time the operations of the Red Cross were the subject of highly visible public controversy. Similar outrage at what was characterized as “withholding funds” and “donor deception” have attended relief efforts going back at least to the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, when complaints came from as far away as Massachusetts that money raised for San Francisco was not spent in that city. More recently, San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos accused the Red Cross of spending only about one quarter of the approximately $52 million raised after the 1989 earthquake in his city. Similar charges were made after the Red River of the North floods in Minnesota in 1997 and San Diego fires earlier in 2001.

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wide range of emergencies, and stated it will ask donors to designate whether their gifts are for a specific occurrence or more general relief. The agency will also now formally tell donors when it has raised enough money to address a particular event.

September 11th Fund

Trust and United Way staff possessed an unmatched wealth of knowledge of the city’s social service delivery structure in both the public and private sectors.

The September 11th Fund utilized staff of its co-sponsoring organizations, the New York Community Trust and United Way of New York City, to develop distribution policies and guidelines. The Trust manages about 1,600 charitable funds and in 2001 made about 15,000 grants totaling $128 million. The United Way had raised about $139 million in its most recent campaign among businesses and their employees, and distributed these funds to some 400 member agencies working in areas such as youth development, job training, childcare, and health care. Drawing on this experience, Trust and United Way staff possessed an unmatched wealth of knowledge of the city’s social service delivery structure in both the public and private sectors. Beginning in the week of the attack and continuing for several weeks, staff met with some 350 nonprofit social services agencies to ascertain needs as they became known, and to assess their capacities to take on additional work in the relief and recovery effort. The resulting guidelines, manifesting a comprehensive approach to 9/11 relief and addressing the needs of a broad group of victims, were clearly stated: • Funding will be available for “both short-term emergency needs as well as long-term needs.” • Support will be given for the “socio-economic recovery of individuals, families, and communities”; for “the economic rebuilding of lower Manhattan and New York City”; and for bolstering “the capacity of nonprofits to continue to provide services.” • Eligibility for assistance will include “ a) individuals and families victimized by the . . . disaster (loss of a family member or caregiver); and b) the larger community of individuals and families affected by the disaster.” • Funding will be “coordinated with public and other private funds and targeted to unmet needs to avoid duplication of services.” • Nonprofit organizations will be utilized as primary vehicles for providing services and cash made available through September 11th Fund resources. The fund’s first grant was announced September 18, $1.2 million for Safe Horizon, a nonprofit victim services and advocacy organization, to provide immediate financial assistance to meet housing, food, medical care, transportation, and burial expenses of victims and their families in New York City. Another early grant enabled Safe Horizon and Seedco to prepare and publish a resource guide of services and other assistance. In mid-October, the Trust and United Way announced formation of an independent board to oversee the fund, chaired by Franklin Thomas, former president of the Ford Foundation. Joshua Gotbaum, who was named CEO, had held three high-level federal

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agency positions in the Clinton administration and before that was a partner and managing director of the investment bank Lazard Freres & Co. (Gotbaum is the son of long-time New York City labor leader Victor Gotbaum, who once ran the nation’s largest municipal employees union.) By June 30, 2002, the September 11th Fund had received $501 million and distributed $301 million in 250 grants to nonprofit organizations that provided cash and services to victims. More than 100,000 individuals received cash and services, including 3,800 families and other financial dependents of those who were killed or were severely injured, 35,000 people who lost their jobs, and 6,000 individuals and families who were displaced from their homes. The largest share of the $301 million distributed as of June 30, 2002 was $128 million, the proceeds from a United Way-sponsored national telethon, that was awarded in the form of $10,000 payments to each family of a direct victim of the attacks in New York and Washington and the crash in Pennsylvania, and $2,500 for each displaced worker or resident below Canal Street in New York City. The next largest share of funds given out by the September 11th Fund, $94.2 million, went to Safe Horizon (described below), mostly for emergency financial assistance.

. . . the Ongoing Recovery Program included both new and expanded initiatives to seek to fill gaps in existing services. . . .

Other recipients of $1 million or more included Seedco; Nonprofit Finance Fund; Fund for the City of New York; NYU Downtown Hospital (for reimbursement for emergency care immediately after the attack); the New York City Partnership (for downtown small and medium-sized business retention); Consortium for Worker Education (for employment services); Legal Aid Society (for emergency civil legal assistance for low-wage workers in and near the World Trade Center); Renaissance Economic Development Corporation (for loans to Chinatown small businesses); and for the United Ways of Bergen and Monmouth counties in New Jersey,Westchester/Putnam County in New York, and the National Capital Area/DC (all for cash assistance and services to victims and their families, for which the United Ways charged no administrative costs). Plans for the remaining $200 million of unallocated funds, announced July 11, 2002, and known as the Ongoing Recovery Program, included both new and expanded initiatives to seek to fill gaps in existing services available through government or other philanthropic sources. In the announcement, CEO Gotbaum said that the program “continues to help those who need it, but in a better way. In the emergency phase . . . the emphasis was on delivering help quickly. Now we are funding a program that meets a wider range of needs, that gives people choices about where and how to get help, and makes it easier for them to get it.” New activities included: • up to $3,000 per person for mental health counseling for those who are not insured; • employment services, including financial assistance for people in training, for an estimated 12,000 people including dislocated workers, regardless of immigration status, and surviving family members of those who died;

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• health insurance for an estimated 14,000 victims, mostly dislocated workers, who cannot afford private health insurance and are not eligible for public programs such as Medicaid or FHP; • specialized assistance for an estimated 25,000 children in schools who were evacuated or directly witnessed the attack;

Its founders correctly sensed that the September 11th Fund would be operating in a fishbowl. . . .This “was going to have to be the most accountable charitable effort in history.”

• service coordinators to help more than 10,000 people get help more easily. In addition, it was stated that the fund would expand funding for previous services, including grants and loans for small businesses and nonprofit organizations in lower Manhattan; continued legal and financial advice on issues such as settling estates or applying to the federal September 11th Victim Compensation Fund; and continued cash assistance for those who were eligible but had not yet come forward, including surviving families, the injured, and displaced residents. A new component provided financing for small businesses at Reagan National Airport serving Washington, DC, which suffered losses as a result of sharply reduced operations for several weeks following 9/11. Board Chairman Franklin Thomas, in announcing the Ongoing Recovery Program, said, “The needs of those directly affected . . . are so great that alone we could not cover them all” and emphasized that government and other philanthropic entities also needed to address ongoing problems.6

Accountability and Donor Intent Its founders correctly sensed that the September 11th Fund would be operating in a fishbowl on worldwide public view, and that funding decisions would be the subject of scrutiny from the media, social services agencies competing for funds, and affected individuals and families. Accordingly, as Gotbaum put it some months later, the fund determined that this “was going to have to be the most accountable charitable effort in history.” Gotbaum’s second hire was a communications officer, and he soon added two more. Among some members of the media, public officials, and the general public, there was an apparent assumption that donors to the fund intended that their contributions would be distributed at once in the form of cash compensation and services to a narrow group of immediate victims and their families, to the exclusion of other affected groups such as displaced workers.7 Gotbaum found himself on the defensive, answering accusatory questions about why the funds had not been paid out to the people who were thought by many to have been the bona fide beneficiaries of the fund’s more than two million donors.

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6

A survey of 1,139 victims by McKinsey & Company for the 9/11 United Services Group, released July 8, 2002, estimated that the total cost for the next year of meeting unmet needs for financial supplements, employment services, mental health, and other services would be about $768 million, the largest share of which, $700 million, was needed for workers whose livelihoods were affected by the attack. Of this $700 million, an estimated $562 million was needed to fill gaps in basic household expenses.

7

The September 21 national telethon sponsored by the United Way may have created some confusion on this point, since the networks, led by ABC, insisted that the audience be told that proceeds were earmarked for immediate victims and their families (even though there was no list of victims).


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To gain reassurance on the important issue of donor intent, and to help in program planning, the fund conducted public opinion research through an online survey October 1 and a telephone survey a month later, including respondents who did and did not give to a 9/11-related cause, both in New York City and elsewhere. The results confirmed support for the fund’s strategy of taking a broad view of who should be helped and the need for both cash assistance and services such as mental health counseling and job training. For example, in both surveys more than 80 percent of those polled agreed that the definition of victims should include people who were displaced from their homes or lost their jobs in the World Trade Center or Pentagon. (Both surveys were made possible by special in-kind corporate contributions.) The September 11th Fund’s Web site provided comprehensive information on all facets of the operation. Grants were announced monthly, including recipients, amounts, and purposes. Contributors were listed by the size category of their gifts. And there were nine pages of detailed answers to 41 FAQs on governance, how people could get help, what cash and services were available, and how private philanthropy differed from government funding. Perhaps inspired by this example, other philanthropies expanded their public information activities. Prior to 9/11, the Robin Hood Foundation in New York City, for example, posted only the names of its grantees, but information about its 9/11 relief fund included amounts granted and purposes of the grants.

More than 80 percent of those polled agreed that the definition of victims should include people who were displaced from their homes or lost their jobs. . . .

UNIFORMED RESCUE WORKERS’ FUNDS The funds that solicited for the families of rescue officers, who gave their lives saving others, collectively received, next to the American Red Cross and the September 11th Fund, the third largest share of donations. Brief descriptions of these three major funds follow.

Twin Towers Fund The largest of the uniformed rescue workers’ funds, the Twin Towers Fund, was announced September 12 by Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. The first contributor was General Electric Company, with a $10 million gift, and by November the total reached $80 million. Giuliani named his deputy counsel, Larry Levy, as the operating head with pro bono assistance from Changing Our World, Inc., a New York-based philanthropic services firm. (Levy, who had previously served as special assistant corporation counsel to Mayors Ed Koch and David Dinkins in his decades-long New York City government service, also played a key role in the city’s establishment of family assistance centers following the attack.) During the fall, Levy and his associates convened weekly meetings at City Hall with other uniformed personnel funds, including those established by the unions, to share information, address complex policy choices, and discuss plans for distributions. The Twin Towers Fund faced difficult decisions, some of which were shared by other uniformed services funds, such as: • whether to include the court officers and non-uniformed rescue personnel, such as Port Authority staff, who died in rescue efforts (they were included on a case-by-case determination);

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• whether to give the same amount to every family or to factor in the number of dependents, length of service, and the like (the formula took into account the number of children, with a distinction between those under and over twenty-three); • whether to make payments to the families of single people (next of kin received about three quarters as much as the families of married persons);

There also were issues to be resolved concerning the rightful recipient in complicated family situations such as divorce and domestic partners.

• whether to observe the long-standing federal law limiting charitable payments only to those for whom financial need could be shown (Mayor Giuliani initially had implied that he would challenge the law if it was not changed); • whether to pay out all the money in one installment or to reserve a portion to meet future needs of the families; • whether to set aside funds to meet non-financial needs that would emerge later, such as trauma and grief counseling and family support services (provision was made for current and future non-financial needs). There also were issues to be resolved concerning the rightful recipient in complicated family situations such as divorce and domestic partners. Generally the spouse was the Twin Towers Fund’s beneficiary, and “registered domestic partners” were also eligible; difficult cases were reviewed in consultation with the fund’s Family Advisory Board, consisting of members of the victims’ families. A final complication was that the Twin Towers Fund did not exist as a recognized charitable entity until its IRS tax exemption was received in December; the temporary repository of donations was Public-Private Initiatives, Inc. (PPI), a nonprofit established in 1994 by Mayor Giuliani for the incubation of new programs. After his term ended in January, 2002, Giuliani planned to carry on the work of the Twin Towers Fund as board chairman of the newly incorporated private nonprofit organization of the same name. The fire union and a few police families criticized this plan, in part because some felt that distributions had not been made rapidly enough and they did not want Giuliani to continue to control the donations. In early 2002, the fund requested approval of the New York State Attorney General, who oversees tax-exempt charitable organizations, to transfer the fund’s assets from PPI to the Twin Towers Fund. Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who had earlier clashed inconclusively with Giuliani over the question of which of the two officials was the appropriate person to coordinate philanthropic relief efforts, granted approval for the asset transfer in April on the condition that one-quarter of the Twin Towers Fund board members be appointees of the new mayor, Michael Bloomberg. The fund made its initial distributions, totaling about $49 million, in November and December, 2001, and a second distribution, $3.5 million for non-uniformed personnel, in January. By June 6, 2002, the fund had made its third distribution, bringing the total to $155 million, with each surviving spouse having received $235,000 plus various amounts for surviving children. Next of kin where there was no spouse received $150,000.

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The fund planned to utilize the balance for such things as college scholarships through the Citizens’ Scholarship Foundation of America; summer camps with grief counselors; assistance for injured rescue workers; financial and emotional support counseling; and possible assistance for cases that were still under review. The fund distributed all of its resources and closed at the end of 2003.

9/11 Disaster Relief Fund of the International Association of Fire Fighters This fund, the second largest among the rescue workers funds, was established by the AFL-CIO affiliated labor union representing more than 240,000 professional fire fighters and emergency medical personnel in the United States and Canada. According to George Burke of the union, 60-70 percent came from collections organized by local firehouses around the country. As late as June, 2002, donations were continuing to arrive at the rate of about $750,000 per month, according to IAFF chief of staff Michael J. Crouse. The IAFF moved quickly to get an IRS Section 501(c)(3) tax exemption for the 9/11 Disaster Relief Fund, which was approved in early October, near-record time, and it acted speedily and decisively to make its distributions. Following the instructions of its general president, Harold Schaitberger, to “do it right and do it quick,” the IAFF kept it simple: divide the total pool of dollars raised by the number of surviving families and give each family, including the families of single fire fighters, an equal amount. Payments were made in increments as funds continued to come in. Fire Department of New York official records were relied upon to determine who was the legitimate beneficiary.

This fund also financed counseling for firefighters who suffered from guilt because they did not die.

The IAFF set aside about $4 million from the fund to establish a new program, the 9/11 Fire Fighters Counseling Fund, to provide grief and trauma counseling for families who lost a loved one.This fund also financed counseling for firefighters who suffered from guilt because they did not die. Crouse believed that it would be easier to attract firefighters and families into such a counseling program if it was done under the aegis of the FDNY and union than if it is offered through a regular employee assistance program, which carried the stigma of substance abuse counseling. The IAFF, asserting its lack of jurisdiction, managed to remain out of the bitter public controversy over the distribution of funds to survivors by the Uniformed Firefighters Association of Greater New York (UFA), Local 94 of the IAFF, which raised about $70 million through its Widows’ and Children’s Fund. (The UFA’s Widows’ and Children’s Fund is distinct from the New York Police and Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund, described below.) Families of the 97 unmarried firemen who died September 11 said they were as entitled to a payment as the widows were, because the union’s Web site advertising the fundraising appeal said that donations were for “the families of our fallen firefighters.” However, the union by-laws provided that the donations were to “relieve the need of the widows, children and dependents. . . .” One of the mothers of a dead single fireman, Domenica Ragusa, was quoted in the May 12, 2002 NewYork Times, saying “My son is just

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as dead as a married man who is dead.” A full-page ad sponsored by the UFA in the May 19 Times defended the union’s position, and said that the dispute would be resolved “in consultation with the Charities Bureau of the New York State Attorney General’s Office.”

New York Police and Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund

Before 9/11 the fund had raised a total of about $52 million in its 16-year history, and since 9/11 it had raised more than twice that much. . . .

This fund was established in 1985 by Rusty Staub, the former New York Mets baseball star, to help the families of police and fire officers who die in the line of duty. The fund’s annual appeals raised less than $1 million until 1996, and its typical distributions have been one-time death benefits of $10,000 plus annual payments based on fundraising success. Until 9/11, the largest annual gift had been about $2,200 per year, according to Stephen J. Dannhauser, president of the fund and executive partner of the Manhattan law firm Weil, Gotshal and Manges. Before 9/11 the fund had raised a total of about $52 million in its 16-year history, and since 9/11 it had raised more than twice that much, about $115 million as of July 1, 2002. Major contributors included Deutsche Bank, with $9 million in foregone stock trading commissions, and $8 million from the Starr Foundation. In all, there were over 100,000 gifts and Weil, Gotshal and Manges mobilized a group of volunteers that opened the mail, and acknowledged and booked the receipts. Even though it was an established organization with guidelines, the fund faced two decisions about whom to help and how. One was whether to make payments to the families of Port Authority and EMS personnel; the fund decided to include them in its 9/11 distributions. The other question was about the pre-9/11 widows the fund had been assisting with payments since its beginning. The fund’s board felt that provisions should be made for these approximately 429 widows in the distribution of the new funds.To be certain that there would be no violation of donor intent for these steps broadening the beneficiary group, the fund wrote to each contributor of $5,000 or more and asked if they had a problem with the fund’s intentions. Only a few objected, in which cases the fund returned their gifts. The fund made $100,000 payments to each 9/11 widow in two or three installments, and a special $30,000 gift for each pre-9/11 widow. In keeping with the fund’s traditional policy, beneficiaries of single persons received a $10,000 death benefit. In the cases of disputed beneficiaries, the fund relied on union records and union determinations of disputed cases. At the time, fund chief financial officer David Golush said that the fund expected to make a further payment of $18,000 to each 9/11 widow and $8,000 to each pre-9/11 widow in October.The approximately $62 million balance remaining after these payments were made would be escrowed for annual payments of $12,000 to approximately 729 widows (including both pre-9/11 and 9/11-related) over a seven-year period beginning in October 2003.

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SAFE HORIZON Safe Horizon is a nonprofit victim assistance, advocacy, and violence prevention organization, the largest such agency in the country, and formerly known as Victim Services. For many years the agency has worked closely with the State of New York’s Crime Victims Board in processing crime victims’ compensation claims. By September 15, 2001, in response to a request by Governor George Pataki, Safe Horizon began serving as the Crime Victims Board’s agent for writing checks for financial assistance for surviving spouses who lost their primary wage earners in the attack. Because state guidelines limited this assistance to persons who were still married when their spouses died, Safe Horizon turned to the United Way of New York City to provide comparable funding for domestic partners, gay and lesbian couples, and others who did not meet the state’s requirements. Lilliam Barrios-Paoli, then senior vice president and chief executive for agency services of the United Way of New York City, and one of the key planners for the September 11th fund, readily agreed. By the week following 9/11, Safe Horizon was the only agency issuing on-the-spot checks, for up to $1,500, to replace lost incomes. After the attack, Safe Horizon was forced to vacate its downtown headquarters, at 2 Lafayette Street, and when staff returned ten days later, they were without phones, fax, or Internet until December. Despite these obstacles, and in the absence of formal agreements with funding organizations or existing procedures for handing out money, Safe Horizon moved quickly to provide cash and crisis counseling not only at the main Family Assistance Center but also at four other centers in the outer boroughs to facilitate access for people who were reluctant to come to downtown Manhattan. Safe Horizon also opened a toll-free twenty-four-hour hotline and, with Seedco and United Way, prepared and published in print form and online a directory of resources for victims and their families.

Safe Horizon was able to adapt flexibly to the extraordinary circumstances because it was an independent local organization, not bound by the rules of a national organization. . . .

Safe Horizon CEO Gordon Campbell delegated to his frontline staff the authority to make decisions and hand-write checks even as procedures and forms were being designed. Calling it “managing by groping,” Campbell credited his agency’s performance — widely acknowledged as exemplary — to “knowing the victim business,” relationships with state and city agencies, and the professionalism and dedication of the staff. Senior vice president Elizabeth McCarthy said that Safe Horizon was able to adapt flexibly to the extraordinary circumstances because it was an independent local organization, not bound by the rules of a national organization, as was the case with the local branches of the American Red Cross and Salvation Army. As of March 31, 2002, Safe Horizon had received $90.3 million for 9/11 services, all but $2 million of which came from the September 11th Fund. (By June 17, Safe Horizon had received an additional $5.5 million from the September 11th Fund.) Of the $90.3 million, about 90 percent, or $80.8 million, was passed through in cash payments to 43,828 surviving family members, injured persons, and displaced residents and workers. The $9.5 million balance, about 10 percent of the total, was spent on operations costs such as staffing seven assistance centers, the September 11th hotline, and trauma education seminars.

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The $90.3 million total received for 9/11 is almost three times as great as the agency’s annual budget of $34 million, but Safe Horizon managed to conduct 9/11 relief while not “missing a beat” with its regular clients, according to Campbell, because many dedicated staff members worked 12–16 hours/day, and their number was augmented by new staff and over a thousand volunteers.

Criticism by Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly . . . though overstated and inflammatory . . . had a basis in reality.

Recognizing from experience that providing emergency cash to victims may succeed in relieving the immediate anxiety, but only open the door for the beginning of the more challenging long-term process of healing, recovery, and getting on with one’s life, Safe Horizon continued to follow up all of its approximately 47,000 9/11 clients with phone calls from a twenty-five-person phone bank to see how they were faring and what further assistance they needed.

SERVICE COORDINATION The problem is that one charity doesn’t know what the other is doing. There is no central controlling authority. . . . Grieving people are forced to fill out dozens of forms and then left to fend for themselves. . . .This is one big cruel mess.The United States government can move a huge military machine half way around the world in two weeks — but can’t supervise charities and get financial help to a few thousand devastated families in six weeks. Does this make sense to you? This criticism by Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly in his October 15, 2001, syndicated column, though overstated and inflammatory — and suggesting a new role for government to oversee philanthropic operations — had a basis in reality. Despite the fact that frontline staff at the Family Assistance Center on Pier 94 were, by most first-hand accounts, welcoming and eager to help, and the overall accommodations were a model for similar multi-service locations, there were problems. People seeking aid had to fill out several different forms with mostly the same information. Some people were not well treated, and some did not get what they wanted. Some seeking aid had never asked for help from a government or nonprofit service organization, and were not accustomed to standing in line or answering personal questions. It is not difficult to find angry, grief-stricken, confused, and terrified people in the aftermath of a calamity who lash out at the closest target and tell their stories to a reporter, and New Yorkers are famously impatient and demanding. There were enough well-publicized negative experiences to prompt two Congressional hearings in early November.8 Arizona Republican Congressman J. D. Hayworth called on the House Ways and Means Committee to assume an oversight role in the private philanthropic relief effort. Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA), ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee, urged federal and state regulators “to work together to oversee the fair and expeditious distribution” of donations. New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who regulates tax-exempt charitable organizations, called a September 26 meeting in his office with the large relief groups, including the Red Cross, Salvation Army, and others. Spitzer’s section chief of the

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Charities Bureau, Marla Simpson, had been conferring extensively with key participants in the Oklahoma City response to the 1995 bombing of the Murrah Building, and believed that the coordination of agencies that had occurred in that city could be replicated among at least ten times that many, serving a much larger and more diverse population, in New York City. At the September 26 meeting, Spitzer proposed that his office establish a central database of everyone who sought assistance from the major service providers, as a means of ensuring fairness in the distribution of funds and services, and to prevent duplication and fraud. According to Spitzer during an interview in June, 2002, all of the participants agreed this was a sound idea, but the next day, apparently on orders from national headquarters, the American Red Cross of Greater New York office said that confidentiality rules prevented it from disclosing information about its clients. The question of a central database was therefore unresolved, but the Office of the Attorney General posted on its Web site a list of organizations and services for people and organizations affected by the disaster. Leaders of charitable service organizations recognized the validity of appeals for greater coordination, but felt that the Office of the Attorney General should not be the one to do it, because of a concern that information might be used in connection with the attorney general’s oversight and regulatory responsibility. The two top officials of the September 11th Fund, board chairman Franklin Thomas and CEO Joshua Gotbaum, met with Spitzer in mid-October, 2001, and told him this. Rather, they argued, the charities should be responsible for their own coordination, and Spitzer agreed. Gotbaum said in a June 2002 interview that, after this meeting, Spitzer urged the major charitable service providers to organize themselves. Gotbaum then offered to fund the effort. This was the origin of the 9/11 United Services Group, which is described later in this report.9

8

Similar problems, though much less emotionally charged, occurred for businesses and nonprofit organizations seeking aid to recover from the attacks’ impacts. Several different nonprofit financial institutions and government agencies offered aid to small businesses downtown and in Chinatown, often with different geographic and other eligibility requirements. Programs whose northern boundary was Canal Street excluded the approximately two-thirds of Chinatown’s small garment manufacturers with large numbers of low-wage workers. (This problem was addressed by the September 11th Fund.) Two nonprofit organizations, the Fund for the City of New York and the Nonprofit Finance Fund, received separate grants from the Ford Foundation and the September 11th Fund to provide similar assistance to nonprofit organizations that suffered similar impacts.

9

Tragically, communications failures were not limited to the charitable sector. It has been widely reported, for example, that better communication and coordination between the CIA and FBI might conceivably have averted the attacks. An in-depth investigation by the New York Times, published July 7, 2002, concluded that throughout the September 11 crisis “the two largest emergency departments, Police and Fire, barely spoke to coordinate strategy or to share intelligence about building conditions,” and found that firefighters’ radio systems did not function and were not linked to those of the Police Department. “The city’s Office of Emergency Management, which was created by Mayor Giuliani in 1996 and had spent nearly $25 million to coordinate emergency responses,” according to the Times, “had not conducted an emergency exercise [in the World Trade Center] that included the Fire Department, the police, and the Port Authority emergency staff.”

Spitzer urged the major charitable service providers to organize themselves. Gotbaum then offered to fund the effort.This was the origin of the 9/11 United Services Group. . . .

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A main stumbling block to sharing information among relief organizations was their confidentiality policies.

Although there was no central registry of applicants, the three major relief agencies at the Family Assistance Center — the Red Cross, Salvation Army, and Safe Horizon — had quickly developed ad hoc coordinating procedures that simplified life for persons seeking aid. Staff of Safe Horizon, the first stop for visitors to the center, offered to escort their clients to the desks of the Red Cross and Salvation Army and provide some of the necessary basic information required to initiate registration with those organizations. By January, 2002, the agencies had developed what amounted to a one-stop process: staff were cross-trained so that a representative of one could take down the information required for all three, and later do the work of filling out the separate forms. A main stumbling block to sharing information among relief organizations was their confidentiality policies. The Red Cross, for example, said that it had had some bad experiences giving out the names of fire victims forced from their homes, whose vulnerability then became known to estranged, abusive spouses.The Salvation Army said that their confidentiality policies were designed to protect people who are concerned that the assistance they receive will be reported as taxable income, and to protect undocumented workers, who fear that government authorities might have access to the information and initiate deportation proceedings. The Red Cross, Salvation Army, and Safe Horizon allowed their clients to waive their confidentiality, but Safe Horizon appears to have been more adroit than the others in interpreting the waiver in the context of the situation, to the benefit of its clients. Safe Horizon explained the advantages of information sharing in terms of saving time and trouble, and facilitating access to additional services. It also made clear that the information would be shared only with other service providers.

9/11 United Services Group The 9/11 USG was launched December 14, 2001, with much fanfare. Its core financing came from the September 11th Fund, in fulfillment of Gotbaum’s pledge to help the leading charities develop their own solutions to coordination of their work and thus avoid possible intervention by Attorney General Spitzer. The 9/11 USG was described as a “consortium of 13 New York City human services organizations . . . to coordinate the help being provided to those affected by the World Trade Center terrorist attacks and ensure that their needs are efficiently and compassionately met.” Member agencies were the American Red Cross (which had changed its mind and agreed to cooperate, with confidentiality issues to be worked out later); Asian American Federation of New York; Black Agency Executives, Inc.; Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York; Catholic Charities Diocese of Brooklyn; Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies, Inc.; Hispanic Federation; Human Services Council; Mental Health Association of New York City, Inc.; Safe Horizon; Salvation Army; UJA-Federation of New York; and United Neighborhood Houses of New York. The 9/11 USG’s budget was approximately $3 million, of which more than half was said by a 9/11 USG official to be in the form of donated services from IBM,Warburg Pincus, ADP, McKinsey & Company, and others.

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The 9/11 USG compiled a central database of individuals affected by the attacks who had received services from one or more of the member organizations. One purpose of this was to prevent duplication of services and “double dipping” on financial benefits. Another purpose was to provide victims with periodic notification of new programs and services, such as the $200 million Ongoing Recovery Program that had been announced by the September 11th Fund. Another 9/11 USG program was training for “service coordinators” in its approximately 25 member and affiliated organizations to be able to direct clients to the full array of 9/11related services. The 9/11 USG also continued to operate the Safe Horizon September 11th 24-hour hotline, and to maintain a database of resources built on the directory developed soon after the attacks by Safe Horizon, United Way, and Seedco with funding from the New York Community Trust and United Way of New York City through the September 11th Fund.

The value of 9/11 USG may become apparent in the future if the collaboration serves as a model for future catastrophes. . . .

Persons involved in New York’s social service community, who were close to the 9/11 relief effort and were interviewed for this report, evince perfunctory support for the 9/11 USG, and say that the effort may have been too little, too late. It failed to reach most of the medium- and smaller-sized community based organizations, although steps were being taken to remedy this shortcoming. As one 9/11 USG Board member said in an interview, “A database is a good thing, but it doesn’t make coordination and collaboration happen.” However, the value of 9/11 USG may become apparent in the future if the collaboration serves as a model for future catastrophes and develops a common intake process that can be activated immediately. In debriefings about the reports’ findings and implications for future disasters with philanthropic groups and individuals in New York and other cities, it became clear that attempts to improve planning for post-disaster responses needed to include attention not only to philanthropy, but also government programs. Philanthropy does not operate in a vacuum, but rather seeks to find niches that relieve the burdens of government, fill gaps, or test and evaluate new approaches to meeting human needs. The following sections attempt to place philanthropic programs in this larger context through a closer look at the scope, coverage, and difficulties of government programs in 9/11 relief and recovery in New York City.

SUMMARY OF FEDERAL AID Federal aid for disasters is triggered by a presidential declaration, requested by the governor, of a disaster area. Federal funds are allocated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, with the approval of the Office of Management and Budget, for a wide variety of purposes pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act of 1974. Most of these funds flow through the state emergency management agency to state and local public agencies. FEMA is the lead federal agency for the response, and is “authorized to enter into agreements with the American National Red Cross, the Salvation Army, the Mennonite Disaster Service, and other relief or disaster assistance organizations” for coordination of activities.

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Federal 9/11-related aid for New York City from all sources totaled about $25 billion, ten times as great as the total philanthropic amount for all locations and individuals.

In addition to FEMA’s statutory assistance programs, Congress frequently appropriates additional funds through other federal agencies to cover needs not met by FEMA’s authorizations. Examples in the 9/11 response were the community development block grant program, for business recovery and other purposes, through the Department of Housing and Urban Development; funds for health screening and reimbursements for hospitals through the Department of Health and Human Services; tax incentives for new investments in New York City’s downtown district through the Internal Revenue Service; and dislocated worker training through the Department of Labor. Federal 9/11-related aid for New York City from all sources totaled about $25 billion, ten times as great as the total philanthropic amount for all locations and individuals. Initially, President Bush requested from Congress a special $20 billion appropriation to fight the war on terrorism in Afghanistan and elsewhere. New York Senators Schumer and Clinton demanded that there also be an equal amount for relief, recovery, and rebuilding in New York City, and Bush committed to this amount in an Oval Office announcement attended by the two senators on September 13.The $40 billion emergency supplemental appropriations bill, introduced September 14, was enacted as Public Law 107-38 on September 18. There was no delineation of uses of the funds except that one-half was for domestic relief and recovery. Of the total $40 billion, the president was granted authority to expend the first $10 billion; the next $10 billion was to be available only after fifteen days’ advance notice on proposed uses to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations; and the final $20 billion could be obligated “only when enacted in a subsequent emergency appropriations bill.” In subsequent negotiations about the uses of funds, Congressional conservatives sought to undermine the commitment, and OMB director Mitchell Daniels made negative comments about it, but the president stood by his pledge, and all of the funds were appropriated with designated uses. The appropriations act watered down Bush’s commitment to New York by providing that “not less than one-half of the $40 billion shall be for disaster recovery activities and assistance related to the terrorist acts in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. . . .” Nevertheless, the president repeatedly referred to $20 billion for New York City, and the OMB, in internal documents, periodically updated the “Status of President’s $20 Billion Commitment to New York.” It was estimated that an additional $5 billion would be distributed by the federal September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, established in a later piece of legislation. In an early 2003 interview about the process by which Congress and the administration decided on specific programs to be funded with the $20 billion, a member of Senator Schumer’s staff at the time recalled Otto von Bismarck’s quip, that the two things one does not want to see being made are laws and sausages. The process was greatly complicated because the Hart Senate Office Building was closed for the three months following arrival of a letter containing anthrax in Senator Daschle’s office October 15. New York’s senators and their staffs — as well as others normally housed there — worked out of temporary offices, often without computers, in other parts of Capitol Hill.

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In the then Democratic-controlled upper house, Senators Schumer and Clinton were the initiators and arbiters of numerous funding requests urged by private firms, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations active in relief and recovery. Thus, like much of the philanthropic response, large amounts of funds were made available before planning had occurred, and negotiations about specific uses of appropriated but unspent funds took place. For example, the New York Times reported on February 7, 2003, that the administration had agreed, following intense negotiations, to a precedent-breaking understanding that would permit New York State and City to use about $980 million of the $20 billion in emergency relief funds to help close budget deficits. Of the $25 billion (including the estimated $5 billion for the Victim Compensation Fund), about $6.810 billion was directed at the broad categories of human, economic, and social needs that also received philanthropic contributions, and it is this portion that is the focus of this report. The balance, furnished mainly through FEMA, covered major expenditures such as debris removal, emergency transportation, DNA testing, transportation and other physical infrastructure replacements, insurance for contractors working at ground zero, and reimbursements to New York City Fire and Police Departments for various costs such as death benefits, overtime, and replacement of destroyed government facilities and equipment. As one FEMA official put it in commenting on the agency’s problems with its individual assistance programs, “FEMA’s big role is to help governments, not people, recover.” The $25 billion figure also included about $5 billion in tax incentives for corporations to reinvest in lower Manhattan.

Of the $25 billion . . . about $6.8 billion was directed at the broad categories of human, economic, and social needs. . . .

Excluding the estimated $5 billion in victim compensation, federal aid totaled about $1.8 billion for human, social, and economic purposes. About 60 percent of this was for small business loans and loss compensation grants, and the balance went for all other programs including mortgage and rental assistance, home repairs, temporary lodgings, individual and family grants, disaster unemployment assistance, trauma counseling, employment assistance, health screening and registry, and reimbursement of hospital expenses. The largest categories of non-business aid were health/mental health and needs-based financial assistance, each accounting for about 18 percent of the total. Private philanthropy provided roughly the same total amount. Exclusive of victim compensation payments, $1.8 billion was spent for individual, family, and community needs by philanthropic organizations.11 Human services programs and needs-based financial assistance were the largest categories of the $1.8 billion, each accounting for roughly 30–35 percent. 10

Sums cited in this report are approximate and are based on best estimates as of March 2003. Moreover, some extraordinary services provided by government discussed in this report, such as emergency Medicaid and HRA emergency checks, were funded out of normal appropriations and not counted in total federal aid for the disaster.

11

The main sources for these estimates of philanthropic contributions and distributions were the Foundation Center, Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11, November 2002; various issues of The Chronicle of Philanthropy; the AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy, Giving USA: 2002: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2001, Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University, Indianapolis, 2002; and Ford Fessenden, “After the World Gave: Where $2 Billion in Kindness Ended Up,” the NewYork Times, November 18, 2002.

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Family Assistance Center (New York City)

. . . a Family Assistance Center [was] a one-stop facility where family members . . . could file a missing persons report . . . and receive other help.

The Mayor’s Community Assistance Unit, the City’s Office of Emergency Management, the City Human Resources Administration (HRA), with FEMA assistance, opened, on September 17, a Family Assistance Center as a one-stop facility where family members who had lost someone could file a missing persons report, begin the process of obtaining death certificates, and receive other help. Anne Grunewald, director of human services for the City’s Office of Emergency Management, credited FEMA as having been “tremendous in supporting us quickly” in opening the Family Assistance Center (FAC). Human Resources Administration personnel installed phone lines and computers, and deployed staff to process emergency food stamps, Medicaid, and up to $1,500 for emergency child care. HRA’s lead official, Jane Corbett, deputy commissioner for domestic violence and emergency intervention services, had coordinated the City’s response to the 1993 World Trade Center bombing and the fatal 1981 fire that claimed eighty-seven lives at the Happyland Social Club in the Bronx. She persuaded top HRA management to support the concept of a one-stop center and obtained the unusual authority to issue checks in amounts of $200-$400, on the spot and with no documentation, to tide people over until other benefit streams could be activated. The Social Security Administration,Veterans Administration, and State Workers Compensation Board also opened desks to serve their statutory beneficiaries. Major nonprofit organizations represented at FAC included the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, New York Cares, and Safe Horizon. Safe Horizon also opened offices for this purpose in the outer boroughs, for the convenience of individuals who were unable or frightened to travel into Manhattan. Representatives of the Crime Victims Board issued checks on the spot for up to $1,500 to cover loss of earnings of deceased family members (with a maximum payment of $30,000 per year), and in the other boroughs Safe Horizon issued checks in the expectation of subsequent reimbursement by the Crime Victims Board. Documentation of eligibility was expedited at the time of application and completed later. The September 11th Fund awarded Safe Horizon a grant to pay comparable death benefits for same-sex partners, and to families whose primary wage earner had not died but had lost his or her job. It gradually became clear that the disaster had wide impacts that extended well beyond the deaths and injuries at ground zero. Most significantly, about 100,000 jobs had been lost, devastating individuals and families who lived throughout the city and region. Others whose livelihoods depended on doing business with downtown companies, such as car service drivers, also suffered economic losses. These people began streaming into FAC, which had been intended to help only those who were family members of an immediate victim. In response to this unexpected outpouring of people with diverse needs, HRA on September 19 opened a Disaster Assistance Service Center (DASC), initially to serve displaced workers with the participation of the State Department of Labor, at 180 Water Street, but which soon became a much larger operation than the Family Assistance Center.

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The DASC’s mission was expanded to include other services provided by agencies such as HUD and the Small Business Administration, and moved to 51 Chambers Street; the DASC relocated again to 141 Worth Street, in headquarters that were organized by FEMA. A portion of the FAC at Pier 94 was also converted to a DASC. Some thirty public and private agencies ultimately were represented at these one-stop centers. There were no protocols or precedents for such collaboration and the agencies needed to improvise procedures to mesh their operations and facilitate the process for clients. Agencies were concerned that some people would try to take advantage of the crisis and get benefits they were not entitled to. Privacy rules prevented some organizations, especially public agencies but also the Red Cross, from sharing information about clients. As a result, DASC experienced well-publicized cases of frustrated and anguished individuals who had to provide the same information on different forms for several agencies, of people who did not get straight answers to their questions, and cases of delays or denials of benefits. An ad hoc system of coordination began to emerge from the work of an informal “services coordination group,” consisting of the top leadership of key organizations, chaired by FEMA, that could make decisions and empower DASC personnel to carry them out. The group sorted out which agencies were responsible for various services and configured a flow of clients through the different stops. The group developed a single information form to capture basic information needed by each agency for every client — such as family size, how they were impacted, and social security number — and this information was shared among the agencies, reducing the amount of time clients needed to spend on this task. IBM donated personnel to digitize the form, using techniques developed in earthquake disasters in Turkey, India, and Peru. Some of the agencies, including HRA, began recording on the form the benefits they disbursed.These arrangements were made too late to save time or trouble for many of the first wave of clients, but they became the groundwork for the 9/11 United Services Group, described earlier, which by early 2002 had developed an online unified case management system for the broadly defined group of victims and their families.

There were no protocols or precedents for such collaboration and the agencies needed to improvise procedures to mesh their operations. . . .

Cash Benefits for Families of Immediate Victims The largest single federal assistance program for individuals and families was the unprecedented September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, providing tax-free cash awards for the survivors of persons killed or seriously injured in the attacks who agreed to waive their right to sue the airlines or any other public or private entity (except alleged foreign terrorists or their supporters). The fund was established by Title IV of the Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act of 2001, commonly referred to as the airlines bailout bill, hastily enacted by Congress eleven days after 9/11.The payments were intended to compensate surviving dependents for the expected future economic value of the victim’s life, based on their current earnings. This formula generated larger payments for well-to-do victims than for those at the lower ends of the earnings scale, an imbalance

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not corrected by charitable awards. Awards from the fund were expected ultimately to reach about $5 billion, for approximately 3,200 eligible claimants, including nationals of 61 different countries.

Victim compensation for families of persons who died or were seriously injured in one of the three disaster sites . . . was by far the largest category of philanthropic aid. . . .

To prevent “double dipping,” the authorizing legislation specified that awards from the fund be reduced by “all collateral sources” of payments such as life insurance, pension funds, and payments by federal, state, and local governments (except the federal Public Safety Officers Benefit). Fund Special Master Kenneth Feinberg initially interpreted the statute to mean that charitable payments, such as those made by various benefit funds, were to be counted as collateral sources. In the November 2001 meeting with Feinberg, representatives of about fifty philanthropic organizations had threatened to withhold their payments until after the Victim Compensation Fund made its awards, so as to prevent reductions in the federal amounts. Recognizing the potential for unacceptable delays, Feinberg decided to exempt charitable payments from the collateral sources calculation. As a result of this decision, some families received cash awards from numerous sources including the Red Cross, uniformed officers benefit funds, and the federal fund.

Philanthropic Victim Compensation Victim compensation for families of persons who died or were seriously injured at one of the three disaster sites, without regard to financial need, was by far the largest category of philanthropic aid, accounting for more than $800 million.The largest single source was the American Red Cross, which reported disbursing $316 million for these purposes as of January 31, 2003. The Red Cross had never made such gifts, having previously confined its financial assistance to temporary living expenses for needy victims. The new program was created as part of the response to widespread public controversy over the Red Cross’ announcement that it would not spend all of the 9/11-inspired Liberty Fund contributions on that disaster.When the Red Cross reversed this policy, it was forced to find new ways to spend the contributions, and the outright gift program was the largest of these inventions. The three major funds dedicated to the 436 families of deceased uniformed rescue workers raised about $455 million, mainly for payments to survivor families, by late 2002. Smaller amounts were distributed as outright gifts to families of immediate victims by other charities, principally the September 11th Fund and the Robin Hood Foundation. Corporations that lost large numbers of employees in the World Trade Center also established their own charitable funds for cash payments to surviving family members. Three firms that suffered about one-third of the total deaths — Marsh & McClennan, Cantor Fitzgerald, and Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc. — contributed and raised from their employees and others a total of about $30 million. Operations of these funds were marked by ad hoc decision-making, because most of the funds were newly created and lacked policies, criteria, and procedures. These had been hastily created to enable expeditious action in the face of media stories highlighting the gap between total funds donated and totals paid out. Each fund used a different formula for its

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distributions. In some cases, there was a flat amount per family, while in others the number of dependents, length of service, and other factors were taken into account. Most families received support from more than one fund, with no coordination of benefits paid. The various public and private cash compensation programs were extraordinary in comparison with those made following previous acts of terrorism, such as the bombings of the World Trade Center in 1993, the Oklahoma City Murrah Building in 1995, and the U.S. embassies in Africa in 1998. In none of these cases, nor in natural disasters, has Congress or philanthropy made such generous provisions for survivors. In striking contrast, the Department of Veterans Affairs has a standard schedule of benefits for surviving spouses and dependent children of active duty military personnel who die in the line of duty. This provides a spouse with two children under eighteen a life insurance benefit of $250,000 plus $1,422 per month. Dependents of military personnel killed on 9/11 were eligible for the Victim Compensation Fund, but the awards were reduced by the “collateral� payments from the VA.

Problems and Policy Issues Despite their unmatched liberality, all of the funds encountered bitter criticism from the beneficiaries who complained that the formulas were flawed in one respect or another. Some uniformed rescue workers’ families who received a flat amount protested that those with more dependents and length of service should receive higher awards. Families of seven victims at Cantor Fitzgerald Securities filed a federal lawsuit against the Special Master of the federal Victim Compensation Fund, alleging, among other things, that his calculations shortchanged higher income earners by offering them only about ten percent of what they believe their spouses would have earned over the rest of their lifetimes.

. . . policies, criteria, and procedures. . . . had been hastily created to enable expeditious action in the face of media stories highlighting the gap between total funds donated and totals paid out.

The March 15, 2003 New York Times reported that there had been some 1,700 disasterrelated suits against the City, including 1,000 firefighters seeking a total of at least $12 billion. The City Law Department set up a special World Trade Center defense unit consisting of twenty-one lawyers, operating on a $3 million budget, to fight these claims, which could take years to decide.

Aid for Small Businesses The New York City Partnership and Chamber of Commerce reported that 707 small businesses were destroyed at the World Trade Center, and that in the forty-five days after 9/11 the losses at 3,400 inaccessible small firms in the immediate vicinity of ground zero amounted to $795 million. Small businesses as far as two miles from ground zero that experienced no physical damage nevertheless felt secondary impacts from disrupted subway service, utility repairs, closed streets, and a drop in tourism. Retail and food businesses, whose main market is foot traffic from office buildings, and small manufacturers, were especially hard-hit. By one estimate, there were about 14,000 small firms with

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fifty or fewer employees in Lower Manhattan and Chinatown south of Canal Street.These employed a total of about 370,000 people, including large numbers of low-wage and immigrant workers.

Small businesses as far as two miles from ground zero . . . felt secondary impacts from disrupted subway service, utility repairs, closed streets, and a drop in tourism.

The second largest category of federal aid, totaling an estimated allocation of about $1.1 billion as of mid-2002, went for grants and low-interest loans for these enterprises. Federal and philanthropic funds were used to compensate for lost revenues, replace or repair damaged facilities or equipment, bridge insurance payments, and provide cash flow for recovery. About $700 million of the $1.1 billion in federal aid, mostly for grants for business loss compensation, came from outside an established channel of authorized federal disaster relief, through the community development block grant (CDBG) program created in 1974 to revitalize low-income neighborhoods. About $400 million was for loans under the FEMA-Small Business Administration’s statutory disaster relief authorizations. Philanthropic organizations such as the Ford Foundation, the New York Times Company Foundation, the September 11th Fund, and other foundations and corporations made grants and low-interest loans to help support similar activities administered by nonprofit organizations. Federal emergency supplemental CDBG appropriations for New York City economic recovery went to two quasi-independent state agencies, Empire State Development and its subsidiary, the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC). Specific plans for expending the funds were subject to prior HUD approval. As in the case of natural disasters, the HUD Secretary waived many requirements of the CDBG program, such as the one that at least 70 percent of the beneficiaries be low- or moderate-income persons. Of the $3.5 billion total CDBG funding for the City — more than the total CDBG funds provided nationwide for all major disasters since 1991 — Congress required that at least $500 million be used to compensate small businesses and nonprofit organizations located in lower Manhattan for their economic losses. LMDC indicated that it planned to provide an additional $200 million for these purposes. The approximately $2.8 billion balance was used for downtown relocation and retention incentives for large firms, downtown residential relocation incentives, rebuilding Con Ed and Verizon facilities, master planning of the World Trade Center site, and various city expenses related to the emergency.

Business Recovery Grants This program, the largest one to be funded with CDBG allocations, was designed by LMDC and Empire State Development to provide businesses or nonprofit organizations with fewer than 500 employees, located south of 14th Street, with cash grants for uncompensated economic losses related to the attacks. The closer a business was to ground zero, the greater the amounts that were compensated. The maximum grant, for businesses closest to the World Trade Center site, covered 25 days of lost revenue, up to $300,000. As of March 18, 2003, a spokesman for Empire State Development said that the agency had approved 14,233 grants totaling $530 million in business recovery grants. In a November 2002 study, the U.S. General Accounting Office (since renamed the Government

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Accountability Office) reported that about three quarters of the recipients employed 10 or fewer people, making it likely that a majority of the recipients employed a predominantly low-wage workforce.

Small Firm Attraction and Retention Grants This LMDC/Empire State small business program was designed to provide cash grant incentives for small businesses that agreed to remain in or relocate to lower Manhattan. The program offers payments to businesses (but not nonprofits) with fewer than 200 employees that were located or were planning to locate south of Canal Street, and signed a new lease or renewed an existing lease for at least five years. Total payments were $3,500 per employee, except for those that were in the “Restricted Zone” close to ground zero, which could qualify for $5,000 per employee. As of September 11, 2002, $12 million had been disbursed to 246 businesses. According to Empire State Development’s plan for its CDBG funds, a total of $105 million was earmarked for the small firm attraction and retention program.

Business Recovery Loan Program Another initiative of Empire State Development, also undertaken with CDBG funds, provided low-interest recovery loans for small businesses and nonprofit organizations that could not qualify for a conventional or SBA loan. This activity was directed at business revitalization, not compensation for losses or incentives for relocation, and firms that participated in one of the earlier programs were also eligible for this one. Businesses with 500 or fewer employees, located anywhere in the city provided they were south of 14th Street on 9/11, were eligible. Firms located beyond these boundaries on 9/11 qualified if they derived at least ten percent of their revenues from business south of 14th Street. Empire State funded the program with $50 million in grants to nonprofit community development financial institutions (CDFIs), which in turn awarded the funds as lowinterest loans. Empire State expected that the CDFIs would make a total of about 1,000 loans averaging $50,000, with a cap of $250,000 per loan. Seedco, a CDFI which had been operating a small business loan and grant program with funding from several public and philanthropic donors, was the first recipient of Empire State funds under this new initiative, and had closed about forty loans worth about $2 million as of January 2003.

Another initiative of Empire State Development . . . provided low-interest recovery loans for small businesses and nonprofit organizations that could not qualify for a conventional or SBA loan.

Assistance by State and City before Approval of Federal CDBG Funds Shortly after the attacks and before approval of the CDBG funds, Empire State Development and the City Economic Development Corporation began a program of cash grants of up to $10,000 each to small businesses, and about $24 million was approved for 4,322 firms. The state and city also operated a joint program in which they furnished loan loss reserves to banks and nongovernmental community development financial institutions that extended bridge loans to small businesses and nonprofit organizations. The estimated $24 million in cash grants was expected to be reimbursed from CDBG funds, and the loan loss reserve program was funded with $15 million in CDBG resources.

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Problems and Policy Issues

The state and city . . . furnished loan loss reserves to banks and nongovernmental community development financial institutions that extended bridge loans to small businesses and nonprofit organizations.

Empire State Development’s small business programs received a great deal of criticism, including concerns about reimbursement grants that fell substantially short of actual losses, delays in approving and disbursing funds, confusion about boundaries demarcating eligibility for different programs and differing grant sizes, and perceived inequities such as the fact that businesses in the World Trade Center that were totally destroyed received the same amount as other businesses in the same geographic zone.The November 2002 GAO report found that the state had awarded only about one-half of the number of business recovery grants it originally estimated, but by March 2003 about three-quarters of the original target of 19,600 small businesses had been helped. The median amount of loss coverage not otherwise reimbursed by insurance or other grants was only about 17 percent. Because this was not an established disaster relief program, guidelines and criteria had to be improvised hastily to meet the emergency. As a result, according to an April 10, 2003 New York Times report, a HUD audit found that Empire State had “paid millions of dollars to companies without getting details on how they had calculated their losses, a flaw that persisted despite a preliminary audit that flagged the problems.” Criticisms by business owners of the attraction and retention grant program focused on slow disbursements, ineligibility of firms with fewer than ten employees (a rule that was later eliminated), and disputes about the significance of lease expiration dates for businesses that were located in the World Trade Center. Another concern was that business grants were subject to federal income taxes, even though this was self-defeating of the purpose of the program’s assistance; grants to individuals for personal expenses like housing were not taxable. Some business owners were pleased with the assistance they received, and, according to officials of public and nonprofit organizations active in downtown economic assistance, some owners devoted a great deal of time and energy to making the rounds of various funding sources seeking to get the maximum possible aid. Questions also were raised about the overall allocation of the $3.5 billion in CDBG funds. Large companies that remained or relocated in downtown could receive up to $6,250 per employee, compared to a maximum of $5,000 for small firms. A total of $170 million was allocated for the large firm retention program, compared to $105 million for small firms. Two firms that had quickly expressed an intention to stay downtown, American Express and the American Stock Exchange, were early recipients of these grants. The residential relocation incentive program, for which about $280 million in CDBG funds was allocated, provided residents of Battery Park City and parts of Tribeca, where the median household income was about $125,000, with grants of up to $14,500 if they signed new leases. Residents of Chinatown — where there was no direct damage but large economic disruptions — qualified for residential incentive grants of up to only $7,750, even though the Chinatown median household income was about a third of that in Battery Park City and Tribeca.

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Small Business Administration Loans The Small Business Administration (SBA) is equipped with statutory authority to make disaster-related loans in three categories: business physical disaster loans for repair or replacement of property; economic injury disaster loans for working capital to assist small businesses and nonprofit organizations cover operating expenses; and disaster assistance loans for repair or replacement of homeowners’ or renters’ real and personal property. Prospective borrowers from SBA were strongly encouraged first to register and establish their eligibility with FEMA, in a common intake procedure. Business owners who did not qualify for one of the SBA programs could be eligible for one of FEMA’s individual assistance programs. Congress appropriated $175 million to the Small Business Administration as part of the $40 billion emergency supplemental bill, a figure that was calculated to support about $651 million in loans through the agency’s three programs. SBA loan officers were out stationed in the Disaster Assistance Recovery Center (DASC) at 141 Worth Street, and at one time at nineteen other locations including one in Chinatown. Eligibility was open to any small business that sustained physical or economic damage in any borough of New York City, ten suburban New York counties, six upstate New York Counties, six northern New Jersey counties, two counties each in Connecticut and Pennsylvania, and Berkshire County in Massachusetts. In addition, Congress authorized $75 million to enable the SBA to guarantee $4.5 billion in non-disaster-related “7(A)” bank loans for small businesses located anywhere in the country that could show a direct or indirect adverse impact from 9/11.

Prospective borrowers from SBA were strongly encouraged first to register and establish their eligibility with FEMA, in a common intake procedure.

The SBA disaster loan programs carried interest rates of 3.375 to 8 percent, and could be for a term as long as 30 years. SBA loans were relatively straightforward and free of most of the intricate complexities of the Empire State grant programs, and could be for much greater amounts — up to $10 million, compared with $300,000 in Empire State’s business recovery grants and $250,000 in recovery loans. (The maximum SBA loan in other disasters has been $1.5 million.) All of SBA’s assistance is in the form of loans secured by collateral, a requirement that could be waived or negotiated flexibly in the Empire State and CDFI loan programs because the source of these funds was mainly grants. Downtown business real or personal property that was destroyed or severely damaged was obviously not available as collateral. Instead, these owners usually needed to offer their homes as collateral, a very risky move when facing great uncertainties about the economic future of the city and their businesses. Undocumented immigrants were not eligible for SBA loans, but some Empire State/CDFI programs were less exacting than the SBA in their immigrant status documentation requirements.

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SBA applicants could also qualify for all three of the Empire State programs and the CDFI programs, and in practice receipt of a grant or wage subsidy strengthened the cash flow projections analyzed in the loan underwriting process. Under program rules, owners were not prevented from borrowing from more than one source, although the ability to service total debt was a key underwriting factor.

Criticisms of the SBA program focused on the collateral requirements and high denial rates.

As of January 4, 2003, SBA had approved $411 million for 11,165 disaster loans in New York City, about 85 percent of which were in Manhattan. Another $54 million had been approved for the suburban and upstate counties in the broader tri-state disaster area.There are no figures available on utilization of the expanded 7(A) guarantee program anywhere in the U.S., but SBA officials indicated that there had been very little interest. Of the $411 million in New York City, just over 90 percent was for economic injury loans for working capital and operating expenses in the disaster period. Eight percent was for repair or replacement of real estate, machinery, equipment, inventory, and supplies. Only $5.9 million had been approved for loans to homeowners or renters to repair or replace real estate or personal property. The $411 million represented about two-thirds of the authorized $651 million. SBA closed its DASC office and stopped processing applications January 31, 2003, upon expiration of the disaster period. Criticisms of the SBA program focused on the collateral requirements and high denial rates. A November 2002 GAO study found that denials and withdrawn applications accounted for 54 percent of all business application dispositions, and the primary reasons for denial were “no repayment ability” and “unsatisfactory credit.” The primary reasons for withdrawals were “no IRS record found” and “failure to furnish additional information.”

Non-governmental CDFI Programs Several nonprofit community development financial institutions began operating small business loan, grant, and wage subsidy programs soon after 9/11, initially with philanthropic support that reached a total of about $50 million. Seedco is the largest of these, having committed about $21 million as of January 31, 2003, mostly for retail and manufacturing enterprises employing less than fifty people south of Canal Street including Chinatown.12 Retail and manufacturing businesses with less than fifty employees were more likely to employ predominantly low-wage and immigrant workforces than larger businesses and businesses engaged in professional services or other industries. Until it received Empire State Development grant, whose purpose is business recovery, Seedco’s programs focused on stopgap bolstering of small businesses’ cash flows and stabilizing their low-wage workforces until larger, longer-range assistance could be identified. Other CDFIs and nonprofit organizations with similar programs for small businesses and nonprofit organizations in lower Manhattan included the Renaissance Economic Development Corporation, affiliated with Asian Americans for Equality; ACCION; the New York City Partnership and Chamber of Commerce; the Nonprofit Finance Fund; and 12

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The Seedco program was chronicled by Tom Seessel, Back in Business:The Lower Manhattan Small Business and Workforce Retention Program, Seedco, New York, April 2002.


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the Fund for the City of New York. Each of these carved out a mostly distinctive niche, although there was some overlap in terms of eligibility, purposes, and uses of funds among CDFIs, Empire State, and SBA programs. CDFIs provided useful though small supplements to Empire State and SBA programs and were able to respond to very small businesses that for one reason or another could not qualify for, or did not receive, as much as they felt they needed from, a government program.

FEMA Individual Assistance Programs At the time of its response to 9/11, FEMA had statutory authorization for three principal programs to assist individuals and families meet their economic needs following a disaster: Mortgage and Rental Assistance, Individual and Family Grants, and Disaster Unemployment Assistance. These are discussed in the following sections. As is the case with all other government programs — with the important exception of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund — undocumented immigrants and most of those who arrived after August 1996 were not eligible. These individuals became a special concern of philanthropic organizations.

Mortgage and Rental Assistance

. . . undocumented immigrants and most of those who arrived after August 1996 were not eligible.These individuals became a special concern of philanthropic organizations.

The Mortgage and Rental Assistance Program (MRA) authorizes FEMA to cover up to eighteen months of rent or mortgage payments for victims who suffer financial hardship as a result of a major disaster. FEMA’s initial policy in New York City was to restrict eligibility narrowly to persons who could demonstrate a “direct” link between physical damage to their place of employment and the loss of at least 29 percent of their monthly gross income. Applicants also needed to produce a written eviction, dispossession, or mortgage foreclosure document. FEMA application forms contained no guidance or criteria for interpretation of “direct,” and 15,000 faulty applications were mailed out that increased the risk that eligible families would not receive help. There were numerous cases of administrative ineptness, such as denial because FEMA staff could not obtain employer verification of a job loss at a destroyed firm in the World Trade Center. Application evaluators — two-thirds of whom were temporary workers — were located in Texas, Virginia, and elsewhere, and many did not understand New York’s geography. One employee, for example, did not know that 1 Liberty Plaza was located in downtown Manhattan, adjacent to the World Trade Center site. Another insisted that garment workers, many of whom had lost their Chinatown-based jobs because of transportation closures, had been laid off because it is a seasonal occupation. There were frequent descriptions of evaluators as condescending or rude. FEMA made minor adjustments in its process and criteria at various times in late 2001 through early 2002, but never clarified what it meant by “direct.” Among the changes was that a late notice would be acceptable documentation of intent to foreclose or evict. The adjustments did not improve the situation much, and the application denial rate six months after 9/11 was 70 percent. Only 2,854 applications were approved, for a total amount of

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$13 million. FEMA officials sought to deflect attention away from its shortcomings by making public statements, with some justification if not sensitivity, that the large charitable response helped New Yorkers stay current with their mortgage and rental obligations, thus preventing issuance of foreclosure or eviction notices.

FEMA officials sought to deflect attention away from its shortcomings by making public statements . . . that the large charitable response helped New Yorkers. . . .

FEMA officials struggling with the “direct effect” issue were troubled by how wide the eligibility area might become, and how large the outlays would be, if the direct connection to physical damage near the disaster site was no longer the criterion. Larry Zensinger, director of FEMA’s Recovery Division, continued to defend the initial eligibility criteria in a January 8, 2003 interview, noting “once you get away from a connection with direct physical impact, where do you draw the line? Airline employees living in Los Angeles also suffered economic hardship due to reduced flight schedules.” In April and May 2002, FEMA reviewed all 7,323 denied applications and found about 22 percent to be eligible, and additional documentation was requested for a further 43 percent. But the need to prove undefined “direct” impact continued to be the main stumbling block. By June 2002, under the threat of pending Congressional legislation establishing eligibility boundaries and discarding the “direct” language, FEMA issued revised guidelines expanding the geographic area to include the entire Borough of Manhattan. (Taking no chances, Congress subsequently enacted this into law on August 2.) FEMA also discontinued requiring self-employed or business-owner applicants to apply for an SBA loan before seeking continued mortgage and rental assistance. Under the new rules, applicants could demonstrate economic impact by showing that: • their employers were located in Manhattan and suffered financially because of the World Trade Center attack, or • they lost jobs or significant income because their non-Manhattan employers had significant business relationships with firms in Manhattan, or • they lived in Manhattan but commuted to work outside the borough and suffered financially because of travel restrictions after 9/11. The standard of financial hardship was also decreased from 29 to 25 percent of gross monthly income. As a result of the new guidelines, and application deadlines that were extended several times, ultimately to January 31, 2003, the rate of eligible applications and amounts awarded increased dramatically. The number of eligible applications increased from 2,854 applications for a total amount of $13 million in April, to 10,429 and $87.7 million by December 26, 2002, a month before the deadline. The overall approval rate increased from 20 to 60 percent over this same period. For all of its troubles, the Mortgage and Rental Assistance program provided much more help to New York City than it had in all other disasters since its inception. The program was little used before 9/11 because, according to a FEMA Inspector General’s Report in December 2002, “previous disasters did not coincide with nor result in widespread unemployment and national economic losses.” Before 9/11, a total of $18.1 million had

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been awarded for sixty-eight declared disasters, compared with $87.7 million for New York, with further monthly amounts yet to be paid out to those who could demonstrate continued economic need. The MRA program had operated at such a low level that, in 2000, Congress made it unavailable for disasters after May 1, 2002. The Individual and Family Grants program was also repealed for disasters after May 1, 2002. For disasters occurring after that date, items previously covered by these two programs were combined in a new Individual and Households Program. The FEMA Inspector General’s Report concludes its discussion of the MRA by saying that the program “if reinstated . . . would still require legislative revision to make it less complicated to administer. A broader, more flexible program . . . would more appropriately meet the range of economic losses experienced such as with the September 11 terrorist attacks. FEMA should explore such a program with Congress.” Based on interviews with current and former high-ranking FEMA and other federal government officials, there were no indications that such an exploration was a priority for FEMA, which has now been incorporated in the new Department of Homeland Security.

Individual and Family Grants

For all of its troubles, the Mortgage and Rental Assistance program provided much more help to New York City than it had in all other disasters since its inception.

This program provides grants to states, subject to a 25 percent matching requirement, as a sort of “ultimate safety net” to help meet disaster victims’ various needs that cannot be addressed under other federal programs. Eligible expenses include compensation for such losses as vehicles and other personal property, moving and storage expenses, and medical, dental, and funeral costs. To qualify for the Individual and Family Grants (IFG) program, individuals must first have utilized insurance receipts and applied for and been denied an SBA disaster assistance loan for homes and personal property. In New York, the IFG program is administered by the State Department of Labor in accordance with a FEMAapproved plan. The IFG program was marked by widespread complaints about confusing rules, excessive documentation requirements, delays in processing applications, high rejection rates, small awards, and poor public outreach and communications. About 300 people who mailed in applications had their packets returned in November 2002 because FEMA’s Albany Post Office Box was closed after the agency failed for three months to renew the $425 annual fee. In response to criticisms, FEMA and the state extended the IFG application deadline on several occasions, finally to January 31, 2003. Items normally covered by IFG in other disasters, such as burial expenses and health care coverage, were not provided in New York City because the disaster was caused by a crime, and consequently these expenses were reimbursable under the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime programs. FEMA officials also said that private charitable organizations were helping to meet these expenses. The state Labor Department initially assigned ten permanent and 50 temporary employees to answer inquiries and process applications — utilizing a paper-based information management and case-processing system — in the Disaster Assistance Service

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The Individual and Family Grants program (IFG) was marked by widespread complaints. . . .

Center at 141 Worth Street in lower Manhattan.The antiquated paper-based methodology led to an overwhelming backlog when, in May 2002, in response to heightened concerns about environmental contamination, the state and FEMA announced that the Individual and Family Grants program could be used to reimburse up to $1,550 in outlays for indoor air conditioner units and other air quality equipment for residents anywhere in the five boroughs, regardless of income or proof of adverse environmental impact. This was instituted despite the fact that EPA had concluded the city’s outside air quality was back to where it was pre-9/11, and made use of apartments above 78th Street as clean control samples when testing for downtown air quality. Indoor air quality equipment such as filters, air purifiers, and high-efficiency particulate air vacuum cleaners had been reimbursable since October 2001, but the May 2002 announcement that air conditioners were included engendered an entrepreneurial response by existing and start-up businesses that began promoting the program by encouraging individuals to purchase the equipment and seek reimbursement. Consumer uptake caused IFG applications to quadruple from about 3,000 per month to an average of about 12,000 in the unusually hot summer months of 2002. Not anticipating the upsurge, the state in March had reduced the number of staff assigned to IFG from sixty to thirty. FEMA assigned a team of 150 employees to help the state reduce the backlog by converting data to an electronic database, referring new incoming calls to the FEMA national processing center, making on-the-spot eligibility determinations where possible, providing online registration in the DASC, and streamlining redundant processing procedures. FEMA and the state grossly overstated the consequent improvements, saying in late October 2002 that the approval rate had jumped from 13 percent to 89 percent. In responding to Congressional questions about “Enron accounting,” a spokesman for the state Labor Department conceded that the new calculations did not represent real awards made, but rather the possibility that awards would be forthcoming. “It’s more of a positive way of looking at where those people stand,” the spokesman was quoted as saying in the November 1 New York Times. As of December 24, 2002, about a month before the IFG application deadline, there had been 211,305 applications, of which 46,610 were approved, with awards totaling $46.8 million, or an average of just over $10,000 per grant.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance The smallest of FEMA’s individual assistance programs is unemployment assistance, primarily for self-employed workers such as car service drivers and others not covered by regular unemployment insurance, who are unemployed as “a direct result” of a disaster. As in the case of other public programs, undocumented immigrants, and most documented immigrants who arrived in this country after August 22, 1996, were not eligible. All of the DUA program costs were paid by FEMA, through a transfer to the U.S. Department of Labor, which in turn makes the funds available to the state Department of Labor pursuant to an approved plan and guidelines. The state processed applications in the Disaster Assistance Service Center.

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The state acted quickly to get clarification from the U.S. Department of Labor about the interpretation of “direct,” which had never been defined in previous disasters. An October 12, 2001 letter, subsequently confirmed in the November 14 Federal Register, went into great detail defining the term in restrictive language limiting eligibility to unemployment resulting from “physical damage or destruction of the work site,” “the physical inaccessibility of the work site,” and loss of work in a business that “previously received at least a majority of its revenue or income” from businesses that suffered the specified direct impacts. The regulation ruled out unemployment that was “the result of a longer chain of events precipitated or exacerbated by the major disaster.” Although FEMA didn’t use these words, the same thoughts were in the minds of its officials who resisted expanding the boundaries of the Mortgage and Rental Assistance Program. Minimum DUA benefits are one-half of the average regular unemployment weekly benefit, which in New York worked out to be $138 per week. The actual benefits paid were based on earnings, and in New York the average was about $183/week. Awards are reduced by any Workmen’s Compensation or Social Security payments. DUA benefits are customarily paid for up to 26 weeks of disaster-related unemployment, but in New York the period was extended to thirty-nine weeks thanks to special legislation introduced by the New York State Congressional delegation. The deadline for applying for benefits was extended several times, ultimately until June 2002. According to FEMA figures as of the week ending November 29, 2002, a total of 3,290 claims had been approved, a 49 percent approval rate, and $13.2 million in benefits had been paid.

FEMA’s unemployment assistance program is primarily for selfemployed workers . . . not covered by regular unemployment insurance, who are unemployed as “a direct result” of a disaster.

Crisis Counseling FEMA’s largest individual assistance program following the 9/11 disasters was its one hundred percent funded grants to New York State for the Crisis Counseling Assistance and Training Program (CCP), administered by the state’s Office of Mental Health with technical support from the federal Center for Mental Health Services. Known as Project Liberty, the program offered community outreach, education, group counseling, referrals and short-term interventions for disaster-related distress, including bereavement counseling and cognitive-behavioral counseling such as teaching skills for managing anxiety and coping with stress. Project Liberty services were delivered by 68 public and private nonprofit agencies at over one hundred locations, with multicultural staffs possessing fluency in more than two dozen languages. The CCP is traditionally limited to the state where the disaster occurred, but in the case of 9/11 New York State requested, and FEMA agreed, that residents of New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania also be eligible. Project Liberty services were available to any person who lived in or visited these areas during the disaster. The program was extensively promoted through publication of an 800 number, extensive advertising with the de-stigmatizing “Feel Free to Feel Better” slogan, and TV and radio public service announcements from celebrities such as Joe Torre and Susan Sarandon.

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Longer-term mental health services, as well as financial support, and related social services for crime victims, are made possible by funding from the federal Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime. . . .

In August 2002 the state received FEMA approval to expand the scope and range of services beyond short-term interventions, to assist individuals “who continue to experience trauma symptoms at levels resulting in substantial function impairment.” This permitted the addition of treatment for post traumatic stress disorders, depression, and anxiety, but there were still restrictions on provision of medication, hospitalization, and long-term therapy. The CCP program customarily operates for nine months following a grant award, which would have been the end of 2002, but in the New York area the deadline was extended to December 31, 2003. Longer-term mental health services, as well as financial support, and related social services for crime victims, are made possible by funding from the federal Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) through one hundred percent grants to state agencies. In New York, these resources were provided to the State Crime Victims Board, which contracts with public and private nonprofit agencies to furnish the services to eligible victims. Many agencies, such as Safe Horizon, one of the largest nonprofit crime victims’ organizations in the nation, received funding from both the CVB and Project Liberty to deliver services. FEMA’s Project Liberty grants could be used only for outreach-based, short-term counseling (with the recent liberalizations noted above), but CVB funds can be used for services for up to four years and can reimburse third-party providers. FEMA reported that, as of December 24, 2002, about $165 million had been approved for Project Liberty in New York and the four other states — by far the largest such grant in the 27-year history of the program and almost as much as had been awarded in all previous disasters combined. However, only about $65 million had actually been obligated, and figures were not available on numbers of people served. Foundations and other philanthropic organizations also made major commitments to provide for longer term therapy and other needs not covered by FEMA. The September 11th Fund allocated some $45$55 million for mental health benefits up to $3,000 for an estimated 15,000 people, as a supplement to existing health insurance or payment for treatment for those who do not have coverage. The New York Times Company Foundation’s 9/11 Neediest Cases Fund played a leadership role in elevating awareness of mental health impacts, especially among children, and made grants of more than $5 million in this area, chiefly to help with training and capacity-building of providers.

Recommendations for FEMA The FEMA Inspector General, in a December 2002 report, FEMA’s Delivery of Individual Assistance Programs: New York — September 11, 2001, concluded with issues “requiring FEMA’s attention.” The most significant of these, in relation to the subjects covered in this report, were that FEMA: • examine how to address individual economic loss; • develop “fair and equitable eligibility criteria . . . and . . . not appear arbitrary”; • reach “diverse ethnic populations in dense urban areas”;

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• recognize “the hardships of extremely low-income populations”; • broaden its outreach capability regarding non-English speaking victims; • pursue “legislative changes that would exempt FEMA’s [individual and household assistance] programs from the Federal public benefit classification when victims . . . are lawfully present . . . but may not have the qualified alien status required by Title IV of the [welfare reform act] of 1996.”; • simplify documentation requirements; • be “flexible in defining the time period” for assistance; • work with states to “ensure that the State contingency staffing plans can adapt to fluctuations in applicant activity”; • be “better able to anticipate the proactive role non-governmental organizations will play . . . and attempt to coordinate relationships with these organizations.” These recommendations seem highly appealing, but some may conflict with others. For example, application of fair and equitable procedures in a transparent fashion may not always be consistent with an attempt to be flexible.

Disaster Relief Medicaid The City’s Medicaid agency could not follow the usual procedures for enrolling or recertifying Medicaid recipients through the state’s Medicaid computer system because of telecommunications failures following 9/11. To deal with this crisis, Governor Pataki received a special waiver from the federal Medicaid agency that permitted a greatly streamlined application process.The Disaster Relief Medicaid (DRM) program, providing emergency four-month coverage, also put into effect the new Family Health Plus plan, a Medicaid expansion that was scheduled to be implemented in the fall of 2001 but was delayed as a result of the disaster. This new program allowed for higher income eligibility limits than before (from 87 to 133 percent of the federal poverty level for families), and dispensed with asset tests.

The FEMA Inspector General [recommended] that FEMA be “better able to anticipate the proactive role non-governmental organizations play . . . and attempt to coordinate relationships with these organizations.”

As reported in the November 14, 2002 Wall Street Journal, “fraud prevention took a back seat to getting help for needy people.” The application form was trimmed from eight pages to one; interviews took only about fifteen minutes rather than the traditional two or three separate three-hour sessions; applicants could qualify by verifying only their identity rather than having to produce reams of material; Medicaid workers made decisions on the spot at one of twenty-two community-based centers and coverage began immediately; and eligibility was broadened to include legal immigrants regardless of their date of entry in the U.S., as contrasted with the previous rule, enacted in the 1996 welfare reform law, that they had to have been in this country before August 22, 1996. Aggressive community outreach,

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media publicity, training Medicaid providers, and program assessment were made possible through grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the United Hospital Fund of New York, and the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Results

The Disaster Relief Medicaid program succeeded in enrolling nearly 350,000 people in four months, about ten times the usual volume for the same amount of time.

The DRM program succeeded in enrolling nearly 350,000 people in four months, about ten times the usual volume for the same amount of time. Preliminary research by the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, released in August 2002, found that enrollees made “heavy use” of preventive services such as check-ups and mammograms, as well as surgery, dental visits, prescriptions, and eye examinations. When emergency coverage began to expire, beginning January 31, 2002, DRM enrollees needed to complete a full application, provide the usual documentation, and appear for a personal interview at a regular Medicaid office. In the early stages of the transition, only about half of the DRM enrollees appeared for the recertification interview, a finding whose significance researchers sought to understand. Possible explanations included mistaken beliefs that the emergency coverage was still in effect, inability to read the HRA letter calling them in for an interview, undeliverable letters, or that fraud was committed in the DRM application and the beneficiaries feared discovery. Protection of taxpayers and philanthropic donors from fraud was a dominant element in government and philanthropic programs. The concluding sentence in an article about the DRM by Kathryn Haslanger of the United Hospital Fund of New York raises the important caution, not just for disaster relief but also more generally, that “fidelity to program integrity must do a better job so that procedures to screen out the ineligible do not exclude large numbers of eligibles.”

Air Pollution Destruction of the World Trade Center and severe damage to surrounding buildings caused release of such great quantities of debris, dust, and smoke that people in the area in the immediate aftermath of the event spoke of it as having been like night. There was concern about the extent to which exposure to these materials would cause health effects. EPA began air sampling in lower Manhattan and downwind locations, Brooklyn and Jersey City, with funding supplied by FEMA. EPA also oversaw removal of hazardous materials from the “Pile” at ground zero, cleaned up dust that had accumulated up to several inches thick on downtown streets, and cleaned the exteriors of about 200 buildings. It also established a network of about 20 monitors downtown and in adjacent areas to measure airborne dust particles and other contaminants released as a result of the burning and collapse of the World Trade Center. By late 2002, EPA issued a report finding that air contaminants in Lower Manhattan were “less likely to cause cancer and other long-term health problems than many had feared,” as reported in a December 24 article in the NewYork Times. The study found that most people

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living or working in the area around ground zero were “unlikely to suffer serious short- or long-term health effects . . . [but] anyone exposed in the early hours was at risk of chronic sickness, as many firefighters have already reported.” Despite these generally sanguine findings, many were still concerned about potential dangers. In response to intense pressure from residents and elected officials, EPA announced in May 2002 that it would, for the first time ever, carry out indoor clean-up, testing, and environmental remediation for any resident south of Canal Street who requested it.Through private contractors hired by the city’s Department of Environmental Protection, the cleaning included all hard surfaces, rugs, carpets, curtains, drapes, upholstered furnishings, air conditioner units, exterior balconies and terraces, exterior window ledges, and window guards. Contractors sought building owners’ permission to clean common areas, vacant apartments, and central HVAC systems. Following the cleaning, DEP/EPA contractors tested for asbestos in all residences, and for dioxins and twenty-three elements in a sample of about 250 homes, and followed up when unacceptable levels were found. Residents were promised that they would receive test results within four to six weeks. Commercial properties were not included in the EPA program, which referred business owners to the SBA for loans for these purposes.

Protection of taxpayers and philanthropic donors from fraud was a dominant element in government and philanthropic programs.

Using city-furnished census data, EPA estimated there were 20,000–30,000 eligible residences. As of January 21, 2003, Mary Mears of EPA estimated that about 6,700 units had been cleaned, but was unable to furnish any information about costs.

Health Monitoring The Environmental Protection Agency may have felt that there was little remaining danger, but community and occupational health professionals following rescue workers exposed to contamination after 9/11 were not so sure. In late January 2003, Dr. Stephen M. Levin of Mount Sinai Medical Center announced initial results from his team’s clinical work-ups of some 3,500 ground zero workers, made possible with $12 million in federal funding through one of the emergency supplemental appropriations bills enacted in 2002 to help fulfill President Bush’s $20 billion pledge. As reported in the January 31 New York Times, Dr. Levin found that, of a sample of 250 examinations, three-fourths still had respiratory problems ten months after the attack, half had lung-related complaints, and half were experiencing psychological trauma warranting further review. It was estimated that as many as 35,000 workers and volunteers spent time at or adjacent to ground zero in the days following September 11. Senator Clinton pushed strongly for additional federal appropriations, up to a total of $90 million, to support continuation of Dr. Levin’s work. Philanthropic contributions to health monitoring were made by the September 11th Fund. Other studies turned up similarly troubling findings. A Centers for Disease Control telephone survey of a sample of Manhattan residents five to nine weeks following September 11, found that among the 13 percent of adults with asthma, 27 percent reported more severe asthma symptoms after the attack. In an October 17, 2002 Forum on World Trade Center health effects, the director of the NYU-National Institute of

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Environmental Health Sciences Center reported that “premature declarations of ‘safety’ were in contrast to the ‘World Trade Center Cough’ experience of many people in lower Manhattan,” and that “this increased both distrust of government and the public’s concerns about health risks.”

World Trade Center Registry

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene created a registry for long-term tracking . . . of the health status of the . . . people who lived or worked near the World Trade Center . . . .

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene created a registry for longterm tracking and monitoring of the health status of the estimated 100,000–200,000 people who lived or worked near the World Trade Center site between September 11, 2001 and June 30, 2002. The registry, similar to one that was compiled following the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, uses periodic surveys to measure short- and long-term health and mental health effects of exposures to the attacks and ensuing smoke, dust, and airborne substances. The registry seeks to identify patterns of illness and pinpoint their origins, evaluate possible risks, and provide prevention and public health policy information to all New Yorkers and others who were affected. Dr. Pauline Thomas, assistant commissioner of the bureau of surveillance of the City Health Department, believes that the comprehensive registry is an essential means of establishing whether clinical reports of high incidences of certain conditions among small samples were reflective of “background” health conditions of a large population. Dr. Thomas also believes that such a study is necessary as a means of resolving “lingering anxiety” among the public. The registry was expected to begin in the spring of 2003, and ideally would continue until 2021 if sufficient funding is made available.The initial $20 million was provided by FEMA to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, whose Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, an environmental public health group, was working with the City Health Department on the registry. Officials emphasized that the registry will not include medical diagnoses or clinical examinations, but people who say in the interviews that they are still sick would be provided with referrals, including referrals to Project Liberty for respondents experiencing emotional or other mental health problems.

Employment Services Federal aid to help individuals cope with disasters focuses on short-term relief. Disaster Unemployment Assistance is no exception, since it provides minimal benefits for a short period of time until people can find new jobs. Adjustments to permanent changes in the labor market are not addressed as part of disaster response. Accordingly, employment services to help people improve their skills or find new jobs is an overlooked subject in the standard federal disaster response programs. The Consortium for Worker Education (CWE), a nonprofit organization sponsored by the New York City Central Labor Council and its forty-six affiliated unions, gained a special $32.5 million appropriation in one of the emergency supplemental appropriations bills introduced to fulfill the president’s $20 billion commitment.With this funding, CWE created an Emergency Employment Clearinghouse to assist some of the “80,000 workers

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. . . displaced by the World Trade Center attacks either directly or indirectly” through such services as job placement assistance, career advancement counseling and referrals, and education and training to teach new skills. The Center was also supported by philanthropic organizations, including the September 11th Fund, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the McCormick Tribune Foundation, whose grant was designated to help undocumented workers gain new or improved skills.The September 11th Fund also allocated more than $50 million for other employment training programs, including payment of stipends for trainees. The Consortium for Worker Education entered into agreements with some 160 firms that committed to a program of job retention, rehiring, and new hires. For some of these firms, CWE subsidized approximately one-half the wages, for periods up to ninety days, for jobs that paid no more than $25/hour, with a maximum subsidy of $100,000 per company.

WHAT HAS BEEN LEARNED The purpose of this study has been to increase public understanding of lessons learned in the overall government-philanthropic relief effort, suggest a framework for preparation for future similar events, and highlight unresolved public policy issues arising from the 9/11 experience. The nation was tragically unprepared for the worst attacks on U.S. soil by a foreign enemy since the War of 1812. As a result, governmental, private, and philanthropic organizations were forced to create, in the midst of turmoil and grief, new procedures to respond to the disaster. Despite widespread public and media criticism pointing out one shortcoming or another, this effort was in fact remarkably successful overall. Funds provided by both the federal government and philanthropic entities far surpassed the amounts in any previous disaster, and the allocations for some government aid programs exceeded the totals distributed for all previous disasters combined. Moreover, in numerous instances government agencies and philanthropic organizations demonstrated unaccustomed flexibility, agility, and speed in assisting individuals, families, small businesses, and nonprofit organizations.

Human suffering was alleviated by the rapid and creative philanthropic responses that in many cases preceded significant similar aid by the lead federal disaster agency.

Following is a brief summary of lessons learned in this experience. • Human suffering was alleviated by the rapid and creative philanthropic responses that in many cases preceded significant similar aid by the lead federal disaster agency. • Conventional philanthropic planning and decision-making processes must be streamlined and made very flexible in responding to fast-moving emergency circumstances. • Philanthropic speed and flexibility are not necessarily attended by widespread fraud. • Cash gifts can ease anxieties about financial needs, but no formula for distributing this assistance will be greeted by universal acceptance or solve complex problems of loss, stress, or unemployment. • Because of the real possibility of future terrorist attacks on cities, FEMA should prepare for large-scale urban calamities by expanding its current capacity to deal with individual and family needs traditionally geared to natural disasters in sparsely populated areas.

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• Changes in federal law lifting the limitations on charitable payments to the financially needy, and establishment of the federal September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, may have distorted the public perception of the role of philanthropy by creating an expectation that its purpose is to provide financial compensation for lost life.

The long-term recovery process was aided by the fact that some philanthropic organizations reserved funds for later use to meet individual, family, and community needs. . . .

• The long-term recovery process was aided by the fact that some philanthropic organizations reserved funds for later use to meet individual, family, and community needs whose exact dimensions were not immediately apparent in the chaotic weeks following 9/11. • New York City and the metropolitan area benefited from the controversial decisions of some foundations to direct 9/11-related resources to shoring up nonprofit organizations including arts and culture groups. • Even with many agencies’ work over many months, there remain uncounted thousands who did not receive adequate assistance. • The major relief agencies need to continue and make permanent their work in developing a simplified one-stop application process in preparation for use in another disaster. • Questions about donor intent in emergency fundraising can be avoided by unambiguous appeals and, if questions arise, can be addressed by polling donors and the general public at various times after the emergency. • In a future event of this magnitude, the major philanthropies should expand their efforts to provide frequent in-depth media briefings on their activities.

Public Policy The lead federal disaster agency, FEMA, is better equipped to deal with the aftermath of natural disasters, such as floods in rural areas, than it is to work in complex urban settings. It is more effective in providing aid to state and local government than to individuals and families. FEMA’s individual and family assistance programs failed to help many people who needed them, or provided help only after extensive delays and, finally, Congressional action. FEMA guidelines contemplate replacement of physical loss, not compensation for economic setbacks like those experienced by thousands of jobless New Yorkers. FEMA’s requirement that individuals demonstrate that their job was eliminated as a “direct” result of the attacks failed to recognize widespread economic impacts throughout the region, and caused thousands of needy people to go without financial assistance for their mortgage and rental payments. FEMA’s Inspector General’s report of December 2002 contains numerous recommendations for remedying many of these shortcomings, including the need to address economic losses, development of “fair and equitable eligibility criteria,” and the importance of reaching “diverse ethnic populations in dense urban areas.” Some recovery needs are not addressed in the authorizing statutes for federal disaster relief programs, and special Congressional action and philanthropic organizations filled the gaps. Chief among these were employment training and readjustment, financial assistance for very small businesses with inadequate collateral for SBA loans, indoor cleaning and environmental remediation, and health monitoring and treatment. The ad hoc approach

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has provided needed relief to many people and businesses, but in the process engendered confusion about eligibility criteria and procedures and diminished the credibility of government. It was unclear in these and other areas where the responsibility of government ended and that of philanthropy began, or where individuals and organizations or their insurance policies were responsible for their own recovery. The federal government needs to decide whether to create new programs with defined criteria to meet these needs in future disasters. Perhaps the most important philosophical and public policy issue arising from the response to 9/11 has to do with the concept of compensation of surviving families for the death of a loved one. By far the largest share of government and philanthropic aid distributed for humanitarian purposes — about $5.8 billion of a total $8.6 billion — was for this use. An unprecedented federal September 11th Victim Compensation Fund was established for 9/11 survivors, but families of victims of other terrorist disasters, such as the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, were not included. Philanthropic organizations distributed an estimated $800 million to the approximately 3,200 families of people who died or were seriously injured in the attacks in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Much of this occurred because of intense media pressure insisting that this was the intention of donors to various relief funds. To facilitate the distributions, Congress did away with the long-standing criterion of financial need for receipt of charitable donations. This has created an impression that one of the purposes of philanthropy is to compensate for lost life. Congress and the philanthropic sector need to decide if this concept will be a precedent for philanthropic responses to future disasters.

Some recovery needs are not addressed in the authorizing statutes for federal disaster relief programs, and special Congressional action and philanthropic organizations filled the gaps.

To address these and related policy issues, Congress should consider creating and funding a Disaster Relief and Recovery Commission with leadership representation from philanthropy, business, the media, and federal, state, and local government, to clarify the disaster-related relief and recovery responsibilities of government, philanthropy, insurance, and individuals. The commission could draw upon the substantial body of relevant investigation and research done in the aftermath of the September 11th emergency, examining problems identified, good practices described and recommendations made in the GAO reports on charitable performance and small business assistance programs; the FEMA Inspector General’s report; the two Ford Foundation/Thomas Edison State College reports; Foundation Center reports; the Stanford Graduate School of Business case study of the September 11th Fund; the United Way of New York City’s report on the September 11th Fund; the LBG Associates report on corporate responses to disaster relief; and the Century Foundation report on media coverage of the philanthropic response. Problems and policy issues discussed in this report have received scant systematic attention from policymakers. This is unfortunate, because they bear on our preparedness for future similar events and affect public confidence in government and philanthropy. They raise important questions about:

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• the extent of federal responsibility to restore communities, individuals, and families to their pre-disaster state; • the role of philanthropy vis-à-vis government at all levels; • coordination of effort; • the purposes and criteria for financial aid for individuals and businesses; and

Problems and policy issues discussed in this report have received scant systematic attention from policymakers.

• the operations of important government and charitable institutions.

Recommendations The report’s four major recommendations are:

1. Encourage major cities to draw up coordinated contingency plans. In anticipation of future similar attacks, major urban areas might do well to develop a contingency plan and locations for one-stop service centers, including a list of agencies and services, a protocol for uniform intake, a system for digitizing and sharing information, and provisions for coordinated case management. Such measures would save time and maximize assistance for grief-stricken and traumatized individuals.

2. Establish a federal commission. The U.S. Congress should consider creating and funding a Disaster Relief and Recovery Commission with leadership representation from philanthropy, business, the media, and federal, state, and local government.The commission’s charge would be to: • clarify the disaster-related relief and recovery responsibilities of government, philanthropy, insurance, and individuals, with attention to filling key gaps; • review and refine the purposes and procedures of existing federal programs and suggest new elements and changes in existing elements to improve efficiency and responsiveness; • establish principles about financial awards for individuals and businesses, including taxation of recovery grants to businesses, with special attention to eligibility of immigrants for government disaster relief assistance; • assume responsibility for implementing the GAO’s recommendation that FEMA convene a working group of government and philanthropic leaders to develop better means of philanthropic coordination.

3. Encourage philanthropy to clarify charitable appeals. The philanthropic sector needs to consider questions that arose about the intentions of donors to 9/11 relief funds. Charities soliciting from the general public need to meet two conflicting challenges. Their appeals should be specific enough to tell the potential donor how the funds will be used, but broad enough to permit flexibility to respond to needs as they become known. Charitable funds that plan to assist activities not contemplated in the

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solicitation should review the experience of the September 11th Fund, which conducted public opinion surveys, including respondents who did and did not give to a 9/11-related cause, both in New York City and elsewhere.

4. Clarify victim compensation. By doing away with the long-standing criterion of financial need for receipt of charitable donations, Congress made it possible for philanthropic organizations to compensate for lost life. Congress and the philanthropic sector need to decide if this will be a precedent for philanthropic responses to future disasters.

[Charitable] appeals should be specific enough to tell the potential donor how the funds will be used, but broad enough to permit flexibility to respond to needs as they become known.

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September 11 Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy

During 2002 and 2003, the staff of Philanthropy News Digest (PND) conducted interviews with leaders from the nonprofit sector on various aspects of the response to the September 11 attacks.These interviews were later collected in September 11: Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy, volumes one and two. The interviews, listed below, are available as part of PND’s Newsmakers series (www.fdncenter.org/pnd/ newsmakers/). In addition, each volume of collected interviews is available as a downloadable PDF file at www.fdncenter.org/research/ 911/book.html and www.fdncenter.org/research/911/ book2.html. VOLUME ONE Disaster Relief, Donor Intent, and Public Accountability Mark Edelman, American Red Cross

Regulating Charitable Relief Marla Simpson and Karin Goldman, New York State Charities Bureau

Supporting the Recovery of Nonprofit Organizations Clara Miller, Nonprofit Finance Fund

Assessing the Economic Impact on Chinatown Christopher Kui, Asian Americans for Equality

Impact on the Arts Virginia Louloudes, Alliance of Resident Theatres/New York

The Challenges for Human Services Ralph Dickerson and Larry Mandell, United Way of New York City

Maximizing America’s Generosity Lorie Slutsky, New York Community Trust

Assessing Immediate and Longer-Term Needs Joshua Gotbaum, September 11th Fund

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Cash Assistance for Immediate Needs Gordon J. Campbell, Safe Horizon

Coordinating Support for Long-Term Educational Needs Charles “Chip” Raymond, Citigroup Foundation

Civil Liberties and September 11 Gara LaMarche, Open Society Institute

September 11 as Symptom Robert K. Ross, California Endowment

Terrorism, Civil Society, and International Security Jonathan F. Fanton, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

September 11 and Beyond Susan V. Berresford, Ford Foundation.

VOLUME TWO Philanthropy and Domestic Terrorism Nancy Anthony, Oklahoma City Community Foundation

Mobilizing Resources to Meet the Needs of Pentagon Families Terri Lee Freeman, Community Foundation for the National Capital Region

Helping Undocumented Immigrants in the Wake of 9/11 Teresa Garcia, Asociación Tepeyac de New York

The Impact of 9/11 on Low-Income Workers David R. Jones, Community Service Society of New York

Forging Connections in Response to Disaster Jack Rosenthal, New York Times Company Foundation

Helping the Arts and Artists Recover in the Wake of 9/11 Theodore S. Berger, New York Foundation for the Arts

Working to Expand Access to Higher Education for All Americans Martha Lamkin, Lumina Foundation for Education

Philanthropy in a Post-9/11 World Vartan Gregorian, Carnegie Corporation of New York

Democracy as an Antidote to Terrorism Benjamin R. Barber, author

Development and Democracy in Post-9/11 Asia William Fuller, Asia Foundation

Human Rights in an Age of Terror Ken Roth, Human Rights Watch

September 11 and the Arab American Community James Zogby, Arab American Institute

The Media Response to 9/11 Hodding Carter III, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Media, Charity, and Philanthropy in the Aftermath of September 11 Paula DiPerna, author

Coordinating Service Delivery to Victims of the World Trade Center Attack Stephen Solender, 9/11 United Services Group

Meeting the Long-Term Needs of Individuals, Families, and Communities Carol Kellerman, September 11th Fund

The Oral History of 9/11 Mary Marshall Clark, Oral History Research Office, Columbia University

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September 11 A Timeline

The following pages outline, in timeline form, the unfolding of events on and after September 11, 2001, including the responses of private philanthropy, government agencies, and the media during the period covered. This is not meant to be a definitive record. Its purpose is to depict the various responses to the attacks and their aftermath and to provide context for the commentaries and reports in this compendium volume and elsewhere. Commentary, analysis, and distillation of lessons learned are crucial for further developing policy and practice concerning disaster response. Inevitably, however, any consideration of 9/11

LEGEND Events Significant events related to the hijacking of four commercial airliners on the morning of September 11, 2001, their use in strikes against targets in New York and Washington, DC, and subsequent developments.

Government response Significant events related to the federal, state, and municipal response to the September 11 attacks and their aftermath.

Philanthropic response Significant events related to the institutional philanthropic response to the September 11 attacks and their aftermath.

Media response An overview of the print and broadcast media coverage of the September 11 attacks and their aftermath.

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must take into account the unprecedented challenges presented by that awful day: the suddenness and utter unexpectedness of the precipitating events, the time required to identify the full array of needs, confusion about the role philanthropy should play with respect to emergency relief and compensation, and the difficulties of coordinating the public/private response when existing programs and procedures were clearly inadequate. The timeline format can remind us of another important consideration: the powerful emotional response of a horror- and grief-stricken nation.

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Events Government Response Philanthropic Response Media Response

September 11, 2001 7:59 a.m. American Airlines Flight 11, bound for Los Angeles, departs Boston’s Logan International Airport 8:14 a.m. United Airlines Flight 175, also bound for Los Angeles, departs Logan International Airport 8:20 a.m. American Airlines Flight 77, bound for Los Angeles, departs Dulles International Airport in Washington, DC 8:40 a.m. Boston flight control notifies NORAD American Airlines Flight 11 has been hijacked 8:42 a.m United Airlines Flight 93, bound for San Francisco, departs Newark International Airport 8:43 a.m. FAA notifies NORAD that United Airlines Flight 175 has been hijacked 8:45 a.m. American Airlines Flight 11, with 81 passengers and 11 crew on board, slams into north tower of World Trade Center

A TIMELINE

10:45 a.m. All federal office buildings in Washington evacuated 10:53 a.m. New York’s primary election, scheduled for the 11th, is cancelled 10:57 a.m. New York governor George Pataki orders all state offices closed 11:02 a.m. New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani orders evacuation of Manhattan south of Canal Street 12:04 p.m. Los Angeles International Airport, destination of three of the four hijacked planes, is evacuated 12:15 p.m. San Francisco International Airport, the destination of Flight 93, is evacuated 1:27 p.m. State of emergency declared by the city of Washington 2:30 FAA says commercial air traffic will not resume until noon, Wednesday, at the earliest

8:48 a.m. First TV and radio reports about events at World Trade Center broadcast

2:49 p.m. Mayor Giuliani appears at a news conference and reports that subway and bus service in Manhattan has been partially restored

9:03 a.m. United Flight 175, with 56 passengers and 9 crew members on board, crashes into south tower of World Trade Center

4:00 p.m. CNN reports there are “good indications” Osama bin Laden is involved in the attacks

9:17 a.m. FAA shuts down all New York City-area airports

5:20 p.m. Building 7, a 47-story structure at the World Trade Center complex, collapses

9:21 a.m. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey orders all bridges and tunnels into New York area closed

7:02 p.m. CNN reports the Marriott Hotel near the WTC is on the verge of collapse

9:30 a.m. President Bush, speaking in Florida, says the country has suffered an “apparent terrorist attack”

7:45 p.m. New York Police Dept. reports 78 officers missing and says that as many as half of the 400 firefighters on the scene were killed

9:38 a.m. American Airlines Flight 77, with 58 passengers and 6 crew members on board, slams into west side of Pentagon

8:30 p.m. President Bush addresses the nation, saying U.S. will make no distinction between the terrorists who committed the acts and those who harbor them

9:40 a.m. FAA halts flight operations across the country 9:45 a.m. White House is evacuated 10:05 a.m. South Tower of the World Trade Center collapses, producing massive debris cloud 10:10 a.m. Portion of the Pentagon's west wall collapses 10:10 a.m. United Flight 93, with 38 passengers and 7 crew members on board, crashes in a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, southeast of Pittsburgh 10:13 a.m. United Nations building in New York City evacuated 10:22 a.m. In Washington, State and Justice Departments evacuated

September 12 At 8:45 a.m., European stock markets cease trading to observe a moment of silence New York Community Trust and United Way of New York City issue joint press release announcing creation of September 11th Fund New York Times Company Foundation creates New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, the first-ever special campaign of New York Times Neediest Cases Fund At West Side headquarters of New York City Chapter of the Red Cross, lines of blood donors, volunteers stretch around the block; Red Cross Web site crashes from load placed on it by would-be donors and volunteers Tulsa-based Williams Energy Company announces $1 million pledge to September 11th Fund

10:28 a.m. North Tower of the World Trade Center collapses, producing second massive debris cloud

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September 13, 2001

September 18

Port of New York, which had closed after second tower was hit, reopens for business

Governor George Pataki promises free college education to family members of 9/11 victims who attend a New York State institution

Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment pledges $30 million to 9/11 relief and recovery efforts

September 11th Fund okays first grant — $1.2 million, to Safe Horizon

General Electric Co. announces contribution of $10 million for families of New York firefighters, police officers, and rescue workers killed or missing in attack; Cisco Systems, Inc. contributes $6 million to Red Cross and other relief groups

Leading high-tech firms, including AOL/Time Warner, Microsoft, Amazon, Ebay, Cisco Systems and Yahoo, form American Liberty Partnership to encourage online giving for 9/11 victims via libertyunites.org September 19

“For Arab Americans, A Familiar Backlash,” Hanna Rosin, Washington Post

Governor Pataki signs Disaster Relief Medicaid program into law

September 14

“People, Firms Are Giving Big to Relief Efforts,” Jacqueline Salmon, Washington Post

President Bush, accompanied by Rudy Giuliani, George Pataki, and a New York congressional delegation, visits ground zero

September 20

FBI announces identities of 19 alleged hijackers and launches biggest investigation in its history; Attorney General John Ashcroft says all roads lead to Osama bin Laden

Appearing before a joint session of Congress, President Bush warns, “Every nation, in every region, now has a decision to make…either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists.”

Bond brokerage firm Cantor Fitzgerald, scrambling to account for more than 700 missing employees, announces establishment of Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund

Cantor Fitzgerald CEO Howard Lutnick pledges 25 percent of the firm’s profits to the relatives of the more than 700 employees missing since September 11

Ford and Starr foundations, both New York City-based, pledge $10 million each to relief and recovery efforts Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation pledges $3 million to relief and recovery efforts Hollywood executives begin to organize telethon for victims of the attacks; September 11th Fund designated to receive proceeds

September 21 By vote of 356-54 in House and 96-1 in Senate, Congress passes $15 billion Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act, creating Sept. 11th Victim Compensation Fund to protect industry from ruinous law suits

“Disaster May Tax Charities,” Aaron Donovan, New York Times

Tribute to Heroes telethon benefiting September 11th Fund raises $128 million for victims of the attacks

September 15

New York City-based Rockefeller Foundation and New Jersey-based Robert Wood Johnson Foundation commit $5 million each to support individuals and communities affected by the attacks

In New York, estimates of the dead and missing hover near 6,000; only 150 bodies recovered DaimlerChrysler AG pledges $10 million to relief and recovery efforts; German media giant Bertelsmann AG promises $2 million to surviving families of New York firefighters and police officers Red Cross president Bernadine Healy circulates memo to Red Cross chapters alerting them to decision to segregate Sept. 11 donations in a separate fund Donations to the September 11th Fund reach $100 million “Companies Pledge $100 Million in Relief,” Tamar Lewin, New York Times “’Charity’ Scams Starting to Appear: Red Cross Says Illicit Web Sites Collecting Funds in Its Name, Vows to Prosecute,” Christian Davenport, Washington Post “A Wide, Aggressive Probe Collides With Civil Rights: Innocent People May Face Questioning, Experts Say,” Serge F. Kovaleski, Washington Post September 17 Stock exchanges reopen for business; record 2.3 billion shares trade by close U.S. airlines receive letters from insurers informing them that policies for terror-related crashes will be canceled as of following Monday Carnegie Corporation of New York pledges $10 million to relief and recovery efforts

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Events Government Response Philanthropic Response Media Response

Cable news personality Bill O’Reilly devotes portion of The O’Reilly Factor to charitable response to 9/11 and Tribute to Heroes telethon “As Relief Money Pours In, Charities Fear the Impact,” Nina Bernstein, New York Times September 22 “Relief Funds Growing: Challenge Now Becomes Dispersing Aid Fairly,” Robert Polner, New York Newsday September 24 U.S. authorities freeze the assets of 27 groups and individuals, many of them Islamic charities, alleged to be funding terrorist organizations “Other Causes Hurting,” Hannelle Rubin, New York Post September 25 U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft appears before Senate Judiciary Committee to argue for new anti-terrorist legislation Red Cross president Bernadine Healy announces Family Grant Program, which will use money in Liberty Fund — more than $200 million — to provide three months’ living expenses to victims’ families “Plan to List Who Receives Disaster Aid Stirs Concern,” David Barstow and Diana B. Henriques, New York Times


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A TIMELINE

September 26

October 4

New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer suggests that FEMA, private donor agencies create and share a common database that includes names of individuals each had assisted

Ford Foundation announces additional $1.2 million in grants for recovery efforts in Washington, DC

“On Pier 94, a Welfare State That Works, and a Possible Model for the Future,” Nina Bernstein, New York Times “Volunteerism in U.S. Surges Following Terrorist Attacks,” Kelly Greene, Wall Street Journal “Red Cross Distributing $100 Million; Payments to Help the Families of Terrorist Attack Victims,” Jacqueline Salmon, Washington Post

New York Regional Association of Grantmakers hosts meeting at Ford Foundation to encourage exchange of information among regional grantmakers Donations to September 11th Fund pass $200 million mark Bernadine Healy appears on The O’Reilly Factor “In the Face of Disaster Red Cross President Bernadine Healy Activated Her Troops — and Riled Her Critics,” Paul Farhi, Washington Post

September 27 FBI releases photographs, names, and aliases of the 19 hijackers “Some Might Slip Between Cracks of Disaster Aid,” David Bank and Anne Marie Chaker, Wall Street Journal “Worries Over Record Relief Giving: Watchdogs Say Cash Coming Too Fast to Monitor,” Todd Wallack, San Francisco Chronicle September 28 Meeting of foundation, corporate, and local government leaders at Carnegie Corporation of New York to discuss information sharing in wake of attacks Red Cross president Bernadine Healy tells board she has “categorically rejected” Eliot Spitzer’s suggestion that Red Cross participate in creation of common database

October 6 “For Muslims, Benevolence Is Prevailing Over Backlash,” Caryle Murphy, Washington Post October 7 U.S. launches air campaign against Taliban targets and al-Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan By executive order, President Bush establishes Office of Homeland Security; Pennsylvania governor Tom Ridge named director “Nearly $1 Billion Has Been Donated…Nonprofits Struggle With How to Disperse It Fairly,” New York Newsday “Flow of Cash for the Victims Leaves Other Causes Bereft; Some Recast Their Pitches,” David Bank and Ann Marie Chaker, Wall Street Journal

“Destroyed Computer Links Leave Thousands of Poor People Without Welfare Benefits,” Nina Bernstein, New York Times

October 9

“Welfare Applications Affected; WTC Attack Disrupts Computer Processing,” Lauren Terrazzano, New York Newsday

Stuyvesant High School, five blocks from ground zero, reopens after a thorough cleanup

September 29

October 10

Former President Bill Clinton and former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole named honorary co-chairs of Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund

Bush administration releases list of the 22 “most wanted” terrorists; the list is topped by Osama bin Laden and his deputy, Ayman al-Zawahri

September 30

Miami-based John S. and James L. Knight Foundation pledges $5 million for post-terrorist activities and Flight 93 memorial efforts

“Aid Groups Face Unusual Quandries: Officials Scramble to Decide How, Whom to Help With Quickly Raised Millions,” Jacqueline Salmon, Washington Post

October 11

October 1

Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal offers $10 million donation to the Twin Towers Fund; Mayor Rudolph Giuliani refuses the donation later that afternoon

U.S. investigators report they have established financial links between al-Qaeda and the 19 hijackers

Senate, by vote of 100-0, passes Airline Security bill requiring federalization of airport screening function “as soon as practicable”

Japanese Red Cross gives $7.2 million to Red Cross’ Liberty Fund

Senate, by vote of 99-1, passes USA PATRIOT Act

Red Cross president Bernadine Healy appears on CBS Morning News and defends the organization’s confidentiality policy

U.S. adds names of 37 individuals and institutions to the list of entities whose assets it has frozen

October 3

House, by vote of 337-79, passes version of PATRIOT Act virtually identical to version passed by Senate

At executive committee meeting of Red Cross board, Bernadine Healy apologizes for having made decision to segregate 9/11 funds without board vote; board votes unanimous approval of specially designated Liberty Fund

Red Cross estimates it will spend more than $300 million over the next several months to provide ongoing disaster relief services following the 9/11 attacks — the costliest and most extensive response to any disaster in the organization’s 120-year history Fannie Mae Corporation makes $5 million donation to Community Foundation for the National Capital Region’s Survivors Fund to benefit the long-term needs of DC-area victims

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October 11, 2001, continued

October 27

“$850 Million for Charity, Not Centrally Monitored,” David Barstow, New York Times

“Disaster Fades Into the Past, But Generosity Does Not,” Aaron Donovan, New York Times

October 14

October 28

“Outside New York, Charities Feel the Pinch,” Tamar Lewin, New York Times

“Charity Abundant, But So Is Red Tape, After Terror Attack,” David Barstow and Diana B. Henriques, New York Times

“Partners of Gay Victims Find the Law Calls Them Strangers,” Denny Lee, New York Times “Victims’ Kin Still Wait for Charity Cash,” Susan Edelman, New York Post October 16 September 11th Fund announces appointment of Franklin Thomas, former president of Ford Foundation, and Joshua Gotbaum, former controller of Office of Management and Budget, as chairman and president/CEO, respectively Donations to September 11 relief funds hit $1 billion; Red Cross announces it may use a portion of the $450 million it has collected for 9/11 relief efforts for future disasters At Madison Square Garden, the Concert for New York City featuring Paul McCartney, Bon Jovi, the Who, and others raises more than $30 million for 9/11 victims “Red Cross Donations Earmarked for Future; Agency May Have Enough for Terror Victims,” Todd Wallack, San Francisco Chronicle “Giving Too Big a Hand?” Nanette Byrnes and David Henry, Business Week October 21 United We Stand, an 11-hour benefit concert for victims of the attack on the Pentagon, raises $2 million In Nashville, top country music stars participate in the third concert of the weekend to benefit victims of the 9/11 attacks

October 29 Federal government issues advisory to 18,000 state and local law enforcement agencies warning of potential al-Qaeda strike in the United States October 30 House, by vote of 218-214, passes its version of the Airline Security bill Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA), ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, calls for greater federal oversight of disbursement of more than $1 billion in donations to victims of 9/11 attacks Interim CEO Howard Decker announces Red Cross will stop soliciting contributions to Liberty Fund, which has received $547 million September 11th Fund announces 34 new grants to relief organizations On The O’Reilly Factor, O’Reilly focuses on the Tribute to Heroes telethon fund and the fact it has distributed $35 million of $230 million raised to date “Aid to Terror Victims: Our View: New Beneficiaries May Be Deserving, But Donors Were Misled,” editorial, USA Today “Senator Wants Federal Oversight of Charitable Money,” Tanya Ballard, GovExec.com “Tax Report: Charities Cheer a Treasury Move Designed to Boost Donations,” Tom Herman, Wall Street Journal “New Yorkers Struggle Under a Double Blow,” Michael Powell, Washington Post

Open letter signed by Bernadine Healy runs in USA Today, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Boston Herald, Chicago Tribune, and Los Angeles Times

November 1

Board of Red Cross votes to ask for Bernadine Healy’s resignation; decides to name Harold Decker, organization’s general counsel, as interim CEO

House Subcommittee on Oversight of the Committee on Ways and Means announces it will hold a hearing on the response by charitable organizations to 9/11 attacks

Red Cross president Bernadine Healy announces her resignation at what she later calls “the press conference from hell”

NPR’s Talk of the Nation invites calls from listeners “who were worried that the funds they had contributed might not be well spent”

President Bush signs USA PATRIOT Act into law

Chronicle of Philanthropy includes lengthy article about troubles at the Red Cross

On CNN’s Moneyline, anchor Lou Dobbs looks at the matter of benefit concerts and concludes that none of the money raised had been disbursed to date “Tax Issues Loom for Recipients of Sept. 11 Aid,” Ann Marie Chaker, Wall Street Journal “Red Cross Agrees to Database,” David Barstow, New York Times “Red Cross Faces Big Task; Also Confronted by Critics” Dave Saltonstall, New York Daily News “Red Cross Yielding on Victims Database,” Peggy McGlone, New Jersey Star-Ledger “Red Cross President Is Resigning,” Laura Meckler, Associated Press

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Events Government Response Philanthropic Response Media Response

Hundreds of New York City firemen show up at City Hall to protest decision by Mayor Giuliani to cut back on number of firemen assigned to ground zero cleanup November 5 “The Charity Olympics…Americans Want to Know Is That Money Helping?” Josh Tyrangiel, Time November 6 Billionaire media tycoon Michael Bloomberg narrowly defeats Public Advocate Mark Green in New York City mayoral election


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A TIMELINE

November 13

Appearing before House Energy Committee’s Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, Bernadine Healy defends her organization’s decision to set aside aside $264 million of the $564 million it has raised since September 11

Northern Alliance troops enter Kabul, capital of Afghanistan, as Taliban forces flee southward to Kandahar

“Debate Over Rules for Victims Fund,” David Barstow and Diana B. Henriques, New York Times

November 14

“New York City Mayor’s Twin Towers Fund Raised $100 Million, But Hasn’t Paid a Cent,” David Bank, Wall Street Journal

Red Cross announces that money remaining in Liberty Fund — $390 million — will be used exclusively to meet the immediate and long-term needs of direct and indirect victims of 9/11

“Red Cross May Triple Aid to Victims,” Hayah El Nassar, USA Today November 17 November 7 The names of 62 groups and people are added to a list of suspected supporters of terrorism Executive board of the Red Cross decides to distribute rest of money in Liberty Fund to victims and to extend Family Grant Program for up to a year Twin Towers Fund, which has raised $85 million to date, announces first round of awards to families of rescue workers who lost their lives in 9/11 attacks Josh Gotbaum, president and CEO of September 11th Fund, appears on Hardball with Chris Matthews “In Congress, Harsh Words for Red Cross,” David Barstow, New York Times “Red Cross Defends Use of Donations,” Mary Flaherty, Wall Street Journal November 8 Subcommittee on Oversight of the Committee on Ways and Means holds hearing on the response by charitable organizations to the 9/11 attacks

Twin Towers Fund announces it has mailed checks averaging $124,000 to the families of 197 rescue workers killed in 9/11 attack “I.R.S. Makes an Exception on Terror Aid,” David Barstow and Diana B. Henriques, New York Times November 18 “Arts Groups Are Reeling in Wake of the Attacks,” Robin Pogrebin, New York Times November 19 President Bush signs Aviation and Transportation Act, creating Transportation Security Administration within Dept. of Transportation November 20 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation announces creation of $50 million fund to assist New York cultural and performing arts organizations California Endowment announces grants of $3 million to help displaced hospitality/tourism workers in the state “Foundation Starts $50 Million Fund for Arts Groups Hurt By Terrorism,” Karen Arenson, New York Times

November 9 Department of Justice releases order formalizing plan to interview men between ages of 18 and 33 who entered the country on visas from countries suspected of harboring terrorists

November 23 “Disaster Gives the Uninsured Wider Access to Medicaid,” Kathryn E. Finkelstein, New York Times

September 11th Fund announces $14 million in new grants for individuals and organizations affected by the 9/11 attacks

November 26

November 12

Attorney General Ashcroft names Kenneth Feinberg special master of the Sept. 11th Victim Compensation Fund

American Airlines Flight 587, bound for the Dominican Republic, crashes minutes after takeoff from Kennedy International Airport in Rockaway, a Queens neighborhood

Joshua Gotbaum makes a second appearance on The O’Reilly Factor and is questioned about the necessity of having two funds — the main fund and the telethon fund

McCormick Tribune Disaster Relief Fund announces it has raised more than $20 million for 9/11 recovery efforts MacArthur Foundation establishes $5 million fund to make grants related to aftermath of 9/11 attacks “Victims’ Funds May Violate U.S. Tax Law,” David Barstow and Diana B. Henriques, New York Times “Charities Get a Big Helping of Uncertainty,” John O’Neil, New York Times “The I.R.S. Moves Rapidly to Process New Charities,” Jay Tokasz, New York Times

November 27 U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft says 600 people are in federal custody in connection with investigations into the 9/11 attacks; most are held on immigration violations Safe Horizon implements 24-hour Safe Horizon September 11th Support Hotline November 28 “Small Arts Groups Feel the Pain: With Audiences and Money Dwindling, Some May Find It Hard to Survive,” Joe Garofoli, San Francisco Gate

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Events Government Response Philanthropic Response Media Response

December 4, 2001

December 19

U.S. government moves to block assets of three Muslim charities, including a group called the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development, because of suspected links to terrorist groups

Last fires at ground zero extinguished

December 5

September 11th Victim Compensation Fund special master Kenneth Feinberg releases draft interim regulations for fund, initiating threemonth comment period

United Nations brokers so-called Bonn Agreement, creating a plan for a power-sharing interim government in Afghanistan

December 20

“Red Cross Details Gay-Inclusive Relief Plan,” Tom Musbach, Gay.com

International Association of Fire Fighters announces it is distributing $278,000 each to families of New York City firefighters killed in 9/11 attack

December 6

Mellon Foundation announces first three grants, totaling $8 million, from $50 million fund to help New York arts and cultural organizations

Attorney General Ashcroft testifies before Senate Judiciary Committee “Giuliani Seeks to Lead Fund for Uniformed After Jan.1,” Sarah Kershaw, New York Times December 7

December 21 “Victims’ Fund Likely to Pay Average of $1.6 Million Each,” David Barstow and Diana B. Henriques, New York Times

Taliban fighters abandon Kandahar

December 22

December 9

In Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai sworn in as head of 30-member interim government

Taliban surrenders province of Zabul, effectively ending Taliban rule in Afghanistan December 12 Detained since August on immigration charges, Zacarias Moussaoui, the alleged “20th hijacker,” is charged with conspiracy to murder in connection with the 9/11 attacks September 11th Fund announces $75 million cash assistance program for victims and families

December 23 Richard Reid, an English citizen of Jamaican descent, arrested in Boston after unsuccessfully trying to ignite explosives in his shoe on a ParisMiami flight “Who Brought Bernadine Healy Down?” Deborah Sontag, New York Times Magazine December 27

“Those Who Lost Homes or Jobs Are to Get $2,500 Grants,” David Barstow, New York Times

Red Cross announces it will spend $317.5 million of the $667 million in Liberty Fund by end of year and also announces appointment of former Senator George Mitchell as independent overseer of the fund

December 14

“Pataki Says $700 Million in Aid Will Go to Downtown Businesses,” Charles Bagli, New York Times

Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control blocks assets of two Muslim charities, Benevolence International Foundation and Global Relief Foundation Thirteen New York City human services organizations join forces to form 9/11 United Services Group to coordinate services to direct and indirect victims of 9/11 attacks

2002 January 1

“Coalition of Charities Will Launch Group to Coordinate Aid Related to Sept. 11,” Anne Marie Chaker, Wall Street Journal

Inauguration of Michael Bloomberg as mayor of New York City

“Victims’ Families Lack Voice in Effort to Coordinate Relief,” David Barstow, New York Times

January 7 “For Charities, 2001 ‘Not Terrible’,” Jon Yates, Chicago Tribune

December 17

January 8

“The Heart Is Willing, But the Economy Isn’t,” Aline Sullivan, Barron’s

Five Sept. 11 widows spurn Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund and sue either American Airlines or United Airlines and the private security companies responsible for providing passenger screening at airports in question

December 18 Congress agrees to package that provides $10.7 billion in aid to New York City and $425 million to Virginia and Pennsylvania

January 9 September 11th Fund announces 2001 total of $154.3 million to help victims, families and communities rebuild after the 9/11 attacks

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January 14

February 17

“Charities Reap Millions from Tie-Ins,” Jacqueline Salmon and Lena Sun, Washington Post

Supervision of all airport security screeners transferred to Transportation Security Administration

January 16

February 21

September 11th Fund, having received $425 million from two million donors, announces it is closed to further contributions

Board of Red Cross formally votes to reaffirm policy of not soliciting or segregating donations for specific disasters

January 22

February 25

“Firefighter Families Quietly Get $100 Million,” William Murphy, New York Newsday

Foundation Center releases report on 9/11 philanthropic response

“Families Find That Public Considers Demands to Change Terms of a Victims Fund ‘Greedy’,” Milo Geyelin, Wall Street Journal

February 27

January 29 In his State of the Union address, President Bush brands Iraq, as well as Iran and North Korea, as part of an “axis of evil”

“In a Twin Towers Charity Shift, Giuliani to Give Money Quickly,” David Barstow and David Herszenhorn, New York Times “Many Charities Report ‘Encouraging’ Donations,” Associated Press February 28

January 30 American Red Cross and former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell unveil plan providing $360 million in additional assistance to 9/11 Families

Carnegie Corporation of New York announces $1.6 million grant in support of WNYC, whose broadcast antenna was destroyed in the destruction of twin towers March 5

January 31 Disaster Relief Medicaid program expires

“U.S. May Approve More Aid for Kin of Sept. 11 Dead,” David Barstow, New York Times

February 2

March 6

“9/11 Tie-Ins Blur Lines of Charity and Profit,” David Barstow, New York Times

September 11th Fund reports six-month disbursement of $205 million out of $465 million donated

February 5

March 7

Catholic Charities USA announces grants totaling more than $20 Million to 16 local agencies for September 11 recovery efforts

“Charity Shifting Emphasis Away from Cash Payments,” David Barstow, New York Times

February 7

March 11

“Red Cross Gives Disaster Relief to Tony Enclave,” Anne Marie Chaker, Wall Street Journal

Six-month anniversary of 9/11 attacks Saudia Arabia moves to shut down al-Haramain Islamic Foundation's branches in Somalia and Bosnia

February 8 9/11 United Services Group announces coordinated plan by Red Cross, Salvation Army, and Safe Horizon to provide assistance to displaced workers February 12 Twin Towers Fund announces 28 grants averaging $100,000 to families of rescue workers Carnegie Corporation of New York announces anonymous $10 million gift to help arts and cultural organizations in New York City February 15

March 12 Office of Homeland Security director Tom Ridge announces terror alert system; alert level is set at yellow Mellon Foundation announces $28 million in grants to New York City arts organizations March 19 Department of Justice releases report on interviews of Muslim immigrants: of 4,793 prospective interviewees, 1,700 could not be located or had left U.S.; 2,261 agreed to be interviewed, generating ten leads

“9/11 Charities Set Cutoff Date for Applicants,” David W. Chen, New York Times

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Events Government Response Philanthropic Response Media Response

March 21, 2002

May 4

Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld announces rules for military commissions created to try certain terror suspects

“Senate Seeks Inquiry into FEMA 9/11 Role,” Diana B. Henriques, New York Times

March 27

May 6

“Tax Report [IRS to Ease Rules for September 11-Related Donations],” Wall Street Journal

“For Illegal Workers’ Kin, No Paper Trail and Less 9/11 Aid,” Aireya Navarro, New York Times

March 28

May 9

American forces capture Abu Zubaydah, a high-ranking al-Qaeda official, in a raid in Pakistan

Seedco announces extension of Lower Manhattan Small Business Initiative

March 29

May 12

Brooklyn Battery Tunnel and West Street in Lower Manhattan are reopened to traffic

Recovery workers find what will prove to be last human remains recovered at ground zero

April 5

May 15

California Endowment announces grants totaling $4.2 million to programs promoting tolerance in California communities

“Downtown Families Eligible for More Housing Aid,” Edward Hyatt, New York Times

April 15

May 17

Open Society Institute announces grants in support of organizations working to preserve civil liberties and immigrant rights

September 11th Fund provides additional $38 million to help affected individuals and families and to help revitalize lower Manhattan

April 18

May 19

9/11 United Services Group announces program to offer financial planning to victims and families

Vice President Dick Cheney says it's “almost certain” al-Qaeda will carry out another terror attack in the U.S.

April 23

May 21

New York Regional Association of Grantmakers report finds that majority of aid disbursed in wake of attacks took the form of direct cash payments to victims and their families

Federal and local law enforcement officials warn of uncorroborated threats against Brooklyn Bridge and Statue of Liberty Mellon Foundation announces nearly $6 million for New York City parks

“Thousands of Displaced New York Workers Not Qualifying for Sept. 11 Charities,” Associated Press May 23 April 24 MacArthur Foundation announces grants totaling $1.8 million to advance efforts in international peace and security

United Nations Security Council votes to extend mandate of International Security Assistance Force in Kabul beyond June 20 May 29

April 26 “Sorting Out Why U.S. Agency [FEMA] Spent So Little,” David Barstow and Diana B. Henriques, New York Times May 1 FEMA announces it will reopen more than 7,000 applications for housing assistance it had rejected in the months after 9/11 attacks May 2 “U.S. [FEMA] to Reconsider Applicants Rejected for Aid After Attack,” Diana B. Henriques, New York Times

80

Ceremony to mark end of cleanup at ground zero: in total, 200,000 pounds of steel and 1.7 million tons of debris removed from site — three months ahead of schedule and $3 billion under budget May 30 Watergate-era rules restricting FBI agents from canvassing public places or Web sites lifted “U.S. Fund for Tower Victims Will Aid Some Gay Partners” Jane Gross, New York Times May 31 Only 496 out of possible 3,000 people have filed claims with Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund


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June 5

July 16

Congress begins closed hearings into possible intelligence failures in the run-up to 9/11

Six proposals for rebuilding the World Trade Center unveiled at a ceremony in Lower Manhattan

Red Cross announces new Donor Direct policy, “an explicit response to September 11 criticism …[intended] to minimize public misunderstanding about where money is spent….”

July 17

“Red Cross Is Pressed to Open Its Books,” New York Times “Red Cross Changes Donation Process,” Associated Press June 6 Twin Towers Fund announces third round of distributions, bringing total distributed to $155 million June 11 “Much of Sept.11 Charity Remains to Be Disbursed,” Lena H. Sun, Sarah Cohen, and Jacqueline Salmon, Washington Post June 13 Specially convened loya jirga elects Hamid Karzai to head Afghanistan’s transitional government June 23 “Families Fret as Charities Hold a Billion Dollars in 9/11 Aid,” Stephanie Strom, New York Times June 26 Bill passed in U.S. House of Representatives making it easier for federal agencies to share information with local and state authorities June 28 FEMA announces liberalization of its mortgage and rental assistance program guidelines to help “lawful U.S. residents who suffered at least a 25 percent income loss as a result of the attack avoid eviction from their dwellings. . . .” June 29 “After Criticism, U.S. [FEMA] Broadens 9/11 Aid Pool,” David W. Chen, New York Times July 9 9/11 United Services Group releases findings from “Ongoing Needs Study” of those affected by World Trade Center attacks

FEMA reports it has approved 5,147 out of 11,202 applications submitted to the mortgage and rental assistance program and has disbursed roughly $32 million July 22 “Finding Cure for Hearts Broken on Sept. 11 as Difficult as Explaining the Cost,” Stephanie Strom, New York Times July 26 House of Representatives approves creation of Department of Homeland Security July 29 “Saying No to Free Aid, Many Families Hire Lawyers,” David W. Chen, New York Times August 8 “Family of 9/11 Victim Accepts $1.04 Million in U.S. Compensation,” David W. Chen, New York Times August 12 “352 Artists and 135 Arts Groups Sharing $4.6 Million from Sept. 11 Fund,” Robin Pogrebin, New York Times August 19 New York City medical examiner’s office releases first comprehensive list of those killed or missing in 9/11 attacks “Big Gaps Found in 9/11 Benefits,” Martin Kasindorf, USA Today August 21 “Program to Cover Psychiatric Help for 9/11 Families,” Erica Goode, New York Times August 23 New York BBB announces survey results of September 11th charity activity “Victims’ Fund Announces First Awards,” David W. Chen, New York Times

July 11 September 11th Fund announces $200 million Ongoing Recovery Program

August 30 Foundation Center releases September 11: Perspectives From the Field of Philanthropy, vol. 1.

July 13

New York Times reports that of the 2,823 dead or missing, only 1,229 people (44 percent) have been identified

September 4 U.S. General Accounting Office releases Interim Report on the Response of Charities, says better coordination of charities needed in wake of 9/11

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Events Government Response Philanthropic Response Media Response

September 4, 2002, continued

November 4

Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund announces it has reached fundraising goal of $100 million

Catholic Charities USA announces $30.5 million distributed to 25 local Catholic agencies for September 11 recovery

September 5

November 5

American Red Cross releases September 11, 2001: Unprecedented Events, Unprecedented Response — A Review of the American Red Cross’ Response in the Past Year

Major League Baseball and Major League Baseball Players Association announce donation of $2 Million to Families of Freedom 2 November 8

September 9 September 11th Fund releases The September 11th Fund: One Year Later

UN Security Council Resolution 1441 requires Iraq to declare all weapons of mass destruction (WMDs)

Foundation Center releases report on post-9/11 funding climate

November 13

Ford Foundation releases report on philanthropic response to 9/11

“Victims’ Kin Find Fault With Overseer of 9/11 Fund,” David W. Chen, New York Times

September 11 Second anniversary of the 9/11 attacks; Ramzi Binalshibh, accused of being a planner of the attacks, is arrested in Karachi, Pakistan “A Flood of Money, Then a Deluge of Scrutiny for Those Handing It Out,” Stephanie Strom, New York Times

November 19 Foundation Center releases follow-up report on philanthropy’s response to 9/11 November 20

September 14 “Suits by 950 Families Allege Safety Lapses at the Towers,” David W. Chen, New York Times

Developer Larry Silverstein, who controls lease on WTC site, releases design for a new office tower to replace 7 World Trade Center November 27

September 17 Bond brokerage firm Cantor Fitzgerald issues 80-page report criticizing aspects of Sept. 11th Victim Compensation Fund “Worst-Hit Firm Faults Fairness of Sept. 11 Aid,” David W. Chen, New York Times “Survey Finds Artists Since 9/11 Have Less Work and More Debt,” Jesse McKinley, New York Times September 26 September 11th Fund announces appointment of Carol Kellerman to replace Joshua Gotbaum as CEO September 28 “Seen as Safety Net, 9/11 Program Is Anything But,” David W. Chen, New York Times

“9/11 Aid Requests Returned: FEMA Didn’t Pay for P.O. Box,” David W. Chen, New York Times November 28 In Mombasa, Kenya, terrorists fire a shoulder-launched missile at an Israeli passenger jet and three suicide bombers kill themselves and thirteen others at a resort hotel November 29 Only 820 applications filed with Special Master Kenneth Feinberg’s office, roughly a quarter of all those eligible to apply December 3 “Saudis Detail Steps on Charities,” Karen DeYoung, Washington Post December 7

September 30 “Fund for Terror Attack Victims Offers Awards in 14 Test Cases,” David Chen, New York Times

Iraq submits documents required by UN Security Council Resolution 1441; UN inspection teams begin inspecting suspected WMD sites December 20

October 12 “Public Frustration Persists Over 9/11 Relief Program,” David W. Chen, New York Times

Twin Towers Fund announces another round of distributions, bringing total amount it has distributed to $193 million December 27

November 1 “Dispute Over Statistics Emerges in Sept. 11 Grants Program,” David W. Chen, New York Times

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2003 January 8 “FEMA Criticized for Its Handling of 9/11 Claims,” David W. Chen, New York Times

March 17 UK ambassador to United Nations declares diplomatic process on Iraq at an end; arms inspectors evacuate the country; President Bush gives Saddam Hussein and his sons 48 hours to leave the country March 18

January 24

Iraq rejects U.S. ultimatum

Tom Ridge sworn in as first-ever Secretary of Homeland Security March 19 January 27 “7 Families Sue Administrator of 9/11 Fund,” David W. Chen, New York Times

First U.S. missiles hit Baghdad in early morning, marking start of campaign to topple Saddam Hussein's regime March 21

January 29 “Charities Face More Pressure to Be Accountable,” Mark O’Keefe, San Francisco Chronicle January 31 “Shoe-bomber” Richard Reid sentenced to life in prison for attempting to blow up passenger jet en route to Miami in December 2001 February 3 Lower Manhattan Development Corp. announces finalists in design competition to select master plan for WTC site February 5 Secretary of State Colin Powell appears before UN Security Council with “proof” of Iraq’s WMD programs February 13

“A Lessson Plan About Generosity,” Stephanie Strom, New York Times April 9 U.S. forces advance into central Baghdad, breaking Saddam Hussein’s control of the city April 15 “Relatives’ Lawyers Ask Court to Rule Sept. 11 Fund Unfair,” David W. Chen, New York Times May 1 President Bush declares the “end to hostilities” in Iraq May 8 Carnegie Corporation of New York announces $5.5 million in grants for a “living memorial” to those killed in 9/11 attacks

Anti-aircraft missile batteries placed around Washington, DC, and London's Heathrow airport amid fears of an imminent al-Qaeda attack

“Judge Rejects Challenges to Sept. 11 Compensation Fund,” Associated Press

February 18

May 9

“A Slow, Deliberate Process of Judging 9/11 Victim Awards,” David W. Chen, New York Times

“Judge Dismisses 3 Cases Against 9/11 Fund’s Special Master,” David W. Chen, New York Times

March 1

May 27

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, alleged mastermind of the 9/11 attacks, is arrested in joint Pakistani-CIA operation near Islamabad, Pakistan

“9/11 Fund Claims Remain Low,” Associated Press September 11

March 7

Second anniversary of the attacks

Chief Weapons Inspector Hans Blix tells UN Security Council that Iraqi disarmament will take months; U.S. and UK present draft resolution to Security Council giving Saddam Hussein until March 17 to disarm

December 22 Last day to file a claim with Sept. 11th Victim Compensation Fund

March 16 President Bush and Prime Minister Blair meet in Azores with leaders of Spain and Portugal in final attempt to solve Iraq crisis diplomatically

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2004 January 6 Lower Manhattan Development Corp. selects a single design, “Reflecting Absence,” for memorial at World Trade Center site January 7 Foundation Center releases 9/11 Relief and Regranting Funds: A Summary Report on Funds Raised and Assistance Provided January 26 Afghanistan’s loya jirga announces new constitution that grants the president sweeping powers and allows parliament to appoint ministers April 5

Events Government Response Philanthropic Response Media Response

July 28 “Arrests Tie Charity Group to Palestinian Terrorists,” Eric Lichtblau, New York Times August 3 Statue of Liberty reopened to the public August 22 President Bush orders Treasury Dept. to freeze assets of five charities with links to Palestinian terrorist group Hamas August 23 “Bush Orders Move to Freeze Assets of Hamas Charities,” Edmund Andrews and Richard Stevenson, New York Times

Day, Berry & Howard LLP, in partnership with Council on Foundations, Independent Sector, and InterAction, a U.S.-based alliance of international development and humanitarian NGOs, issues Handbook on Counter-Terrorism Measures: What U.S. Nonprofits and Grantmakers Need to Know

Third anniversary of the attacks

May 11

Ten million Afghans go to the polls to elect a president in that country's first-ever direct presidential election

September 11

October 9 Pittsburgh-based Heinz Endowments announce $500,000 grant to fund international design competition for a 9/11 memorial in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, on the site where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed May 25 Again working through the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Mayor Michael Bloomberg donates $15 million to New York City nonprofits suffering from post-9/11 budget cuts

October 21 Topping-out ceremony for 7 World Trade Center; the 750-foot, 52-story structure replaces previous building on site, which collapsed on the afternoon of September 11, 2001 November 2 George W. Bush, 43rd president of the United States, elected to second term

June 14 Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund closes after paying more than $7 billion to 2,878 families, or roughly 97 percent of those eligible

November 3 With 55.4 percent of the vote, interim president Hamid Karzai is declared winner of Afghanistan's presidential election

June 15 “After Weighing Cost of Lives, 9/11 Fund Completes Its Work,” David W. Chen, New York Times July 4 Ground-breaking ceremony for Freedom Tower, the 1,776-foot centerpiece of the redevelopment plan for World Trade Center site July 7 American Red Cross September 11 Recovery Program announces twoyear, $50 million program to support longer-term recovery needs of people directly affected by the events of 9/11

November 8 Rand Corporation releases study that shows that families of victims and businesses affected by the 9/11 attacks received $38.1 billion in assistance, with insurance companies accounting for the greatest share November 9 “With Funds Winding Down, Questions Remain About Longer-Term Needs,” Lydia Polgreen, New York Times November 14 “Groups, U.S. Battle Over 'Global Terrorist' Label,” David Ottaway, Washington Post

July 22 National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, better known as the 9/11 Commission, releases its final report to the public July 27 Justice Dept. arrests five former officials of Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development on charges they funneled millions of dollars to Palestinian terrorists

84

November 17 Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund issues final report November 18 “$7 Billion for the Grief of Sept. 11,” David W. Chen, New York Times


Giving in the Aftermath of September 11 Final Update on the Foundation and Corporate Response

The unprecedented outpouring of charitable support that followed the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks prompted the Foundation Center to launch a multi-year effort to track relief and recovery funding by foundations, corporations, and other institutional donors. Our goal early on was to document the philanthropic response as it was happening so that grantmakers and charities could better identify unmet needs and to help the field respond to questions from the media, government officials, and the general public. Over the longer term, our goal has been to provide a definitive record of the response that will help the philanthropic sector identify its successes and lessons learned, so that it can prepare effectively to respond to future emergencies. In the first phase of the project — spanning the year following the attacks — we built a comprehensive database of

AUTHORS

OREN ICE

CONTRIBUTORS

ENZ

RESIDENT FOR

ESLIE

ARINO

ESEARCH

LIZABETH ESEARCH

EPTEMBER ESPONSE

UCCARO

HILANTHROPIC

ROJECT

OORDINATOR

IREK

ROZDZOWSKI

SSISTANT PECIAL

ROJECTS

SSOCIATE

85


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

FIGURE 1

corporate and foundation contributions in response to 9/11 and issued a

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding as a Share of All Private Giving

series of summary reports examining the role of these donors in financing relief and recovery, mainly through support of 9/11 relief and regranting funds. In the second phase, we focused on the ultimate uses and beneficiaries of the donations raised by the relief funds from all sources, and we issued a comprehensive report on their funding activities and practices.1

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004 1 The estimate of total private 9/11 response funding includes an estimated $2.6 billion raised by major relief funds from all sources and $234 million in grants from foundations and corporations to direct service providers.

KEY FACTS AND FIGURES ON FOUNDATION AND CORPORATE GIVING:* Donors: • The Foundation Center has identified 1,339 foundations, corporations, and other institutional donors that made gifts in response to 9/11

• These donors gave over $1.1 billion in more than 4,500 gifts for relief and recovery efforts and for issues related to the attacks, e.g., bioterrorism and civil rights

• Giving by institutional donors represented 39 percent of an estimated $2.8 billion in total private 9/11-related giving

• 301 donors contributed in excess of $1 million each for relief and recovery

• The median amount of giving per donor was $100,000 • Foundations and corporations in the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut) provided 52 percent of all giving

Recipients and Beneficiaries: • 278 relief and regranting funds created to aid victims, their families, and communities affected by the disaster received support from institutional donors totaling $773 million

• The September 11th Fund of the United Way of New York City/New York Community Trust received $163 million, surpassing all other organizations; the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund received $150 million

• 1,538 direct-service providers, groups directly affected by the attacks, and organizations addressing 9/11-related issues received $235 million

• Among direct-service organizations, arts and culture groups affected by the attacks received $56 million; local human service agencies providing aid to affected persons and communities garnered nearly $55 million

• Recipient organizations and funds were located in 44 states and 12 countries *Based on data compiled by the Foundation Center through September 2004.

86


GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11

While the scope of our 9/11-related efforts has expanded, we have continued to track the foundation and corporate response. Specifically, in the lat-

TABLE 1

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding by Donor Type

est year we have added many new donors to our 9/11 database

No. of Donors

%

Amount

%

No. of Gifts

Corporations/ Corporate Foundations

632

46.5

$ 721,790,850

65.5

1,829

40.3

Independent and Family Foundations

535

their beneficiaries. Based on data compiled through September 2004, this

40.0

315,544,283

28.6

2,180

48.0

study updates and expands on the findings presented in our December

Community Foundations

112

8.4

23,078,420

2.1

357

7.9

2003 report.2 The latest information was drawn primarily from 2002 and

Other Public Foundations

54

4.0

21,518,917

2.0

160

3.5

2003 annual reports provided by foundation and corporate donors and

Associations/ Other

15

1.1

19,835,700

1.8

16

0.4

1,339

100.0

$1,101,768,170

100.0

4,542

100.0

and documented the purposes of many hundreds of gifts. This fourth

Donor Type

and final version of Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11 provides a definitive and comprehensive overview of foundation and corporate donors and

from data reported by private foundations in their Form 990-PF tax returns. Information also comes from grantmaker news releases and Web sites and donor lists compiled by leading recipients, such as the American

TOTAL

1

%

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Due to rounding, percentages may not total 100. 1 Includes cash donations and amounts pledged to match employee gifts; excludes in-kind donations.

Red Cross and the September 11th Fund of the United Way of New York City and the New York Community Trust.

DONORS Institutional donors include corporations and corporate foundations; independent and family foundations; community foundations and other public foundations; and a variety of business and professional associations. FIGURE 2

• The Foundation Center has identified 1,339 foundations, corporations, and other institutional donors that have together

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding by Donor Type

contributed more than $1.1 billion for relief and recovery efforts and for purposes related to the 9/11 attacks and their aftermath (Table 1).3 The sweeping breadth of the response has proven a milestone for philanthropy. Prior to 9/11, the institutional philanthropic response to natural disasters and other regional or international crises had been far narrower in scope.

• Giving by institutional donors represented 39 percent of an estimated $2.8 billion in total private giving in response to 9/11 (Figure 1).4 To put this spending in perspective, this proportion is more than double the share of all U.S. private giving provided annually by foundations and corporations in recent years.5

• Foundations and corporations reported a total of 4,542 donations. The number of gifts has increased dramatically from prior editions of this report, as 9/11 donors have fulfilled their undesignated pledges and as more funders have provided complete reporting of the exact amounts given to named recipients.6

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Due to rounding, percentages may not total 100.

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SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

FIGURE 3

Corporate Foundation Giving as a Share of All Corporate 9/11 Giving

By Funder Type

• 632 corporations pledged $721.8 million, or 66 percent of all institutional giving made in response to the 9/11 attacks (Figure 2).7 This figure includes cash donations and more than $126 million pledged to match employee gifts.8 (In-kind gifts were excluded from this analysis.9)

• Corporate donors reported 1,829 donations to named recipient groups, mainly 9/11 relief funds.10 These donations represented two-fifths of all gifts designated for specific purposes. Another 30 percent of the number of corporate donations went to directservice organizations providing a variety of services to those directly and indirectly affected by the attacks. Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Includes 276 corporate foundations.

• Among various types of corporate donors were 276 corporate foundations. They contributed $360 million, or 50 percent of all corporate 9/11 giving (Figure 3). This is close to double the proportion of total annual corporate giving typically provided by corporate foundations. Possible explanations for this higher proportion include corporations’ use of their foundations’ endowments to help fund the unbudgeted 9/11 donations, e.g., for matching employee contributions and providing direct assistance to victims or their families.

• 701 independent and community or other public foundations pledged $360.1 million, or about 33 percent of institutional 9/11 funding. Independent foundations alone provided $315.5 million, while community foundations contributed $23.1 million and other public foundations gave $21.5 million.

• Independent and community and other public foundations reported 2,697 gifts to specific recipient organizations, or 59 percent of all institutional gifts reported. Independent foundations alone made 2,180 gifts, or 48 percent of all designated gifts. In addition to supporting relief funds, larger independent foundations funded a wide range of local and national direct-service providers, groups directly affected by the 9/11 attacks, and organizations addressing issues related to the attacks and their aftermath. (See “Recipients and Beneficiaries” for an analysis of 9/11 giving to recipient organizations.)

• Fifteen associations, including business groups, sports groups, and trade unions pledged $19.8 million, or close to 2 percent of the total. They reported 16 gifts, or less than 1 percent of designated gifts.

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GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11

Like corporations, they mainly channeled their support through 9/11 relief funds.

By Range of Giving

TABLE 2

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding By Range of Giving Range of 9/11 Giving

No. of Donors

%

Amount

1

$5 million–$10 million

35

2.6

214,322,555

19.5

$2 million–$5 million

58

4.3

160,279,452

14.5

$1 million–$2 million

180

13.4

197,011,180

17.9

$500,000–$1 million

91

6.8

54,695,939

5.0

$250,000–$500,000

93

6.9

29,635,184

2.7

among U.S. independent foundations by giving in 2002. Among

$100,000–$250,000

216

16.1

27,567,575

2.5

$50,000–$100,000

126

9.4

7,538,934

0.7

corporations, giving ranged from less than $5,000 to the $16.3 million

$25,000–$50,000

132

9.9

4,016,266

0.4

Less than $25,000

380

28.4

3,470,391

0.3

• Giving per funder ranged from less than $500 for a small community foundation in Michigan to the $50.5 million pledged by the New York-based Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which ranked eighth

pledged by ExxonMobil through its foundation.

• Seventy-one percent of all institutional donors gave less than

2.1

$403,230,694

%

$10 million and over

28

36.6

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Due to rounding, percentages may not total 100. 1 Includes cash donations and amounts pledged to match employee gifts; excludes in-kind donations.

$500,000 for 9/11 relief and recovery (Table 2 and Figure 4). The median amount — the mid-point for all donors ranked by giving — was $100,000, but it varied widely by donor type. Among the principal donor types in the Foundation Center’s 9/11 database, the

FIGURE 4

Foundation vs. Corporate 9/11 Response Funding by Range of Giving

median giving amount ranged from $25,000 for independent foundations, including family foundations, to $295,000 for corporations overall and $376,000 for corporate foundations. For community foundations it was $31,100; for other public foundations, $100,000; and for associations, $500,000.

• 301 donors (22 percent) contributed $1 million or more for relief and recovery efforts. Together they gave $974.8 million, or 88 percent of total funding.

• $1 million+ contributors included 232 corporations, 49 independent foundations, seven community foundations, seven public foundations, and six associations. Thirty-seven percent of the corporate donors gave $1 million or more in 9/11 response funding, compared to 9 percent for independent and community foundations.

• Sixty-three donors — fewer than 5 percent — pledged $5 million or more. Their contributions totaled $617.6 million, or 56 percent of institutional 9/11 giving. The proportion of funding provided by the largest contributors varied by donor type. For example, 46 corporations — or roughly 7 percent of the corporate donors — reported giving $5 million or more, and they represented 53 percent of the corporate giving. In contrast, only 14 independent and community foundations — just 2 percent — gave $5 million or more, yet they provided 64 percent of 9/11 giving by these foundations. Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Based on total giving figures for latest fiscal year reported (2003 for most foundations, 2002 for others); due to rounding, percentages may not total 100.

89


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

FIGURE 5

• Eleven corporate contributors gave in excess of $10 million:

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding by Donor State

ExxonMobil (TX), Citigroup (NY), Deutsche Bank (NY), General Electric (CT), J.P. Morgan Chase (NY), Verizon (NY), Coca-Cola (GA), ChevronTexaco (CA), Philip Morris (NY), Fannie Mae (DC), and Morgan Stanley (NY) (Table 3). Seven of the top corporate donors made their 9/11 gifts from their foundations.

• Foundation donors that gave in excess of $10 million each included the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (NY), Lilly Endowment (IN), Starr Foundation (NY), Ford Foundation (NY), Carnegie Corporation (NY), Atlantic Philanthropies (NY),11 and California Endowment (CA) (Table 4).

By Funder Location

• While corporations, foundations, and other institutional donors

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Due to rounding, percentages may not total 100.

across the United States and abroad responded generously to the 9/11 terrorist attacks, New York State-based corporations and

TABLE 3

Top 25 Corporate Donors Ranked by Total 9/11 Response Funding Corporation/Corporate Foundation

1

State

Amount

1. ExxonMobil Foundation

TX

$ 16,251,000

10

2. Citigroup Foundation

NY

15,211,000

20

3. Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation 4. GE Foundation 5. J. P. Morgan Chase/J. P. Morgan Chase Foundation 6. Verizon Foundation

NY CT NY

13,597,823 13,260,000 13,045,278

26 5 7

NY

12,625,000

5

7. Coca-Cola Company 8. ChevronTexaco Corporation

GA CA

12,194,150 10,560,000

7 57

9. Philip Morris USA

NY

10,431,666

72

10. Fannie Mae/Fannie Mae Foundation

DC

10,156,770

8

11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

NY NY NY MI VA

10,010,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000

2 1 1 1 2

16. Goldman, Sachs Foundation 17. Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies

NY NJ

10,000,000 10,000,000

1 3

18. 19. 20. 21.

NY NY NY NY

10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 9,500,000

8 1 6 4

22. Pfizer/Pfizer Foundation

NY

9,263,500

22

23. Anheuser-Busch Family of Wholesalers/ Anheuser-Busch Foundation

MO

8,400,000

6

24. SoundView Technology Group 25. Credit Suisse First Boston

CT NY

7,067,850 6,648,345

28 17

Morgan Stanley AXA Foundation Bear, Stearns & Co. DaimlerChrysler Corporation Freddie Mac

Lehman Brothers Holdings Marsh & McLennan Companies Merrill Lynch & Co. Vivendi Universal Foundation

No. of Gifts Purpose of Funding

Top 25 Subtotal

$268,222,382

320

All Other Corporate Donors

$453,568,468

1,509

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. 1 Includes cash donations and amounts pledged to match employee gifts; excludes in-kind donations.

90

To support the ExxonMobil September 11th Disaster Relief Campaign; support also for various relief and recovery organizations through employee, retiree, dealer, and distributor matching gift programs. To establish the Citigroup Relief Fund for scholarships for the children of victims and to provide disaster assistance to various NYC nonprofits. To support the 9/11 Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund and various organizations helping with relief and recovery. To support the Twin Towers Fund and the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund. To establish the J. P. Morgan Chase WTC Disaster Relief Fund to aid victims and families. To support the 9/11 Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund, the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund (and local chapters), and the September 11th Fund. To support the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund and various relief and recovery organizations. To support various relief and recovery organizations providing for the short- and long-term needs of affected individuals and communities; support also for various organizations promoting tolerance, inclusiveness, and anti-bias educational programs. To support the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund, September 11th Fund, Safe Horizon WTC Fund, Scholarship America, and various community-based service organizations. To support various organizations including the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region Survivors’ Fund, REALTORS Housing Relief Fund, September 11th Fund, and the DC Disaster Relief Fund. To establish the Morgan Stanley Victims Relief Fund to aid victims and families. To establish the AXA 9/11 Relief Fund aiding those affected by 9/11. To establish the Bear Stearns Relief Fund to benefit victims and families. To establish the DaimlerChrysler Help the Children Fund to benefit the children of those killed or injured in the attacks. To support various relief organizations providing for the short-term needs of survivors and families of victims and longterm relief for victims’ families; support also for MBS Mega Scholarship Fund. To establish the Goldman Sachs Relief Fund to aid victims and families. To support the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund, September 11th Fund, and various organizations to help speed relief and recovery. To support the NYU Downtown Hospital and various relief and recovery organizations. To establish the Marsh & McLennan Victims’ Relief Fund to aid victims and families. To establish the Merrill Lynch 9/11 Scholarship Fund and to support various relief and recovery organizations. To support the September 11th Fund, Robin Hood Relief Fund (to underwrite the Concert for NYC), and various organizations through employee matching gift programs. To support the Twin Towers Fund, September 11th Fund, American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund, and various relief organizations. To support the NYS World Trade Center Relief Fund, September 11th Fund, Community Foundation for the National Capital Region Survivors’ Fund, the American Red Cross (for long-term personal needs of victims and families), and the Salvation Army (to provide meals for emergency workers in NY and DC). To support the Robin Hood Relief Fund and various relief and recovery organizations. To support various relief and recovery organizations including the 9/11 Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund and the Children’s Aid Society WTC Relief Fund; support also for community-based service organizations.


GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11

foundations provided more than two-fifths of all 9/11 response funding ($467 million) (Figure 5 and Table 6). Tri-state (NY, NJ, CT) grantmakers together contributed over half of all support ($572.2 million). Seven of the top ten independent foundations, four of the top ten public foundations, and six of the top ten corporate donors were located or headquartered in New York State or the tri-state area.

• California ranked second after New York among states providing institutional philanthropic support, with close to 9 percent of funding ($93.9 million). The California Endowment, the largest California-based 9/11 donor, ranked seventh among independent TABLE 4

Top 25 Independent and Operating Foundations Ranked by Total 9/11 Response Funding State

Foundation 1 Type

Amount

No. of Gifts

1. Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

NY

IN

$ 50,501,500

135

2. Lilly Endowment

IN

IN

34,660,100

4

3. Starr Foundation

NY

IN

20,071,446

164

Foundation

4. Ford Foundation

NY

IN

18,923,850

67

5. Carnegie Corporation of New York

NY

IN

14,592,400

155

NY

IN

13,770,670

30

7. California Endowment

CA

IN

13,368,041

76

8. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

NY

IN

9,923,919

37

6. Atlantic Philanthropies

2

FL

IN

9,351,000

252

10. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

NJ

IN

8,616,520

31

11. W. K. Kellogg Foundation

MI

IN

6,316,492

18

12. Rockefeller Foundation

NY

IN

5,715,596

43

13. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

IL

IN

5,170,000

30

14. Andor Capital Management Foundation 15. Charles Stewart Mott Foundation 16. Kresge Foundation

CT MI MI

IN IN IN

5,000,000 3,803,737 3,250,000

1 21 3

9. John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

17. Thomas and Stacey Siebel Foundation

CA

IN

3,069,391

1

18. Lumina Foundation for Education 19. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

IN WA

IN IN

3,025,000 3,020,000

3 4

20. Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation

NY

IN

3,015,000

4

21. Annie E. Casey Foundation

MD

IN

3,000,000

15

22. Open Society Institute

NY

OP

2,732,994

33

23. William Randolph Hearst Foundation

NY

IN

2,630,000

27

24. William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust 25. Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation

NC IL

IN IN

2,500,000 2,500,000

1 1

Top 25 Subtotal

$248,527,656

1,156

All Other Independent Foundations

$ 67,016,627

1,024

Purpose of Funding To assist NYC cultural and performing arts organizations directly affected by September 11th; support also for various organizations’ New York disaster response. To support the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund, the September 11th Fund, and the Salvation Army’s national disaster training project for faith-based disaster relief organizations. To support various NYC nonprofit organizations affected by September 11th; support also for AIG Disaster Relief Fund through a matching gift program for AIG employees. To support the September 11th Fund, nonprofits directly affected by the WTC disaster, and those working to promote public discourse on issues related to September 11th. To support various educational and media-related organizations dealing with public awareness and response to the aftermath of the attacks; support also for NYC cultural organizations through an anonymous $10 million gift. To support the September 11th Fund, nonprofits affected by the attacks, and various organizations involved in tolerance and anti-bias educational programs. To support workers and nonprofit organizations in California affected by September 11th; support also for CA-based nonprofits working to promote intercultural communication, religious tolerance, conflict resolution, and violence prevention. To support the September 11th Fund and various educational institutions responding to the needs of those affected in NYC and Washington, DC, and seeking to prevent the threat of bioterrorism through research and program development. To support various relief-related activities for the secondary economic victims of September 11th in the 26 communities served by the foundation and for memorial efforts honoring hijacking victims of Flight 93. To support the Task Force for Child Survival and Development and various organizations focusing on public health preparedness and disaster response, mental health, and direct aid to recovery workers. To support various educational and community outreach organizations that provided support to communities and population groups affected by the attacks. To support various relief organizations, particularly those involved with minority communities in NYC; support also for those working to promote community awareness and involvement in the rebuilding of Lower Manhattan. To support organizations addressing issues arising from September 11th related to strengthening the quality of public information and analysis, understanding the underlying causes of terrorism, and determining the implications for civil liberties. To support the Robin Hood Relief Fund. To support the September 11th Fund and various organizations dealing with the aftermath of the attacks. To support the Nonprofit Recovery Fund, The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region Survivors’ Fund, and the New York Foundation. To establish the Siebel America Fund to support the relief work of the American Red Cross and Salvation Army. To support the Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund. To support the September 11th Fund, the New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, and the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund. To support the September 11th Fund, the Twin Towers Fund, and the Community Foundation of New Jersey Star Ledger Disaster Relief Fund. To support New Yorkers for Children and other organizations providing assistance to children and families affected by the attacks. To support various organizations that promote policy development, advocacy, and monitoring pertaining to civil liberties of immigrant and minority groups affected by 9/11. To support the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund, Twin Towers Fund, Salvation Army of Greater New York, and various NYC arts and culture organizations affected by September 11th. For fellowship program at CUNY Honors College. To establish the McCormick Tribune Disaster Relief Fund to aid organizations providing services to the victims of the attacks, their families, and those in the impacted communities.

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. 1 Includes independent and family (IN) and operating (OP) foundations; excludes company-sponsored foundations. 2 An international endowed philanthropy with a principal domicile outside the U.S., it operates like an independent foundation and maintains a grant selection and administration office in New York.

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SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

foundation donors, while ChevronTexaco Corporation, the second largest California donor, placed eighth among corporate 9/11 contributors.

• Twenty-four donors — mainly corporations — based outside of the United States provided roughly 1 percent of 9/11 response funding ($12.1 million). Canada represented the largest number of donors (9), and Japan accounted for the largest giving amount ($3.6 million), followed by Canada and the Netherlands. It should be noted that many foreign and multinational companies donated 9/11 funds through their U.S.-based affiliates. Therefore, the total amount reported does not represent all funding from overseas corporations and foundations.

By Funder Size The following analysis of 9/11 giving by funder size is limited to independent, community, and corporate foundations for which asset information is available in the Foundation Center’s foundation database.12 While not all foundations maintain large endowments relative to their giving, asset size nevertheless provides one criterion for assessing giving capacity.

• Larger foundations represented the majority of the 9/11 foundation donors identified by the Foundation Center. Nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of the 647 independent and community foundation 9/11 donors held at least $10 million in assets in their latest fiscal year, while 43 percent held at least $50 million in assets (Table 7 and Figure 6).13

TABLE 5

Top 10 Community and Other Public Foundations and Associations Ranked by Total 9/11 Response Funding Amount

No. of Gifts

PC

$ 7,000,000

1

NY CA IN

AS AS AS

5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000

1 1 1

5. New York Community Trust

NY

CM

4,677,895

46

6. 7. 8. 9.

FL NJ CA OH

PC CM CM CM

2,518,204 2,098,303 1,950,000 1,389,992

7 10 1 39

PA

CM

Donor Name

State

Donor Type

1. Robin Hood Foundation

NY

2. Major League Baseball Players Association 3. National Association of Theatre Owners 4. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

PGA Tour Charities Community Foundation of New Jersey Community Foundation Silicon Valley Columbus Foundation and Affiliated Organizations 10. Pittsburgh Foundation

1,310,700

4

Top 10 Subtotal

$35,945,094

111

All Others

$28,487,943

422

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. 1 AS = Association; CM = Community Foundation; PC = Public Charity/Other.

92

1

Purpose of Funding To establish the Robin Hood Relief Fund for organizations helping victims and families, uniformed service workers, and low-income victims impacted by the resulting economic downturn. To establish the MLB-MLBPA Disaster Relief Fund to aid victims and families. To support various relief and recovery organizations. To support the Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund to benefit former or current NCAA studentathletes, firefighters, police officers, and emergency medical technicians who were permanently disabled as a result of the WTC tragedy. To support the September 11th Fund and various organizations directly involved in short- and long-term relief and recovery efforts, anti-bias and tolerance activities, and emergency preparedness planning. To support various relief and recovery organizations. To provide scholarships for individuals. To support the September 11th Fund. To support the September 11th Fund and various relief organizations providing aid to victims and families. To support the September 11th Fund.


GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11

• Large foundations provided the vast majority of 9/11 support. The 281 foundation donors holding at least $50 million in assets

TABLE 6

Top 15 States by Total Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding

accounted for almost 86 percent of all 9/11 giving by independent and community foundations. The 30 foundation 9/11 donors with assets of $1 billion or more provided 66 percent of all foundation 9/11 giving ($224 million).

• Compared with independent and community foundations, the 276 corporate foundations that made 9/11 gifts were more equally distributed by asset size. Just over two-fifths (43 percent) held assets of $10 million or more, while just 15 percent held at least $50 million

No. of 1 Donors

State

%

Amount

%

New York

303

22.4

$ 467,008,556

42.4

2.

California

147

10.9

93,902,132

8.5

3.

New Jersey

73

5.4

59,675,525

5.4

1.

4.

Indiana

23

1.7

47,175,605

4.3

5.

Connecticut

45

3.3

45,476,825

4.1

6.

Illinois

67

5.0

44,214,698

4.0

7.

Texas

56

4.1

41,012,174

3.7

8.

Michigan

52

3.8

37,097,872

3.4

9.

Florida

38

2.8

24,106,139

2.2

10.

Georgia

29

2.1

23,381,010

2.1

11.

Pennsylvania

54

4.0

20,520,387

1.9

12.

Washington

21

1.6

19,630,617

1.8

in assets. One-fourth of corporate foundation donors held less than

13.

Ohio

55

4.1

17,998,476

1.6

$1 million in assets (Table 8 and Figure 7).14

14.

23 Virginia 16 District of Columbia Subtotal 1,002 325 All Other States

1.6

15.

• Despite the more even distribution of corporate foundation 9/11 donors by asset size, larger corporate foundations also provided a majority of corporate foundation 9/11 funding. In the top asset ranges, those reporting assets of $10 million or more accounted for 61 percent

Non-U.S.

2

TOTAL

1.7

17,635,017

1.2

16,210,768

1.5

74.2 24.1

$ 975,045,801

88.5 10.4

114,598,635

24

1.8

12,123,734

1.1

1,351

100.0

$1,101,768,170

100.0

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. 1 Includes six corporate donors with funding sources in more than one location. 2 Principal countries by amount of giving include Japan, Canada, Netherlands, Germany, England, France, and Kuwait.

of all corporate foundation 9/11 giving. Those holding assets of $50 million or more contributed 34 percent of all corporate foundation 9/11 support.

RECIPIENTS AND BENEFICIARIES The following is an analysis of contributions from institutional donors to more than 1,800 recipient groups, including relief funds created by relief agencies, gov-

FIGURE 6

Distribution of Independent and Community Foundation 9/11 Response Funding by Foundation Asset Size

ernment agencies, corporations, and foundations to aid 9/11 victims and affected communities; emergency relief and other direct-service providers; local nonprofits directly affected by the disaster and its aftermath; and organizations working on issues related to the attacks. As part of our tracking effort, the Foundation Center created a recipient database and classified recipients of gifts from institutional donors by geographic location, organization type, and field of activity.

Relief Funds

• Seven-tenths ($773 million) of the $1.1 billion pledged by foundations, corporations, and other institutional donors supported 278 relief funds created after 9/11 to aid victims, their families, and other persons and communities affected by the disaster, mainly through regranting (Figure 8). These intermediaries included generaland special-purpose funds created by relief agencies and other nonprofits and also funds created by institutional donors, especially corporations, community and other public foundations, federated funds, and associations.15

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Based on assets for latest fiscal year reported (2003 for most foundations, 2002 for others); due to rounding, percentages may not total 100.

93


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

TABLE 7

Breakdown of Independent and Community Foundation 9/11 Response Funding by Foundation Asset Size Asset Range

No. of Foundations

%

9/11 Giving Amount

%

$1 billion and over

30

4.6

$223,879,622

66.1

$250 million–$1 billion

73

11.2

36,699,162

10.8

$50 million–$250 million

178

27.4

29,605,826

8.7

$10 million–$50 million

135

20.8

16,670,082

4.9

$1 million–$10 million

143

22.5

7,533,120

2.2

Under $1 million

61

9.4

3,340,607

1.0

Not available

27

4.2

20,894,284

6.2

647

100.0

TOTAL

$338,622,703 100.0

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Based on assets for latest fiscal year reported (2003 for most foundations, 2002 for others); due to rounding, percentages may not total 100.

• The September 11th Fund was the largest 9/11 relief fund ranked by amount received from institutional donors ($162.5 million, or 15 percent) and number of gifts (589). It also ranked as the top recipient in the Foundation Center’s database overall (Table 9). The Fund’s broad purposes include providing direct assistance to victims and their families and services to affected communities. Excluding donations raised for the Fund in a national telethon, foundations and corporations provided 41 percent of the Fund’s reported $410 million in private support. (Including the telethon pledges, the Fund received $540 million.16)

• The American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund, which raised funds for victims and their families and also provided direct services, ranked second in institutional donor contributions ($150.2 million, or 14 percent) and in number of gifts (393). Yet, compared with the September 11th Fund, foundations and corporations provided a much smaller, 15 percent share of the Liberty Fund’s $1 billion in overall support.17 (Most of the fund’s support came from individuals.) The Liberty Fund captured roughly 36 percent of the estimated $2.8 billion in private 9/11 response funding.

• Other top 9/11 relief fund recipients of institutional donors’ gifts included the Twin Towers Fund ($51 million) and the New York Police and Fire 9/11 Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund ($28.9 million), both established to aid the families of New York City police, firefighters, and FIGURE 7

Distribution of Corporate Foundation 9/11 Response Funding by Foundation Asset Size

rescue workers who were victims of the attacks; and the Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund ($24.3 million), a national-level fund that provides post-secondary educational assistance to dependents of those killed or injured in the attacks.

• Relief funds created by more than 60 corporations to aid victims (especially employees) and their families and to support relief and recovery efforts together received $173.2 million, or 16 percent of all institutional funding. Eight corporate funds received at least $10 million in support (Table 10). The largest relief fund recipient by far was the Citigroup Relief Fund, which received $15.1 million from the Citigroup Foundation to provide post-secondary scholarships to the children of victims.

• The vast majority, or roughly nine-tenths, of the $773 million received by relief funds from foundations and corporations provided emergency relief and disaster assistance. Still, some of the largest 9/11 charities focused their giving for specific fields or funding priorities: Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Due to rounding, percentages may not total 100.

94

$76 million supported educational purposes, mainly through grants to


GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11

various scholarship funds and a school relief fund; roughly $31 million targeted community development and economic recovery, especially

TABLE 8

Breakdown of Corporate Foundation 9/11 Response Funding by Foundation Asset Size

through funds aiding affected businesses and nonprofits; and more than $6 million supported general and public health issues. Other fields that raised more than $1 million each from institutional donors through special-purpose funds included arts and culture, mental health, civil rights, and international affairs.

Asset Range $250 million and over

• 1,538 direct-service providers, groups directly affected by the 9/11

9/11 Giving Amount

%

5

1.8

$50 million–$250 million

37

$10 million–$50 million $1 million–$10 million

$

%

9,697,366

2.7

13.4

113,097,519

31.5

77

27.9

96,314,497

26.8

78

28.3

77,960,933

21.7

Under $1 million

55

19.9

42,994,422

12.0

Not available

24

8.7

19,492,625

5.4

276

100.0

$359,557,362

100.0

TOTAL

Direct-Service Providers

No. of Foundations

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Based on assets for latest fiscal year reported (2003 for most foundations, 2002 for others); due to rounding, percentages may not total 100.

attacks, and organizations addressing issues related to the attacks and their aftermath received $234.5 million, or roughly 21 percent of funding. These organizations took in 2,318 donations from institutional funders, or 51 percent of their gifts.

• The NYU Downtown Hospital, a medical facility located just three blocks from ground zero, was the top direct-service recipient. It received contributions totaling $5.9 million, including $5 million from the Lehman Brothers Foundation (NY) for renovation and expansion

FIGURE 8

of its emergency center. The center’s services were heavily utilized

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding by Type of Recipient

following the attacks. In all, 45 organizations and institutions received $1 million or more from donors — mainly foundations — for outreach services, emergency needs, special programming, advocacy, repairs and renovation, and operating support. More than 478 groups received $100,000 or more. A large majority of organizations received less than $50,000.

• About 9 percent of institutional giving ($94.4 million) could not be assigned to a recipient because donors either did not break down amounts pledged to named recipients ($62 million, or 6 percent) or did not designate a recipient ($32.4 million, or 3 percent).18

By Donor Type

• Corporate donors pledged 22 percent of their 9/11 funding ($157.6 million) to corporate relief funds, 18 percent to the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund, 15 percent to the September 11th Fund, and 20 percent to other relief funds, especially the Twin Towers Fund and the New York Police and Fire 9/11 Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund (Figure 9). Just under 9 percent of corporate giving ($62 million) supported direct-service agencies. Seven percent of corporate pledges ($50 million) could not be allocated by recipient, while roughly 4 percent ($27.7 million) was undesignated. (A substantial portion of corporate donors’ undesignated giving represents funds pledged to match employee gifts.)

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Due to rounding, percentages may not total 100. Shows individual organizations that received at least 5 percent of funding. 1 Regranting funds established by individual companies after 9/11. 2 Various recipients named but amount not reported by recipient; includes grants to unspecified individuals totaling $3,425,185. 3 No recipient named at time of pledge.

95


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

FIGURE 9

Corporate 9/11 Response Funding by Type of Recipient

• Independent and community or other public foundations gave 16 percent of their 9/11 funding ($55.9 million) to the September 11th Fund and 5 percent to the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund; another 33 percent of donations went to various other relief funds (Figure 10). In contrast with corporate donors, the single largest share of foundation funding — $158.1 million, or 44 percent — supported direct-service organizations active in relief and recovery efforts or addressing issues related to the attacks. Only 2 percent of funds ($7 million) could not be broken down by recipient, and just 1 percent ($4.2 million) of pledges was undesignated.

• Corporations and foundations differed strikingly in the degree to which they supported relief funds. Corporations gave 64 percent of their 1,829 gifts to corporate and other relief funds and 30 percent to direct-service organizations. Another 6 percent of gifts remains undesignated or unspecified. In contrast, 65 percent of foundations’ 2,697 gifts went to direct-service organizations, including nonprofits affected by 9/11 and those addressing related issues, while 33 percent went to relief funds. A modest 2 percent of foundation gifts was undesignated or could not be allocated by recipient.

By Recipient Location Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Donors include 623 corporations and corporate foundations; due to rounding, percentages may not total 100. Shows individual organizations that received at least 5 percent of funding. 1 Regranting funds established by individual companies. 2 Various recipients named but amount not reported by recipient; includes grants to unspecified individuals totaling $581,785. 3 No recipient named at time of pledge.

• Foundations and corporations supported 9/11 relief funds and service organizations located in 44 states and twelve countries, including Afghanistan and Pakistan. New York-based funds and recipients garnered $609 million, or 55 percent of all 9/11 response funding (Figure 11). They received 2,466 gifts, or 54 percent of the total, including many of those to direct-service providers and groups affected by the attacks.

• Including gifts to the American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund, recipients in the District of Columbia ranked second by dollars received ($198.1 million), followed by California ($35.6 million) and Minnesota ($27.5 million). The DisneyHAND: Survivor Relief Fund, a regranting fund, was the top California recipient, with $6.9 million in gifts from the Walt Disney Company’s foundation and contributions program. In Minnesota, Scholarship America garnered $24.3 million from foundations and corporations across the country to support various long-term scholarship funds benefiting the dependents of victims. Organizations in eight states received a combined total of at least $10 million each from institutional donors for 9/11-related causes. Recipients included local 9/11 relief funds, local chapters of the American Red Cross and Salvation Army, fire

96


GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11

departments and emergency services, and nonprofits working locally, nationally, and internationally on issues related to the attacks.

By Recipient Field of Activity As noted above, recipients fell into two broad categories: relief funds and direct-service agencies. The following is an analysis of funding for direct-service organization recipients by principal field of activity. Recipients were coded using the National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities. Direct-service organizations received more than 2,318 gifts totaling nearly $234 million, mainly from foundations. Of that total, roughly $223 million could be identified by recipient field.

• Arts and culture groups ranked first by share of funding for directservice organizations ($55.7 million, or 25 percent) and second by number of gifts (480, or nearly 22 percent) (Figure 12 and Table 11). The vast majority of gifts supported performing and visual arts groups and museums in the New York metropolitan area that suffered displacement or substantial loss of income following the attacks. Cultural recipients also included public broadcasting and other media organizations. By far the largest provider of emergency support for affected arts groups was the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which distributed nearly $38 million in direct grants and an additional $8 million through support for intermediaries, such as the New York

TABLE 9

Top 20 Designated Recipients of Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding Sources of Institutional 2 Funding

Recipient/Recipient Fund

State

Amount

1

% of Total Funding

No. of Gifts

Corporations/ Corporate Foundations

Independent, Community and Public 3 Foundations

NY

$162,531,187

14.8

589

65.6

34.4

DC

150,247,237

13.6

393

87.3

11.8

Twin Towers Fund

NY

51,165,986

4.6

99

89.3

9.7

NY Police & Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund

NY

28,923,274

2.6

37

68.4

31.6

1.

September 11th Fund of the United Way of NYC and New York Community Trust

2.

American Red Cross Liberty Disaster Relief Fund

3. 4.

4

5.

Scholarship America—Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund

MN

24,302,008

2.2

32

51.9

23.5

6.

Robin Hood Foundation—Robin Hood Relief Fund

NY

19,448,800

1.8

23

27.3

72.7

7.

Salvation Army—9/11 Disaster Response

VA

17,642,676

1.6

29

11.1

88.9

8.

Community Foundation for the National Capital Region—Survivor’s Fund and other programs

DC

13,791,448

1.3

32

80.9

19.1

9.

New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund

NY

12,274,144

1.1

64

70.3

29.7

10.

American Red Cross in Greater New York

NY

11,968,614

1.1

22

90.3

9.7

11.

MLB-MLBPA Disaster Relief Fund

NY

10,250,000

0.9

3

51.2

0.0

12.

New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund

NY

9,584,265

0.9

24

97.0

3.0

13.

National Housing Endowment—Homebuilders Care Victims Relief Fund

DC

7,000,000

0.6

7

100.0

0.0

14.

New York University—NYU WLRK Scholarship Fund and other purposes

12.2

15.

Greater Kansas City Community Foundation—September 11th Fund and other purposes

16.

NYU Downtown Hospital

17. 18.

NY

6,780,000

0.6

11

87.8

MO

6,093,887

0.6

5

99.8

0.2

NY

5,925,000

0.5

6

89.9

10.1

Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation

NY

5,157,777

0.5

16

72.9

27.1

Siebel America Fund

CA

4,869,391

0.4

2

37.0

63.0

19.

New York Foundation for the Arts—New York Arts Recovery Fund

NY

4,746,876

0.4

20

5.5

94.5

20.

New York City Police Foundation

NY

4,532,525

0.4

12

30.6

69.4

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Excludes relief funds established by individual corporate donors. 1 Excludes undesignated pledges and unspecified amounts donated to named recipients. 2 Does not include associations, so figures may not total 100 percent. 3 Includes independent, community, and public foundations; excludes associations. 4 Includes all contributions to headquarters for 9/11-related efforts.

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TABLE 10

Top 15 Corporate Relief Fund Recipients of Corporate 9/11 Response Funding Corporate Relief Fund

State

Amount

1

% of Total Corporate Funding

Arts Recovery Fund. The top New York-based cultural recipients included the Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum of Natural History, WNYC Foundation, Whitney

No. of Gifts

Museum of Modern Art, Brooklyn Institute for Arts and Science, and Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. Other leading recipients were the

NY NY

$15,100,000 12,765,278

2.1

2

1.8

3

Marsh & McLennan Victims Relief Fund

NY

10,519,875

1.5

13

4.

AXA 9/11 Relief Fund

NY

10,000,000

1.4

1

5.

Bear Stearns Relief Fund

NY

10,000,000

1.4

1

6.

Daimler Chrysler 9/11 Relief Fund

MI

10,000,000

1.4

1

funding to direct-service organizations ($54.6 million, or 25 percent)

7.

Goldman Sachs Relief Fund

NY

10,000,000

1.4

1

and the largest share of gifts (831, or 37 percent). Funding supported

8.

Morgan Stanley Victims’ Relief Fund

NY

10,000,000

1.4

1

multipurpose human service agencies, including 82 chapters of the

9.

Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund

NY

7,115,980

1.0

11

10.

DisneyHAND: Survivor Relief Fund

CA

6,876,284

1.0

2

distribution (e.g., City Harvest, NY); legal services (e.g., Legal Aid

11.

BP Employee Disaster Relief Fund

IL

5,933,333

0.8

2

Society, NY); employment (e.g., Los Angeles Alliance for a New

12.

American Express World Trade Center Disaster Relief Fund

NY

4,100,000

0.6

1

Economy); and youth development (e.g., Big Brothers/Big Sisters of

13.

Alcoa Relief Fund

PA

3,000,000

0.4

2

14.

Phillips Petroleum September 11th Fund

OK

3,000,000

0.4

1

15.

Unilever September 11th Children’s Fund

NJ

2,546,000

0.4

2

1.

Citigroup Relief Fund

2.

J.P. Morgan Chase WTC Disaster Relief Fund

3.

Smithsonian Institution and National Public Radio, both located in the District of Columbia, and Facing History and Ourselves National Foundation in Massachusetts.

• Human service providers accounted for the second largest share of

American Red Cross, but also agencies working in such areas as food

NYC). Included among the largest multipurpose recipients were local

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Regranting funds established by individual companies after 9/11 to assist victims and their families. 1 Amount includes pledges and matching gifts from the institutional donors in the 9/11 response database only; excludes funds contributed by employees.

community organizations serving Arab and other ethnic communities, such as the Michigan-based Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services.

• Public affairs/society benefit organizations ranked third by share of 9/11 funding for service organizations ($43.6 million, or 20 percent) and share of gifts (386, or 17 percent). Roughly one-third of funding supported philanthropy organizations, such as community foundations, United Ways, and other federated funds. The next largest share of funds went to public affairs groups and government agencies, including a $2.5 million grant from the California-based Cisco Systems Foundation to the City of New York Office of Emergency Management to provide infrastructure support for the relief effort and support for children and families of victims. The remaining funds were divided between community improvement organizations active in recovery and rebuilding efforts and civil rights and advocacy groups. In the former category, top recipients included the Regional Plan Association of New York, which convened the Civic Alliance to Rebuild Downtown New York to develop strategies for redeveloping Lower Manhattan; and Working Partnerships USA (CA) for the Bay Area Worker Relief Project, which supported workers in the tourist industry who experienced economic distress due to the effects of the September 11 attacks. Civil rights groups included local and national organizations, such as the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation (NY), New York Immigration Coalition, Asian American Legal Defense and

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GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11

Education Fund (NY), and American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (DC).

FIGURE 10

Foundation 9/11 Response Funding by Type of Recipient

• Educational organizations and institutions received 13 percent of 9/11 funding ($28.9 million) and 9 percent of gifts (198) for service organizations. While a small portion of funds targeted Lower Manhattan schools and institutions directly affected by the attacks, by far the largest share supported higher and graduate educational institutions across the country for activities addressing issues related to the attacks. For example, Columbia University (NY) received $2.8 million to research and develop public education programs on 9/11-related topics ranging from anti-discrimination to public health and bio-terrorism. Libraries, especially the New York Public Library ($3.1 million) and branch libraries in Brooklyn and Queens, received the second largest share of education funding. Support came mainly in the form of grants from the Andrew W. Mellon and Starr Foundations to replace income lost due to the economic effects of the attacks. Grants also funded educational support organizations, such as the New York-based After-School Corporation and Sponsors for Educational Opportunity, and the DC-based WAVE, Inc., a school dropout prevention program.

• Health care organizations and institutions, including hospitals, blood banks, and emergency medical services providing for affected communities, as well as counseling and mental health groups around the country, garnered 10 percent of 9/11 funding

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Donors include 538 independent and family foundations, 112 community foundations, and 55 other public foundations; due to rounding, percentages may not total 100. 1 Various recipients named but amount not reported by recipient; includes grants to unspecified individuals totaling $2,843,400. 2 No recipient named at time of pledge.

($23.2 million) and 6.7 percent of gifts (150). In addition to the NYU Downtown Hospital (mentioned earlier), top health recipients included the Task Force for Child Survival and Development, which received a $2.9 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for a public health information system project to improve bio-terrorism readiness; Saint Vincent’s Hospital and Medical Center (NY), which provided emergency services to victims and workers at ground zero; the Children’s Health Fund (NY); and America’s Health Together (DC).

• The majority of the remaining 9/11 funds for service organizations supported international affairs, relief, and human rights groups in the United States and overseas. Small amounts of funding also went to environmental and animal welfare organizations, social science research groups, and churches and interfaith councils.

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SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

FIGURE 11

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Response Funding by Recipient Location

9/11-RELATED FOUNDATION GRANTS AWARDED IN 2003 Foundations continued to report new grants for 9/11-related purposes through year-end 2003. In all, the Foundation Center identified 68 grants awarded in 20031 totaling $7,547,336. These grants were reported by 19 donors, of which the vast majority were large New York-based independent foundations.

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Due to rounding, percentages may not total 100. 1 In the 9/11 response database, all gifts to the American Red Cross (ARC) Liberty Disaster Relief Fund are accounted for in the District of Columbia, which houses ARC headquarters. 2 Includes grants to various organizations for unspecified amounts and undesignated pledges.

While some of the newer grants provided ongoing support for 9/11-related funds or outreach programs initiated in the aftermath of the attacks, the majority of them funded either new long-term service initiatives — such as mental health and general health care coverage for those affected by the attacks — or emerging social issues in the post-9/11 world, with an emphasis on preserving civil liberties and human rights and fostering religious and racial tolerance, especially in areas with Arab and other immigrant communities across the country. New grants also focused on homeland security and local disaster preparedness; business recovery and nonprofit organization assistance; rebuilding efforts; the creation of memorials; and foreign policy. Community leaders with experience in earlier disaster recovery efforts, especially 2 those from Oklahoma City, had warned 9/11 donors about the critical need for long-term philanthropic resources. These 2003 grants suggest that some foundations did heed this advice and are taking a long-term approach.

Examples of 2003 Donors and Beneficiaries: • By far the largest new grant was the Starr Foundation’s $1 million FIGURE 12

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Direct Giving to Service Organizations by Major Recipient Field

award to the New York City Police Foundation for technological and communications equipment to support counter-terrorism and crime prevention programs.

• The Ford Foundation awarded the year’s second largest grant of $700,000 to Public Interest Projects (NY) for start-up support for the Freedom Fund, a national fundraising and grantmaking collaborative to advance immigrants’ and human rights in the post-9/11 context. Among its other grants, Ford gave $100,000 to the Circle Foundation’s Center for the Study of Policy Attitudes (MD) to conduct public opinion research to help U.S. policymakers understand post-9/11 public attitudes on the nation’s role in the world.

• The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (NY) gave $294,000 to Project Rebirth (NY) to develop and launch a state-of-the art Web site centered around the rebuilding of Ground Zero; and $45,000 to New York University to evaluate post-9/11 economic assistance for small businesses and nonprofits in lower Manhattan.

• The Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund (CA) gave $200,000 to America’s Health Together (DC) to expand its “Facing Fear Together” program, which is a national initiative addressing mental health issues related to exposure to homeland terrorism in the United States. Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Includes recipient type fields representing at least 4 percent of the dollars donated directly to service organizations; excludes gifts to relief funds and other funding intermediaries. 1 Includes civil rights and social action, community improvement, philanthropy and voluntarism, and public affairs.

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GIVING IN THE AFTERMATH OF SEPTEMBER 11

TABLE 11

In a related grant, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (NJ) awarded $103,000 to America’s Health Together to improve mental health services and primary care in a time of terrorism.

• The Commonwealth Fund (NY) made a grant of just over $100,000 to Lake, Snell, Perry and Associates (DC) for a project to assist New Yorkers with the transition from disaster relief Medicaid to permanent health coverage, and nearly $100,000 to the Asian American Federation of New York for its “Informing Initiative” to expand health coverage after September 11 in New York City’s Chinatown.

Foundation and Corporate 9/11 Direct Giving to Service Organizations by Recipient Field and Sub-Field Recipient Field

Amount $ 55,694,408

Arts and Culture

several grants in 2003 to local area organizations for ongoing disaster relief and recovery efforts, including $150,000 to the Children’s Health Fund, $135,000 to the Floating Hospital, and $100,000 to the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation.

• The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (NY) provided continuing support for local affected arts groups, including a $50,000 grant to the Alliance for the Arts for “The Arts Rebuild New York” campaign.

• The New York Community Trust and the California Endowment reported the largest number of 2003 grants related to 9/11 (12 each). Among the Trust’s grants, four provided about $50,000 each to local groups such as the Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York and New York Cares, to use lessons learned from the 9/11 attacks to help nonprofits develop disaster response and business continuity plans, and a $40,000 grant to the DC-based ADC Research Institute, an arm of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, to combat post-9/11 discrimination against Arab-American New Yorkers.

• The California Endowment’s 12 grants to organizations in its home state for various 9/11-related projects included a $200,000 grant to Chinese for Affirmative Action for “United Response to Backlash Hate, Violence, and Discrimination,” a five-agency collaborative to create a coordinated response to post-9/11-related acts of violence against immigrants in the Bay Area, and almost $189,000 to the Orange County Human Relations Council for “Living Room Dialogues,” a program to increase racial and religious tolerance by engaging in community-building activities that bring together diverse people, including Muslims and Arabs throughout Orange County.

25.0

No. of Gifts 480

% 21.5

Museums

20,619,044

9.3

86

3.8

Performing Arts

16,469,000

7.4

189

8.5

Media/Communications

8,447,092

3.8

66

3.0

Arts—Multidisciplinary

4,392,637

2.0

58

2.6

Visual Arts

2,613,635

1.2

44

2.0

Historic Preservation

2,616,000

1.2

24

1.1

537,000

0.2

13

0.6

54,612,432

24.5

831

37.2

32,133,524

14.4

517

23.1

Other Arts and Culture Human Services

• The MetLife Foundation, a New York-based corporate donor, made

%

Human Services— Multipurpose Food Distribution

7,264,500

3.3

93

4.2

Crime, Justice, Legal services

4,175,000

1.9

49

2.2

Recreation

3,474,140

1.6

19

0.9

Youth Development

2,549,062

1.1

42

1.9

Employment

2,351,956

1.1

35

1.6

Other Human Services

2,664,250

1.2

76

3.4

Public/Society Benefit

43,610,340

19.6

386

17.3

14,737,749

6.6

144

6.4

10,414,788

4.7

59

2.6

Community Improvement

9,720,425

4.4

97

4.3

Civil Rights

8,736,878

3.9

85

3.8

28,909,475

13.0

198

8.9 3.9

Philanthropy/Voluntarism

1

Public Affairs

Education

16,172,898

7.3

87

Libraries/Library Sciences

8,277,500

3.7

31

1.4

Elementary/Secondary Education

1,468,177

0.7

27

1.2

Higher Education

Other Education Health

2,990,900

1.3

53

2.4

23,248,699

10.4

150

6.7

18,842,699

8.5

95

4.3

Mental Health

2,945,500

1.3

38

1.7

Other Health

1,460,500

0.7

17

0.8

International Affairs

9,130,513

4.1

96

4.3

Environment and Animals

3,036,705

1.4

37

1.7

Science and Social Science

2,667,603

1.2

16

0.7

Religion

1,679,371

0.8

41

1.8

$222,589,546

100.0

2,235

100.0

General Health Care

TOTAL

Source: The Foundation Center, December 2004. Includes giving to agencies and organizations that provide services or conduct programs; excludes gifts to 9/11 relief funds, scholarship funds, and other funding intermediaries. 1 Includes gifts to local federated funds.

1. These grants included one 2004 grant from the Starr Foundation for $100,000. 2. At an event marking the release of the September 11th Fund’s six-month report, Nancy Anthony, executive director of the Oklahoma City Community Foundation, told nonprofit leaders that 30 percent of the funds collected in response to the Oklahoma City bombing were used in years four to six after the disaster; that most requests for counseling came only after the first year, with counseling becoming the single largest ongoing expense; and that seven years after the disaster 10 percent of their cases were still active. See press release, “September 11th Fund Reports Six-Month Disbursements of $205 Million from $456 Million Donated; Plans $250 Million for Future Use,” available from http://national.unitedway.org/news/sept11_sixmonths.cfm; Internet; accessed on 10/15/04.

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IMPACT OF 9/11 RESPONSE FUNDING ON PROSPECTS FOR GIVING The $1.1 billion in 9/11 response funding provided by foundations, corporations, and other institutional donors in such a short time frame was unprecedented. Still, the scale of this funding should be kept in perspective. The $339 million donated by independent and community foundations represented just 1 percent of the $27.2 billion they gave to all causes in 2001, while the $722 million pledged by corporations accounted for less than 6 percent of the estimated $12.9 billion they contributed in the same year.19 These findings suggest that the impact of the philanthropic response on future giving levels was relatively modest. Of far greater consequence in terms of its impact on funding capacity, especially of endowed foundations, was the precarious state of the economy at the time of the attacks. In a survey of 9/11 donors conducted in early 2002, grantmakers emphasized that it was the continuing stock market slide — starting well in advance of September 2001 — and not their 9/11 donations that was threatening their future giving prospects and driving changes in grantmaking practice.20 Yet, despite substantial market losses, institutional giving remained remarkably steady in 2002 and declined only modestly in 2003. Independent and community foundation giving slipped by less than 1 percent in 2002, followed by a 3 percent drop in 2003. Over the same period, corporate foundation giving increased 5 percent in 2002, and then decreased by a modest 2 percent in 2003.21 While these aggregate findings may not reflect the experience of individual institutional donors, they nevertheless suggest that 9/11 donations helped to bolster overall giving in 2001 and again in 2002, as donors continued to make good on their substantial pledges. In addition, the positive feedback received by foundations and corporations for their unprecedented generosity in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks may have encouraged some funders to maintain relatively high levels of giving despite three years of asset losses — or even to increase their giving. Although many factors need to be taken into account, such as an increased demand for private funding in the wake of draconian cuts in government support triggered by a recession, these results suggest that the immediate foundation and corporate response to America’s greatest national tragedy since Pearl Harbor set a historic milestone for the field and stimulated donors to be more philanthropic going forward.

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Endnotes 1

See Renz, L., 9/11 Relief and Regranting Funds: A Summary Report on Funds Raised and Assistance Provided, New York, NY: Foundation Center, November 2003.

2

See Renz, L., Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11: 2003 Update on the Foundation and Corporate Response, New York, NY: Foundation Center, December 2003. Findings were based on data compiled through September 2003.

3

Since publication of the December 2003 edition of Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11, the number of 9/11 donors identified by the Foundation Center has increased by just over 5 percent, while the total for 9/11 giving has risen by close to 3 percent. These increases reflect more complete reporting by donors of their 9/11 giving as well as donations announced after the latest edition was compiled.

4

The estimate of total private 9/11 response funding includes an estimated $2.6 billion raised by major relief funds from all sources and roughly $234 million in gifts and grants from foundations and corporations to direct-service providers. The relief fund total derives from a 2003 survey conducted by the Foundation Center. The total has been adjusted to account for estimated regranting and transfers between funds in the sample that did not provide a detailed breakdown of their gifts. Because of incomplete information and inter-fund regranting, the figure for all 9/11 giving is subject to change.

5

See Brown, M., Giving USA 2004: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2003, Indianapolis, IN: AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy, 2004. The report provides revised 2002 overall private giving figures.

6

Since publication of the December 2003 edition of Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11, the number of gifts has increased by almost 18 percent (from 4,031). This increase mainly reflects more detailed and complete reporting of recipient names and gift amounts by donors. Many foundations that announced large pledges immediately following the attacks waited to assess needs before earmarking the funds for specific recipients. To a lesser extent, the increase reflects gifts reported by the 68 donors that are new to the 9/11 funding database.

7

For the purpose of this analysis, giving by separate corporate-directed entities — including corporate foundations, corporate direct-giving programs, and corporate affiliates and subsidiaries — has been collapsed into a single 9/11 giving figure tied to the corporate parent.

8

Some companies reporting matching gifts did not provide an exact dollar figure. As a result, the actual figure for 9/11-related employee matching gifts is likely higher. Also, to avoid double counting of 9/11-related gifts, the matching gift amount includes gifts from the company only; it excludes roughly $80 million donated by individual employees.

9

Corporate donors in the 9/11 funding database reported in-kind gift pledges totaling $73 million. Because many donors did not affix monetary values to in-kind gifts, and the relative value of in-kind gifts reported is difficult to measure, these pledges have been excluded from the analysis.

10

Since publication of the December 2003 edition of Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11, the number of company-sponsored gifts identified by the Foundation Center’s 9/11 database has increased by more than 12 percent (up from 1,627).

11

An international endowed philanthropy with a principal domicile outside the United States, the Atlantic Philanthropies operates like an independent foundation and maintains a grant selection and administration office in New York.

12

Since corporate direct giving programs do not maintain assets, comparisons can only be made with corporate foundations.

13

By comparison, only about 7 percent of U.S. foundations overall held assets of $10 million or more, while less than 2 percent held assets of $50 million or more. Fiscal year reported was 2002 for most foundations, 2001 for others.

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SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

104

14

By comparison, roughly 12 percent of the nation’s 2,362 corporate foundations held assets of $10 million or more, while almost 3 percent held assets of $50 million or more. More than half held less than $1 million in assets.

15

Since publication of the December 2003 edition of Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11 the total number of relief funds tracked in the Foundation Center’s 9/11 database has had a net decrease due to reclassification of some of funds. For more detailed information about relief funds and their giving patterns, see the Foundation Center’s 9/11 Relief and Regranting Funds, December 2003.

16

See September 11th Fund of the United Way of New York and the New York Community Trust, “The September 11th Fund: Year Three,” available from www.september11fund.org; Internet; accessed 9/23/04. The September 11th Fund announced on September 7, 2004, that its final grantmaking and administrative activities will cease in December 2004. Services being provided to those already enrolled will continue to be delivered through January 2005, and no enrollment or service deadline has been set for the 9/11 Mental Health and Substance Abuse program created in cooperation with the American Red Cross.

17

See American Red Cross, “2002 Corporate Annual Report,” available from www.redcross.org; Internet; accessed on 9/23/04.

18

Since publication of the December 2003 edition of Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11, the proportion of undesignated pledges and giving that is not broken down by recipient fell from 11 percent to 9 percent.

19

Since some 9/11 pledges were paid in 2002, this comparison overestimates the share of overall 2001 foundation and corporate giving directed to the 9/11 response. Nonetheless, these comparisons provide a useful yardstick for the scale of private institutional support. For more information on overall annual corporate giving, see revised 2001 figures in Giving USA 2002 (2003).

20

See Renz, L., Assessing the Post-9/11 Funding Environment: Grantmakers’ Perspectives, New York, NY: Foundation Center, 2002.

21

Based on estimates from Giving USA, overall corporate giving increased 10.3 percent in 2002 and rose another 4.2 percent in 2003.


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Philanthropy and September 11 A Bibliography

This bibliography of books, pamphlets, and articles related to September 11 is selected from the Literature of the Nonprofit Sector Online (LNPS), the Foundation Center’s free, searchable catalog of the published material about philanthropy. LNPS represents the literature acquired for the Foundation Center’s five libraries due to its relevance to: visitors to our libraries, trustees and staff of foundations and nonprofit organizations, fundraisers, representatives of government agencies, the media, librarians, and the burgeoning numbers of scholars and students interested in reading and writing about the philanthropic sector of American society. The listing is organized in alphabetical order by author or main entry, and contains descriptive abstracts for most entries. Each of the items in this bibliography is available in at least one of the Center’s five libraries. Several of the items contain URLs, indicating where entire reports can be located on the Internet. The citations range from late 2001 through mid-2004. Much of the literature during that period related to the establishment of charities to aid victims, data on the monies contributed, controversies that arose over disbursement of

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funds, and the impact on fundraising throughout the nonprofit sector. More general works provide essays by various specialists on the nature of philanthropy and generosity. To keep up with new materials being published on this topic, refer to the Literature of the Nonprofit Sector Online (http://lnps.fdncenter.org) using the subject heading “September 11 terrorist attacks.” Abshire, Michael. “E-Philanthropy Continues to Grow.” Corporate Philanthropy Report, vol. 17 (April 2002): p. 1, 11. Reports on the Third Annual E-Philanthropy Conference that took place in March 2002 in McLean,VA.The role of Internet fundraising after the attacks of September 11 took center stage, and several statistics about the amounts raised are provided. Other speakers focused on the role of the Internet in soliciting volunteers and in sharing information about corporate donations.

Abshire, Michael. “The Funding in the (Auto) ‘Parts’.” Corporate Philanthropy Report, vol. 17 (February 2002): p. 1, 11. Describes giving trends within the automotive component sector in the wake of the September 11 attacks and the recession.

Anft, Michael. “Assisting Terrorism’s Other Victims.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 15 (September 4, 2003): p. 7–8, 10. Explains that more foundations have begun to support charities that serve immigrants from Arab and predominantly Muslim countries facing post-September 11 backlash in the United States. Smaller organizations, however, have found fundraising difficult under the increased scrutiny of federal investigators looking for ties to terrorist groups.

Anft, Michael. “Immigrant-Rights Organizations Face Fallout from September 11.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (January 10, 2002): p. 18–9. In the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, nonprofit immigration groups have found it more difficult to fundraise and draw support for immigrants’ rights.

Association of Fundraising Professionals. Study of the Impact of the Events of September 11 on Charities. Alexandria,VA: Association of Fundraising Professionals, 2002. 49 p. Reports findings from an Association of Fundraising Professionals survey studying the effects of the September 11 attacks on fundraising.The survey was conducted from November 2001 to early January 2002, with 248 members responding.The report covers the effect of September 11 on specific fundraising campaigns, including direct mail, planned giving, major gifts, online solicitation, and annual campaigns. Also describes the impact of September 11 on fundraising strategies, donor attitudes, and business operations.

Baron, Barnett F. “Philanthropy and Homeland Security.” Foundation News & Commentary, vol. 45 (May–June 2004): p. 30–3. Baron analyzes the USA PATRIOT Act and its impact on international grantmaking.The U.S. Treasury Department has indicated its concern that philanthropy may be a major source of support for terrorist activity, but a recent report by the General Accounting Office has called that supposition into question.

Bernacchi, Gina. “Corporate Giving Picks Up Despite Weak Economy, Attacks.” NonProfit Times, vol. 15 (November 1, 2001): p. 1, 10, 12. At this time it appears that corporate giving will increase substantially in 2001 over 2000, perhaps largely due to the September 11 attacks.

Bernacchi, Gina. “Giving Grew after September 11 Terror Attacks.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (June 1, 2002): p. 1, 6. Discusses the impact of the September 11 terrorist attacks on fundraising, analyzing results from reports published by the Association of Fundraising Professionals.While arts, cultural, and humanities organizations witnessed a decline in donations in October 2001, year-end fundraising totals of nearly all nonprofits were higher than in 2000.

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“Beyond September 11:Where Do We Go from Here?” Carnegie Reporter, vol. 1 (Summer 2002): 45 p. Blum, Debra E. “Hundreds of Displaced N.Y. Charities Face Financial, Other Losses in Attack.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 13 (October 4, 2001): p. 12. Describes how nonprofits in lower Manhattan are coping with the damage caused by the September 11 terrorist attacks. Explains that many organizations not directly affected by the disaster will witness a growing demand in social services. Provides a list of grantmakers and other nonprofits that are offering financial and technical support.

Blum, Debra E. “New Telemarketing Law Called Too Restrictive by Some Fund Raisers.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 15, 2001): p. 21. The Federal Trade Commission has new authority to regulate appeals by telemarketers; those in the industry claim the rules are burdensome. HR 3162 is a broad anti-terrorism bill that included these new regulations in the anticipation of fraudulent fundraising schemes after the September 11 attacks.

Borochoff, Daniel. Congressional Testimony on the Charities Response to the September 11 Terrorist Attack for Subcommittee on Oversight of the Committee on Ways and Means, November 8, 2001. American Institute of Philanthropy, 4 p. Borochoff, president of the American Institute of Philanthropy, gave testimony to the U.S. Congress, and this is a reprint of his text.

Brody, Deborah A. “In for the Long Haul in the Capital City.” Foundation News & Commentary, vol. 42 (November–December 2001): p. 32–4. Describes how foundations in Washington DC have been working more closely together after the September 11 attacks. Grantmakers and nonprofits have learned the importance of long-term planning from the Oklahoma bombing six years earlier.

Carpenter, Clint. “Cancelled Revenues: Attacks Hurt Annual Events, Cash Flow.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (February 1, 2002): p. 27–9. Discusses the impact of the September 11 attacks on several annual conferences. Organizations covered include the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy, the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, the American Society of Association Executives, and the National Catholic Development Conference.

Carpenter, Clint. “September 11 Impact on Overall Giving Sparks Diverse Opinions.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (July 1, 2002): p. 1, 5–6. Carpenter, Clint; Causer, Craig; Clolery, Paul;Williamson, Richard. “We Shall Overcome: Charities Rally Nation, Lend Aid after Attacks.” NonProfit Times, vol. 15 (October 1, 2001): p. 1, 4–5. Reports on the emergency relief efforts of various nonprofits in response to the September 11 terrorist attacks. Organizations described include the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army.

Causer, Craig; Clolery, Paul; Sinclair, Matthew;Williamson, Richard. “Money Pouring In, Yet Fundraising on Hold.” NonProfit Times, vol. 15 (October 1, 2001): p. 6. Describes the effect of the September 11 terrorist attack on fundraising efforts.

Charitable Contributions for September 11: Protecting Against Fraud,Waste, and Abuse. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, 107th Congress, 1st session. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2001. 102 p. Includes the testimony of leaders of the following entities: United Way of America, Federal Trade Commission, American Red Cross in Greater New York, International Association of Fire Fighters, September 11th Fund of the New York Community Trust, American Red Cross, New York State Attorney General, Marsh, Inc., and Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance.

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Cho, Eunice. “Building Communities, Defeating Fear: Organizing for Immigrant Rights after September 11.” Nonprofit Quarterly, vol. 9 (Spring 2002): p. 32–5. The author, from the National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, gives a status report.

Cohen, Rick. “Reflecting upon the Charitable Response of September 11:We’ve Just Begun.” Nonprofit Quarterly, vol. 9 (Spring 2002): p. 16–20. Numerous unique issues were raised by the donations that poured in after September 11, such as how to define a victim, what is excessive charity, use of donations for administrative expenses, and many more.This article outlines some of the major concerns, and argues for the sector to learn from mistakes that were made, and also the unprecedented accomplishments that were achieved.

“Congressional Hearings on 9-11 Relief Organizations: BBB Wise Giving Alliance Speaks Out for Donors.” Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Guide, (Winter 2001): p. 4–10. Reprints excerpts of Congressional testimony by executives of the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, September 11th Fund, and others regarding their organizations’ response to donors’ expectations and victims’ needs.

Corporate Contributions in 2001: Executive Summary. New York, NY: Conference Board, 2003. 10 p. This is the executive summary of the annual statistical analysis delving into the contributions of 187 companies in 2001. Data indicates a total of $4.52 billion in giving, of which $648 million was earmarked for disaster and relief related to the September 11 attacks.

Cox, Linda R. September 11th Relief Funds:A Report at Six Months. New York, NY: New York Regional Association of Grantmakers, 2002. 12 p. Lists 37 relief funds that responded to the needs of victims and families in the wake of September 11, and provides some statistics about the amounts raised and distributed, as well as the charities’ approach to the task at hand.

Cross, Devon Gaffney. “Arms and the Foundation.” Philanthropy, vol. 16 (January–February 2002): p. 22–5. Author asserts that foundations should play a greater role in supporting national security in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Curtis, Jody. “Set Up before the Sun Set.” Foundation News & Commentary, vol. 42 (November–December 2001): p. 28–31. Explains how the September 11th Fund came about, and its progress to date in supporting the families of September 11 victims.

Derryck, Dennis; Abzug, Rikki. “Lessons from Crisis: New York City Nonprofits PostSeptember 11.” Nonprofit Quarterly, vol. 9 (Spring 2002): p. 6–11. The authors provide a look at how neighborhood nonprofits in New York City have fared in the two months after the destruction of the September 11 attacks, based on their survey of more than one hundred that replied to their questionnaire.

Derryck, Dennis; Abzug, Rikki. The WTC Tragedy Ripple Effect Devastates Neighborhood Nonprofits. New York, NY: New School University. Milano Graduate School of Management and Urban Policy, 2001. 12 p. URL: http://www.newschool.edu/milano/rebuild_nyc/nonprofits911.pdf Reports the results of a survey of 125 neighborhood organizations taken in the first two months after the September 11 attacks in New York City. Eighty percent of the nonprofits indicated that they had been adversely impacted, but many had recovered by the time of the survey.

“Donors Respond to Terror: A Symposium.” Philanthropy, vol. 15 (November–December 2001): p. 11–3. Representatives from various foundations explain how the September 11 attacks and the current recession will impact their giving patterns.

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Feller, Michael. “Minding the Gaps.” Foundation News & Commentary, vol. 43 (September–October 2002): p. 24–7. The employees of the J. P. Morgan Chase Foundation experienced the events of September 11 at close range, and committed substantial funds for the relief effort immediately after the disaster.The president of the foundation explains their grantmaking strategy, and the lessons they learned.

Fickenscher, Lisa. “Charities, Feds Leave Small Firms Out in the Cold.” Crain’s NewYork Business, vol. 18 (March 4, 2002): p. 1, 41. Little money is finding its way to aid the small businesses in New York that were most affected by the attacks on the World Trade Center. Most of the charities that are involved are directing their support to the families of the victims.

“Foundation and Corporate Grants to Relief Funds: A Sampling.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 13 (October 4, 2001): p. 18, 20. A listing of foundations and companies that have donated to the American Red Cross, September 11th Fund, and other beneficiaries for disaster relief efforts.

“The Giving Climate: New Normalcy, New Vigilance.” Advancing Philanthropy, vol. 9 (January–February 2002): p. 21–4, 46. Advice about approaching donors in the wake of September 11.

“Giving for September 11:The View from Ground Zero.” Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Guide, (Fall 2002): p. 2–5. Brief interviews with representatives of City Harvest, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and Safe Horizon, all of whom were affected by the World Trade Center attacks, and the September 11th Fund, which was created to assist the victims and their families.

Global Philanthropic Strategies for a Post-September 11th World: A Working Paper for Individual and Institutional Donors. New York, NY: Rockefeller Philanthropy Office/The Philanthropic Collaborative, Inc., 2001. 19 p. A working paper on grantmaking strategies.

Gose, Ben. “42% of Americans Say Relief Effort Damaged Faith in Nonprofit Groups.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (September 5, 2002): p. 12. Reports results from a Chronicle survey of 1,000 Americans on public confidence in nonprofits after September 11.

Gose, Ben. “Terrorist Attacks Did Not Cause Major Shift in Focus of Most Grant Makers.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (September 5, 2002): p. 15–6, 18. Explains that few foundations have changed their funding priorities for areas such as homeland security and international peace efforts since the September 11 terrorist attacks. Provides several examples of grantmakers that are responding to the terrorist threat.

Greene, Elizabeth. “Disaster-Relief Funds Face Tough Decisions on How To Put Good Will to Good Use.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 13 (October 4, 2001): p. 14–7. Foundations and grantmaking public charities are determining how to spend the funds that have been raised for the victims of the September 11 terrorist attack. Several nonprofits including the Black United Fund of New York are concerned that prejudices may hinder funding to minority groups. Contains a listing of organizations that are collecting contributions for relief efforts.

Greene, Elizabeth;Wolverton, Brad. “Learning the Lessons of September 11: Charities Reassess How They Handled Aid.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (September 5, 2002): p. 5, 9, 11. Explains how charities are learning from their experience with September 11 donations, focusing on the Salvation Army and the American Red Cross.

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Greene, Stephen G. “Borderless Giving Crucial to Solving Global Strife, Experts Say.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (March 21, 2002): p. 10–1. Discusses remarks from a conference organized by the Global Philanthropy Forum. Some speakers touched on promoting an international philanthropic vision in the aftermath of September 11. Nonprofit leaders also addressed the AIDS epidemic and spoke on the needs of Central Asia.

Greene, Stephen G. “In Disaster’s Wake.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (September 5, 2002): p. 4–6, 8. Explains that the public may have lost confidence in charities after September 11, as critics question the nonprofit sector’s ability to handle similar disasters. Observers suggest charities missed opportunities to effectively harness the good will of volunteers and to clearly communicate the value of the nonprofit sector to the public.

Higgins, Heather R. “Fighting Back: How to Avert a Charitable Calamity.” Philanthropy, vol. 15 (November–December 2001): p. 9–10. Suggests changes in federal tax policy that could encourage philanthropy in the wake of the September 11 attacks.

Hinds, Michael deCourcy. “Nonprofits at Ground Zero: Struggling to Survive,Their Missions Point the Way.” Carnegie Reporter, vol. 1 (Spring 2002): p. 22–32. Profiles of four nonprofits whose offices were in the World Trade Center neighborhood: Four Way Books, Safe Horizon, Robin Hood Foundation, and Futures and Options.Their stories sketch out how they experienced the events of September 11 and the months after, as each worked to resume services.

Hoyt, David. “Under Pressure:Where the Charitable Response to 9/11 Went Wrong.” Stanford Social Innovation Review, vol. 2 (Summer 2004): p. 66–73. A case study of the September 11th Fund, which was created on the day of the terrorist attacks in New York City by a collaboration between the New York Community Foundation and the United Way of New York City.While the outpouring of donations to the Fund was unprecedented, and thousands of people were helped, the lack of coordinated and effective communication to the public resulted in several negative stories in the media. Strains developed between the two agencies as some critics questioned the role of the Fund.

Indiana University Center on Philanthropy. America Gives: Survey of Americans’ Generosity after September 11. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Center on Philanthropy, 2002. 7 p. Co-published with the Association of Fundraising Professionals, this presents the results of a survey of more than 1,300 households about their giving or volunteering in the wake of the terrorist attacks on September 11.

Indiana University Center on Philanthropy; Brown, Melissa S. (ed.) Giving USA 2004:The Annual Report on Philanthropy for theYear 2003. 49th ed. Indianapolis, IN: American Association of Fund Raising Counsel Trust for Philanthropy, 2004. v, 260 p. An annual statistical analysis of charitable contributions, distribution, donors, recipients, sources of philanthropy, and areas of philanthropic opportunity; this edition covers 2003. Sources analyzed include individuals, bequests, foundations, and corporations. Areas of philanthropic opportunity that are compared for various periods up to 2003 are religion; education; health; human services; arts, culture, and humanities; public/society benefit; environment/wildlife; and international affairs. A separate section lists studies of giving in specific states. Contains numerous charts, lists, and statistical tables. Of particular note are the listings of gifts of five million dollars or more by individuals. Includes a table of the National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities.This edition contains a special section on the subject of philanthropy related to September 11.

Jones, David R.; Campbell, David. “Philanthropy and 9/11: How Did We Do?” Responsive Philanthropy, (Fall 2002): p. 1, 12–5. A report card on the results of charitable giving and disbursement after September 11.

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Jones, Jeff; Sinclair, Matthew. “Grantmakers’ Changes Rooted in Economy, Not Terrorism Fears.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (November 1, 2002): p. 28, 36. Summarizes findings from the Foundation Center report, Assessing the Post-September 11 Funding Environment: Grantmakers’ Perspective. Over 330 grantmakers responded to the survey that was conducted in Spring 2002.The results indicate that approximately 95 percent of respondents did not change their funding focus after September 11.

Jones, Jeff. “Most Donors Believe Money Was Used Wisely.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (September 1, 2002): p. 1, 12. Provides results from a NonProfit Times/Ruotolo Associates national survey on September 11 donations that was taken in late June. Half of the people polled indicated that they gave to September 11 causes, and two-thirds of people who made donations felt that nonprofits used the funds properly.

Jones, Jeff. “Nonprofits Fear False Accusations of Terror Grants.” NonProfit Times, vol. 17 (May 1, 2003): p. 1, 4, 6. Describes laws and voluntary guidelines issued by the federal government to prevent charitable donations from funding terrorism. Discusses how these measures are affecting international grantmaking. Sidebar lists additional resources to help nonprofits comply with guidelines.

Jones, Jeff. “Questions Raised about How IRS OK’d Status.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (September 1, 2002): p. 1, 4–5. Describes research performed by NonProfit Times reporters in an effort to contact nonprofits that received expedited tax-exempt status for September 11-related causes.While the reporters had difficulty obtaining information from the organizations, there have been relatively few cases of fraud reported in New York. Changes to the federal tax code have been proposed so that federal officials can disseminate information to state regulators.

Lake, Eli. “Leading the Charge:Top Donors and Grantees on the Private Sector’s Role in Defending America.” Philanthropy, vol. 17 (November–December 2003): p. 17–21. A status report on some of the anti-terrorism initiatives by the following donors: German Marshall Fund, JM Foundation, John M. Olin Foundation, Lauder Foundation, Merrill Family Foundation, Rosenkranz Foundation, Shelby Cullom Davis Foundation, David Steinmann, Stuart Family Foundation, and the W. H. Donner Foundation. Programs by the following grantees are also described briefly: American Enterprise Institute, Asia Pacific Initiative, Aspen Institute Berlin, Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America, Foreign Policy Research Institute, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, Freedom House, Imagine New York, Institute of World Politics, International Center for Nonviolent Conflict, Investigative Project, Islam and American Democracy Project, Middle East Forum, Middle East Media Research Institute, National Interest, Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies, Project for a New American Century, and Shalem Center.

Lipman, Harvy. “IRS Handling of September 11 Charities Shows Weakness of Approval System, Critics Say.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (March 7, 2002): p. 8, 10. Nonprofit organizations responding to the September 11 terrorist attacks were granted tax-exempt status under an expedited approval process. Critics of the Internal Revenue Service’s review system insist that several of the approved nonprofits had nothing to do with the September 11 disaster.

Lipman, Harvy. “Majority of Funds Raised after September 11 Have Been Distributed.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 15 (September 4, 2003): p. 16–7. Provides results from the Chronicle’s survey of 28 charities. Indicates 80 percent of the $2.4 billion raised has been allocated.

Lyman,Timothy R.; Considine, Michael G.; Sachs, Jennifer L. “International Grantmaking after September 11: Dealing with Executive Order 13224 and the USA PATRIOT Act.” International Dateline, vol. 64 (Fall 2002): p. 1–4. Explains the provisions of laws passed after September 11 that impact funders, and outlines how grantmakers can best comply with the new regulations.

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Maehara, Paulette V. “Let Ethics Be Your Fundraising Guide.” Association Management, vol. 54 (July 2002): p. 30–4, 36–7. Discusses fundraising ethics in the wake of the controversies surrounding the use of the September 11th Fund and the Red Cross Liberty Fund. Explains how fundraisers should develop trust, educate donors, demonstrate accountability, minimize risk, and protect donor privacy.

McKivergan, Daniel. “Bankrolling Terror.” Philanthropy, vol. 12 (November–December 1998): p. 38–41. Discusses the prevalence of U.S.-based organizations that fundraise for terrorist activities around the world.

Melcher, Michael F.; Mandl, Alex. The Philanthropic Response to 9/11:A Practical Analysis and Recommendations. New York, NY: Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP, 2003. 42 p. The report is based on interviews with service providers, foundations, government agencies, and others, and also includes several recommendations for disaster planning.

Morrison & Foerster LLP. Helping Handbook for Small Business Affected by the World Trade Center Disaster. New York, NY: Association of the Bar of the City of New York, 2001. 50 p. Meyerson, Adam. “Pitching in: Philanthropy’s Role in the War on Terror.” Philanthropy, vol. 15 (November/December 2001): p. 7–8. Discusses the importance of philanthropy in the wake of the September 11 attacks. Suggests that private funding can foster new ideas on foreign policy, encourage research on emergency preparedness, and support organizations that promote tolerance in the Islamic world.

Pulley, John L. “Fund-Raising Efforts Proliferate for Families of Terrorists’Victims.” Chronicle of Higher Education, vol. 48 (November 2, 2001): p. A35–6. Describes the scholarship funds that colleges and grantmakers are establishing for family members of victims of the September 11 terrorist attack.

Putnam, Robert D. “Bowling Together.” American Prospect, vol. 13 (11 February 2002): 5 p. Putnam, author of Bowling Alone, claims that the events of September 11 radically changed how Americans experience their sense of community. He presents here the results of surveys he conducted in 2000 and again in the fall of 2001, measuring levels of trust in the government, civic involvement and other issues.

Ramos, Edgardo; Lyman,Timothy R.; Canavan, Patricia; Nichols, Clifford, III. Handbook on Counter-Terrorism Measures: What U. S. Nonprofits and Grantmakers Need to Know. Hartford, CT: Day, Berry & Howard Foundation, Inc., 2004. vii, 25 p. Provides an overview of Executive Order 13224, the USA PATRIOT Act, and other regulations that may affect international grantmaking.

“Recovering from a National Tragedy:Women’s Special Role.” Women’s Philanthropy Institute News, (December 2001): p. 1, 3. Discusses women’s philanthropic role in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Reiss, Alvin H. “Arts Respond in Time of Crisis.” Fund Raising Management, vol. 32 (November 2001): p. 26, 35. Describes how arts organizations have helped with relief efforts in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks. Some arts groups have donated proceeds from performances, while other organizations have provided free programs.

Renz, Loren; Cuccaro, Elizabeth; Marino, Leslie. 9/11 Relief and Regranting Funds:A Summary Report on Funds Raised and Assistance Provided. New York, NY: Foundation Center, 2003. 27 p. URL: http://fdncenter.org/research/trends_analysis/pdf/9_11relief_funds.pdf This survey of 111 9/11-related relief funds revealed that 64.2 percent of these organizations had planned to distribute 100 percent of the funds they raised by year-end 2003. Further, nearly all

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relief funds with unspent contributions have specific plans for distributing their remaining funds, such as providing long-term assistance and scholarships for children of victims. In addition to the survey findings that are presented in part one, the second part of the report analyzes the actual donations received by 40 of the largest funds, as well as how these funds have distributed this support. Overall, excluding donations from one fund to another, these funds have raised almost $2.9 billion for relief and recovery and contributed $2.2 billion, accounting for the vast majority of dollars raised and disbursed by the more than 350 relief funds created after 9/11.The analysis provides precise breakdowns of funds distributed and estimates of unspent funds by beneficiary group and type of assistance.

Renz, Loren. Assessing the Post-9/11 Funding Environment: Grantmakers’ Perspectives. New York, NY: Foundation Center, 2002. 8 p. URL: http://www.fdncenter.org/research/trends_analysis/pdf/post911.pdf Based on a nationwide survey of 333 grantmakers, this report examines the impact of foundations’ and corporations’ response to the September 11 tragedy on their overall giving, and assesses the relative impact of the 9/11 response vs. the economic downturn on giving patterns and practices.

Renz, Loren; Marino, Leslie. Giving in the Aftermath of 9/11: 2003 Update on the Foundation and Corporate Response. New York, NY: Foundation Center, 2003. 16 p. URL: http://fdncenter.org/research/trends_analysis/pdf/9_11update03.pdf Based on data collected through September 2003, this report provides statistics on institutional donors (independent and family foundations, corporate foundations and direct giving programs, community and other public foundations, as well as trade and business associations) in response to the September 11 terrorist attacks. Analyses are provided based on funder type, range of giving, funder location, and recipients.

Rhule, Patty. “After the Attacks: Nonprofits and Volunteers Rush to Aid Victims.” Volunteer Leadership, (Fall 2001): p. 20–1. A sampling of efforts around the country.

Rhule, Patty. “Disaster Relief:Volunteers Sign on for the Long Haul.” Volunteer Leadership, (Winter 2002): p. 4–8. Some examples of the outpouring of volunteer aid after the September 11 attacks, and advice on preparation for disasters.

Salamon, Lester M. “What Really Matters about September 11.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (September 5, 2002): p. 47–8. Salamon opines on the response of nonprofits to the cataclysmic events of September 11. Though the philanthropic response was unprecedented and remarkably generous, the coordination of organizations left something to be desired, and that fact will have implications for the future. He warns against “go-it-alone“ philanthropy. He suggests that Americans pay greater attention to social justice concerns, noting the relationship of terrorism to the underlying despair that may spawn it, and citing statistics that indicate that the percentage of charitable monies funneled to human services has declined in recent decades. Finally, Salamon encourages Americans to look more closely at efforts to support emerging movements for civil society in the international Islamic community.

Schram, Sanford F. “Social Welfare after September 11.” Nonprofit Quarterly, vol. 9 (Spring 2002): p. 21–4. State budgets are adversely impacted by the loss of the federal budget surplus, and the effect on social welfare programs could be dire, according to this analysis. Other forces are also eating away at the social safety net, and the author decries the erosion of government support for basic needs.

Schwinn, Elizabeth. “Easing of IRS Policy Lets Relief Groups Disburse Funds Regardless of Need.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 29, 2001): p. 30. In an exception to IRS regulations, funds raised for the victims and families of the September 11 attacks in New York and Washington can be distributed by charities to individuals regardless of need.The new ruling is not without its critics, however.The policy is Notice 2001–78.

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Schwinn, Elizabeth. “Guarding against Future Threats.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 15, 2001): p. 19–20. Outlines some recent efforts to work against terrorism.The Global Terrorism Project has received funding from several foundations; the MacArthur Foundation has earmarked $5 million; and the Nathan Cummings Foundation has pledged $500,000 to protect the civil liberties of Arab Americans.

Seessel,Tom. The Philanthropic Response to 9/11:A Report Prepared for the Ford Foundation. Trenton, NJ:Thomas Edison State College, 2002. viii, 63 p. URL:http://www.fordfound.org/publications/recent_articles/philanthropic_response.cfm Provides short descriptions of the response of foundations, corporations, and relief organizations to the needs created by the September 11 attacks.The foundations are: Andrew W. Mellon, Lilly Endowment, Ford, Carnegie Corporation of New York, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur, Charles Stewart Mott, Robert Wood Johnson, Rockefeller, Atlantic Philanthropies, Starr, John S. and James L. Knight, Annie E. Casey, and the Lumina Foundation for Education.The corporations are: Marsh & McLennan, Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Citigroup Foundation, New York Times Company Foundation, and Goldman Sachs. Also included are the American Red Cross, the September 11th Fund, the Twin Towers Fund, the 9/11 Disaster Relief Fund of the International Association of Fire Fighters, the New York Police and Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund, and Safe Horizon.

Seessel,Tom. Responding to the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks: Lessons from Relief and Recovery in NewYork City. Trenton, NJ:Thomas Edison State College, 2003. 43 p. URL:http://www.fordfound.org/publications/recent_articles/philanthropic_response_ii.cfm This report supplements a Ford Foundation report, “The Philanthropic Response to 9/11,“ released in August 2002 on the philanthropic response in relief and recovery for New York City following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

“September 11 Donations: How Much Charities Have Raised and Distributed.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 15, 2001): p. 16–7. A chart showing the activities of 29 organizations that have raised money related to September 11, and how the funds are being disbursed.

September 11: Interim Report on the Response of Charities. Washington, DC: U. S. General Accounting Office, [2002]. ii, 37 p. This is the presentation made on August 21, 2002 by the General Accounting Office to the Committee on Finance of the U. S. Senate.The report covered data about monies raised and disbursed by charities that were aiding victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks.

September 11: Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy. New York, NY: Foundation Center, 2002. viii, 182 p. URL: http://www.fdncenter.org/research/911/book.html Essays by or interviews of leaders from the nonprofit sector, reflecting on various aspects of the response to the September 11 attacks. Essays include: “Managing Charitable Giving in the Wake of Disaster“ by C. Eugene Steuerle; and “Reflections on September 11 Legal Developments“ by Victoria B. Bjorklund (Simpson Thacher & Bartlett). Fourteen interviews are listed in “September 11: Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy” on pp. 69–70.

September 11: Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy, Volume Two. New York, NY: Foundation Center, 2003. viii, 208 p. URL: http://fdncenter.org/research/911/book_2.html Essays by or interviews of leaders from the nonprofit sector, reflecting further on various aspects of the response to the September 11 attacks. Essays include: “Compassion & Competence: A NonPhilanthropist Reflects on the Contributions of Philanthropy” by Joshua Gotbaum (September 11th Fund); and “Nonprofits and 9/11: Now the Good News“ by Susan V. Berresford (Ford Foundation). Seventeen interviews are listed on p. 70.

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The September 11th Fund: OneYear Later. [New York]: September 11th Fund, [2002]. 46 p. A progress report on the September 11th Fund that describes accomplishments and ongoing activities. Includes several first-person accounts.

September 11th: Lessons Learned. Washington, DC:Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers, 2002. 30 p. Short essays by the heads of many of the organizations involved in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks at the Pentagon: Federal Emergency Management Agency, American Red Cross, Army Emergency Relief, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, Greater DC Cares, Community Services Agency of the Metropolitan Washington Council, AFL-CIO, United Way of the National Capital Area, Community Foundation of the National Capital Region, Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, and Washington Grantmakers.

“Shaken Foundations.” Trust & Foundation News, vol. 58 (September–November 2001): p. 1, 24. Describes how foundations located near the World Trade Center have been impacted by the September 11 attacks.

Sinclair, Matthew. “Community Service Projects to Remember Victims of 9-11.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (May 1, 2002): p. 1, 10, 25. Describes the recently passed Unity in the Spirit of America Act that will sponsor community service programs in the name of the victims of the September 11 attacks.The Points of Light Foundation and Volunteer Center National Network will be overseeing the projects around the nation.

Sinclair, Matthew; Jones, Jeff. “Following the Money: Meeting the Need.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (September 1, 2002): p. 14, 39. Provides results from a NonProfit Times survey of nearly 300 new charities and funds within existing organizations that were established as a result of the September 11 attacks. Indicates that approximately $2.2 billion was raised and $1.4 billion was disbursed. Also provides specific disbursement figures for several funds.

Sinclair, Matthew. “Mission Served.” NonProfit Times, vol. 18 (April 1, 2004): p. 1, 5–6. URL: http://www.nptimes.com/Apr04/npt2.html Organizations that had been created in response to the September 11 attacks have begun preparations for closing, or have already closed.The 9/11 United Services Group that was established to coordinate relief efforts will cease operations by the end of 2004.The number of people seeking assistance from traditional programs is likely to increase during the transition period.

Sinclair, Matthew. “Quick Action, Long Reflection Mark Tragic Year.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (September 1, 2002): p. 1, 6, 8. Discusses lessons that nonprofit leaders have learned about fundraising and disaster relief since the September 11 attacks. Sidebar includes a chart listing the top six relief funds along with disbursement figures.

Sinclair, Matthew. “United Ways Mobilize National Support System: Funneling Money Where It’s Needed.” NonProfit Times, vol. 15 (October 1, 2001): p. 6–7. Describes how United Ways across the nation have responded to the September 11 terrorist attack. The United Way of New York City and the New York Community Trust established the September 11th Fund.

Souccar, Miriam Kreinin. “Bleak Months in Offing for Arts Groups.” Crain’s NewYork Business, vol. 17 (November 26, 2001): p. 3, 47. Most arts groups in New York City foresee a decline in attendance, sales, and fundraising in the next six months, largely due to the effects of the attack on September 11.

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Souccar, Miriam Kreinin. “United Way Slashes Funds for Agencies.” Crain’s NewYork Business, vol. 18 (July 15, 2002): p. 1, 44. Many New York City nonprofits will find their United Way grants much smaller this year, due to the fact that about half of the agency’s receipts were earmarked for victim relief related to September 11.

Suhrke, Henry C. “A Wannabe Federal Charity Regulator Tries Again.” Philanthropy Monthly, vol. 34 (#7–8 2002): p. 5–12. The Federal Trade Commission has been charged with overseeing charitable solicitation by forprofits, in the wake of several fraudulent schemes after September 11.This is not the first time the FTC has attempted this regulatory role, as this history indicates.The most recent effort is part of the USA PATRIOT Act, legislation passed in the autumn of 2001.

Summary of Findings: Survey of Foundation Communications Issues Post-September 11. Communications Network, [2002]. 3 p. Presents the results of a survey of 32 communications directors of foundations regarding how their priorities changed (or did not) after September 11, and how the communications function and budget was impacted.

“Under Pressure.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 15, 2001): p. 9. Now, two months after an unprecedented outpouring of monetary support for victims of the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, tough questions are arising. Congress, the press, and the public are looking closely at how funds are disbursed, and some charities are having trouble giving a complete picture. The American Red Cross, and the Liberty Fund that it created, have been a special focus of attention; leaders there are criticized for their plans to earmark a substantial part of the funds in reserve for other needs. In light of the controversy, the organization’s chief executive Bernadine Healy has resigned. Other charities have yet to distribute any funds. Some critics are calling for government oversight of the entire relief effort.

Wallace, Nicole. “Online Giving Soars as Donors Turn to the Internet Following Attacks.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 13 (October 4, 2001): p. 22. Describes the rise in online giving after the September 11 terrorist attack.The American Red Cross reported it has raised $60 million over the Internet thus far.

Wallace, Nicole. “Technology Plays Many Roles in Aftermath of Disaster.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 13 (October 4, 2001): p. 22. Companies donated hardware and developed Web sites to help with the September 11 relief efforts.

Whelan, David. “September 11 Fund Discourages New Gifts: Studies Show Tragedy’s Effect on Charities.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (January 24, 2002): p. 18, 20. Provides highlights from several studies that analyze the impact of the September 11 attacks on nonprofits.

White, Doug. “How Can Donors Know When a Charity Is ‘Terrorist’?” Trusts & Estates, vol. 142 (May 2003): p. 66–7. Safeguards that donors can take to reduce the possibility that charitable monies will be utilized to support terrorist activities.

Wilhelm, Ian;Williams, Grant. “American Red Cross Names Interim Chief and Vows Additional Changes.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 15, 2001): p. 10. In the wake of the controversy over the disbursement of funds collected for the victims of September 11, Harold Decker has been appointed interim chief executive, replacing Bernadine Healy. Healy was criticized for decisions made involving the Liberty Fund, which has collected $564 million to date in gifts and pledges. Decker comes from a background in the pharmaceutical industry.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

Wilhelm, Ian. “Former OMB Executive Steps in to Run September 11th Fund.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 15, 2001): p. 18. An interview with Joshua Gotbaum, who has been appointed chief executive of the September 11th Fund, created by the New York Community Trust and the United Way of New York City.

Wilhelm, Ian. “Half of $2-Billion Raised for September 11 Given Away; Other Recovery Updates.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (March 7, 2002): p. 14–5. Provides results from a Chronicle survey of organizations that were raising funds for September 11 relief efforts. Sidebar includes a listing of the charities and how much each has distributed thus far.

Wilhelm, Ian. “Nonprofit Groups Search for Better Ways to Manage Disaster Volunteers.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (September 5, 2002): p. 13–4. Explains that the poor coordination by charities and emergency personnel in managing volunteers after September 11 has prompted nonprofit and government leaders to examine better procedures for handling large numbers of emergency workers. Discusses the challenges and risks involved when working with so-called spontaneous volunteers.

Wilhelm, Ian. “Red Cross Fund Raiser Takes on Unforeseen Challenges.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 13 (October 4, 2001): p. 28. Profiles Michael D. Farley, a senior fundraiser at the American Red Cross. Provides excerpts from an interview conducted after the September 11 terrorist attack.

Wilhelm, Ian. “Red Cross Plans to Spend All Donations to Help September 11 Attack Victims.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 29, 2001): p. 30. In a turnaround, the American Red Cross has decided to allocate all funds raised for the relief efforts to the September 11 families of victims. Earlier, the organization had planned to earmark some of the donations for future disasters, a plan that was widely criticized.

Williams, Grant. “Turmoil at the Red Cross: Critics Blame Charity’s Leader for Problems in Wake of Attacks.” Chronicle of Philanthropy, vol. 14 (November 1, 2001): 2001. Reports that the American Red Cross, along with its president Bernadine P. Healy, has been facing criticism for the way fundraising efforts have been managed after the September 11 attack.There is confusion over the amount that victims, families, and rescue workers will receive from the charity’s Liberty Fund.

Williams, Roger M. “In Solomon’s Footsteps: Conversation with Kenneth Feinberg.” Foundation News & Commentary, vol. 43 (September–October 2002): p. 20–3. Kenneth Feinberg heads up the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund of 2001, which was established by the U.S. Congress. In this interview he explains his work and the role of the charity.

Williams, Roger M.; Siska, Darlene. “New York Philanthropy after the Attacks.” Foundation News & Commentary, vol. 42 (November–December 2001): p. 22–6. A roundup about the response of foundations and nonprofits to the September 11 attacks in New York City. Some of the featured programs are Futures & Options for Kids, American Express Foundation, Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation, and Trinity Church. A sidebar presents an interview with Barbara Bryan, head of the New York Regional Association of Grantmakers.

Williamson, Richard; Sinclair, Matthew. “Islamic Charities under Spotlight’s Red Glare.” NonProfit Times, vol. 16 (January 1, 2002): p. 1, 6, 11. In the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, the federal government is working to seize the assets of several Islamic nonprofits with alleged ties to terrorist groups. Charities such as the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development in Texas have denied involvement in any terrorist activity.

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Williamson, Richard. “Money Comes between Charities,Terror Victims.� NonProfit Times, vol. 15 (December 1, 2001): p. 1, 6, 8. Facing controversy over the management of the Liberty Fund, the American Red Cross has announced that all of the $543 million raised will go toward helping September 11 victims and their families. Discusses the organizational restructuring after the departure of Dr. Bernadine Healy.

Wirthlin Worldwide. A Survey of Charitable Giving after September 11th, 2001. Washington, DC: Independent Sector, 2001. 10 p. Presents the results of a national telephone survey of more than one thousand Americans in October 2001. Among the major findings, it shows that one in seven Americans donated money, blood, or time in the weeks after the attack.

118


September 11 Guide to Relief and Recovery Grants by Foundations and Corporations

LIST OF FUNDERS BY TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 INDEX OF GRANT RECIPIENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 INDEX OF SUBJECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243


List of Funders by Total Contributions

Total number of grants: 4,542 Total dollar value of grants: $1,101,786,170

FUNDER

Mellon Foundation, Andrew W., The Lilly Endowment Inc. Starr Foundation, The Ford Foundation, The Exxon Mobil Corporation Contributions Program Citigroup Foundation Carnegie Corporation of New York Atlantic Philanthropies Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation California Endowment, The GE Foundation Morgan Chase Foundation, J. P., The Verizon Foundation ChevronTexaco Corporation Contributions Program Altria Group, Inc. Morgan Stanley Corporate Giving Program AXA Foundation, Inc. Bear, Stearns & Co. Inc. DaimlerChrysler Corporation Contributions Program Fannie Mae Freddie Mac Corporate Giving Program Goldman Sachs Foundation Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Contribution Fund Lehman Brothers Foundation Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. Corporate Giving Program Sloan Foundation, Alfred P. Coca-Cola Company Contributions Program, The Vivendi Universal Foundation, Inc., The Knight Foundation, John S. and James L. Johnson Foundation, Robert Wood, The SoundView Technology Group, Inc. Robin Hood Foundation, The Credit Suisse First Boston LLC Corporate Giving Program Kellogg Foundation, W. K. Microsoft Corporation Community Affairs Cisco Systems Foundation BP Foundation, Inc. Rockefeller Foundation, The MetLife Foundation Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc., The Wal-Mart Foundation

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

$50,501,500 34,660,100 20,071,446 18,923,850 16,251,000 15,211,000 14,592,400 13,770,670 13,597,823 13,368,041 13,260,000 12,765,278 12,625,000

135 4 164 67 10 20 155 30 26 76 5 3 5

10,560,000 10,431,666 10,010,000 10,000,000 10,000,000

57 72 2 1 1

10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000

1 4 2 1

10,000,000 10,000,000

3 8

10,000,000

1

10,000,000 9,923,919 9,750,000 9,500,000 9,351,000 8,616,520 7,067,850 7,000,000

6 37 2 4 252 31 28 1

6,648,345 6,316,492 6,300,000 6,000,000 5,933,333 5,715,596 5,526,000 5,510,000 5,300,000

17 18 2 5 2 43 31 12 5

FUNDER

MacArthur Foundation, John D. and Catherine T. Boeing Company Charitable Trust, The PepsiCo Foundation, Inc., The Amerada Hess Corporation Contributions Program Andor Capital Management Foundation Cantor, Fitzgerald Foundation Disney World Co. Contributions Program, Walt DuPont Corporate Giving Program Major League Baseball Major League Baseball Players Association National Association of Theatre Owners National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Pfizer Foundation, Inc., The Shell Oil Company Foundation Siebel Systems, Inc. Thomson Corporation, The UBS Securities LLC Corporate Giving Program Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Foundation, The Wyeth Corporate Giving Program Merck Company Foundation, The New York Community Trust, The Prudential Foundation, The Pfizer Inc. Corporate Giving Program Anheuser-Busch Family of Wholesalers Anheuser-Busch Foundation American Express Foundation Sony USA Foundation Inc. New York Life Foundation Time Warner Foundation Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation Mott Foundation, Charles Stewart Ford Motor Company Fund Intel Foundation Kresge Foundation, The Siebel Foundation, Thomas and Stacey, The Lumina Foundation for Education, Inc. Gates Foundation, Bill & Melinda Newhouse Foundation, Inc., Samuel I. Casey Foundation, Annie E., The Michelin North America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Novartis U.S. Foundation

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

5,170,000 5,100,000 5,100,000

30 3 4

5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000

1 1 1

5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000

1 1 1 1 1

5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000

1 1 3 2 4

5,000,000

1

5,000,000 5,000,000 4,913,151 4,677,895 4,264,726 4,263,500 4,200,000 4,200,000 4,100,000 4,080,000 4,000,000 4,000,000 3,953,948 3,803,737 3,512,612 3,508,200 3,250,000 3,069,391 3,025,000 3,020,000 3,015,000 3,000,000

1 37 24 46 2 21 1 5 1 4 2 1 3 21 6 4 3 1 3 4 4 15

3,000,000 3,000,000

2 1

121


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE FUNDER

Phillips Petroleum Foundation, Inc. SAP America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program State Farm Companies Open Society Institute Hearst Foundation, William Randolph Unilever United States Foundation PGA Tour Charities, Inc. Andersen LLP Corporate Giving Program, Arthur Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust, William R. Kohlberg Kravis Roberts Foundation McCormick Tribune Foundation, Robert R. Lucent Technologies Foundation Coca-Cola Foundation, Inc., The AT&T Foundation Procter & Gamble Fund, The FleetBoston Financial Foundation Best Buy Company, Inc. Panasonic Corporate Giving Program EDS Foundation, The SBC Foundation Abbott Laboratories Fund Community Foundation of New Jersey Key Foundation HSBC Bank USA Corporate Giving Program Amgen Foundation, Inc. Gannett Foundation, Inc. Principal Financial Group Foundation, Inc. Alcoa Inc. Bertelsmann Foundation U.S., Inc. Computer Associates International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Discover Card Financial Services Eastman Kodak Company Contributions Program Ernst & Young Foundation European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company (EADS) Giant Food Foundation, Inc. HCA Foundation, The NRG Energy, Inc. Rolex Watch U.S.A. Siemens Foundation Time Warner Inc. Corporate Giving Program UPS Foundation, The MBIA, Inc. Community Foundation Silicon Valley Disney Company Foundation, Walt, The Nordstrom, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Motorola Foundation Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc. Toys “R” Us Children’s Fund, Inc. Lilly and Company Foundation, Eli Avaya Carnival Cruise Lines Investment Technology Group, Inc. Mitsubishi International Corporation Contributions Program Siemens Corporation Contributions Program Tricon Global Restaurants, Inc. Bank of America Foundation, Inc. Aetna Foundation, Inc. Household International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Columbus Foundation and Affiliated Organizations, The

122

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

3,000,000 3,000,000 2,782,459 2,732,994 2,630,000 2,546,000 2,518,204

1 1 5 33 27 2 7

2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,476,000 2,444,150 2,431,405 2,367,000 2,290,000 2,200,000 2,200,000 2,150,000 2,130,596 2,110,000 2,098,303 2,073,626 2,040,000 2,038,898 2,030,000 2,000,003 2,000,000 2,000,000

1 1 1 1 4 5 12 9 19 2 2 2 12 4 10 68 5 10 2 12 1 1

2,000,000 2,000,000

1 2

2,000,000 2,000,000

1 1

2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 1,998,600 1,950,000 1,876,284 1,868,000 1,856,059 1,775,000 1,703,270 1,560,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 1,500,000

1 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 1 7 25 1 5 1 1 2

1,500,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 1,450,000 1,439,263

2 1 1 2 33

1,400,000

4

1,389,992

39

FUNDER

GlaxoSmithKline Holdings (Americas) Inc. Corporate Giving Program General Motors Foundation, Inc. Pittsburgh Foundation, The Neuberger Berman Foundation, The Cardinal Health Foundation Tenet Healthcare Foundation Comcast Foundation, The International Paper Company Foundation National Hockey League Foundation Pharmacia Foundation, Inc. Starbucks Foundation, The Phoenix Foundation, Inc., The BANK ONE Foundation Community Foundation for the Central Savannah River Area El Paso Corporate Foundation Atlantic Foundation of New York, The Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield Surdna Foundation, Inc. Schwab Corporation Foundation, Charles, The Nationwide Foundation Alcoa Foundation Mattel, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Philadelphia Foundation, The Wells Fargo Foundation, The Marriott Foundation, J. Willard and Alice S., The Xerox Foundation, The Toshiba America Inc. Corporate Giving Program CIGNA Foundation Packard Foundation, David and Lucile, The Sempra Energy Corporate Giving Program Dodge Foundation, Inc., Geraldine R. GreenPoint Foundation, Inc., The ING DIRECT Kids Foundation Dow Chemical Company Foundation Janus Foundation, The Emerson Foundation, Inc., Fred L. Gap Foundation, The H&R Block Foundation, The MBNA America Bank, N.A. Corporate Giving Program HRH Charitable Foundation Overbrook Foundation, The Academy Foundation Accenture ACE INA Foundation, The Alcatel USA, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Allen Charitable Foundation, Paul G., The Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America Corporate Giving Program AMVESCAP Apollo Group Applied Materials Foundation, The Asea Brown Boveri Inc. Corporate Giving Program Aventis Pharmaceuticals Foundation Avon Products, Inc. Corporate Giving Program BD Corporate Giving Program Beazer Homes BellSouth Corporation Contributions Program BI-LO Inc. Corporate Giving Program

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

1,348,456 1,325,000 1,310,700 1,298,252 1,241,958 1,217,013 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,175,000 1,170,000

4 3 4 7 9 25 9 1 1 3 1 15 11

1,137,411 1,136,657 1,120,670 1,102,500 1,100,000

2 13 15 2 15

1,090,702 1,090,000 1,085,000 1,085,000 1,074,263 1,065,500

4 2 4 2 12 4

1,060,000 1,050,000

3 2

1,045,000 1,040,645 1,034,750 1,033,994 1,030,600 1,025,000 1,025,000 1,020,000 1,019,861 1,010,000 1,010,000 1,005,000

4 5 3 11 47 3 2 4 7 2 3 2

1,003,000 1,001,000 1,001,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

2 18 2 1 1 1 1 1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 1 2

1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 1

1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1


LIST OF FUNDERS BY TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS FUNDER

Blackstone Group, The Blockbuster Inc. Corporate Giving Program Blue Cross/Blue Shield Association Blum-Kovler Foundation BMW Group Bridgestone Corporation Brown Foundation, Inc., James Graham Campbell Foundation, J. Bulow Carey Family Trust Centex Corporation Contributions Program Claiborne Foundation, Liz Colgate-Palmolive Company Contributions Program Concord Camera Corp. ConocoPhillips Corporate Giving Program Cooke Foundation, Jack Kent Cross Country Bank Dell Foundation, Michael and Susan, The Duke Energy Foundation Enron Corp. Contributions Program FederalExpress First Union Foundation, The FleetBoston Financial Corporation Freeman Foundation, The Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc. Corporate Giving Program Fujitsu America Inc. Corporate Giving Program GAMA Foundation, Inc. Genentech, Inc. Corporate Giving Program General Growth Properties Good Guys’ Harley-Davidson Foundation, Inc. Haworth Inc. Corporate Giving Program Hilton Hotels Corporation Contributions Program Hitachi America, Ltd. Corporate Giving Program Home Depot, Inc. Corporate Giving Program, The Honeywell International Inc. Corporate Giving Program Hovnanian Enterprises Interactive Brokers Group International Council of Shopping Centers Educational Foundation, Inc. Johnson Controls Foundation Kaiser Permanente Kansas City Chiefs Kimberly-Clark Foundation, Inc. Koch Industries, Inc. Corporate Giving Program KPMG Foundation, The Lazard Freres Lennar Foundation, Inc., The Limited Brands Foundation Lindenwood University Lockheed Martin Corporation Foundation Lortel Foundation, Inc., Lucille, The Luitpold Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Mandalay Resort Group McDonald’s Corporation Charitable Foundation MDC Holdings, Inc./Richmond America MGM Mirage, Inc,, 1,000,000 Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Japan Mitsui U.S.A. Foundation, The Mizuho Financial Group Mohegan Tribe/Mohegan Sun National Association of Realtors

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 6 1 1 1 3 2 1 2 1 3

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1

1,000,000

1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 49 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1

FUNDER

National Association of Security Dealers (NASD), Inc. New York Yankees Nissan Foundation, The North Jersey Media Group Inc. Corporate Giving Program NVIDIA OfficeMax Charitable Foundation PG&E Corporation Foundation, The Pulte Homes, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Reynolds Tobacco Company Foundation, R. J. Riggio Foundation, The Robertson Foundation Robertson Stephens Ronald McDonald House Charities Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) Financial Group Safeway Inc. Corporate Giving Program Safra Foundation, Edmond J. Saks Incorporated Foundation SANYO Manufacturing Corporation Contributions Program Sears, Roebuck and Co. Contributions Program Simon Property Group SL Green Realty Corporation Sony USA Corporate Giving Program Southeastern Conference Sovereign Bank Foundation Spears Foundation, Britney Starwood Foundation, Inc., The Susquehanna International Group Swiss ReInsurance ThyssenKrupp TIAA-CREF Tim Hortons/The TDL Group Ltd. Toll Brothers Tops Markets LLC Corporate Giving Program Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. Corporate Giving Program TXU Corp. Contributions Program Ty, Inc. UAW-GM Human Resource Center Unisys Corporation Contributions Program Verity, Inc. Vodafone-US Foundation Weinberg Foundation, Inc., Harry and Jeanette, The Wendy’s International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Williams Companies Foundation, Inc., The Xilinx Geffen Foundation, David, The NIKE Foundation Sunoco, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Enterprise Rent-A-Car Foundation Six Continents Hotels Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Cleveland Foundation, The Revson Foundation, Inc., Charles H. Bank of Montreal Medtronic Foundation, The

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 1 1

1,000,000

1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

2 1 1 1 1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 1 1 1

1,000,000

1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

2 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1,000,000

1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

1 2 1 1 1 1 1

1,000,000

1

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 999,999 994,000 975,000 955,000 923,923

1 1 1 3 12 9 7 2

850,000 837,751 825,000 815,000 800,000

3 18 3 2 3

123


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE FUNDER

Penney Corporation, Inc. Corporate Giving Program, J. C. Stryker Short Foundation Compaq Computer Corporation Contributions Program ADP Corporate Giving Program Granite Broadcasting Corporation Baxter International Foundation, The Cingular Wireless LLC Corporate Giving Program Community Foundation for Southeastern Michigan PETCO Foundation, The Hapag-Lloyd AG Goldman Fund, Richard & Rhoda Goldsmith Foundation, Horace W. NEC USA, Inc. Corporate Giving Program United Way of Palm Beach Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Andy, The Bechtel Foundation PSEG Foundation, Inc. Baxter International Inc. Corporate Giving Program Federation of Korean Industries CBS Foundation, Inc. McInerny Foundation Hosiosky Foundation, Issai & Ellen Reader’s Digest Foundation Target Stores, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation, The American Electric Power System Educational Trust Fund, The Annenberg Foundation, The Pew Charitable Trusts, The Strauss Foundation, Levi Mellon Financial Corporation Fund Hewlett Foundation, William and Flora, The Cargill, Incorporated Corporate Giving Program Illinois Tool Works Foundation California Community Foundation Corning Incorporated Foundation Baltimore Community Foundation, The Cummings Foundation, Nathan, The Commonwealth Fund, The Humana Foundation, Inc., The Lee Corporation Contributions Program, Sara Tides Foundation Northern Trust Company Charitable Trust, The Clark Foundation, Edna McConnell, The Minneapolis Foundation, The Dominion Resources, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Anchor Gaming Danforth Foundation, The Daniels Charitable Fund Dell Foundation, The Dillon Fund, The Dodge Foundation, Inc., Cleveland H. Dominion Foundation Duke Charitable Foundation, Doris Dunwalke Trust, Clarence and Anne Dillon El Pomar Foundation Entergy Corporation Contributions Program Equilon Enterprises, LLC Exelon Corporation

124

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

800,000 797,065

2 3

777,000 750,000 750,000 748,250

3 1 1 2

732,457

2

730,000 723,000 720,000 700,000 700,000 700,000 700,000

4 2 1 2 3 1 1

700,000 698,913 672,000

33 1 1

659,791 650,000 642,248 640,000 622,500 610,000 608,607

1 2 2 16 1 2 3

601,495

20

600,000 600,000 600,000 600,000 599,837 594,000 593,857 583,333 580,000 576,633 576,000 535,000 530,763 526,133 525,000 523,280 518,956 515,000 506,110

1 3 2 5 55 5 10 2 8 2 2 12 9 2 2 51 5 2 1

505,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

3 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1

FUNDER

Financial Security Assurance Fortune Brands, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Contributions Program, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Fund Harriman Foundation, Gladys and Roland Heineken ITT Industries, Inc. Corporate Giving Program K-B Toys Keck Foundation, W. M. Kuwait Red Crescent Lucent Technologies, Inc. Manulife Financial Corporation Marathon Oil Company Contributions Program Marathon Oil Foundation, Inc. Mast-Jagermeister AG Mitsubishi Corporation - Tokyo Monsanto Fund NHL Players Association Northrop Grumman Corporation Contributions Program Northrop Grumman Foundation, The Oak Foundation U.S.A., The Parsons Foundation, Ralph M., The Prebon Group Progress Energy Foundation, Inc. Progress Energy Service Company Sprint Foundation Straus Foundation, Inc., Philip A. and Lynn, The Summit Partners SunLife Financial Suntory International SunTrust Bank Corporate Giving Program SunTrust Bank, Atlanta Foundation TD Bank Financial Group Thomson Financial Inc. Corporate Giving Program 3M Foundation TotalFinaElf Tri State Ford Dealers UDS Foundation USA Funds USFreightways Corporation Wachovia Foundation, Inc., The Warburg Pincus Partners LLC Corporate Giving Program Weingart Foundation American Jewish World Service, Inc. New York Women’s Foundation, The May Department Stores Company Foundation, Inc., The National City Corporation Contributions Program Community Foundation of Louisville, Inc., The Allstate Foundation, The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc. Corporate Giving Program, The New York Mets Rippel Foundation, Fannie E. Talbots Charitable Foundation, Inc. American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation, Inc.

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

500,000

1

500,000

1

500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

1 1 2 4

500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

2 1 1 1 1 1

500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

4 4 1 1 2 1

500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

4 4 1 1 2 2 1 1

500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1

500,000 500,000 472,768 464,000

1 1 1 30

463,441

3

455,000

1

454,619 450,000

6 2

450,000 450,000 450,000 450,000

3 1 2 2

408,360

2


LIST OF FUNDERS BY TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS FUNDER

Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Inc., The Asbury Auto Group Community Response Fund Langeloth Foundation, Jacob and Valeria, The Luce Foundation, Inc., Henry, The Oldcastle, Inc. Teagle Foundation, Inc., The Meadows Foundation, Inc., The Central New York Community Foundation, Inc. Northwestern Mutual Foundation American Standard Foundation Hawaii Community Foundation duPont Fund, Jessie Ball New York Foundation Astoria Federal Savings New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, The Lincoln Financial Group Foundation Hundred Club of Colorado Springs Booth Ferris Foundation Caterpillar Inc. Corporate Giving Program Chartwell Charitable Foundation GAR Foundation, The Park Foundation, Inc. Harris Bank PNC Foundation, The Altman Foundation Hewitt Associates LLC Corporate Giving Program Pitney Bowes Inc. Corporate Giving Program Clorox Company Foundation, The St. Paul Travelers Foundation Mead Corporation Foundation, The Boston Foundation, Inc. Rhode Island Foundation, The Convergys Foundation, Inc., The Agilent Technologies Foundation Anadarko Petroleum Corporation Deere Foundation, John Freed Foundation, The NEC Foundation of America Trendwest Resorts Price Associates Foundation, Inc., T. Rowe Community Foundation Serving Richmond & Central Virginia, The Lowe’s Corporate Giving Program Morgan Chase & Co. Contributions Program, J. P. M & D Relief Fund Comerica Foundation Seattle Foundation, The Celanese Americas Foundation Superior Energy Services Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians American RuYi Machinery Corporation BB&T Corporation Contributions Program Belo Bertelsmann, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Canadian National Railway Company Cathay Bancorp, Inc. Chubb Corporation Contributions Program, The Citizens Communications Company Contributions Program Clark Foundation, Inc., Robert Sterling Doornink Foundation, The Galvin Charitable Trust, Helen M. GM Corporate Giving Program

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

402,700 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 397,500 377,000 376,181 376,000 374,107 370,000 365,000 362,585 361,734 360,100 355,000 351,303 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 340,551 340,362 340,000 327,809 322,302 314,500 310,000 309,570 306,137 304,136 303,640 300,417 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 295,145

1 7 1 4 1 1 1 3 2 1 8 1 6 18 2 3 2 1 2 3 2 1 10 2 1 5 3 3 4 3 1 10 5 2 2 1 1 6 1 1 8

286,700 285,000

4 1

280,000 275,700 272,800 257,068 255,000 255,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000

4 1 5 10 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000

2 1 1 1 1

FUNDER

Greater New York Automobile Association Hasbro Children’s Foundation Inter-Tel, Incorporated Kennedy Family Foundation, Inc., Ethel & W. George, The Kennedy Foundation, Karen A. & Kevin W. Lear Corporation Contributions Program Liquidnet MCI Foundation McNair Foundation, Robert and Janice, The Moody’s Investors Services New Era Cap Company NiSource Inc. Corporate Giving Program Office Depot, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Penn Foundation, William, The Rohm and Haas Company Contributions Program San Angelo Health Foundation Sidney Frank Importing Co. Sigma-Aldrich Corporation Contributions Program Solectron Corporation Contributions Program State Street Corporation Contributions Program Tokyo Electron limited Transocean Sedco Forex, Inc. UAW Valeo Washington Mutual Foundation Saks Incorporated Corporate Giving Program Monterey Fund, Inc. Norris Foundation, Kenneth T. and Eileen L., The Rochester Area Community Foundation Barker Welfare Foundation, The Cincinnati Foundation, Greater, The America’s Collectible Network Bodman Foundation, The Joukowsky Family Foundation Applied Micro Circuits Corporation Contributions Program KPMG Consulting Charitable Foundation Sirus Fund, The Stanley Works Foundation, The With Arms Wide Open Foundation CIGNA Corporation Contributions Program Berlitz International, Inc. Bremer Foundation, Otto Crane Fund for Widows and Children First Tennessee Foundation Hilton Foundation, Conrad N. Kansas Health Foundation Lafarge North America Inc. Corporate Giving Program Lam Research Corporation Foundation Mitsubishi Motors USA Foundation Ohrstrom Foundation, Inc., The Pinnacle Entertainment Princess Grace Foundation - U.S.A. Standard Register Company Contributions Program, The Syngenta Corporation Contributions Program WTEN-TV

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

250,000 250,000 250,000

1 1 1

250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

250,000 250,000

1 1

250,000 250,000 250,000

3 1 1

250,000

2

250,000

1

250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000

2 1 1 1 1 1

245,000 240,000

1 14

230,000 226,591 225,270 215,864 215,024 215,000 206,927

2 1 13 2 1 4 2

205,154 205,000 205,000 205,000 202,811 202,788 200,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 200,000

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2

200,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 200,000

1 2 1 4 1 1

200,000

2

200,000 200,000

1 1

125


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE FUNDER

Advanced Micro Devices Charitable Foundation Graham Fund, Philip L. Fluor Foundation, The Wilcox, G.N. Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, Inc. OppenheimerFunds, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Trust Company Contributions Program Kohlberg Foundation, Inc., The Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland Women’s Foundation of California, The Alabama Power Foundation, Inc. Peninsula Community Foundation Community Foundation of Greater Birmingham, The Heinz Company Foundation, H. J. Denso Corporation Tobias Foundation, Inc., Randall L. BTM Foundation, Inc., The Amerisure Corporate Giving Program Avnet, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Fannie Mae Foundation Hartford Foundation, Inc., John A., The Whirlpool Foundation Con-Way Transportation Services, Inc. Goodrich Foundation, Inc., The Huntington Foundation, The Jostens, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Reiman Foundation, Inc. U.S. Trust Corporation Foundation UTC Corporate Giving Program Scripps Howard Foundation APS Corporate Giving Program Atlanta Falcons Youth Foundation, Inc. Foundation for the Carolinas Meyer Foundation, Eugene and Agnes E. Avery Dennison Foundation Achelis Foundation, The Independence Community Foundation Johnson Endeavor Foundation, Christian A. Random House, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Hallmark Corporate Foundation DTE Energy Foundation PNM Foundation, Inc. Simon Youth Foundation, Inc. Palmer Foundation, The Raskob Foundation for Catholic Activities, Inc. Autodesk Foundation, Inc., The Carson Family Charitable Trust, The Delany Charitable Trust, Beatrice P. IFF Foundation, Inc., The itelligence, Inc. PPL Corporation Contributions Program Pulliam Charitable Trust, Nina Mason Sinatra Foundation, Frank, The MassMutual Financial Group Corporate Giving Program Adventist Community Services Bard Foundation, Inc., C. R. Dayton Foundation, The Kaplan Fund, Inc., J. M., The Providian Financial Corporation Contributions Program Frueauff Foundation, Inc., Charles A.

126

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

196,891 195,000 194,214 194,000

24 3 3 9

187,650

4

187,188

2

186,304 185,900 181,000 180,000 175,000 174,317

4 4 1 10 2 8

167,731 167,000 166,000 165,000 163,000 162,151 162,000 156,770 153,000 151,356 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 146,924 146,000 140,419 139,641 138,998 136,776 135,000 134,000 134,000 134,000 131,285 130,000 129,908 129,400 128,000 127,800 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000

2 2 1 1 3 3 1 4 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 3 1 3 2 5 2 5 1 3 2 5 1 7 1 2 1 2 6 2 2 3 1 1 2 4 2

121,397 120,001 120,000 120,000 120,000

1 1 4 1 3

120,000 118,000

2 2

FUNDER

GPU, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Guidant Foundation QUALCOMM Incorporated Corporate Giving Program Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., Jean and Louis Edison International Foundation Land O’Lakes Foundation Richardson Foundation, Inc., Smith Wolfensohn Family Foundation Atrix Laboratories Grant Foundation, William T. Trellis Fund Burlington Northern Santa Fe Foundation Alavi Foundation Community Foundation of Greater Memphis Barra Foundation, Inc. JCCC Foundation A.C. Moore Arts & Crafts Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Alden Trust, George I., The Ambac Financial Group, Inc. Corporate Giving Program APB Energy Apex Fund/Apex Venture Partners Aspect Community Commitment Fund, The Audi of America Basic American Foods Bedminster Fund, Inc., The Berkshire Life Insurance Company of America Corporate Giving Program Best Western International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Black & Decker Employees Combined Charities Trust Towson, The Blank Family Foundation, Arthur M., The Bremer Financial Corporation Bridgestone/Firestone Trust Fund Brookdale Foundation, The Brother International Corporation Contributions Program Brown & Sons Charitable Foundation, Inc., Alex Buca Di Beppo Buhl Foundation, The Butler Foundation, Inc., J. E. & Z. B. Butt Foundation, H. E. California Federal Bank “Community Power” Program Callaway Golf Company Foundation Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Carnegie Hero Fund Commission Carolina First Bank Casey Foundation, Eugene B. Champlin Foundations, The Charles River Laboratories Cheney Foundation, Ben B. Colorado Trust, The Compaq Canada Compass Bank Foundation Constellation Energy Group Corn Products International Crossmark CSG Foundation, Inc. Dade Community Foundation, Inc. Dayton Superior

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

118,000 117,930

2 1

117,000 115,000 115,000 115,000 115,000 110,400 110,000 110,000 110,000 109,707 106,000

2 6 1 3 4 4 1 6 2 2 3

105,150 102,500 100,700 100,000

9 3 1 1

100,000 100,000

1 1

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

100,000

1

100,000

1

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 1 1 1 1

100,000

1

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 1 2 1 1

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1


LIST OF FUNDERS BY TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS FUNDER

Dean Foods Company Contributions Program Deluxe Corporation Foundation Dibner Fund, Inc., The Donnelly, R.H. Downey Savings Driehaus Foundation, Richard H., The Drown Foundation, Joseph Electricite de France Fairbanks Foundation, Inc., Richard M. Farish Fund, William Stamps, The Federated Department Stores Foundation Fetzer Institute, Inc., John E. Fleishman-Hillard Charitable Trust FMC Foundation Foot Locker, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Frankel Foundation, Evan Gateway Foundation General Mills Foundation Georgia-Pacific Foundation, Inc. Gordon Foundation, Jeff, The Guffey Family Foundation Gund Foundation, George, The H.O. Penn, NYC Caterpillar Dealer Harris Foundation, Irving, The Heinz Endowment, Howard Heinz Endowment, Vira I. Help America Foundation, Ltd. Herbst Foundation, Inc., The HIFN Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation Hitachi Foundation, The Hughes Medical Institute, Howard Hy-Vee Foundation, Inc. Inco Alloys International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Internet Security Systems Jewett Foundation, George Frederick Johnson Foundation, Helen K. and Arthur E. Juniper Networks KeySpan Energy Delivery New England Corporate Giving Program Lenfest Foundation, Inc., The Lenfest Foundation, The Lincy Foundation, The Lithia Motors LSG Skychefs M&T Bank MassMutual Foundation for Hartford, Inc., The McBean Charitable Trust, Alletta Morris McCaw Foundation, Craig and Susan, The McEnroe Foundation, John McGregor Fund MIM Corporation National Association of Chain Drug Stores Education Foundation, Inc. National Center for Outreach National Distributing Company New York Rotary Foundation Nextgen Foundation Charitable Trust Payne Foundation, Frank E. Payne and Seba B. PerkinElmer Foundation Piper Charitable Foundation, Marion D. and Jane E., The Radio One, Inc. Retirement Research Foundation, The Rockwell Automation Trust Fund

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 1 1 9 1

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

1 1 2 1

FUNDER

Rockwell Collins Roth Staffing Companies, Inc. Scaife Family Foundation Serano Inc. Shizouka Bank Sonoco Foundation South Financial Group Foundation, The Steelcase Foundation SunTrust MidAtlantic Charitable Trust TCF Foundation TFC/Jewel Osco “The Producers” Trident Capital United Way of Central Maryland Unocal Corporation Contributions Program Vinik Family Foundation Waitt Family Foundation Weil, Gotshal & Manges Foundation Weill Family Foundation, The Yellow Corporate Foundation BMG Music Flint Ink Foundation St. Paul Companies, Inc. Corporate Giving Program, The HON INDUSTRIES Charitable Foundation Maytag Corporation Foundation Amica Companies Foundation Denver Foundation, The Triangle Community Foundation Community Foundation of Sarasota County, Inc., The Read-Rite Stamps Family Charitable Foundation, Inc. California Dental Association Foundation Safeco Corporation Contributions Program Electric Boat Employees Community Service Association van Ameringen Foundation, Inc. Waddell & Reed VNU, Inc. Dallas Foundation, The Community Foundation of Greater Chattanooga, Inc., The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina, Inc., The Grainger, Inc. Corporate Giving Program, W. W. Dircks Foundation, Inc., Robert and Joan CIT Group Foundation, Inc., The Clark Retail Enterprises Crossroads Fund Hotchkiss Foundation, W. R. Kornfeld Foundation, Emily Davie and Joseph S. Paley Foundation, Inc., William S. Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving State Street Foundation Summit Foundation, The Whole Foods Market, Inc. Corporate Giving Program ADC Foundation Northeast Utilities Foundation, Inc. RBC Dain Rauscher Foundation Lubrizol Foundation, The Rudin Family Foundation, Inc., May and Samuel MONY Foundation

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 95,000 95,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

91,500 91,150 87,681 85,250 85,000 84,836

1 1 3 1 2 11

84,214 84,077 83,154 81,290 80,500

2 1 1 3 1

80,000 80,000 80,000 79,777 78,300

4 4 1 1 4

77,642

1

77,190

2

76,500 76,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000

3 3 2 2 1 1

75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000

5 3 1 1 1

75,000 74,500 74,400 72,000 71,335

1 2 3 2 2

71,044 70,519

3 3

127


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE FUNDER

Bauer, Inc. Corporate Giving Program, Eddie Kauffman Foundation, Ewing Marion Third Wave Foundation Gruner & Jahr Bemis Company Foundation Prospect Hill Foundation, Inc., The Phelps Dodge Foundation Lee Enterprises, Incorporated Corporate Giving Program Albany Molecular Research, Inc. Community Foundation for Southern Arizona Flora Family Foundation Lyndhurst Foundation Rohatyn Foundation, Inc., Felix and Elizabeth, The Rosenberg Foundation, Inc., Sunny and Abe Community Foundation of Lowcountry, Inc. Union Planters Community Foundation Auchincloss Foundation, Inc., Lily drugstore.com Foundation Fairfield County Community Foundation, Inc. Mercantile Bankshares Corp. Ronald McDonald House Charities of Northeastern Ohio, Inc. Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro, Inc. Polk Bros. Foundation, Inc. Austin Community Foundation for the Capital Area, Inc. Hartford Foundation for Public Giving Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey, The Metal Industries Foundation, Inc. Weyerhaeuser Company Foundation Agere Systems Airgas, Inc. AK Steel Foundation American Trading and Production Corporation Contributions Program Arison Family Foundation USA, Inc., Ted Burlington Resources Foundation Campbell Soup Company Contributions Program Cantwell Private Foundation, Louis Yager CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Cassava Enterprises Cemala Foundation, Inc., The Charter Municipal Mortgage Acceptance Company Chef America, Inc. City National Corporation Contributions Program Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, The Community Foundation of Ottawa Consumers Energy Company Contributions Program Credence CVS Corporation Contributions Program Dana Foundation, The Donnelley & Sons Company Contributions Program, R. R. Excel Communications Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta First Kentucky National Charitable Foundation, Inc. Foster Wheeler Inc. Corporate Giving Program Giant Eagle Foundation

128

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

70,000 70,000 69,500 67,000 65,000 64,980 64,784

1 2 2 1 1 3 1

64,500 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000

6 1 1 3 1

60,000 60,000 58,130 57,999 55,000 55,000 55,000 55,000

2 1 1 7 3 1 1 1

55,000

1

54,182 52,500

1 2

52,000 51,000 51,000 51,000 51,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

1 1 2 3 1 1 1 1

50,000 50,000 50,000

2 1 1

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

1 3 1 1 1

50,000 50,000

1 1

50,000

1

50,000 50,000

1 1

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

1 1 1 1

50,000 50,000 50,000

1 1 1

50,000 50,000 50,000

1 1 1

FUNDER

Goldman Foundation, Herman IonIdea JM Foundation, The Joyce Foundation, The Kaufman Foundation, Inc., Henry & Elaine Kikkoman Foods Foundation, Inc. Koch Foundation, Inc. Krahm Charitable Foundation, Inc., Dorothy H. Lozier Foundation LTV Foundation Charitable and Educational Trust, The Macy, Jr. Foundation, Josiah Mercer Foundation, Johnny, The Merck Fund, John, The Meyer Family Foundation Nash Finch Foundation Noyes, Jr. Memorial Foundation, Inc., Nicholas H. Party City Corporation Pearle Vision Foundation, Inc. Piedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Piper Charitable Trust, Virginia G. Plum Creek Foundation Rich Products Corporation Contributions Program Rose Community Foundation and Affiliates Rosemore Schumann Fund for New Jersey, Inc., The Sedgwick Publishing Sharp Foundation, Peter Jay, The ShopKo Stores, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Sports Offshore Steele Foundation, Inc., The Straus Foundation, Inc., Aaron Straus & Lillie, The Stuart Foundation Sylvan Learning Foundation, Inc., The Tull Charitable Foundation, The Union Bank of California Foundation United States-Japan Foundation van Beuren Charitable Foundation, Inc. Webster Bank Corporate Giving Program Zarrow Family Foundation, Maxine and Jack, The Metris Companies Foundation Haas Fund, Walter and Elise Tulsa Community Foundation Bosch Foundation, The Calder Foundation, Louis, The Massachusetts Intitute of Technology Office of the Arts O’Neill Foundation, Inc., William J. and Dorothy K., The Elk County Community Foundation Kress Foundation, Samuel H. Welch Foods Inc. Corporate Giving Program Hibernia Corporation Contributions Program Benwood Foundation, Inc. Blaustein Foundation, Inc., Morton K. and Jane, The Butler Family Foundation, Patrick and Aimee CNT Eaton Charitable Fund, The

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

1 2 2 1 1 1 1

50,000 50,000

3 1

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

1 2 1 1 2 1

50,000 50,000 50,000

1 2 1

50,000 50,000 50,000

1 1 1

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

1 1 1 1 1 1

50,000 50,000 50,000

1 1 1

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1

50,000 46,807 46,000 45,805 45,000 45,000

2 2 1 1 1 2

45,000

1

45,000 43,435 42,500 41,000

2 1 6 2

40,777 40,000

1 4

40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000

2 2 1 1


LIST OF FUNDERS BY TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS FUNDER

Ondeo Nalco Company Contributions Program Scherman Foundation, Inc., The United Chinese Association of Greater New York Tauck Foundation, The Arvato & Bertelmann, Inc. RGK Foundation Zale Foundation, M. B. and Edna People’s Bank Corporate Giving Program Community Foundation of Monroe County Community Foundation of Broward Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County, The Orange County Community Foundation McCune Charitable Foundation Allfirst Foundation, Inc. BB&T Charitable Foundation Community Foundation of Central Illinois Eckerd Corporation Foundation Finish Line Youth Foundation, Inc. Hoblitzelle Foundation Jerome Foundation Lowenstein Foundation, Inc., Leon Norton Family Foundation, Peter Stratford Foundation United Way of Greater New Haven Wiegand Foundation, E. L. Pasadena Community Foundation Axe-Houghton Foundation DENSO International America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Oregon Community Foundation, The Suncor Energy Foundation Lutheran Community Foundation Resnick Family Foundation Gartner, Inc. Harrisburg Foundation, Greater, The Latham & Watkins Lincoln Community Foundation, Inc. Aladdin Systems, Inc. Vermont Community Foundation Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, S. D. Central Alabama Community Foundation, Inc. Arizona Community Foundation BMW Manufacturing Corporation Gerber Foundation, The Greenwall Foundation, The Nordson Corporation Foundation, The Pryne Foundation Roby Foundation, The Allyn Foundation, Inc. Dermalogica Foundation, The Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties, Inc. Noyes Foundation, Inc., Jessie Smith Community Foundation of South Alabama Fry Foundation, Lloyd A. Subaru of America Foundation, Inc. Target Stores Reed Foundation, Inc., The Community Foundation of Westmoreland Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore, Inc. Lane Family Foundation Chicago Community Trust and Affiliates, The Saint Paul Foundation, Inc., The Abbott Family Foundation

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

40,000 40,000 40,000 39,999 38,000 38,000 37,500 37,266 36,379 36,000

1 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1

36,000 36,000 35,500 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 34,515 34,000

1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 4 1

34,000 33,751 33,734 33,501 33,058 32,500 32,000 32,000 31,700 31,335 31,200 31,000 31,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 29,000 28,357

2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 6 1 3 1 1 1

28,127 27,500 27,028 26,500 26,085 26,079 26,000 25,907

2 2 1 3 1 3 1 13

25,750 25,750 25,625 25,375 25,000

1 1 1 2 1

FUNDER

Airborne Express Corporate Giving Program Amerivest Partners BEA Foundation Benedum Foundation, Claude Worthington Bovaird Foundation, Mervin, The Branan Foundation, Mary Allen Lindsey Bush Foundation California Association of Realtors Callaway Foundation, Inc. CHS Foundation Eastman Kodak Charitable Trust Ebix.com Edison International Corporate Giving Program Educational Testing Services English-Bonter-Mitchell Foundation Fieldstone Foundation, The First Southwest Company France-Merrick Foundation Fremont Area Community Foundation Georgia Power Foundation, Inc. Grand Marnier Foundation, The Green Mountain Power Corporation Gregory Foundation, Alexis Guttman Foundation, Inc., Stella and Charles Hill/Hill and Knowlton Foundation, Inc., John W., The Indianapolis Foundation, The Jennings Foundation, Mary Hillman, The Kirby Foundation, Inc., F. M. Kirsch Foundation, Irving and Elaine, The Kobo Products Lord Baltimore Capital Corporation Mason Fund, Carlos and Marguerite, The Mitsubishi Chemical America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Mosaic Fund, The Mulford Foundation, Vincent National Penn Bank NCC Charitable Foundation New York Times Company Foundation, Inc., The Norfolk Foundation, The NYSEG Foundation, Inc., The Ohio Casualty Foundation, Inc. OPNET Technologies, Inc. Oxford Foundation, Inc. Plum Foundation Price Foundation, Inc., Louis and Harold, The Prince Charitable Trusts Public Strategies, Inc. Rite Aid Corporation Contributions Program Rite Aid, New York City S & G Foundation, Inc. Society of the Friendly Sons of Saint Patrick in the City of New York, The Sports Authority Summit Fund of Washington, The SUPERVALU Foundation Tinker Foundation Inc., The Tully Family Foundation Walgreen Co. Contributions Program

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

25,000 25,000 25,000

1 1 1

25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

25,000

1

25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

1 1 1 1 1

25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

1 2 1 1 1 1 1

25,000 25,000 25,000

1 2 1

25,000 25,000 25,000

1 1 1

25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

129


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE FUNDER

Weinberg Family Foundation, William and Irene Westlake Foundation, Inc., The Wolverine Foundation, The Young Foundation, Inc., George & Fay PEMCO Foundation Community Foundation of Gaston County, Inc. Grand Rapids Community Foundation Advanced Energy Industries D-B Trust, The Houston Community Foundation, Greater Friends of Barnabas Foundation, The Comey-Fitzgerald Family Foundation Community Foundation for Monterey County AEGON Transamerica Foundation American Savings Bank Anderson Foundation, John W. Baker Street Foundation, The Baker Trust, Clayton C.E. and S. Foundation, Inc., The Clark Family Foundation, Inc. Cypress Foundation, Inc. Dedalus Foundation, Inc. Deitchman Family Foundation, John V., The Emerson Charitable Trust Gillmore Fund, Frederick H., The Goldhammer Family Foundation Gould Foundation for Children, Edwin Hess Foundation, Inc. Home Shopping Network IPSCO JL Foundation Lakeside Foundation LEF Foundation Mazda Foundation (USA), Inc., The Minnesota Mutual Foundation, The Mnuchin Foundation, Steven T., The Nymox Pharmaceutical Corporation Olson Family Foundation, Delmar and Audria M., The Olympic Optical Ryan Foundation, Richard Nelson Seay Memorial Trust, George and Effie Severns Family Foundation Spectrian Stanton Irrevocable Charitable Trust, Joan Sternberg Charitable Trust Tapper Charitable Foundation Tucker Foundation, Inc., Marcia Brady Uni-Marts, Inc. Unitarian Universalist Service Committee Zisman Charitable Foundation, Simon & Sylvia, The Berrien Community Foundation, Inc. Great Lakes Technologies Group Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc. Quaker Oats Foundation, The Guggenheim Foundation, Harry Frank, The Bider Family Foundation, Lynn and Les Zalaznick Foundation, Barbara M. Toro Foundation, The Mitchell, Silberberg & Knupp Foundation Kalamazoo Community Foundation Day Foundation, Willametta K. Fredericks Family Foundation Leeway Foundation, The

130

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 24,880 23,699 22,485 22,000 22,000 22,000 21,077 21,000 20,100 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000

1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1

20,000 19,680 19,040 19,000 19,000 18,004 18,000 18,000 17,920 17,630 17,500 17,340 17,300 17,250

1 11 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1

FUNDER

Bookspan Yamaha Corporation of America Corporate Giving Program Applebaum Family Foundation, Eugene, The American Savings Foundation Carey Foundation, W. P. Central Maine Power Company Contributions Program Community Foundation of the Elmira-Corning Area, The Corwin Charitable Foundation, Jack B., The Dinnerstein Foundation, Inc., Elliot Fels Fund, Samuel S. Hansen Family Foundation Maddox Foundation, J. F Massachusetts Association of Realtors Charitable and Educational Foundation Muller Foundation, Inc., Robert & Elizabeth, The Roche Foundation, The Samuels Foundation, Inc., Fan Fox and Leslie R., The Sasco Foundation Toronto Blue Jays Charitable Foundation Winfield Foundation, The McNeely Foundation, The CH Foundation, The East Tennessee Foundation JM Family Enterprises, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Spencer Foundation, The Oneida Limited Church in Radburn Foundation, Inc., The Alfa Foundation Compton Foundation, Inc. Peoples Energy Corporation Contributions Program PLACE Fund Wolfe Associates, Inc. Hatfield Family Foundation, The Capital Community Foundation, Inc. Stark Foundation, Nelda C. and H. J. Lutcher Kauffman Foundation, Muriel McBrien Krumholz Foundation, Inc., Elroy and Terry Serimus Foundation Wallerstein Institute, Johanette Wichita Falls Area Community Foundation Susman and Asher Foundation Williamsport-Lycoming Foundation Abeles Foundation, Inc., Joseph & Sophia Abell-Hanger Foundation American Fiber Systems American Foundation Corporation, The Aron Charitable Foundation, Inc., J. Bank Rhode Island Barclay Investments Baroco Foundation, Inc., J. H. Belfer Foundation, Inc., Arthur and Rochelle, The Bell Family Foundation, Stuart L. & Susan S. Bennett Foundation, Inc., Alan R., The Berman Foundation, Inc., Bennett M. & Gertrude Bernstein Family Foundation, Inc. Bigelow Foundation, F. R. Blowitz-Ridgeway Foundation, The

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

17,000

1

16,800 16,000 15,000 15,000

1 3 2 1

15,000

1

15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000

1 2 2 1 1 2

15,000

1

15,000 15,000

2 1

15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 14,583 14,406 14,150

1 1 1 2 8 1 2

14,000 13,500 13,257 13,250 13,000 13,000

1 1 1 1 1 1

13,000 12,500 12,096 12,076 12,000

1 1 1 1 1

12,000 11,000 11,000 11,000 11,000 10,715 10,500 10,500 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

10,000 10,000 10,000

1 1 1

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 1 1 1


LIST OF FUNDERS BY TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS FUNDER

Builder’s General Supply Company Cafritz Foundation, Morris and Gwendolyn, The California Exotic Novelties Castle Foundation, Samuel N. and Mary Chapman Family Fund ChoiceOne Clowes Fund, Inc., The Cohen Opportunity Fund Component Assembly Systems Constantin Foundation, The Dharma-Grace Foundation Diamond Fund, Irene Dodge Jones Foundation Dragicevich Charitable Remainder Trust, Matthew Duncan Oil Company DuPage Community Foundation, The Eades Foundation Endowment Fund of the Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven Fios Fort Wayne Community Foundation, Inc. Foundation for Appalachian Ohio, The Frist Foundation, The Gale Foundation, Bulova, The Ginsberg Foundation, Inc., Albert and Pearl Global Resource Golding Foundation, Inc., Faith, The Graustein Memorial Fund, William Caspar Gray Foundation, Garland Gund Foundation, Agnes, The Hall Foundation, Inc., Andrew J. and Christine C., The Hamilton Foundation, Inc., Thomas H. Handspring Foundation Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino Resort Hassanein Foundation, Salah M., The Hazen Foundation, Inc., Edward W., The Health Foundation of South Florida Healthcare Foundation for Orange County, The Hennessy Foundation, Inc. Herbalife Family Foundation Huffy Foundation, Inc., The Ikonix Group InfoSpace Foundation Jewish Federation of Hartford Jordan Foundation, Inc., The Kanawha Valley Foundation, Greater, The Kellogg Foundation, Peter & Cynthia K. Keren Keshet - The Rainbow Foundation Kimco Realty Company Kindred Healthcare Knight Foundation, Inc., Faith & James Kravis Foundation, Robert Kravis and Kimberly, The Laurie Foundation, Inc., Blanche & Irving Lifebridge Foundation, Inc., The Loews Foundation Lost Tree Village Charitable Foundation, Inc., The Marx Foundation, William, The Maslin Foundation, Inc., Lucille and Paul, The McConnell Foundation, The Merck Family Fund Milano Foundation, Inc. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc. Mutual Benefit Credit Union

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

2 1 1 1

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 2 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

FUNDER

Nagase America Corporation Nokomis Foundation, The Oakleaf Foundation Oberkotter Foundation Phoenixville Community Health Foundation Provident Bank Rich Foundation, Shelly and Donald Robins Foundation Robinson Foundation, Inc., Jim and Linda, The Russell Family Foundation, The Savings Bank of Manchester Foundation, Inc. Schiff Foundation, Robert C. & Adele R. Schmidt Family Foundation, Theodore & Elizabeth Seabury Foundation, The Shulevitz Foundation, Norman Siragusa Foundation, The Snow Memorial Trust, John Ben Spahr Foundation, The Speckhard-Knight Charitable Foundation Spewack Article 5 Trust, Bella Sporran, Inc. Sterling Foundation, The Thompson Family Foundation, Lucille S. Tisch Foundation, Inc. TJX Foundation, Inc., The Turbo Sportswear UniHealth Foundation Vance Foundation, Inc., H. A. Wachovia Corporation Contributions Program WD-40 Company West Central Initiative Whitford Company, Jaques Wilson Fund, Matilda R. Winston Foundation, Inc., Norman and Rosita, The Winston-Salem Foundation, The Woodward Fund-Atlanta, David, Helen, and Marian, The Worcester Community Foundation, Inc., Greater Yeonas Foundation, Stephen G. and Thelma S., The Yum! Brands Foundation Zellerbach Family Foundation, The Zimmerman Foundation, Mary and George Herbert Liberty Bank Foundation, Inc. Community Foundation of Greater Lorain County, The Gaiser Unitrust, Mary Jewett Community Foundation of Grand Forks, East Grand Forks and Region Marvin Foundation, The U.S. Bancorp Foundation, Inc. Community Foundation Serving Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, The Bohemian Foundation Bank of the Northwest Maine Community Foundation, Inc., The Richland County Foundation Community Foundation of Collier County Galway Bay Foundation, Inc., The Gimprich Family Foundation

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

10,000 10,000

1 1

10,000 10,000

1 1

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

1 1 1 1 1

10,000 10,000

1 1

10,000

1

10,000

1

10,000 10,000 10,000

2 1 1

10,000 8,945

1 1

8,220 8,169

1 1

8,000 8,000 7,740

1 1 3

7,677 7,511 7,500 7,000 6,500 6,333 6,000 6,000

1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1

131


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE FUNDER

Kennecott Utah Copper Visitors Center Charitable Foundation Andres Charitable Trust, Frank G. KT Family Foundation Fein Foundation Oshkosh Area Community Foundation Budco Berks County Community Foundation Community Foundation of Northern Illinois AKC Fund, Inc. Allegheny Foundation Allyn Foundation, The American Arab Chamber of Commerce Appel Family Foundation Archbold Charitable Trust, Adrian & Jessie Association of Specialists in Cleaning and Restoration Foundation Barbash Family Fund, Inc. Barrios Trust, The Bitensky Foundation, Inc., Samson & Halina Blum Foundation, Inc., Edith C. Bradley Foundation, Inc., Lynde and Harry, The Cammarata Family Foundation Central Carolina Community Foundation Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts Cowles Charitable Trust, The Deaconess Community Foundation Degenstein Foundation, 1994 Charles B., The DPC Community Foundation Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., Camille and Henry, The East Stroudsburg Savings Association Foundation Elmwood Foundation, Inc., The Engineering Information Foundation Feil Family Foundation, The Fifth Third Foundation, The FISA Foundation Fisher Charitable Foundation, Jerome & Anne C. Frank Foundation, Lawrence L. Gamble Foundation, Anna C. Goldseker Foundation of Maryland, Inc., Morris Golkin Family Foundation, Perry & Donna Grotto Foundation, Inc. Hanlon Foundation, The Henry Foundation, Paul B. Heritage Fund of Bartholomew County, Inc. Herrick Foundation Isermann Family Foundation, Inc. Jacobus Family Foundation, Inc., Richard G. Jamieson Foundation Jergens Foundation, Andrew, The Jones Foundation, Daisy Marquis Kandell Fund, The Kempner Fund, Inc., Harris and Eliza Krol Charitable Foundation, Inc., Jan M. and Eugenia, The Liberty Bank Lynch Family Foundation, Gerard P., The Marcus Foundation, Grace R. and Allan D. Merrill Foundation, Inc., Jane and Randy, The Mississippi Power Foundation, Inc. MWVE Fund Newland Family Foundation, Inc., The

132

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

5,686 5,584 5,500 5,400 5,320 5,250 5,100 5,075 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1

5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000

1 1 1 1 1

5,000

2

5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000

1 1 1 1 1 1

5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

FUNDER

Northwest Minnesota Foundation (NWMF) Pantirer Family Foundation, Inc., Larry and Nancy, The Pharmacia Corporation Contributions Program Portland Foundation Reynolds Foundation, Donald W. Ritchie Memorial Foundation, Charles E. and Mabel M., The River Rock Foundation Robison Foundation, James E. Rural Development Foundation Schlanger Family Foundation, Inc., The Seaver Institute, The Stratfield Fund Tocker Foundation Van Leer U.S. Foundation, Inc. Wanek-Vogel Foundation, Ltd., The Werblin Foundation, Inc., David A. & Leah Ray Wouk Foundation, Inc., Abe Wurzburg Foundation, Warren S. Wurzburg, Sr. and Marjorie O., The Yen Chuang Foundation New Yorker/Advance Magazines, The Pollak Fund, Lucile and Maurice Bansal Foundation, The Rawlings Foundation, Inc., The Sancoa Foundation Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc. Wyoming Community Foundation Greater Jackson Foundation Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation Anschutz Foundation, The Deakins Family Charitable Foundation Golden Artists Colors Kirkeby Foundation Management Consultants for the Arts McFeely-Rogers Foundation Pohanka Family Foundation, John J., The Tipton County Foundation, Inc. Buuck Family Foundation Community Foundation for Muskegon County Gramercy Park Foundation, Inc., The Littauer Foundation, Inc., Lucius N., The Southwest Minnesota Foundation Stranahan Foundation Brown and Charles Seelig Family Foundation, Robin, The Butler Foundation, Marilyn and Marshall Cavaliere Foundation, Inc. FishAmerica Foundation Handtmann Family Foundation, The Lieb Foundation, Inc., David L. Loewenberg Foundation, Inc. Lowenstein Family Foundation Wood Family Foundation, Inc. Woodstock Foundation, Inc. Schrager Foundation, Phillip and Terri Gordon Family Foundation, The Knott Foundation, Inc., Marion I. and Henry J., The Linehan Family Foundation, Inc. Bunbury Company, The Arkansas Community Foundation, Inc.

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

5,000

1

5,000

1

5,000 5,000 5,000

1 1 1

5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

5,000 5,000

1 1

5,000 5,000 4,876 4,450 4,240 4,200 3,763 3,547 3,500 3,400 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 2,575 2,500

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500

2 1 1 1 1

2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 1,622 1,500

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1,500 1,500 1,300 1,000

1 1 2 1


LIST OF FUNDERS BY TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS FUNDER

Barr Foundation Brown Foundation, The Colt Foundation, Inc., James J. Community Foundation of Jackson Hole Community Foundation of the Ozarks Dachs Foundation, A. M. Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation Frey Foundation Golden Foundation for the Arts, Sam and Adele Green River Foundation, The Hartmarx Charitable Foundation Hermes Foundation, Inc. Junior League of Hartford Kayden Foundation, The Logan Foundation, E. J. Lubbock Area Foundation, Inc. Moffitt Foundation, L. R. Moffitt & L. Q. Remala Foundation, Satya and Rao Riklis Foundation, Judith, The Robbins Foundation, J. H. Shaw Family Foundation, Inc., Jerome & Joyce Cutler, The

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1,000

1

FUNDER

Sheffler Foundation, Dudley P. and Barbara K., The Slifka Foundation, Inc., Alan B. Spencer Charitable Fund Stephens Charitable Foundation, D. R. and C. B. Stern Foundation, William A. Women’s Foundation of Colorado, The Aon Foundation Madison County Community Foundation Greenblatt Foundation, Inc., Burton G. and Anne C. Molton Family Foundation, The Upton Foundation, Frederick S. Wolk Family Foundation, Inc., Elliot K. Tilley Family Foundation Bay Area Community Foundation von Liebig Foundation, Inc., William J., The Star Tribune Foundation Samek Foundation, Edward & Marthann, The Midland Area Community Foundation

DOLLAR AMOUNT

NUMBER OF GRANTS

1,000 1,000 1,000

1 1 1

1,000 1,000 1,000 750 600

1 1 1 3 1

500 500 500 500 400 300 250 180

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4

100 90

1 1

133


List of Grants by Funder

A.C.

Accenture

Advanced

A. C. Moore Arts & Crafts

Accenture

Advanced Energy Industries

c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 500 University Court Blackwood, NJ 08012 1. Undesignated. $100,000.

c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 11951 Freedom Drive Reston, VA 20190 11. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000.

c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 1625 Sharp Point Drive Fort Collins, CO 80525-4423 19. American Red Cross, National, DC. $22,000.

Abbott

Abbott Family Foundation The ACE INA Foundation

330 South Ocean Blvd., Ste. 5F Palm Beach, FL 33480 2. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. For general support. Abbott

Abbott Laboratories Fund Dept. 379, Bldg. Apt. 6D 100 Abbott Park Rd. Abbott Park, IL 60064-3500 (847) 937-7075 URL: http://abbott.com/citizenship/fund/fund.shtml 3. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. 4. American Veterinary Medical Foundation, Schaumburg, IL. $10,000. To equip and finance emergency veterinarians caring for animals affected by the recent terrorist attacks, specifically the training and equipping of veterinarians stationed at the World Trade Center treating search and rescue dogs. 5. AmeriCares Foundation, New Canaan, CT. $100,000, 2001. 6. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Abeles

Joseph & Sophia Abeles Foundation, Inc. 1055 Bedford Rd. Pleasantville, NY 10570-3907 7. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. 8. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. Abell

Abell-Hanger Foundation P.O. Box 430 Midland, TX 79702 (432) 684-6655 FAX: (432) 684-4474; E-mail: AHF@abell-hanger.org; URL: http:// www.abell-hanger.org 9. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For September 11th Fund. Academy

Academy Foundation c/o Communications Dept. 8949 Wilshire Boulevard Beverly Hills, CA 90211 10. Various organizations. $1,000,000.

Advanced ACE

2 Liberty Pl. 1601 Chestnut St., Ste. TL31 Philadelphia, PA 19101 (215) 640-1000 12. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Achelis

The Achelis Foundation 767 3rd Ave., 4th Fl. New York, NY 10017 (212) 644-0322 FAX: (212) 759-6510; E-mail: main@achelis-bodman-fnds.org; URL: http:// fdncenter.org/grantmaker/achelis-bodman/ 13. Bill of Rights Institute, DC. $15,000, 2001. For development and marketing of Citizenship and Character instructional material to supplement American government and history classes in U.S. high schools. 14. Columbia University, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. To the Center for Public Health Preparedness for public health activities that will improve the ability of medical institutions in New York City to respond to public health emergencies, especially bio-terrorist attacks. 15. Save the Children Federation, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001. To support relief efforts for refugees and other victims of the fighting in Afghanistan. ADC

ADC Foundation P.O. Box 1101 Minneapolis, MN 55440-1101 (952) 917-0118 FAX: (952) 917-0965; E-mail: veronica_theobald@adc.com; URL: http:// www.adc.com/aboutadc/adcfoundation/ 16. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. 17. Undesignated. $24,500. ADP

ADP Corporate Giving Program 1 ADP Blvd. Roseland, NJ 07068 18. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $750,000.

Advanced Micro Devices Charitable Foundation 901 Thompson Place P.O. Box 3453, MS68 Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (408) 749-2063 20. American Red Cross, Central Chapter, Austin, TX. $850. 21. American Red Cross, National, DC. $147,846. 22. American Red Cross, National, DC. $12,442. 23. American Red Cross, Palo Alto Chapter, Palo Alto, CA. $100. 24. American Red Cross, San Francisco Chapter, San Francisco, CA. $25. 25. American Red Cross, San Jose Chapter, San Jose, CA. $500. 26. American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, New York, NY. $325. 27. Catholic Relief Services, Baltimore, MD. $1,100. 28. Garden Pathways, Bakersfield, CA. $250. 29. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $1,300. 30. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,390. 31. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $200. 32. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $100. 33. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $18,540. 34. Salvation Army of Austin, Austin, TX. $200. 35. Salvation Army of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. $385. 36. Salvation Army of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. $385. 37. Salvation Army of Santa Clara County, San Jose, CA. $100. 38. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $250. 39. United Way of Capital Area, Austin, TX. $6,000. 40. United Way of Greater Rochester, Rochester, NY. $100. 41. United Way, Silicon Valley, San Jose, CA. $725. 42. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,000.

135


Advanced

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE AKC

43. World Vision International, Federal Way, WA. $1,778. Adventist

Adventist Community Services 12501 Old Columbia Pike Silver Spring, MD 20904 44. General Conference of Seventh-Day Adventists, Silver Spring, MD. $120,001. For 9/11 disaster relief. AEGON

AEGON Transamerica Foundation c/o Tax Dept. 4333 Edgewood Rd., N.E. Cedar Rapids, IA 52499 (319) 398-8852 45. New York City Public Safety Memorial Fund, DC. $20,000. Aetna

Aetna Foundation, Inc. 151 Farmington Ave., REIB Hartford, CT 06156-3180 (860) 273-6382 FAX: (860) 273-4764; E-mail: aetnafoundation@aetna.com; URL: http:// www.aetna.com/foundation 46. America’s Second Harvest, Chicago, IL. $1,500. 47. American Red Cross, Bethlehem Chapter, Bethlehem, PA. $28,232. 48. American Red Cross, Dallas Area Chapter, Dallas, TX. $250. 49. American Red Cross, Denver, Denver, CO. $500. 50. American Red Cross, Farmington, Farmington, CT. $5,800. 51. American Red Cross, Greater Los Angeles Chapter, Los Angeles, CA. $650. 52. American Red Cross, Harrisburg, Harrisburg, PA. $250. 53. American Red Cross, Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL. $250. 54. American Red Cross, Middletown, Middletown, CT. $3,200. 55. American Red Cross, Morristown, Morristown, NJ. $3,438. 56. American Red Cross, Nassau County Chapter, Mineola, NY. $500. 57. American Red Cross, National, DC. $64,883. 58. American Red Cross, New Canaan, New Canaan, CT. $500. 59. American Red Cross, Portland, ME, Portland, ME. $1,750. 60. American Red Cross, Southeast PA Chapter, Philadelphia, PA. $1,125. 61. American Red Cross, St. Paul Chapter, Saint Paul, MN. $1,750. 62. American Red Cross, White Plains, White Plains, NY. $225. 63. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $32,600. 64. Greater New York Hospital Foundation, New York, NY. $5,350. 65. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $250. 66. Main Street Community Foundation, Bristol, CT. $20,000. 67. Mercy Corps International, Portland, OR. $250. 68. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $12,500. 69. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $754,115, 2001. 70. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000, 2002.

136

71. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $1,250. 72. New York Womens Foundation, New York, NY. $12,500. 73. Salvation Army of Greater New York, New York, NY. $4,750. 74. Salvation Army of Hartford, Hartford, CT. $1,750. 75. Salvation Army of Houston, Houston, TX. $500. 76. Salvation Army of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA. $250. 77. Salvation Army, U.S.A. Eastern Territory, West Nyack, NY. $250. 78. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $228,145.

AKC Fund, Inc. 67A E. 77th St. New York, NY 10021 87. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. For September 11th Fund to provide direct relief to victims and their families. Alabama

Alabama Power Foundation, Inc. 600 N. 18th St. Birmingham, AL 35291-0011 (205) 257-2508 FAX: (205) 257-1860 88. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. 89. Undesignated. $150,000.

Agere Aladdin

Agere Systems c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 555 Union Blvd. Allentown, PA 18109 79. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. Agilent

Agilent Technologies Foundation 5301 Stevens Creek Blvd. P.O. Box 58059, M.S. 54L-AW Santa Clara, CA 95052-8059 (408) 553-7181 E-mail: contributions@agilent.com; URL: http:// www.agilent.com/philanthropy/foundation.html 80. American Red Cross, National, DC. $210,568. 81. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $89,849. Agua

Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians

Aladdin Systems, Inc. c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 245 Westridge Drive Watsonville, CA 95076 90. American Red Cross, National, DC. $31,335. To help aid victims of the attack on September 11th. Alavi

Alavi Foundation 500 5th Ave., 39th Fl. New York, NY 10110-0397 (212) 944-8333 FAX: (212) 921-0325; URL: http:// www.alavifoundation.org 91. American Red Cross, National, DC. $3,000. 92. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,000. 93. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $100,000. Albany

c/o Communications Dept. 600 E. Tahquitz Canyon Way Palm Springs, CA 92262 82. Various organizations. $250,000. For donations to help families of firefighters, police officers and emergency response personnel who perished in the Pentagon and WTC disasters.

Albany Molecular Research, Inc. c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 21 Corporate Circle, PO Box 15098 Albany, NY 12204 94. Various organizations. $60,000. Alcatel Air

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Corporate Giving Program

Alcatel USA, Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 1000 Coit Rd. Plano, TX 75075 (972) 519-3000 95. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000.

c/o Corp. Philanthropy 7201 Hamilton Blvd. Allentown, PA 18195-1501 (610) 481-8527 FAX: (610) 481-6642; E-mail: gabrielmb@apci.com; URL: http:// www.airproducts.com/social_responsibilities 83. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

Alcoa

Alcoa Foundation

Airborne

Airborne Express Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Giving Comm. and Treas. P.O. Box 662 Seattle, WA 98111-0662 (206) 285-4600 84. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. Airgas

Airgas, Inc. c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 259 North Radnor - Chester Road Radnor, PA 19087 85. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. AK

AK Steel Foundation 703 Curtis St. Middletown, OH 45043 86. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000.

Alcoa Corporate Ctr. 201 Isabella St. Pittsburgh, PA 15212-5858 (412) 553-2348 E-mail: alcoa.foundation@alcoa.com; URL: http:// www.alcoa.com/global/en/community/ foundation.asp 96. Alcoa Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA. $1,000,000. To match employee and retiree contributions to assist in relief and recovery efforts in affected communities. 97. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000, 2001. For NYC disaster relief at the World Trade Center. 98. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000, 2001. For DC disaster relief at Pentagon. 99. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000, 2001. Alcoa

Alcoa Inc. 201 Isabella Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 100. Alcoa Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA. $2,000,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Alden

Altria

Altman

The George I. Alden Trust

Altman Foundation

370 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608-1779 (508) 798-8621 FAX: (508) 791-6454; E-mail: trustees@aldentrust.org; Additional tel.: (508) 798-8621, ext. 3303; URL: http:// www.aldentrust.org 101. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund post-attack relief efforts.

521 5th Ave., 35th Fl. New York, NY 10175 (212) 682-0970 FAX: (212) 682-1648; URL: http:// www.altmanfoundation.org 112. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To respond to the emotional needs of children and families affected by September 11th. 113. Catholic Big Brothers of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. To help support Dwight’s Lights, effort to enroll new volunteer mentors and reach out to children who lost parents on September 11th. 114. City Harvest, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. For September 11th relief services support. 115. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000, 2001. 116. New York Regional Association of Grantmakers, New York, NY. $5,000. To support website upgrade and general mission of facilitating communication within the New York philanthropic community, and help defray the costs of an initial report on the philanthropic funds developed following September 11th.

Alfa

Alfa Foundation P.O. Box 11189 Montgomery, AL 36111-0189 (334) 613-4498 102. American Red Cross, National, DC. $13,000. To assist victims of September 11th attacks. Allegheny

Allegheny Foundation 301 Grant St., Ste. 3900 Pittsburgh, PA 15219-6401 (412) 392-2900 URL: http://www.scaife.com/alleghen.html 103. Undesignated. $5,000, 2002. For 9/11 education project.

Altria Allen

The Paul G. Allen Charitable Foundation 505 5th Ave., S., Ste. 900 Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 342-2030 E-mail: info@pgafoundations.com; URL: http:// www.pgafoundations.com 104. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. For September 11 Fund. Allfirst

Allfirst Foundation, Inc. 110 S. Paca St., M.C. 109-620 Baltimore, MD 21201 (410) 244-3949 105. Baltimore Cares, Baltimore, MD. $10,000. 106. Undesignated. $25,000. Allianz

Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 1750 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403-2195 107. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. Allstate

The Allstate Foundation 2775 Sanders Rd., Ste. F3 Northbrook, IL 60062-6127 (847) 402-2794 FAX: (847) 326-7517; URL: http:// www.allstate.com/foundation 108. National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, Emmitsburg, MD. $400,000, 2001. 109. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. Allyn

Allyn Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 22 Skaneateles, NY 13152 110. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $29,000, 2001. Allyn

The Allyn Foundation 2211 S. Dixie Ave., Ste. 302 Dayton, OH 45409 (937) 299-2295 E-mail: csafdn@ix.netcom.com 111. American Red Cross, Dayton, OH. $5,000. For operating support.

Altria Group Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 120 Park Ave New York, NY 10017 117. AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL. $25,000. To support HIV nutrition services. 118. Alliance of Resident Theaters/New York (ART/NY), New York, NY. $100,000. To support theaters and art programs impacted by WTC disaster. 119. America’s Second Harvest, Chicago, IL. $1,000,000. To secure the national network of food banks. 120. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $100,000. To support general emergency relief efforts. 121. American Red Cross, Cabarrus County Chapter, Concord, NC. $50,000. 122. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. To support general emergency relief efforts. 123. AmeriCares Foundation, New Canaan, CT. $30,000. To contribute to the Twin Towers Fund. 124. Aon Memorial Education Fund, Chicago, IL. $75,000. To assist Aon employee victims of 9/11. 125. Art in General, New York, NY. $25,000. To offset diminished revenues. 126. Asian American Federation of New York, New York, NY. $150,000. To support recovery efforts in Chinatown. 127. Atlantic Theater Company, New York, NY. $30,000. To offset losses in revenue to secure 2002 season and the academic year for the Atlantic Theater School. 128. Bar of City of New York, City Bar Fund, New York, NY. $200,000. To provide legal services and advocacy to victims. 129. Bereavement Center of Westchester, The, Tuckahoe, NY. $25,000. To provide support groups and outreach. 130. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City, New York, NY. $50,000. For placement training of mentors. 131. Borough of Manhattan Community College of the City University of New York, New York, NY. $195,000. To provide scholarships to students who lost their work-study employment and cannot continue to attend school without assistance. 132. Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY. $40,000. To offset diminished revenues.

133. Brooklyn Legal Services Corporation, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000. For legal assistance and outreach. 134. Children’s Aid Society, New York, NY. $100,000. For grief counseling. 135. City Harvest, New York, NY. $250,000. To provide meals for rescue workers at Ground Zero. 136. Community Works, New York, NY. $50,000. To support relief activities including staff training, and expanded after-school programming. 137. Creative Time, New York, NY. $25,000. To support public art initiatives. 138. Food and Friends, DC. $75,000. To continue food service to homebound ill. 139. Food for Survival, Bronx, NY. $200,000. For food for victims and rescue workers. 140. Foodcare, Brooklyn, NY. $5,000. To serve new clients accessing food pantry. 141. Fords Theater, DC. $10,000. To offset losses in revenues due to cancellation of tour groups. 142. Gateway Community Services, Lansing, MI. $100,000, 2001. To help continue services to homeless adolescents. 143. Gay Mens Health Crisis (GMHC), New York, NY. $120,000. To support a congregate meal program for people with AIDS. 144. Gift of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. To provide tickets to entertainment venues to families of victims. 145. Gods Love We Deliver, New York, NY. $100,000. To cover additional expenses incurred as a direct result of 9/11. 146. Greater Richmond Chapter of the American Red Cross, Richmond, VA. $70,000. 147. HealthCare Chaplaincy, New York, NY. $150,000. For researching the efficacy of long-term psychological, emotional and spiritual counseling for the victims of grief and trauma. 148. Hispanic Committee of Virginia, Falls Church, VA. $50,000. To provide employment services to workers displaced in the aftermath of 9/11. 149. Hispanic Federation of New York City, New York, NY. $100,000. 150. Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen, New York, NY. $40,000. To assist meeting increased demand for emergency food, post 9/11. 151. Inspiration Cafe, Chicago, IL. $20,000. To offset losses of revenues redirected to 9/11 charities. 152. International Center of Photography, New York, NY. $50,000. To support the Meyerwitz exhibit at the Venice Bienale. 153. Legal Aid Society, New York, NY. $100,000. To hire a legal emergency relief team to assist victims of the disaster with legal issues. 154. Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York, NY. $120,000. Grant to support staff salaries for two months as LMCC stabilizes is organization’s infrastructure, searches for new office space (originally located in 5 World Trade Center) and rebuilds its existing programs. 155. Mabou Mines Development Foundation, New York, NY. $25,000. To re-hire a touring manager. 156. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $125,000. To provide assistance to employees of Marsh and McLennan. 157. Momentum AIDS Project, New York, NY. $30,000. To support congregate meal programs for people with AIDS. 158. Mount Sinai Hospital and Medical Center, New York, NY. $17,000. To assist with costs of service of trauma experts working with victims and rescue workers.

137


Altria

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE American

159. Museum of the City of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To exhibit photographs of the disaster by Joel Meyerowitz. 160. National Center for Disability Services, Albertson, NY. $100,000. To provide job placement services for displaced disabled workers. 161. National Center for Victims of Crime, Arlington, VA. $50,000. To grant support to the Victims House which has experienced a significant increase in caller volume since the WTC attacks. 162. National Domestic Violence Hotline, Austin, TX. $200,000. To support the national domestic violence hotline. 163. New Direction Services, Staten Island, NY. $6,000, 2001. To host community activities aimed at relieving racial and ethnic tensions after the attacks of 9/11. 164. New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, NY. $20,000. To reimburse for additional security costs and membership fees. 165. New School University, New York, NY. $25,000. For benefit dinner to establish a scholarship fund and provide community outreach. 166. New York Blood Center, New York, NY. $25,000. To assist with the additional costs of increased blood collection and processing. 167. New York City Coalition Against Hunger, New York, NY. $75,000. To establish Emergency Food Action Centers. 168. New York City Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project, New York, NY. $35,000. To hire an additional victim advocate/counselor to provide assistance to primary and secondary victims of the attacks. 169. New York University, New York, NY. $100,000. To provide long-term trauma and bereavement counseling and the creation and distribution of educational materials for use by parents and teachers. 170. North Shore Child and Family Guidance Center, Roslyn Heights, NY. $50,000. To support groups and community forums. 171. Northern Westchester Shelter, Pleasantville, NY. $5,000. To offset loss of donations and volunteers services to DV shelter. 172. P.S. 122, New York, NY. $35,000. To assist in offsetting diminished revenues and support tickets for relief workers. 173. Project Angel Food, Los Angeles, CA. $100,000. To offset losses in revenue to enable continued provision of home delivered meals for persons with HIV/AIDS. 174. Project Open Hand, San Francisco, CA. $50,000, 2001. To help avoid reductions in food and nutrition for people living with HIV/AIDS after the increased need of 9/11. 175. Safe Horizon, New York, NY. $1,500,000. To open a transitional shelter for victims of domestic violence. 176. Safe Horizon, New York, NY. $250,000. To hire victims advocates. 177. Saint Johns Bread and Life Program, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000, 2001. To help purchase additional food. 178. Sanctuary for Families, New York, NY. $100,000. For financial assistance and outreach. 179. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $1,000,000. For scholarships for children and spouses of 9/11 victims. 180. Services Now for Adult Persons (SNAP), New York, NY. $50,000. For transportation of seniors to medical and social service appointments. 181. Shelter House, Falls Church, VA. $30,000. To provide domestic violence services.

138

182. Sidran Traumatic Stress Foundation, Baltimore, MD. $50,000. To provide education on grief issues to school personnel. 183. Silver Shield Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000. To provide scholarships to children of uniformed officers killed in the line of duty. 184. Soho Repertory Theater, New York, NY. $20,000. To offset diminished revenues from rentals during closure. 185. Various organizations. $1,178,666, 2001. To support various organizations. 186. West Hawaii AIDS Foundation, Kailua Kona, HI. $15,000. To assist in meeting increased demand for emergency food, post 9/11. 187. Yorkville Common Pantry, New York, NY. $20,000. To assist in meeting increased demand for emergency food, post 9/11. 188. 651 Kings Majestic Corporation, Brooklyn, NY. $30,000. To offset diminished revenues and avoid indefinite postponement 2002 season. Ambac

Ambac Financial Group, Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 1 State Street Plz. New York, NY 10004 189. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Amerada

Amerada Hess Corporation Contributions Program 1185 Ave. of the Americas New York, NY 10036 (212) 997-8500 FAX: (212) 536-8318 190. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $5,000,000, 2001. To benefit the families of New York firefighters, police officers, and other rescue workers who died or were injured as a result of September 11th attacks. America’s

America’s Collectible Network c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 10001 Kingston Pike Knoxville, TN 37922 191. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $215,024. American

Arab American Chamber of Commerce c/o Communications Dept. 4917 Schaefer, Suite 215 Dearborn, MI 48126 192. Arab American Chamber of Commerce, Dearborn, MI. $5,000. To support victims of September 11th in Washington and New York. American

The American Electric Power System Educational Trust Fund c/o American Electric Power Co., Inc., Tax Dept. P.O. Box 16428 Columbus, OH 43216-0428 193. American Red Cross, National, DC. $600,000. American

American Express Foundation World Financial Ctr. 200 Vesey St., 48th Fl. New York, NY 10285-4804 (212) 640-5661 Contact for organizations located outside the U.S.: Cornelia W. Higginson, V.P.; URL: http:// www.americanexpress.com/corp/philanthropy/ 194. American Express Foundation, New York, NY. $4,100,000.

American Fiber Systems c/o Corp. Communications Dept. Meridian Centre, Suite 250 Rochester, NY 14618 195. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000. American

The American Foundation Corporation 720 National City Bank Bldg. Cleveland, OH 44114 (216) 241-6664 196. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $10,000. American

American Jewish World Service, Inc. 45 W. 36th St., 10th Fl. New York, NY 10138-0932 (212) 736-2597 197. Various organizations. $472,768. For September 11th relief and recovery efforts and community development organizations. American

American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 37941 Raleigh, NC 27627-7941 (919) 334-4010 198. Animal Medical Center, New York, NY. $83,360. For assessment of injuries, environmental toxins and anthrax exposure in NYPD Search & Rescue & Bomb Detection Canine units during WTC-site relief and recovery efforts. 199. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. $325,000. For medical surveillance of dogs deployed to the WTC & the Pentagon. American

American RuYi Machinery Corporation c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 5105 Tollview Drive Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 200. Various organizations. $250,000. American

American Savings Bank P.O. Box 10 New Britain, CT 201. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $10,000. 202. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $10,000. American

American Savings Foundation 185 Main St. New Britain, CT 06051 (860) 827-2556 E-mail: info@asfdn.org; URL: http:// www.asfdn.org/ 203. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. 204. Various organizations. $5,000. American

American Standard Foundation 1 Centennial Ave. P.O. Box 6820 Piscataway, NJ 08855-6820 (732) 980-6000 205. American Red Cross, National, DC. $83,333, 2001. 206. American Red Cross, National, DC. $71,486, 2001. 207. Aon Memorial Education Fund, Chicago, IL. $2,500, 2001. 208. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $2,500, 2001. 209. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $83,333, 2001.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Appel

AMVESCAP

210. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $18,649, 2001. 211. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $83,333, 2001. 212. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $28,973, 2001. American

American Trading and Production Corporation Contributions Program 10 E. Baltimore St., Ste. 1111 Baltimore, MD 21202-1630 FAX: (410) 347-7210 213. American Red Cross, Central Maryland Chapter, Baltimore, MD. $25,000. 214. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Amerisure

Amerisure Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 26777 Halsted Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48331-3586 (248) 615-9000 URL: http://www.amerisure.com/ au_1d_community.cfm 215. American Red Cross, National, DC. $75,000. 216. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. 217. Undesignated. $62,151.

Anadarko

c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 1201 Lake Robbins Drive The Woodlands, TX 77380 231. American Red Cross, National, DC. $300,000.

Annenberg

Anchor

Anchor Gaming c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 815 Pilot Road, suite G Las Vegas, NV 89119 232. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000.

Anderson

John W. Anderson Foundation

Amgen

Amgen Foundation, Inc. 1 Amgen Center Dr., M.S. 38-3-B Thousand Oaks, CA 91320 (805) 447-4056 Additional application addresses: CO: AC-27B, 4000 Nelson Rd., Longmont, CO 80503, RI: M.S. TS-A, 40 Technology Way, West Greenwich, RI 02817, WA: AW1/J-4144, 1201 Amgen Ct. W., Seattle, WA 98119-3105; FAX: (805) 499-6751; URL: http://wwwext.amgen.com/community/ foundation_community.html 219. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. 220. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $100,000. 221. Greater New York Hospital Foundation, New York, NY. $300,000. 222. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $700. 223. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $150,000. 224. New York Fire Safety Foundation, New York, NY. $150,000. 225. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $1,900. 226. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $800,000. 227. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $35,948. 228. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $350. Amica

Ann Arbor

Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation

The Annenberg Foundation

225 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL 60601 (312) 580-0069 233. Anderson Foundation, IL. $2,500,000.

c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 50 Broad Street New York, NY 10004 218. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000.

242. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $200,000, 2001. To help supply daily meals for emergency workers at the World Trade Center and Pentagon.

201 South Main Street, Suite 501 Ann Arbor, MI 48104 243. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,000.

Anadarko Petroleum Corporation

Andersen

Amerivest Partners

100 Amica Way Lincoln, RI 02865 229. American Red Cross, National, DC. $85,250.

11 Devonshire Square London, 230. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000.

Arthur Andersen LLP Corporate Giving Program

Amerivest

Amica Companies Foundation

AMVESCAP

402 Wall St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 (219) 462-4611 234. Washington Family Relief Fund, DC. $20,000, 2001.

Rodnor Financial Ctr., Ste. A-200 150 N. Radnor-Chester Rd. Radnor, PA 19087 (610) 341-9066 FAX: (610) 964-8688; E-mail: info@annenbergfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.annenbergfoundation.org 244. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000, 2002. For September 11th relief effort in NYC. 245. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $100,000. For counseling and education for students, teachers and parents in the aftermath of September 11th. 246. United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. $250,000, 2002. For September 11th relief effort in NYC. Anschutz

The Anschutz Foundation

Andor

Andor Capital Management Foundation c/o Andor Capital Management, LLC 107 Elm St., 7th Fl. Stamford, CT 06902 235. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $5,000,000. For Robin Hood Relief Fund.

1727 Tremont Pl. Denver, CO 80202 (303) 308-8220 247. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $3,000. Aon

Aon Foundation

Andres

Frank G. Andres Charitable Trust c/o First Bank of Tomah P.O. Box 753, 1001 Superior Ave. Tomah, WI 54660-0753 236. Tomah, City of, Tomah, WI. $5,584. For skid unit for brush truck.

200 E. Randolph St. Chicago, IL 60601 (312) 381-3549 248. Saint Gregory Episcopal Church, Hamilton, NJ. $250. 249. Saint Sebastian Parish Association, Woodside, NY. $250, 2002. 250. Union Theological Seminary, New York, NY. $250. APB

Anheuser-Busch

Anheuser-Busch Family of Wholesalers St. Louis, MO 237. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $4,200,000. To aid the families of firefighters, police officers and emergency rescue workers who perished in the attacks with health care, income maintenance and other long-term personal needs. Anheuser

Anheuser-Busch Foundation c/o Anheuser-Busch Cos., Inc. 1 Busch Pl. St. Louis, MO 63118 (314) 577-7368 238. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. To support September 11th relief and recovery activities and to help the victims and families. 239. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. 240. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. 241. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. To aid the families of firefighters, police officers and emergency rescue workers who perished in the September 11th attacks with health care, income maintenance, and other long-term personal needs.

APB Energy c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 9931 Corporate Campus Dr. suite 1000 Louisville, KY 40223 251. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Apex

Apex Fund/Apex Venture Partners c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 225 West Washington Street, Suite 1450 Chicago, IL 60606 252. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Apollo

Apollo Group c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 4615 E. Elwood Street Phoenix, AZ 85040 253. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Appel

Appel Family Foundation c/o Robert J. Appel 700 Park Ave. New York, NY 10021 254. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. For general support.

139


Applebaum

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Applebaum

The Eugene Applebaum Family Foundation 39400 Woodward Ave., Ste. 100 Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304 255. Garden Pathways, Bakersfield, CA. $7,500. 256. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $1,000, 2001. 257. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $7,500. Applied

The Applied Materials Foundation c/o Mike O’Farrell 3050 Bowers Ave., M.S. 2033 Santa Clara, CA 95054 258. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $750,000. 259. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. To support ongoing September 11th relief efforts. Applied

Applied Micro Circuits Corporation Contributions Program c/o Community Rels. 6290 Sequence Dr. San Diego, CA 92121 (858) 535-6554 260. Various organizations. $205,154. APS

APS Corporate Giving Program

126 E. 56th St., Ste. 2300 New York, NY 10022 (212) 832-3405 267. FT Fiduciary Trust Memorial Fund, San Mateo, CA. $10,000. For general support. Arvato

Arvato & Bertelmann Inc. New York, NY 268. Bertelsmann Relief Fund, New York, NY. $38,000, 2002. Asbury

Asbury Auto Group 3 Landmark Square Stamford, CT 06901 269. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $150,000. 270. HOPE Worldwide, Wayne, PA. $25,000. 271. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $50,000. 272. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $50,000. 273. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. 274. United Way of National Capital Area, DC. $50,000. 275. Youth Empowerment America, Atlanta, GA. $25,000. Asea

P.O. Box 53999, M.S. 8510 Phoenix, AZ 85072-3999 (602) 250-2257 261. United Way, Valley of the Sun, Phoenix, AZ. $96,000, 2002. Company Match. 262. United Way, Valley of the Sun, Phoenix, AZ. $50,000, 2002. Pinnacle West Corporate Contribution. Archbold

Adrian & Jessie Archbold Charitable Trust c/o Arthur J. Mahon 401 E. 60th St., Ste. 36B New York, NY 10022 (212) 371-1152 263. Silver Shield Foundation, New York, NY. $5,000. Toward educational support for children who have lost a parent in the line of duty in New York City. Arison

Ted Arison Family Foundation USA, Inc. 3655 N.W. 87th Ave. Miami, FL 33178-2428 (305) 599-2600 264. Trust for Jewish Philanthropy, New York, NY. $50,000. For September 11th Relief Fund. Arizona

Arizona Community Foundation 2122 E. Highland Ave., Ste. 400 Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 381-1400 265. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $30,000. Arkansas

140

Aron

J. Aron Charitable Foundation, Inc.

Asea Brown Boveri Inc. Corporate Giving Program 501 Merritt 7 Norwalk, CT 06851-7000 FAX: (203) 750-7788 276. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Aspect

The Aspect Community Commitment Fund

284. American Red Cross, National, DC. $230,000, 2001. 285. American Red Cross, National, DC. $200,000, 2001. 286. American Red Cross, National, DC. $150,000, 2001. 287. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000, 2001. 288. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000, 2001. 289. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000, 2001. 290. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000, 2001. 291. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000, 2001. 292. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $56,405, 2001. Atlanta

Atlanta Falcons Youth Foundation, Inc. 4400 Falcon Pkwy. Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (770) 965-3115 FAX: (770) 965-3185; E-mail: afyf@falcons.nfl.com 293. American Red Cross, National, DC. $515, 2001. 294. Chris Faughman Memorial Fund, GA. $3,010, 2001. 295. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $84,828, 2001. 296. New York City Public/Private Initiatives, New York, NY. $50,266, 2001. 297. Various organizations. $1,800. For donations generated through fan donations, corporate gifts and employee donations. Atlantic

The Atlantic Foundation of New York

1310 Ridder Park Dr. San Jose, CA 95131-2312 (408) 325-2850 FAX: (408) 325-4232; URL: http:// www.aspect.com/company/community.cfm 277. Various organizations. $100,000. Association

Association of Specialists in Cleaning and Restoration Foundation c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 8229 Cloverleaf Drive, Suite 460 Millersville, MD 21108 278. Various organizations. $5,000. Astoria

Astoria Federal Savings c/o Corp. Communications Dept. One Astoria Federal Plaza Lake Success, NY 11042 279. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000. 280. American Red Cross, National, DC. $111,734. AT&T

Arkansas Community Foundation, Inc.

AT&T Foundation

700 S. Rock St. Little Rock, AR 72202 (501) 372-1116 FAX: (501) 372-1166; E-mail: arcf@arcf.org; URL: http://www.arcf.org 266. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000. For September 11th Fund.

32 Ave. of the Americas, 6th Fl. New York, NY 10013 (212) 387-6555 FAX: (212) 387-4882; E-mail: reznick@att.com; URL: http://www.att.com/foundation 281. Alliance for Downtown New York, New York, NY. $75,000. For River to River Festival 2002 to help restore confidence in downtown New York. 282. American Red Cross, National, DC. $970,000, 2001. 283. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000, 2001.

125 Park Ave., 21st Fl. New York, NY 10017-5581 FAX: (212) 922-0360; E-mail: USA@atlanticphilanthropies.org; URL: http:// www.atlanticphilanthropies.org 298. Asian Americans for Equality, New York, NY. $76,000. For emergency aid, counseling, and assistance to Chinatown and Lower East Side communities in wake of September 11th. 299. City Meals on Wheels, New York, NY. $100,000. To implement Emergency Food Pantry Program in response to September 11th disaster. 300. City Meals on Wheels, New York, NY. $50,000. To replenish food warehouse, and develop reserves for emergency meal and food deliveries to homebound elderly in wake of September 11th. 301. Common Cents New York, New York, NY. $50,000. For Twin Towers Penny Harvest, expansion of annual Penny Harvest campaign. 302. Community Resource Exchange, New York, NY. $75,000. For general operating support which will allow uninterrupted continuation of regranting and technical assistance programs in wake of September 11th. 303. Council on Senior Centers and Services of New York City, New York, NY. $100,000. Toward education, training, and support to aging services network in wake of September 11th. 304. Council on Senior Centers and Services of New York City, New York, NY. $50,000. For immediate needs of service program that were closest to World Trade Center and were most affected by September 11th. 305. Helen Keller International, New York, NY. $350,000. For ChildSight program to replace inventory and rebuild databases lost in September 11th disaster.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER 306. Human Rights Watch, New York, NY. $45,000. For U.S. domestic policy work protecting civil liberties of Arab-Americans, Muslims, and South Asian minorities in the U.S. who may experience hate crimes or bias against them as result of September 11th attacks. 307. National Council on the Aging, Washington, DC. $12,000. For nonrecoverable costs incurred as result of September 11th. 308. New York Cares, New York, NY. $50,000. For general operating support to replace funding and resources used for relief efforts in response to September 11th. 309. New York Legal Assistance Group, New York, NY. $50,000. To provide support to victims for legal assistance in aftermath of attacks of September 11. 310. NPower NY, New York, NY. $50,000. For immediate technology assistance to nonprofits located at or near Ground Zero of September 11th tragedy, and for coordination efforts among other nonprofit technology-assistance providers. 311. United Neighborhood Houses of New York, New York, NY. $57,670. For staff overtime costs following September 11th, and for emergency home-delivered meals to elderly from United Neighborhood senior centers. 312. United Seamens Service, New York, NY. $5,000. To replace inventory lost in the aftermath of September 11th. Atlantic

Atlantic Philanthropies c/o Communications Dept. 125 Park Avenue, 21st Floor, DO NOT MAIL/E-MAIL CONFIRM New York, NY 10017 313. American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. To support the American Civil Liberties Union’s Security and Civil Liberties Task Force. 314. Arab American Institute Foundation, DC. $200,000, 2002. To support the Foundation in its work to strengthen and better articulate the needs and nature of the Arab American community in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11th. 315. Asian Americans for Equality, New York, NY. $76,000, 2001. To provide emergency aid, counseling, and assistance to the Chinatown and Lower East Side communities in the wake of the September 11th tragedy. 316. Aviation Volunteer Fire Department Engine Company 3, Bronx, NY. $7,500, 2002. To provide the balance of funding for the repair of the fire engine that was damaged in the September 11th recovery efforts. 317. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City, New York, NY. $332,500, 2002. To provide funding for three mentoring programs specifically targeting youth affected by the events of September 11th. 318. Center for National Security Studies, DC. $100,000, 2002. To support the Center for National Security Studies’ Emergency Project to Defend Civil Liberties and Protect Security and to support any past, present or future September 11 iniatives. 319. Chhaya Community Development Corporation, Flushing, NY. $100,000, 2002. To support Chhaya’s advocacy, educational and outreach work in the South Asian community of New York City in the wake of the September 11th attacks. 320. City Meals on Wheels, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. To implement an Emergency Food Pantry Program in response to the September 11th disaster. 321. City Meals on Wheels, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To replenish

Citymeals-on-Wheels’ food warehouse, and develop reserves for emergency meal and food deliveries to homebound elderly. 322. Common Cents New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To support the Twin Towers Penny Harvest, an expansion of the annual Penny Harvest campaign. 323. Community Resource Exchange, New York, NY. $75,000, 2001. To provide general operating support which will allow the uninterrupted continuation of re-granting and technical assistance programs in the wake of the September 11th tragedy. 324. Council on Senior Centers and Services of New York City, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. To provide partial support for education, training, and support to the aging services network in the wake of the September 11th tragedy. 325. Council on Senior Centers and Services of New York City, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To provide support for the immediate needs of seven service programs that were closest to the World Trade Center and were most affected by the September 11th disaster. 326. Helen Keller International, New York, NY. $350,000, 2001. To provide support to the ChildSight program to replace inventory and rebuild databases lost in the September 11th disaster. 327. Human Rights Watch, New York, NY. $45,000, 2001. To support the U.S. domestic policy work of Human Rights Watch—protecting the civil liberties of Arab-Americans, Muslims, and South Asian minorities in the U.S. who may experience hate crimes or bias against them as a result of the September 11th attacks. 328. Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. To support the Committee’s work in monitoring the implementation of the laws and presidential orders envoked in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11th, and its advocacy with Washington, D.C. 329. Legal Aid Society, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. To provide general operating support for disaster relief efforts in providing legal services to low income individuals who were adversely effected by the events of September 11th. 330. National Council on the Aging, Washington, DC. $12,000, 2001. To provide support for nonrecoverable costs incurred as a result of the September 11th disaster. 331. New York Cares, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To provide general operating support to replace the funding and resources used for relief efforts in response to the September 11th disaster. 332. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000,000, 2001. To contribute to the September 11 Fund, established by the New York Community Trust and the United Way to provide relief for the victims and families of those who have suffered during the World Trade Center tragedy. 333. New York Legal Assistance Group, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. To support the ongoing legal services to victims of the September 11th tragedy through NYLAG’s Volunteer Outreach, Education, and Training program. 334. New York Legal Assistance Group, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To provide support to victims for legal assistance in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11th. 335. NPower NY, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To provide support for immediate technology assistance to nonprofits located at or near Ground Zero of the September 11th tragedy, and for coordination efforts among other nonprofit technology-assistance providers. 336. P.S. 234 Parents and Teachers Association, Inc.. $100,000, 2002. To continue in the 2002-3

Austin school year a therapeutic program to ameliorate the psychological effect of September 11th, 2001 and its aftermath on the students, teachers and their families. 337. Regional Plan Association, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. To support ‘Listening to the City II’, the second in a series of town hall meetings covened by the Civic Alliance to Rebuild Downtown New York. 338. Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. To provide support to the New York City Consortium for Effective Trauma Treatment for mental health training and evaluation of services as a result of the September 11th tragedy. 339. Union Settlement Association, New York, NY. $20,000, 2002. To provide support for a series of tolerance and sensitivity seminars and workshops for Union Settlement staff and community residents (children, teens, and parents) in the wake of the September 11th attacks. 340. United Neighborhood Houses of New York, New York, NY. $57,670, 2001. To provide support for staff overtime costs following the September 11th tragedy, and for emergency home-delivered meals to the elderly from the United Neighborhood senior centers. 341. United Seamens Service, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. To provide funding to replace inventory lost in the September 11th disaster. 342. Young Citizens, Inc., New York, NY. $15,000, 2001. To provide general support in the aftermath of the September 11th tragedy. Atrix

Atrix Laboratories c/o Corp. Communications Dept. 2579 Midpoint Dr Fort Collins, CO 80525 343. American Red Cross, National, DC. $110,000. Auchincloss

Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc. 16 E. 79th St., Ste. 31 New York, NY 10021 (212) 737-9533 FAX: (212) 737-9578; E-mail: info@lilyauch.org; URL: http://www.lilyauch.org 344. Humane Society of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For World Trade Center emergency services. 345. New York Historical Society, New York, NY. $20,000. For History Responds project, response to events of September 11th. 346. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. Audi

Audi of America c/o Corporate Communications 1440 Gratiot Avenue Detroit, MI 48207 347. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $100,000. Austin

Austin Community Foundation for the Capital Area, Inc. P.O. Box 5159 Austin, TX 78763 (512) 472-4483 FAX: (512) 472-4486; E-mail: info@austincommunityfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.austincommunityfoundation.org 348. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $52,000.

141


Autodesk

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Autodesk

Baker

The Autodesk Foundation, Inc.

Clayton Baker Trust

111 McInnis Pkwy. San Rafael, CA 94903 (415) 507-6336 FAX: (415) 507-6339; URL: http:// www.autodesk.com/foundation/ 349. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. To support families and victims, September 11th relief and recovery work, and safety/disaster preparedness initiatives. 350. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $100,000.

2 E. Read St., Ste. 100 Baltimore, MD 21202 (410) 837-3555 FAX: (410) 837-7711 360. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000. Baltimore

The Baltimore Community Foundation

Avaya

Avaya c/o Corporate Communications 211Mt. Airy Road Basking Ridge, NJ 07920 351. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,500,000. Aventis

Aventis Pharmaceuticals Foundation 400 Somerset Corp. Blvd. Bridgewater, NJ 08807 (908) 243-6777 352. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Avery

c/o Anne Ross Knoeller 2 E. Read St., 9th Fl. Baltimore, MD 21202 (410) 332-4171 FAX: (410) 837-4701; E-mail: knoeller@bcf.org; URL: http://www.bcf.org 361. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $226,000. 362. Undesignated. $350,000. Bank

Bank of America Foundation, Inc. 100 N. Tryon St., NC1-007-18-01 Charlotte, NC 28255-0001 URL: http://www.bankofamerica.com/foundation/ 363. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. 364. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $450,000.

Avery Dennison Foundation

Avnet

Avnet, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 2211 S. 47th St. Phoenix, AZ 85034 (480) 643-2000 354. American Red Cross, National, DC. $162,000.

9 W. 57th St. New York, NY 10019 (212) 282-5000 355. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000.

1861 International Dr. McLean, VA 22102 384. American India Foundation, New York, NY. $4,240. For September 11th Relief Fund. Barbash

Barbash Family Fund, Inc.

c/o Corporate Communications 4794 SW 76th Ave Portland, OR 97225 367. American Red Cross, National, DC. $7,500. Bank

Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Trust Company Contributions Program

AXA

AXA Foundation, Inc. 1290 Ave. of the Americas, 7th Fl. New York, NY 10104 (212) 314-2566 FAX: (212) 314-4480; URL: http:// www.axaonline.com/axafoundation 356. AXA Foundation, Inc., New York, NY. $10,000,000. To establish fund to support relief efforts and related programs aiding those affected by 9/11. Axe

Axe-Houghton Foundation 919 3rd Ave., 2nd Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212) 909-8304 357. Various organizations. $34,000. For special one-time increases in grants for nonprofit grantees disrupted or suffering losses after September 11th attacks. Baker

Bansal

The Bansal Foundation

c/o Corporate Communications 115 S La Salle St No. 1200 Chicago, IL 60603 365. Red Cross of Canada, Ottawa, Canada. $500,000. 366. Red Cross of Canada, Ottawa, Canada. $315,000.

Bank of the Northwest

Avon Products, Inc. Corporate Giving Program

142

c/o Corporate Communications One Turks Head Place Providence, RI 02903 383. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000.

Bank of Montreal

Bank

Avon

135 Main St., Ste. 1140 San Francisco, CA 94105 358. American Red Cross, San Francisco Chapter, San Francisco, CA. $10,000. For 9/11 rescue efforts. 359. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $10,000. For 9/11 rescue efforts.

Bank

Bank Rhode Island

Bank

150 N. Orange Grove Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91103 353. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $136,776, 2001.

The Baker Street Foundation

375. Children’s Aid Society, New York, NY. $50,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 376. Fire Rescue Development Program, Chicago, IL. $50,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 377. FT Fiduciary Trust Memorial Fund, San Mateo, CA. $10,000. 378. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. 379. Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, Arlington, VA. $50,000. For Pentagon Assistance Fund. 380. New York, State of, Albany, NY. $300,000. 381. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $150,000. For Families of Freedom 2, providing scholarships for postsecondary education for families in Lower Manhattan who suffered loss of income as result of attacks on September 11, 2001. 382. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $200,000.

c/o Legal and Public Affairs Office 1251 Sixth Ave., 15th Fl. New York, NY 10020-1104 (212) 782-4627 368. American Red Cross, National, DC. $13,000. 369. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. 370. Various organizations. $48,183. For donations to September 11th Fund, American Red Cross, Employee Scholarship Fund, NY Times 9/11 Neediest Cases Fund, Twin Towers Fund, Salvation Army, WTC Relief Fund, NY Police & Fire Widows’ Fund. 371. Various organizations. $25,121. For donations to September 11th Fund, American Red Cross, Employee Scholarship Fund, NY Times 9/11 Neediest Cases Fund, Twin Towers Fund, Salvation Army, WTC Relief Fund, NY Police & Fire Widows’ Fund. BANK

BANK ONE Foundation 1 BANK ONE Plz., Ste. 0308 Chicago, IL 60670 (312) 407-8052 372. Aon Memorial Education Fund, Chicago, IL. $100,000. 373. Army Emergency Relief, Alexandria, VA. $50,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 374. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $200,000.

265 W. Main St. Babylon, NY 11702-3419 385. Newsday Community Service Fund, Melville, NY. $5,000. For general support. Barclay

Barclay Investments c/o Corporate Communications 693 Fifth Avenue 18th Fl New York, NY 10023 386. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Bard

C. R. Bard Foundation, Inc. 730 Central Ave. New Providence, NJ 07974 (908) 277-8182 FAX: (908) 277-8098; URL: http:// www.crbard.com/about/community/foundation.cfm 387. Engine 8 Ladder Association, New York, NY. $5,000. To support families of firefighter victims of September 11th. 388. New Jersey Network (NJN) Foundation, Trenton, NJ. $5,000. For Remembrance and Reflection event held at Liberty State Park. 389. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 390. Summit Area Public Foundation, Summit, NJ. $10,000, 2002. To provide aid to families of the victims within local community. Barker

The Barker Welfare Foundation P.O. Box 2 Glen Head, NY 11545 (516) 759-5592 FAX: (516) 759-5497; E-mail: BarkerSMD@aol.com; URL: http:// www.barkerwelfare.org 391. Ackerman Institute for the Family, New York, NY. $5,000. For counseling for survivors, victims, family members and rescue workers in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Belo Basic

392. American Red Cross, Nassau County Chapter, Mineola, NY. $25,000, 2002. For September 11th disaster relief effort efforts in New York. 393. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. 394. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City, New York, NY. $11,000. Toward programs associated with the events of 9/11/01. 395. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City, New York, NY. $8,000. 396. Children’s Museum of the Arts, New York, NY. $3,000. 397. Fund for the City of New York, New York, NY. $3,000. For costs associated with 9/11. 398. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. For September 11th disaster relief effort efforts in New York. 399. Partnership for After School Education, New York, NY. $5,000. 400. Project Renewal, New York, NY. $11,770. Toward programs associated with the events of 9/11/01. 401. Project Renewal, New York, NY. $3,500. 402. Saint Vincents Hospital and Medical Center of New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. For September 11th disaster relief efforts in Manhattan. 403. Various organizations. $50,000. Baroco

J. H. Baroco Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 10729 Pensacola, FL 32524-0729 (850) 479-2491 Application address: 6706 N. 9th Ave., Pensacola, FL 32504 404. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Barr

Barr Foundation The Pilot House Lewis Wharf Boston, MA 02110 (617) 854-3500 FAX: (617) 854-3501; E-mail: info@barrfoundation.org, khurley@pilothouse.com; URL: http://www.barrfoundation.org 405. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,000. Barra

Barra Foundation, Inc. 8200 Flourtown Ave., Ste. 12 Wyndmoor, PA 19038-7976 (215) 233-5115 FAX: (215) 836-1033; E-mail: william.harral@verizon.net 406. American Red Cross, Southeast PA Chapter, Philadelphia, PA. $50,000, 2001. 407. Undesignated. $2,500. To off-set fees charged for credit card payments to the 9/11 Fund via the GivingCapital.com website. 408. United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. $50,000, 2001.

Bear, Stearns & Co. Inc.

c/o Corporate Communications 415 W. Collins Road Blackfoot, ID 83221 410. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $100,000.

New York, NY 421. Bear Stearns Charitable Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000,000. To establish charitable fund to benefit 9/11 victims and families.

Bauer

Eddie Bauer, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 15010 N.E. 36th St. Redmond, WA 98052-9700 FAX: (425) 882-6127; URL: http:// www.eddiebauer.com/about/eb_philanthropy.asp 411. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $70,000. Baxter

The Baxter International Foundation 1 Baxter Pkwy. Deerfield, IL 60015 FAX: (847) 948-4559; E-mail: celene_peurye@baxter.com; URL: http:// www.baxter.com/about_baxter/sustainability/ our_communities/foundation/index.html 412. Baxter International Foundation, Deerfield, IL. $500,000. 413. Baxter International Foundation, Deerfield, IL. $248,250.

653 11th St. Oakland, CA 94607 409. Children’s Aid Society, New York, NY. $5,000. For children whose parents were victims of September 11th attacks.

Beazer

Beazer Homes 5775 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd. Suite B-200 Atlanta, GA 30342 422. National Housing Endowment, DC. $1,000,000. Bechtel

Bechtel Foundation 50 Beale St. San Francisco, CA 94105 (415) 768-5444 Application address: P.O. Box 193965, San Francisco, CA 94119-3965; Additional tel.: (415) 768-7158; E-mail: foundtn@bechtel.com; URL: http://www.bechtel.com/foundation.htm 423. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $698,913. Bechtel

S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation

Baxter

Baxter International Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Community Rels. Dept. 1 Baxter Pkwy. Deerfield, IL 60015-4633 (847) 948-2000 FAX: (847) 948-2887; URL: http:// www.baxter.com/about_baxter/sustainability/ our_communities/index.html 414. Baxter International Foundation, Deerfield, IL. $659,791.

P.O. Box 193809 San Francisco, CA 94119-3809 (415) 284-8572 FAX: (415) 284-8571; E-mail: esb@fremontgroup.com 424. American Red Cross, National, DC. $5,000. 425. National Disaster Search Dog Foundation, Ojai, CA. $1,000. 426. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. For World Trade Center Disaster Relief Fund. Bedminster

The Bedminster Fund, Inc.

Bay

Bay Area Community Foundation 703 Washington Ave. Bay City, MI 48708-5732 (989) 893-4438 FAX: (989) 893-4448; E-mail: bacfnd@bayfoundation.org; Additional tel.: (800) 926-3217; URL: http://www.bayfoundation.org 415. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $300. BB&T

BB&T Charitable Foundation

1330 Ave. of the Americas, 27th Fl. New York, NY 10019-5490 427. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Belfer

The Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Foundation, Inc. c/o Belfer Mgmt., LLC 767 5th Ave., 46th Fl. New York, NY 10153-0002 428. American Jewish Committee, New York, NY. $10,000. For 911 Fund. Bell

c/o BB&T Corp., Trust Dept. P.O. Box 2907 Wilson, NC 27894-2907 416. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $10,000. 417. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000.

Stuart L. & Susan S. Bell Family Foundation 688 N. Wilton Rd. New Canaan, CT 06840 (203) 845-8717 429. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For Telethon Fund.

BB&T

BB&T Corporation Contributions Program 200 W. 2nd St. Winston-Salem, NC 27101 418. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000. BD

Barrios

The Barrios Trust

Bear

Basic American Foods

BD Corporate Giving Program 1 Becton Dr. Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417 FAX: (201) 847-7065; URL: http://www.bd.com/ responsibility 419. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. BEA

BEA Foundation 2315 North First Street San Jose, CA 95131 420. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000.

BellSouth

BellSouth Corporation Contributions Program 1155 Peachtree St., N.E., Rm. 7H08 Atlanta, GA 30309 URL: http://www.bellsouth.com/community/ index.html 430. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Belo

Belo c/o Corporate Communications 400 South Record Street Dallas, TX 75265 431. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000.

143


Bemis

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Bemis

BI

Bernstein Family Foundation, Inc.

BI-LO Inc. Corporate Giving Program

222 S. 9th St., No. 2300 Minneapolis, MN 55402-4099 (612) 376-3093 E-mail: bemisfoundation@bemis.com; Additional tel.: (612) 376-3007; URL: http://www.bemis.com/ corp_citizenship/community_relations.html 432. American Red Cross, National, DC. $65,000.

P.O. Box 343 Brooklandville, MD 21022-0343 443. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000.

c/o Corp. Contribs. 208 Industrial Blvd. Greenville, SC 29607 Application address: P.O. Box 99, Mauldin, SC 29662; URL: http://www.bi-lo.com/learn/ community.htm 460. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000.

Benedum

Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation 1400 Benedum-Trees Bldg. 223 4th Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (412) 288-0360 FAX: (412) 288-0366; E-mail: info@benedum.org; URL: http://www.fdncenter.org/grantmaker/ benedum/ 433. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $25,000. To aid poorest victims of World Trade Center attack on September 11, 2001. Bennett

The Alan R. Bennett Foundation, Inc. 4847 Foxhall Crescent N.W. Washington, DC 20007 434. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support. Benwood

Benwood Foundation, Inc. SunTrust Bank Bldg. 736 Market St., Ste. 1600 Chattanooga, TN 37402 (423) 267-4311 FAX: (423) 267-9049; E-mail: Benwood@Benwood.org 435. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000. 436. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. 437. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $10,000. 438. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. Berks

Berks County Community Foundation P.O. Box 212 Reading, PA 19603-0212 (610) 685-2223 FAX: (610) 685-2240; E-mail: info@bccf.org; URL: http://www.bccf.org 439. Salvation Army of Reading, Reading, PA. $5,100. For storage of supplies and materials for NYC disaster relief efforts. Berkshire

Berkshire Life Insurance Company of America Corporate Giving Program

Berrien

Berrien Community Foundation, Inc. 2900 S. State St., Ste. 2E. St. Joseph, MI 49085 (269) 983-3304 FAX: (269) 983-4939; E-mail: nkeiser@qtm.net; URL: http://www.berriencommunity.org 444. American Red Cross, Berrien County Chapter, Benton Harbor, MI. $4,270. For local Red Cross efforts in the aftermath of September 11th. 445. American Red Cross, National, DC. $750. For needs of local military families in the aftermath of September 11th. 446. Beacon Police Department, Beacon, NY. $2,500. For puppy purchase for September 11th disaster relief efforts. 447. Childrens Hope Foundation, New York, NY. $500. For support for children of 9/11 tragedy. 448. Federal Employee Education & Assistance Fund, Littleton, CO. $500. For Pentagon’s civilian victims’ families. 449. Gods Love We Deliver, New York, NY. $500. For assistance to senior citizens in the aftermath of September 11th. 450. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $1,000. For Firefighters Family Relief Fund. 451. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $7,410. For September 11th Fund. 452. Partnership for After School Education, New York, NY. $1,000. For support for children of the World Trade Center attack. 453. Safe Horizon, New York, NY. $750. For general relief in New York in the aftermath of September 11th. 454. United Way of Passaic Valley, Paterson, NJ. $500. For displaced workers fund. Bertelsmann

Bertelsmann Foundation U.S., Inc. 1540 Broadway New York, NY 10036-4094 455. Bertelsmann Relief Fund, New York, NY. $2,000,000.

Bider

Lynn and Les Bider Family Foundation 16830 Ventura Blvd., Ste. 300 Encino, CA 91436 461. Jewish Federation Council of Greater Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA. $18,000. For September 11th Victims Fund. Bigelow

F. R. Bigelow Foundation 600 5th St. Ctr. 55 E. 5th St. St. Paul, MN 55101-1797 (651) 224-5463 FAX: (651) 224-8123; E-mail: inbox@frbigelow.org; URL: http:// www.frbigelow.org 462. Saint Paul Foundation, Saint Paul, MN. $10,000, 2001. Bitensky

Samson & Halina Bitensky Foundation, Inc. 200 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10016 463. United Jewish Communities, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. Black

The Black & Decker Employees Combined Charities Trust Towson 701 E. Joppa Rd. Towson, MD 21286-5502 464. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Blackstone

Blackstone Group c/o Corporate Communications 345 Park Avenue New York, NY 10154 465. Various organizations. $1,000,000. Blank

The Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation

Bertelsmann

Bertelsmann, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 1540 Broadway New York, NY 10036 (212) 782-7676 456. BMG, New York, NY. $250,000.

3223 Howell Mill Rd, N.W. Atlanta, GA 30327 (404) 367-2100 FAX: (404) 367-2058; URL: http:// www.blankfoundation.org 466. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. Blaustein

Best

700 South St. Pittsfield, MA 01201 (413) 499-4321 440. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Berlitz

Berlitz International, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 400 Alexander Park Princeton, NJ 08540 441. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $200,000. Berman

Bennett M. & Gertrude Berman Foundation, Inc. 1700 Broadway, 23rd Fl. New York, NY 10019 442. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support.

144

Bernstein

Bemis Company Foundation

Best Buy Company, Inc. 7075 Flying Cloud Drive Minneapolis, MN 55440 457. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,200,000. 458. Best Buy Children’s Foundation, Eden Prairie, MN. $1,000,000. Best

Best Western International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 6201 N. 24th Pkwy. Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 957-4200 FAX: (602) 957-5740; E-mail: nancy.kennedy@bestwestern.com; URL: http:// www.bestwestern.com/about/donation.html 459. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, Inc. 10 E. Baltimore St., Ste. 1111 Baltimore, MD 21202 (410) 347-7206 FAX: (410) 347-7210; E-mail: Tanya Herbick: therbick@blaufund.org; URL: http:// www.blaufund.org/foundations/ mortonandjane_f.html 467. City Harvest, New York, NY. $15,000. 468. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Bremer

Blockbuster

Blockbuster Inc. Corporate Giving Program Renaissance Tower 1201 Elm St. Dallas, TX 75270-2187 (214) 854-3077 FAX: (214) 854-3822; URL: http:// www.blockbuster.com/bb/about/community 469. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Blowitz

The Blowitz-Ridgeway Foundation 1701 E. Woodfield Rd., Ste. 201 Schaumburg, IL 60173 (847) 330-1020 FAX: (847) 446-6318; E-mail: laura@blowitzridgeway.org; URL: http:// www.blowitzridgeway.org/ 470. Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation, Chicago, IL. $10,000. For disaster relief efforts in New York and Washington following September 11th, 2001. Blue

Blue Cross/Blue Shield Association c/o Corporate Communications 225 N. Michigan Avenue Chicago, IL 60601 471. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Blum

Edith C. Blum Foundation, Inc. c/o KPMG, LLP 345 Park Ave. New York, NY 10154 472. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. For September 11th Fund. Blum

Blum-Kovler Foundation 875 N. Michigan Ave., Ste. 3400 Chicago, IL 60611-1958 (312) 664-5050 473. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. $1,000,000. For Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies. BMG

BMG Music New York, NY 474. Bertelsmann Relief Fund, New York, NY. $95,000, 2002.

c/o The Boeing Co. P.O. Box 34345 Seattle, WA 98124-1345 Application address: c/o The Boeing Co., Education Rels., P.O. Box 3707, M.S. 17-MP, Seattle, WA 98124-2207; FAX: (206) 655-2133; URL: http:// www.boeing.com/companyoffices/aboutus/ community/guidelines.htm 481. American Red Cross, National, DC. $2,500,000. 482. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,500,000. 483. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Bohemian

Bohemian Foundation

2621 Palisades Ave. Riverdale, NJ 475. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. To support 9/11 relief and recovery efforts. BMW

BMW Manufacturing Corporation P.O. Box 111000 Spartanburg, SC 29304 476. American Red Cross, Spartenburg Chapter, Spartanburg, SC. $30,000. To match employee contributions in the wake of September 11th. Bodman

490. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $93,137. 491. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. For September 11th Fund. 492. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $48,000. 493. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. 494. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. 495. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. 496. Trinity Church, New York, NY. $10,000. For Day of Remembrance activities on September 11th. 497. United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Boston, MA. $25,000. Toward fundraising goal of Unity Fund. 498. United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Boston, MA. $25,000. For development and operating support of Unity Fund. Bovaird

The Mervin Bovaird Foundation 401 S. Boston Ave., Ste. 3300 Tulsa, OK 74103-4070 (918) 592-3300 499. American Red Cross, Tulsa Area Chapter, Tulsa, OK. $25,000. BP

BP Foundation, Inc. 4101 Winfield Rd., M.C. 4E Warrenville, IL 60555-3521 (630) 821-3174 FAX: (312) 616-0826; E-mail: foundation@bpamoco.com 500. BP Foundation, Chicago, IL. $5,000,000. Initial commitment of BP to relief and other organizations through the BP Employee Disaster Relief Fund. 501. BP Foundation, Chicago, IL. $933,333.

103 W. Mountain Ave. Fort Collins, CO 80524 (970) 482-4642 FAX: (970) 482-6139; E-mail: beth@bohemianfoundation.org or info@bohemianfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.bohemianfoundation.org 484. Community Foundation of Northern Colorado, Fort Collins, CO. $7,511, 2002. For September 11th Fund brochure.

Bradley

Bookspan

Bookspan New York, NY 485. Bertelsmann Relief Fund, New York, NY. $17,000, 2002. Booth

BMW

767 3rd Ave., 4th Fl. New York, NY 10017-2023 (212) 644-0322 FAX: (212) 759-6510; E-mail: main@achelis-bodman-fnds.org.; URL: http:// www.fdncenter.org/grantmaker/achelis-bodman/ 477. Catholic Relief Services, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001. To support relief efforts for refugees and other victims of the fighting in Afghanistan. 478. East Harlem Employment Services, New York, NY. $75,000, 2001. For STRIVE

Boeing

The Boeing Company Charitable Trust

Booth Ferris Foundation

BMW Group

The Bodman Foundation

Community Partnership, citywide job training and placement effort by nonprofits, including settlement houses, to assist those who have lost jobs due to recession and World Trade Center attacks. 479. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. For research, articles, panels and other events on Rebuilding New York in the wake of September 11th. 480. New York Historical Society, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001. For Monument: The World Trade Center, an exhibition and public program series, in collaboration with the Skyscraper Museum, on the conception, design, engineering, building, and destruction of the World Trade Center.

345 Park Ave., 4th Fl. New York, NY 10154 (212) 464-2487 FAX: (212) 4642305; E-mail: maurer_barbara@jpmorgan.com; URL: http:// fdncenter.org/grantmaker/boothferris/ 486. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $250,000, 2001. 487. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. Bosch

The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 510860 Milwaukee, WI 53203-0153 (414) 291-9915 FAX: (414) 291-9991; URL: http:// www.bradleyfdn.org 502. Yeshiva University, New York, NY. $5,000. For Barbara Olson Memorial Scholarship Fund. Branan

Mary Allen Lindsey Branan Foundation Wachovia Bank, N.A. 191 Peachtree St. NE MC:GA 1102 Atlanta, GA 30303 503. USO Council of Georgia, Atlanta, GA. $25,000. For capital and operating support for USO Center at Hartsfield International Airport, Atlanta, in the aftermath of September 11th.

The Bosch Foundation

Bremer

811 Dallas Ave. Houston, TX 77002 Application address: 3760 Olympia Dr., Houston, TX 77019, tel: (713) 466-4018 488. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $45,000.

Bremer Financial Corporation c/o Corporate Communications 260 Wentworth Avenue E. West St. Paul, MN 55118 504. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000.

Boston

Bremer

Boston Foundation, Inc.

Otto Bremer Foundation

75 Arlington St.,10th Fl. Boston, MA 02116 (617) 338-1700 FAX: (617) 838-1604; E-mail: alk@tbf.org; URL: http://www.tbf.org 489. American Red Cross, MassBay Chapter, Boston, MA. $25,000. To assist locally-based families and individuals affected by September 11th tragedy.

445 Minnesota St., Ste. 2000 St. Paul, MN 55101-2107 (651) 227-8036 505. Saint Paul Foundation, Saint Paul, MN. $200,000, 2001.

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Bridgestone

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Bridgestone

Bridgestone Corporation Tokyo, Japan 506. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Bridgestone

Bridgestone/Firestone Trust Fund 535 Marriott Dr. Nashville, TN 37214 (615) 937-1415 FAX: (615) 937-1414; E-mail: bfstrustfund@bfusa.com 507. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000, 2001.

P.O. Box 2257 Baltimore, MD 21203 523. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Brown

71 W. Park Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 524. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,000. For general support.

c/o Fdn. Coord. 345 Park Ave., 43rd Fl. New York, NY 10154 URL: http://www.bms.com/aboutbms/founda/data 508. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. 509. HealthCare Chaplaincy, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. 510. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $750,000, 2001. 511. John Jay College of Criminal Justice Foundation, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001. 512. National Crime Prevention Council, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. 513. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 514. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. 515. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. 516. Saint Vincents Hospital and Medical Center of New York, New York, NY. $150,000, 2001. 517. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $150,000, 2001. 518. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $750,000, 2001. 519. United Service Organization of Metropolitan New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For World Trade Center relief. Brookdale

The Brookdale Foundation 126 E. 56th St., 10th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212) 308-7355 E-mail: BkdlFdn@aol.com; URL: http:// www.ewol.com/brookdale/ 520. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Brother

Brother International Corporation Contributions Program c/o Corp. Public Rels. 100 Somerset Corporate Blvd. Bridgewater, NJ 08807 Tel.: (908) 704-1700, ext. 3047; FAX: (732) 375-3721; E-mail: dfischer@brother.com 521. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Brown

The Robin Brown and Charles Seelig Family Foundation c/o BCRS Assocs., LLC 100 Wall St., 11th Fl. New York, NY 10005 522. Ground Hero Kids, New York, NY. $2,000. For general support.

2 Railroad Pl. Hopewell, NJ 08525 Tel./FAX: (609) 333-8900; E-mail: bunburyco@aol.com; URL: http:// www.bunburycompany.org 535. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $800. 536. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500. Burlington

Brown

The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc.

Bunbury

The Bunbury Company

The Brown Foundation

Bristol

146

Brown

Alex Brown & Sons Charitable Foundation, Inc.

James Graham Brown Foundation, Inc. 4350 Brownsboro Rd., Ste. 200 Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 896-2440 FAX: (502) 896-1774; E-mail: mason@jgbf.org; URL: http://www.jgbf.org 525. National Philanthropic Trust, Jenkintown, PA. $250,000, 2001. 526. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $750,000, 2001. BTM

The BTM Foundation, Inc. c/o Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, Ltd. 1251 Ave. of the Americas New York, NY 10020-1104 (212) 782-4627 E-mail: bgilroy@btmna.com 527. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. 528. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. 529. Undesignated. $13,000. Buca

Buca Di Beppo 1300 Nicollet Mall, Suite 5003 Minneapolis, MN 55403 530. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $100,000. To assist families of members of the uniformed servicemen who lost their lives in the attacks of the 11th of September. Budco

Budco c/o Corporate Communications 13700 Oakland Avenue Highland Park, MI 48203 531. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,250. To meet immediate and long-term needs of victims, families, and communities impacted by the events of September 11th. Buhl

The Buhl Foundation 650 Smithfield St., Ste. 2300 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (412) 566-2711 532. American Red Cross, Pittsburgh, PA. $50,000. For Disaster Relief Fund designated for Somerset area hijacked airplane disaster. 533. Salvation Army of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA. $50,000. For Disaster Relief Fund following attacks of September 11th, 2001, designated for relief efforts in Somerset area where hijacked plane was forced down. Builder’s

Builder’s General Supply Company c/o Corporate Communications 222 Throckmorton Street Freehold, NJ 07728 534. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000.

Burlington Northern Santa Fe Foundation 5601 W. 26th St. Cicero, IL 60804 (708) 924-5615 FAX: (708) 924-5657 537. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. 538. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $9,707. Burlington

Burlington Resources Foundation 5051 Westheimer St., Ste. 1400 Houston, TX 77056 (713) 624-9898 Additional contact: Dee McBride, Admin., tel.: (713) 624-9366; FAX: (713) 624-9955; E-mail: gsmith@br-inc.com or dmcbride@br-inc.com; Additional address: 717 Texas Ave., Ste. 2100, Houston, Texas 77002; URL: http:// www.br-inc.com/community/ community_brFound.asp 539. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. Bush

Bush Foundation E-900 First National Bank Bldg. 332 Minnesota St. St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 227-0891 FAX: (651) 297-6485; E-mail: info@bushfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.bushfoundation.org 540. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000, 2001. Butler

Patrick and Aimee Butler Family Foundation 332 Minnesota St., E-1420 St. Paul, MN 55101-1369 (651) 222-2565 E-mail: info@butlerfamilyfoundation.org; URL: http://www.butlerfamilyfoundation.org 541. American Red Cross, National, DC. $20,000, 2001. 542. Saint Paul Foundation, Saint Paul, MN. $20,000. Butler

J. E. & Z. B. Butler Foundation, Inc. 825 3rd Ave., 40th Fl. New York, NY 10022 543. Gift of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Butler

Marilyn and Marshall Butler Foundation c/o AVX Corp. 750 Lexington Ave., 27th Fl. New York, NY 10022-1282 544. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,000. For September 11th Fund. Butt

H. E. Butt Foundation P.O. Box 290670 Kerrville, TX 78029-0670 (830) 896-2505 545. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

California

Buuck

Buuck Family Foundation c/o Lowry Hill 90 S. 7th St., Ste. 5300 Minneapolis, MN 55402 Application address: 8800 Deer Ridge Ln., Bloomington, MN 55438; FAX: (612) 667-7839 546. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,500. C.E.

The C.E. and S. Foundation, Inc. 1650 National City Tower Louisville, KY 40202 (502) 583-0546 FAX: (502) 583-7648; URL: http:// www.cesfoundation.com 547. American Red Cross, Louisville, KY. $20,000. For relief efforts following terrorist attacks in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania. Cadence

Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Community Affairs Dept. 2655 Seely Ave., M.S. 5A1 San Jose, CA 95134 (408) 428-5993 Tel. for University Relations and Recruiting: (408) 428-5368; URL: http://www.cadence.com/ company/com_svc_l2_index.html 548. American Red Cross, National, DC. $400,000. 549. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $400,000. 550. Various organizations. $50,000. Cafritz

The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation 1825 K St., N.W., 14th Fl. Washington, DC 20006 (202) 223-3100 FAX: (202) 296-7567; E-mail: info@cafritzfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.cafritzfoundation.org 551. Echo Hill Outdoor School, Worton, MD. $10,000. To provide DC Public School children with residential outdoor experiences; grant made in memory of Hilda Taylor, teacher who perished in plane that crashed into Pentagon on September 11. Calder

The Louis Calder Foundation 175 Elm St. New Canaan, CT 06840 (203) 966-8925 E-mail: admin@calderfdn.org; URL: http:// www.louiscalderfdn.org 552. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City, New York, NY. $25,000. For Disaster Relief Services response to children and families affected by September 11th. 553. City Harvest, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001. California

California Association of Realtors c/o Corporate Communications 525 South Virgil Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90028 554. National Association of Realtors, Chicago, IL. $25,000. California

California Community Foundation 445 S. Figueroa St., Ste. 3400 Los Angeles, CA 90071 (213) 413-4130 FAX: (213) 383-2046; E-mail: info@ccf-la.org; URL: http://www.calfund.org 555. Asian Pacific American Legal Center of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. $25,000. For public education program addressing hate crimes in wake of September 11.

556. Beyond Shelter, Los Angeles, CA. $50,000. For efforts to provide rental assistance to local secondary victims of September 11th, such as workers with little or no savings who lost jobs in tourism industry. 557. Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, Los Angeles, CA. $120,000. For serving workers who have lost their jobs as result of September 11th. 558. Los Angeles Coalition to End Hunger and Homelessness, Los Angeles, CA. $30,000. For production of copies of informational brochure distributed to agencies serving families who lost jobs in wake of September 11th. 559. Los Angeles Commission on Assaults Against Women, Los Angeles, CA. $30,000. For assistance to battered women and rape victims Post-September 11. 560. Los Angeles Regional Foodbank, Los Angeles, CA. $100,000. For people affected by events of September 11. 561. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $200,000. 562. Shelter Partnership, Los Angeles, CA. $25,000. For distribution of donated goods through churches, family centers, and AFL/CIO to those facing unexpected difficulties after events of September 11. California

California Dental Association Foundation 1201 K Street Mall, 8th Floor Sacramento, CA 95814 563. American Dental Association, Chicago, IL. $5,000. 564. New York Dental Society, New York, NY. $66,290. 565. New York Forensic Dental Society, New York, NY. $10,000. California

The California Endowment 21650 Oxnard St., Ste. 1200 Woodland Hills, CA 91367 (800) 449-4149 566. Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith, San Diego, CA. $377,595, 2002. For Pathways to Tolerance program to promote tolerance and elimination of racial, religious, and other bias among San Diego County high school-age youth by offering anti-bias and violence-prevention workshops in high schools, and providing intensive counseling to juvenile perpetrators and youth at risk of committing bias-related violence. 567. Asian Pacific Fund, San Francisco, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 568. Black United Fund Bay Area, Oakland, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 569. California Community Foundation, Los Angeles, CA. $400,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 570. California Council of Churches, Sacramento, CA. $300,000, 2002. For Building Bridges of Understanding: An Interfaith Response to September 11 to produce and distribute materials and provide training to congregations of all traditions designed to deepen knowledge and understanding of diverse faith traditions. 571. Capital Unity Council, Sacramento, CA. $219,962, 2002. For Unity Teams Program to

increase capacity of diverse community leaders in Sacramento Valley region to promote cross-cultural understanding among their respective communities. 572. Center for the Advancement of Nonviolence, Los Angeles, CA. $25,000, 2002. For A Season of Nonviolence, nonviolence education and community healing campaign in Los Angeles. 573. Center on Policy Initiatives, San Diego, CA. $568,830, 2002. For Tourism Industry Displaced Worker Relief Program to assist workers in San Diego County who have been affected by the September 11 terrorist attacks and related economic downturn, and who are in need of emergency financial assistance, public benefits advocacy, and related support. 574. Chinese For Affirmative Action, San Francisco, CA. $200,000, 2003. For A United Response to Backlash Hate, Violence, and Discrimination, five-agency collaborative to create coordinated response to recent acts of violence against immigrants in the Bay Area as a result of September 11. 575. Community Foundation for Monterey County, Monterey, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 576. Community Foundation of Santa Cruz, Soquel, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 577. Community Foundation of the Napa Valley, Napa, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 578. Community Foundation Serving Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, Riverside, CA. $200,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 579. Community Foundation Silicon Valley, San Jose, CA. $150,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 580. Community Partners, Los Angeles, CA. $50,000, 2002. For Coming Together In Crisis Hate Crime Prevention Dialogues, program to promote understanding of Arab-Americans and people of Islamic faith by conducting community forums and dialogues between various religious and ethnic groups in selected Southern California areas. 581. East Bay Community Foundation, Oakland, CA. $150,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 582. El Dorado Community Foundation for Youth and Family Services, Placerville, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 583. Facing History and Ourselves National Foundation, Brookline, MA. $200,000, 2003. For The California Project to provide training, support and resources to teachers in California so they can help students responsibly frame diversity

147


California

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

and tolerance issues in the aftermath of the events of September 11. 584. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2003. For September 11th Philanthropic Response Project. 585. Fresno Regional Foundation, Fresno, CA. $150,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 586. Glendale Community Foundation, Glendale, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 587. Glide Memorial Foundation, San Francisco, CA. $70,000, 2003. For Peacemakers, program for cultural and religious tolerance education and outreach in Bay Area communities. 588. Hebrew Union College, Jewish Institute of Religion, Los Angeles, CA. $84,250, 2002. For My America — Beyond Multiculturalism, week-long series of seminars and performing arts events in Los Angeles that emphasize distinctive and integral contributions of immigrants in America. 589. Horizons Foundation, San Francisco, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 590. Humboldt Area Foundation, Bayside, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 591. Kern County Community Foundation, Bakersfield, CA. $50,000. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 592. Liberty Hill Foundation, Santa Monica, CA. $100,000. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 593. Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, Los Angeles, CA. $900,000, 2002. For Displaced Worker Relief Program to provide emergency assistance and support services to tourism workers who have been unemployed or had their schedules reduced as a result of the September 11 terrorist attacks. 594. Los Angeles Brotherhood Crusade, Los Angeles, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 595. Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, Los Angeles, CA. $180,000, 2003. For Hate Crime Media Campaign and Capacity Building Project to implement comprehensive plan in Los Angeles County to respond to increase in hate crimes in the aftermath of the September 11 tragedy. 596. Marin Community Foundation, Larkspur, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 597. Mazon-A Jewish Response to Hunger, Los Angeles, CA. $1,400,000, 2002. For California

148

Emergency Food Assistance and Advocacy Program to provide statewide emergency food assistance, outreach on eligibility for income and food assistance programs, and advocacy support to low-wage and immigrant workers recently laid-off as a result of the September 11th tragedy and California’s economic downturn. 598. Mendocino County Community Foundation, Ukiah, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 599. Multicultural Collaborative, Los Angeles, CA. $150,000, 2003. To expand Multicultural Collaborative Town Halls, programs in Los Angeles that address issues of power, inequity, and poverty that often underlie the intolerance, fear, and competition that breeds inter-ethnic conflict. 600. National Conference for Community and Justice, Los Angeles, CA. $205,850, 2002. For Community/Interfaith 911 Dialogue Initiative, to support interfaith and intercultural dialogue in Southern California to reduce anti-Arab American and Muslim emotions and hate-motivated behaviors that have increased in the wake of recent terrorism. 601. National Conference for Community and Justice - Orange County Region, Newport Beach, CA. $100,000, 2002. For Community Cousins Program to promote tolerance and elimination of racial and religious bias by facilitating friendships and promoting mutual understanding among people of all ethnicities and religions in Orange County. 602. North Valley Community Foundation, Chico, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 603. Operation HOPE, Los Angeles, CA. $100,000, 2003. For Project Islamic Hope to enhance and expand youth violence prevention program and development of youth leaders trained in multi-ethnic, religious tolerance, and conflict resolution at South Los Angeles high schools. 604. Orange County Community Foundation, Irvine, CA. $200,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 605. Orange County Human Relations Council, Santa Ana, CA. $188,991, 2003. For Living Room Dialogues, program to increase racial and religious tolerance by engaging in community building activities, which bring together diverse people, including Muslims and Arabs throughout Orange County. 606. Partners for Democratic Change, San Francisco, CA. $125,000, 2003. For East Bay Afghan Community Project to improve mental and physical health of East Bay Afghan community in the aftermath of September 11 by increasing organizational and leadership capacity of Afghan Coalition. 607. Pasadena Foundation, Pasadena, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 608. Peninsula Community Foundation, San Mateo, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks).

609. Sacramento Regional Foundation, Sacramento, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 610. San Diego Foundation, San Diego, CA. $200,000. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 611. San Francisco Foundation, San Francisco, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 612. San Luis Obispo County Community Foundation, San Luis Obispo, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 613. Santa Barbara Foundation, Santa Barbara, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 614. Seventh Generation Fund for Indian Development, Forestville, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 615. Shasta Regional Community Foundation, Redding, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 616. Simon Wiesenthal Center, Los Angeles, CA. $350,000, 2002. For Tolerance Education Program for Youth, to expand number of youth in Los Angeles who participate in tolerance and hate crime reduction programs and to support inclusion of specific September 11, 2001 museum program components, teaching materials, and seminars. 617. Solano Community Foundation, Fairfield, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 618. Sonoma County Community Foundation, Santa Rosa, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 619. Sonora Area Foundation, Sonora, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 620. Truckee Tahoe Community Foundation, Truckee, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 621. United Way California Capital Region, Sacramento, CA. $250,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks).


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER 622. United Way of Fresno County, Fresno, CA. $150,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 623. United Way of Kern County, Bakersfield, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 624. United Way of Monterey County, Monterey, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 625. United Way of Mount Baldy, Rancho Cucamonga, CA. $150,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 626. United Way of Orange County Chapter, Irvine, CA. $250,000. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks). 627. United Way of San Diego County, San Diego, CA. $250,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 628. United Way of San Joaquin County, Stockton, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 629. United Way of Sonoma-Mendocino-Lake, Santa Rosa, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 630. United Way of Stanislaus County, Modesto, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 631. United Way of the Bay Area, San Francisco, CA. $500,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 632. United Way of the Inland Valleys, Riverside, CA. $150,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 633. United Way of Ventura County, Camarillo, CA. $150,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 634. United Way, Inc., Los Angeles, CA. $600,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 635. United Way, Silicon Valley, San Jose, CA. $150,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will

support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 636. University Muslim Medical Association, Los Angeles, CA. $150,000, 2003. For The Islamic Media Roundtable — Building a Healthy Voice for the Community, media and opinion makers convening in Los Angeles to increase public awareness about Islamic cultures and to form Muslim coalition to foster positive portrayal of their community as one promoting violence prevention. 637. Vanguard Public Foundation, San Francisco, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 638. Ventura County Community Foundation, Camarillo, CA. $100,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 639. Walnut Avenue Womens Center, Santa Cruz, CA. $100,000, 2003. For Contra Costa Labyrinth Project, supporting development of educational and outreach programs that foster religious tolerance in Contra Costa County communities. 640. Womens Foundation, San Francisco, CA. $50,000, 2002. For regranting efforts that will support health and health-related safety net providers affected by California’s economic downturn (connected with the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks). 641. Working Partnerships USA, San Jose, CA. $972,563, 2002. For Bay Area Worker Relief Project to support workers in tourist industry in Alameda, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Santa Clara Counties who are experiencing economic distress due to the effects of the September 11th attacks and the current recession. California

California Exotic Novelties c/o Corporate Communications 14235 Ramona Ave Chino, CA 91710 642. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. California

California Federal Bank “Community Power” Program 3900 Lennane Dr., Ste. 102 Sacramento, CA 95834 (916) 614-2335 E-mail: mhogarty@calfed.com 643. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Callaway

Callaway Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 790 LaGrange, GA 30241 (706) 884-7348 FAX: (706) 884-0201; E-mail: hsburdette@callaway-foundation.org 644. American Red Cross, La Grange, La Grange, GA. $25,000, 2001. For New York and Washington DC disaster relief. Callaway

Callaway Golf Company Foundation 2180 Rutherford Rd. Carlsbad, CA 92008-7328 (760) 930-8686 FAX: (760) 930-5021; E-mail: cgcfoundation@callawaygolf.com; URL: http:// www.callawaygolf.org 645. American Red Cross, National, DC. $60,000.

Capital 646. Undesignated. $20,000. 647. Undesignated. $20,000. Cammarata

Cammarata Family Foundation P.O. Box 248 Concord, MA 01742 648. Leary Firefighters Foundation Fund for New Yorks Bravest, Boston, MA. $5,000. For general support. Campbell

J. Bulow Campbell Foundation The Hurt Building, Ste. 850 50 Hurt Plz. Atlanta, GA 30303 (404) 658-9066 649. American Red Cross, Metropolitan Atlanta Chapter, Atlanta, GA. $500,000, 2001. To support victims and families affected by terrorist attacks in New York, Washington, DC and Pennsylvania. 650. Salvation Army of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA. $500,000, 2001. To support victims and families affected by terrorist attacks in New York, Washington, DC and Pennsylvania. Campbell

Campbell Soup Company Contributions Program c/o Public Affairs Dept. Campbell Pl., Box 60B Camden, NJ 08103-1799 (856) 342-4800 651. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. Canadian

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce c/o Corporate Communications Commerce Court Toronto, Ontario M5L 1A2 652. Undesignated. $100,000. Canadian

Canadian National Railway Company c/o Corporate Communications 935 de la Gauchetiere Street West Montreal, Quebec H3B 2M9 653. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. Cantor

Cantor, Fitzgerald Foundation c/o J. Ficarro 101 Park Ave., 34th Fl. New York, NY 10172 654. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $5,000,000. Cantwell

Louis Yager Cantwell Private Foundation 11 Cape Woodbury Newport Beach, CA 92660 655. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000. 656. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $20,000. 657. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $20,000. Capital

Capital Community Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 18902 Raleigh, NC 27619-8902 Tel./FAX: (919) 782-0602; E-mail: info@capitalcf.org; URL: http://www.capitalcf.org 658. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $12,000. Capital

The Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation 11100 Santa Monica Blvd., Fl. 9 Los Angeles, CA 90025-3384 659. Catholic Charities USA, Alexandria, VA. $200.

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SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Carey

660. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $50,000. 661. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $4,570. 662. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $690. 663. Engine No. 22/Ladder No. 13 Family Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. 664. Engine No. 22/Ladder No. 13 Family Fund, New York, NY. $600. 665. Farmington Hills Police Benevolent Association, Farmington Hills, MI. $5,000. 666. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $200. 667. Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association, Los Angeles, CA. $1,400. 668. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $8,830. 669. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $162,272. 670. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $100,000. 671. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $81,063. 672. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $28,740. 673. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $16,400. 674. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $2,340. 675. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $1,000. 676. United Way of New York City, New York, NY. $100,000. 677. United Way of New York City, New York, NY. $27,240. 678. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $950. Cardinal

Cardinal Health Foundation 7000 Cardinal Pl. Dublin, OH 43017 (614) 757-7450 E-mail: cardinalfoundation@cardinal.com; URL: http://www.cardinal.com/content/about/ cardfoundation.asp 679. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $150,000, 2001. 9/11 disaster relief for the capital region. 680. Greater New York Hospital Foundation, New York, NY. $450,000, 2001. 681. Greater New York Hospital Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 682. Greater New York Hospital Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 683. Greater New York Hospital Foundation, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. 684. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $100, 2001. 685. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $175,000, 2001. 9/11 disaster relief focused on children and low income victims of attacks. 686. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $1,150, 2001. matching gift for 9/11 employee contributions. 687. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $215,708, 2001. Scholarship fund to support 9/11 victims and their families. CareFirst

CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield c/o Corporate Communications 301 Bay Street, Suite No. 401 Easton, MD 21601 688. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000.

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Carey Family Trust 1175 Hilltop Drive Redding, CA 96002 689. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Carey

W. P. Carey Foundation 50 Rockefeller Plz., 2nd Fl. New York, NY 10020 690. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $15,000. Cargill

Cargill, Incorporated Corporate Giving Program c/o Citizenship Comm. P.O. Box 5650 Minneapolis, MN 55440-5650 (952) 742-4311 Additional contact: Michelle Grogg, Sr. Prog. Off., tel.: (952) 742-2931, E-mail: michelle_grogg@cargill.com; Additional address: Cargill Office Ctr., 15407 McGinty Rd. W., Wayzata, MN 55391-2399 (express mail or messenger); FAX: (952) 742-7224; E-mail: stacey_smida@cargill.com; URL: http:// www.cargill.com/commun/index.htm 691. American Red Cross, National, DC. $208,136, 2001. 692. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. 693. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $90,000, 2001. 694. Credit Suisse/First Boston Corporate Contributions Program, NY. $20,000, 2001. 695. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $108,000, 2001. 696. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. 697. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $9,000, 2001. 698. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $47,000, 2001. 699. Undesignated. $1,181, 2001. Un-named recipient. 700. World Trade Center Disaster Fund, London, England. $540, 2001. Carnegie

Carnegie Corporation of New York 437 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10022 (212) 371-3200 FAX: (212) 754-4073; URL: http:// www.carnegie.org 701. Aaron Davis Hall, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 702. Alliance for the Arts, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 703. Alliance of Resident Theaters/New York (ART/NY), New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 704. American Museum of the Moving Image, Astoria, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 705. American Music Center, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 706. American Place Theater, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 707. Amigos del Museo del Barrio, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

708. Anthology Film Archives, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 709. Art in General, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 710. Artists Space, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 711. ArtsConnection, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 712. Asian American Arts Alliance, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 713. Atlantic Theater Company, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 714. Ballet Hispanico of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 715. Ballet Tech Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 716. Bargemusic, Brooklyn, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 717. Borough of Manhattan Community College Performing Arts Center, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 718. Boston University, Boston, MA. $100,000, 2002. For WBUR Group radio stations to support programming on Islam and foreign policy. 719. Boys Choir of Harlem, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 720. Bronx Council on the Arts, Bronx, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 721. Bronx County Historical Society, Bronx, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 722. Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 723. Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 724. Brooklyn Arts Council, Brooklyn, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 725. Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 726. Brooklyn Childrens Museum, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 727. Brooklyn Conservatory of Music, Brooklyn, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 728. Brooklyn Historical Society, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 729. Brooklyn Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, Brooklyn, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 730. Brooklyn Youth Chorus, Brooklyn, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 731. Brown University, Providence, RI. $48,800. Toward development and distribution of curriculum resources about issues surrounding September 11 attacks for high school students and teachers.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER 732. Castillo Cultural Center, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 733. Center for Arts Education, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 734. Center for Investigative Reporting, San Francisco, CA. $50,000. Toward investigation of surveillance technologies, new government intelligence-gathering policies, and impact on U.S. democracy, including civil liberties. 735. Center for Traditional Music and Dance, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 736. Chamber Music America, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 737. Children’s Museum of Manhattan, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 738. Circle in the Square Theater School, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 739. City Center Fifty-Fifth Street Theater Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 740. City Lore, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 741. Columbia University, New York, NY. $49,300. Toward study of role of United Nations in counterterrorism. 742. Concert Artists Guild, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 743. Council on Arts & Humanities for Staten Island Film Video Arts, Inc., Staten Island, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 744. Creative Time, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 745. Dance Theater of Harlem, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 746. Dance Theater Workshop (DTW), New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 747. Dancing in the Streets, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 748. Dia Center for the Arts, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 749. Duke University, Durham, NC. $499,300. For project on managing external interventions after September 11. 750. Educational Broadcasting Corporation, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. For Channel Thirteen / WNET New York’s expenses related to restoration of transmission and broadcast capabilities, website enhancement and programming. 751. Ensemble Studio Theater (EST), New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 752. Fifty-Second Street Project, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 753. Film/Video Arts, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 754. Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts, Flushing, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 755. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $35,000, 2002. To support the Center’s 9/11 Philanthropic Response Project.

756. Four Way Books, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 757. Fund for Public Schools, Brooklyn, NY. $1,850,000, 2002. For projects to honor New York City public school teachers in the wake of the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. 758. Greater Washington Educational Telecommunications Association, Arlington, VA. $250,000, 2002. For reporting by The NewsHour from countries involved in different aspects of the war on terrorism. 759. H. T. Dance Company, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 760. Harlem School of the Arts, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 761. Harlem Textile Works, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 762. HERE/Home for Contemporary Theater and Art, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 763. High Five Tickets to the Arts, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 764. Historic House Trust of New York City, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 765. Hospital Audiences, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 766. Human Rights Watch, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward project to monitor human rights issues related to post-September 11 antiterrorism campaigns and war in Afghanistan. 767. International Print Center New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 768. Internews Network, Arcata, CA. $10,000. Toward Open Media Fund for Afghanistan. 769. Irish Repertory Theater Company, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 770. Isamu Noguchi Foundation, Long Island City, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 771. Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, Jamaica, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 772. John A. Noble Collection, Staten Island, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 773. John F. Kennedy Library Foundation, Boston, MA. $50,000. Toward series of education forums called Responding to Terrorism. 774. Jose Limon Dance Foundation, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 775. King Manor Association of Long Island, Jamaica, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 776. La Mama Experimental Theater Club, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 777. Lower East Side Printshop, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 778. Lower East Side Tenement Museum, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 779. Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

Carnegie 780. Mabou Mines Development Foundation, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 781. Martha Graham Center of Contemporary Dance, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 782. Mindbuilders Creative Arts Company, Bronx, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 783. Museum for African Art, Long Island City, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 784. Museum of American Folk Art, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 785. Museum of Jewish Heritage, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 786. Museum of the City of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 787. National Academy of Sciences, DC. $200,000. For project on Russian-American cooperation in countering terrorism. 788. National Choral Council, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 789. National Dance Institute, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 790. National Public Radio, DC. $250,000, 2002. Toward programming on the aftermath of September 11 and the war on terrorism. 791. New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 792. New School University, New York, NY. $50,000. Toward research project on domestic arms lobby and intersection of campaign financing in shaping size and content of post-September 11 military build-up. 793. New Victory Theater, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 794. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 795. New York Hall of Science, Corona, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 796. New York Historical Society, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 797. New York Shakespeare Festival, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 798. New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 799. Nuyorican Poets Cafe, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 800. Ontological-Hysteric Theater, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 801. Open Channels New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 802. Orpheon Little Orchestra Society, The, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 803. Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 804. P. S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support

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in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 805. Pan Asian Repertory Theater, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 806. Paper Bag Players, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 807. Paul Taylor Dance Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 808. Performance Space 122, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 809. Playwrights Horizons, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 810. Poets and Writers, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 811. Poets House, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 812. Pregones Touring Puerto Rican Theater Collection, Bronx, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 813. Public Art Fund, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 814. Publicolor, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 815. Queens Botanical Garden Society, Flushing, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 816. Queens College of the City University of New York Foundation, Flushing, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 817. Queens Council on the Arts, Woodhaven, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 818. Queens Museum of Art, Flushing, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 819. Queens Symphony Orchestra, Rego Park, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 820. Queens Theater in the Park, Flushing, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 821. Repertorio Espanol, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 822. Saratoga International Theater Institute (SITI), New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 823. Signature Theater Company, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 824. Snug Harbor Cultural Center, Staten Island, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 825. Society for the Preservation of Weeksville and Bedford-Stuyvesant History, Brooklyn, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 826. Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 827. Soho Repertory Theater, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 828. Staten Island Botanical Garden, Staten Island, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

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829. Staten Island Childrens Museum, Staten Island, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 830. Staten Island Historical Society, Staten Island, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 831. Staten Island Institute of Arts and Sciences, Staten Island, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 832. Staten Island Zoological Society, Staten Island, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 833. Studio in a School Association, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 834. Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 835. Symphony Space, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 836. TADA Theater and Dance Alliance, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 837. Target Margin Theater, Brooklyn, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 838. Teachers and Writers Collaborative, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 839. Thalia Spanish Theater, Sunnyside, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 840. Theater for a New Audience, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 841. Theatre for A New City Foundation, Inc., New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 842. Third Street Music School Settlement, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 843. Town Hall Foundation, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 844. Trisha Brown Dance Company, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 845. University of Maryland Foundation, College Park, MD. $25,000. Toward international roundtable on impact of terrorism on global civil society and democracy. 846. UrbanGlass/New York Contemporary Glass Center, Brooklyn, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 847. Vineyard Theater and Workshop Center, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 848. Wave Hill, Bronx, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 849. WNYC Foundation, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. Toward rebuilding organizational capacity and strengthening programming in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 850. Womens Project and Productions, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 851. Wooster Group, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 852. Working Group, Oakland, CA. $25,000. For reactivating national Not In Our Town network, national community campaign against hate crimes in aftermath of September 11.

853. World Music Institute, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 854. Young Audiences-New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 855. Young Playwrights, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Toward support in wake of terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Carnegie

Carnegie Hero Fund Commission 425 6th Ave., Ste. 1640 Pittsburgh, PA 15219-1823 (412) 281-1302 FAX: (412) 281-5751; E-mail: carnegiehero@carnegiehero.org; Additional tel.: (800) 447-8900; URL: http:// www.carnegiehero.org/ 856. National Philanthropic Trust, Jenkintown, PA. $50,000, 2002. 857. Todd M. Beamer Foundation, Cranbury, NJ. $50,000, 2002. Carnival

Carnival Cruise Lines c/o Corporate Communications 3655 NW 87th Avenue Miami, FL 33178 858. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,500,000. Carolina

Carolina First Bank c/o Corporate Communications The South Financial Group, PO Box 1029 Greenville, SC 29602 859. South Carolina Cares Relief Fund, Greenville, SC. $100,000. Carson

The Carson Family Charitable Trust c/o U.S. Trust Co. of New York 114 W. 47th St. New York, NY 10036 860. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $100,000. For Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund. 861. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $25,000. For Families of Freedom Fund. Casey

The Annie E. Casey Foundation 701 St. Paul St. Baltimore, MD 21202 (410) 547-6600 FAX: (410) 547-6624; E-mail: webmail@aecf.org; URL: http://www.aecf.org 862. Alianza Dominicana, New York, NY. $150,000, 2001. For emergency relief efforts after the crash of Flight 587. 863. Asian American Coalition for Children and Families, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. To assess post-September 11 mental health needs of Chinatown residents and provide outreach to parents and children to ensure they receive needed mental health services and support. 864. Baltimore Community Foundation, Baltimore, MD. $5,000. To support the September 11th Fund to help victims of the terrorist attacks and those affected by the tragedy. 865. Citizens Committee for Children of New York, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. To support the development of a trauma-related training program for child-welfare clients and staff, impacted by the WTC attacks. 866. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $300,000, 2001. To address the emotional needs of children and families affected by the tragic events of September 11 and to address the backlash against Muslims and Arab-Americans in our region.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Charter

Caterpillar

867. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $10,000. For September 11th Fund to help victims of terrorist attacks and those affected by tragedy. 868. Community YMCA, Red Bank, NJ. $30,000, 2001. Support for the YMCA’s Family Services Center WTC911 relief effort and YCARES Financial assistance program. 869. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $90,000, 2001. For compilation and tracking of philanthropy’s response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 870. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $90,000, 2002. For continued support of the Center’s 9/11 Philanthropic Response Project. 871. New Yorkers for Children, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. To provide longer-term grants to community non-profits already engaged and working with vulnerable children and families, now further destabilized as a result of the World Trade Center attacks. 872. New Yorkers for Children, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. To prepare child welfare caseworkers and other frontline staff to more effectively address the trauma families are experiencing since the World Trade Center attacks. 873. Points of Light Foundation, DC. $49,875, 2001. To support a re-granting process tot he Volunteer Center National Network and other non-profit organizations administering community service projects honoring the victims of the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center attacks. 874. Undesignated. $951,237, 2001. Balance of original commitment. 875. United Neighborhood Houses of New York, New York, NY. $98,888, 2002. For efforts of neighborhood based settlement houses to address longer-term needs of children and families economically and emotionally harmed by the attacks on the World Trade Center, and to support community outreach to promote tolerance. 876. United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Boston, MA. $25,000, 2001. Support the USA Memorial Fund and provide direct services to families and community organizations immediately affected by the occurrences of September 11, 2001. Casey

Eugene B. Casey Foundation 800 S. Frederick Ave., Ste. 100 Gaithersburg, MD 20877-4102 877. Salvation Army of Washington, DC, DC. $100,000. For Pentagon victims of September 11, 2001. Cassava

Cassava Enterprises

Central Carolina Community Foundation

100 N.E. Adams St. Peoria, IL 61629-1480 (309) 675-1000 880. American Red Cross, National, DC. $300,000. 881. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. 882. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000.

P.O. Box 11222 Columbia, SC 29211-1222 (803) 254-5601 FAX: (803) 799-6663; E-mail: info@yourfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.yourfoundation.org 893. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. For September 11th recovery efforts. Central Cathay

Cathay Bancorp, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 777 N. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90012 883. 911 Healing Hands, Los Angeles, CA. $250,000.

Castle

Samuel N. and Mary Castle Foundation Pacific Guardian Ctr., Makai Tower 733 Bishop St., Ste. 1275 Honolulu, HI 96813 (808) 522-1101 FAX: (808) 522-1103; E-mail: acastle@aloha.net; URL: http://fdncenter.org/grantmaker/castle/ 879. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000, 2001.

Central Maine Power Company Contributions Program 83 Edison Dr. Augusta, ME 04336 894. American Red Cross, National, DC. $15,000. Central

Cavaliere

Cavaliere Foundation, Inc. 1716 Jefferson St. Madison, WI 53711 Application address: 211 S. Patterson St., Madison, WI 53703, tel.: (608) 260-9500 884. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $2,000. For unrestricted support. CBS

CBS Foundation, Inc. 1515 Broadway, 50th Fl. New York, NY 10036 (212) 258-6000 885. American Red Cross, National, DC. $370,248, 2002. 886. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $272,000, 2002. Celanese

Celanese Americas Foundation c/o Celanese Americas Corp. 86 Morris Ave. Summit, NJ 07901 887. American Red Cross, National, DC. $17,000. 888. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $200,000. 889. Undesignated. $38,000. To donate $100 to families of each firefighter and police officer reported missing in World Trade Center collapse. Cemala

The Cemala Foundation, Inc. 330 S. Greene St., Ste. 101 Greensboro, NC 27401 (336) 274-3541 FAX: (336) 272-8153; E-mail: cemala@cemala.org; URL: http://www.cemala.org 890. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. Centex

c/o Corporate Communications Old Parham Road St. John’s, Gibraltar 878. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000.

Central

Caterpillar Inc. Corporate Giving Program

Central New York Community Foundation, Inc. 500 S. Salina St., Ste. 428 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 422-9538 FAX: (315) 471-6031; URL: http://www.cnycf.org 895. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $14,715. 896. Various organizations. $361,466. For donations to support local not-for-profit organizations that received less funding than normally expected because of local diversion of funds to various 9/11-related funding opportunities. CH

The CH Foundation P.O. Box 94038 Lubbock, TX 79493-4038 (806) 792-0448 FAX: (806) 792-7824 897. American Red Cross, National, DC. $14,406. Champlin

The Champlin Foundations 300 Centerville Rd, Ste. 300S Warwick, RI 02886-0226 (401) 736-0370 FAX: (401) 736-7248; E-mail: champlinfdns@worldnet.att.net; URL: http:// www.fdncenter.org/grantmaker/champlin 898. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $100,000, 2001. For post-secondary education scholarships in the aftermath of September 11th. Chapman

Chapman Family Fund P.O. Box 194 Scarborough, NY 10510 899. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002.

Centex Corporation Contributions Program

Charles River Laboratories

c/o Corp. Contribs. 2728 N. Harwood Dallas, TX 75201 891. National Housing Endowment, DC. $1,000,000.

c/o Corporate Communications 251 Ballardvale St Wilmington, MA 01887 900. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000.

Charles

Central

Charter

Central Alabama Community Foundation, Inc.

Charter Municipal Mortgage Acceptance Company

P.O. Box 11587 Montgomery, AL 36111 (334) 264-6223 FAX: (334) 263-6225; E-mail: cacf@bellsouth.net 892. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $31,000.

c/o Corporate Communications 625 Madison Ave New York, NY 10022 901. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000.

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SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Chartwell

Chartwell Charitable Foundation 1999 Ave. of the Stars, Ste. 3050 Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310) 556-7600 902. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 903. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $250,000. Chef

Chef America, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 20 Inverness Pl. E. Engelwood, CO 80112 904. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. Cheney

Ben B. Cheney Foundation 3110 Ruston Way, Ste. A Tacoma, WA 98402-5307 (253) 572-2442 E-mail: info@benbcheneyfoundation.org; URL: http://www.benbcheneyfoundation.org 905. American Red Cross, Tacoma Chapter, Tacoma, WA. $100,000, 2001. To support disaster relief in the aftermath of the terrorist strikes against NYC and Washington, DC. ChevronTexaco

ChevronTexaco Corporation Contributions Program 6001 Bollinger Canyon Rd., Rm. A2332 San Ramon, CA 94583-0778 URL: http://www.chevrontexaco.com/ social_responsibility 906. Active Voice, San Francisco, CA. $100,000. To extend the Islam Project, a community and media-based effort geared toward helping build bridges between Muslim and Non-Muslim organizations, to Houston, TX and New Orleans, LA. 907. Afghan Coalition, Fremont, CA. $100,000. To support the creation of cross-cultural alliances, stimulate meaningful dialogue, and promote increased understanding and respect for local communities that have been victims of the heightened discrimination after the 9/11 attacks. 908. American Group Psychotherapy Association, New York, NY. $465,000, 2001. To focus on providing services to the large cadre of mental health professionals (both clinicals and paraprofessionals) who work with those affected by September 11th. 909. American Immigration Law Foundation, DC. $50,000. To support the development of a new policy paper and a related series of regional briefings that will bring together legal experts, community representatives, and the public to review how the newly enacted government policies and federal agency restructuring will impact South Asian, Muslim, and Arab immigrants. 910. American Red Cross, Kern County, Bakersfield, CA. $5,000, 2001. 911. American Red Cross, Kern County, Bakersfield, CA. $5,000, 2001. 912. American Red Cross, San Francisco Chapter, San Francisco, CA. $800,000. To support NY-based relief and recovery efforts. 913. American Red Cross, San Francisco Chapter, San Francisco, CA. $200,000. To support DC-based relief and recovery efforts. 914. American Red Cross, Southeastern Fairfield County, Fairfield, NJ. $5,000, 2001. To support WTC Disaster Relief Fund. 915. Arab American Institute Foundation, DC. $100,000. To support 1) the education of teachers, students and civic groups on the culture heritage and contributions of Americans of Arab descent; 2) conduct and disseminate accurate and useful research on Arab American communities and current challenges to their civil liberties and

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civic integration to media outlets, government agencies, social service agencies and academic institutions; 3) provide resources, training and contacts to Arab American leaders in major U.S. communities to expand local level outreach on Arab American needs to public and private sector agencies. 916. Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, New York, NY. $240,000. For long-term counseling needs. 917. Bereavement Center of Westchester, The, Tuckahoe, NY. $25,000. For long-term counseling needs. 918. California State University, Long Beach, CA. $52,000. To support the Social Work Anti-Bias Curriculum Project, to provide an educational experience for social workers across the state of California to examine their conscious and unconscious attitudes regarding South Asian, Muslim, and Arab communities in order to better serve the needs of these vulnerable communities. 919. Chhaya Community Development Corporation, Flushing, NY. $35,000. To support the Housing Discrimination Outreach, Education Initiative, a project assisting the South East Asian community by providing workshops, focus groups and community events to inform them of their rights, and assist them in advocating for themselves. 920. Childrens National Medical Center, DC. $125,000, 2001. To provide financial support to the International Center to Heal our Children Program to help children cope with tramatic events such as the September 11th attacks. 921. Childrens National Medical Center, DC. $125,000, 2001. To work with children kindergarten-sixth grade to express their emotions through a series of arts activities including Wall of HeARTS. 922. Chinese-American Planning Council, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. To provide post-September 11th workforce development. 923. Church Avenue Merchants Block Association (CAMBA), Brooklyn, NY. $100,000. To support the Mosaic Youth Project, which provides 200 junior high and high school age New York City youth by providing them the skills and tools needed to avoid negative behaviors, value diversity and successfully negotiate situations of conflict through peaceful means. 924. Columbia University, New York, NY. $684,000, 2001. To support collaborative and pre-project organization of The Oral History Telling Lives Project: September 11 Stories. 925. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $750,000, 2001. To support the Partnership’s work as it continues to invest in the assets contained within our immigrant communities. To support “Moving Forward: Employment and Educational opportunities for Immigrant Families” Project. 926. Council of Religious Leaders of Metropolitan Chicago, Chicago, IL. $100,000. To support the ally relationships with youth and adults among Chicago’s Muslim, Sikh, Greek Orthodox and Jewish communities. 927. Educators for Social Responsibility, New York, NY. $100,000. To support the implementation of Teaching for Understanding in Secondary Classrooms Post-September 11; to (1) develop greater understanding among adults and students about Muslims, Arabs, and South Asians, and raise awareness about increased discrimination they face in the aftermath of September 11; and (2) equip secondary educators with tools and strategies for interrupting bias and discrimination in their schools and communities. 928. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $25,000. For September 11th Philanthropic Response Project.

929. Fund for the City of New York, New York, NY. $250,000, 2001. To support the Youth Development Institute to engage 10 organizations in a New York City-wide effort to improve employment and other opportunities for displaced youth aged 16-24, a group disproportionately affected by the September 11th attacks. 930. Graduate School of Islamic and Social Studies, DC. $100,000. To support the empowerment of ordinary members of the Muslim community through education by U.S.-based Islamic social scientists and scholars on Islam’s fundamental messages of tolerance, inclusiveness, and peaceful coexistence for all people, and on personal skills to identify and address bigotry and discrimination. 931. Hate Free Zone Campaign of Washington, Seattle, WA. $100,000. To support Project Reflect, geared toward the development of develop a comprehensive and innovative educational curriculum that focuses on immigrant communities affected by the post 9/11 backlash. 932. Hispanic Federation of New York City, New York, NY. $250,000. For long-term counseling needs. 933. Houchin Blood Services, Bakersfield, CA. $5,000, 2001. 934. Houchin Blood Services, Bakersfield, CA. $5,000, 2001. 935. Interfaith Ministries Wichita, Wichita, KS. $91,000. To support “More Alike Than Different” a project that aims to dismantle bias and bigotry against Muslims, Arabs, and South Asian groups through a social marketing campaign to help increase respect and understanding regarding the faith, history and cultures of the groups. 936. Islamic Social Services Association, Mesa, AZ. $41,000. To support the education of mainstream professionals and students in the fields of social service, health, law enforcement, education and the media about Muslims in America to raise awareness and knowledge, and develop cultural competencies to increase the effectiveness of the services professionals provide to Muslim clients, patients, students and the general public. 937. Islamic Society of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. $100,000, 2001. To provide support for the United Response to Backlash Hate Violence and Discrimination in the San Francisco Bay Area Project. Includes preparing and distributing materials to increase public awareness and dispel myths and damaging sterotypes about Arab, Muslim, Asian, and North African communities. 938. Japanese American Citizens League, San Francisco, CA. $74,000. To support What It Means To Be an American, a project to promote tolerance of Arab, South Asian, and Muslim populations and dialogue through training workshops for teachers and school administrators. 939. Lohgarh Sikh Education Foundation, Palo Alto, CA. $95,000. To support The Sikh Next Door: Introducing Sikhs to America’s Classrooms a project geared toward developing a set of professional, interactive, educational materials about Sikh-Americans that are specifically designed for classroom instruction. 940. Masjidul Waritheen, Oakland, CA. $92,000. To support the United Youth Leadership Council, a project designed to work with youth to decrease bias, bigotry and racism among youth in the Bay Area. 941. Metropolitan Opera, New York, NY. $500,000. 942. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $100,000. 943. Museum of Chinese in the Americas, New York, NY. $65,000, 2001. To provide support for


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER the Mapping Our Herritage Project. The museum will help implement the final phase of the Oral History Telling Lives Project by preserving and exhibiting the various interviews, artifacts, and other materials collected by the Project’s activities. 944. Muslim Student Association of United States and Canada, Washington, DC. $37,000. To support Building Muslim Friendly Campuses, a project seeking to research and document the level in which University and Colleges are Muslim friendly and discover best practices that lead to the creation of Muslim friendly programs. 945. National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium, DC. $85,000, 2001. To support a two-day leadership-training workshop for the Post 9/11 Leadership Training Project focused on institutional development, fundrasing, communication strategies, and advocacy skills. 946. National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium, DC. $20,000. For long-term counseling needs. 947. National Conference for Community and Justice, New York, NY. $250,000. 948. National Conference for Community and Justice, New York, NY. $165,000, 2001. To enhance the work of the September 11th Anti-Bias Project by engaging 10 of NCCJ’s regional offices in locales where winning RFP projects are underway to monitor and evaluate activities. 949. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. 950. New York Stock Exchange Fallen Heroes Fund, New York, NY. $100,000. 951. New York University, New York, NY. $750,000. For long-term counseling needs. 952. Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, New York, NY. $350,000, 2001. Project Ayuda. To continue to provide case management and legal serives to existing and new PRLDEF clients who suffer from the post-September 11th impact on individuals and families. 953. Salvation Army New Jersey Divisonal Headquarters, Union, NJ. $5,000. 954. Salvation Army New Jersey Divisonal Headquarters, Union, NJ. $5,000, 2001. To support NY Trade Center Disaster Relief Fund. 955. United Neighborhood Houses of New York, New York, NY. $371,000. For four community-based settlement houses in New York City. 956. United Neighborhood Houses of New York, New York, NY. $279,000. To four settlement houses in New York City. 957. United Neighborhood Houses of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. For long-term counseling needs. 958. University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA. $77,000, 2001. To support an essay competition open to UC Berkeley students and International House residents. The topic of the essay would be heightened bigotry and stereotyping that has surfaced in the aftermath of September 11th and how to combat this discrimination. 959. University of Richmond Chaplaincy, Richmond, VA. $100,000. To support Metropolitan Richmond September 11th Anti-Bias Project, a project designed to engage leadership outreach and establish a collaborative model to increase regional leaders’ awareness and understanding of the South Asian, Muslim, and Arab populations; create settings which encourage regional religious, business, and civic leaders to examine their conscious and unconscious attitudes regarding these communities; and provide opportunities to affect systemic change with regard to regional bias against the South Asian, Muslim, and Arab communities.

Citigroup

960. Vital Voices Global Partnership, DC. $75,000, 2001. To provide cross-cultural understanding through women’s leadership programs in the Muslim/Arab world and Pakistan that will include opportunities for intercultural dialogue and exchange among Americans and participants from the Arab/Muslim world and Pakistan. 961. WAVE (Work, Achievement, Values and Education), DC. $340,000, 2001. To provide 9/11 grant for the District of Columbia Homeland Security Academy to assist displaced youth in DC get homeland security jobs. 962. WAVE (Work, Achievement, Values and Education), DC. $142,000. For long-term counseling needs. Chicago

The Chicago Community Trust and Affiliates 111 E. Wacker Dr., Ste. 1400 Chicago, IL 60601 (312) 616-8000 FAX: (312) 616-7955; E-mail: sandy@cct.org; TDD: (312) 856-1703; URL: http://www.cct.org 963. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,625. For Critical Needs Fund. ChoiceOne

ChoiceOne c/o Corporate Communications 56 Grandville Ave. SW Grand Rapids, MI 49503 964. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. CHS

CHS Foundation

970. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001. 971. Staten Island Victims Relief Fund, Staten Island, NY. $1,000. 972. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001. 973. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $38,645, 2001. Cincinnati

The Greater Cincinnati Foundation 200 W. 4th St. Cincinnati, OH 45202-2602 (513) 241-2880 FAX: (513) 852-6888; E-mail: info@greatercincinnatifdn.org; URL: http:// www.greatercincinnatifdn.org 974. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $205,864. 975. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For emergency grant from the Foundation. Cingular

Cingular Wireless LLC Corporate Giving Program c/o Charitable Contribs. and Sponsorships 5565 Glenridge Connector, Ste. 2070-B Atlanta, GA 30342 E-mail: charitable.contributions@cingular.com; URL: http://www.cingular.com/cingular/about_us/ community_involvement 976. American Red Cross, National, DC. $232,457. 977. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000. Cisco

5500 CENEX Dr., M.S. 470 Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077 (651) 451-5481 E-mail: mkast@chsco-ops.com; URL: http:// www.chsfoundation.org 965. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Chubb

The Chubb Corporation Contributions Program 15 Mountain View Rd. Plainfield, NJ 07061-1615 (908) 580-2000 966. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. Church

The Church in Radburn Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 598 Fair Lawn, NJ 07410-0598 967. American Red Cross, Bergen County Chapter, Ridgewood, NJ. $13,250. To help victims of 9/11 residing in Bergen County, NJ. CIGNA

CIGNA Corporation Contributions Program 1650 Market St., OL54C Philadelphia, PA 19192-1540 Application address in CT: James N. Mason, Jr., Dir., Contribs. and Civic Affairs, W-A/900 Cottage Grove Ave., Bloomfield, CT 06002; FAX: (215) 761-5515; URL: http://www.cigna.com/general/ about/community/index.html 968. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $202,788. CIGNA

CIGNA Foundation 2 Liberty Pl. 1601 Chestnut St., TL06B Philadelphia, PA 19192-1540 URL: http://www.cigna.com/general/about/ community 969. ACCION New York, Brooklyn, NY. $1,000.

Cisco Systems Foundation 170 W. Tasman Dr. San Jose, CA 95134-1706 E-mail: ciscofoundation@cisco.com; E-mail for product donations: dicountech_cisco@techsoup.org; URL: http:// www.cisco.com/go/foundation 978. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $2,000,000. 979. American Red Cross, DC Chapter, DC. $500,000. 980. City of New York, New York, NY. $2,500,000. 981. YMCA of Greater New York, New York, NY. $500,000. 982. YMCA of the USA, Armed Services Washington Office, Springfield, VA. $500,000. CIT

The CIT Group Foundation, Inc. c/o The CIT Group, Inc. 1211 Ave. of the Americas New York, NY 10036 NJ tel.: (973) 740-5638; FAX: (973) 740-5424 983. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. 984. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. Citigroup

Citigroup Foundation 850 3rd Ave., 13th Fl. New York, NY 10043 (212) 559-9163 E-mail: citigroupfoundation@citigroup.com; URL: http://www.citigroup.com/citigroup/corporate/ foundation/index.htm 985. ACCION New York, Brooklyn, NY. $25,000, 2001. For American Dream Disaster Relief Fund. 986. ACCION New York, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 987. American Tribute Center, Sands Point, NY. $10,000. For publication of Tribute book.

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Citigroup

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Clark

988. American Woman’s Economic Development (AWED), New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 989. Asian American Federation of New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For September 11th relief support. 990. Asian Americans for Equality, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 991. Brooklyn Alliance, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 992. Brooklyn Economic Development Corporation, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 993. Chinatown Manpower Project, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 994. Citigroup Relief Fund, New York, NY. $15,000,000. To provide scholarships to the children of victims of the September 11th attacks. 995. East Harlem Business Capital Corporation, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 996. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For project on Philanthropic Response to 9/11. 997. Hunts Point Local Development Corporation, Bronx, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 998. Jamaica Business Resource Center, Jamaica, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 999. Lehman College of the City University of New York, Bronx, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 1000. Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 1001. Nonprofit Finance Fund, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For disaster assistance. 1002. Saint Vincents Hospital and Medical Center of New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. For September 11th initiatives. 1003. Wall Street Rising Corporation, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. 1004. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,000. Citizens

Citizens Communications Company Contributions Program c/o Corp. Contribs. High Ridge Park, P.O. Box 3801 Stamford, CT 06905 (203) 329-8800 1005. American Red Cross, National, DC. $125,000. 1006. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $125,000. City

City National Corporation Contributions Program 400 N. Roxbury Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 888-6000 1007. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. Claiborne

Liz Claiborne Foundation 1440 Broadway New York, NY 10018 (212) 626-5704 FAX: (212) 626-5304 1008. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Clark

Clark Family Foundation, Inc. 1633 Broadway, 30th Fl. New York, NY 10019 1009. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $20,000. For general support.

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The Edna McConnell Clark Foundation 250 Park Ave., Ste. 900 New York, NY 10177-0026 (212) 551-9100 FAX: (212) 986-4558; E-mail: info@emcf.org; URL: http://www.emcf.org 1010. Community Funds, Inc, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001. For fund to aid victims, families, and not-for-profit organizations affected by terrorist attacks on September 11. 1011. New York University, New York, NY. $15,000. For Civic Alliance to Rebuild Downtown New York, coalition of business, community, and civic groups that is exploring how best to rebuild New York City’s downtown area in the wake of September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Clark

Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, Inc. 135 E. 64th St. New York, NY 10021 (212) 288-8900 FAX: (212) 288-1033; URL: http:// www.rsclark.org 1012. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $250,000. For New York Arts Recovery Fund. Clark

Clark Retail Enterprises c/o Corporate Communications 3003 Butterfield Road, Suite 300 Oak Brook, IL 60523 1013. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. 1014. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. To support the families of firefighters in the aftermath of September 11th. Cleveland

The Cleveland Foundation 1422 Euclid Ave., Ste. 1300 Cleveland, OH 44115-2001 (216) 861-3810 FAX: (216) 589-9039; TTY: (216) 861-3806; URL: http://www.clevelandfoundation.org 1015. American Red Cross, Greater Cleveland Chapter, Cleveland, OH. $397,500. To support the ARC 9-11 Disaster Relief Fund. 1016. American Red Cross, Greater Cleveland Chapter, Cleveland, OH. $10,000, 2001. For Disaster Relief Fund. 1017. American Red Cross, Greater Cleveland Chapter, Cleveland, OH. $1,000, 2001. For Disaster Relief Fund - September 11. 1018. American Red Cross, Greater Cleveland Chapter, Cleveland, OH. $1,000, 2001. For Disaster Relief Fund - September 11. 1019. American Red Cross, Greater Cleveland Chapter, Cleveland, OH. $300, 2001. For Disaster Relief Fund - September 11. 1020. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $200,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1021. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $68,951, 2001. For September 11th terrorist attacks. 1022. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. For relief to victims of September 11th terrorist attacks. 1023. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. For relief for September 11th disaster. 1024. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $15,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1025. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund.

1026. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1027. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1028. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. For Relief to terrorist attack victims. 1029. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1030. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1031. United Way of Lake County, Mentor, OH. $5,000, 2001. 1032. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $7,500, 2001. For relief aid. Clorox

The Clorox Company Foundation East Bay Community Fdn., DeDomenico Bldg. 200 Frank Ogawa Plz. Oakland, CA 94612 (510) 836-3223 E-mail: cloroxfndt@eastbaycf.org; URL: http:// www.clorox.com/company/foundation 1033. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000, 2001. 1034. American Red Cross, San Francisco Chapter, San Francisco, CA. $107,000. For contribution from Stars and Stripes campaign for 9/11/01 disaster. 1035. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. 1036. United Way of the Bay Area, San Francisco, CA. $107,500. For Stars and Stripes campaign contribution to September 11th Fund. Clowes

The Clowes Fund, Inc. 320 N. Meridan St., Ste. 316 Indianapolis, IN 46204-1722 (317) 833-0144 1037. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. CNT

CNT c/o Corporate Communications 6000 Nathan Lane North Minneapolis, MN 55442 1038. Various organizations. $40,000. Coca

The Coca-Cola Company Contributions Program 1 Coca-Cola Plz. Atlanta, GA 30313 (404) 676-2121 URL: http://www2.coca-cola.com/citizenship/ index.html 1039. American Red Cross, National, DC. $6,000,000, 2001. To support relief and recovery efforts. 1040. Various organizations. $3,750,000. To support a variety of local relief organizations. Coca-Cola

The Coca-Cola Foundation, Inc. 1 Coca-Cola Plz., N.W. Atlanta, GA 30301 (404) 676-2568 Application address: P.O. Drawer 1734, Atlanta, GA 30301; FAX: (404) 676-8804; URL: http:// www2.coca-cola.com/citizenship/ foundation_coke.html 1041. American Red Cross, National, DC. $2,000,000, 2001. For September 11 disaster relief. 1042. American Red Cross, National, DC. $84,150, 2001.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER 1043. New York City Public/Private Initiatives, New York, NY. $250,000. For September 11 Anniversary Fund. 1044. Tavis Smiley Foundation, Los Angeles, CA. $100,000, 2001. 1045. United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta, Atlanta, GA. $10,000. For September 11 events. Cohen

Cohen Opportunity Fund Washington, DC 1046. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Colgate

Colgate-Palmolive Company Contributions Program 300 Park Ave. New York, NY 10022 (212) 310-3428 1047. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Colorado

The Colorado Trust The Colorado Trust Bldg. 1600 Sherman St. Denver, CO 80203-1604 (303) 837-1200 1048. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. Colt

James J. Colt Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 9130 Lyndhurst, NJ 07071 (201) 804-8322 1049. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $1,000. Columbus

The Columbus Foundation and Affiliated Organizations 1234 E. Broad St. Columbus, OH 43205-1453 (614) 251-4000 FAX: (614) 251 4009; E-mail: info@columbusfoundation.org, rbiddisc@columbusfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.columbusfoundation.org 1050. American Red Cross, Columbus Chapter, Columbus, OH. $4,300. 1051. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000, 2001. 1052. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $23,300, 2001. 1053. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $23,300, 2001. For grant from principals and employees of Stonehenge Financial Holdings. 1054. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1055. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1056. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $15,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund to mobilize financial resources to respond to needs of victims and their families. 1057. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $12,389, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1058. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1059. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. 1060. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund.

1061. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $8,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1062. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1063. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1064. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund, to benefit families of firefighters and police officers who died in attacks. 1065. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1066. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1067. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund to support Greater New York families. 1068. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1069. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,500, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1070. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1071. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. To assist families of firemen, policemen and other rescue workers who have perished in rescue mission. 1072. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund and is for victim’s families. 1073. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1074. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1075. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1076. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1077. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1078. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1079. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500, 2001. For September 11th Fund, to benefit families of firefighters and police officers who perished in attacks on September 11th. 1080. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1081. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $400, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1082. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $200, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1083. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $200, 2001. For America, Tribute to Heroes September 11th Telethon Fund.

Comerica 1084. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1085. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $10,000, 2002. For Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund, benefitting financially needy children and spouses of victims of September 11th attacks. 1086. Squad 41 Associations Heroes Fund, Bronx, NY. $50,000. 1087. Squad 41 Associations Heroes Fund, Bronx, NY. $15,000. 1088. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $53,303. Comcast

The Comcast Foundation 1201 Market St., Ste. 1405 Wilmington, DE 19801-1165 Application address: 1500 Market St., E. Tower, 35th Fl., Philadelphia, PA 19102, tel.: (215) 665-1700 1089. Alliance of Neighbors of Monmouth County, Red Bank, NJ. $25,000, 2001. Grant to support their relief effort to aid families of victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks who reside in Monmouth County, NJ. 1090. American Red Cross, National, DC. $75,000, 2001. To support the Liberty Disaster Relief Fund aiding the immediate and emerging efforts of the Red Cross in response to the tragic events of September 11. 1091. Army Emergency Relief, Alexandria, VA. $50,000, 2001. Grant to provide financial assistance to the families of Army personnel lost during the September 11 attack on the Pentagon. 1092. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $100,000, 2001. To support the long-term educational health income maintenance and other needs of the individual victims and their families in the DC region. 1093. District of Columbia Public Schools, DC. $50,000, 2001. Grant to create a memorial to the DCPS teachers and students lost in the attack. 1094. Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, Arlington, VA. $50,000, 2001. Grant to provide financial assistance to the families of Navy personnel lost during the September 11 attack on the Pentagon. 1095. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. Grant to support the September 11th Fund which will make grants to establish non-profit agencies. 1096. Various organizations. $600,000. 1097. Various organizations. $225,000. Comerica

Comerica Foundation c/o Comerica Inc. P.O. Box 75000, M.C. 3390 Detroit, MI 48275-3390 (313) 222-7356 Application address: 500 Woodward Ave., Detroit, MI 48226-3390; FAX: (313) 222-5555 1098. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000, 2001. 1099. Childrens Home of Detroit, Grosse Pointe Woods, MI. $2,500. 1100. Foundation for Alger Families, Jersey City, NJ. $300. 1101. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $10,000, 2001. 1102. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $10,000, 2001.

157


Comey

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Comey

Comey-Fitzgerald Family Foundation P.O. Box 65 Glen Ridge, NJ 07028 1103. Undesignated. $21,000. To support direct relief for victims and their families. Commonwealth

The Commonwealth Fund 1 E. 75th St. New York, NY 10021-2692 (212) 606-3844 FAX: (212) 606-3500; E-mail: cmwf@cmwf.org; URL: http://www.cmwf.org 1104. Asian American Federation of New York, New York, NY. $99,963. For Informing Initiative to Expand Health Coverage After September 11 in New York City’s Chinatown. 1105. Betances Health Unit, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. For Lower East Side post-disaster outreach effort. 1106. Columbia University, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. For Focus on Workforce Component of Hospital Emergency Response. 1107. Columbia University, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. For Bioterrorism Disease Preparedness: Training for Emergency Service Workers. 1108. Greater New York Hospital Association, New York, NY. $20,000, 2002. For Bioterrorism and Emergency Preparedness Education Project: Training for Emergency Services Workers. 1109. Lake, Snell, Perry and Associates, DC. $100,800. For Making Transition from Disaster Relief Medicaid to Permanent Health Coverage: Focus Groups with New Yorkers. 1110. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. For post-disaster mental health needs assessment among New Yorkers. 1111. New York University, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. For Conversations with the City on Rebuilding Lower Manhattan. 1112. Regional Plan Association, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. For ensuring civic involvement in master planning for Lower Manhattan. Communities

Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc. 5500 Caruth Haven Ln. Dallas, TX 75225-8146 (214) 750-4222 FAX: (214) 750-4210; URL: http:// www.cftexas.org 1113. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $19,000. For September 11th Fund. Community

Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, Inc. The Hurt Bldg., Ste. 449 Atlanta, GA 30303 (404) 688-5525 FAX: (404) 688-3060; URL: http://www.atlcf.org 1114. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $21,800, 2002. 1115. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $89,150, 2002. 1116. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $26,700, 2002. For September 11th Fund. 1117. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $50,000, 2002.

158

Community

Community

The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven

Community Foundation for Southern Arizona

70 Audubon St. New Haven, CT 06510 (203) 777-2386 FAX: (203) 787-6584; E-mail: contactus@cfgnh.org; URL: http://www.cfgnh.org 1118. Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, New Haven, CT. $50,000.

2250 E. Broadway Blvd. Tucson, AZ 85719-6014 (520) 770-0800 FAX: (520) 770-1500; E-mail: philanthropy@cfsoaz.org, salley@cfsoaz.org; URL: http://www.cfsoaz.org 1130. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $60,000.

Community

Community Foundation for Monterey County 99 Pacific St., No. 155A Monterey, CA 93940 (831) 375-9712 FAX: (831) 375-4731; E-mail: info@cfmco.org; URL: http://www.cfmco.org 1119. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For September 11th Fund. 1120. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. 1121. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100. Community

Community Foundation for Muskegon County 425 W. Western Ave., Ste. 200 Muskegon, MI 49440 (231) 722-4538 FAX: (231) 722-4616; E-mail: info@cffmc.org; URL: http://www.cffmc.org 1122. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000. For New York relief efforts related to September 11 terrorist attacks. 1123. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,500. Community

Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties, Inc. 700 S. Dixie Hwy., Ste. 200 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 659-6800 FAX: (561) 832-6542; E-mail: info@cfpbmc.org; Martin County Office: P.O. Box 2441, Stuart, FL 34995-2441, tel.: (888) 853-4438; URL: http:// www.yourcommunityfoundation.org 1124. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $15,100. 1125. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $13,027. For September 11th Fund. Community

Community Foundation for Southeastern Michigan 333 W. Fort St., Ste. 2010 Detroit, MI 48226 (313) 961-6675 FAX: (313) 961-2886; E-mail: cfsem@cfsem.org; URL: http://www.cfsem.org 1126. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $206,670, 2001. 1127. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $30,625. For September 11th Fund. 1128. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,947. 1129. Various organizations. $466,758.

Community

Community Foundation for the Central Savannah River Area 1450 Greene St., Ste. 228 Augusta, GA 30901 (706) 724-1314 FAX: (706) 724-1315; E-mail: info@cfcsra.org; Mailing address: P.O. Box 31358, Augusta, GA 30903; URL: http://www.cfcsra.org 1131. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $885,449. 1132. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $251,962. Community

Community Foundation of Broward 1401 E. Broward Blvd., Ste. 100 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 (954) 761-9503 FAX: (954) 761-7102; E-mail: lcarter@cfbroward.org; URL: http:// www.cfbroward.org 1133. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $36,000. To support paramedics and their families in the aftermath of September 11th. Community

Community Foundation of Central Illinois 331 Fulton St., Ste. 310 Peoria, IL 61602 (309) 674-8730 FAX: (309) 674-8754; E-mail: jim@communityfoundationci.org; URL: http:// www.communityfoundationci.org 1134. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. 1135. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Community

Community Foundation of Collier County c/o Mary George 2400 Tamiami Trail, N., Ste. 300 Naples, FL 34103 (239) 649-5000 1136. American Red Cross, National, DC. $3,117. 1137. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,216. Community

Community Foundation of Gaston County, Inc. P.O. Box 123 Gastonia, NC 28053 FAX: (704) 869-0222; E-mail: jedgerton@cfgaston.org; URL: http:// www.cfgaston.org 1138. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $23,699. Community

Community Foundation of Grand Forks, East Grand Forks and Region 412 DeMers Ave. Grand Forks, ND 58203 (701) 746-0668 1139. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $8,000. For direct relief for victims of September 11th and their families.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Community

The Community Foundation of Greater Birmingham 2100 First Ave. N., Ste. 700 Birmingham, AL 35203 (205) 328-8641 FAX: (205) 328-6576; E-mail: info@foundationbirmingham.org; URL: http:// www.foundationbirmingham.org 1140. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $102,000, 2001. 1141. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $65,731. Community

The Community Foundation of Greater Chattanooga, Inc. 1270 Market St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 (423) 265-0586 FAX: (423) 265-0587; E-mail: pcooper@cfgc.org; URL: http://www.cfgc.org 1142. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $77,642. Community

Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro, Inc. Foundation Place 330 S. Greene St., Ste. 100 Greensboro, NC 27420 (336) 379-9100 FAX: (336) 378-0725; E-mail: info@cfgg.org; Application address: P.O. Box 20444, Greensboro, NC 27420; URL: http://www.cfgg.org 1143. Undesignated. $54,182.

Community

Community Foundation of Jackson Hole 255 E. Simpson St. P.O. Box 574 Jackson, WY 83001 (307) 739-1026 FAX: (307) 734-2841; E-mail: info@cfjacksonhole.org; URL: http:// www.cfjacksonhole.org 1154. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000. Community

The Community Foundation of Louisville, Inc. Waterfront Plz. Bldg. 325 W. Main St., Ste. 1110 Louisville, KY 40202 (502) 585-4649 FAX: (502) 587-7484; E-mail: info@cflouisville.org; URL: http:// www.cflouisville.org 1155. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $31,950. 1156. American Red Cross, National, DC. $12,955. 1157. New York City Fire Department, New York, NY. $125,000. 1158. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $170,000. 1159. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $94,714. For September 11th Fund. 1160. Salvation Army of Greater New York, New York, NY. $20,000.

Community

The Community Foundation of Greater Lorain County 1865 N. Ridge Rd. E., Ste. A Lorain, OH 44055 (440) 277-0142 FAX: (440) 277-6955; E-mail: foundation@cfglc.org; Additional tel.: (440) 323-4445; URL: http://www.cfglc.org 1144. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $8,220. Community

Community Foundation of Greater Memphis 1900 Union Ave. Memphis, TN 38104 (901) 728-4600 FAX: (901) 722-0010; URL: http://www.cfgm.org 1145. American Red Cross, DC Chapter, DC. $1,650. 1146. American Red Cross, Memphis/Jackson Chapter, Memphis, TN. $6,600. 1147. Catholic Charities USA, Alexandria, VA. $500. 1148. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $1,550. 1149. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $22,850, 2002. 1150. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1151. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. 1152. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $10,500, 2002. 1153. Union of American Hebrew Congregations, New York, NY. $1,500.

Community 1171. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $750, 2001. 1172. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $32,000, 2001. Community

Community Foundation of Northern Illinois 946 N. 2nd St. Rockford, IL 61107 (815) 962-2110 FAX: (815) 962-2116; E-mail: info@cfnil.org; URL: http://www.cfnil.org 1173. American Red Cross, National, DC. $3,700. 1174. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,375. Community

Community Foundation of Ottawa 75 Albert Street Suite 301 Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5E7 1175. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. Community

The Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County 2425 Porter St., Ste. 17 Soquel, CA 95073-2453 (831) 477-0800 FAX: (831) 477-0991; E-mail: info@cfscc.org, or lance@cfscc.org; URL: http://www.cfscc.org 1176. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $36,000.

Community

Community

Community Foundation of Lowcountry, Inc.

The Community Foundation of Sarasota County, Inc.

4 Northridge Drive Suite A Post Office Box 23019 Hilton Head Island, SC 29925 1161. Undesignated. $58,130.

P.O. Box 49587 Sarasota, FL 34230-6587 (941) 955-3000 Office address: 1800 2nd St., Ste. 103, Sarasota, FL 34236; FAX: (941) 952-1951; E-mail: sstearns@sarasota-foundation.org; URL: http:// www.sarasota-foundation.org 1177. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $57,000. 1178. Various organizations. $27,214. For donations to support nonprofit organizations working directly with victims of September 11th and their families.

Community

Community Foundation of Monroe County 111 E. 1st St. P.O. Box 627 Monroe, MI 48161 (734) 242-1976 FAX: (734) 242-1234; E-mail: info@cfmonroe.org; URL: http://www.cfmonroe.org 1162. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $36,379. To support relief and recovery efforts. Community

Community Foundation of New Jersey 35 Knox Hill Rd. P.O. Box 338 Morristown, NJ 07963-0338 (973) 267-5533 FAX: (973) 267-2905; E-mail: info@cfnj.org; URL: http://www.cfnj.org 1163. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $250, 2001. 1164. Community Foundation of New Jersey, Morristown, NJ. $48,600, 2001. 1165. Community Foundation of New Jersey, Morristown, NJ. $15,250, 2001. 1166. Individual beneficiaries. $1,000,000. For scholarships. 1167. Individual beneficiaries. $1,000,000. For scholarships. 1168. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $750, 2001. 1169. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $500, 2001. 1170. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $203, 2001.

Community

Community Foundation of South Alabama P.O.Box 91007 Mobile, AL 36601 1179. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $27,028. Community

Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore, Inc. 200 W. Main St. Salisbury, MD 21803-0152 (410) 742-9911 Additional address: P.O. Box 152, Salisbury, MD 21803; FAX: (410) 742-6638; E-mail: cfes@cfes.org; URL: http://www.cfes.org/ 1180. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,750.

159


Community

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Community

The Community Foundation of the Elmira-Corning Area

Compass

1198. Volunteer Fire Department of Stoystown, Stoystown, PA. $100.

307B, E. Water St. Elmira, NY 14901-3402 (607) 734-6412 FAX: (607)734-7335; E-mail: ips@communityfund.org, nvf@communityfund.org, rlh@communityfund.org, shl@communityfund.org; URL: http://www.communityfund.org 1181. American Red Cross, National, DC. $15,000. Community

Community Foundation of the Ozarks Hammons Twr., Ste. 701 901 St. Louis St. Springfield, MO 65806 (417) 864-6199 FAX: (417) 864-8344; E-mail: hlandwer@cfozarks.org; URL: http:// www.cfozarks.org 1182. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000. Community

Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts

Community

The Community Foundation Serving Richmond & Central Virginia 7325 Beaufant Springs Dr., Ste. 210 Richmond, VA 23225 (804) 330-7400 FAX: (804) 330-5992; URL: http:// www.tcfrichmond.org 1199. American Red Cross, National, DC. $33,700. 1200. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $153,000, 2001. To provide immediate support to victims and their families and to support established emergency assistance agencies like ARC, Salvation Army and other emergency service providers. 1201. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 1202. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. Community

1500 Main St., Ste. 2300 P.O. Box 15769 Springfield, MA 01115 (413) 732-2858 FAX: (413) 733-8565; E-mail: wmass@communityfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.communityfoundation.org 1183. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $5,000. For New York Arts Recovery Fund.

The Community Foundation Serving Riverside and San Bernardino Counties 3880 Lemon St., Ste. 300 Riverside, CA 92501-3622 (909) 684-4194 FAX: (909) 684-1911; E-mail: ccooney@thecommunityfoundation.net; URL: http://www.thecommunityfoundation.net 1203. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $7,677.

Compass Bank Foundation P.O. Box 10566, Acctg. Dept. Birmingham, AL 35296 Application address: 15 S. 20th St., Birmingham, AL 35233 1210. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. Component

Component Assembly Systems c/o Corporate Communications 7 Raymond Avenue Salem, NH 03079 1211. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Compton

Compton Foundation, Inc. 535 Middlefield Rd., Ste. 160 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650) 328-0101 FAX: (650) 328-0171; E-mail: info@comptonfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.comptonfoundation.org 1212. 20/20 Vision Education Fund, DC. $13,000. For capturing moderate opinion on post-tragedy weapons issues. Computer

Computer Associates International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 1 Computer Associates Plz. Islandia, NY 11749 (631) 342-6225 URL: http://www.ca.com/community 1213. Computer Associates International, Inc., New York, NY. $2,000,000. Toward fund for children in New York who lost a parent.

Community Community

The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina, Inc. The BB&T Bldg., Ste. 1600 1 W. Pack Sq., P.O. Box 1888 Asheville, NC 28802 (828) 254-4960 E-mail: kdeaton@cfwnc.org; Mailing address: P.O. Box 1888, Asheville, NC 28802; FAX: (828) 251-2258; URL: http://www.cfwnc.org 1184. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $52,690. 1185. Various organizations. $24,500. Community

Community Foundation of Westmoreland 111 Station Place 101 Ehalt Street Greensburg, PA 15601 1186. American Red Cross, National, DC. $704. 1187. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $17,004. 1188. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $3,247. 1189. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $704. 1190. Shanksville Volunteer Fire Company, Shanksville, PA. $300. 1191. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $3,248. 1192. Volunteer Fire Department of Berlin, Berlin, PA. $100. 1193. Volunteer Fire Department of Central City, Central City, PA. $100. 1194. Volunteer Fire Department of Friedens, Friedens, PA. $100. 1195. Volunteer Fire Department of Hooversville, Hooversville, PA. $100. 1196. Volunteer Fire Department of Listie, Listie, PA. $100. 1197. Volunteer Fire Department of Somerset, Somerset, PA. $100.

160

Con-Way

Community Foundation Silicon Valley

Con-Way Transportation Services, Inc.

60 S. Market St., Ste. 1000 San Jose, CA 95113-1000 (408) 278-2200 FAX: (408) 278-0280; E-mail: info@cfsv.org; URL: http://www.cfsv.org 1204. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,950,000.

c/o Corporate Communications 110 Parkland Plaza Ann Arbor, MI 48103 1214. American Red Cross, National, DC. $150,000.

Community

Community Response Fund c/o c/o The Connecticut Council On Philanthropy 221 Main Street, Suite 300 Hartford, CT 06106 1205. American Red Cross, Southeastern Fairfield County, Fairfield, NJ. $400,000. Compaq

Compaq Canada c/o Corporate Communications 45 Vogell Road Richmond Hill, L4B 3P6 1206. Red Cross of Canada, Ottawa, Canada. $100,000. To coordinate disaster relief efforts related to the events of September 11th. Compaq

Compaq Computer Corporation Contributions Program c/o Corp. Community Rels. Dept. 20555 SH 249, M.S. 050204 Houston, TX 77070-2698 (281) 514-0527 FAX: (281) 514-7024; E-mail: cpq.contributions@compaq.com; URL: http:// www.compaq.com/corporate/community 1207. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. 1208. Undesignated. $389,000. To support charities established by families of Compaq employees who died in 9/11. 1209. Undesignated. $138,000. For programs in U.S. and Canada in wake of events of 9/11.

Concord

Concord Camera Corp. c/o Corporate Communications 4000 Hollywood Blvd. No. 650N Hollywood, FL 33201 1215. Various organizations. $1,000,000. ConocoPhillips

ConocoPhillips Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs., 3132 Marland Bldg. 600 N. Dairy Ashford Houston, TX 77079-1175 (281) 293-1000 FAX: (281) 293-2767; URL: http:// www.conocophillips.com/community/ community.asp 1216. Army Emergency Relief, Alexandria, VA. $67,560. 1217. Federal Employee Education & Assistance Fund, Littleton, CO. $73,826. 1218. Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, Arlington, VA. $239,400. 1219. Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association of the City of New York, New York, NY. $230,280. 1220. Port Authority Police Benevolent Association, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. $224,264. 1221. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $164,670. Constantin

The Constantin Foundation 4809 Cole Ave., LB 127 Dallas, TX 75205-3578 (214) 522-9300 FAX: (214) 521-7023 1222. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Constellation

Cummings

Credence

CSG

Constellation Energy Group

Credence

CSG Foundation, Inc.

c/o Corporate Communications 250 West Pratt Street Baltimore, MD 21201 1223. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000.

c/o Corporate Communications 215 Fourier Avenue Fremont, CA 94539 1236. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000.

8401 Connecticut Ave., Ste. 1111 Chevy Chase, MD 20815 (301) 652-6880 1257. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

Consumers

Credit

Consumers Energy Company Contributions Program

Credit Suisse First Boston LLC Corporate Giving Program

212 W. Michigan Ave. Jackson, MI 49201 (517) 788-0432 1224. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000.

c/o Corp. Contribs. 11 Madison Ave., 7th Fl. New York, NY 10010 1237. A Little Hope, New York, NY. $10,000. 1238. Boy Scouts of America, New York, NY. $100,000. 1239. Boys & Girls Club of America, Atlanta, GA. $100,000. 1240. Bronx Community Services, Bronx, NY. $30,000. 1241. Children’s Aid Society, New York, NY. $250,000. 1242. Christopher Robert Clarke Foundation, Princeton, NJ. $5,000. 1243. City Harvest, New York, NY. $100,000. 1244. CityKids Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000. For the Bridge Builder Initiative. 1245. Face to Face International, New York, NY. $100,000. 1246. Good Shepherd Services, New York, NY. $50,000. 1247. National Outdoor Leadership School, Lander, WY. $3,345. 1248. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $250,000. To support Moving from Crisis to Hope and Well Being. 1249. New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, New York, NY. $125,000. 1250. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $5,250,000. 1251. New York University, New York, NY. $100,000. 1252. Nonprofit Finance Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. 1253. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY. $25,000.

Convergys

The Convergys Foundation, Inc. 201 E. 4th St., Ste. 102-1900 Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 784-5937 1225. American Red Cross, National, DC. $203,640. 1226. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. Cooke

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation 44115 Woodridge Parkway Suite 200 Landsdowne, VA 20176 1227. Kent Foundation, Altavista, VA. $1,000,000. For college education fund for families affected by the September 11th attacks. Corn

Corn Products International c/o Corporate Communications 6500 South Archer Avenue Bedford Park, IL 60501 1228. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. 1229. New York Firemen’s Association, New York, NY. $50,000. Corning

Corning Incorporated Foundation MP-LB-02 Corning, NY 14831 (607) 974-8722 URL: http://www.corning.com/inside_corning/ foundation.asp 1230. American Red Cross, National, DC. $470,883, 2001. 1231. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $105,750, 2001. Corwin

The Jack B. Corwin Charitable Foundation 633 W. 5th St., Ste. 6780 Los Angeles, CA 90071-2099 1232. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For program support. 1233. Union of American Hebrew Congregations, New York, NY. $5,000. For program support.

Cross

Cross Country Bank c/o Corporate Communications P.O. Box 310711 Boca Raton, FL 33431 1254. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Crossmark

Crossmark c/o Corporate Communications 6400 InternationalParkway, Suite 1000 Plano, TX 75093 1255. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

Cowles

Crossroads

The Cowles Charitable Trust

Crossroads Fund

P.O. Box 219 Rumson, NJ 07760 (732) 936-9826 1234. Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $5,000, 2002.

3411 W. Diversey Ave., Ste. 20 Chicago, IL 60647-1245 (773) 227-7676 FAX: (773) 227-7790; E-mail: info@crossroads.org; URL: http:// www.crossroadsfund.org 1256. Crossroads Fund, Chicago, IL. $75,000. For safety and civil rights and advocacy in immigrant communities.

Crane

Crane Fund for Widows and Children 140 Sylvan Ave. Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632-2509 1235. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $200,000.

Cummings

The Nathan Cummings Foundation 475 10th Ave., 14th Fl. New York, NY 10018 (212) 787-7300 FAX: (212) 787-7377; E-mail: info@nattancummings.org; URL: http:// www.nathancummings.org 1258. American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, New York, NY. $75,000, 2001. For Securities and Civil Liberties Task Force to address new civil liberties issues in the wake of 9/11. 1259. Arab American Family Support Center, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000, 2001. To meet increased needs from families within the Arab-speaking community for information and counseling services for adults and children who have been devastated by the tragedy and who are fearful to appear in public including distributing flyers in the community with a hot line number to call for assistance in obtaining referrals for assistance, information, reporting harassment and bias incidents and obtaining escort services and developing more proactive youth and community education programs to diminish the isolation of the Arab-American community and to build bridges to the larger community. 1260. Citizens Budget Commission, New York, NY. $10,000. For conference with supporting background materials that will provide opportunity for newly elected City officials (including Mayor, Comptroller, and the City Council Speaker candidates, with their staffs) to reflect on challenges they will face in assess. 1261. Education Development Center, Newton, MA. $15,000, 2001. For Beyond Blame: Reacting to the Terrorist Attack, which seeks to support the broad dissemination and use of new curriculum that helps youth workers and teachers to address the possible negative consequences for American Muslims, Arab-Americans and others as a result of the terrorist attack. 1262. Facing History and Ourselves National Foundation, Brookline, MA. $35,000, 2001. For planning grant to push curriculum deeper, in order to prepare teachers and students for global citizenship and for initial development and dissemination of resources on themes related to the events of September 11th. 1263. Financial Markets Center, Philomont, VA. $25,000. For start-up support for series of new initiatives that respond to current domestic and international economic developments in order to address worsening global economic situation and geopolitical turmoil created by events of September 11th. 1264. Georgetown University, DC. $50,000, 2001. For The Constitution Project’s (initiative of Public Policy Institute) Initiative on Liberty and Security, which will form bipartisan, blue-ribbon committee to lend voices of moderation, caution and judgment to the current debate on civil liberties. Committee will focus on creating general principles for liberty, engaging in outreach and coalition building, educating policy makers, and aggressively seeking media attention. 1265. National Security Archive Fund, DC. $100,000, 2001. For emergency effort being undertaken by project, Center for National Security Studies which has begun an emergency public education campaign on current dangers to civil liberties and the false notion of a necessary trade-off between security and liberty. Project will increase public and policy makers understanding

161


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

Cummings

Dallas

of how to achieve security while respecting liberties and constitutional processes. 1266. New York Foundation, New York, NY. $65,000, 2001. For program support for organizations affected by events of 9/11. 1267. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $60,000, 2001. For New York Arts Recovery Fund which combines strength of key New York service organizations by creating collaborative, comprehensive effort to address challenges specifically facing New York’s artists and art organizations affected by the 9/11 tragedy. 1268. New York Immigration Coalition, New York, NY. $15,000, 2001. For hate crimes data collection, assisting national and local media outlets with story ideas, and providing training to immigrants and to the staff of immigrant-servicing organizations about various disaster relief programs and other resources and for Economic Impact Research initiative. 1269. Union Community Fund, DC. $75,000, 2001. For HERE Education and Support Fund. HERE is project of Union Community Fund. Purpose of HERE Fund is to meet emergency needs of both union and non-union families of food service workers who were killed and food service workers who were displaced as a result of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center. CVS

CVS Corporation Contributions Program 1 CVS Dr. Woonsocket, RI 02895 Tel.: (401) 765-1500, ext. 4517; FAX: (401) 769-4488 1270. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. Cypress

Cypress Foundation, Inc.

900 Jackson St., Ste. 150 Dallas, TX 75202 (214) 741-9898 FAX: (214) 741-9848; E-mail: info@dallasfoundation.org, mjalonick@dallasfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.dallasfoundation.org 1276. American Red Cross, Dallas Area Chapter, Dallas, TX. $41,300, 2001. 1277. American Red Cross, Dallas Area Chapter, Dallas, TX. $25,000, 2001. For Family Well-Being Inquiry Center, a call-in center. 1278. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $2,000. 1279. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For September 11th Fund.

4269 Pearl Rd., Ste. 108 Cleveland, OH 44109-4227 (216) 741-4077 FAX: (216) 741-6042; E-mail: info@deacomfdn.org; URL: http:// www.fdncenter.org/grantmaker/deaconess/ 1289. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000.

Dana

The Dana Foundation 745 5th Ave., Ste. 900 New York, NY 10151-0799 (212) 223-4040 FAX: (212) 317-8721; E-mail: danainfo@dana.org; URL: http://www.dana.org 1280. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. For victims of the attack on the World Trade Center. Danforth

The Danforth Foundation 211 N. Broadway, Ste. 2390 St. Louis, MO 63102 (314) 588-1900 FAX: (314) 588-0035 1281. Policemen and Firemen Fund of Saint Louis, Chesterfield, MO. $500,000, 2002. For direct relief for victims and their families.

D-B

55 Madison St., Ste. 255 Denver, CO 80206 1282. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000.

Willametta K. Day Foundation

Dachs

A. M. Dachs Foundation P.O. Box 193809 San Francisco, CA 94119-3809 1273. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000, 2001. Dade

Dade Community Foundation, Inc. 200 S. Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 505 Miami, FL 33131-2343 (305) 371-2711 FAX: (305) 371-5342; E-mail: ruth.shack@dadecommunityfoundation.org; URL: http://www.dadecommunityfoundation.org 1274. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $100,000. For September 11th Emergency Relief Fund. DaimlerChrysler

DaimlerChrysler Corporation Contributions Program CIMS: 485-02-46 1000 Chrysler Dr. Auburn Hills, MI 48326-2766 (248) 512-2502 1275. DaimlerChrysler Corporation Fund, Auburn Hills, MI. $10,000,000.

3 Woodpath Dr. Northport, NY 11768-3519 Application address: P.O. Box 1034, West Diver, VT 05356, tel.: (212) 422-1626 1290. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $3,000. Dean

Dean Foods Company Contributions Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 2515 McKinney Ave., Ste. 1200 Dallas, TX 75201 1291. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Dedalus

Dedalus Foundation, Inc. c/o Hecht & Co., PC 111 W. 40th St. New York, NY 10018 1292. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $20,000. For New York Arts Recovery Fund. Deere

Day

1 M&T Plz., Ste. 2000 Buffalo, NY 14203-2391 1272. Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. $22,000. For September 11th Fund.

Deakins

Deakins Family Charitable Foundation

John Deere Foundation

Daniels Charitable Fund

The D-B Trust

162

Deaconess Community Foundation

Daniels

c/o Sandler O’Neill & Partners, LP 919 3rd Ave., 6th Fl. New York, NY 10022 1271. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $20,000.

Deaconess

The Dallas Foundation

865 S. Figueroa St., Ste. 700 Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213) 891-6300 Mailing address: P.O. Box 71289, Los Angeles, CA 90071 1283. Direct Relief International, Santa Barbara, CA. $7,500, 2001. 1284. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $3,750, 2001. 1285. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $3,750, 2001. 1286. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $2,340, 2001. Dayton

The Dayton Foundation

1515 River Dr. Moline, IL 61265 (309) 748-7955 FAX: (309) 748-7953; E-mail: christisonjudya@johndeere.com 1293. John Deere Foundation, Moline, IL. $300,000. Degenstein

The 1994 Charles B. Degenstein Foundation c/o Mellon Financial Corp. P.O. Box 7236, AIM 193-0224 Philadelphia, PA 19101-7236 Application address: 43 S. 5th St., Sunbury, PA 17801-2896 1294. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $5,000, 2002. For 9/11/01 Disaster Relief. Deitchman

The John V. Deitchman Family Foundation c/o U.S. Trust 114 W. 47th St., TAXRGR New York, NY 10036 1295. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $20,000. For operating support. Delany

2300 Kettering Twr. Dayton, OH 45423-1395 (937) 222-0410 Toll-free tel.: (877) 222-0410; FAX: (937) 222-0636; E-mail: info@daytonfoundation.org; URL: http://www.daytonfoundation.org 1287. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $120,000. Dayton

Dayton Superior c/o Corporate Communications 7777 Washington Village Drive, Suite 130 Dayton, OH 45459 1288. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000.

Beatrice P. Delany Charitable Trust c/o JPMorgan Chase Bank 1211 Avenue of the Americas, 34th FL. New York, NY 10036 1296. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. For general support. 1297. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. For general support. 1298. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. For general support.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Dodge

Dell

The Dell Foundation Round Rock 1, Box 8045 1 Dell Way Round Rock, TX 78682-9426 E-mail: the_dell_foundation@dell.com; URL: http:// www.dell.com/dellfoundation 1299. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. Dell

The Michael and Susan Dell Foundation P.O. Box 163867 Austin, TX 78716-3867 URL: http://www.msdf.org/ 1300. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Deluxe

Deluxe Corporation Foundation P.O. Box 64235 St. Paul, MN 55164-0235 (651) 483-7111 URL: http://www.deluxe.com/dlxab/ deluxe-foundation.jsp 1301. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000, 2001. 1302. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. Denso

Denso Corporation Battle Creek, MI 1303. American Red Cross, National, DC. $166,000. For contribution in the wake of September 11th on behalf of Denso Corporation and Denso World headquarters in Japan. DENSO

DENSO International America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 24777 DENSO Dr. P.O. Box 5047, M.C. 4600 Southfield, MI 48086-5047 (248) 372-8232 FAX: (248) 213-2550; E-mail: john_voorhorst@denso-diam.com; URL: http:// www.densocorp-na.com/corporate/community.html 1304. American Red Cross, National, DC. $19,000. 1305. American Red Cross, National, DC. $15,000. Denver

The Denver Foundation 950 S. Cherry St., Ste. 200 Denver, CO 80246 (303) 300-1790 FAX: (303) 300-6547; E-mail: info@denverfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.denverfoundation.org 1306. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Toward administrative costs. 1307. Various organizations. $60,000. Dermalogica

Dibner

1311. Civic Capital Corporation, New York, NY. $250,000, 2001. 1312. Euro Brokers Relief Fund, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. 1313. Individual beneficiaries. $50,000. 1314. Joint Industry Board of the Electrical Industry, Flushing, NY. $10,000. 1315. Metropolitan Opera, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. 1316. MicroFinance Network, DC. $650,000. 1317. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1318. Municipal Art Society of New York, New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 1319. National Philanthropic Trust, Jenkintown, PA. $100,000, 2002. 1320. Neighborhood Housing Services of New York City, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 1321. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. For New York Arts Recovery Fund. 1322. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $9,000,000, 2002. 1323. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $5,000. 1324. New York Stock Exchange Fallen Heroes Fund, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 1325. Nonprofit Finance Fund, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 1326. NYU Downtown Hospital, New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 1327. Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. $150,000, 2002. 1328. Safe Horizon, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 1329. Saint Francis Xavier Welcome Table, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1330. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $50,000, 2001. 1331. State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY. $250,000, 2002. 1332. Various organizations. $497,823. For donations to September 11th disaster relief organizations identified by DB employees through Global Matching Gifts program. 1333. Wall Street Rising Corporation, New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 1334. Working in Support of Education, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Dharma

Dharma-Grace Foundation c/o Mann, Celon & Glodney Inc. 1880 Century Park E., Ste. 700 Los Angeles, CA 90067 1335. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For September 11th Telethon Fund.

The Dermalogica Foundation

Diamond

1001 Knox St. Torrance, CA 90502 1308. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $28,357. For 9/11 Fund. Deutsche

Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation 60 Wall St., NYC60-2110 New York, NY 10005-2858 (212) 250-0539 URL: http://www.cib.db.com/community/htm/ db_americas_foundation.html 1309. American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. 1310. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001.

Irene Diamond Fund 375 Park Ave., Ste. 3303 New York, NY 10152-3399 (212) 838-9525 1336. Daedalus Productions, New York, NY. $5,000. For supplementary support towards the production of a documentary on emergency efforts in response to September 11, 2001. 1337. Daedalus Productions, New York, NY. $5,000. For additional support for the production of a documentary on relief efforts in response to the attack at the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

The Dibner Fund, Inc. P.O. Box 7575 Wilton, CT 06897 (203) 761-9904 FAX: (203) 761-9989; E-mail: info@dibnerfund.org; URL: http:// www.dibnerfund.org 1338. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. For September 11th Fund. Dillon

The Dillon Fund 1330 Ave. of the Americas, 27th Fl. New York, NY 10019 1339. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000. Dinnerstein

Elliot Dinnerstein Foundation, Inc. 36 Indian Creek Island Indian Creek, FL 33154-2901 1340. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $10,000. 1341. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $5,000. Dircks

Robert and Joan Dircks Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 6 Mountain Lakes, NJ 07046 E-mail: grants@dircksfoundation.org; PA tel.: (610) 925-3713; MA tel.: (978) 449-0072; URL: http:// www.dircksfoundation.org 1342. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $25,000. To provide assistance to widows and children. 1343. RENEW International, Plainfield, NJ. $26,000. To provide funding to print grieving book for victims and their families. 1344. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. To provide assistance to widows and children. Discover

Discover Card Financial Services c/o Corporate Communications 2500 Lake Cook Road Deerfield, IL 60015 1345. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. 1346. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $1,000,000. Disney

The Walt Disney Company Foundation 500 S. Buena Vista St. Burbank, CA 91521-0987 (818) 560-1006 1347. Walt Disney Company Foundation, Burbank, CA. $1,876,284. Disney

Walt Disney World Co. Contributions Program c/o Corp. Contribs. Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830 1348. Walt Disney Company Foundation, Burbank, CA. $5,000,000. Dodge

Cleveland H. Dodge Foundation, Inc. 670 W. 247th St. Bronx, NY 10471 (718) 543-1221 FAX: (718) 543-0737 1349. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $250,000. For disaster relief services due to World Trade Center catastrophe on 9/11/01. 1350. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. For victims of World Trade Center disaster.

163


Dodge

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Dodge

Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, Inc. 163 Madison Ave., 6th Fl. P.O. Box 1239 Morristown, NJ 07962-1239 (973) 540-8442 FAX: (973) 540-1211; E-mail: info@grdodge.org; For Cynthia Evans, Compt., tel.: (973) 540-8443, ext. 107; URL: http://www.grdodge.org 1351. African Globe TheaterWorks, Newark, NJ. $25,000, 2001. For project that will celebrate power of human spirit by using arts to conquer fear and pain and aid marching forward through history and showing road to personal redemption and collective healing. 1352. AKC Canine Health Foundation, Aurora, OH. $10,000, 2001. For researchers who will collect/analyze health data from Search & Rescue dogs to develop training and equipment to help dogs cope with stress with their work. 1353. ArtPride New Jersey Foundation, Trenton, NJ. $15,000, 2001. To develop online resource room to include Connections, online gallery to showcase creative expressions in response to 9/11 tragedy. 1354. Arts Council of the Morris Area, Madison, NJ. $25,000, 2001. For believing arts provide opportunities for personal expression and avenue for healing in times of crisis, ACMA invites greater community to come together during coming year to create Unity Quilt of remembrance, reflection and renewal. 1355. Arts Horizons, Englewood, NJ. $10,000, 2001. To mobilize Arts Horizons arts therapists and teaching artists to provide classroom residencies and professional development, providing students with arts-based activities to deal with fear, grief, anger and prejudice caused by 9/11 events. 1356. Boston University, Boston, MA. $15,000. To develop web-site featuring multi-media resources to support efforts of teachers and students to understand and deal constructively with the events of 9/11. 1357. Center for Nonprofit Corporations, North Brunswick, NJ. $5,000. To underwrite a survey assessing the impact and implications of September 11th on New Jersey’s non-profit sector. 1358. Child and Family Resources, Randolph, NJ. $12,000, 2001. To build capacity to support children and families living with war and terrorism. Also to collect and share resources, strategies and curriculum from experts. To expand ACT coalition to develop/implement/access support roadmap for Morris County. 1359. Children’s Music Network, Evanston, IL. $10,000, 2001. To expand online Peace Resources Page, compilation of songs, articles, etc. to help children cope with their changing world, by partnership with NJ schools. 1360. County College of Morris, Randolph, NJ. $14,000, 2001. For two interactive workshops on Teaching in Suddenly Changing World that would be cablecast and videotaped. 1361. Environmental Defense, New York, NY. $15,000, 2001. To secure adoption of cost-effective steps to reduce emissions from construction vehicles and trucks at NYC site. 1362. George Street Playhouse, New Brunswick, NJ. $15,000, 2001. To provide forum for young audiences to discuss 9-11 crisis through their educational and Main Stage programming. 1363. Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Program, Morristown, NJ. $38,000. For Dodge Poetry program, which proposes to more than triple number of school visits and to introduce 30 new teacher sessions in response to events of 9/11. 1364. Institute for Arts and Humanities Education, New Brunswick, NJ. $15,000, 2001.

164

For Time to Heal, program to provide students, teachers, families and communities with opportunity to share thoughts and feelings about events on 9/11 - incorporating music, visual arts and writing. 1365. International Institute of New Jersey, Jersey City, NJ. $50,000, 2001. For meeting multiple needs of New Jersey’s immigrant population after 9/11 through assessment, clinical interventions, and public education, including establishment of New American Ensemble, theater of witness featuring immigrant high school students’ work. 1366. International Institute of New Jersey, Jersey City, NJ. $12,500. For additional funding to expand impact of New Americans Theatre Ensemble Program. 1367. ISLES, Trenton, NJ. $20,000, 2001. To coordinate community education and training campaign to address ability of families do deal with trauma, fear and racist challenges in Trenton region in aftermath of 9/11. 1368. Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, New Brunswick, NJ. $10,000, 2001. For exhibition of photographs entitles, Victor Weeps, by Fazal Sheikh, depicting lives of Afghani refugees living along border between Afghanistan and Pakistan. 1369. Luna Stage Company, Montclair, NJ. $20,000, 2001. For American Experience, to create theatre piece on what it means to be American. Creative process can give voice to fears, express who and what we are and allow healing through community. 1370. McCarter Theater Company, Princeton, NJ. $30,000, 2001. To commission Marc Wolf to create documentary play about events of 9/11. 1371. Montessori Childrens House of Morristown, Morristown, NJ. $6,150. Toward Hearts, Hands and Voices: A Children’s Festival for Tolerance and Diversity, to bring children and families in Morris County together to explore the richness of our diversity through dialogue and the arts. 1372. Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ. $10,000, 2001. For warm, friendly, unstructured avenue for self-expression through drop-in workshops for children to respond to 9/11 through creativity. 1373. Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company, Fort Lee, NJ. $5,000. For American Rising—Asian Moon Festival, performance to benefit September 11th relief funds. Traditionally a time for family unity, this year’s festival convened Asian-American artists and audiences for community healing and civic participation. 1374. National Public Radio, DC. $50,000, 2001. For expanded and special programming to help inform and connect listeners to events relating to September 11th. 1375. New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, NJ. $50,000, 2001. For oral history component of multifaceted, long-term historical project to document and interpret impact of 9/11 on lives of New Jersey residents and the state. 1376. New Jersey Network (NJN) Foundation, Trenton, NJ. $75,000, 2001. For unexpected emergency programming that was done in response to 9/11 and for new special projects to document New Jersey’s heroism, courage and sacrifice. 1377. New Jersey Repertory Company, Long Branch, NJ. $25,000, 2001. For playwriting project for high-school students relating to events of 9/11. Plays will deal with grief, loss, fear, anger, diversity, tolerance, affirmation and hope and will serve to bring community together for discussion and healing. 1378. New Jersey Theater Alliance, Madison, NJ. $40,000, 2001. For symposium entitled Theatre: Catalyst for Transformation featuring panel of noted theatre arts professionals; symposium will be followed by three roundtables for further

discussion among arts groups & other community groups. 1379. New Jersey Work Environmental Council, Trenton, NJ. $15,000, 2001. To examine, in collaboration with community organizations, ways to prevent adverse public health and environmental consequences from potential threats to security or safety of New Jerseys chemical manufacturing facilities. 1380. New York/New Jersey Baykeeper, Highlands, NJ. $15,000, 2001. To collaborate with Liberty State Park Conservancy to design and plant memorial trees and gardens. 1381. Newark Museum, Newark, NJ. $75,000, 2001. For creation of Garden of Paradise, place of healing and contemplation based on medieval Spain when Muslims, Christians & Jews lived together. 1382. Orion Society, Great Barrington, MA. $10,000, 2001. For Winter issue of Orion, booklet of essays by Wendell Berry, second booklet of Orion writers and weekend conference of Orion writers. 1383. Perkins Center for the Arts, Moorestown, NJ. $15,000, 2001. For exhibition that honors indomitable spirit of city featuring work made from 1976 to present including children’s activities, slide presentation, lecture series and catalog. 1384. Principals Center for the Garden State, Princeton, NJ. $31,200, 2001. To develop and publish booklet entitled Leadership in Crisis, which will present leadership responses of New Jersey school principals to the events of September 11, 2001. 1385. Printmaking Council of New Jersey, Somerville, NJ. $12,750, 2001. To facilitate creation of memorial collaborative print piece in order to help capture community’s shared grief and support for events of 9/11. 1386. Randy James Dance Works, Highland Park, NJ. $20,000, 2001. For collaborating artists who will create multi-media performance developed from artists personal experiences of 9/11 and community emotions. 1387. Regional Plan Association, New York, NY. $10,000. To convene Civic Alliance to Rebuild Downtown New York and support series of Conversations With the City. 1388. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, NJ. $45,000, 2001. For televised town hall meeting inspired by recent events, which challenge our notions of American innocence and exceptionalism. Program will explore cultural and ideological context of 9/11 and subsequent global anxieties. 1389. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ. $30,000, 2001. For Citizens Across Borders, education/action project for high school students that will generate understanding and change out of 9/11 tragedy. 1390. Saint Huberts Animal Welfare Center, Madison, NJ. $5,000. To cover costs of transporting and storing large quantities of excess dog food donated to the search and rescue dogs and for a special newsletter. 1391. South Brunswick Board of Education, Monmouth Junction, NJ. $15,000, 2001. For Voices of Children: A Community Confronts the Unexplainable. Project will involve partnership which include clergy, police and municipal and school personnel to help children express their responses to events of 9/11. 1392. Sundance School, Gateway, CO. $10,000, 2001. Toward printing and distributing of My Fathers Love written by Kathleen Maleski. 1393. Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, VT. $9,000. To make four-week retreats in an atmosphere conducive to healing, contemplation


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Duke

Donnelly

and available to three artists and/or writers directly impacted by September 11th. 1394. WGBH Educational Foundation, Boston, MA. $15,000, 2001. To develop a website for teachers, students and parents featuring multi-media learning resources prepared in direct response to the September 11th attacks. 1395. WNYC Foundation, New York, NY. $15,000, 2001. For emergency grant to help WNYC restore transmission to their listener-audience in New Jersey. 1396. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ. $35,000, 2001. For summer commuter institute entitled American Civil Liberties at Times of Crisis. Goal is to review and analyze for NJ high school teachers many historical circumstances that created threats to civil liberties that prevailed in crisis-free times. 1397. World Affairs Council of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA. $20,000, 2001. For Terrorism: Challenge and Response, program for middle and high school teachers in southern New Jersey, including curriculum materials and assistance of Choices Teaching Fellows. Dodge

Dodge Jones Foundation P.O. Box 176 Abilene, TX 79604 (325) 673-6429 1398. American Red Cross, Abilene, Abilene, TX. $5,000. 1399. Salvation Army of Dallas, Dallas, TX. $5,000. Dominion

R. H. Donnelly c/o Corporate Communications One Mahhattanville Road Purchase, NY 10577 1406. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Doornink

The Doornink Foundation c/o Jeffrey B. Power 111 Lyon St. N.W., Ste. 900 Grand Rapids, MI 49503-2487 1407. United Way of New York City, New York, NY. $250,000. Dow

Dow Chemical Company Foundation 2030 Dow Ctr. Midland, MI 48674 (989) 636-6891 URL: http://www.dow.com/about/corp/social/ social.htm 1408. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000, 2001. 1409. Garden Pathways, Bakersfield, CA. $10,000. For Twin Towers Orphan Relief Fund. 1410. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001. 1411. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. Downey

Downey Savings 3501 Jamboree Rd. Newport Beach, CA 92660 1412. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

Dominion Foundation

DPC

c/o Dominion Tower 625 Liberty Ave., 21st Fl. Pittsburgh, PA 15222-3199 (412) 690-1430 FAX: (412) 690-7608; URL: http://www.dom.com/ about/community/foundation/index.jsp 1400. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. For September 11th Fund disaster relief. 1401. Virginia Department of Emergency Management, Richmond, VA. $250,000. For Pentagon Disaster Fund. Dominion

Dominion Resources, Inc. Corporate Giving Program P.O. Box 26532 Richmond, VA 23261-6532 FAX: (804) 775-5822; URL: http://www.dom.com/ about/community 1402. American Red Cross, Johnstown Chapter, Johnstown, PA. $5,000. 1403. Commonwealth of Virginia, Richmond, VA. $250,000. 1404. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. Donnelley

R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company Contributions Program 77 W. Wacker Dr. Chicago, IL 60601-1696 (312) 326-8102 FAX: (312) 326-8262; E-mail: susan.levy@rrd.com; URL: http:// www.rrdonnelley.com/cportal/public/home/ publicaffairs/index.jsp 1405. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000.

DPC Community Foundation 530 Main St., Ste. 302 P.O. Box 1039 Danville, VA 24543 (434) 793-0884 FAX: (434) 793-6489; E-mail: dpccf@gamewood.net; URL: http://www.dpccf.org 1413. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000.

1420. Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen, New York, NY. $30,000. For emergency relief. 1421. New York City Opera, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. 1422. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $15,000. 1423. Saint Vincents Hospital and Medical Center of New York, New York, NY. $15,000, 2002. Driehaus

The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation 203 N. Wabash, 1800 Chicago, IL 60601 (312) 641-5772 FAX: (312) 641-5736; E-mail: driehausfoundation@ameritech.net 1424. Firemens Fund, New Paltz, NY. $100,000. Drown

Joseph Drown Foundation 1999 Ave. of the Stars, Ste. 1930 Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310) 277-4488 FAX: (310) 277-4573; E-mail: staff@jdrown.org; URL: http://www.jdrown.org 1425. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. For September 11th Fund relief efforts. drugstore

drugstore.com Foundation 13920 S.E. Eastgate Way, Ste. 300 Bellevue, WA 98005 E-mail: foundation@drugstore.com; URL: http:// www.shareholder.com/drugstore/guidelines.cfm 1426. American Red Cross, National, DC. $55,000. DTE

DTE Energy Foundation 2000 2nd Ave., Rm. 1046 WCB Detroit, MI 48226-1279 (313) 235-9271 URL: http://www.dteenergy.com/community/ foundation/index.html 1427. American Red Cross, National, DC. $130,000.

Dragicevich

Matthew Dragicevich Charitable Remainder Trust

Duke

Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

P.O. Box 606 Palm Springs, CA 92263 (760) 320-6642 1414. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $5,000. 1415. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $5,000. Dreyfus

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. 555 Madison Ave., Ste. 1305 New York, NY 10022-3301 (212) 753-1760 FAX: (212) 593-2256; E-mail: admin@dreyfus.org; URL: http://www.dreyfus.org 1416. Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association of the City of New York, New York, NY. $2,500. 1417. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $2,500. Dreyfus

Jean and Louis Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 626 New York, NY 10170 (212) 599-1931 FAX: (212) 599-2956; E-mail: jldreyfusfdtn@hotmail.com; URL: http:// fdncenter.org/grantmaker/dreyfus/ 1418. Alliance for the Arts, New York, NY. $15,000. Toward Arts Rebuild New York Project. 1419. Bridge Fund of New York, New York, NY. $15,000. For Project Recovery.

650 5th Ave., 19th Fl. New York, NY 10019 (212) 974-7000 FAX: (212) 974-7590; Additional tel.: (212) 974-7100; URL: http://www.ddcf.org 1428. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $250,000. For New York Arts Recovery Fund. 1429. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $250,000, 2001. For New York Arts Recovery Fund’s emergency re-granting program for artists and arts organizations adversely affected by events of September 11, and to encourage community interaction and audience participation in the arts. Duke

Duke Energy Foundation 526 S. Church St., M.C. ECO6G-FC P.O. Box 1009 Charlotte, NC 28201-1009 (704) 382-7200 FAX: (704) 382-7600; URL: http:// www.duke-energy.com 1430. American Red Cross, Charlotte, Charlotte, NC. $10,000, 2001. For operating support to administer and complete blood drive in the aftermath of September 11th. 1431. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000, 2001. 1432. Undesignated. $490,000, 2001. Part of original $1.0 million committment.

165


Duncan

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Duncan

Duncan Oil Company c/o Corporate Communications 849 Factory Road Beaver Creek, OH 45434 1433. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000.

East Stroudsburg

East Stroudsburg Savings Association Foundation

2244 Walnut Grove Ave. Rosemead, CA 91770 (626) 302-8114 1453. American Red Cross, National, DC. $115,000.

744 Main St. Stroudsburg, PA 18360-2029 1444. American Red Cross of Monroe County. $5,000. For 9/11 Fund.

Dunwalke

Clarence and Anne Dillon Dunwalke Trust 1330 Ave. of the Americas, 27th Fl. New York, NY 10019 1434. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000. DuPage

The DuPage Community Foundation 110 N. Cross St. Wheaton, IL 60187-5318 (630) 665-5556 FAX: (630) 665-9571; E-mail: bheydorn@dcfdn.org, nchibucos@dcfdn.org, or dmm@dcfdn.org; URL: http://www.dcfdn.org 1435. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. DuPont

DuPont Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. Office, Public Affairs 1007 Market St. Wilmington, DE 19898 (302) 774-2036 Application address for education: c/o DuPont Center for Collaborative Research and Education, P.O. Box 80030-1370, Wilmington, DE 19880-0030 1436. Various organizations. $5,000,000. duPont

Jessie Ball duPont Fund 1 Independent Dr., Ste. 1400 Jacksonville, FL 32202-5011 (904) 353-0890 FAX: (904) 353-3870; Additional tel.: (800) 252-3452; E-mail: smagill@dupontfund.org (for Sherry P. Magill), jbennett@dupontfund.org (for Jo Ann P. Bennett), sdouglass@dupontfund.org (for Sally Douglass), ekingjr.@dupontfund.org (for Edward King), and sgreene@dupontfund.org (for Sharon Greene); URL: http://www.dupontfund.org/ 1437. American Red Cross, Delaware, Wilmington, DE. $130,000. For Phase II of post-9/11 Business Recovery, Stabilization, and Growth Plan. 1438. American Red Cross, Delaware, Wilmington, DE. $25,000, 2001. Toward national relief efforts. 1439. Christian Herald Association, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. To defray expenses related to the attack on the World Trade Center. 1440. Osborne Association, Long Island City, NY. $25,000, 2001. For internal grief counseling, staff support and unexpected organizational expenses resulting from the attacks on the World Trade Center. 1441. Salvation Army of Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL. $25,000, 2001. For disaster relief grant to alleviate suffering and distress caused by September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. 1442. United Way of Northeast Florida, Jacksonville, FL. $150,000, 2001. For support of victims in New York City through the September 11th Fund managed by the New York Community Trust. Eades

Eades Foundation 1701 Broadmoor Dr., Ste. 200 Champaign, IL 61821-5933 1443. Salvation Army of Greater New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For 9/11 recovery.

166

Edison

Edison International Foundation

East

EDS

East Tennessee Foundation

The EDS Foundation

550 W. Main St., Ste. 550 Knoxville, TN 37902 (865) 524-1223 FAX: (865) 637-6039; E-mail: etf@etf.org; URL: http://www.easttennesseefoundation.org 1445. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000. 1446. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $13,150.

5400 Legacy Dr., H3-6F-47 Plano, TX 75024 E-mail: info@eds.com; URL: http://www.eds.com/ foundation 1454. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,150,000. 1455. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000.

Eastman

Eastman Kodak Charitable Trust

Educational

Educational Testing Services c/o Corporate Communications Rosedale Road Princeton, NJ 08541 1456. American Red Cross, Mercer County Chapter, Princeton, NJ. $25,000.

c/o JPMorgan Chase Bank P.O. Box 31412 Rochester, NY 14603 (585) 724-2434 Application address: 343 State St., Rochester, NY 14650 1447. George Eastman House/International Museum of Photography and Film, Rochester, NY. $25,000. For Picturing What Matters: An Offering of Photographs, pictorial memorial exhibit of September 11th.

El Paso

El Paso Corporate Foundation

Eastman

Eastman Kodak Company Contributions Program 343 State St. Rochester, NY 14650-0517 (716) 724-1980 URL: http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/ community.shtml 1448. American Red Cross, National, DC. $2,000,000. Eaton

The Eaton Charitable Fund c/o Eaton Corp. 1111 Superior Ave. Cleveland, OH 44114-2584 (216) 523-4944 FAX: (216) 479-7013; E-mail: barrydoggett@eaton.com; URL: http:// www.eaton.com 1449. American Red Cross, National, DC. $40,000. For September 11th disaster relief fund. Ebix.com

Ebix.com c/o Corporate Communications 5 Concourse Parkway NE No. 3200 Atlanta, GA 30328 1450. NASDAQ Issuers Disaster Relief Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. Eckerd

Eckerd Corporation Foundation 6501 Legacy Dr., M.S. 1205 Plano, TX 75024-3698 (972) 431-2159 Additional address: 8333 Bryan Dairy Rd., Largo, FL 33777-1230, tel.: (727) 395-6971 1451. American Red Cross, National, DC. $35,000. To aid 9/11 efforts. Edison

Edison International Corporate Giving Program P.O. Box 800, G.O. 1 Rm. 399 Rosemead, CA 91770 (626) 302-9853 1452. American Red Cross, Greater Los Angeles Chapter, Los Angeles, CA. $25,000.

P.O. Box 2511 Houston, TX 77252-2511 (713) 420-2878 Application address: 1001 Louisiana St., Houston, TX 77002 1457. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. 1458. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $11,685. For September11th Fund. 1459. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,490, 2001. 1460. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $15,822, 2001. 1461. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $6,050, 2001. 1462. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $1,850, 2001. 1463. Port Authority Police Benevolent Association, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. $11,605, 2001. 1464. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,200, 2001. 1465. United Jewish Communities, New York, NY. $10,000. 1466. United Jewish Communities, New York, NY. $2,380, 2001. 1467. World Trade Center Port Authority Memorial Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000. 1468. World Trade Center Port Authority Memorial Fund, New York, NY. $13,230. 1469. World Trade Center Port Authority Memorial Fund, New York, NY. $10,345. El Pomar

El Pomar Foundation 10 Lake Cir. Colorado Springs, CO 80906 (719) 633-7733 1470. Bonfils Blood Center, Denver, CO. $250,000. For relief for New York City disaster victims. 1471. Hundred Club of Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, CO. $250,000, 2001. Toward collecting blood and delivering it to the New York City area. Electric

Electric Boat Employees Community Service Association P.O. Box 1291 Groton, CT 06340-1291 1472. American Red Cross, New London Chapter, New London, CT. $13,500.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Fannie Exxon

1473. Central Labor Rehabilitation Council of New York, New York, NY. $40,000. 1474. Community Services Agency, DC. $15,500. 1475. Various organizations. $11,000. Electricite

Electricite de France c/o Corporate Communications 22 av Wagram 75008 Paris, France 1476. Greater New Orleans Foundation, New Orleans, LA. $100,000. For educational assistance to surviving children of victims of the September 11th terrorist attacks.

1486. Various organizations. $500,000. For donations to organizations in NYC that are assisting families in the wake of September 11th. Entergy

Entergy Corporation Contributions Program c/o Corp. Contribs. P.O. Box 61000, L-ENT-8A New Orleans, LA 70161 (504) 576-6990 1487. Greater New Orleans Foundation, New Orleans, LA. $500,000. For educational assistance to surviving children of victims of the September 11th terrorist attacks.

Elk Enterprise

Elk County Community Foundation 111 Erie Ave. St. Marys, PA 15857 (814) 834-2125 FAX: (814) 834-2126; E-mail: eccf@penn.com; URL: http://www.elkcountyfoundation.com 1477. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $43,435. Elmwood

The Elmwood Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 2287 La Crosse, WI 54602-2287 (608) 781-0850 1478. American Red Cross, La Crosse, WI. $5,000. For September 11th Relief Fund. Emerson

Emerson Charitable Trust 8000 W. Florissant Ave. P.O. Box 4100 St. Louis, MO 63136 (314) 553-2000 FAX: (314) 553-1605 1479. American Red Cross, National, DC. $20,000.

Enterprise Rent-A-Car Foundation 600 Corporate Park Dr. Clayton, MO 63105-4211 (314) 512-2754 FAX: (314) 512-4754 1488. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1489. Firefighters Fund of Fairfax County, Fairfax, VA. $125,000. For support in the aftermath of September 11th. 1490. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $5,000, 2002. 1491. Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service, Rockville, MD. $125,000. For support in the aftermath of September 11th. 1492. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000, 2003. 1493. Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association of the City of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1494. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Equilon

Equilon Enterprises, LLC Emerson

Fred L. Emerson Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 276 Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 253-9621 1480. United Way of Cayuga County, Auburn, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. 1481. WNYC Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001.

c/o Corporate Communications 1100 Louisiana Street Houston, TX 77002 1495. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000. Ernst

Ernst & Young Foundation

Endowment

Endowment Fund of the Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven 360 Amity Road Woodbridge, CT 06525 1482. United Jewish Community Relief Fund, New York, NY. $10,000.

5 Times Sq. New York, NY 10036 (212) 773-3103 1496. Ernst & Young Foundation, New York, NY. $2,000,000, 2001. To match funds collected from employees, alumni and retirees for the purpose of providing financial support to those affected by the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. European

Engineering

Engineering Information Foundation 180 W. 80th St., Ste. 207 New York, NY 10024-6301 FAX: (212) 579-7517; E-mail: info@eifgrants.org; URL: http://www.eifgrants.org 1483. Goodwill Industries of Greater New York and Northern New Jersey, Astoria, NY. $5,000.

European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company (EADS) c/o Corporate Communications Le Carre - Beechavenue 130-132 Schiphol Rijk, Netherlands 1119PR 1497. Undesignated. $2,000,000. For donations to support victims of the terrorist attacks and their families. Excel

English

English-Bonter-Mitchell Foundation

c/o Corporate Communications 8750 N. Central Expy No. 2000 Dallas, TX 75231 1498. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000.

c/o National City Bank 110 W. Berry St. Fort Wayne, IN 46802-2316 1484. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $25,000, 2001.

Exelon Enron

Enron Corp. Contributions Program 1400 Smith St. Houston, TX 77002 (713) 853-6161 1485. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000.

Excel Communications

Exelon Corporation c/o Corporate Communications 10 South Dearborn St. - Fl.37 Chicago, IL 60603 1499. Greater New Orleans Foundation, New Orleans, LA. $500,000. For educational assistance to surviving children of victims of the September 11th terrorist attacks.

Exxon Mobil Corporation Contributions Program 5959 Las Colinas Blvd. Irving, TX 75039-2298 (972) 444-1106 FAX: (972) 444-1405; URL: http:// www.exxonmobil.com/community 1500. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $5,105,348, 2001. 1501. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $667,000, 2001. 1502. Children’s Aid Society, New York, NY. $2,059,383, 2001. 1503. Children’s Aid Society, New York, NY. $667,000, 2001. 1504. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. 1505. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $774,738, 2001. 1506. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $1,344,507, 2001. 1507. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $667,000, 2001. 1508. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $2,000,000, 2001. 1509. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,966,024, 2001. Fairbanks

Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation, Inc. 9292 N. Meridan St., Ste. 304 Indianapolis, IN 46260 (317) 846-7111 FAX: (317) 844-0167; E-mail: Bikoff@rmfairbanksfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.rmfairbanksfoundation.org 1510. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. For general support for September 11th Fund. Fairfield

Fairfield County Community Foundation, Inc. 523 Danbury Rd. Wilton, CT 06897 (203) 834-9393 FAX: (203) 834-9996; E-mail: info@fccfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.fccfoundation.org 1511. Fairfield County Community Foundation, Wilton, CT. $55,000. Fannie

Fannie Mae Washington, DC 1512. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $5,000,000. 1513. District of Columbia, Government of, DC. $1,000,000. For financial support of DC residents directly and adversely affected by the attacks of September 11th. 1514. National Association of Realtors, Chicago, IL. $1,000,000. 1515. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,000,000. For financial support of DC residents directly and adversely affected by the attacks of September 11th. Fannie

Fannie Mae Foundation 4000 Wisconsin Ave. N.W. N. Tower, Ste. 1 Washington, DC 20016-2804 (202) 274-8057 1516. Arlington, County of, Arlington, VA. $25,000, 2001. 1517. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $50,000, 2001.

167


SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

Fannie

Fetzer

1518. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $54,566. For NYC relief efforts. 1519. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $27,204. For DC relief efforts.

First Tennessee Foundation

9292 West KL Ave. Kalamazoo, MI 49009-9398 FAX: (269) 372-2163; E-mail: info@fetzer.org; URL: http://www.fetzer.org 1529. Undesignated. $100,000.

c/o First Tennessee National Corp. 165 Madison Ave., 8th Fl. Memphis, TN 38103 (901) 532-4380 1539. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $200,000.

Farish

Fieldstone

The William Stamps Farish Fund

The Fieldstone Foundation

10000 Memorial Dr., Ste. 920 Houston, TX 77024 (713) 686-7373 1520. American Red Cross, Lexington, KY. $100,000. For disaster relief fund for New York City September 11 attack.

14 Corporate Plz. Newport Beach, CA 92660 (949) 640-9090 ext.: 5869; Alternate address: 5465 Morehouse Dr., Ste. 250, San Diego, CA 92121; E-mail: foundation@fieldstone-homes.com; URL: http:// www.fieldstone-homes.com/foundation 1530. Undesignated. $25,000.

Federal

Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta c/o Corporate Communications P.O. Box105565 Atlanta, GA 30348 1521. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $50,000.

First

Fifth

The Fifth Third Foundation

FederalExpress

FederalExpress c/o Corporate Communications 942 South Shady Grove Memphis, TN 38120 1522. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Federated

Federated Department Stores Foundation 7 W. 7th St. Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 579-7000 FAX: (513) 579-7185; URL: http:// www.federated-fds.com/community/report/ chapter2/index_1_4.asp 1523. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

c/o Fifth Third Bank 38 Fountain Sq. Plz., M.D. 1090CA Cincinnati, OH 45263 (513) 534-7001 URL: http://www.53.com/about53/foundation.asp 1531. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $5,000, 2002. Financial

Financial Security Assurance c/o Corporate Communications 350 Park Avenue - Fl. 12 New York, NY 10022 1532. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $500,000.

101 W. Sandusky St. Suite 207 Findlay, OH 45840 1533. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000. Finish

1001 Liberty Ave., Ste. 650 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (412) 456-5550 FAX: (412) 456-5551; E-mail: dee@fisafoundation.org, or sue@fisafoundation.org; URL: http:// www.fisafoundation.org/ 1542. National Council on Independent Living, Chicago, IL. $5,000. For urgent needs of people with disabilities affected by the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States.

Finish Line Youth Foundation, Inc.

c/o Communications Dept. 460 Park Avenue New York, NY 10022 1524. Army Emergency Relief, Alexandria, VA. $150,000. 1525. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $500,000.

FishAmerica

FishAmerica Foundation

3308 N. Mitthoeffer Rd. Indianapolis, IN 46235 (317) 899-1022 URL: http://www.finishline.com/store/ corporate_info/youthfoundation.jsp 1534. Undesignated. $35,000. Fios

Feil

The Feil Family Foundation

Fios

370 7th Ave., Ste. 618 New York, NY 10001 (212) 563-6557 1526. Special Operations Warrior Foundation, Tampa, FL. $5,000, 2003. For the children of 9/11.

c/o Corporate Communications 921 SW Washington St. No. 850 Portland, OR 97205 1535. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $5,000. 1536. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $5,000.

Fein

Fein Foundation

First

First Kentucky National Charitable Foundation, Inc.

P.O. Box 99 Scarsdale, NY 10583 1527. New York, State of, Albany, NY. $5,400. Fels

Samuel S. Fels Fund 1616 Walnut St., Ste. 800 Philadelphia, PA 19103-5313 (215) 731-9455 FAX: (215) 731-9457; URL: http:// www.samfels.org 1528. Arab-American Development Corporation, Philadelphia, PA. $15,000. For start-up support to educate community about Muslims and Islam.

168

c/o Wachovia Corp. 301 S. Tryon St., TW-11 Charlotte, NC 28288-0143 (704) 374-6649 Local bank addresses: CT, NJ, NY: Yvonne Calcagno, 370 Scotch Rd., Trenton, NJ 08628, tel.: (609) 530-7357, FL: Connie Smith, 225 Water St., 7th Fl., FL0670, Jacksonville, FL 32202, tel.: (904) 489-3268, DC, GA, MD, NC, SC, VA: Robby Russell, 310 S. Tryon St., Charlotte, NC 28288-0143, tel.: (704) 374-4912, DE, PA: Kevin Dow, 1339 Chestnut St., 13th Fl., Philadelphia, PA 19107, tel.: (267) 321-7664, First Union Securities, Inc.: Tim Holtz, 10700 Wheat 1st Dr., Glen Allen, VA 23060, tel.: (804) 965-2415; FAX: (704) 374-2484 1540. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. 1541. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. FISA

Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation

Federation of Korean Industries

The First Union Foundation

FISA Foundation

Findlay-Hancock

Federation

First

John E. Fetzer Institute, Inc.

P.O. Box 3600 Louisville, KY 40233 (502) 581-5258 1537. Fire Rescue Development Program, Chicago, IL. $50,000. To pay the travel expenses of firefighters helping in September 11th relief efforts. First

First Southwest Company c/o Corporate Communications 1700 Pacific Avenue, Suite 500 Dallas, TX 75201 1538. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000.

225 Reinekers Ln., Ste.420 Alexandria, VA 22315 (703) 519-9691 FAX: (703) 519-1872; E-mail: fishamerica@asafishing.org; URL: http:// www.fishamerica.org/ 1543. Central Park Conservancy, New York, NY. $2,000. For re-stocking of Harlem Meer pond in Central Park, so children and families may fish and enjoy a respite from the pace of city life as way to improve the lives of New Yorkers in view of the tragedies of September 11th. Fisher

Jerome & Anne C. Fisher Charitable Foundation c/o Caler, Donten & Levine, et al. 505 S. Flagler Dr., Ste. 900 West Palm Beach, FL 33401-5923 1544. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. FleetBoston

FleetBoston Financial Corporation c/o Corporate Communications 100 Federal Street, 10034F Boston, MA 02110 1545. Various organizations. $1,000,000. For donations related to the events of September 11th from Fleet Bank and subsidiaries through FleetBoston Financial Foundation.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER FleetBoston

Fluor

FleetBoston Financial Foundation

The Fluor Foundation

100 Federal St., MA DE 10018A Boston, MA 02110 (617) 434-2804 FAX: (617) 434-6072; URL: http://www.fleet.com/ foundation 1546. ACCION New York, Brooklyn, NY. $200,000, 2002. 1547. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000, 2002. 1548. Bridge Fund of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1549. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support. 1550. Harvey Young Yurman Relief Fund. $150,000, 2002. 1551. Individual beneficiaries. $200,000, 2002. To provide individual support to directly impacted employees. 1552. James E. Hayden Memorial Fund, MA. $25,000, 2002. 1553. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $100,000, 2001. 1554. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $5,000, 2002. 1555. Massachusetts 9/11 Fund, Boston, MA. $25,000, 2002. 1556. Neighborhood Housing Services of New York City, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1557. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 1558. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $25,000, 2002. 1559. New York Stock Exchange Fallen Heroes Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. 1560. Renaissance Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1561. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $25,000, 2001. 1562. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $5,000, 2002. 1563. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. 1564. Various organizations. $145,000.

1 Enterprise Dr. Aliso Viejo, CA 92656-2606 (949) 349-6797 FAX: (949) 349-7175; E-mail: community.relations@fluor.com; URL: http:// www.fluor.com/community/involvement.asp 1570. American Red Cross, National, DC. $104,207. To match gifts made by Fluor Corporation employees. 1571. American Red Cross, National, DC. $68,762. To match gifts made by Fluor employees. 1572. American Red Cross, National, DC. $21,245. To match gifts made by Fluor Fernald employees.

Fleishman

Fleishman-Hillard Charitable Trust 200 N. Broadway, Ste. 1800 St. Louis, MO 63102-1706 (314) 982-1700 1565. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Flint

Flint Ink Foundation c/o Flint Ink Corp. 4600 Arrowhead Dr. Ann Arbor, MI 48105-2773 1566. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $95,000. For September 11th Fund. Flora

Flora Family Foundation 2121 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 123 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650) 233-1335 FAX: (650) 233-1340; E-mail: info@florafamily.org; URL: http:// www.florafamily.org 1567. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. For 9/11 relief efforts in New York City. 1568. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. For September 11th Fund. 1569. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. For fund for families of victims following September 11th.

Ford

FMC

FMC Foundation c/o FMC Corp. 1735 Market St., 23rd Fl. Philadelphia, PA 19103 (215) 299-6000 1573. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Foot

Foot Locker, Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 233 Broadway New York, NY 10279 (212) 553-2000 1574. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $100,000. Ford

The Ford Foundation 320 E. 43rd St. New York, NY 10017 (212) 573-5000 FAX: (212) 351-3677; URL: http:// www.fordfound.org 1575. Action Alliance for Virginias Children and Youth, Richmond, VA. $14,200, 2002. To inform public discourse about the impact and burden of increased costs and constrained budget resources resulting from the events of September 11. 1576. Alzheimers Disease and Related Disorders Association, Chicago, IL. $20,000, 2002. For New York City chapter to conduct special outreach to assist those in Alzheimer’s community affected by the terrorist attacks. 1577. American Association of University Professors, DC. $50,000. For activities of Special Committee on Academic Freedom and National Security in a Time of Crisis. 1578. American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, PA. $100,000. To ensure that human rights of non-citizens detained in New Jersey in aftermath of attacks of September 11, 2001 are respected. 1579. American Immigration Law Foundation, DC. $50,000. To address curtailment of due process protections for non-citizens during immigration proceedings in post-September 11 period. 1580. Arab American Family Support Center, Brooklyn, NY. $50,000. For crisis intervention, legal aid, community education and outreach and coalition building for Arab-American detainees and victims of bias crimes and discrimination in aftermath of September 11. 1581. Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Little Rock, AR. $14,200, 2002. To inform public discourse about the impact and burden of increased costs and constrained budget resources resulting from the events of September 11. 1582. Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, New York, NY. $100,000. For core support for 9/11 Immigrant Access to Justice

Project to ensure that human rights of non-citizens detained in the U.S. in aftermath of September 11, 2001 are respected. 1583. Aspen Institute, DC. $25,000. For conference on how forces of homeland security and commercialism are shaping future of journalism. 1584. Bank Information Center, DC. $200,000, 2002. To monitor the response of international financial institutions to September 11th. 1585. Brecht Forum, New York, NY. $50,000. To organize and provide assistance to Arab, Muslim and South Asian communities in New York and New Jersey experiencing discrimination as result of events of September 11. 1586. Center for Constitutional Rights, New York, NY. $150,000. For racial justice litigation, advocacy, and educational outreach activities related to detention and racial profiling of Arab Americans and Muslims following World Trade Center attack. 1587. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, DC. $150,000, 2002. For state-level dialogues on policy implications of post-September 11 budget cuts. 1588. Centre for Development and Conflict Management Studies, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. $200,000. For research and public education on September 11, anti-Americanism and conflict in Nigeria. 1589. Childrens Action Alliance, Phoenix, AZ. $14,200, 2002. To inform public discourse in Arizona about the impact and burden of increased costs and constrained budget resources resulting from the attacks of September 11th. 1590. Childrens Defense Fund, DC. $14,200, 2002. To inform public discourse in Minnesota about the impact and burden of increased costs and constrained budget resources resulting from the attacks of September 11th. 1591. Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing. $118,200. To conduct research on changes in social stratification, occupational structure and income distribution in China since 1980. 1592. Circle Foundation, Bethesda, MD. $100,000. For Program on International Policy Attitudes to conduct public opinion research to help U.S. policy makers better understand post-September 11 public attitudes on nation’s role in world. 1593. City Limits Community Information Service, New York, NY. $125,000, 2002. For the Center for an Urban Future to undertake an initiative to help NYC leaders address critical workforce development issues in the aftermath of September 11th. 1594. City Limits Community Information Service, New York, NY. $100,000. For continuing efforts of Center for Urban Future to help New York City business and political leaders address critical workforce development issues in aftermath of September 11. 1595. Common Cents New York, New York, NY. $100,000. For report on Twin Towers Penny Harvest, New York City school-based fundraising and grantmaking program that enabled students to carry out service projects in aftermath of September 11th. 1596. Communications Network, DC. $250,000. For core support for South Asian Strategic Communications Project to strengthen ability of South Asian and Muslim community organizations to protect civil liberties in wake of September 11. 1597. Council on Foreign Relations, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. For development of Council Task Force on Terrorism and roundtables to discuss challenges facing international affairs community in the wake of September 11.

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Ford

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

1598. Deep Dish T.V. Network, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. For television news series Democracy Now to continue incorporating aftermath of September 11 attacks into future broadcasts. 1599. Economic Policy Institute, DC. $66,000. For research and analysis on effects of state unemployment insurance laws on contingent workforce in post-September 11th economy. 1600. Educational Broadcasting Corporation, New York, NY. $300,000, 2002. For already-aired and future programming which directly related to the 9/11 crisis and its repercussions. 1601. Fenton Communications, DC. $300,000, 2002. For strategic communications activities to promote informed voices in response to the September 11th attacks, with an emphasis on the protection of civil liberties and prevention of discrimination. 1602. Ford Foundation, New York, NY. $175,000. For administration of the September 11th Fund. 1603. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. For September 11th Philanthropic Response Project. 1604. Fund for the City of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. To provide loans for nonprofit organizations whose revenue streams were disrupted by World Trade Center disaster. 1605. Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. For series of public forums to consider history and future of New York City in light of World Trade Center attacks. 1606. Human Rights Education and Law Project (HELP), Montclair, NJ. $50,000. To insure adequate legal representation of post-September 11 detainees and for activities that address civil rights issues arising from selected governmental responses to attack. 1607. Human Rights Watch, New York, NY. $375,000, 2002. Core support for the Academic Freedom Program to foster tolerance for secular education and critical thought worldwide, particularly, post September 11, in Southwest and Central Asia and in the Middle East. 1608. Human Rights Watch, New York, NY. $75,000. To document and advocate against, human rights violations in Afghanistan related to aftermath of September 11 attacks. 1609. Independent Sector, DC. $13,000, 2002. For public education in the aftermath of the September 11th terrorist attacks about the important role of the nonprofit sector. 1610. Interfaith Alliance Foundation, DC. $330,000, 2002. For an innovative effort in the aftermath of September 11 to create Jewish, Muslim and Christian congregational partnerships for local action in US communities. 1611. International Rescue Committee, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. For the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children to protect Afghan refugee and internally displaced women and girls. 1612. International Rescue Committee, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. To expand human rights protections for displaced Afghans. 1613. Kentucky Youth Advocates, Louisville, KY. $14,200, 2002. To inform public discourse about the impact and burden of increased costs and constrained budget resources resulting from the events of September 11. 1614. Kitchen Sisters Productions, San Francisco, CA. $35,000. For Sonic Memorial Project, post-September 11 nationwide public radio collaboration commemorating people, places and endeavors involved in World Trade Center and its surrounding neighborhoods. 1615. Legal Aid Society, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. For legal services and other

170

activities to help low-income people and the working poor affected by the September 11 World Trade Center disaster. 1616. Legal Defense Institute, Lima, Peru. $500,000, 2002. For legal defense and promotion of international human rights in Andean Region, and program of action to respond to regional consequences of September 11. 1617. Link Media, San Rafael, CA. $585,000, 2002. For the digital distribution of WorldLink TV’s international programming to the national network of public television stations, including a series of post-September 11 global town meetings. 1618. Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, Los Angeles, CA. $75,000. To expand study on impact of Los Angeles Living Wage Ordinance on workers and employers in post-September 11th economy. 1619. Middle East Institute, DC. $250,000. To establish U.S.-Arab Working Group for ongoing dialogue in aftermath of September 11 on political, social and economic issues and for policy report on common agenda. 1620. National Center on Education and the Economy, DC. $195,000, 2002. To educate local workforce board members about responsibilities & opportunities under the federal workforce system & share effective strategies of post-September 11 global town meetings. 1621. National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild, Boston, MA. $100,000, 2002. For core support for activities to ensure that the human rights of noncitizens detained in the United States in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11, 2001 are respected. 1622. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,000,000, 2002. For the September 11th Fund’s grantmaking in support of relief and restoration activities. 1623. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,000,000, 2002. For the operating committee and staffing expenses of the September 11th Fund. 1624. Nonprofit Finance Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. To help nonprofit organizations that have suffered physical damage or loss of business as result of World Trade Center tragedy. 1625. Physicians for Human Rights, Boston, MA. $25,000. To complete survey of maternal mortality in Afghanistan in context of U.S. response to September 11 attacks. 1626. Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. $150,000, 2002. To develop a plan to address community needs in the aftermath of September 11th. 1627. Public Interest Projects, New York, NY. $700,000. For start-up support for Freedom Fund, national fundraising and grant making collaborative to advance immigrants’ and human rights in post-9/11 context. 1628. Regional Plan Association, New York, NY. $350,000, 2002. For the Civil Alliance Project to develop strategies for the rebuilding of Lower Manhattan in the wake of the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center. 1629. Rethinking Schools, Milwaukee, WI. $40,000, 2002. To publish and disseminate materials to help K-12 educators discuss the events of September 11th with students. 1630. Rock the Vote Education Fund, Los Angeles, CA. $100,000, 2002. For Aftermath, documentary exploring post-September 11 experiences of young people with issues with discrimination. 1631. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ. $30,000. For video project exploring South Asian community organizing around issues of gender, sexuality and nationalism, with events of September 11 as point of departure.

1632. Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. To provide small grants, short-term loans and technical assistance to micro enterprises and other small firms affected by World Trade Center disaster. 1633. Thomas A. Edison Foundation for Non-Traditional Education, Trenton, NJ. $57,400, 2002. For report on the philanthropic and operational lessons learned in responding to the consequences of the September 11 attack. 1634. Thomas A. Edison State College Foundation, Trenton, NJ. $29,850. To create supplement and executive summary to report on philanthropic and operational lessons learned report in responding to consequences of September 11th attack. 1635. Tides Center, San Francisco, CA. $50,000. For September Eleventh Families for Peaceful Tomorrows, project to intensify outreach and membership building efforts and expand fundraising and development activities. 1636. Tides Center, San Francisco, CA. $50,000, 2002. For start-up support for September Eleventh Families for Peaceful Tomorrows, an organization to create opportunities for public discussion of governmental responses to the September 11 attacks. 1637. University of California, Los Angeles, CA. $55,000. For research and analysis on impact of Los Angeles living wage ordinance on workers and on employers in post-September 11th economy. 1638. Voices for Alabamas Children, Montgomery, AL. $14,200, 2002. To inform public discourse about the impact and burden of increased costs and constrained budget resources resulting from the events of September 11. 1639. Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers, DC. $1,200,000, 2002. To assist nonprofit organizations and enhance coordination among donors and service providers working on community recovery issues. 1640. Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, Madison, WI. $14,200, 2002. To inform public discourse about the impact and burden of increased costs and constrained budget resources resulting from the events of September 11. 1641. WNYC Foundation, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. To purchase new transmitter to restore FM public radio station to full service in aftermath of September 11th World Trade Center disaster. Ford

Ford Motor Company Fund 1 American Rd. P.O. Box 1899 Dearborn, MI 48126-2798 (313) 248-4745 1642. American Red Cross, Southeast Michigan, Detroit, MI. $1,000,000, 2001. 1643. American Red Cross, Southeast Michigan, Detroit, MI. $1,000,000, 2001. To match Ford individual contributions for September 11th disaster relief. 1644. American Red Cross, Southeast Michigan, Detroit, MI. $7,612. Funds transferred through Fund from Ford Japan. 1645. Farmington Hills Police Benevolent Association, Farmington Hills, MI. $5,000, 2001. To support a Disaster Relief walk from Detroit to New York by firefighters. 1646. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. To sponsor the Concert for NY fundraiser for Robin Hood Relief Fund. 1647. Undesignated. $500,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Fort Wayne

Gaiser

Frankel

Frey

Fort Wayne Community Foundation, Inc.

Evan Frankel Foundation

Frey Foundation

701 S. Clinton St., Ste. 210 Fort Wayne, IN 46802 (260) 426-4083 FAX: (260) 424-0114; E-mail: info@fwcf.org; URL: http://www.fwcf.org 1648. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For September 11th fund.

P.O. Box 5072 East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 329-2833 FAX: (631) 329-7102; E-mail: frankelfound@hamptons.com 1658. New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY. $100,000.

40 Pearl St., N.W., Ste. 1100 Grand Rapids, MI 49503-3028 (616) 451-0303 FAX: (616) 451-8481; E-mail: freyfdn@freyfdn.org; URL: http://www.freyfdn.org 1672. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000.

Fortune

Fortune Brands, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 300 Tower Pkwy. Lincolnshire, IL 60069-3640 (847) 484-4400 1649. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000. Foster

Freddie

Friends

Freddie Mac Corporate Giving Program

The Friends of Barnabas Foundation

8200 Jones Branch Dr. McLean, VA 22102-3110 (703) 903-2000 1659. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $2,000,000. 1660. Various organizations. $8,000,000. To cover day-to-day expenses of survivors and families of victims, long-term relief for families of victims.

P.O. Box 2100 Danville, VA 24541 Application address: P.O. Box 34531, Richmond, VA 23234 1673. American Red Cross, National, DC. $12,077. For disaster relief fund. 1674. United Methodist Church, Richmond, VA. $9,000. For disaster relief fund.

Foster Wheeler Inc. Corporate Giving Program

Fredericks Family Foundation

The Frist Foundation

Perryville Corporate Park Clinton, NJ 08809-4000 (908) 730-4050 FAX: (908) 730-5300 1650. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000.

c/o Vincent Andrews Mgmt. 16 West Ave. Darien, CT 06820 1661. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $17,300. For general support.

3319 West End Ave., Ste. 900 Nashville, TN 37203-1076 (615) 292-3868 FAX: (615) 292-5843; E-mail: askfrist@fristfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.fristfoundation.org 1675. United Way of Metropolitan Nashville, Nashville, TN. $10,000, 2001.

Fredericks

Foundation

Freed

The Foundation for Appalachian Ohio

The Freed Foundation

36 Public Sq. P.O. Box 456 Nelsonville, OH 45764 (740) 753-1111 FAX: (740) 753-3333; E-mail: info@appalachianohio.org; URL: http:// www.appalachianohio.org 1651. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $2,500. For Survivor’s Fund. 1652. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,500. 1653. Various organizations. $5,000. To support Appalachian Ohio victims and families of victims from Appalachian Ohio and to promote and encourage strong community relationships within and across Appalachian Ohio’s racial and ethnic diversities.

1025 Thomas Jefferson St., Ste. 308 E. Washington, DC 20007 (202) 337-5487 1662. AmeriCares Foundation, New Canaan, CT. $50,000. 1663. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $50,000. 1664. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $50,000. 1665. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. 1666. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $50,000. 1667. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $50,000.

Foundation

Foundation for the Carolinas 217 South Tryon St. Charlotte, NC 28202 (704) 973-4500 1654. American Red Cross, National, DC. $26,000. 1655. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $113,641. For September 11th Fund. France

France-Merrick Foundation The Exchange 1122 Kenilworth Dr., Ste. 118 Baltimore, MD 21204 (410) 832-5700 FAX: (410) 832-5704 1656. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Frank

Lawrence L. Frank Foundation 234 E. Colorado Blvd., Ste. 500 Pasadena, CA 91101-2206 (626) 440-5234 1657. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. For September 11th Fund.

Freeman

The Freeman Foundation c/o JPMorgan Private Bank 345 Park Ave., 4th Fl. New York, NY 10154 (212) 464-2487 FAX: (212) 464-2305; E-mail: wong_elizabeth@jpmorgan.com 1668. City Harvest, New York, NY. $300,000. For relief efforts associated with events of September 11. 1669. Community Service Society of New York, New York, NY. $400,000. For relief efforts associated with events of September 11. 1670. Food for Survival, Bronx, NY. $300,000. For relief efforts associated with events of September 11. Fremont

Fremont Area Community Foundation 4424 W. 48th St. P.O. Box B Fremont, MI 49412 (231) 924-5350 FAX: (231) 924-5391; E-mail: gzerlaut@tfacf.org; URL: http://www.tfacf.org 1671. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001.

Frist

Frueauff

Charles A. Frueauff Foundation, Inc. 3 Financial Ctr. 900 S. Shakleford, Ste. 300 Little Rock, AR 72211 (501) 219-1410 FAX: (501) 219-1416; URL: http:// www.frueaufffoundation.com 1676. Various organizations. $108,000. To aid New York nonprofits that were disrupted or suffered loss of income after 9/11. 1677. WNYC Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. To restore FM transmission antenna after 9/11. Fry

Lloyd A. Fry Foundation 120 S. LaSalle St., Ste. 1950 Chicago, IL 60603 (312) 580-0310 FAX: (312) 580-0980; E-mail: usong@fryfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.fryfoundation.org 1678. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500, 2002. 1679. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $1,000, 2002. 1680. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Fuji

Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. Dept. 200 Summit Lake Dr. Valhalla, NY 10595-1356 (800) 755-3854 1681. Various organizations. $1,000,000. Fujitsu

Fujitsu America Inc. Corporate Giving Program 3055 Orchard Dr. San Jose, CA 95134 (408) 432-1300 1682. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Gaiser

Mary Jewett Gaiser Unitrust Seattle, WA 1683. American Red Cross, Spokane Chapter, Spokane, WA. $8,169.

171


Gale

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Gale

Gartner

Gartner, Inc.

General Growth Properties

c/o Maurice Silberman 403 Blanketflower Ln. Princeton Junction, NJ 08550-2437 1684. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support.

c/o Corporate Communications 56 Top Gallant Rd. Stamford, CT 06902 1696. AmeriCares Foundation, New Canaan, CT. $6,000. 1697. Undesignated. $26,500.

c/o Corporate Communications 110 N. Wacker Drive Chicago, IL 60606 1712. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000.

Galvin

Gates

Helen M. Galvin Charitable Trust

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

c/o Christopher B. Galvin 1303 E. Algonquin Rd. Schaumburg, IL 60196 1685. Live Brave Coalition, Schaumburg, IL. $250,000.

P.O. Box 23350 Seattle, WA 98102 (206) 709-3100 FAX: (206) 709-3180; E-mail: info@gatesfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.gatesfoundation.org 1698. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. 1699. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. For the victims of the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C. 1700. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. 1701. Town Hall Foundation, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001.

Galway

The Galway Bay Foundation, Inc. 5 Burning Hollow Rd. Saddle River, NJ 07458-2926 1686. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $1,000. For general support. 1687. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $5,000. For general support. GAMA

GAMA Foundation, Inc. 1302 Pleasant Ridge Rd Greensboro, NC 27409 1688. Undesignated. $1,000,000. For grants to individuals adversely affected by the events of 9/11 and to enable them to pursue Market American’s Unfranchis opportunity.

Gateway

Gateway Foundation 14303 Gateway Pl. Poway, CA 92064-7140 1702. Undesignated. $100,000. GE

Gamble

Anna C. Gamble Foundation c/o Bank One Trust Co., N.A. P.O. Box 1308 Milwaukee, WI 53201 1689. American Red Cross, National, DC. $5,000, 2002. Gannett

Gannett Foundation, Inc. 7950 Jones Branch Dr. McLean, VA 22107 FAX: (703) 854-2167; E-mail: isimpson@gannett.com; URL: http:// www.gannettfoundation.org 1690. American Red Cross, National, DC. $2,000,000. 1691. Arlington, County of, Arlington, VA. $30,000, 2001.

GE Foundation 3135 Easton Tpke. Fairfield, CT 06431 (203) 373-3216 FAX: (203) 373-3029; E-mail: gefoundation@ge.com; URL: http://www.ge.com/ foundation/ 1703. American Red Cross, National, DC. $2,500,000. 1704. Municipal Art Society of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. 1705. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $10,000,000, 2001. 1706. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $500,000. 1707. Wall Street Rising Corporation, New York, NY. $10,000. Geffen

Gap

The Gap Foundation 2 Folsom St., 14th Fl. San Francisco, CA 94105 (415) 427-6473 E-mail: dotti_hatcher@gap.com 1692. America Reads, DC. $10,000. To honor the death of a Gap employee who perished in one of the hijacked planes on 9/11. 1693. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000. 1694. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. GAR

The GAR Foundation 50 S. Main St. P.O. Box 1500 Akron, OH 44309-1500 (330) 643-0201 FAX: (330) 252-5584; E-mail: RBriggs@BDBlaw.com; URL: http:// www.garfdn.org 1695. American Red Cross, Akron, OH. $350,000. For construction, maintenance, and endowment; and for Disaster Relief Fund to help victims of September 11th, 2001.

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General

The Bulova Gale Foundation

The David Geffen Foundation 331 N. Maple Dr., Ste. 200 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 288-7333 FAX: (310) 288-7329 1708. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $333,333. For grant made in the aftermath of September 11th. 1709. Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association of the City of New York, New York, NY. $333,333. For PBA Widows’ and Children’s Fund in the aftermath of September 11th. 1710. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $333,333. For grant made in the aftermath of September 11th. Genentech

Genentech, Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Mgr., Contribs. 460 Point San Bruno Blvd. South San Francisco, CA 94080-4990 (650) 225-1000 FAX: (650) 225-2021; URL: http://www.gene.com/ gene/about/community 1711. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000.

General

General Mills Foundation P.O. Box 1113 Minneapolis, MN 55440 (763) 764-2211 Contact for Merit Scholarship Prog.: Cynthia Ann Theien; Address for “Challenge U” Scholarship Prog.: Scholarship America, Inc., P.O. Box 297, St. Peter, MN 56082, tel.: (507) 931-1682; FAX: (763) 764-4114; E-mail: mills999@mail.genmills.com; URL: http:// www.generalmills.com/corporate/commitment/ community/ Foundation 1713. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. General

General Motors Foundation, Inc. 300 Renaissance Ctr., M.C. 482-C27-D76 Detroit, MI 48265-3000 (313) 665-0824 URL: http://www.gm.com/company/gmability 1714. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. 1715. American Red Cross, National, DC. $300,000. 1716. Tavis Smiley Foundation, Los Angeles, CA. $25,000. Georgia

Georgia Power Foundation, Inc. 241 Ralph McGill Blvd., N.E., Bin 10131 Atlanta, GA 30308-3374 FAX: (404) 506-1485; E-mail: gpfoundation@southernco.com; URL: http:// www.southerncompany.com/gapower/charitable 1717. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000, 2001. Georgia

Georgia-Pacific Foundation, Inc. 133 Peachtree St. N.E. Atlanta, GA 30303 (404) 652-4000 URL: http://www.gp.com/center/community/ index.html 1718. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000, 2001. Gerber

The Gerber Foundation 4747 W. 48th St., Ste. 153 Fremont, MI 49412-8119 (231) 924-3175 FAX: (231) 924-7906; E-mail: tgf@ncresa.org; URL: http://www.gerberfoundation.org 1719. Mercy Corps International, Portland, OR. $30,000. For Comfort Kits for children affected by September 11, 2001. Giant

Giant Eagle Foundation c/o Giant Eagle, Inc. 101 Kappa Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15238 (412) 963-6200 Application address for scholarships: Giant Eagle Foundation Scholarship Prog., Giant Eagle, Inc., c/o Human Resources Dept., 701 Alpha Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15238 1720. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Giant

Giant Food Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 1804 Washington, DC 20013 (301) 341-4171 FAX: (301) 618-4972; Application address: 6300 Sheriff Rd., Landover, MD 20785 1721. Giant Food Foundation, DC. $1,000,000. 1722. Giant Food Foundation, DC. $1,000,000. Gillmore

The Frederick H. Gillmore Fund c/o Morris & McVeigh, LLP 767 3rd Ave. New York, NY 10017-2023 1723. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000. For unrestricted support. Gimprich

Gimprich Family Foundation 1 West 4th Street New York, NY 10012 1724. Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $6,000, 2002.

Golden

Sam and Adele Golden Foundation for the Arts c/o Mark Golden 188 Bell Rd. New Berlin, NY 13411 (607) 847-8158 FAX: (607) 847-8158; E-mail: info@goldenfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.goldenfoundation.org 1734. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $1,000. For New York Arts Recovery Fund. Goldhammer

Goldhammer Family Foundation c/o Robert F. Goldhammer 284 Locha Dr. Jupiter, FL 33458 1735. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $20,000.

900 3rd Ave., 35th Fl. New York, NY 10022 1736. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. Goldman

64-35 Yellowstone Blvd. Forest Hills, NY 11375 1725. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. 1726. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. GlaxoSmithKline

GlaxoSmithKline Holdings (Americas) Inc. Corporate Giving Program 5 Moore Dr. Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-3398 (919) 483-2719 Application address: P.O. Box 13398, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709; FAX: (919) 483-8765 1727. American Red Cross, National, DC. $267,753. 1728. AmeriCares Foundation, New Canaan, CT. $34,802. 1729. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000. 1730. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $45,901.

Herman Goldman Foundation 61 Broadway, 18th Fl. New York, NY 10006 (212) 797-9090 1737. Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. Goldman

1 Lombard St., Ste. 303 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415) 788-1090 FAX: (415) 788-7890; E-mail: info@goldmanfund.org; URL: http:// www.goldmanfund.org 1738. America’s Health Together, DC. $200,000. For expanding Facing Fear Together, national initiative addressing mental health issues related to exposure to homeland terrorism in the U.S. 1739. Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties, San Francisco, CA. $500,000. Goldman

Goldman Sachs Foundation

c/o Corporate Communications CA 1731. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000.

375 Park Ave., Ste. 1008 New York, NY 10152 (212) 902-5402 FAX: (212) 888-9482; URL: http://www.gs.com/ foundation 1740. Goldman Sachs Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000,000.

GM Corporate Giving Program M.C. 482-111-134 3044 W. Grand Blvd. Detroit, MI 48202-3091 (313) 556-4260 URL: http://www.gm.com/company/gmability 1732. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000.

Goldseker

Morris Goldseker Foundation of Maryland, Inc.

Golden

Golden Artists Colors New York, NY 1733. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $3,000. For New York Arts Recovery Fund.

1040 Park Ave., Ste. 310 Baltimore, MD 21201 (410) 837-5100 FAX: (410) 837-7927; E-mail: tdebord@goldsekerfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.goldsekerfoundation.org 1741. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. Goldsmith

Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation 375 Park Ave., Ste. 1602 New York, NY 10152 (212) 319-8700 1742. Gift of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. 1743. Here is New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001.

Good

Good Guys’ c/o Corporate Communications 1600 Harbor Bay Parkway Alameda, CA 94502 1746. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000.

c/o 4 Coliseum Ctr. 2730 W. Tyvola Rd. Charlotte, NC 28217-4578 (704) 423-7080 FAX: (704) 423-7127; E-mail: mviser@corp.bfg.com 1747. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. 1748. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. Goodyear

Global Resource

GM

c/o Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. 9 W. 57th St. New York, NY 10019 1745. Engine No. 22/Ladder No. 13 Family Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. For general support.

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Contributions Program

Richard & Rhoda Goldman Fund

Global

Golkin

Perry & Donna Golkin Family Foundation

Goodrich

Golding

Ginsberg

1744. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001.

The Goodrich Foundation, Inc.

The Faith Golding Foundation, Inc.

Albert and Pearl Ginsberg Foundation, Inc.

Gould

1144 E. Market St. Akron, OH 44316-0001 (330) 796-8928 FAX: (330) 796-8836; URL: http:// www.goodyear.com/corporate/community.html 1749. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $500,000. Goodyear

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Fund 1144 E. Market St. Akron, OH 44316-0001 (330) 796-2408 1750. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. Gordon

The Gordon Family Foundation c/o Goldman Sachs & Co. 85 Broad St., Tax Dept. New York, NY 10004 1751. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,500. For general support. Gordon

The Jeff Gordon Foundation P.O. Box 880 Harrisburg, NC 28075 FAX: (704) 455-0623; E-mail: foundation@jgiracing.com; URL: http:// www.jeffgordonfoundation.org 1752. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. To help restore life to children affected by terrorist attacks of September 11th. Gould

Edwin Gould Foundation for Children 23 Gramercy Park S. New York, NY 10003 (212) 982-5200 1753. Andrew Golkin Scholarship Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. 1754. Gramercy Park Block Disaster Relief Effort, New York, NY. $10,000. To support September 11th rescue workers stationed at Precinct 13.

173


GPU

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE GPU

GPU, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 300 Madison Ave. Morristown, NJ 07962 1755. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $18,000. 1756. Various organizations. $100,000. Graham

Philip L. Graham Fund c/o The Washington Post Co. 1150 15th St., N.W. Washington, DC 20071 (202) 334-6640 FAX: (202) 334-4498; E-mail: plgfund@washpost.com 1757. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $90,000. For The Survivors’ Fund. 1758. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $65,000. For September 11th Fund. 1759. United Way of National Capital Area, DC. $40,000. For September 11th Fund. Grainger

W. W. Grainger, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 100 Grainger Pkwy. Lake Forest, IL 60045 (847) 535-0540 1760. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. 1761. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,500. 1762. Various organizations. $50,000. Gramercy

The Gramercy Park Foundation, Inc. c/o Zemlock, Levy, Bick & Karnbad 225 Broadway, Ste. 1202 New York, NY 10007-3001 (212) 964-4140 1763. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $2,500. For general support.

Green

impact of World Trade Center bombing on well-being of New York’s children. 1768. Educational Broadcasting Corporation, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001. For pilot episode of Kids Cope, project of In The Mix program on PBS. Kids Cope will do a series of broadcast programs addressing the World Trade Center disaster from the perspective of students aged 14-18 throughout New York. 1769. Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, Jamaica, NY. $15,000, 2001. For Artist Cares program, in response to the events of September 11, 2001, promoting healing through creative expression and using artists, storytellers, and counselors/ therapists in structured workshops to help New York City children and youth. 1770. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $25,000. For research project, The Impact of the World Trade Center Disaster on the Mental Health of Children. 1771. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $15,000. For research project, The Impact of the World Trade Center Disaster on the Mental Health of Children. 1772. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For Moving from Crisis to Hope and Well-Being: A Response to the Events of September 11,2001, collaborative program with New York City Board of Education focusing on healing as well as racism and intolerance. Graustein

William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund One Hamden Ctr. 2319 Whitney Ave., Ste. 2B Hamden, CT 06518 (203) 230-3330 FAX: (203) 230-3331; E-mail: gmfmail@wcgmf.org; URL: http://www.wcgmf.org 1773. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Gray

Grand

The Grand Marnier Foundation 80 Rte. 4 E. Paramus, NJ 07652 (201) 368-9500 Fellowship application address: c/o Grand Marnier Film Fellowships, 165 W. 65th St., 4th Fl., New York, NY 10023; URL: http://www.filmlinc.com 1764. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. For general support. Grand Rapids

Grand Rapids Community Foundation 209-C Waters Bldg. 161 Ottawa Ave. N.W. Grand Rapids, MI 49503-2757 (616) 454-1751 FAX: (616) 454-6455; E-mail: grfound@grfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.grfoundation.org 1765. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $22,485. Granite

Granite Broadcasting Corporation

Garland Gray Foundation c/o Bruce B. Gray P.O. Box 397 Richmond, VA 23218 1774. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Great

Great Lakes Technologies Group c/o Corporate Communications 26999 Central Park Blvd, Suite 380 Southfield, MI 48076 1775. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $9,520. 1776. Focus: HOPE, Detroit, MI. $4,760. To alleviate drop in support since the September 11th attacks. 1777. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $4,760. For Bed and Bread Program in the aftermath of September 11th. Greater

Greater Jackson Foundation 4500 I-55 North Suite 258 Jackson, MS 39211 1778. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,400.

c/o Corporate Communications 767 3rd Ave - FL. 34 New York, NY 10017 1766. Various organizations. $750,000.

Greater

Grant

William T. Grant Foundation 570 Lexington Ave., 18th Fl. New York, NY 10022-6837 (212) 752-0071 FAX: (212) 752-1398; E-mail: info@wtgrantfdn.org; URL: http:// www.wtgrantfoundation.org/ 1767. Columbia University, New York, NY. $25,000. For Social Indicators Survey, study of

174

Greater New York Automobile Association c/o Communications Division 335 West 38th St.- 5th Floor New York, NY 10018 1779. Greater New York Auto Dealers Disaster Relief Fund. $250,000.

Green Mountain Power Corporation c/o Corporate Communications 163 Acorn Lane Colchester, VT 05446 1780. Various organizations. $25,000. For donations to support victims of September 11th and their families. Green

The Green River Foundation c/o Goldman Sachs & Co. 85 Broad St., Tax Dept. New York, NY 10004 1781. Neil D. Levin Educational Fund, NY. $1,000. Greenblatt

Burton G. and Anne C. Greenblatt Foundation, Inc. 111 Coolidge St. South Plainfield, NJ 07080 1782. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $500. GreenPoint

The GreenPoint Foundation, Inc. 90 Park Ave., 4th Fl. New York, NY 10016-1303 (212) 834-1215 FAX: (212) 834-1406; E-mail: gperry@greenpoint.com; URL: http:// www.greenpoint.com 1783. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. 1784. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $250,000. 1785. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $750,000. Greenwall

The Greenwall Foundation 2 Park Ave., 24th Fl. New York, NY 10016-5603 (212) 679-7266 FAX: (212) 679-7269; E-mail: admin@greenwall.org; URL: http:// www.greenwall.org 1786. HERE/Home for Contemporary Theater and Art, New York, NY. $5,000. 1787. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $5,000. 1788. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $5,000. 1789. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. 1790. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $5,000. 1791. Soho Repertory Theater, New York, NY. $5,000. To provide emergency relief for losses resulting from the World Trade Center disaster. Gregory

Alexis Gregory Foundation 1334 York Ave. New York, NY 10021 1792. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. Grotto

Grotto Foundation, Inc. 5323 Lakeland Ave. N., Ste. 100 Minneapolis, MN 55429-3115 Tel.: (763) 277-3434, ext. 3450; FAX: (763) 277-3444; E-mail: info@grottofoundation.org; URL: http://www.grottofoundation.org 1793. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. Gruner

Gruner & Jahr New York, NY 1794. Bertelsmann Relief Fund, New York, NY. $67,000, 2002.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Guffey

Hartford Haas

Hansen

Guffey Family Foundation

Walter and Elise Haas Fund

Hansen Family Foundation

6908 Matthews Mint Hill Rd., PMB 256, Ste. 340 Charlotte, NC 28227-4406 1795. State Street Heroes Fund, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000.

1 Lombard St., Ste. 305 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415) 398-4474 URL: http://www.haassr.org 1803. Facing History and Ourselves National Foundation, Brookline, MA. $46,000. To pilot curriculum studying legacies of September 11.

5050 Lincoln Dr., Ste. 480 Edina, MN 55436-2303 1818. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $15,000.

Guggenheim

The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation 527 Madison Ave., 15th Fl. New York, NY 10022-4304 (212) 644-4907 FAX: (212) 644-5110; E-mail: hfgacf@aol.com; URL: http://www.hfg.org 1796. Columbia University, New York, NY. $18,004. For symposium on terrorism at School of International and Public Affairs, with panelists Martha Crenshaw, Gustavo Gorriti and Ehud Sprinzak. Guidant

Guidant Foundation 111 Monument Cir., Ste. 2900 Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 971-2272 URL: http://www.guidant.com/foundation/ 1797. United Way of New York City, New York, NY. $117,930. Gund

The Agnes Gund Foundation c/o Agnes Gund 517 Broadway, 3rd Fl. East Liverpool, OH 43920 (330) 385-3400 1798. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support for Robin Hood Relief Fund.

Hapag-Lloyd

Hapag-Lloyd AG Hall

The Andrew J. and Christine C. Hall Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 1184 Southport, CT 06890-2184 1804. Citigroup Relief Fund, New York, NY. $10,000.

Harley

Harley-Davidson Foundation, Inc. Hallmark

Hallmark Corporate Foundation c/o Hallmark Cards, Inc. P.O. Box 419580, M.D. 323 Kansas City, MO 64141-6580 1805. American Red Cross, Kansas City, Kansas City, MO. $27,532, 2001. 1806. American Red Cross, Kansas City, Kansas City, MO. $7,268. 1807. American Red Cross, Kansas City, Kansas City, MO. $6,443. 1808. Greater Kansas City Community Foundation, Kansas City, MO. $50,000, 2001. 1809. Greater Kansas City Community Foundation, Kansas City, MO. $33,887, 2001. 1810. Salvation Army, Kansas and Missouri Division, Kansas City, MO. $3,865. 1811. Salvation Army, Kansas and Missouri Division, Kansas City, MO. $2,290. Hamilton

Gund

The George Gund Foundation

Thomas H. Hamilton Foundation, Inc.

1845 Guildhall Bldg. 45 Prospect Ave. W. Cleveland, OH 44115-1018 (216) 241-3114 FAX: (216) 241-6560; E-mail: info@gundfdn.org; URL: http://www.gundfdn.org 1799. American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, New York, NY. $50,000. For protecting civil liberties activities in wake of September 11. 1800. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001.

204 Philadelphia Ave. Egg Harbor City, NJ 08215 1812. Undesignated. $10,000. For donations for direct relief for victims of September 11th and their families.

Guttman

Stella and Charles Guttman Foundation, Inc. 122 E. 42nd St. Ste. 2010 New York, NY 10168 (212) 371-7082 FAX: (212) 371-8936; E-mail: info@guttmanfoundation.org; URL: http:// fdncenter.org/grantmaker/guttman/ 1801. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $25,000. For planning phase of partnership among Office of School Health, mental health professionals, and NYC Board of Education to build a mental health infrastructure for NYC public school community in wake of September 11th. H.O.

H.O. Penn, NYC Caterpillar Dealer c/o Corporate Communications 699 Brush Ave Bronx, NY 10465 1802. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000.

c/o Corporate Communications Ballindamm 25, D-20095 Hamburg, Germany 1819. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $720,000.

H&R

The H&R Block Foundation 4400 Main St. Kansas City, MO 64111-1812 (816) 932-8324 1813. American Red Cross, National, DC. $5,000. 1814. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Handspring

Handspring Foundation 189 Bernardo Ave. Mountain View, CA 94043 (650) 230-5446 E-mail: foundation@handspring.com; URL: http:// www.handspring.com/company/foundation/ 1815. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Handtmann

The Handtmann Family Foundation 333 Lambert Rd. Carpinteria, CA 93013 1816. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $2,000. Hanlon

The Hanlon Foundation 746 Walker Rd., PMB 10-186 Great Falls, VA 22066 1817. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $5,000.

3700 W. Juneau Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53208 (414) 343-4001 1820. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. Harrah’s

Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino Resort c/o Corporate Communications 15406 Manicopa Rd Manicopa, AZ 85239 1821. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Harriman

Gladys and Roland Harriman Foundation c/o Brown Brothers Harriman Trust Co. 140 Broadway, 4th Fl. New York, NY 10005 (212) 493-8182 1822. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000. 1823. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. For September 11th Fund. Harris

Harris Bank Chicago, IL 1824. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $190,551. 1825. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $150,000. Harris

The Irving Harris Foundation 191 N. Wacker Dr., Ste. 1500 Chicago, IL 60606-1899 (312) 621-0566 FAX: (312) 621-9179 1826. Undesignated. $100,000. To lend expertise to support early childhood and infant health services to those affected by the attacks. Harrisburg

The Greater Harrisburg Foundation 200 N. 3rd St., 8th Fl. P.O. Box 678 Harrisburg, PA 17108-0678 (717) 236-5040 FAX: (717) 231-4463; E-mail: info@ght.org; URL: http://www.ghf.org 1827. Undesignated. $32,000. Hartford

The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Hartford Plz. 690 Asylum Ave., T-12-56 Hartford, CT 06115 Tel.: (860) 547-5000, ext. 4995; FAX: (860) 547-6393; E-mail: jennifer.kasparian@thehartford.com; URL: http:// www.thehartford.com/about/affairs.html 1828. Aon Memorial Education Fund, Chicago, IL. $50,000. 1829. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $50,000.

175


Hartford

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Hawaii

1830. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $350,000. Hartford

The John A. Hartford Foundation, Inc. 55 E. 59th St., 16th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212) 832-7788 FAX: (212) 593-4913; E-mail: mail@jhartfound.org; URL: http:// www.jhartfound.org 1831. Council on Senior Centers and Services of New York City, New York, NY. $153,000, 2001. For September 11: Responding to the Needs of Older New Yorkers effort to help senior citizens’ agencies in New York meet client and agency needs in aftermath of World Trade Center attack. Grant will provide funds for creation of emergency response plans at member agencies, support agency staff training on problem identification and treatment referral options for clients, and provide employee assistance options for agency staff. Hartford

Hartford Foundation for Public Giving 85 Gillett St. Hartford, CT 06105 (860) 548-1888 FAX: (860) 524-8346; E-mail: hfpg2@hfpg.org; URL: http://www.hfpg.org 1832. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $51,000, 2001. For donations in response to September 11 terrorist attacks for individuals and families not supported by other funds. Hartmarx

Hartmarx Charitable Foundation 101 N. Wacker Dr., 23rd Fl. Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 357-5331 1833. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000. For undesignated purpose. Hartmarx is not accepting proposals from any organizations that are not presently being funded. Hasbro

Hasbro Children’s Foundation 10 Rockefeller Plz. New York, NY 10020-1903 (917) 606-6226 FAX: (917) 606-6264; URL: http:// www.hasbro.org 1834. National Philanthropic Trust, Jenkintown, PA. $250,000. To provide support services to surviving children of passengers and crews aboard crashed airplanes, clerical workers, secretaries, security personnel, and others lost at World Trade Center, the Pentagon, Fire, Police, EMS, and other rescue workers. Hassanein

The Salah M. Hassanein Foundation 514 Via De La Valle, Ste. 209 Solana Beach, CA 92075 (858) 509-7979 1835. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support. Hatfield

The Hatfield Family Foundation 12164 Occidental Rd. Sebastopol, CA 95472-9649 1836. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $12,076, 2001.

176

Hawaii Community Foundation 1164 Bishop St., Ste. 800 Honolulu, HI 96813 (808) 537-6333 FAX: (808) 521-6286; E-mail: info@hcf-hawaii.org; URL: http:// www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org 1837. Hawaii Community Foundation, Honolulu, HI. $370,000. Haworth

Haworth Inc. Corporate Giving Program 1 Haworth Ctr. Holland, MI 49423-9576 FAX: (616) 393-3740 1838. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $350,000. 1839. Various organizations. $650,000. Hazen

The Edward W. Hazen Foundation, Inc. 90 Broad St., Ste. 604 New York, NY 10004 (212) 889-3034 Application address: 309 5th Ave., Rm. 200-3, New York, NY 10016; E-mail: hazen@hazenfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.hazenfoundation.org 1840. Funding Exchange, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. Toward the Peace and Racial Justice Fund. 1841. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000, 2001. To aid the families and victims of the World Trade Center tragedy. HCA

The HCA Foundation 1 Park Plz., Building 1-4E Nashville, TN 37203 (615) 344-2390 FAX: (615) 344-5722; E-mail: joanne.pulles@hcahealthcare.com; URL: http:// www.hcacaring.org/ 1842. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,000,000. Health

Health Foundation of South Florida 601 Brickell Key Dr., Ste. 901 Miami, FL 33131 (305) 374-7200 FAX: (305) 374-7003; E-mail: pwood@hfsf.org; URL: http://www.hfsf.org 1843. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. HealthCare

The Healthcare Foundation for Orange County 1450 N. Tustin Ave., Ste. 103 Santa Ana, CA 92705-8641 (714) 245-1650 FAX: 714-245-1653; E-mail: Susan Zepeda, C.E.O.: szepeda@hfoc.org or Doris Flander, Off. Mgr.: dflander@hfoc.org; URL: http:// www.hfoc.org 1844. American Red Cross, Orange County Chapter. $5,000. For donations to be used locally in Orange County in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 1845. United Way of Orange County Chapter, Irvine, CA. $5,000. For donations to be used locally in Orange County in response to September 11 terrorist attacks.

Healthcare

The Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey 70 S. Orange Ave., Ste. 245 Livingston, NJ 07039 (973) 535-8200 FAX: (973) 535-8393; E-mail: info@hfnj.org; URL: http://www.hfnj.org/ 1846. Medical Society of New Jersey, Lawrenceville, NJ. $25,000. For Bioterrorism Informational Outreach Campaign. 1847. United Jewish Federation of MetroWest, Whippany, NJ. $26,000. For World Trade Center Relief Fund. Hearst

William Randolph Hearst Foundation 888 7th Ave., 45th Fl. New York, NY 10106-0057 (212) 586-5404 FAX: (212) 586-1917; Address for applicants from west of the Mississippi River: c/o Thomas Eastham, V.P. and Western Dir., 90 New Montgomery St., Ste. 1212, San Francisco, CA 94105, tel.: (415) 543-0400; URL: http://www.hearstfdn.org 1848. Aaron Davis Hall, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1849. Alliance of Resident Theaters/New York (ART/NY), New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1850. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000, 2001. To support the American Red Cross - National Headquarters in its emergency efforts in the wake of the World Trade Center and Pentagon disasters. 1851. ArtsConnection, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1852. Asian American Federation of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. Toward technical assistance programs and recovery efforts following World Trade Center disaster. 1853. Bloomingdale School of Music, New York, NY. $40,000, 2002. 1854. Brooklyn Childrens Museum, Brooklyn, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1855. Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1856. Brooklyn Youth Chorus, Brooklyn, NY. $40,000, 2002. 1857. Coalition for the Homeless, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward the Crisis Intervention Program. 1858. Elders Share the Arts, Brooklyn, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1859. Fund for the City of New York, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. Toward 9/11 New York Nonprofits Up and Running. 1860. Hamilton-Madison House, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward additional services needed in the aftermath of the September 11th attacks. 1861. Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, Jamaica, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1862. Museum for African Art, Long Island City, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1863. Museum of the City of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1864. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. To support technical assistance to build capacity at small mid-sized arts organizations. 1865. New York Hall of Science, Corona, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1866. New York Restoration Project, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1867. Queens Library Foundation, Jamaica, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1868. Queens Museum of Art, Flushing, NY. $50,000, 2002.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Hilton

Hennessy

1869. Rotunda Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1870. Salvation Army of Greater New York, New York, NY. $250,000, 2001. To support “Operation Compassion Under Fire,” the emergency efforts developed in response to the World Trade Center collapse. 1871. Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. Toward the Lower Manhattan Small Business and Workforce Retention Project to assist businesses and workers affected by the events of September 11th. 1872. Symphony Space, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1873. TADA Theater and Dance Alliance, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 1874. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $250,000, 2001. To assist families of the fallen rescue workers in the World Trade Center disaster. Heineken

Heineken

Hennessy Foundation, Inc. c/o Syska & Hennessy, Inc. 11 W. 42nd St. New York, NY 10036-8002 1884. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. Henry

Paul B. Henry Foundation c/o Varnum, Riddering, Schmidt, Howlett P.O. Box 352 Grand Rapids, MI 49501-0352 (616) 336-6000 1885. American Red Cross, Grand Rapids Chapter, Grand Rapids, MI. $5,000. Herbalife

Herbalife Family Foundation 1800 Century Park E. Los Angeles, CA 90067-1501 (310) 410-9600 FAX: (310) 557-3925 1886. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Herbst

c/o Corporate Communications 360 Hamilton Ave White Plains, NY 10601 1875. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $125,000. 1876. Netherlands American Chamber of Commerce, LaVerne, CA. $50,000. 1877. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $125,000. 1878. Various organizations. $200,000. For donations to support other disaster relief organizations in the aftermath of September 11th. Heinz

H. J. Heinz Company Foundation P.O. Box 57 Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0057 (412) 456-5773 FAX: (412) 456-7859; E-mail: heinz.foundation@hjheinz.com; URL: http:// www.heinz.com/jsp/foundation.jsp 1879. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 1880. United Way of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, PA. $67,000. To match employee contributions to 9/11 Fund. Heinz

Howard Heinz Endowment 30 Dominion Tower 625 Liberty Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222-3115 (412) 281-5777 FAX: (412) 281-5788; E-mail: info@heinz.org; URL: http://www.heinz.org 1881. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. Heinz

Vira I. Heinz Endowment 30 Dominion Tower 625 Liberty Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222-3115 (412) 281-5777 FAX: (412) 281-5788; E-mail: info@heinz.org; URL: http://www.heinz.org 1882. Pittsburgh Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA. $100,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund.

The Herbst Foundation, Inc. 30 Van Ness Ave., Ste. 3600 San Francisco, CA 94102 (415) 252-1220 1887. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

Hewlett

Heritage

Heritage Fund of Bartholomew County, Inc. P.O. Box 1547 Columbus, IN 47202 (812) 376-7772 FAX: (812) 376-0051; E-mail: hfgrants@kiva.net; URL: http://www.heritagefundbc.com 1888. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000.

c/o AtHome America, Inc. 5625 W. 115th St. Alsip, IL 60803 FAX: (708) 597-1435; E-mail: info@helpamericafoundation.org; URL: http:// www.helpamericafoundation.org/ 1883. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $100,000, 2002.

3000 Hanover St., M.S. 20AH Palo Alto, CA 94304-1112 (650) 857-2982 FAX: (650) 857-2982; E-mail: philanthropy_ed@hp.com; Application address: P.O. Box 10301, Palo Alto, CA 94303; URL: http:// www.hp.com/go/grants 1900. American Red Cross, National, DC. $3,000,000. 1901. American Red Cross, National, DC. $718,133. 1902. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $235,815.

Hermes

Hermes Foundation, Inc.

Hibernia

c/o Ropes & Gray 1 International Pl. Boston, MA 02110-2624 1889. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $1,000. For general support. Herrick

Herrick Foundation 150 W. Jefferson, Ave., Ste. 2500 Detroit, MI 48226 (313) 496-7585 FAX: (313) 496-8452 1890. Childrens Home of Detroit, Grosse Pointe Woods, MI. $5,000, 2002. Hess

Hess Foundation, Inc. 75 Eisenhower Pkwy. Roseland, NJ 07068 1891. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $20,000. For Relief Fund.

Hewitt Associates LLC Corporate Giving Program

Help

2121 Sand Hill Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650) 234-4500 FAX: (650) 234-4501; E-mail: info@hewlett.org; URL: http://www.hewlett.org 1895. Fund for Public Schools, Brooklyn, NY. $19,000, 2001. For programs to help children deal with terrorist attacks of September 11 by implementing Sera Learning Programs. 1896. Human Rights Watch, New York, NY. $75,000, 2001. 1897. International Crisis Group (Belgium), Brussels, Belgium. $400,000, 2002. Toward creation of global terrorism division and field offices in the Middle East and the Pakistan-Afghanistan region which will address root causes of terrorism and to advocate improved and coordinated international policy against terrorism. 1898. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $75,000. 1899. Safe Horizon, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001.

Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation

Hewitt

Help America Foundation, Ltd.

Hewlett

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

c/o Corp. Contribs. 100 Half Day Rd. Lincolnshire, IL 60069 1892. American Red Cross, National, DC. $161,802. 1893. National Organization for Victim Assistance, DC. $36,593. 1894. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $129,414.

Hibernia Corporation Contributions Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 313 Carondelet St. New Orleans, LA 70130 URL: http://www.hibernia.com/in_your_community 1903. American Red Cross, National, DC. $40,777. HIFN

HIFN c/o Corporate Communications 750 University Avenue Los Gatos, CA 95032 1904. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. Hill

The John W. Hill/Hill and Knowlton Foundation, Inc. 466 Lexington Ave. New York, NY 10017-3140 1905. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. Hilton

Conrad N. Hilton Foundation 10100 Santa Monica Blvd., Ste. 1000 Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310) 556-4694 FAX: (310) 556-2301; E-mail: cnhf@hiltonfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.hiltonfoundation.org 1906. American Red Cross, National, DC. $200,000. For September 11 relief efforts.

177


Hilton

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Hilton

Hilton Hotels Corporation Contributions Program c/o Contribs. Review Comm. 9336 Civic Center Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 278-4321 FAX: (310) 205-7678; URL: http:// www.hiltonworldwide.com/en/ww/company_info/ philanthropy_citizenship.jhtml 1907. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. For donation made on behalf of Hilton, HHonors Worldwide and Hilton Family of Hotels. Hispanic

Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation c/o Corporate Communications 3102 Oak Lawn Avenue, Suite 215 Dallas, TX 75219 1908. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $100,000. Hitachi

Hitachi America, Ltd. Corporate Giving Program 50 Prospect Ave. Tarrytown, NY 10591-4698 (914) 332-5800 1909. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. For combined corporate contribution from Hitachi North American Group Companies in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. Hitachi

The Hitachi Foundation 1509 22nd St., N.W. Washington, DC 20037-1073 (202) 457-0588 Nomination address: The Yoshiyama Award, P.O. Box 19247, Washington, DC 20036-9247; FAX: (202) 296-1098; URL: http://www.hitachi.org; URL: http://www.hitachifoundation.org 1910. American Red Cross, DC Chapter, DC. $50,000. For donation to Liberty Disaster Relief Fund for victims and families of the September 11, 2001 attack on America. 1911. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. For donations to victims and the families of September 11, 2001 attack on America. Hoblitzelle

Hoblitzelle Foundation 5956 Sherry Ln., Ste. 901 Dallas, TX 75225-6522 (214) 373-0462 URL: http://www.hoblitzelle.org 1912. American Red Cross, Dallas Area Chapter, Dallas, TX. $25,000. For September 11, 2001, response. 1913. Salvation Army of Dallas, Dallas, TX. $10,000. For North Texas Homefront Coalition, to educate communities about increased human and charitable needs following September 11th terrorist attacks. Home

The Home Depot, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 2455 Paces Ferry Rd. Atlanta, GA 30339-4089 Tel.: (770) 433-8211, ext. 82688 1914. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Home

Home Shopping Network c/o Corporate Communications 12000 25th Court North St. Petersburg, FL 33716 1915. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000.

178

HON

HON INDUSTRIES Charitable Foundation P.O. Box 1109 Muscatine, IA 52761-0071 Application address: 414 E. 3rd St., Muscatine, IA 52761-0071 1916. American Red Cross, National, DC. $91,150. Honeywell

Honeywell International Inc. Corporate Giving Program 101 Columbia Rd. Morristown, NJ 07962-2245 Application address: P.O. Box 2245, Morristown, NJ 07962-2245 1917. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Horizon

Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield c/o Corporate Communications 3 Penn Plaza Newark, NJ 07105 1918. American Red Cross, National, DC. $102,500. 1919. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield, Newark, NJ. $1,000,000. To pay health benefits for eligible families who experienced a change in their health coverage as a result of the September 11th attacks. Hosiosky

Issai & Ellen Hosiosky Foundation New York, NY 1920. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $622,500. Hotchkiss

W. R. Hotchkiss Foundation P.O. Box 64235 St. Paul, MN 55164-0235 1921. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $75,000.

1929. Amy Toyen Memorial Scholarship Fund, Avon, CT. $10,000, 2002. 1930. Aon Memorial Education Fund, Chicago, IL. $75,000, 2002. 1931. Aon Memorial Education Fund, Chicago, IL. $25,000. 1932. Cheshire Education Foundation, Cheshire, CT. $1,000. 1933. Comfort Zone Camp, Blairstown, NJ. $40,140, 2002. 1934. Cove Family Fund, Glen Rock, NJ. $10,000, 2002. 1935. Garden Pathways, Bakersfield, CA. $35,000, 2002. 1936. Hobin Keane & Klares Memorial Golf Tournament, Westport, CT. $10,000, 2002. 1937. Hospice of Medina County, Medina, OH. $25, 2002. 1938. Individual beneficiaries. $331,785, 2002. 1939. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $150,000, 2002. 1940. Mark S. Jardin Scholarship Fund, Hartford, CT. $1,000, 2002. 1941. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $77,000, 2002. 1942. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. 1943. Our Lady of Fatima, Wilton, CT. $10,000, 2002. 1944. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $125,000. 1945. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $75,000, 2002. HSBC

HSBC Bank USA Corporate Giving Program

Household

Household International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Philanthropic Svcs. 2700 Sanders Rd. Prospect Heights, IL 60070 (847) 564-6010 FAX: (847) 564-7094; URL: http:// www.household.com/corp/ hiau_community_commit.jsp 1922. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $500,000. 1923. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $300,000. 1924. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $500,000. 1925. Union Community Fund, DC. $100,000. Houston

Greater Houston Community Foundation 4550 Post Oak Pl., Ste. 100 Houston, TX 77027-3106 (713) 333-2200 FAX: (713) 333-2220; E-mail: lgardner@ghcf.org; URL: http://www.ghcf.org 1926. Undesignated. $22,000. Hovnanian

Hovnanian Enterprises c/o Corporate Communications 412 Montrose Lane Absecon, NJ 08205 1927. National Housing Endowment, DC. $1,000,000. HRH

HRH Charitable Foundation c/o Tax Dept. 4951 Lake Brook Dr., Ste. 500 Glen Allen, VA 23060 1928. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50, 2002.

452 5th Ave. New York, NY 10018 (212) 525-8239 URL: http://us.hsbc.com/inside/community/ communities.asp 1946. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. 1947. Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, New York, NY. $15,000. 1948. New York City Partnership Foundation, New York, NY. $25,000. Toward Foundation’s Business Assistance call center. 1949. Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association of the City of New York, New York, NY. $500,000. 1950. Uniformed Fire Officers Association of Greater New York, New York, NY. $500,000. Huffy

The Huffy Foundation, Inc. 225 Byers Rd. Miamisburg, OH 45342 1951. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000. Hughes

Howard Hughes Medical Institute c/o Office of Grants and Special Progs. 4000 Jones Bridge Rd. Chevy Chase, MD 20815-6789 (301) 215-8870 1952. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. 1953. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Humana

Jamieson

Indianapolis

Internet

The Humana Foundation, Inc.

The Indianapolis Foundation

Internet Security Systems

500 W. Main St. Louisville, KY 40202 (502) 580-3613 URL: http://www.humanafoundation.org 1954. American Red Cross, National, DC. $491,133, 2001. 1955. Community Foundation of Louisville, Louisville, KY. $35,000. For 9/11 anniversary event, and for study of merged government conducted by Brookings Institution in Washington, DC.

615 N. Alabama St., Rm. 119 Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 634-2423 FAX: (317) 684-0943; E-mail: program@cicf.org; URL: http://www.indyfund.org 1966. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001.

c/o Corporate Communications 6600 Peachtree Dunwoody No. R Atlanta, GA 30328 1978. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

InfoSpace

InfoSpace Foundation

Hundred

Hundred Club of Colorado Springs Colorado Springs, CO 1956. Silver Shield Foundation, New York, NY. $351,303, 2002. To support the families of the firefighters and police officers who lost their lives in the devastating terrorist attacks on New York City on September 11. Huntington

The Huntington Foundation 41 S. High St., HC 0910 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 480-3898 1957. United Way of Central Ohio, Columbus, OH. $150,000. For September 11th Fund.

601 108th Ave. N.E., Ste. 1200 Bellevue, WA 98004 (425) 201-8947 1967. American Red Cross, Seattle, WA. $10,000. For 9-11 effort. ING

5820 Westown Pkwy. West Des Moines, IA 50266-8223 1958. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. IFF

The IFF Foundation, Inc. 521 W. 57th St. New York, NY 10019 1959. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $125,000. Ikonix

Ikonix Group c/o Corporate Communications PO Box 1938 Lafayette, CA 94549 1960. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Illinois

c/o Communications Dept. 1 South Orange Street, Suite 600 Wilmington, DE 19801 1968. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. 1969. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000.

c/o Corporate Communications 10300 Eaton Place, Suite 300 Fairfax, VA 22030 1981. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. 1982. Undesignated. $25,000.

c/o Prog. Off. 5200 N.E. Elam Young Pkwy., AG6-601 Hillsboro, OR 97124-6497 FAX: (503) 456-1539; E-mail: intel.foundation@intel.com; URL: http:// www.intel.com/community/index.htm 1970. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $1,254,000, 2002. 1971. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,243,200, 2001. 1972. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. 1973. American Red Cross, National, DC. $11,000, 2001. For relief to New York City and Washington, DC after the events of September 11. Inter-Tel

Inter-Tel, Incorporated c/o Corporate Communications 120 North 44th Street, Suite 200 Phoenix, AZ 85034-1826 1974. Undesignated. $250,000.

Huntington

c/o Corp. Contribs. P.O. Box 1958 Huntington, WV 25720 (304) 526-5100 1963. Red Cross of Canada, Ottawa, Canada. $100,000. Independence

Independence Community Foundation 182 Atlantic Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11201 (718) 722-2300 FAX: (718) 722-5757; E-mail: inquiries@icfny.org; URL: http://www.icfny.org 1964. Independence Community Foundation, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000. 1965. Independence Community Foundation, Brooklyn, NY. $34,000.

c/o Corporate Communications 651 Warranville Road Lisle, IL 60532 1983. American Red Cross, National, DC. $20,000. Isermann

Isermann Family Foundation, Inc. c/o Conroy, Smith & Co. 385 Prospect Ave. Hackensack, NJ 07601 1984. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. itelligence

itelligence, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 4555 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 310 Cincinnati, OH 45242 1985. American Red Cross, National, DC. $125,000. ITT

Interactive

Inco Alloys International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program

IPSCO

IPSCO

ITT Industries, Inc. Corporate Giving Program

Illinois Tool Works Foundation 3600 W. Lake Ave. Glenview, IL 60025-5811 (847) 724-7500 FAX: (847) 657-4505; E-mail: mmallahan@itw.com; URL: http://www.itw.com/ itw_foundation.html 1961. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. 1962. Undesignated. $83,333.

IonIdea

IonIdea

Intel Foundation

Hy-Vee

c/o Corporate Communications 320 E. 72nd Street, Suite 9C New York, NY 10023 1979. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000. 1980. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $500,000.

ING DIRECT Kids Foundation

Intel

Hy-Vee Foundation, Inc.

Investment

Investment Technology Group, Inc.

Interactive Brokers Group c/o Corporate Communications 980 N. Michigan Ave Suite 1998 Chicago, IL 60611 1975. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. International

International Council of Shopping Centers Educational Foundation, Inc. 1221 Ave. of the Americas, 41st Fl. New York, NY 10020-1099 (646) 728-3800 FAX: (212) 589-5555; E-mail: RCohen@icsc.org 1976. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. International

International Paper Company Foundation 400 Atlantic St. Stamford, CT 06921 FAX: (203) 541-8261; URL: http:// www.internationalpaper.com/our_world/ philanthropy/index.asp 1977. International Paper Company Foundation, Memphis, TN. $1,200,000, 2001.

4 W. Red Oak Ln. White Plains, NY 10604 (914) 641-2157 FAX: (914) 696-2977; URL: http:// www.ittind.com/new/NEW-COMM.HTM 1986. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. 1987. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $250,000. Jacobus

Richard G. Jacobus Family Foundation, Inc. 2323 N. Mayfair Rd. Wauwatosa, WI 53226 (414) 475-6565 1988. United Way of Greater Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI. $5,000. Jamieson

Jamieson Foundation 1 Embaracadero Ctr., Ste. 1200 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415) 732-3702 FAX: (415) 732-3710; E-mail: sannesanfr@aol.com 1989. American Red Cross, National, DC. $5,000.

179


Janus

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Janus

The Janus Foundation 151 Detroit St. Denver, CO 80206 (303) 333-3863 FAX: (303) 394-7797; E-mail: janusfoundation@janus.com 1990. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000, 2001. For disaster relief efforts in New York. 1991. American Red Cross, National, DC. $3,924, 2001. 1992. Aon Memorial Education Fund, Chicago, IL. $715, 2001. 1993. Firefighters National Trust, Gig Harbor, WA. $2,241, 2001. 1994. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001. 1995. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $7,247, 2001. 1996. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $5,734, 2003. JCCC

JCCC Foundation 12345 College Blvd. Box 25 Overland Park, KS 66210 1997. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,700.

Jewish

Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland 1750 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH 44115-2106 Tel.: (216) 566-9200, ext. 268; FAX: (216) 861-1230; E-mail: mbennett@jcfcleve.org; URL: http://www.jewishcleveland.org 2003. United Jewish Communities, New York, NY. $181,000. Jewish

Jewish Federation of Hartford

Helen K. and Arthur E. Johnson Foundation

JL

JL Foundation 333 S. Hope St., Ste. 52 Los Angeles, CA 90071 (213) 486-9369 2005. Vera Institute of Justice, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. 2006. WNYC Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. JM

Jennings

625 Stanwix St., Ste. 2203 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (412) 434-5606 FAX: (412) 434-5907 1998. American Red Cross, Pittsburgh, PA. $25,000. To support direct relief for victims and their families in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. Jergens

The Andrew Jergens Foundation c/o The Greater Cincinnati Foundation 200 W. 4th St. Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 241-2880 1999. Hamilton County Urban Search & Rescue Task Force (USAR), Cincinnati, OH. $5,000. Jerome

Jerome Foundation 125 Park Square Ct. 400 Sibley St. St. Paul, MN 55101-1928 (651) 224-9431 FAX: (651) 224-3439; E-mail: info@jeromefdn.org; Additional tel.: (800) 995-3766 (MN and NY only); URL: http:// www.jeromefdn.org 2000. Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York, NY. $25,000. 2001. Three-legged Dog, New York, NY. $10,000.

c/o Corp. Contribs. 100 N.W. 12th Ave. Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 2007. United Way of Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $14,000. JM

The JM Foundation 60 E. 42nd St., Ste. 1651 New York, NY 10165 (212) 687-7735 FAX: (212) 697-5495; URL: http://fdncenter.org/ grantmaker/jm-milbank/ 2008. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, New York, NY. $25,000. For Responding to the Crisis: Rebuilding New York Initiative. 2009. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Johnson

Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Contribution Fund 1 Johnson & Johnson Plz. New Brunswick, NJ 08933 (732) 524-3255 2010. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. 2011. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,000,000. 2012. Various organizations. $6,000,000. To support local organizations with strong community outreach to help speed relief directly to those in need and help rebuild communities in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. Johnson

Jewett

George Frederick Jewett Foundation

Johnson Controls Foundation

The Russ Bldg. 235 Montgomery St., Ste. 612 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415) 421-1351 FAX: (415) 421-0721; E-mail: TFBjewettf@aol.com or ADGjewettf@aol.com 2002. San Francisco General Hospital Foundation, San Francisco, CA. $100,000. To develop emergency map for community in response to September 11 terrorist attacks.

5757 N. Green Bay Ave. P.O. Box 591, M.S. X-46 Milwaukee, WI 53201 (414) 524-2296 URL: http://www.johnsoncontrols.com/corpvalues/ foundation.htm 2013. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. Johnson

Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Foundation 1060 Park Ave. New York, NY 10128-1033 (212) 534-6620 FAX: (212) 410-5909 2014. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000, 2001.

180

Johnson

40 Woodland Drive Hartford, CT 06015 2004. United Jewish Community Relief Fund, New York, NY. $10,000.

JM Family Enterprises, Inc. Corporate Giving Program

The Mary Hillman Jennings Foundation

2015. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. 2016. Orpheon Little Orchestra Society, The, New York, NY. $14,000. For concert for 9/11 Victims’ Families. 2017. WNYC Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000. To replace antenna lost in World Trade Center attack. 2018. World Monuments Fund, New York, NY. $10,000.

1700 Broadway, Ste 1100 Denver, CO 80290-2301 (303) 861-4127 2019. Care and Share, Colorado Springs, CO. $10,000, 2004. 2020. Compa Food Ministries, Denver, CO. $15,000, 2004. 2021. Food Bank for Larimer County, Fort Collins, CO. $10,000, 2004. 2022. Food Bank of the Rockies, Denver, CO. $20,000, 2004. 2023. Longmont Meals on Wheels, Longmont, CO. $5,000, 2004. 2024. Meals on Wheels of Boulder, Boulder, CO. $10,000, 2004. 2025. Meals on Wheels of Greeley, Greeley, CO. $10,000, 2004. 2026. Project Angel Heart, Denver, CO. $10,000, 2004. 2027. Weld Food Bank, Greeley, CO. $10,000, 2004. Johnson

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rte. 1 and College Rd. E. P.O. Box 2316 Princeton, NJ 08543-2316 (609) 452-8701 E-mail: mail@rwjf.org; URL: http://www.rwjf.org 2028. America’s Health Together, DC. $563,000, 2002. 2029. American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL. $100,000, 2002. 2030. American Red Cross, Mercer County Chapter, Princeton, NJ. $149,619. To improve central Jersey disaster response preparedness and education. 2031. Art Science Research Laboratory, Inc., New York, NY. $700,000, 2002. Toward tools, clothes and supplies for recovery workers at World Trade Center site. 2032. Art Science Research Laboratory, Inc., New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. Toward tools, clothes and supplies for recovery workers at World Trade Center site. 2033. Asian American Federation of New York, New York, NY. $199,874. 2034. Association of Academic Health Centers, DC. $25,315, 2002. 2035. Association of Schools of Public Health, DC. $15,000, 2002. 2036. Burness Communications, Bethesda, MD. $269,273. 2037. Century Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000. To develop policies and programs for improving homeland security. 2038. Charles B. Wang Community Health Center, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. Toward provision of mental health services in Chinatown in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2039. Childrens National Medical Center, DC. $50,000, 2002. 2040. Columbia University, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. For project involving collection of


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Kauffman Jordan

oral histories of public health professional response to 9/11 and its aftermath. 2041. Columbia University, New York, NY. $49,571. To assess effects of World Trade Center attacks on well-being of New York residents. 2042. Committee for Hispanic Children and Families, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. For disaster-related counseling. 2043. Families and Work Institute, New York, NY. $180,000, 2002. To develop guide to assist educators nationally to help children and adolescents cope with crises such as World Trade Center terrorist attacks. 2044. International Communications Research, Media, PA. $245,000. 2045. National Association of County and City Health Officials, DC. $35,000, 2002. 2046. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, DC. $100,000, 2002. 2047. National Opinion Research Center, Chicago, IL. $78,275, 2001. For survey of public response to national tragedy. 2048. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. 2049. RAND Corporation, Arlington, VA. $49,971. To analyze perceived attitudes among postal workers toward public health response to anthrax exposure. 2050. Research Foundation of the City University of New York, New York, NY. $21,800, 2001. To draft guidelines and disseminate key information for medical school educators on biological weapons. 2051. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ. $175,000. 2052. Task Force for Child Survival and Development, Decatur, GA. $2,867,359. For technical assistance on research project at Public Health Informatics Institute: Modifying Information Systems to Improve Bioterrorism Readiness and Laboratory Management. 2053. Third Sector New England, Boston, MA. $50,000. 2054. Trauma Intervention Program of Merrimack County, Methuen, MA. $3,000. To provide comfort kits to area churches and families impacted by World Trade Center disaster. 2055. Trust for Americas Health, DC. $500,000. To develop educational campaign on public health preparedness. 2056. United Hospital Fund of New York, New York, NY. $750,000, 2001. To improve awareness of and enrollment in New York’s disaster relief Medicaid program. 2057. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. $224,654, 2002. 2058. Various organizations. $639,809. For undesignated funds to various organizations with distribution to be coordinated by United Way of New York and New York Community Trust.

Kanawha

The Jordan Foundation, Inc.

The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation

6001 River Rd., Ste. 100 Columbus, GA 31904-2949 (706) 649-3000 2060. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For September 11th Fund.

Huntington Sq., Ste. 1600 900 Lee St. E. Charleston, WV 25301 (304) 346-3620 FAX: (304) 346-3640; E-mail: tgkvf@tgkvf.org; URL: http://www.tgkvf.org 2071. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000.

Jostens

Jostens, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 5501 Norman Center Dr. Minneapolis, MN 55437 (612) 830-3235 2061. Todd M. Beamer Foundation, Cranbury, NJ. $150,000, 2003. To support the Heroic Choices program and the Foundation’s mission to provide long-term assistance to traumatized children. Joukowsky

Joukowsky Family Foundation 410 Park Ave., Ste. 1610 New York, NY 10022-4407 FAX: (212) 355-3147; E-mail: info@joukowsky.org; URL: http:// www.joukowsky.org 2062. Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, NJ. $100,000. For challenge grant for 9/11 funds. 2063. Nightingale-Bamford School, New York, NY. $106,927. For 9/11 challenge grant.

59 E. 54th St. New York, NY 10022-4211 2072. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. Kansas City

Kansas City Chiefs c/o Corporate Communications 1 Arrowhead Drive Kansas City, MO 64129 2073. Greater Kansas City Community Foundation, Kansas City, MO. $1,000,000. Kansas

Kansas Health Foundation

Joyce

The Joyce Foundation 3 First National Plz. 70 W. Madison St., Ste. 2750 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 782-2464 FAX: (312) 782-4160; E-mail: info@joycefdn.org; URL: http://www.joycefdn.org 2064. Various organizations. $50,000. To support local organizations that address human relations and ethnic tensions raised by attacks of September 11. Junior

Junior League of Hartford 993 Farmington Avenue West Hartford, CT 06105 2065. Junior League of New York, New York, NY. $1,000. Juniper

Juniper Networks c/o Corporate Communications 1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 2066. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. K-B

K-B Toys c/o Corporate Communications 100 West Street Pittsfield, MA 01201 2067. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000.

309 E. Douglas Wichita, KS 67202-3405 (316) 262-7676 FAX: (316) 262-2044; Additional tel.: (800) 373-7681; E-mail: nclaassen@khf.org; URL: http:// www.kansashealth.org 2074. Salvation Army of Wichita, Wichita, KS. $100,000. For effort to aid nation after September 11th attacks. 2075. United Way of the Plains, Wichita, KS. $100,000. For effort to aid nation after September 11th attacks. Kaplan

The J. M. Kaplan Fund, Inc. 261 Madison Ave., 19th Fl. New York, NY 10016 (212) 767-0630 FAX: (212) 767-0639; Application address for publication program: Furthermore, P.O. Box 667, Hudson, NY 12534; tel.: (518) 828-8900; URL: http://www.jmkfund.org 2076. Citizens Union Foundation of the City of New York, New York, NY. $45,000. To establish special section on Web site for coverage of New York City’s rebuilding efforts following World Trade Center attack. 2077. City Parks Foundation, New York, NY. $25,000. To revitalize lower Manhattan’s parks in aftermath of World Trade Center attacks. 2078. Fund for the City of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. To build New York Relief, Recovery, Rebuild website in response to World Trade Center attacks. Kauffman

Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Kaiser

Jones

Kandell

The Kandell Fund

Daisy Marquis Jones Foundation

Kaiser Permanente

1600 South Ave., Ste. 250 Rochester, NY 14620-3921 (585) 461-4950 FAX: (585) 461-9752; E-mail: mail@dmjf.org; URL: http://www.dmjf.org 2059. American Red Cross, National, DC. $5,000. For Disaster Relief Fund to help victims and families of terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001.

c/o Corporate Communications 1 Kaiser Plaza Oakland, CA 94612 2068. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. 2069. Union Community Fund, DC. $500,000. Kalamazoo

Kalamazoo Community Foundation 151 S. Rose St., Ste. 332 Kalamazoo, MI 49007 (269) 381-4416 FAX: (269) 381-3146; E-mail: info@kalfound.org; URL: http://www.kalfound.org 2070. American Red Cross, National, DC. $17,500.

4801 Rockhill Rd. Kansas City, MO 64110-2046 (816) 932-1000 FAX: (816) 932-1100; E-mail: info@emkf.org; URL: http://www.emkf.org 2079. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. For disaster relief efforts in New York and Washington, DC (with $5,000 earmarked for DC). 2080. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000. For September 11 Fund to be used to respond to urgent needs of victims and their families affected by terrorists attacks in New York and Washington, DC.

181


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SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Kauffman

Muriel McBrien Kauffman Foundation 4801 Rockhill Rd. Kansas City, MO 64110 FAX: (913) 649-9438 2081. American Red Cross, Kansas City, Kansas City, MO. $1,000. For support of the Genevieve Byrne Speaker Series on 11/12/01 f/b/o the American Red Cross Local Disaster Relief Fund. 2082. Greater Kansas City Community Foundation, Kansas City, MO. $10,000. For Kansas City September 11th Fund, which will provide support of health and human services for victims and families of 9/11/01 terrorist attacks in NYC and DC. Kaufman

Henry & Elaine Kaufman Foundation, Inc. 660 Madison Ave., 15th Fl. New York, NY 10021-8405 2083. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. Kayden

The Kayden Foundation 550 Mamaroneck Ave., Ste. 404 Harrison, NY 10528-1612 Application address: 10312 Shireoaks Ln., Boca Raton, FL 33498, tel.: (914) 381-1010 2084. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $1,000. Keck

W. M. Keck Foundation 550 S. Hope St., Ste. 2500 Los Angeles, CA 90071 (213) 680-3833 FAX: (213) 614-0934; E-mail: info@wmkeck.org; URL: http://www.wmkeck.org 2085. United Negro College Fund, VA. $500,000, 2001. To support scholarships for students who were economically affected by 9/11 including those whose parents lost their jobs or where students themselves lost part-time jobs. Kellogg

Peter & Cynthia K. Kellogg Foundation c/o Spear, Leeds, & Kellogg 120 Broadway New York, NY 10271-0093 2086. Andrew Golkin Scholarship Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. Kellogg

W. K. Kellogg Foundation 1 Michigan Ave. E. Battle Creek, MI 49017-4058 (269) 968-1611 FAX: (269) 968-0413; URL: http://www.wkkf.org 2087. Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services, Dearborn, MI. $450,000, 2002. To strengthen relationships between Arab-American and Chaldean communities and non-Arab communities through intensive community outreach and educational programs in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2088. Arab-American and Chaldean Communities Social Services Council, Lathrup Village, MI. $450,000, 2002. To strengthen relationships between Arab-American and Chaldean and non-Arab communities through intensive community outreach and educational programs in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2089. Citizens Committee for Children of New York, New York, NY. $324,941, 2002. To provide additional support to grantees whose work has been affected by terrorist actions of September 11, 2001. 2090. City Year, Boston, MA. $55,812, 2002. Toward development and distribution of curriculum, Facing Fear: Helping People Deal with Terrorism and Tragic Events, to K-8 students in the Washington, DC, area in response to September 11, 2001.

182

Kenan

2091. Columbia University, New York, NY. $1,169,822, 2002. To provide additional support to grantees whose work has been affected by terrorists’ actions of September 11, 2001. 2092. Columbia University, New York, NY. $295,000, 2002. To demonstrate (in response to September 11 terrorist attacks) how to sustain safety net providers through partnerships with community and health and human service providers. 2093. District of Columbia Birth Center, DC. $125,000, 2002. To support poor neighborhoods with high infant mortality rates in meeting new and unexpected demands as result of events of September 11, 2001. 2094. Family Support America, Chicago, IL. $299,917, 2002. For program to build and mobilize network of existing family support resources for times of crisis and disaster. 2095. International Center in New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. To promote long-term assistance and training to non-English speaking immigrants affected by terrorist actions of September 11, 2001. 2096. Learning Matters, New York, NY. $681,000. To empower youth to initiate dialogue on issues of race, diversity, and social and economic inequality in response to events of September 11. 2097. New York Immigration Coalition, New York, NY. $625,000, 2002. For short-term relief efforts on behalf of New York’s immigrant community and long-term implications of policy proposals that arise in response to September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. 2098. New York Regional Association of Grantmakers, New York, NY. $240,000, 2002. To promote sustained, strategic philanthropy among African-American, Latino, and Asian-American communities of New York metropolitan area in response to events of September 11, 2001. 2099. New York University, New York, NY. $275,000, 2002. To assure diversity of community voice in urban planning process to redesign and rebuild lower Manhattan. 2100. Piatigorsky Foundation, New York, NY. $20,000, 2002. For replacement of office equipment and supplies lost as result of events of September 11, 2001. 2101. Social Entreprise Alliance, San Francisco, CA. $300,000, 2002. To provide support and visibility to organizations addressing long-term needs of victims of terrorist actions of September 11, 2001. 2102. Sponsors for Educational Opportunity, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. To establish SEO Community Assistance Fund to give aid to organizations and programs affected by events of September 11, 2001. 2103. Women’s Funding Network, San Francisco, CA. $330,000, 2002. For work of women’s and girls’ foundations in New York, New Jersey and Washington, DC in response to terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 2104. Young Citizens, Inc., New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. For service-learning helper programs by New York City teachers as a result of terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Kempner

Harris and Eliza Kempner Fund, Inc. 2201 Market St., Ste. 601 Galveston, TX 77550-1529 (409) 762-1603 FAX: (409) 762-5435; E-mail: information@kempnerfund.org; URL: http:// www.kempnerfund.org 2105. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000.

William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust Kenan Ctr. P.O. Box 3858, Bowles Dr. Chapel Hill, NC 27515-3858 (919) 962-8150 2106. City University of New York, New York, NY. $2,500,000, 2002. For a fellowship program to support the best and brightest students from New York to remain in New York and attend the Honors College at CUNY. Kennecott

Kennecott Utah Copper Visitors Center Charitable Foundation P.O. Box 6001 Magna, UT 84044-6001 (801) 569-7433 E-mail: cononell@kennecott.com 2107. American Red Cross, National, DC. $5,686. For donation from KUC Employee Care and Share Campaign in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. Kennedy

The Ethel & W. George Kennedy Family Foundation, Inc. 1550 Madruga Ave., Ste. 225 Coral Gables, FL 33146 (305) 666-6226 FAX: (305) 666-2441; E-mail: admin@kennedyfamilyfdn.org; URL: http:// www.kennedyfamilyfdn.org 2108. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. 2109. University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL. $200,000. Kennedy

Karen A. & Kevin W. Kennedy Foundation c/o Goldman Sachs & Co. 85 Broad St., Tax Dept. New York, NY 10004 2110. Undesignated. $250,000. Keren

Keren Keshet - The Rainbow Foundation 1015 5th Ave. New York, NY 10028 (212) 396-8800 2111. Engine No. 22/Ladder No. 13 Family Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. For emergency support following September 11 attack. Key

Key Foundation 127 Public Sq., M.C. OH-01-27-0705 Cleveland, OH 44114-1306 (216) 689-5458 FAX: (216) 689-5444; E-mail: key_foundation@keybank.com 2112. Akron Community Foundation, Akron, OH. $450. 2113. American Red Cross, Greater Cleveland Chapter, Cleveland, OH. $10,065, 2001. 2114. American Red Cross, National, DC. $926,024. 2115. American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, New York, NY. $825. 2116. American Veterinary Medical Foundation, Schaumburg, IL. $750. 2117. AmeriCares Foundation, New Canaan, CT. $18,930. 2118. AmeriCares Foundation, New Canaan, CT. $510. 2119. Bowery Mission and Young Mens Home, New York, NY. $75. 2120. Campus Crusade for Christ, New York, NY. $300. 2121. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,350.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Knight Kirby

2122. Catholic Charities USA, Alexandria, VA. $25,914. 2123. Catholic Community Services, Newark, NJ. $6,000. 2124. City Mission, Cleveland, OH. $240. 2125. Clear Channel Communications, San Antonio, TX. $1,800. 2126. Community Church of Colonie, Albany, NY. $1,950. 2127. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $1,350. 2128. Community Foundation of Greater Lorain County, Lorain, OH. $300. 2129. Community Foundation of Southeastern Connecticut, New London, CT. $2,025. 2130. Doctors Without Borders USA, New York, NY. $150. 2131. Episcopal Relief and Development, New York, NY. $750. 2132. Federal Employee Education & Assistance Fund, Littleton, CO. $3,000. 2133. Feed the Children, OK. $75. 2134. Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union (HERE), Local 100, New York, NY. $750. 2135. International Aid, Spring Lake, MI. $6,000. 2136. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $157,920. 2137. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $2,025. 2138. Jewish Federation of Greater Washington, Rockville, MD. $1,800. 2139. Kiwanis International Foundation, Indianapolis, IN. $225. 2140. LCMS World Relief, Saint Louis, MO. $75. 2141. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $375. 2142. NASDAQ Issuers Disaster Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,500. 2143. National Disaster Search Dog Foundation, Ojai, CA. $150. 2144. National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, DC. $150. 2145. National Organization for Victim Assistance, DC. $450. 2146. Navy League of the United States, Arlington, VA. $900. 2147. New York City Rescue Mission, NY. $630. 2148. New York Community Trust, New York, NY. $1,350. 2149. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $176,255. 2150. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,947. 2151. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $11,475. 2152. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $1,875. 2153. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $9,018. 2154. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $175. 2155. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $8,962. 2156. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $125. 2157. New York Stock Exchange Fallen Heroes Fund, New York, NY. $67,761. 2158. New York Stock Exchange Fallen Heroes Fund, New York, NY. $100. 2159. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $4,125. 2160. Northwest Medical Teams International, Portland, OR. $5,790.

2161. Northwest Medical Teams International, Portland, OR. $150. 2162. Saint Bonaventure University, Saint Bonaventure, NY. $150. 2163. Saint Jude Church, NY. $300. 2164. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $800. 2165. Samaritans Purse, Boone, NC. $6,000. 2166. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $2,400. 2167. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $2,091. 2168. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $40. 2169. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $30,915. 2170. Undesignated. $401,416. 2171. Undesignated. $151,733. 2172. United Brotherhood of Carpenters Local 608, New York, NY. $90. 2173. United Jewish Communities, New York, NY. $1,350. 2174. United Methodist Committee on Relief, New York, NY. $750. 2175. William J. and Dorothy K. O’Neill Foundation, New York, NY. $7,500. 2176. Willoughby Rotary Foundation, NY. $750. 2177. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $2,100. 2178. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $200. 2179. WTEN/Trustco Bank, NY. $150. KeySpan

KeySpan Energy Delivery New England Corporate Giving Program 52 2nd Ave. Waltham, MA 02451 (781) 466-5101 FAX: (781) 290-4899 2180. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. Kikkoman

Kikkoman Foods Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 69 Walworth, WI 53184 (262) 275-6181 2181. Research Foundation of the State University of New York, Albany, NY. $50,000. To establish The Children and Spouses’ Secondary Education Scholarship Fund for benefit of families of victims of September 11th air disasters in Pennsylvania and at the Pentagon in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between SUNY and Kikkoma. Kimberly

Kimberly-Clark Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 619100 Dallas, TX 75261-9100 (972) 281-1200 2182. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Kimco

Kimco Realty Company c/o Corporate Communications 1533 Central Avenue Albany, NY 12205 2183. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Kindred

Kindred Healthcare c/o Corporate Communications 1313 St. Anthony Place Louisville, KY 40204 2184. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000.

F. M. Kirby Foundation, Inc. 17 DeHart St. P.O. Box 151 Morristown, NJ 07963-0151 (973) 538-4800 URL: http://www.fdncenter.org/grantmaker/kirby 2185. Helen Keller International, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. For one-time increase of support in response to extraordinary losses suffered as result of World Trade Center disaster. Kirkeby

Kirkeby Foundation 730 Arizona Ave., Ste. 421 Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 451-9455 2186. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,000, 2001. Kirsch

The Irving and Elaine Kirsch Foundation 20 Corporate Woods Blvd. Albany, NY 12211 (518) 465-4500 2187. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Knight

Faith & James Knight Foundation, Inc. c/o R.J. Gaughran P.O. Box 143 Middletown, NJ 07748 2188. American Red Cross, Asbury Park, NJ. $10,000. Knight

John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Wachovia Financial Ctr., Ste. 3300 200 S. Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33131-2349 (305) 908-2600 2189. Access, Akron, OH. $50,000, 2002. 2190. Aid to Victims of Domestic Assault, Delray Beach, FL. $50,000, 2002. 2191. AIDS Task Force, Fort Wayne, IN. $10,000, 2002. 2192. Akron Community Service Center and Urban League, Akron, OH. $100,000, 2002. 2193. Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank, Akron, OH. $100,000, 2002. 2194. Alexandra House, Blaine, MN. $17,000, 2002. 2195. America’s Second Harvest of the Big Bend, Tallahassee, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2196. American Red Cross, Centre Communities Chapter, State College, PA. $10,000, 2002. 2197. American Red Cross, Northeast Indiana Chapter, Fort Wayne, IN. $10,000, 2002. 2198. American Red Cross, Oconee Valley Chapter, Milledgeville, GA. $30,000, 2002. 2199. Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services, Dearborn, MI. $100,000, 2002. 2200. Arab-American and Chaldean Communities Social Services Council, Lathrup Village, MI. $100,000, 2002. 2201. Asian Americans for Community Involvement of Santa Clara County, San Jose, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2202. ASPIRA of Florida, Miami, FL. $35,000, 2002. 2203. Associated Churches of Fort Wayne and Allen County, Fort Wayne, IN. $10,000, 2002. 2204. Battered Womens Shelter, Akron, OH. $50,000, 2002. 2205. Big Bend Cares, Tallahassee, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2206. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Greater Miami, Miami, FL. $30,000, 2002.

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SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

2207. Bill Wilson Marriage and Family Counseling Center, Santa Clara, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2208. Boulder County Safehouse, Boulder, CO. $21,930, 2002. 2209. Boulder Shelter for the Homeless, Boulder, CO. $22,210, 2002. 2210. Boys and Girls Club of Duluth, Duluth, MN. $10,000, 2002. 2211. Boys and Girls Club of Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN. $25,000, 2002. 2212. Boys and Girls Club of Superior, Superior, WI. $10,000, 2002. 2213. Boys and Girls Clubs of Long Beach, Long Beach, CA. $70,000, 2002. 2214. Boys and Girls Clubs of Summit County, Akron, OH. $50,000, 2002. 2215. Boys and Girls Clubs of the Gulf Coast, Biloxi, MS. $10,000, 2002. 2216. Boysville of Michigan, Clinton, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2217. Bread of Life EPA, East Palo Alto, CA. $15,000, 2002. 2218. Brehon Institute for Human Services, Tallahassee, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2219. Bridgeway House, Tallahassee, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2220. Broward Coalition for the Homeless, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $35,000, 2002. 2221. Broward Partnership for the Homeless, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $30,000, 2002. 2222. Cabarrus Cooperative Christian Ministry, Concord, NC. $25,000, 2002. 2223. Camillus House, Miami, FL. $25,000, 2002. 2224. Capital Area Healthy Start Coalition, Tallahassee, FL. $30,000, 2002. 2225. Capital City Youth Services, Tallahassee, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2226. CareTeam, Myrtle Beach, SC. $15,000, 2002. 2227. Catholic Charities of Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN. $10,000, 2002. 2228. Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County, San Jose, CA. $35,000, 2002. 2229. Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami, Miami, FL. $125,000, 2002. 2230. Catholic Charities of Wichita, Wichita, KS. $15,000, 2002. 2231. Catholic Social and Community Services, Biloxi, MS. $10,000, 2002. 2232. Catholic Social Services of Summit County, Akron, OH. $25,000, 2002. 2233. Catholic Social Services of the Diocese of Charlotte, Charlotte, NC. $50,000, 2002. 2234. Center Against Sexual and Domestic Abuse, Superior, WI. $5,000. 2235. Center for Family Services of Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, FL. $50,000, 2002. 2236. Center for Health and Wellness, Wichita, KS. $25,000, 2002. 2237. Center for Information and Crisis Services, Lantana, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2238. Center of Hope, Wichita, KS. $15,000, 2002. 2239. Centre County Women’s Resource Center, State College, PA. $35,000, 2002. 2240. Century Foundation, New York, NY. $200,000. To study how new homeland security measures affect freedom of information and federal government reporting. 2241. CHARLEE of Dade County, Miami, FL. $40,000, 2002. 2242. Charlotte Center for Urban Ministry, Charlotte, NC. $25,000, 2002.

184

2243. Charlotte Rescue Mission, Charlotte, NC. $50,000, 2002. 2244. Children’s Clinic, Long Beach, CA. $50,000, 2002. 2245. Children’s Haven and Adult Center, Sarasota, FL. $40,000, 2002. 2246. Children’s Home Society of Florida, Tallahassee, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2247. City Team Ministries, San Jose, CA. $50,000, 2002. 2248. Clara-Mateo Alliance Community Shelter, Menlo Park, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2249. Coalition on Temporary Shelter (COTS), Detroit, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2250. Columbus Baptist Association, Columbus, GA. $15,000, 2002. 2251. Committee for Dignity and Fairness for the Homeless Housing Development, Philadelphia, PA. $100,000, 2002. 2252. Community Action Council for Lexington-Fayette, Bourbon, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Lexington, KY. $100,000, 2002. 2253. Community Culinary School of Charlotte, Charlotte, NC. $10,000, 2002. 2254. Community Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Indiana, Fort Wayne, IN. $10,000, 2002. 2255. Community Kitchen of Myrtle Beach, Myrtle Beach, SC. $15,000, 2002. 2256. Community Partnership for Homeless, Miami, FL. $125,000, 2002. 2257. Community Service Council of Chester County, West Chester, PA. $50,000, 2002. 2258. Community Violence Intervention Center, Grand Forks, ND. $30,000, 2002. 2259. Concern for the Poor, San Jose, CA. $20,000, 2002. 2260. Cooperative Feeding Program, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $30,000, 2002. 2261. Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of Aberdeen Fifth Judicial Circuit, Aberdeen, SD. $25,000, 2002. 2262. Covenant House Michigan, Detroit, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2263. Crisis Assistance Ministry, Charlotte, NC. $150,000, 2002. 2264. Crisis Center of Gary, Gary, IN. $40,000, 2002. 2265. CUP Inc., Charlotte, NC. $10,000, 2002. 2266. Cupertino Community Services, Cupertino, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2267. Daily Bread Community Food Bank, Miami, FL. $60,000, 2002. 2268. Damiano Center, Duluth, MN. $10,000, 2002. 2269. Day Shelter, Charlotte, NC. $25,000, 2002. 2270. Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries, Detroit, MI. $75,000, 2002. 2271. Diocese of San Jose, Santa Clara, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2272. Eastside Emergency Center, Detroit, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2273. ECHO Outreach Ministries, Tallahassee, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2274. Ecumenical Hunger Program, East Palo Alto, CA. $20,000, 2002. 2275. Emergency Family Assistance Association, Boulder, CO. $33,520, 2002. 2276. Emergency Housing Consortium of Santa Clara County, San Jose, CA. $35,000, 2002. 2277. Episcopal Social Services, Wichita, KS. $10,000, 2002. 2278. Family Center, Charlotte, NC. $25,000, 2002.

2279. Family Resource Center of South Florida, Miami, FL. $50,000, 2002. 2280. Family Service Center of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. $50,000, 2002. 2281. Family Service of Chester County, West Chester, PA. $100,000, 2002. 2282. Family Service of Montgomery County, Norristown, PA. $25,000, 2002. 2283. Farm Share, Florida City, FL. $50,000, 2002. 2284. First Witness Child Abuse Resource Center, Duluth, MN. $20,000, 2002. 2285. Focus: HOPE, Detroit, MI. $100,000, 2002. 2286. Food Bank of Oakland County, Pontiac, MI. $50,000, 2002. 2287. Food Bank of South Jersey, Camden, NJ. $25,000, 2002. 2288. Food Bank of State College, State College, PA. $20,000, 2002. 2289. Forgotten Harvest, Southfield, MI. $75,000, 2002. 2290. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $75,000. For general operating support and to catalog foundation and corporate giving in response to events of September 11, 2001. 2291. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $75,000. For general operating support and to catalog foundation and corporate giving in response to events of September 11, 2001. 2292. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $45,000, 2002. For September 11th Philanthropic Response Project. 2293. Gleaners Community Food Bank, Detroit, MI. $75,000, 2002. 2294. God’s Pantry Food Bank, Lexington, KY. $50,000, 2002. 2295. Good Neighbors, Akron, OH. $25,000, 2002. 2296. Goodwill Industries of Greater Detroit, Detroit, MI. $50,000, 2002. 2297. Goodwill Industries of Middle Georgia, Macon, GA. $25,000, 2002. 2298. Goodwill Industries of the Southern Piedmont, Charlotte, NC. $10,000, 2002. 2299. Goodwill Industries of Upper South Carolina, Greenville, SC. $25,000, 2002. 2300. Greater Philadelphia Food Bank, Philadelphia, PA. $150,000, 2002. 2301. Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition, Philadelphia, PA. $150,000, 2002. 2302. Guadalupe Clinic, Wichita, KS. $25,000, 2002. 2303. Gulf Coast Womens Center for Nonviolence, Biloxi, MS. $10,000, 2002. 2304. Habitat for Humanity of Greater Akron, Akron, OH. $25,000, 2002. 2305. Habitat for Humanity of Greater Miami, Miami, FL. $45,000, 2002. 2306. Harvest Hope Food Bank, Columbia, SC. $75,000, 2002. 2307. HAVEN (Help Against Violent Encounters Now), Pontiac, MI. $75,000, 2002. 2308. Haven of Rest Ministries, Akron, OH. $50,000, 2002. 2309. HelpSource, Ann Arbor, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2310. Homeless Care Force, Santa Clara, CA. $15,000, 2002. 2311. HOPE of Manatee County, Bradenton, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2312. Horace Mann-Ambridge Neighborhood Improvement, Gary, IN. $50,000, 2002. 2313. House of Restoration, Phenix City, AL. $40,000, 2002.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER 2314. House of Time, Columbus, GA. $40,000, 2002. 2315. Hunter Health Clinic, Wichita, KS. $25,000, 2002. 2316. Immigrant Resettlement and Cultural Center, San Jose, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2317. Info Line, Akron, OH. $40,000, 2002. 2318. Inn Between of Longmont, Longmont, CO. $10,000, 2002. 2319. Inn Vision of Santa Clara Valley, San Jose, CA. $65,000, 2002. 2320. Interfaith Ministries Wichita, Wichita, KS. $15,000, 2002. 2321. Interval Brotherhood Homes Corporation, Akron, OH. $100,000, 2002. 2322. Jewish Family Service, Southfield, MI. $75,000, 2002. 2323. Jubilee Center of South Broward, Hollywood, FL. $15,000, 2002. 2324. Kansas Food Bank Warehouse, Wichita, KS. $25,000, 2002. 2325. L.I.F.T. Women’s Resource Center, Detroit, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2326. Let’s Grow Akron, Akron, OH. $10,000, 2002. 2327. Lifetrack Resources, Saint Paul, MN. $33,000, 2002. 2328. Lighthouse Emergency Services, Pontiac, MI. $75,000, 2002. 2329. Lighthouse Mission, Macon, GA. $10,000, 2002. 2330. Loaves and Fishes Family Kitchen, San Jose, CA. $15,000, 2002. 2331. Loaves and Fishes Ministry of Macon, Macon, GA. $25,000, 2002. 2332. Long Beach Day Nursery, Long Beach, CA. $50,000, 2002. 2333. Longmont Coalition for Women in Crisis, Longmont, CO. $12,340, 2002. 2334. Lords Place, West Palm Beach, FL. $15,000, 2002. 2335. Lutheran Services Florida, Tampa, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2336. Lutheran Social Service of Kansas, Wichita, KS. $10,000, 2002. 2337. Lutheran Social Services of Indiana, Fort Wayne, IN. $20,000, 2002. 2338. Lutheran Social Services of North Florida, Tallahassee, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2339. Macomb County Rotating Emergency Shelter Team, Mount Clemens, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2340. Macon Outreach at Mulberry, Macon, GA. $25,000, 2002. 2341. Manatee Children’s Services, Bradenton, FL. $15,000, 2002. 2342. Manatee Opportunity Council, Bradenton, FL. $12,500, 2002. 2343. Meals on Wheels of Baldwin County, Milledgeville, GA. $5,000. 2344. Meals on Wheels Plus of Manatee, Bradenton, FL. $12,500, 2002. 2345. Mental Health Association of Mississippi, Gulfport, MS. $20,000, 2002. 2346. Miami Rescue Mission, Miami, FL. $125,000, 2002. 2347. Middle Georgia Community Food Bank, Macon, GA. $25,000, 2002. 2348. Moore Community House, Biloxi, MS. $5,000. 2349. Mothers in Crisis, Tallahassee, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2350. Mount Bethel Human Services Corporation, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $25,000, 2002.

2351. National Security Archive Fund, DC. $150,000. To complete audit of federal Freedom of Information Act policy since terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. 2352. Neighbor to Neighbor, White Bear Lake, MN. $101,000, 2002. 2353. New Image Emergency Shelter for the Homeless, Long Beach, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2354. Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence, San Jose, CA. $20,000, 2002. 2355. Open Door Community House, Columbus, GA. $25,000, 2002. 2356. Opportunity Parish Ecumenical Neighborhood Ministry, Akron, OH. $25,000, 2002. 2357. Ozone House, Ann Arbor, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2358. PACE Center for Girls of Leon County, Tallahassee, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2359. Park Center, Fort Wayne, IN. $10,000, 2002. 2360. Philabundance, Philadelphia, PA. $100,000, 2002. 2361. Philadelphia Committee to End Homelessness, Philadelphia, PA. $100,000, 2002. 2362. Pilgrims’ Inn, Rock Hill, SC. $25,000, 2002. 2363. Planned Parenthood Mar Monte, San Jose, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2364. Prairie Harvest Human Services Foundation, Grand Forks, ND. $20,000, 2002. 2365. Pro Bono Project of Santa Clara County, San Jose, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2366. RotaCare Bay Area, Gilroy, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2367. Ruth Rales Jewish Family Service, Boca Raton, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2368. S.O.S. Community Services Crisis Center, Ypsilanti, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2369. S.O.S. Health Care, Myrtle Beach, SC. $30,000, 2002. 2370. Sacred Heart Community Service, San Jose, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2371. Safe Harbor, Aberdeen, SD. $25,000, 2002. 2372. Saint Jude House, Crown Point, IN. $20,000, 2002. 2373. Saint Paul Western Palm Beach County Food Distribution Center, Belle Glade, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2374. Saint Peters Home for Boys, Detroit, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2375. Saint Vincent de Paul Society, Detroit, MI. $75,000, 2002. 2376. Saint Vincent de Paul Society, Milledgeville, GA. $10,000, 2002. 2377. Saint Vincent de Paul Society of San Mateo, San Mateo, CA. $20,000, 2002. 2378. Saint Vincent de Paul Society of Santa Clara County, Mountain View, CA. $25,000, 2002. 2379. Salvation Army of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, SD. $20,000, 2002. 2380. Salvation Army of Akron, Akron, OH. $50,000, 2002. 2381. Salvation Army of Biloxi, Biloxi, MS. $10,000, 2002. 2382. Salvation Army of Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $65,000, 2002. 2383. Salvation Army of Conway, Conway, SC. $40,000, 2002. 2384. Salvation Army of Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN. $10,000, 2002. 2385. Salvation Army of Grand Forks, Grand Forks, ND. $50,000, 2002.

Knight 2386. Salvation Army of Gulfport, Gulfport, MS. $20,000, 2002. 2387. Salvation Army of Macon, Macon, GA. $75,000, 2002. 2388. Salvation Army of Miami, Miami, FL. $125,000, 2002. 2389. Salvation Army of Milledgeville, Milledgeville, GA. $30,000, 2002. 2390. Salvation Army of Munster, Munster, IN. $25,000, 2002. 2391. Salvation Army of Rock Hill, Rock Hill, SC. $25,000, 2002. 2392. Salvation Army of Santa Clara County, San Jose, CA. $65,000, 2002. 2393. San Jose Day Nursery, San Jose, CA. $15,000, 2002. 2394. San Jose First Community Services, San Jose, CA. $15,000, 2002. 2395. SCAN, Fort Wayne, IN. $10,000, 2002. 2396. Second Harvest Food Bank of Metrolina, Charlotte, NC. $50,000, 2002. 2397. Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties, San Jose, CA. $100,000, 2002. 2398. Second Harvest Food Bank of the Chattahoochee Valley, Columbus, GA. $25,000, 2002. 2399. Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank, Duluth, MN. $20,000, 2002. 2400. Sexual Assault Crisis Agency, Long Beach, CA. $20,000, 2002. 2401. Shelter Network of San Mateo County, Burlingame, CA. $25,000, 2002. 2402. Shepherds Way, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $40,000, 2002. 2403. Sistercare, Columbia, SC. $50,000, 2002. 2404. South Central Improvement Alliance, Wichita, KS. $10,000, 2002. 2405. South Florida Food Recovery, Miami, FL. $30,000, 2002. 2406. South Mississippi Exchange Clubs Child Abuse Prevention Center, Gulfport, MS. $15,000, 2002. 2407. Starfish Family Services, Inkster, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2408. Starting Over, Miramar, FL. $15,000, 2002. 2409. Summit County Community Drug Board, Akron, OH. $25,000, 2002. 2410. Sunnyvale Community Services, Sunnyvale, CA. $25,000, 2002. 2411. Support Network for Battered Women, Mountain View, CA. $20,000, 2002. 2412. Susan B. Anthony Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $15,000, 2002. 2413. Switchboard of Miami, Miami, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2414. Telephone Counseling and Referral Service, Tallahassee, FL. $30,000, 2002. 2415. Think Detroit, Detroit, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2416. Tooth Mobile, Santa Clara, CA. $20,000, 2002. 2417. Turn About, Tallahassee, FL. $10,000, 2002. 2418. Turning Point of Union County, Monroe, NC. $25,000, 2002. 2419. Turnstone Center for Disabled Children and Adults, Fort Wayne, IN. $5,000. 2420. Undesignated. $500,000. For memorial efforts for hijacking victims of Flight 93. 2421. Union Organization for Social Service, Pennsauken, NJ. $50,000, 2002. 2422. United Family Services, Charlotte, NC. $25,000, 2002.

185


Knight

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Kohlberg

2423. Uptown Outreach Food Pantry, Columbus, GA. $15,000, 2002. 2424. Urban League of Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN. $5,000. 2425. Urban Ministry of Palo Alto, Palo Alto, CA. $10,000, 2002. 2426. Valley Rescue Mission, Columbus, GA. $40,000, 2002. 2427. Village of Arts and Humanities, Philadelphia, PA. $150,000, 2002. 2428. Vincent House, Fort Wayne, IN. $25,000, 2002. 2429. Voices for Children Foundation, Miami, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2430. Warren-Conner Development Coalition, Detroit, MI. $25,000, 2002. 2431. Wichita Childrens Home, Wichita, KS. $15,000, 2002. 2432. Wichita Family Services Institute, Wichita, KS. $10,000, 2002. 2433. Women in Distress of Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, FL. $20,000, 2002. 2434. Women’s Coalition, Duluth, MN. $20,000, 2002. 2435. YMCA of Superior-Douglas County, Superior, WI. $5,000. 2436. YMCA, Akron Metropolitan Board, Akron, OH. $25,000, 2002. 2437. Young Men’s Christian Association of Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN. $20,000, 2002. 2438. Youth and Family Assistance, Redwood City, CA. $20,000, 2002. 2439. Youth Service, Philadelphia, PA. $25,000, 2002. 2440. YWCA. of Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN. $20,000, 2002. Knott

The Marion I. and Henry J. Knott Foundation, Inc. 3904 Hickory Ave. Baltimore, MD 21211-1834 (410) 235-7068 FAX: (410) 889-2577; E-mail: knott@knottfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.knottfoundation.org 2441. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,500.

The Kohlberg Foundation, Inc. 111 Radio Cir. Mount Kisco, NY 10549 FAX: (914) 241-1195; E-mail: dehaan@Kfound.org 2445. National Philanthropic Trust, Jenkintown, PA. $100,000. For September 11th Children’s Fund. 2446. National Philanthropic Trust, Jenkintown, PA. $300. 2447. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $75,000. For September 11th Fund. 2448. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,600. For September 11th Fund. Kohlberg

Kohlberg Kravis Roberts Foundation c/o Simpson, Thacher & Bartlett One Battery Park Plaza New York, NY 10004-1412 2449. Heroes of New York Scholarship Foundation, New York, NY. $2,500,000. To provide for families of emergency and safety workers. Kornfeld

Emily Davie and Joseph S. Kornfeld Foundation 41 Schermerhorn St., Ste. 208 Brooklyn, NY 11201 (718) 624-7969 FAX: (718) 834-1204; E-mail: office@kornfeldfdn.org; URL: http://fdncenter.org/ grantmaker/kornfeld/ 2450. Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000. For emergency operating support in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2451. City Harvest, New York, NY. $5,000. To provide refrigerated trucks for on-site delivery of food donations to emergency workers at World Trade Center site. 2452. Forest Hills Community House, Forest Hills, NY. $10,000, 2001. For 9/11 Program. 2453. Henry Street Settlement, New York, NY. $25,000. For emergency operating support in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2454. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. For donation to Special 9/11 fund.

Kobo KPMG

Kobo Products c/o Corporate Communications 3474 South Clinton Avenue South Plainfield, NJ 07080 2442. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Koch

Koch Foundation, Inc. 2830 N.W. 41st St., Ste. H Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 373-7491 2443. Mount Manresa Retreat House, Staten Island, NY. $50,000. For emergency relief efforts following 9/11 attack. Koch

Koch Industries, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 4111 E. 37th St. N. Wichita, KS 67220-3203 FAX: (316) 828-5739; URL: http:// www.kochind.com/community/default.asp 2444. Kansas Chamber Education Foundation, Topeka, KS. $1,000,000. For donation to September 11th Scholarship fund, pass-through fund of Kansas Chamber Education Fund which contributed all funds raised to Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund.

186

KPMG Consulting Charitable Foundation 106 Allen Road Liberty Corner, NJ 07938 2455. Various organizations. $205,000. To support the September 11 Fund, the NY Firefighters 9-11 Disaster Fund, the UFA Widows & Children’s Fund and the WTC Police Disaster Fund. KPMG

The KPMG Foundation 3 Chestnut Ridge Rd. Montvale, NJ 07645 FAX: (201) 307-7093; E-mail: tperino@kpmg.com; URL: http://www.kpmgfoundation.org 2456. KPMG Peat Marwick Disaster Relief Fund, Montvale, NJ. $1,000,000. Krahm

Dorothy H. Krahm Charitable Foundation, Inc. c/o John T. Krahm 128 Great Barrington Rd. West Stockbridge, MA 01266-9209 2457. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000. 2458. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. 2459. We Care Rockville Center Fund, Rockville Centre, NY. $30,000.

Kravis

The Robert Kravis and Kimberly Kravis Foundation c/o Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. 9 W. 57th St. New York, NY 10019 2460. Ground Hero Kids, New York, NY. $10,000. Kresge

The Kresge Foundation 3215 W. Big Beaver Rd. P.O. Box 3151 Troy, MI 48007-3151 (248) 643-9630 FAX: (248) 643-0588; URL: http://www.kresge.org 2461. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $750,000. For challenge grant for Building Bridges Initiative, collaborative working to strengthen capacity of organizations serving immigrants and new arrivals, in response to terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 2462. New York Foundation, New York, NY. $500,000. For challenge grant for Immigrant Access Project to help agencies serving immigrants respond to increasing demand for services, in response to terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. 2463. Nonprofit Finance Fund, New York, NY. $2,000,000. For challenge grant toward establishment of September 11 Nonprofit Recovery Fund. Kress

Samuel H. Kress Foundation 174 E. 80th St. New York, NY 10021 (212) 861-4993 FAX: (212) 628-3146; E-mail: lisa@kressfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.kressfoundation.org 2464. Community Service Society of New York, New York, NY. $5,000, 2002. Response to September 11, 2001. 2465. Engine No. 22/Ladder No. 13 Family Fund, New York, NY. $2,500, 2002. Response to September 11, 2001. 2466. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000. For response to September 11, 2001. 2467. New York, State of, Albany, NY. $10,000. For response to September 11, 2001. 2468. Preservation League of New York State, Albany, NY. $10,000. For relief of historic buildings in lower Manhattan. 2469. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $5,000, 2002. Response to September 11, 2001. Krol

The Jan M. and Eugenia Krol Charitable Foundation, Inc. 1000 Bennett Blvd., Ste. 8 Lakewood, NJ 08701 (732) 886-2187 2470. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. For general support. Krumholz

Elroy and Terry Krumholz Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 640085 Oakland Gardens, NY 11364 2471. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000. To support direct relief for victims and their families in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2472. Volunteer Engine Company, Bronx, NY. $1,000. To replace engine lost in collapse of the World Trade Center.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER KT

Liberty

Latham

LEF

KT Family Foundation

Latham & Watkins

LEF Foundation

15701 Grooms Ct. Clinton Township, MI 48035-1012 Application address: P.O. Box 337, Fraser, MI 48026 2473. Garden Pathways, Bakersfield, CA. $5,500, 2001.

885 Thrid Avenue Suite 1000 New York, NY 10022-4834 2488. Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $32,000, 2002.

1095 Lodi Ln. St. Helena, CA 94574 (707) 963-9591 FAX: (707) 963-2109; New England address: P.O. Box 382066, Cambridge, MA 02238-2866, tel.: (617) 868-5603, FAX: (617) 868-5603; E-mail: lyda@lef-foundation.org; URL: http:// www.lef-foundation.org 2501. Codman Square Health Center, Dorchester, MA. $5,000, 2002. In support of the Artists All Souls Project reaction to September 11. 2502. Creative Time, New York, NY. $15,000, 2002. In support of Tribute In Light.

Kuwait

Kuwait Red Crescent

Laurie

Blanche & Irving Laurie Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 53 Roseland, NJ 07068-5788 2489. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support of September 11th Fund.

P.O. Box 23167 Safat, 13902 2474. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. Lafarge

Lafarge North America Inc. Corporate Giving Program

Lazard

Lazard Freres

12950 Worldgate Dr., Ste. 500 Herndon, VA 20170 2475. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $200,000.

Lehman

Lehman Brothers Foundation

c/o Corporate Communications 30 Rockefeller Plaza New York, NY 10020 2490. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000.

Lakeside

Lear

Lakeside Foundation

Lear Corporation Contributions Program

3470 Mt. Diablo Blvd., Ste. A-210 Lafayette, CA 94549 2476. Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, DC. $10,000. For Barbara K. Olson Memorial Fund in memory of 9/11 victim. 2477. Independent Womens Forum, Arlington, VA. $10,000. For infant care project for widows of 9/11 victims.

c/o Lear Corp. Contribs. Prog. P.O. Box 5008 Southfield, MI 48086 2491. Various organizations. $250,000.

Lam

Lam Research Corporation Foundation 4650 Cushing Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 2478. Undesignated. $100,000. 2479. Undesignated. $100,000. Land

Land O’Lakes Foundation P.O. Box 64150 St. Paul, MN 55164-0150 (651) 481-2222 URL: http://www.foundation.landolakes.com/ 2480. America’s Second Harvest, Chicago, IL. $65,000. 2481. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. 2482. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Lane

Lane Family Foundation c/o BCRS Associates, LLC 100 Wall St., 11th Fl. New York, NY 10005 2483. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $25,750. For general support.

Lee

Sara Lee Corporation Contributions Program 3 First National Plz. Chicago, IL 60602-4260 (312) 558-8448 URL: http://www.saralee.com/ourcompany/ communitiesHome.aspx 2492. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $350,000. 2493. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $175,000. Lee

Lee Enterprises, Incorporated Corporate Giving Program 215 N. Main St. Davenport, IA 52801 2494. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. 2495. Catholic Charities USA, Alexandria, VA. $5,000. For Disaster Fund. 2496. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $1,000. 2497. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,500. 2498. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500. 2499. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $2,500. Leeway

Langeloth

The Jacob and Valeria Langeloth Foundation 521 5th Ave., Ste. 1612 New York, NY 10175-1699 (212) 687-1133 FAX: (212) 681-2628; E-mail: info@langeloth.org; URL: http://www.langeloth.org 2484. Disaster Psychiatry Outreach, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 2485. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $100,000, 2001. 2486. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 2487. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001.

The Leeway Foundation c/o Wachovia Bank, N.A. 123 S. Broad St., Ste. 2040 Philadelphia, PA 19109 (215) 545-4078 FAX: (215) 545-4021; E-mail: info@leeway.org; URL: http://www.leeway.org 2500. Undesignated. $17,250. Toward creation of Harmony Grants Program, special program to support women-led arts projects that promote racial, ethnic, national and religious tolerance in response to September 11 terrorist attacks.

New York, NY 2503. Broad Channel Volunteer Fire Department, Broad Channel, NY. $25,000, 2002. Replace equipment lost on September 11th. 2504. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $2,500,000, 2002. Relief for families of first responders. 2505. New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. Replacement of 7ambulances Destroyed 9/11/01. 2506. New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY. $250,000, 2002. Replacement of 7 ambulances destroyed 9/11/01. 2507. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $10,000, 2002. Relief for families of NYSDTF Employers. 2508. NYU Downtown Hospital, New York, NY. $3,000,000, 2002. Renovation/Expansion of Lehman Brothers Emergency Center. 2509. NYU Downtown Hospital, New York, NY. $2,000,000, 2002. Renovation/Expansion of Lehman Brothers Emergency Center. 2510. Undesignated. $1,715,000. Balance of funds committed. Lenfest

The Lenfest Foundation, Inc. 5 Tower Bridge 300 Barr Harbor Dr., Ste. 450 West Conshohocken, PA 19428 (610) 828-4510 FAX: (610) 828-0390; E-mail: lenfestfoundation@lenfestfoundation.org; URL: http://www.lenfestfoundation.org 2511. United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. $100,000. For September 11th Fund. Lenfest

The Lenfest Foundation 5 Tower Bridge 300 Barr Harbor Dr., Ste. 450 West Conshohocken, PA 19428 (610) 918-8400 FAX: (610) 828-0390; E-mail: lenfestfoundation@lenfest.com 2512. United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. $100,000. Lennar

The Lennar Foundation, Inc. c/o Lennar Corp. 700 N.W. 107th Ave. Miami, FL 33172 2513. National Housing Endowment, DC. $1,000,000. Liberty

Liberty Bank c/o Corporate Communications 315 Main Street Middletown, CT 06457 2514. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000.

187


Liberty

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Liberty

Limited

Limited Brands Foundation

Loewenberg Foundation, Inc.

P.O. Box 1212 Middletown, CT 06457 (860) 704-2181 Additional contact: Sue Murphy, tel.: (860) 638-2959; URL: http://www.liberty-bank.com/ liberty_foundation.asp 2515. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $8,945.

c/o Public Affairs Dept. 3 Limited Pkwy. Columbus, OH 43230 (614) 251-4000 URL: http://www.limited.com/community/index.jsp 2528. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000.

450 Park Ave., Ste. 2700 New York, NY 10022 (212) 753-4100 2540. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $2,000.

Lieb

David L. Lieb Foundation, Inc. 244 Pine Ridge Boone, NC 28607 2516. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $2,000. Lifebridge

The Lifebridge Foundation, Inc. Times Sq. Station P.O. Box 793 New York, NY 10108 FAX: (212) 757-0246; E-mail: lifebridgenyc@aol.com; URL: http:// www.lifebridge.org 2517. Global Kids, New York, NY. $5,000. Toward educational programs for public school students in response to September 11th attacks. 2518. Healing Works, New York, NY. $5,000. To educate disadvantaged populations in specific techniques of holistic care and guidance to practitioners donating free services to patients affected by September 11th attacks.

Lincoln

Lincoln Community Foundation, Inc. 215 Centennial Mall S., Ste. 100 Lincoln, NE 68508-1813 (402) 474-2345 FAX: (402) 476-8532; E-mail: lcf@lcf.org; URL: http://www.lcf.org 2529. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,100. 2530. Undesignated. $30,600. Lincoln

Lincoln Financial Group Foundation 1300 S. Clinton St. P.O. Box 7863 Fort Wayne, IN 46801-7863 (260) 455-3679 E-mail: skemmish@lnc.com; URL: http:// www.lfg.com/lfg/ipc/abt/cgv/index.html 2531. American Red Cross, National, DC. $280,000, 2001. 2532. Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association of the City of New York, New York, NY. $75,000, 2001.

Lilly

Lincy

Eli Lilly and Company Foundation

The Lincy Foundation

c/o Eli Lilly and Co. Lilly Corporate Ctr., D.C. 1627 Indianapolis, IN 46285-0002 URL: http://www.lilly.com/products/access/ foundation.html 2519. American Association of Pastoral Counseling, Fairfax, VA. $50,000. For depression and/or anxiety counseling to victims of September 11th tragedies in New York, Washington, and Pennsylvania. 2520. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. For relief aid assistance in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2521. Mental Health Association of New York City, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. To provide public education and services in New York City in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2522. Mental Health Association, National, Alexandria, VA. $375,000, 2001. To develop coalition of mental health organizations to deliver mental health education and services throughout the country in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2523. National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association, Chicago, IL. $35,000, 2001. For mental health education and services in response to September 11 terrorist attacks.

150 S. Rodeo Dr., Ste. 250 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 2533. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $100,000.

Lilly

Lilly Endowment Inc. 2801 N. Meridian St. Indianapolis, IN 46208-0068 (317) 924-5471 FAX: (317) 926-4431; URL: http:// www.lillyendowment.org 2524. American Red Cross, National, DC. $10,000,000, 2001. 2525. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000,000, 2001. 2526. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $10,000,000, 2001. 2527. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $4,660,100, 2002. For comprehensive national disaster training and preparedness effort for faith-based disaster relief organizations.

188

Loewenberg

Liberty Bank Foundation, Inc.

Lindenwood

Lindenwood University 209 S. Kingshighway St.Charles, MO 63301 2534. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $1,000,000. Linehan

Linehan Family Foundation, Inc. 515 Fairmont Ave., Ste. 400 Towson, MD 21286 (410) 769-6131 2535. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,500. Liquidnet

Liquidnet c/o Corporate Communications 498 7th Ave. New York, NY 10018 2536. Various organizations. $250,000. Lithia

Lithia Motors c/o Corporate Communications 360 East Jackson Street Medford, OR 97501 2537. Various organizations. $100,000. Littauer

The Lucius N. Littauer Foundation, Inc. 60 E. 42nd St., Ste. 2910 New York, NY 10165 (212) 697-2677 2538. City Harvest, New York, NY. $2,500. To provide aid to local nonprofits in response to September 11 terrorist attacks. Lockheed

Lockheed Martin Corporation Foundation 6801 Rockledge Dr. Bethesda, MD 20817 2539. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $1,000,000.

Loews

Loews Foundation c/o John J. Kenny 655 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10021 (212) 521-2650 FAX: (212) 521-2634 2541. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $10,000. For Families of Freedom Scholarship Fund. Logan

E. J. Logan Foundation 32 E. 64th St., Rm. 4W New York, NY 10021 2542. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $1,000, 2001. For general support. Lord

Lord Baltimore Capital Corporation c/o Corporate Communications 6225 Smith Avenue , Baltimore, MD 21209 2543. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Lortel

The Lucille Lortel Foundation, Inc. c/o Hecht & Co., PC 322 Eighth Ave., 21st Fl New York, NY 10001 (212) 924-2817 FAX: (212) 989-0036; E-mail: swillett@lortel.org; URL: http://www.lortel.org 2544. Acting Company, New York, NY. $20,000. 2545. AMAS Musical Theater, New York, NY. $15,000. 2546. Atlantic Theater Company, New York, NY. $50,000. 2547. Bat Theater Company, New York, NY. $20,000. 2548. Blue Heron Theater, New York, NY. $10,000. 2549. Cherry Lane Alternative Theater, New York, NY. $10,000. 2550. Classic Stage Company, New York, NY. $40,000. 2551. Directors Company, New York, NY. $10,000. 2552. Drama Department Incorporated, New York, NY. $50,000. 2553. Ensemble Studio Theater (EST), New York, NY. $20,000. 2554. Fifty-Second Street Project, New York, NY. $15,000. 2555. Fiji Theater Company, Los Angeles, CA. $10,000. 2556. Foundry Theater, New York, NY. $15,000. 2557. Inside Broadway, New York, NY. $10,000. 2558. International Arts Relations (INTAR), New York, NY. $20,000. 2559. Irish Repertory Theater Company, New York, NY. $30,000. 2560. Irondale Ensemble Project, New York, NY. $10,000. 2561. Jean Cocteau Repertory Theater, New York, NY. $20,000. 2562. La Mama Experimental Theater Club, New York, NY. $10,000. 2563. Lark Theater Company, New York, NY. $15,000. 2564. Mabou Mines Development Foundation, New York, NY. $20,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

M&D

Lowenstein

2565. Manhattan Class Company, New York, NY. $30,000. 2566. Melting Pot Theater, New York, NY. $20,000. 2567. Mint Theatre Company, New York, NY. $20,000. 2568. New Federal Theater, New York, NY. $10,000. 2569. New Group, New York, NY. $25,000. 2570. Ontological-Hysteric Theater, New York, NY. $20,000. 2571. Open Channels New York, New York, NY. $10,000. 2572. Pan Asian Repertory Theater, New York, NY. $20,000. 2573. Paper Bag Players, New York, NY. $10,000. 2574. Pearl Theater Company, New York, NY. $20,000. 2575. Performance Space 122, New York, NY. $10,000. 2576. Pick Up Performance Company, New York, NY. $10,000. 2577. Pregones Touring Puerto Rican Theater Collection, Bronx, NY. $20,000. 2578. Primary Stages Company, New York, NY. $15,000. 2579. Repertorio Espanol, New York, NY. $50,000. 2580. Signature Theater Company, New York, NY. $50,000. 2581. SITI Company, New York, NY. $10,000. 2582. Soho Repertory Theater, New York, NY. $25,000. 2583. TADA Theater and Dance Alliance, New York, NY. $10,000. 2584. Target Margin Theater, Brooklyn, NY. $15,000. 2585. Thalia Spanish Theater, Sunnyside, NY. $10,000. 2586. Urban Stages, New York, NY. $15,000. 2587. Vineyard Theater and Workshop Center, New York, NY. $50,000. 2588. Westbeth Theater Center. $10,000. 2589. Womens Project and Productions, New York, NY. $30,000. 2590. Wooster Group, New York, NY. $25,000. 2591. York Theater Company, New York, NY. $15,000. 2592. Young Playwrights, New York, NY. $25,000. Lost

The Lost Tree Village Charitable Foundation, Inc. 11555 Lost Tree Way North Palm Beach, FL 33408 (561) 622-3780 FAX: (561) 622-7558; E-mail: ltvcfi@aol.com 2593. United Way of Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, FL. $10,000. To meet challenge grant from Countess de Hoernle of Boca Raton for response to September 11 terrorist attacks. Lowe’s

Lowe’s Corporate Giving Program Hwy. 268 E. P.O. Box 1111 North Wilkesboro, NC 28656 (919) 651-4000 2594. American Red Cross, National, DC. $285,000. For disaster relief efforts.

Lucent Technologies Foundation

126 E. 56th St., 28th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212) 319-0670 FAX: (212) 688-0134 2596. Undesignated. $35,000. For relief and recovery efforts and issues related to the aftermath of September 11 terrorist attacks.

600 Mountain Ave. Murray Hill, NJ 07974 (908) 582-4200 E-mail: foundation@lucent.com; URL: http:// www.lucent.com/news/foundation/ 2605. American Red Cross, National, DC. $860,000, 2001. 2606. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000, 2001. 2607. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $616,000. 2608. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001.

Lozier

Lozier Foundation 6336 Pershing Dr. Omaha, NE 68110-1100 (402) 457-8160 E-mail: bob.braun@lozier.biz 2597. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. For general operating support for September 11th Fund. LSG

LSG Skychefs c/o Corporate Communications 525 East Lamar Boulevard Arllington, TX 76011 2598. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. LTV

The LTV Foundation Charitable and Educational Trust Tax Dept. 200 Public Sq., Ste. 39-210 Cleveland, OH 44114-2308 Application address: 200 Public Sq., Ste. 38-506, Cleveland, OH 44114-2308 2599. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. For assistance to victims affected by events of September 11th. Lubbock

1060 Seven Oaks Ln. Mamaroneck, NY 10543 2595. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $2,000. For general support.

c/o Corporate Communications 1 Luitpold Drive Shirley, NY 11967 2609. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. Lumina

Lumina Foundation for Education, Inc. P.O. Box 1806 Indianapolis, IN 46206-1806 (317) 951-5300 FAX: (317) 951-5063; URL: http:// www.luminafoundation.org 2610. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. For September 11th Philanthropic Response Project. 2611. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $2,000,000. 2612. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $1,000,000. Lutheran

Lutheran Community Foundation

1655 Main, Ste. 202 Lubbock, TX 79401 (806) 762-8061 FAX: (806) 762-8551; E-mail: kathy@lubbockareafoundation.org; URL: http:// www.lubbockareafoundation.org 2600. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000.

The Gerard P. Lynch Family Foundation

Lubrizol

The Lubrizol Foundation 29400 Lakeland Blvd., No. 053A Wickliffe, OH 44092-2298 (440) 347-1797 FAX: (440) 347-1858; E-mail: kal@lubrizol.com; URL: http://www.lubrizol.com/foundation/ default.asp 2601. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. To confirm first mailing as donation toward efforts to respond to September 11 terrorist attacks. 2602. American Red Cross, National, DC. $21,335. Luce

The Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. 111 W. 50th St., Ste. 4601 New York, NY 10020 (212) 489-7700 FAX: (212) 581-9541; E-mail: hlf@hluce.org; URL: http://www.hluce.org 2603. New York Historical Society, New York, NY. $400,000, 2001.

625 Fourth Avenue South Suite 1415 Minneapolis, MN 55414 2613. Lutheran Social Services of Metropolitan New York, New York, NY. $33,501. For food shelf stocking in the aftermath of September 11th. Lynch

80 Tortoise Way Vero Beach, FL 32963 FAX: (561) 234-2557 2614. Rescue 2 Family Fund, Brooklyn, NY. $5,000. Lyndhurst

Lyndhurst Foundation 517 E. 5th St. Chattanooga, TN 37403-1826 (423) 756-0767 FAX: (423) 756-0770; E-mail: jmurrah@lyndhurstfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.lyndhurstfoundation.org 2615. United Way of Greater Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN. $60,000. For New York relief effort in response to terrorist attacks of September 11th and for Invest in Children project in Chattanooga. M&D

M & D Relief Fund

Lucent

Lowenstein Family Foundation

Luitpold

Luitpold Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Lubbock Area Foundation, Inc.

Lucent Technologies, Inc. Lowenstein

Lucent

Leon Lowenstein Foundation, Inc.

c/o Corporate Communications 600 Mountain Avenue New Providence, NJ 07974 2604. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500,000.

c/o Murphy & Durieu 120 Broadway New York, NY 10271 2616. Individual beneficiaries. $275,700, 2002. To support twent-three individuals and two charitable foundations providing support to the families of victims of the terrorist attack on the World Trae Center on September 11, 2001.

189


MacArthur

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE MacArthur

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation 140 S. Dearborn St., Ste. 1100 Chicago, IL 60603-5285 (312) 726-8000 FAX: (312) 920-6258; E-mail: 4answers@macfound.org; TDD: (312) 920-6285; URL: http://www.macfound.org 2617. American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, New York, NY. $250,000. Toward work to protect civil liberties in wake of the September 11 attacks. Activities include outreach, litigation and legal analysis focused on rights of Arab-Americans, immigrants, and those detained in connection with attacks. 2618. Aspen Institute, DC. $300,000, 2001. Toward series of seminars for key members of Congress from both parties on issues related to September 11th attacks. Institute also sponsored in-depth congressional conference in January on Islam, terrorism, and the U.S. 2619. Brookings Institution, DC. $150,000. To research broader foreign policy and security implications of terrorist attacks on U.S. policy toward Islamic world, with particular interest in examining causes of Islamic extremism and opposition to U.S. Second project will study how U.S. can protect itself from external and internal attack while imposing fewest costs on American economy and way of life. 2620. Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, DC. $130,000, 2001. Toward projects addressing security issues in southern Eurasia, defined as Muslim regions of Russia and states of Caucuses and Central Asia. Activities including bringing visiting scholars from the region to Carnegie staff and examining how experience of nuclear threat reduction cooperation between U.S. and Russian states may be modified to avert potential nuclear crisis in Pakistan. 2621. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, DC. $250,000, 2001. To study how recent terrorist attacks on America have affected government spending. Center will make policy recommendations about managing national security-related pressures on federal and state budgets on social programs. 2622. Century Foundation, New York, NY. $250,000. To establish task force that will analyze and issue recommendations on mission, structure, and strategy of new Office of Homeland Security. Initiative will focus on long-term strategies for better protecting nation against future attacks while preserving fundamental character of American life. 2623. Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, Chicago, IL. $100,000, 2001. Toward public education and networking related to September 11 attacks. Council also is organizing task force to assess and discuss implications of attacks on Chicago, with special emphasis on including Arab American and other immigrant communities in the activities. 2624. Council on Foreign Relations, New York, NY. $50,000. Toward programs related to September 11 attacks. Activities include task force on America’s response to terrorism, roundtable discussions, and relevant publications. 2625. Crossroads Fund, Chicago, IL. $20,000. Toward Critical Response Fund, which makes grants to Chicago-area organizations working to defend civil rights and combat racism and hate crimes. Particular attention is paid to funding organizations that work closely with immigrant groups, especially those serving immigrants whose homelands are currently in the midst of hostilities. 2626. Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights, Chicago, IL. $75,000. Toward Midwest Immigrant and Human Rights Center, which has increased services in wake of the terrorist attacks. Center is developing

190

multi-lingual education materials on legal rights, coordinating outreach services for immigrants and refugees in Chicago, conducting Know Your Rights presentations, and monitoring detention practices through visit to jails in Illinois and Wisconsin. 2627. Human Rights Watch, New York, NY. $250,000, 2001. Toward efforts to monitor refugee flows and the effects of hostilities on civilian populations in sensitive areas abroad. Organization will also work in U.S. to monitor possible adverse impacts on Muslim and other ethnic groups. 2628. Institute for War and Peace Reporting, London, England. $130,000, 2001. For project linking journalists and analysts from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran, and central Asian states doing independent reporting and analysis. 2629. International Crisis Group (Belgium), Brussels, Belgium. $400,000, 2001. For project titled, Building Sustainable International Defenses Against Terrorism. Work will explore steps needed to preserve stability of states and regions in Central and Southwest Asia. 2630. International Peace Academy, New York, NY. $100,000. For policy research on role of United Nations in addressing terrorism. Because past terrorist acts have often been perceived as domestic in nature, U.N. as an international body has not had to develop mechanisms to combat terrorism and political violence. Project supports workshops on terrorism and ways that U.N. can help sustain broadly supported response by the international community. 2631. International Rescue Committee, New York, NY. $250,000. For activities on behalf of refugees and internationally displaced persons in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Work will include relief, protection, and resettlement services and monitoring of relief efforts. 2632. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. $15,000. For Watermark Project: Democratization of Water Resource Management in Brazil. 2633. Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, Chicago, IL. $65,000, 2001. For work designed to reduce incidence of hate crime and likely landlord and employer discrimination toward people of Middle Eastern ancestry. 2634. Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, New York, NY. $100,000. For project to preserve core democratic values in the face of terrorism. Work will focus on detention of non-citizens and use of military tribunals following September 11 attacks. 2635. Lichtenstein Creative Media, New York, NY. $100,000. Toward distribution of Mental Health in Troubled Times, educational kit drawn from The Intimate Mind documentary television programs covering all aspects of mental health relating to September 11 attacks and their aftermath. Another initiative, America’s State of Mind, is two-hour town meeting that will be broadcast on public radio stations worldwide. 2636. Lumiere Productions, New York, NY. $50,000. Toward documentary film, Caught in the Crossfire, film about changing lives of Arab-Americans in New York as result of September 11 attacks. 2637. Mental Health Association, National, Alexandria, VA. $150,000. For project to improve community responses to trauma, grief and related mental health needs and coordination of services to meet those needs. Result, Blueprint for Responding to Public Mental Health Needs in Times of Crisis, and companion training program, will provide guidance on crisis response planning, budgetary issues, needs of children, and long-term mental health needs following a disaster. 2638. Monterey Institute of International Studies, Monterey, CA. $100,000, 2001. Toward work to assess risk that weapons of mass destruction,

including chemical and biological weapons, might move out of weakened state and into hands of terrorists. Institute also will monitor effectiveness of ongoing U.S. government efforts to reform and rationalize more than 40 federal agencies involved in responding to terrorist incidents, including new Office of Homeland Security. 2639. National Academy of Sciences, DC. $150,000. To accelerate efforts to reduce danger of nuclear weapon use by terrorist organizations. Work specifically addresses aspects of accounting for, monitoring, and protecting nuclear weapons and materials in Russia, as well as stabilization of community of nuclear weapons scientists and technologists in Russia. 2640. National Opinion Research Center, Chicago, IL. $220,000, 2001. Toward Public Response to a National Tragedy, research project to learn how individuals readjust their lives in aftermath of the September 11th attacks and how they react to additional events associated with actions taken against terrorism. Project builds on past surveys of public reaction to previous disasters. 2641. National Public Radio, DC. $400,000, 2001. For expanded news coverage on U.S. campaign against terrorism. Grant supports staff, travel, communications, and equipment incurred in providing comprehensive reporting to meet audience demand for information. 2642. National Security Archive Fund, DC. $200,000, 2001. Toward research, analysis, and public education to protect civil liberties. Project brings together coalition of organizations focusing on issues raised by new legislation designed to combat terrorism. 2643. National Video Resources, New York, NY. $65,000. Toward After 9/11, video collection promoting knowledge, understanding, and tolerance. Documentary films selected for collection will include works on Arab world, Arab-American and East Indian communities in the U.S., and best practices in organizing against intolerance and hatred, and relevant films made by and about young people. 2644. Physicians for Human Rights, Boston, MA. $200,000, 2001. To send three two-person teams to Afghanistan region to monitor and document human rights situation there, with view toward helping movement of food, medicine, and shelter to refugees. 2645. University of London, Cambridge, England. $150,000. For project to draw on European experience in counter terrorist activities and to assess capabilities for coordinated action among European countries and U.S. Helping to bring varying national policies and practices into alignment will significantly contribute to the successful investigation and prosecution of terrorists. 2646. WGBH Educational Foundation, Boston, MA. $500,000, 2001. Toward Frontline’s expanded programming in aftermath of September 11th attacks. Documentary series significantly increased number of hours on air to accommodate new, original programs and additional independent productions from around the world. Macy

Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation 44 E. 64th St. New York, NY 10021 (212) 486-2424 FAX: (212) 644-0765; E-mail: jmacyinfo@josiahmacyfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.josiahmacyfoundation.org 2647. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $25,000. 2648. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Maddox

J. F Maddox Foundation P.O. Box 2588 Hobbs, NM 88241-2588 (505) 393-6338 FAX: (505) 397-7266; URL: http:// www.jfmaddox.org/ 2649. American Red Cross, National, DC. $13,000. For 911 Disaster Relief Fund. 2650. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,000. Madison

Madison County Community Foundation 33 W. 10th St. P.O. Box 1056 Anderson, IN 46015-1056 (765) 644-0002 E-mail: mccf@madisonccf.org; URL: http:// www.madisonccf.org 2651. Undesignated. $600.

Mattel

Marathon

The Lucille and Paul Maslin Foundation, Inc.

539 South Main St. Findlay, OH 45840 (419) 422-2121 2659. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. 2660. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $50,000. 2661. Kansas Chamber Education Foundation, Topeka, KS. $200,000. 2662. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $150,000.

61 Broadway, 19th Fl. New York, NY 10006-2794 2674. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support.

Marathon

Marathon Oil Foundation, Inc.

Maine

The Maine Community Foundation, Inc. 245 Main St. Ellsworth, ME 04605 (207) 667-9735 Portland mailing address: 1 Monument Way, Ste. 200, P.O. Box 7380, Portland, ME 04112; Additional tels.: (207) 761-2440, (877) 700-6800; FAX: (207) 667-0447; E-mail: info@mainecf.org; grants@mainecf.org; URL: http://www.mainecf.org/ 2652. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $7,000. Major

Major League Baseball 245 Park Avenue New York, NY 10167 2653. MLB-MLBPA Disaster Relief Fund, New York, NY. $5,000,000. Major

Major League Baseball Players Association c/o Corporate Communications 12 East 49th Street New York, NY 10017 2654. MLB-MLBPA Disaster Relief Fund, New York, NY. $5,000,000. Management

Management Consultants for the Arts New York, NY 2655. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $3,000. For New York Arts Recovery Fund. Mandalay

Mandalay Resort Group c/o Corporate Communications 3950 Las Vegas Blvd. South Las Vegas, NV 89119 2656. Undesignated. $1,000,000. For the families of fallen police and firefighters. M&T

M & T Bank c/o Corporate Communications P.O. Box 4649 Buffalo, NY 14240 2657. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

539 South Main St., Rm. 830-M Findlay, OH 45840 (419) 422-2121 2663. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. 2664. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $50,000. 2665. Kansas Chamber Education Foundation, Topeka, KS. $200,000. 2666. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $150,000. Marcus

Grace R. and Allan D. Marcus Foundation 7 W. 81st St., Apt. 5B New York, NY 10024-6049 2667. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. For unrestricted support. Marriott

The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation

c/o Corporate Communications 73 Tremont St. Boston, MA 02108 2658. Various organizations. $500,000.

Mason

The Carlos and Marguerite Mason Fund c/o Wachovia Bank of Georgia, N.A. 191 Peachtree St., N.E. Atlanta, GA 30303 (404) 332-6677 E-mail: grantinquiries@wachovia.com; URL: http:// www.wachovia.com/privatefoundations 2675. American Red Cross, Metropolitan Atlanta Chapter, Atlanta, GA. $25,000, 2001. To purchase freezers for blood storage, related to the blood shortage in Georgia in the aftermath of September 11th. Massachusetts

Massachusetts Association of Realtors Charitable and Educational Foundation 256 Second Avenue Waltham, MA 02451 2676. National Association of Realtors, Chicago, IL. $15,000. Massachusetts

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Office of the Arts Cambridge, MA 2677. Skyscraper Museum, New York, NY. $45,000. To enable the conservation of the only extant architectural model of the World Trade Center Complex. MassMutual

P.O. Box 150 Washington, DC 20058 2668. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. For program support. 2669. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $1,000,000. For Marriott Associates Assistance Fund for recovery efforts following September 11th attacks. 2670. Washington Redskins Leadership Council, DC. $10,000. For Redskins Relief Fund to benefit victims of September 11th attacks and their families. Marsh

Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Grant Requests 1166 Ave. of the Americas New York, NY 10036-2774 FAX: (212) 345-4838 2671. MMC Victims Relief Fund, New York, NY. $10,000,000. Marvin

The Marvin Foundation c/o Bank of America 10 Light St., MD4-302-17-06 Baltimore, MD 21202-1435 Application address: c/o 5550 Friendship Blvd., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, tel.: (301) 986-6716 2672. American Red Cross, DC Chapter, DC. $8,000. For 9/11 relief.

MassMutual Financial Group Corporate Giving Program c/o Community Rels., F095 1295 State St. Springfield, MA 01111-0001 (860) 987-2085 E-mail: rrose@massmutual.com; Application address for Hartford, CT: c/o Community Rels., H356, 1295 State St., Springfield, MA 01111-0001; URL: http://www.massmutual.com/ mmfg/about/community.html 2678. MassMutual Foundation of Hartford, Inc., Hartford, CT. $121,397. MassMutual

The MassMutual Foundation for Hartford, Inc. c/o MassMutual Financial Group, Community Rels. 140 Garden St., H356 Hartford, CT 06154 (860) 987-2085 Application address: 1295 State St., H356, Springfield, MA 01111-0001 2679. MassMutual Foundation of Hartford, Inc., Hartford, CT. $100,000. Mast-Jagermeister

Mast-Jagermeister AG c/o Corporate Communications Jagermeisterstrabe 7 -15, Salzdahlumer road 46/48 Wolfenbuettel, Germany 38296 2680. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $500,000.

Manulife

Manulife Financial Corporation

Maslin

Marathon Oil Company Contributions Program

Marx

The William Marx Foundation c/o H.J. Behrman & Co., LLP 2 Penn Plz., Ste. 1970 New York, NY 10121 2673. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $10,000.

Mattel

Mattel, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 333 Continental Blvd. El Segundo, CA 90245 2681. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. 2682. Various organizations. $85,000.

191


May

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE May

The May Department Stores Company Foundation, Inc. 611 Olive St., Ste. 1350 St. Louis, MO 63101-1799 (314) 342-6299 FAX: (314) 342-4461 2683. American Red Cross, National, DC. $400,000. 2684. American Red Cross, National, DC. $37,898. For general support for September 11th relief. 2685. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,543. For general support for September 11th relief. Maytag

Maytag Corporation Foundation P.O. Box 39 403 W. 4th St. N. Newton, IA 50208-0039 (641) 787-6357 2686. American Red Cross, National, DC. $42,925, 2001. 2687. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $24,756, 2001. 2688. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001. Mazda

The Mazda Foundation (USA), Inc. 1025 Connecticut Ave. N.W., Ste. 910 Washington, DC 20036 FAX: (202) 223-6490; E-mail: bnocera@mazdausa.com; URL: http:// www.mazdafoundation.org/ 2689. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000. For September 11th Fund. MBIA

MBIA, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 13 King Street Armonk, NY 10504 2690. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City, New York, NY. $500,000, 2001. 2691. Graifman Scholarship Fund, D.M., Chestnut Ridge, NY. $18,600, 2001. 2692. Undesignated. $1,480,000. MBNA

MBNA America Bank, N.A. Corporate Giving Program c/o Community Rels. Dept. 1100 N. King St. Wilmington, DE 19884-0713 (800) 362-6255 2693. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,000, 2001. 2694. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000. McBean

Alletta Morris McBean Charitable Trust 400 S. El Camino Real, Ste. 777 San Mateo, CA 94402 (650) 558-8480 FAX: (605) 558-8481; E-mail: McBeanProperties@worldnet.att.net 2695. American Red Cross, Newport Chapter, Newport, RI. $100,000, 2001. For relief of families of those who lost their lives in the disaster in New York on September 11th.

McConnell

MCI Foundation

P.O. Box 492050 Redding, CA 96049-2050 (530) 226-6200 FAX: (530) 226-6210; E-mail: info@mcconnellfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.mcconnellfoundation.org 2697. Shasta Regional Community Foundation, Redding, CA. $10,000. For September 11th Fund.

22001 Loudoun County Pkwy. Bldg. G1-3-110 Ashburn, VA 20147 (703) 886-2356 FAX: (703) 886-0094; URL: http:// www.marcopolo-education.org/about/ mci_foundation.aspx 2709. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000.

McCormick

Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation 435 N. Michigan Ave., Ste. 770 Chicago, IL 60611 (312) 222-3512 FAX: (312) 222-3523; E-mail: rrmtf@tribune.com; URL: http://www.rrmtf.org 2698. Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation, Chicago, IL. $2,500,000. For grants to non-profit organizations providing services to victims of the September 11th attacks, their families, and those in the community who were impacted. McCune

McCune Charitable Foundation 345 E. Alameda St. Santa Fe, NM 87501-2229 (505) 983-8300 FAX: (505) 983-7887; E-mail: info@nmmccune.org; URL: http:// www.nmmccune.org 2699. YouthWorks, Santa Fe, NM. $30,000. For general operating support and emergency funding to provide grief support services to Santa Fe area youth related to terrorist attacks on the United States. 2700. YouthWorks, Santa Fe, NM. $5,500, 2001. McDonald’s

McDonald’s Corporation Charitable Foundation 1 Kroc Dr. Oak Brook, IL 60523 2701. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. McEnroe

John McEnroe Foundation c/o Burton Goldstein & Co., LLC 156 W. 56th St. New York, NY 10019 2702. Greater Richmond Chapter of the American Red Cross, Richmond, VA. $25,000. For 9/11 Disaster Relief For general support. 2703. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. For general support. 2704. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $25,000. For general support. 2705. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $25,000. For general support. McFeely

McFeely-Rogers Foundation 1110 Ligonier St., Ste. 300 P.O. Box 110 Latrobe, PA 15650-0110 (724) 537-5588 FAX: (724) 537-5589 2706. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000. 2707. Various organizations. $2,000. To support local nonprofits with national 9/11 relief programs. McGregor

McCaw

The Craig and Susan McCaw Foundation P.O. Box 2908 Kirkland, WA 98083-2908 2696. Live Brave Coalition, Schaumburg, IL. $100,000.

192

MCI

The McConnell Foundation

McGregor Fund 333 W. Fort St., Ste. 2090 Detroit, MI 48226-3134 (313) 963-3495 FAX: (313) 963-3512; E-mail: info@mcgregorfund.org; URL: http:// www.mcgregorfund.org 2708. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

McInerny

McInerny Foundation c/o Bank of Hawaii 130 Merchant St. Honolulu, HI 96813 (808) 538-4944 FAX: (808) 538-4006; Mailing address: P.O. Box 3170, Honolulu, HI 96802-3170; E-mail: pboyce@boh.com 2710. Catholic Charities of Honolulu, Honolulu, HI. $50,000, 2002. 2711. Catholic Charities of Honolulu, Honolulu, HI. $37,500, 2001. 2712. Hawaii Foodbank, Honolulu, HI. $37,500, 2001. 2713. Hawaii Island Food Bank, Hilo, HI. $10,000, 2001. 2714. Institute for Human Services, Honolulu, HI. $50,000, 2002. 2715. Institute for Human Services, Honolulu, HI. $37,500, 2001. 2716. Kauai Food Bank, Lihue, HI. $10,000, 2001. 2717. Maui Food Bank, Kahului, HI. $10,000, 2001. 2718. Pacific Gateway Center, Honolulu, HI. $20,000, 2002. 2719. Salvation Army of Hawaiian Islands, Honolulu, HI. $50,000, 2002. (Oahu). 2720. Salvation Army of Hawaiian Islands, Honolulu, HI. $37,500, 2001. 2721. Salvation Army of Hawaiian Islands, Honolulu, HI. $20,000, 2002. (Maui). 2722. United Way, Aloha, Honolulu, HI. $200,000, 2002. 2723. Women Helping Women, Wailuku, HI. $30,000, 2002. 2724. Women in Need (WIN), Waimanalo, HI. $20,000, 2002. 2725. YWCA of Kauai, Lihue, HI. $20,000, 2002. McNair

The Robert and Janice McNair Foundation 5 Post Oak Park 4400 Post Oak Pkwy., Ste. 1400 Houston, TX 77027 2726. Sandler O’Neill Assistance Foundation, Chatham, NJ. $250,000. McNeely

The McNeely Foundation 444 Pine St. St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 228-4503 2727. American Red Cross, National, DC. $2,191. 2728. Blake Schools, Hopkins, MN. $5,000. 2729. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $2,674. 2730. LCMS World Relief, Saint Louis, MO. $150. 2731. Mercy Corps International, Portland, OR. $50. 2732. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,666. 2733. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $1,072.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER 2734. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $1,780. MDC

MDC Holdings, Inc./Richmond America 3600 S. Yosemite Street Denver, CO 80237 2735. National Housing Endowment, DC. $1,000,000. Mead

The Mead Corporation Foundation Courthouse Plz. N.E. Dayton, OH 45463 (937) 495-3031 URL: http://www.mead.com/am/cc_frset.html 2736. American Red Cross, National, DC. $309,570. For September 11th disaster relief fund. Meadows

The Meadows Foundation, Inc. Wilson Historic District 3003 Swiss Ave. Dallas, TX 75204-6090 (214) 826-9431 2737. American Red Cross, Dallas Area Chapter, Dallas, TX. $188,500, 2001. 2738. Salvation Army of Dallas, Dallas, TX. $150,000, 2001. 2739. Texas Baptist Men, Dallas, TX. $38,500, 2001. Medtronic

The Medtronic Foundation 710 Medtronic Pkwy. Minneapolis, MN 55432-5604 (763) 514-4000 FAX: (763) 505-2648; URL: http:// www.medtronic.com/foundation 2740. American Red Cross, Minneapolis, Minneapolis, MN. $200,000. For disaster relief. 2741. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. 2742. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $500,000. Mellon

Mellon Financial Corporation Fund 1 Mellon Ctr., Ste. 1830 Pittsburgh, PA 15258-0001 (412) 234-2732 2743. American Red Cross, Delaware, Wilmington, DE. $2,500. 2744. American Red Cross, National, DC. $78,887. For Disaster Relief Fund. 2745. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000, 2001. 2746. American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, New York, NY. $500. 2747. AmeriCares Foundation, New Canaan, CT. $200. 2748. Arizona Republic Charities, Tempe, AZ. $200. 2749. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,190. 2750. CARE, Atlanta, GA. $75. 2751. Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. $180. 2752. Catholic Charities USA, Alexandria, VA. $1,150. 2753. Clear Channel Communications, San Antonio, TX. $100. 2754. Crossway Christian Center, Bronx, NY. $400. 2755. Daily News Charities, New York, NY. $50. 2756. Delaware Volunteer Firemen’s Association, Dover, DE. $100. 2757. Engine No. 22/Ladder No. 13 Family Fund, New York, NY. $500.

2758. Federal Drug Agents Foundation, Cedarhurst, NY. $50. 2759. Garden City Community Fund, Garden City, NY. $700. 2760. Howard Stern Relief Fund, New York, NY. $630. 2761. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $6,260. 2762. LCMS World Relief, Saint Louis, MO. $150. 2763. Leary Firefighters Foundation, New York, NY. $135. 2764. Leonard Hatton Family Fund, New Rochelle, NY. $200. 2765. Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA. $250. 2766. Lutheran Brotherhood, Greensburg, PA. $100. 2767. Marin Community Foundation, Larkspur, CA. $150. 2768. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $25. 2769. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 2770. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $86,901. For September 11th Fund. 2771. New York Fire Safety Foundation, New York, NY. $25. 2772. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $1,853. 2773. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $650. 2774. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $6,472. 2775. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $2,350. 2776. Orthodox Church in America, Syosset, NY. $270. 2777. Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation, Chicago, IL. $875. 2778. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $100. 2779. Rotary Foundation of New York, New York, NY. $30. 2780. Saint Gregory Episcopal Church, Hamilton, NJ. $100. 2781. Saint Sebastian Parish Association, Woodside, NY. $250. 2782. Salvation Army of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA. $25,030. For Disaster Relief Fund. 2783. Save the Children Federation, Westport, CT. $250. 2784. Thiel College, Greenville, PA. $325. 2785. Trentini Memorial Fund, Rowley Mall, MA. $25. 2786. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $2,100. 2787. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $665. 2788. UNICEF, New York, NY. $30. 2789. Union of American Hebrew Congregations, New York, NY. $250. 2790. Union of American Hebrew Congregations, New York, NY. $18. 2791. United Methodist Committee on Relief, New York, NY. $75. 2792. United Service Organization of Metropolitan Washington, Fort Myer, VA. $356. 2793. Various organizations. $225,780. 2794. Wallingford Presbyterian Church, Wallingford, CT. $200. 2795. Washington County Department of Public Safety, Washington, PA. $25.

Mellon 2796. Washington Family Relief Fund, DC. $100. 2797. West Islip School District, West Islip, NY. $50. Mellon

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation 140 E. 62nd St. New York, NY 10021 (212) 838-8400 FAX: (212) 223-2778; URL: http:// www.mellon.org 2798. Aaron Davis Hall, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 2799. Actors Fund of America, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2800. Alan Guttmacher Institute, New York, NY. $30,000, 2001. For New York disaster response. 2801. Alley Pond Environmental Center, Douglaston, NY. $75,000, 2002. 2802. Alliance of Resident Theaters/New York (ART/NY), New York, NY. $2,650,000, 2001. To provide grants to small and mid-sized performing arts organizations. 2803. Alliance of Resident Theaters/New York (ART/NY), New York, NY. $35,000, 2002. 2804. Alvin Ailey Dance Theater Foundation, New York, NY. $350,000, 2002. 2805. American Craft Museum, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2806. American Federation of Arts, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2807. American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. $1,750,000, 2002. 2808. American Museum of the Moving Image, Astoria, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2809. American Music Center, New York, NY. $2,650,000, 2001. To provide grants to small and mid-sized performing arts organizations. 2810. American Music Center, New York, NY. $35,000, 2002. 2811. American Symphony Orchestra League, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2812. Amigos del Museo del Barrio, New York, NY. $600,000, 2002. 2813. Amigos del Museo del Barrio, New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2814. Apollo Theater Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2815. Asia Society, New York, NY. $450,000, 2002. 2816. Asia Society, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2817. Ballet Theater Foundation, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. 2818. Big Apple Circus, New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2819. Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, NY. $275,000. 2820. Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, NY. $50,000, 2002. 2821. Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. 2822. Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, NY. $300,000, 2002. 2823. Brooklyn Childrens Museum, Brooklyn, NY. $225,000, 2002. 2824. Brooklyn Information and Culture, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2825. Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Brooklyn, NY. $1,500,000, 2002. 2826. Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn, NY. $867,000, 2002. 2827. Carnegie Hall Corporation, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. 2828. Central Park Conservancy, New York, NY. $300,000, 2002.

193


Mellon

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE

2829. Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 2830. Children’s Museum of Manhattan, New York, NY. $225,000, 2002. 2831. City Center Fifty-Fifth Street Theater Foundation, New York, NY. $35,000, 2002. 2832. City Parks Foundation, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. 2833. City Parks Foundation, New York, NY. $750,000, 2002. 2834. City Parks Foundation, New York, NY. $300,000, 2002. 2835. College Art Association, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 2836. College Community Services, Brooklyn, NY. $25,000, 2002. 2837. Conservancy for Historic Battery Park, New York, NY. $400,000, 2002. 2838. Council on Arts & Humanities for Staten Island Film Video Arts, Inc., Staten Island, NY. $20,000, 2002. 2839. Cunningham Dance Foundation, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. 2840. Dahesh Museum, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 2841. Dance Theater of Harlem, New York, NY. $700,000, 2002. 2842. Dia Center for the Arts, New York, NY. $275,000, 2002. 2843. Discalced, Inc., Brooklyn, NY. $175,000, 2002. 2844. Drawing Center, New York, NY. $185,000, 2002. 2845. Drawing Center, New York, NY. $40,000, 2002. 2846. Educational Broadcasting Corporation, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. 2847. Elaine Kaufman Cultural Center, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. 2848. Eldridge Street Project, New York, NY. $15,000, 2002. 2849. Frick Collection, New York, NY. $270,000, 2002. 2850. Green Guerillas, New York, NY. $80,000, 2002. 2851. Greenbelt Conservancy, Staten Island, NY. $60,000, 2002. 2852. Harlem School of the Arts, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2853. Henry Street Settlement, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2854. InterAction/American Council for Voluntary International Action, DC. $140,000, 2001. For New York disaster response. 2855. International Center of Photography, New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2856. International Print Center New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 2857. International Rescue Committee, New York, NY. $65,000, 2001. For New York disaster response. 2858. Intrepid Museum Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2859. Isabel ONeil Foundation for the Art of the Painted Finish, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. 2860. Jacques Marchais Center of Tibetan Art, Staten Island, NY. $130,000, 2002. 2861. Jazz at Lincoln Center, New York, NY. $300,000, 2002. 2862. Jewish Museum, New York, NY. $740,000, 2002. 2863. Joyce Theater Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2864. Kings Majestic Corporation, Brooklyn, NY. $240,000, 2002.

194

2865. Lehman College Center for the Performing Arts, Bronx, NY. $50,000, 2002. 2866. Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York, NY. $500,000, 2002. 2867. Lower East Side Tenement Museum, New York, NY. $300,000, 2002. 2868. Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2002. 2869. Manhattan Theater Club, New York, NY. $450,000, 2002. 2870. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. $140,000, 2001. For New York disaster response through the Harvard Program in refugee trauma. 2871. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. $65,000, 2001. For the New York disaster response. 2872. Mercy Corps International, Portland, OR. $25,000, 2001. 2873. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY. $1,750,000, 2002. 2874. Metropolitan Opera Association, New York, NY. $250,000, 2002. 2875. Museum for African Art, Long Island City, NY. $250,000, 2002. 2876. Museum of American Financial History, New York, NY. $30,000, 2002. 2877. Museum of American Folk Art, New York, NY. $275,000, 2002. 2878. Museum of American Folk Art, New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2879. Museum of Jewish Heritage, New York, NY. $140,000, 2002. 2880. Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY. $1,750,000, 2002. 2881. Museum of the City of New York, New York, NY. $600,000, 2002. 2882. National Academy of Design, New York, NY. $300,000, 2002. 2883. New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, NY. $650,000, 2002. 2884. New York Academy of Art, New York, NY. $125,000, 2002. 2885. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY. $650,000, 2002. 2886. New York City Ballet, New York, NY. $400,000, 2002. 2887. New York City Opera, New York, NY. $400,000, 2002. 2888. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $2,650,000, 2001. To support small and mid-sized performing arts groups. 2889. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $35,000, 2002. 2890. New York Hall of Science, Corona, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2891. New York Public Library, New York, NY. $1,185,000, 2002. 2892. New York Public Library, New York, NY. $732,500, 2002. 2893. New York Restoration Project, New York, NY. $300,000, 2002. 2894. New York Shakespeare Festival, New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2895. New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture, New York, NY. $85,000, 2002. 2896. New York University Medical Center Foundation, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. 2897. New Yorkers for Parks, New York, NY. $300,000, 2002. 2898. New 42nd Street, New York, NY. $825,000, 2002. 2899. Paul Taylor Dance Foundation, New York, NY. $125,000, 2002.

2900. Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, New York, NY. $250,000, 2002. 2901. Pierpont Morgan Library, New York, NY. $225,000, 2002. 2902. Playwrights Horizons, New York, NY. $175,000, 2002. 2903. Poets House, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. 2904. Prospect Park Alliance, Brooklyn, NY. $300,000, 2002. 2905. Queens Borough Public Library, Jamaica, NY. $838,000, 2002. 2906. Queens Botanical Garden Society, Flushing, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2907. Queens Council on the Arts, Woodhaven, NY. $40,000, 2002. 2908. Queens Museum of Art, Flushing, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2909. Randalls Island Sports Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2910. Riverside Park Fund, New York, NY. $85,000, 2002. 2911. Roundabout Theater Company, New York, NY. $675,000, 2002. 2912. Save the Children Federation, Westport, CT. $64,000, 2001. 2913. Second Stage Theater, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2914. Smithsonian Institution, DC. $750,000, 2002. 2915. Smithsonian Institution, DC. $750,000, 2002. 2916. Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2917. Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2918. South Street Seaport Museum, New York, NY. $350,000, 2002. 2919. Staten Island Botanical Garden, Staten Island, NY. $100,000, 2002. 2920. Staten Island Childrens Museum, Staten Island, NY. $225,000, 2002. 2921. Staten Island Historical Society, Staten Island, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2922. Staten Island Zoological Society, Staten Island, NY. $25,000, 2002. 2923. Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY. $600,000, 2002. 2924. Symphony Space, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2925. Theater Development Fund (TDF), New York, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2926. Theaterworks/USA, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. 2927. Town Hall Foundation, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. 2928. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. $150,000, 2001. For New York disaster response. 2929. Vivian Beaumont Theater, New York, NY. $675,000, 2002. 2930. Wave Hill, Bronx, NY. $200,000, 2002. 2931. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. $1,500,000, 2002. 2932. Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY. $300,000, 2002. Mercantile

Mercantile Bankshares Corp. c/o Corporate Communications 2 Hopkins Plaza Baltimore, MD 21203 2933. American Red Cross, National, DC. $55,000. To match gifts to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Mercer

Meyer Merck

The Johnny Mercer Foundation

The John Merck Fund

c/o Prager and Fenton 675 3rd Ave. New York, NY 10017 (212) 382-2790 2934. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $50,000.

47 Winter St., 7th Fl. Boston, MA 02108 FAX: (617) 556-4130; E-mail: info@jmfund.org; URL: http://www.jmfund.org 2960. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001.

Merck

The Merck Company Foundation P.O. Box 100 Whitehouse Station, NJ 08889-0100 (908) 423-1000 FAX: (908) 423-1987; URL: http:// www.merck.com/about/cr/policies_performance/ social/philanthropy.html 2935. America’s Fund for Afghan Children, Washington, DC. $60. 2936. America’s Fund for Afghan Children, Washington, DC. $60. 2937. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,195,355. 2938. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. For Liberty Disaster Relief Fund. 2939. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. For Liberty Disaster Relief Fund. 2940. American Red Cross, National, DC. $62,220, 2001. For Liberty Disaster Relief Fund. 2941. American Red Cross, National, DC. $4,141. 2942. American Red Cross, National, DC. $4,140. 2943. New Jersey Network (NJN) Foundation, Trenton, NJ. $25,000. For Remembrance and Reflection Service. 2944. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,285,060. 2945. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $390. 2946. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $11,000. 2947. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $11,000. 2948. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Huntington, NY. $1,000. 2949. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Huntington, NY. $500. 2950. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Huntington, NY. $500. 2951. United Way of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Harrisonburg, VA. $390. 2952. United Way of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Harrisonburg, VA. $390. 2953. United Way of Hunterdon County, Lebanon, NJ. $4,141. 2954. United Way of Hunterdon County, Lebanon, NJ. $4,140. 2955. United Way of New York City, New York, NY. $4,530. 2956. United Way of Tri-State, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 2957. United Way of Tri-State, New York, NY. $162,668, 2001. For September 11th Fund. 2958. United Way of Tri-State, New York, NY. $36,466, 2001. For September 11th Fund. Merck

Merck Family Fund 303 Adams St. Milton, MA 02186 (617) 696-3580 FAX: (617) 696-7262; E-mail: merck@merckff.org; URL: http://www.merckff.org 2959. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000.

Merrill

The Jane and Randy Merrill Foundation, Inc. 4246 Sentinel Post Rd. Atlanta, GA 30327 (404) 816-1145 2961. United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta, Atlanta, GA. $5,000, 2001. Merrill

Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 2 World Financial Ctr., 5th Fl. New York, NY 10281 (212) 236-4319 2962. Borough of Manhattan Community College of the City University of New York, New York, NY. $500,000. 2963. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $5,000,000. 2964. South Street Seaport Foundation, New York, NY. $500,000. 2965. Undesignated. $1,200,000. 2966. Various organizations. $2,300,000. 2967. Wall Street Rising Corporation, New York, NY. $500,000. Metal

Metal Industries Foundation, Inc. 861 N. Hercules Ave. Clearwater, FL 33765-1922 2968. Army Emergency Relief, Alexandria, VA. $17,000. For Pentagon Victim’s Fund. 2969. Federal Employee Education & Assistance Fund, Littleton, CO. $17,000. For FEEA World Trade Center/Pentagon Fund. 2970. Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, Arlington, VA. $17,000. For Pentagon Assistance Fund for Navy and Marine Corps victims of 9/11. MetLife

MetLife Foundation 27-01 Queens Plz. N. Long Island City, NY 11101 (212) 578-6272 URL: http://www.metlife.org 2971. ACCION USA, Boston, MA. $100,000. For 9/11 disaster relief, through program on Diversity and Inclusion. 2972. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2973. Childrens Health Fund, New York, NY. $150,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2974. Childrens Health Fund, New York, NY. $125,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2975. Childrens Health Fund, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 2976. Civic Capital Corporation, New York, NY. $250,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2977. Coalition of Voluntary Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Alcoholism Agencies, New York, NY. $100,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2978. Families and Work Institute, New York, NY. $125,000, 2001. 2979. FDNY Fire Safety Education Fund, Brooklyn, NY. $50,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2980. Floating Hospital, New York, NY. $135,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2981. Floating Hospital, New York, NY. $135,000. For 9/11 disaster relief.

2982. Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York, NY. $20,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2983. Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York, NY. $20,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2984. Manhattan Youth Recreation and Resources, New York, NY. $70,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2985. Maternity Center Association, New York, NY. $80,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2986. Municipal Art Society of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2987. National Organization on Disability. $50,000. For 9/11 disaster relief, through program on Diversity and Inclusion. 2988. National Organization on Disability. $25,000. For 9/11 disaster relief, through program for diversity and inclusion. 2989. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $75,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2990. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $75,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2991. New York City Public/Private Initiatives, New York, NY. $100,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2992. Nonprofit Finance Fund, New York, NY. $300,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2993. Renaissance Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $500,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2994. Saint Vincents Hospital and Medical Center of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2995. Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2996. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000. For disaster relief. 2997. United Neighborhood Houses of New York, New York, NY. $140,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 2998. United Way of New York City, New York, NY. $1,000,000. For disaster relief through September 11th Fund. 2999. YMCA of Greater New York, New York, NY. $30,000. For disaster relief. 3000. YMCA of Greater New York, New York, NY. $27,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 3001. YMCA of Greater New York, New York, NY. $19,000. For 9/11 disaster relief, through program on diversity and inclusion. Metris

Metris Companies Foundation 10900 Wayzata Blvd. Minnetonka, MN 55305 3002. American Red Cross, National, DC. $15,138. 3003. Metris Companies Foundation, Minnetonka, MN. $31,669. Meyer

Meyer Family Foundation 1 Westbrook Corp. Ctr., Ste. 300 Westchester, IL 60154 (708) 449-7755 FAX: (708) 449-7701 or (708) 449-7754; E-mail: cmcrobe@interaccess.co, or meyerfamilyfoundation@msn.com 3004. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. 3005. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $25,000.

195


Meyer

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Meyer

MIM

MIM Corporation

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Japan

1400 16th St. N.W., Ste. 360 Washington, DC 20036 (202) 483-8294 FAX: (202) 328-6850; E-mail: meyer@meyerfnd.org; URL: http:// www.meyerfoundation.org 3006. Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, DC. $50,000, 2001. For Survivors Fund, to support the long-term educational, health and rehabilitation, grief counseling and other support needs of the individuals and families affected by the September 11 terrorist attack at the Pentagon. 3007. Foundation Center, DC, DC. $8,998. For workshops following the events of September 11th, Nonprofits in a Time of Crisis and Change. 3008. Salvation Army of Washington, DC, DC. $15,000. For operating support for disaster relief efforts at the Pentagon, including assistance to families affected by employment lay-offs. 3009. Smithsonian Institution, DC. $15,000. For September 11: Bearing Witness to History exhibition. 3010. United Way of National Capital Area, DC. $50,000, 2001. For September 11th Fund.

c/o Corporate Communications 100 Clearbrook Road Elmsford, NY 10523 3018. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000.

Tokyo, Japan 3029. Keidanren, Tokyo, Japan. $1,000,000. For 9/11disaster relief efforts.

MGM

MGM Mirage, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 3260 Industrial Road Las Vegas, NV 89109 3011. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000.

Mitsubishi

Minneapolis

The Minneapolis Foundation 800 IDS Center 80 S. Eighth St. Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612) 672-3878 Application address: c/o Minnesota Nonprofits Assistance Fund: Kate Barr, Exec. Dir., Community Loan Technologies, 2801 21st Ave. S., Ste. 210 Minneapolis, MN 55407, tel: (612) 278-7180; URL: http://www.mplsfoundation.org 3019. Minneapolis Foundation, The, Minneapolis, MN. $506,110. To provide short and long-term relief to victims of September 11th, their families and impacted communities. Minnesota

The Minnesota Mutual Foundation Minnesota Mutual Life Ctr. 400 N. Robert St. St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 665-3501 Application information tel.: (651) 665-3448; FAX: (651) 665-3551 3020. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000. Mississippi

Mississippi Power Foundation, Inc. Michelin

Michelin North America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program P.O. Box 19001 Greenville, SC 29602-9001 (864) 458-6038 3012. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000. 3013. Michelin North America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program, Greenville, SC. $2,000,000. Microsoft

Microsoft Corporation Community Affairs

P.O. Box 4079 Gulfport, MS 39502 (228) 865-5904 3021. American Red Cross, National, DC. $5,000.

Mitsubishi International Corporation Contributions Program c/o Public Rels. Dept. 520 Madison Ave., 23rd Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212) 605-2082 3030. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000. 3031. World Trade Center Disaster Fund, London, England. $1,000,000. To match employee gifts. Mitsubishi

Mitsubishi Motors USA Foundation 6400 Katella Ave. Cypress, CA 90630-5208 3032. American Red Cross, National, DC. $200,000. Mitsui

The Mitsui U.S.A. Foundation 200 Park Ave. New York, NY 10166 3033. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Mizuho

Mizuho Financial Group c/o Corporate Communications 6-1 Marunouchi 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku 1-chome Tokyo, Japan 100-0005 3034. American Red Cross in Japan, Japan. $1,000,000. To support relief efforts for attack victims and to go toward ongoing rescue operation in the U.S. Mnuchin

Mitchell

Mitchell, Silberberg & Knupp Foundation

The Steven T. Mnuchin Foundation

11377 W. Olympic Blvd., Ste. 200 Los Angeles, CA 90064 3022. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $17,630. For September 11th Fund.

c/o Goldman Sachs & Co. 85 Broad St., Tax Dept. New York, NY 10004 3035. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $20,000. For general support. Moffitt

Mitsubishi

c/o Community Affairs 1 Microsoft Way Redmond, WA 98052-6399 (425) 706-8185 Application address for auction donations: c/o Microsoft Community Affairs, Auction Donation, 1 Microsoft Way, Redmond, WA 98052-6399; E-mail: giving@microsoft.com; URL: http:// www.microsoft.com/mscorp/citizenship 3014. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000,000. 3015. Various organizations. $1,300,000.

Midland Area Community Foundation 109 E. Main St. P.O. Box 289 Midland, MI 48640 (989) 839-9661 FAX: (989) 839-9907; E-mail: info@midlandfoundation.com, dspencer@midlandfoundation.com; URL: http:// www.midlandfoundation.com 3016. American Red Cross, Midland Chapter, Midland, MI. $90. For newspaper ad suggesting that contributions be sent directly to the local Red Cross.

L. R. Moffitt & L. Q. Moffitt Foundation

Mitsubishi Chemical America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 1 N. Lexington Ave. White Plains, NY 10601 (914) 761-9450 3023. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Mitsubishi

Mitsubishi Corporation - Tokyo Tokyo, Japan 3024. American Red Cross, National, DC. $500,000.

Midland

c/o FirstMerit Bank, N.A. 121 S. Main St., Ste. 200 Akron, OH 44308 (330) 384-7320 FAX: (330) 849-8992; E-mail: brenda.moubray@firstmerit.com 3036. American Red Cross, Summit County Chapter, Summit, NJ. $1,000. Mohegan

Mohegan Tribe/Mohegan Sun Mitsubishi

Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation 1560 Wilson Blvd., Ste. 1150 Arlington, VA 22209 FAX: (703) 276-8260; E-mail: colleen.maher@meus.mea.com; URL: http:// www.meaf.org 3025. American Red Cross, National, DC. $450,000. 3026. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $450,000. 3027. Pittsburgh Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA. $100,000. Mitsubishi

Milano

196

Mitsubishi

Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation

Milano Foundation, Inc.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.

c/o Robert J. DiQuollo 175 South St., Ste. 200 Morristown, NJ 07960 3017. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $10,000.

630 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3155 New York, NY 10111 3028. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $10,000.

c/o Communications Dept. 1 Mohegan Sun Blvd. Uncasville, CT 06382 3037. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000. Molton

The Molton Family Foundation 161 E. Chicago, Ste. 29A Chicago, IL 60611 3038. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500. For September 11th Telethon Fund.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER Monsanto

Monsanto Fund

Monterey

Monterey Fund, Inc. c/o Bear Stearns & Co. 1 Metrotech Ctr. N. Brooklyn, NY 11201 3041. Cantor Fitzgerald Relief Fund, New York, NY. $1,100. 3042. Gift of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For general support. 3043. Municipal 911 Fund, New York, NY. $6,000. 3044. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $58,375. For September 11th Fund. 3045. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,500. For September 11th Fund. 3046. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $73,575. For support in the adftermath of September 11. 3047. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $11,850. 3048. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $28,700. For general support of Robin Hood Relief Fund. 3049. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $4,500. 3050. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $3,500. For Widows’ and Children’s Fund, assisting families of victims killed on September 11th. 3051. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $30,900. For support in the aftermath of September 11. 3052. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $3,000. For Widows’ and Children’s Fund, assisting families of victims killed on September 11th. 3053. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $1,000. For support in the aftermath of September 11. 3054. Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. MONY

MONY Foundation 1740 Broadway, 10-36 New York, NY 10019 (212) 708-2468 3055. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $43,169. For administrative processing related to 9/11 efforts. 3056. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. 3057. Various organizations. $2,350. For donations too nonprofits assisting with 9/11 disaster. Moody’s

Moody’s Investors Services c/o Corporate Communications 99 Church Street New York, NY 10007 3058. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $250,000.

Morgan

J. P. Morgan Chase & Co. Contributions Program

800 N. Lindbergh Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63167 (314) 694-4391 FAX: (314) 694-7658; E-mail: monsanto.fund@monsanto.com; URL: http:// www.monsantofund.org/ 3039. American Red Cross, National, DC. $250,000, 2002. 3040. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $250,000, 2002.

Mott

1 Chase Manhattan Plz., 5th Fl. New York, NY 10081 (212) 552-1112 URL: http://www.jpmorganchase.com/grants 3059. Battery Dance Corporation, New York, NY. $15,000. 3060. Financial Planning Association, Atlanta, GA. $230,000. 3061. Financial Planning Association, Atlanta, GA. $10,000. 3062. Manhattan Youth Recreation and Resources, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. Morgan

The J. P. Morgan Chase Foundation 1 Chase Manhattan Plz., 5th Fl. New York, NY 10081 (212) 270-0377 URL: http://www.jpmorganchase.com/grants 3063. Morgan Chase Foundation, JP, New York, NY. $9,302,500. 3064. Morgan Chase Foundation, JP, New York, NY. $2,670,456. 3065. Morgan Chase Foundation, JP, New York, NY. $792,322, 2001. Morgan

Morgan Stanley Corporate Giving Program c/o Community Affairs Dept. 1601 Broadway, 12th Fl. New York, NY 10019 (212) 259-1235 E-mail: whatadifference@morganstanley.com; URL: http://www.morganstanley.com/about/inside/ community.html 3066. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $10,000. For September 11th Philanthropic Response Project. 3067. Morgan Stanley Victims’ Relief Fund, New York, NY. $10,000,000. Mosaic

The Mosaic Fund c/o Satterlee, Stephens, Burke & Burke 230 Park Ave., Ste. 1130 New York, NY 10169-1599 3068. World Trade Center Disaster Fund, London, England. $25,000. For general support. Motorola

Motorola Foundation 1303 E. Algonquin Rd. Schaumburg, IL 60196 (847) 576-6200 URL: http://www.motorola.com/ MotorolaFoundation/ 3069. Abilities, Inc., Albertson, NY. $86,164. For 9/11 disaster relief. 3070. American Red Cross, National, DC. $70,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 3071. Federal Employee Education & Assistance Fund, Littleton, CO. $315,933. For 9/11 disaster relief. 3072. Live Brave Coalition, Schaumburg, IL. $200,000. 3073. New York City Police Foundation, New York, NY. $100,000. For 9/11 disaster relief. 3074. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,033,962. For 9/11 disaster relief. 3075. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. For 9/11 disaster relief.

Mott

Charles Stewart Mott Foundation Mott Foundation Bldg., 503 S. Saginaw St., Ste. 1200 Flint, MI 48502-1851 (810) 238-5651 FAX: (810) 766-1753; E-mail: info@mott.org; Additional E-mail: publications@mott.org; URL: http://www.mott.org 3076. ACCION New York, Brooklyn, NY. $100,000, 2001. For disaster and humanitarian relief. 3077. Advertising Council Inc., New York, NY. $100,000. For Campaign for Freedom Fund, designed to help Americans cope with the war against terrorism through timely and relevant public service announcements. 3078. Advertising Council Inc., New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. For Campaign for Freedom Fund, designed to help Americans cope with the war against terrorism through timely and relevant public service announcements. 3079. After-School Corporation, The, New York, NY. $300,000, 2001. For disaster and humanitarian relief. 3080. American Red Cross, Flint County Chapter, Flint, MI. $300,000, 2001. 3081. Arab American Heritage Council, Flint, MI. $160,137, 2002. To promote understanding and tolerance. 3082. Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services, Dearborn, MI. $100,000, 2001. Toward education and outreach initiatives in southeast Michigan. 3083. Carelift International, Bala Cynwyd, PA. $50,000, 2001. 3084. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Braamfontein, South Africa. $262,000, 2001. For Violence in Transition Project, Transitional Project, and Reconciliation Project. Grant will also support Centre to undertake specific activities focusing on impact and significance of September 11, 2001 events in the U.S. for South Africa’s own challenges. 3085. Community Foundation of Greater Flint, Flint, MI. $200,000, 2001. To establish 100 Club, new fund at Foundation for recognition of fundraising efforts conducted by Flint-area firefighters and police for emergency personnel involved in September 11th attacks. Endowment will provide emergency and rescue equipment for local public safety departments. 3086. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. For September 11th Philanthropic Response Project. 3087. Foundation for Global Community, Palo Alto, CA. $51,600, 2002. To support reconstruction in Afghanistan. 3088. Genesee County Board of Commissioners, Flint, MI. $100,000, 2001. 3089. Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. $40,000, 2001. For disaster and humanitarian relief. 3090. International Crisis Group (Belgium), Brussels, Belgium. $200,000, 2001. 3091. International Institute of Flint, Flint, MI. $10,000. For county-wide memorial in honor of victims and heroes of September 11. 3092. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. For direct relief to victims and their families and support of other nonprofit organizations. 3093. People in Need Foundation, Prague, Czech Republic. $250,000, 2001. 3094. Salvation Army of Flint Area Chapter, Flint, MI. $100,000, 2001. 3095. Studio in a School Association, New York, NY. $30,000, 2002.

197


Mott

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE National

3096. United Way of Flint County, Flint, MI. $300,000, 2001. Mulford

Vincent Mulford Foundation c/o Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co. 766 Old Hammonds Ferry Rd. Linthicum, MD 21090 Application addresses: P.O. Box 635, Tuxedo Park, NY 10987; FAX: (845) 351-5752; E-mail: info@mulfordfdn.org; URL: http:// www.mulfordfdn.org 3097. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. Muller

The Robert & Elizabeth Muller Foundation, Inc.

Mutual

Mutual Benefit Credit Union c/o Corporate Communications 139 East 4th Street Cincinnati, OH 45202 3100. Ohio Credit Union Foundation, Dublin, OH. $10,000. MWVE

MWVE Fund 807 Lonsdale Bldg. Duluth, MN 55802 (218) 727-8253 3101. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. Nagase

Nagase America Corporation c/o Corporate Communications 546 5th Avenue New York, NY 10036 3102. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Nash

Nash Finch Foundation 7600 France Ave. South Minneapolis, MN 55440-0355 3103. Undesignated. $50,000.

c/o Communications Dept. 4605 Lankershim Blvd. North Hollywood, CA 91602 3107. Various organizations. $5,000,000.

c/o National City Bank 1900 E. 9th St., LOC 2157 Cleveland, OH 44114 (216) 222-2994 E-mail: bruce.mccrodden@nationalcity.com or joanne.clark@nationalcity.com 3116. Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Family Fund (KBW Family Fund), Melville, NY. $25,000.

National

National Center for Outreach c/o Communications Dept. 975 Observatory Drive Madison, WI 53706 3108. Undesignated. $100,000. To support a Community Response Grants program for pubic television stations serving their community through outreach activities.

National City Corporation Contributions Program National City Ctr. 1900 E. 9th St., LOC-2157 Cleveland, OH 44114-3484 (216) 222-2000 3109. American Red Cross, Greater Cleveland Chapter, Cleveland, OH. $455,000. For grant in support of 9/11efforts. National

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) c/o Communications Dept. 700 West Washington Street, P.O. Box 6222 Indianapolis, IN 46206 3110. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $5,000,000. To benefit former or current NCAA student-athletes who were permanently disabled and members of their families; firefighters, police officers and emergency medical technicians who were permanently disabled during the WTC tragedy and members of their families. National

National Distributing Company c/o Corporate Communications 1 National Dr. SW Atlanta, GA 30336 3111. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. National

National Hockey League Foundation c/o National Hockey League 1251 Ave. of the Americas, 47th Fl. New York, NY 10020-1104 (212) 789-2000 3112. Undesignated. $1,200,000.

National

P.O. Box 1417-D49 Alexandria, VA 22313 Additional address: 413 N. Lee St., Alexandria, VA 22314; URL: http://www.nacds.org 3104. American Red Cross, National, DC. $100,000. National

National Association of Realtors c/o Corporate Communications 700 11th Street Northwest Washington, DC 20001 3105. National Association of Realtors, Chicago, IL. $1,000,000. To help pay mortgage and rental costs of the families of victims of September 11th. National

National Association of Security Dealers (NASD), Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 1735 K Street Northwest Washington, DC 20006 3106. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000.

NEC

NEC Foundation of America 8 Corporate Center Dr. Melville, NY 11747 (631) 753-7021 FAX: (516) 753-7096; E-mail: foundation@necusa.com; URL: http:// necfoundation.org 3117. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $300,000. NEC

NEC USA, Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Comm. Div. 8 Corporate Center Dr. Melville, NY 11747 (631) 753-7045 FAX: (631) 753-7434; E-mail: lwojtecki@necusa.com 3118. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $700,000. Neuberger

The Neuberger Berman Foundation c/o Neuberger Berman Trust Co. of Delaware 919 Market St., Ste. 506, Mellon Bank Ctr. Wilmington, DE 19801-3065 3119. American Red Cross, National, DC. $600,000, 2001. 3120. American Red Cross, National, DC. $78,252, 2001. 3121. Engine Company 21, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. 3122. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001. 3123. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $200,000, 2001. 3124. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $135,000, 2001. 3125. New York State World Trade Center Relief Fund, Albany, NY. $165,000, 2001. New

National

National Association of Chain Drug Stores Education Foundation, Inc.

198

NCC Charitable Foundation

National

c/o Dayton & D’Amato 42-40 Bell Blvd. Bayside, NY 11361-2861 3098. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $10,000. Toward program providing emergency grants to young women and women-led groups who are organizing in response to the events following September 11th. 3099. Undesignated. $5,000.

NCC

National Association of Theatre Owners

National Penn Bank c/o Corporate Communications P.O. Box 547 Boyertown, PA 19512 3113. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. Nationwide

Nationwide Foundation 1 Nationwide Plz., 1-22-05 Columbus, OH 43215-2220 Tel.: (614) 249-4310; URL: http:// www.nationwide.com/aboutus/community/ fndatn.htm 3114. American Red Cross, DC Chapter, DC. $100,000. For Liberty Disaster Relief Fund. 3115. American Red Cross, National, DC. $990,000.

New Era Cap Company c/o Corporate Communications P.O Box 208 Derby, NY 14047 3126. MLB-MLBPA Disaster Relief Fund, New York, NY. $250,000. New Hampshire

The New Hampshire Charitable Foundation 37 Pleasant St. Concord, NH 03301-4005 (603) 225-6641 FAX: (603) 225-1700; E-mail: info@nhcf.org, or rs@nhcf.org; URL: http://www.nhcf.org 3127. New Hampshire Charitable Fund, Concord, NH. $330,000. 3128. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $18,500, 2001. 3129. Portsmouth Christian Academy, Portsmouth, NH. $11,600. For tuition assistance to students whose families were directly affected by September 11th.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

New York

New York

The New York Community Trust 2 Park Ave., 24th Fl. New York, NY 10016-9385 (212) 686-0010 FAX: (212) 532-8528; URL: http:// www.nycommunitytrust.org 3130. ADC Research Institute, DC. $40,000. To combat post-September 11th discrimination against Arab-American New Yorkers. 3131. American Red Cross in Greater New York, New York, NY. $50,000. To use lessons learned from September 11th to help nonprofits and individuals develop disaster plans and train volunteers. 3132. Arab American Family Support Center, Brooklyn, NY. $70,000, 2002. For youth and community programs that address anti-Arab bias and promote intergroup understanding. 3133. Architecture Research Institute, New York, NY. $53,000, 2002. To promote a plan for revitalizing the retail sector of lower Manhattan in the wake of September 11th. 3134. Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, New York, NY. $40,000, 2002. To combat violence and discrimination against Asian, Muslim and Arab Americans. 3135. Borough of Manhattan Community College Fund, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000. To provide scholarships to deserving students who have suffered economic harm as result of 9/11 disaster with special consideration to students who themselves have volunteered their services to help other individuals harmed by 9/11 disaster. 3136. Bridge Fund of New York, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. To expand eviction prevention services for working poor families post-September 11th. 3137. Brooklyn Bureau of Community Service, Brooklyn, NY. $25,000. For support services in responding to September 11th disaster. 3138. Brooklyn Bureau of Community Service, Brooklyn, NY. $25,000. To provide support services in responding to September 11th disaster. 3139. Chhaya Community Development Corporation, Flushing, NY. $35,000, 2002. To combat housing discrimination against South Asians. 3140. Citizens Committee for New York City, New York, NY. $50,000. To use lessons learned from September 11th to help neighborhood groups develop disaster preparedness plans. 3141. City Harvest, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. To support a joint distribution effort with Food for Survival to get more food to the City’s emergency feeding programs. 3142. Columbia University, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. To train physicians to diagnose and treat bioterrorism-related diseases. 3143. Educational Broadcasting Corporation, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. For a public television program that will give practical emergency planning information to New Yorkers. 3144. Engine No. 4 Ladder No. 15 Family Fund, New York, NY. $10,000, 2001. For general support. 3145. ESU-Bomb Squad Relief Fund, North Massapequa, NY. $10,000, 2001. For general support. 3146. Food for Survival, Bronx, NY. $25,000, 2002. For joint distribution effort with City Harvest to get more food to City’s emergency feeding programs. 3147. Foundation Center, New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. To support the Center’s 9/11 Philanthropic Response Project. 3148. Friends of the Firefighters, Brooklyn, NY. $25,000, 2002. To coordinate counseling and support services for wives and children of injured and deceased firefighters.

3149. Fund for New Citizens, New York, NY. $60,000, 2002. To support an initiative to build the capacity of Arab and Muslim grassroots groups. 3150. Fund for the City of New York, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. For report and conference on impact of September 11th events on State’s judicial and legal systems. 3151. Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union (HERE), Local 100, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. To provide job training and placement services to restaurant workers displaced after September 11th. 3152. Just Food, New York, NY. $25,000, 2002. To expand a cooperative food distribution program to low-income families. 3153. Mothers’ Voices, New York, NY. $50,000, 2001. To counterbalance loss of contributions due to 9/11. 3154. Municipal 911 Fund, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. For general support. 3155. National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, Emmitsburg, MD. $100,000, 2002. For memorial service and counseling for families of firefighters killed on September 11th. 3156. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $800,000, 2002. To train New York City teachers to help students deal with the events of September 11th. 3157. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. For forum to review health and mental health issues related to September 11th. 3158. New York Cares, New York, NY. $35,000, 2002. To use lessons from September 11th to develop a disaster response plan to coordinate and deploy volunteers. 3159. New York City Fire Department, New York, NY. $150,000, 2002. To help the Fire Department apply the lessons of September 11th and upgrade its communications systems. 3160. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $2,000,000. 3161. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $3,627, 2002. For general support for September 11th Fund. 3162. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500, 2002. For general support for September 11th Fund. 3163. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $500, 2002. For general support for September 11th Fund. 3164. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $268, 2002. For general support for September 11th Fund. 3165. New York Stock Exchange Fallen Heroes Fund, New York, NY. $10,000, 2002. For general support. 3166. Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York, New York, NY. $50,000. To use lessons learned from September 11th to help nonprofits develop business continuity plans for emergency situations. 3167. POPPA (Police Organization Providing Peer Assistance), New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. To provide counseling and support services for police officers and their families. 3168. Public Health Research Institute of the City of New York, New York, NY. $90,000, 2002. To develop rapid testing procedures for organisms used in bioterrorism. 3169. Regional Plan Association, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. To promote an inclusive and informed plan for rebuilding of downtown Manhattan. 3170. Rescue No. 5 Family Fund, Staten Island, NY. $10,000, 2001. For general support.

3171. Saint Vincents Hospital and Medical Center of New York, New York, NY. $75,000. For outreach and mental health counseling for firefighters and Port Authority police and their families affected by events of September 11th. 3172. Share New York, Bronx, NY. $25,000, 2002. To expand a cooperative food distribution program. 3173. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. For general support. 3174. Union Community Fund, DC. $50,000, 2002. To provide job training and placement services to restaurant workers displaced after September 11th. 3175. 9-11 United Services Group, New York, NY. $10,000. To develop transition plan to transfer services to Human Services Council. New York

New York Foundation 350 5th Ave., No. 2901 New York, NY 10118 (212) 594-8009 URL: http://www.nyf.org/ 3176. Asociacion Tepeyac de New York, New York, NY. $19,000, 2001. For personnel services to support WTC Relief Project for Latino immigrants, which provides relief services and financial relief. 3177. Bangladeshi-American Friendship Association, Jamaica, NY. $12,600, 2001. To reach out to Bangladeshi and South Asian communities in wake of September 11th attacks and assist in obtaining guidance and benefits-related services. 3178. Central American Legal Assistance, Brooklyn, NY. $23,000, 2001. To begin searching out immigrants who lost their jobs or close relatives due to WTC attacks and have not yet sought help out of fear or not being aware of resources available. 3179. Chinese Staff and Workers Association, New York, NY. $38,500, 2001. To assess needs of Chinatown residents affected by attacks, and to aid individuals seeking assistance. 3180. City Project, New York, NY. $20,811, 2001. To call together coalition of nonprofits to create ALTERBUDGET Agenda, which will document disruptions caused by 9/11. 3181. Committee Against Anti-Asian Violence, New York, NY. $15,000, 2001. For post-9/11 outreach work in poor and working-poor Asian immigrant communities. 3182. Community Action Project, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000, 2001. To help low-income immigrants of Flatbush and East Flatbush directly affected by the World Trade Center Tragedy. 3183. Emerald Isle Immigration Center, Woodside, NY. $11,424, 2001. To provide seminars on benefits, new immigration laws, and employment, and to temporarily expand service hours to reach workers affected by 9/11. 3184. Filipino American Human Services, New York, NY. $20,000, 2001. To assist Filipino families affected by 9/11. 3185. Global Kids, New York, NY. $11,250. To integrate post-September 11 issues into trainings and workshops and to provide opportunities for staff and youth leaders to conduct bias awareness education activities in schools and youth organizations. 3186. Haitian American Alliance of New York, Brooklyn, NY. $15,000, 2001. To assess impact of 9/11 on the Haitian community and to develop long-term response. 3187. Independent Press Association, San Francisco, CA. $12,000, 2001. To pay temporary staff to place emergency ads regarding disaster relief in ethnic press. 3188. Latin American Workers Project, Brooklyn, NY. $28,500, 2001. To help relatives and

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dislocated workers to gain access to multiple 9/11 relief funds and to organize day-laborers at Ground Zero. 3189. National Mobilization Against Sweatshops, New York, NY. $30,500, 2001. For emergency support of Disaster Assistance Project for victims of 9/11 who have been largely ignored by other emergency relief efforts. 3190. Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. To provide legal services to immigrants affected by 9/11. 3191. Roza Promotions, Staten Island, NY. $50,000. To assist low-income immigrant and refugee families that lost jobs, wages, or other benefits following September 11th attacks. 3192. Workers Awaaz, Long Island City, NY. $10,000, 2001. To organize free weekly walk-in clinic in Jackson Heights to assist South Asian immigrants affected by 9/11. 3193. Young Korean American Service and Education Center, Flushing, NY. $10,000, 2001. To reach out to Korean-Americans affected by 9/11 who are not accessing relief information. New York

New York Life Foundation 51 Madison Ave., Ste. 604 New York, NY 10010-1655 (212) 576-7341 E-mail: nylfoundation@newyorklife.com; URL: http://www.newyorklife.com/foundation 3194. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000, 2001. 3195. Community Funds, Inc, New York, NY. $3,000,000. For September 11th disaster relief. New York

New York Mets c/o Corporate Communications 12301 Roosevelt Avenue Corona, NY 11368 3196. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $450,000. New York

New York Rotary Foundation 322 Eigth Avenue New York, NY 10001 3197. Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. New York

The New York Times Company Foundation, Inc. 229 W. 43rd St. New York, NY 10036-3959 (212) 556-1091 FAX: (212) 556-4450; URL: http:// www.nytimes.com/scholarship; URL: http:// www.nytco.com/foundation 3198. New York Historical Society, New York, NY. $25,000. For Unfinished Lives, exhibition drawing on New York Times series Profiles in Grief. New York

The New York Women’s Foundation 34 W. 22nd St. New York, NY 10010 (212) 414-4342 FAX: (212) 414-5708; E-mail: info@nywf.org; URL: http://www.nywf.org 3199. Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, New York, NY. $15,000. To provide direct legal assistance to at least 150 Asian immigrant women who are eligible for monetary relief and/or whose immigration status is in jeopardy as a result of the death of a spouse or family members in the World Trade Center tragedy. Also, to provide a comprehensive array of services, including multilingual legal advice, counseling, and referral services to low-income,

200

non-English speaking Asian women who have been affected by the attacks. 3200. Center for Anti-Violence Education/Brooklyn Womens Martial Arts, Brooklyn, NY. $15,000. To provide self-defense and anti-violence prevention workshops to women and teen women at small grassroots organizations that are under increasing attack to due to racist backlash following September 11th. 3201. Central Brooklyn Partnership, Brooklyn, NY. $15,000. To offer support services and technical assistance to low-income women entrepreneurs in Fulton FIRST cooperative market for immigrant street vendors who face decrease in business due to anti-immigration sentiments and economic downturn after September 11th. 3202. Chinese Staff and Workers Association, New York, NY. $15,000. For start-up support for Emergency Response Plan comprising community outreach, environmental/community health, and expansion of existing Labor Rights Clinic to address needs of Chinatown residents affected both directly and indirectly by events of September 11th. 3203. Committee for Hispanic Children and Families, New York, NY. $15,000. For continued support for grief counseling and post-traumatic stress therapy to Latina immigrants who are isolated and left out of the healing process because of language and cultural barriers. 3204. Committee for Hispanic Children and Families, New York, NY. $10,000. To train community-based agencies, PTAs, and church groups to provide grief counseling and post-traumatic stress therapy to Latina immigrants isolated from healing process because of language and cultural barriers. 3205. Community Voices Heard, New York, NY. $30,000. To monitor welfare centers to see if systems were running efficiently after September 11th, contact their membership to assess need for unemployment insurance, and redouble their efforts to campaign for the Jobs Creation Bill. 3206. Community Voices Heard, New York, NY. $15,000. To push for low-income women to be included in rebuilding activities through media attention to experiences of low-wage workers, and teach public about impact of 9/11 on pre-existing poverty crisis in New York City. 3207. Community Works, New York, NY. $5,000. For Honoring Our Heroes: Youth for Youth, performance event to help young people to express their emotions about September 11th events. 3208. Creative Alternatives of New York, New York, NY. $15,000. To offset decline in arts funding and service fees paid by client agencies in order to continue weekly workshops that combine performing arts with modern group psychotherapy for three community facilities affected by September 11th. 3209. Forest Hills Community House, Forest Hills, NY. $15,000. To hire counselor to provide emergency services for South Asian women in Queens experiencing acute stress and fear due to verbal and physical abuse, bias incidents, and prejudice arising out of the September 11th attack. 3210. Hope Program, Brooklyn, NY. $20,000. To give women on public assistance job-readiness training, employment services, and psychological counseling, demand for which rose exponentially after September 11th with the loss of at least 100,000 jobs, many of which were in low-wage workforce. 3211. Iris House - A Center for Women Living with HIV, New York, NY. $15,000. To develop emergency guidelines for staff and short-term intervention for clients, women with HIV/AIDS and their families, who are coping with increased

feelings of isolation, fear, depression, and vulnerability brought on by events of September 11th. 3212. Latin American Workers Project, Brooklyn, NY. $15,000. To advocate for and organize Latin American women day laborers who have lost their jobs due to September 11th, including workshops on labor and immigration laws, ESOL, mental health, and domestic violence issues. 3213. Local Development Corporation of East New York, Brooklyn, NY. $30,000. To help women develop skills and resources to build their small businesses in weakened post-9/11 economic environment. 3214. Maura Clarke-Ita Ford Center, Brooklyn, NY. $15,000. To cover cash flow problem caused by disruption of phone service, delays in funding from foundations and the City, cancellation of fundraising craft fair scheduled for September 15th, 2001, and loss of anticipated revenues from cookie orders. 3215. Mercy Center, Bronx, NY. $15,000. For counseling, conflict resolution training, and alternatives to violence programs that include community events for healing and remembrance and support groups, and for preparation of delegation of counselors to be sent to neighborhood agencies . 3216. National Mobilization Against Sweatshops, New York, NY. $15,000. To assist Latina, Afro-Caribbean, and Eastern-European immigrants injured or otherwise affected by World Trade Center tragedy, many of whom live and work in Lower Manhattan and northern Brooklyn and have been overlooked in disaster relief efforts. 3217. New York Asian Womens Center, New York, NY. $10,000. To strengthen capacity to provide more efficient services to clients in times of crisis. 3218. Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation, New York, NY. $15,000. To advise survivors of victims about disaster relief services and resources and to offer legal services to community residents regarding housing, public assistance, disability, and domestic violence issues that arose due to the attacks. 3219. Project Teen Aid, Brooklyn, NY. $4,000. To develop and implement emergency escape plan for children of Project Chance, Early Head Start program for low-income children in Northern Brooklyn, to relocate to a safe place in the event of another emergency. 3220. Reconciliation And Culture Cooperative Network (RACCOON), New York, NY. $15,000. To provide mental health and domestic violence services for refugee and immigrant women from Balkan community who, coming to terms with violence in their homelands, have been retraumatized by violence in their newly adopted country. 3221. Sakhi for South Asian Women, New York, NY. $10,000. To offer domestic violence counseling services to South Asian women encountering rise in anti-immigrant attacks and fear of persecution for their immigrant status. 3222. Shalom Task Force, New York, NY. $15,000. To work with Beit Shalom to identify Bukharian women and families living in Queens who suffered losses from September 11th tragedy, connect them to organizations providing disaster relief, and temporarily relocate main office. 3223. South Asian Youth Action (SAYA), Elmhurst, NY. $35,000. To offer girls workshops on issues such as gender discrimination, understanding the self in relation to the community, leadership development, and other skill-building activities; and to work with culturally-sensitive girls at schools in Queens. 3224. South Asian Youth Action (SAYA), Elmhurst, NY. $15,000. To engage young people


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Northern NIKE

in hosting inter-cultural dialogues in schools and community centers, train them to use the media to raise awareness about the effects of 9/11, and encourage them to develop strategies to work towards peaceful resolutions. 3225. T.O.P.S. For You, Brooklyn, NY. $10,000. For Bushwick Resource Coalition, representing service providers in Brooklyn, to work with community to address post-traumatic stress caused by September 11th tragedy. 3226. Urban Justice Center, New York, NY. $15,000. To conduct interviews with domestic violence survivors to better understand the impact of September 11th events on their lives, and to analyze changes in calls to the police, calls to the NYC domestic violence hot line, and child abuse reports after September 11th. 3227. We Interrupt This Message, San Francisco, CA. $15,000. For 911 Media Training and Technical Assistance Program designed to give voice in news media to communities most affected by wartime reality: women, Muslims, Arab-Americans, immigrants, and communities of color. 3228. Women’s Venture Fund, New York, NY. $15,000. For start-up support for Small Business Disaster Relief Program, giving technical assistance to women-owned businesses from merchant group, From the Ground Up. New York

New York Yankees c/o Corporate Communications Yankee Stadium, 161st Street and River Avenue Bronx, NY 10452 3229. Undesignated. $1,000,000. New Yorker

New Yorker/Advance Magazines, The New York, NY 3230. New York Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. $4,876. For New York Arts Recovery Fund. Newhouse

Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, Inc. c/o Paul Scherer & Co. LLP 335 Madison Ave., 9th Fl. New York, NY 10017 3231. Community Foundation of New Jersey, Morristown, NJ. $1,000,000, 2001. To provide college scholarships for children of victims of 9/11. 3232. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. 3233. Staten Island September 11 Fund, Staten Island, NY. $15,000. 3234. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. Newland

The Newland Family Foundation, Inc. 230 Hampton Ct. Athens, GA 30605-1404 (706) 543-3938 FAX: (706) 354-6694; E-mail: newlandfamfdninc@mindspring.com 3235. New York Times 9/11 Neediest Fund, New York, NY. $5,000. Nextgen

NIKE Foundation c/o NIKE, Inc. 1 Bowerman Dr. Beaverton, OR 97005-6453 (503) 671-6453 3238. American Red Cross, National, DC. $144,000. 3239. Catholic Charities USA, Alexandria, VA. $50,000. 3240. Catholic Charities USA, Alexandria, VA. $50,000. To provide immediate counseling and family services for those affected by September 11 terrorist attacks in New York City. 3241. Federal Employee Education & Assistance Fund, Littleton, CO. $100,000. 3242. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $50,000. 3243. Mercy Corps International, Portland, OR. $25,000. 3244. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $50,000. 3245. Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association of the City of New York, New York, NY. $175,000. 3246. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $175,000. 3247. Undesignated. $75,000. For programs and organizations promoting racial and religious, healing, and community-building efforts. 3248. United Methodist Committee on Relief, New York, NY. $50,000. 3249. United Methodist Committee on Relief, New York, NY. $50,000. To provide immediate counseling and family services for those affected by September 11 terrorist attacks in New York City. NiSource

NiSource Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Citizenship Dept. 801 E. 86th Ave. Merrillville, IN 46410 FAX: (219) 647-6225; URL: http:// www.nisource.com/about/corpcit/index.asp 3250. NiSource Inc. Corporate Giving Program, Merrillville, IN. $250,000. Nissan

The Nissan Foundation P.O. Box 191 Gardena, CA 90248-0191 (310) 771-3330 FAX: (310) 516-7967; E-mail: tiarzha.taylor@nissan_usa.com 3251. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $1,000,000, 2001. Nokomis

The Nokomis Foundation 161 Ottawa Ave. N.W., Ste. 305-C Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (616) 451-0267 FAX: (616) 451-9914; E-mail: kmulhern@nokomisfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.nokomisfoundation.org 3252. New York Womens Foundation, New York, NY. $10,000. Toward Women’s Disaster Relief Fund. Nordson

Nextgen Foundation Charitable Trust

The Nordson Corporation Foundation

10706 Beaver Dam Road Cockeysville, MD 21030 3236. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000.

28601 Clemens Rd. Westlake, OH 44145-1119 (440) 892-1580 FAX: (216) 892-9253; URL: http:// www.nordson.com/corporate/grants.html 3253. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $30,000.

NHL

NHL Players Association c/o Corporate Communications 69 JOY ST UNIT 1 Boston, MA 02114 3237. Undesignated. $500,000.

Nordstrom

Nordstrom, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 1617 6th Ave. Seattle, WA 98101 3254. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,868,000. Norfolk

The Norfolk Foundation 1 Commercial Pl., Ste 1410 Norfolk, VA 23510-2113 (757) 622-7951 FAX: (757) 622-1751; E-mail: info@norfolkfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.norfolkfoundation.org 3255. American Red Cross, Tidewater Chapter, Norfolk, VA. $12,500, 2001. For disaster relief. 3256. United Way of South Hampton Roads, Norfolk, VA. $12,500, 2001. Norris

The Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation 11 Golden Shore, Ste. 450 Long Beach, CA 90802 (562) 435-8444 FAX: (562) 436-0584; E-mail: gerringer@ktn.org; URL: http://www.norrisfoundation.org 3257. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $205,000, 2001. 3258. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $25,000, 2001. North

North Jersey Media Group Inc. Corporate Giving Program c/o Corp. Contribs. 150 River St. Hackensack, NJ 07601 3259. Community Foundation of New Jersey, Morristown, NJ. $1,000,000. For disaster relief fund for northern New Jersey residents who suffered losses from the September 11th disaster. Northeast

Northeast Utilities Foundation, Inc. P.O. Box 5563 Hartford, CT 06102-5563 (860) 721-4063 Additional contact: Wendy Collier, tel.: (860) 721-4043, E-mail: colliwj@nu.com; FAX: (860) 721-4331; E-mail: hopkit@nu.com; URL: http:// www.cl-p.com/community/partners/grants/ nufoundation.asp 3260. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $36,600. 3261. Salvation Army National Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. $36,600. 3262. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $1,200. Northern

The Northern Trust Company Charitable Trust c/o The Northern Trust Co., Community Affairs Div. 50 S. LaSalle St., M-5 Chicago, IL 60675 (312) 444-4059 Application address: Community Affairs Div., 181 W. Madison St., 5th Fl. Reception, Chicago, IL 60602; URL: http://www.northerntrust.com/ aboutus/community/charitable/index.html 3263. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $89,124, 2001. Employee Matching Gifts to September 11th Fund. 3264. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $127,700, 2001. Employee Matching Gifts to September 11th Fund. 3265. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001.

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Northern

SEPTEMBER 11: THE PHILANTHROPIC RESPONSE Noyes

3266. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $102,132, 2001. Employee matching gifts to September 11th Fund. 3267. New York Police and Fire Widows and Childrens Benefit Fund, New York, NY. $100,000, 2001. Northrop

Northrop Grumman Corporation Contributions Program 1840 Century Park E. Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310) 553-6262 3268. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $125,000. 3269. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $150,000. 3270. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $125,000. 3271. Northrop Grumman Corporation Contributions Program, Los Angeles, CA. $100,000. Northrop

The Northrop Grumman Foundation 1840 Century Park E. Los Angeles, CA 90067 3272. International Association of Fire Fighters, DC. $75,000. 3273. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $100,000. 3274. New York State Fraternal Order of Police Fund, Hicksville, NY. $75,000. 3275. Undesignated. $250,000. For donations to International Association of Firefighters, New York Fraternal Order of Police, and various World trade Center Funds including The September 11th Fund (established by United Way of New York City and New York Community Trusts) and Employee Assistance Fund for Northrop Grumman employees directly affected by terrorist attacks. Northwest

Northwest Minnesota Foundation (NWMF) 4225 Technology Dr. N.W. Bemidji, MN 56601 (218) 759-2057 FAX: (218) 759-2328; E-mail: nwmf@nwmf.org; Additional tel.: (800) 659-7859; URL: http:// www.nwmf.org 3276. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $5,000. Northwestern

Northwestern Mutual Foundation

Peter Norton Family Foundation 225 Arizona, Ste. 350 Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 576-7700 3278. Bridge Fund of New York, New York, NY. $25,000. For Project Recovery. 3279. New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, NY. $10,000. For stabilization grant in the aftermath of September 11th. Novartis

556 Morris Ave. Summit, NJ 07901 3280. American Red Cross, National, DC. $3,000,000.

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6 E. 39th St., 12th Fl. New York, NY 10016-0112 (212) 684-6577 FAX: (212) 689-6549; E-mail: noyes@noyes.org; URL: http://www.noyes.org 3281. Municipal Art Society of New York, New York, NY. $20,000. For Imagine New York visioning project through which public can express their ideas and hopes about rebuilding of Lower Manhattan, and to expand capacity of Imagine New York web site to allow for continued monitoring. 3282. Municipal Art Society of New York, New York, NY. $7,500. For Imagine New York, series of community-based workshops that will gather broad base of ideas and opinions about rebuilding and memorializing World Trade Center site.

47 Winter St., 6th Floor Boston, MA 02108 FAX: 617) 542-5570; E-mail: oak@oakfnd.org; URL: http://www.oakfnd.org 3291. Robin Hood Foundation, New York, NY. $500,000. For Robin Hood Relief Fund to help victims of the World Trade Center attacks.

Noyes

Nicholas H. Noyes, Jr. Memorial Foundation, Inc. 1950 E. Greyhound Pass, No. 18-356 Carmel, IN 46033-7730 (317) 844-8009 FAX: (317) 844-8099; E-mail: admin@noyesfoundation.org; URL: http:// www.noyesfoundation.org 3283. American Red Cross, National, DC. $50,000. For September 11th disaster relief.

Oakleaf

Oakleaf Foundation 5140 Wells Fargo Ctr. 90 S. 7th St. Minneapolis, MN 55402 3292. W N Y C, New York, NY. $10,000. For Emergency Fund. Oberkotter

Oberkotter Foundation 1600 Market St., Ste. 3600 Philadelphia, PA 19103-7286 (215) 751-2601 FAX: (215) 751-2678; E-mail: RDIMARTINO@Schnader.com 3293. American Red Cross, DC Chapter, DC. $10,000. For National Disaster Relief Fund. Office

Office Depot, Inc. Corporate Giving Program NRG

NRG Energy, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 1221 Nicollet Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55403 3284. NRG Energy Inc., Minneapolis, MN. $1,000,000. 3285. Twin Towers Fund, New York, NY. $1,000,000.

c/o Donations 2200 Old Germantown Rd. Delray Beach, FL 33445 (561) 438-3379 3294. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $250,000. OfficeMax

OfficeMax Charitable Foundation

NVIDIA

NVIDIA c/o Corporate Communications 2701 San Tomas Expressway Santa Clara, CA 95050 3286. American Red Cross, National, DC. $1,000,000.

3605 Warrensville Ctr. Rd. Shaker Heights, OH 44122 (216) 471-6900 3295. Scholarship America, Saint Peter, MN. $1,000,000. Ohio

Ohio Casualty Foundation, Inc.

Nymox

Nymox Pharmaceutical Corporation c/o Corporate Communications 230 West Passaic Street Maywood, NJ 07607 3287. Various organizations. $20,000.

9450 Seward Rd. Fairfield, OH 45014 FAX: (513) 603-3181; E-mail: debby.jordan@ocas.com 3296. United Way of Butler County, Butler, PA. $25,000. Ohrstrom

The Ohrstrom Foundation, Inc. NYSEG

The NYSEG Foundation, Inc.

O’Neill Norton

Novartis U.S. Foundation

The Oak Foundation U.S.A.

P.O. Box 5224 Binghamton, NY 13902-5224 (607) 762-7333 3288. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000.

720 E. Wisconsin Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53202 (414) 665-2904 3277. American Red Cross, National, DC. $376,000.

Oak

Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation, Inc.

The William J. and Dorothy K. O’Neill Foundation, Inc. 30195 Chagrin Blvd., Ste. 250 Cleveland, OH 44124 (216) 831-9667 FAX: (216) 831-3779; E-mail: oneillfdn@aol.com; URL: http://www.oneillfdn.org 3289. Center for Independence of the Disabled, New York, NY. $30,000. 3290. Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation, New York, NY. $15,000, 2002.

c/o Curtis Mallet, et. al 101 Park Ave., Ste. 3500 New York, NY 10178-0061 3297. New York Womens Foundation, New York, NY. $50,000. For NYWF Disaster Relief Fund, helping nonprofits serving low-income women and girls affected by the events of 9/11/01. 3298. Richards Street Heroes Fund, New York, NY. $50,000. For families of victims from Red Hook Fire Department. 3299. Tides Foundation, San Francisco, CA. $50,000. To assist people in 9/11/01 tragedy in New York City. 3300. Unitarian Church of All Souls, New York, NY. $50,000. For 9/11/01 Emergency Relief Fund. Oldcastle

Oldcastle, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 375 Northridge Road Atlanta, GA 30305 3301. Oldcastle, Inc., Atlanta, GA. $400,000.


LIST OF GRANTS BY FUNDER

Oshkosh

Olson

The Delmar and Audria M. Olson Family Foundation c/o Gary A. Olson, Tr. 5721 Riegel’s Point Rd. Sarasota, FL 34242 3302. Salvation Army of Sarasota, Sarasota, FL. $20,000. For disaster relief. Olympic

Olympic Optical c/o Corporate Communications 3975 Vantech Drive, Suite 2 Memphis, TN 36115 3303. New York Community Trust & United Way of New York, New York, NY. $20,000. Ondeo

Ondeo Nalco Company Contributions Program 1601 W. Diehl Rd. Ondeo Nalco Ctr. Naperville, IL 60563-1198 3304. American Red Cross, National, DC. $40,000. Oneida

Oneida Limited c/o Corporate Communications 163-181 Kenwood Avenue Oneida, NY 13421 3305. American Red Cross, National, DC. $13,257. Open

Open Society Institute 400 W. 59th St. New York, NY 10019 (212) 548-0600 FAX: (212) 548-4600; URL: http://www.soros.org 3306. American Bar Association, DC. $75,000, 2002. For Immigration Pro Bono Program, focusing on immigrants affected by post-9/11 policies. 3307. American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, New York, NY. $175,000. For Security and Civil Liberties Task Force, responding to September 11 terrorist attacks. 3308. American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. For advocacy, monitoring, and litigation to protect security and civil liberties in the wake of 9/11. 3309. American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Northern California, San Francisco, CA. $75,000. For Campaign Against Racial Profiling, including Driving While Black or Brown Campaign and post September 11 work. 3310. American Immigration Law Foundation, DC. $50,000, 2002. For advocacy, documentation, and public education around the detention of non-citizens post-9/11. 3311. American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, DC. $75,000, 2002. To produce report on civil rights and civil liberties violations suffered by Arab Americans in the wake of 9/11. 3312. Arab American Institute Foundation, DC. $75,000, 2002. For policy advocacy and series of workshops for Arab American communities around national security and civil liberties issues post-9/11. 3313. Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. To fund anti-violence work and continue documenting incidents of hate crimes affecting South Asians and other Asian Americans, provide free legal assistance to victims, and launch community organizing effort. 3314. Catholic Legal Immigration Network, NY. $60,000, 2002. To serve increasing number of immigrants affected by broad detention policies instituted post-9/11. 3315. Center for National Security Studies, DC. $50,000, 2002. For Emergency Project to Defend

Civil Liberties and Protect Security in Defense of Freedom at a Time of Crisis. 3316. Citizens and Immigrants for Equal Justice, Mesquite, TX. $50,000, 2002. For post-9/11 advocacy on behalf of detained immigrants and their families. 3317. Columbia University, New York, NY. $12,994. Toward The Making of Iranian Cinema conference, postponed after September 11. 3318. Constitution Project, DC. $75,000, 2002. For Liberty and Security Initiative in the wake of 9/11. 3319. Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), DC. $150,000. To address challenges posed by deployment of systems of state surveillance after September 11 attacks. 3320. Fiscal Policy Institute, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. For fiscal analysis activities related to post-9/11 issues, particularly rebuilding of lower Manhattan. 3321. Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project, Florence, AZ. $60,000, 2002. To support the Project’s work with the Detention Watch Network. 3322. Fund for Independent Publishing, New York, NY. $50,000. For publishing project, Civil Liberties in the Wake of September 11. 3323. Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights, Chicago, IL. $50,000, 2002. To respond to the needs of immigrants and refugees in the Midwest affected by new anti-terrorist laws and policies. 3324. Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, New York, NY. $100,000, 2002. For work on detention advocacy and policy monitoring in the wake of 9/11. 3325. Leadership Conference Education Fund, DC. $100,000, 2002. For public education campaign to promote sensible policy responses to 9/11 as they affect civil rights, civil liberties, and immigration issues. 3326. Legal Aid Society, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. For representation of immigrants placed in deportation proceedings as a result of post-9/11 crackdowns. 3327. Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, New York, NY. $80,000, 2002. For monitoring and watchdog activities and to coordinate work with member organizations in the wake of 9/11. 3328. Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, New York, NY. $60,000, 2002. To help secure pro-immigrant sentiments and policies post-9/11 through grassroots education, media outreach, and advocacy related to immigrants in INS detention. 3329. Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) Property Management Corporation, Los Angeles, CA. $50,000, 2001. To address the impact of 9/11 on Latino communities. 3330. Migration Policy Institute, DC. $150,000, 2001. For policy development work on striking the proper balance between national security concerns and civil liberties/civil rights in the wake of 9/11. 3331. National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium, DC. $125,000, 2002. For monitoring of hate crimes and of federal agency regulations/ legislation relating to immigrants and national security post-9/11. 3332. National Council of La Raza, Los Angeles, CA. $50,000, 2001. To address the impact of 9/11 on Latino communities. 3333. National Immigration Forum, DC. $50,000, 2002. For on-going advocacy for fair treatment of immigrants and refugees in the aftermath of 9/11. 3334. New York Immigration Coalition, New York, NY. $75,000, 2002. To act as main advocacy

voice for immigrants in New York City in the wake of 9/11. 3335. New York State Defenders Association, Albany, NY. $75,000, 2002. To address legal needs of immigrants detained or taken to jail by the INS or other law enforcement agencies in the wake of 9/11. 3336. Tides Foundation, San Francisco, CA. $350,000, 2002. For Tides 9/11 Democracy Fund for regranting to Arab, Muslim, Sikh, and South Asian organizations responding to erosions of civil liberties and rights post-9/11. 3337. Trial Lawyers Care, Inc., New York, NY. $50,000, 2002. For pro bono legal assistance program for victims of 9/11 who are applying to the Victims Compensation Fund or other relief programs. 3338. Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children, New York, NY. $60,000, 2002. For Detention Asylum Project, focusing on women, adolescents and children in the wake of 9/11. OPNET

OPNET Technologies, Inc. c/o Corporate Communications 7255 Woodmont Avenue Bethesda, MD 20814 3339. American Red Cross, National, DC. $25,000. OppenheimerFunds

OppenheimerFunds, Inc. Corporate Giving Program 498 7th Ave. New York, NY 10018 3340. MassMutual Foundation of Hartford, Inc., Hartford, CT. $177,188. 3341. MassMutual Foundation of Hartford, Inc., Hartford, CT. $10,000. Orange

Orange County Community Foundation 30 Corporate Park, Ste. 410 Irvine, CA 92606 (949) 553-4202 FAX: (949) 553-4211; E-mail: occf@oc-cf.org; URL: http://www.oc-cf.org 3342. UFA Widows and Childrens Fund, New York, NY. $11,000. 3343. United Way of Orange County Chapter, Irvine, CA. $25,000. For American Red Cross programs related to ev