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ISSUE 2

KENNY ARONOFF KENNY ARONOFF TALKS ABOUT HIS INFLUENCES & HOW HE GOT TO THE TOP

STEVE JUDD DRUMMER FOR PROG-ROCK HEAVYWEIGHTS, KARNIVOOL

GAVIN HANSEN DRUMMER FOR THE ICONIC AUSSIE PUB ROCK BAND ‘THE POOR’

HOME RECORDING

BUYER’S GUIDE

DRUMTECH

WE HAVE THE LOW-DOWN ON THE LATEST IN HOME RECORDING EQUIPMENT

NEWS ON THE LATEST IN DRUMMING INNOVATIONS & MUST-HAVE ITEMS

TIPS ON TUNING YOUR DRUMS FROM DRUM TECH HAYDEN VASALLO


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CONTENTS: KENNY ARONOFF

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THIS ISSUE: 2 INTERVIEW WITH KENNY ARONOFF 6 DRUMMING BUYER'S GUIDE 12 INTERVIEW WITH STEVE JUDD DRUMMER FOR KARNIVOOL

17 ELECTRONIC DRUMMING

STEVE JUDD

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21 MIC IT - YOUR GUIDE TO HOME RECORDING 25 INTERVIEW WITH GAVIN HANSEN DRUMMER FOR THE POOR

28 DRUMTECH - TUNING SPECIAL 31 INTERVIEW WITH JACKIE BARNES 34 INTERVIEW WITH TIM MADDEN

DRUMMER FOR MAKE THEM SUFFER

GAVIN HANSEN

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JACKIE BARNES

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ISSUE TWO • MAY 2012 Follow us on facebook for regular updates, comps, and other cool stuff! WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/OFFICIALAUSTRALIANDRUMMER

For all media/advertising enquiries please contact: MARKETING@AUSTRALISMUSIC.COM.AU


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THE DRUM 101

THE LATEST NEWS IN DRUMS FROM AROUND THE GLOBE •••

SMASHING PUMPKINS ALBUM Smashing Pumpkins drummer Mike Byrne has opened up about the band’s forthcoming album Oceania, saying it has a very “Led Zeppelin-vibe.”

image: getty

PETER JONES LOSES BATTLE It is with a heavy heart that we note the passing of Peter Jones, the drummer of Crowded House fame, who passed away from his battle with brain cancer. The band released this statement: “He played with style and spirit. We salute him and send our love and best thoughts to his family and friends.’’

CHAD SMITH RELEASES AN APPLE/ANDROID APP Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith has released a new app for Apple and Android devices. Fans who download the free app, will be able to keep up with all of Chad’s activities, listen to tracks from his recording projects, stay current with the drummers Chad is following, interact with his online fan community, view performance and clinic videos, and follow his blog and Twitter feed.

“At the beginning of the record we have a real one-two punch with real furious drumming,” he explained. “We [have] a song called ‘Quaser,’ which has flam fives all over the thing. We spent all night honing the parts and didn’t do a single take, just ironing out every fill.” “The next day we came in and did the check your tones take and by the time I was finished they called me into the control room and we’d done it on the first take. That was the happiest surprise of the three weeks,” he added.

DRUMMER BRINGS PRIMUS BACK TOGETHER In a recent interview with Les Claypool from Primus talking about their new release, Claypool explained how their old-time favourite drummer, Jay Lane, had helped the release of their new album. Claypool had this to say about the creative process: “As I start playing something, within two measures, he jumps in with me. And he always has. He doesn’t sit there and think about it. He doesn’t hem and haw and tap on his cymbals and fiddle with his snare drum. He could have just a snare and a kick drum and a hi-hat set up with everything else splayed all over the floor. He’s that intuitive.”

SIMON PHILLIPS TOURING Simon Phillips, of Toto fame, will be in store at Drummers Dream on the 4th of June for a meet ‘n greet. This will mark his only appearance in Australia. More information coming soon, check out our Australian Drummer page on Facebook for updates.

METALLICA DRUMMER LARS ULRICH BREAKS A LEG Lars Ulrich of Metallica, who became a household name after for being outspoken against Napster, has stepped out from behind the drum kit to take up a a new position - as actor. Ulrich will be staring in the new HBO series Hemmingway & Gellhorn, alongside Australian actress Nicole Kidman. Ulrich had this to say about learning to act: “I took it very seriously. I studied the difference between how a Dutch person would say things in English and the way I would as a Dane. Most people couldn’t tell the difference, but I can. And it needed to be right.”

ISSUE TWO


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KENNY ARONOFF

BEATING UP THE BIG GUYS

ARONOFF

BEATING UP THE BIG GUYS! With a repertoire that echos your rock dad's entire CD collection, there is no doubt that Kenny Aronoff is one of the most talented and in-demand drummers of the last 20 years. Australian Drummer got the priviledge of some insider drum tips and info from this iconic drummer, who has shared the stage with Meat Loaf, Elton John and more! Words by | Australian Drummer

How long have you been playing the drums? How did you start out? KA: I have been playing the drums for 49 years! Wow - some people don't live that long! I always had lots of energy and so I naturally was drawn towards sports and when it came to music I loved the energy of the drums. Once I saw and heard The Beatles I decided to form a band. I was 10 or 11 years old. All I had was a snare drum and a cymbal. I stood up and played. My parents didn't want to invest in a drum set right away. I kept adding one drum at a time until I had a big kit. Now I have as many as 15 kits, and still have my original kit from the 60's. What drummers have inspired you and influenced your drumming style? KA: In rock ‘n’ roll John Bonham is such an amazing influence for feel, sound, style, parts, knowlegde of lots of different styles of music, Mitch Mitchel influenced me a lot because I was heavily into jazz because I grew up listening to it. My dad and mom were huge music lovers and jazz was their music, so all the great jazz drummers influenced me. I used to go to see Joe Morello every year. Anyone playing with Miles Davis or John Coltrane or in the

Bebop world I loved. I played in jazz trios, quartets, quintets and big bands as a kid, but rock was my most fulfilling style of music. I am now influenced by everyone. Tell us a little about your drumming history? Bands / musical styles, etc? KA: I had my first band when I was 10 or 11 and it was called The Alley Cats. We played what was hip on the radio. I got into jazz and started playing in jazz groups, but I always was in the hippest rock bands with older musicians. My parents let me practice with bands any night of the week as long as I did my home work first. I played varsity sports all year long so after school, I was

me a lot and I ended up doing 5 years of intensive training at 2 music schools that specialised in classical music (University of Massachusetts and Indiana School of Music). I played in orchestras, percussion ensembles, operas, studied music theory, literature and music history, lessons, recitals, jazz bands (small and large) and I had a full load of regular academic courses. Outside of school I was always playing in clubs or rehearsing with all kinds of rock, funk or fusion bands. I was into everything. Every summer I put together a band and played all summer in clubs. I also studied tympani with Vic Firth. When I graduated from college I was

"My dad and mom were huge music lovers and jazz was their music, so all the great jazz drummers influenced me..." playing on teams, then do home work and then practice with the bands I was in. On weekends we would play out. I played varsity sports all year long so after school, I was playing on teams, then I’d do home work and then practice with the bands I was in. On weekends we would play out. Then started studying with Arthur Press, the principle percussionist from the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He influenced

offered 2 jobs in symphony orchestras - one in Israel and the other Quito Equator, South Amercia. I said no to both and decided I wanted to study drum set for the first time with heavy teachers. One was Alan Dawson from the Berklee Shool of Music in Boston and with Gary Chester, a session drummer in NYC. I practiced 8 hours a day for one year and lived at my parent’s house. I then moved back to Bloomington, Indiana and

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KENNY ARONOFF

BEATING UP THE BIG GUYS

started a fusion band called Streamwinner. I played with them for three years. We lived in a band house and rehearsed there also. All I did was practice, rehearse and do shows. After three years I decided to move to NYC. 2 weeks before I moved, I heard that this artist Johnny Cougar was looking for a new drummer. I auditioned and got the gig, so I never left Bloomington. That was my first big break. The band grew and grew and eventually Johnny Cougar went back to his original name John Mellencamp. I played on many hit records and went on many tours with John for 17 years. I also became a very successful session drummer in Los Angeles, NYC and Nashville. I developed a drum clinic program and also taught privately and eventually became an Associate Professor at Indiana University School of Music where I went to school. For more details go to www.kennyaronoff.com Who are you touring with in 2012? KA: I am touring with John Fogerty and also Chickenfoot in 2012.

Do you prefer performing live in front of a crowd or recording in the studio? KA: I love and need to do both. Describe your setup at the moment (kits, cymbals, heads, etc). Does it differ for live performance/recording etc,? Is there anything in particular about your setup that lends itself to your unique style of playing? KA: I use Tama Bubinga drums with Chickenfoot. 24" x 16" kick, 12" rack, 14" and 16" floor toms with legs. I use my 5 x 14" Kenny Aronoff track master signature snare drum with a die cast hoop. All Zildjian cymbals. 2 - 19" a custom crashes, 1 - 19" k crash, 21" a custom ride, 14" master sound hats on my left and 15" new beats on my right on a cable hihat stand. I have a 20" china also. I use Iron Cobra powerglide double bass drum pedals with big wooden beaters. Remo heads. Ambassador X coated on top of toms, clear Ambassador on the bottom. Emperor X drum head without the black bot on snare and kick is a power

stroke 3 clear on beater side. I play with my Kenny Aronoff signature sticks. For John Fogerty I use a Starclassic Maple kit because he loves that sound. Same sizes except he likes the 22 x 18 kick with a fiber skin 3 head on it. I do not use a china. I use a Yamaha DTX pad and multi pad set up for some samples. Do you have any advice/tips to offer young /up and coming drummers? KA: Practice as much as possible and never give up. The music business has changed a lot. Your passion for drums and music combined with hard work and education will help make you the best drummer you can be where ever you are and possibly some success. There are no guarrentees. Anything else that you want to mention? KA: I was just in Australia and it's one of my most favorite places I have ever been in the world for many many reasons.


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LMP1455-ATM Classic Maple

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LAL145 Super Aliminium


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DESCRIPTION

1. ASHTON JOEYDRUMS ASHTON JOEYDRUMS $369

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Perfect for the young starters or travelling musician! 16” kick, 8”/10”/13” toms and 12” snare. Includes cymbals & everything you need to get started! Available in 5 colours.

2. ASHTON TDR522

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TAMA SUPERSTAR (SL62HZBNS BMW & RMK) $2695 Huge specs such as Die-Cast hoops and Tama’s patented Star-Cast floating

tom mount system, the Tama Superstar Hyperdrive has proven itself as the ultimate rock machine time and time again – and these limited edition 6-piece kits are no exception. Made with 100% Birch shells and features short-stacked toms for gunshot-like attack. Available in Brown Banded Matte White (BMW- left) and Red Banded Matte Black (RMK - right).

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5. TAMA LST1365 SONIC STEEL $429 6. TAMA LBR1465 BLACK BRASS $749 7. TAMA LGB146-NQB G-BUBINGA $699 8. TAMA LMB1465 POWER MAPLE $599 ISSUE TWO


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DESCRIPTION

1. ASHTON RHYTHMVX

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Compact, portable, quiet, ad packed with sounds, songs and styles; the Rhythmvx is a popular first choice electro kit!

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4. ASHTON EDP420

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ASHTON ELECTRONIC DRUM PADS (EDP420) $199

Bash away with your sticks or hands on these electronic drum pads! Perfect for bedroom practice and travelling.

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1. LANEY AH100 RRP: $549 2. LANEY AH200 RRP: $999 The Laney Audiohub 100 (65W) is perfect for band rehearsals and small gigs, whilst the Laney Audiohub 200 (160W) has 5 channels to get the rhythm section amped!


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The one-inch width of each muffling ring achieves that great studio sound without choking the drum.

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DESCRIPTION

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1. ASHTON MUTE PADS (MDP) FROM: $149 Perfect for keeping noise down during practice. Available in a variety of sizes to suit most kits.

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STEVE JUDD

DRUMMER FOR KARNIVOOL

STEVE JUDD DRUMMER FOR KARNIVOOL AUSTRALIAN DRUMMER CHATS TO STEVE JUDD, DRUMMER FOR AUSTRALIAN PROG-ROCK HEAVYWEIGHTS KARNIVOOL ABOUT ALL THINGS DRUMMING-RELATED... Words by | Australian Drummer

I

t’s been a busy 3 years for Karnivool after the release of their long anticipated album 'Sound Awake'. The Aussie progrock heavyweights have delivered a powerful, melodic and very rhythmic album. 'Sound Awake' has Karnivool’s fans excited and music industry professionals taking notice. Australian Drummer recently had the pleasure of catching up with Karnivool’s powerhouse of a drummer, Steve Judd.

SJ: "I played with lots of different people and that’s where I learned the most. I just made sure that everyone I played with was better than I was. I read lots of books, listened to lots of records and purchased a great book called 'Future Sounds' by David Garibaldi. I also listened to drummers like Steve Smith, Dennis Chambers and Tony Royster Jr, which helped with the technical side of things."

Steve’s drumming life began when he was just 14 years old after deciding to switch from guitar to drums. The influence of both his parents being musicians gave Steve access to some great material from their record collections at an early age.

Karnivool were in search of a drummer in 2004 and Steve was discovered.

SJ: "I really loved Hendrix and Mitch Mitchell, which got me started and then things really kicked in when I heard Chad Smith on Blood Sugar Sex Magic. I really got into funk and R & B around that time. I also listened to lots of Stewart Copeland – one of my many favourites. I really like to play grooves and work on getting 'the groove' feeling right before I do anything else. The song is always king. " Completely self-taught, Steve spent lots of time listening and playing with as many people possible.

many trips abroad. Australian drummer asked Steve to recall the most memorable shows he’s played. SJ: "Musically, I’d have to say the Big Day Out in 2008 on the Gold Coast. The band just clicked and the show was amazing on all fronts. As far as the experience, I’d have to say Mumbai India in 2011. It’s an amazing place and different from what we’re used to culturally. The show was crazy and went off! I love touring a new record. I love the live shows. It’s what I look forward to the most."

“I PLAYED WITH LOTS OF DIFFERENT PEOPLE AND THAT’S WHERE I LEARNED THE MOST JUST MADE SURE THAT EVERYONE I PLAYED WITH WAS BETTER THAN I WAS...” SJ: "I was playing a show with my old prog/ emo band and Ian (Karnivool’s frontman) was there and asked if I’d be interested in a jam. I ended up having a jam, which went OK and did a couple of small shows and then landed the gig. It was a bonus that I was also a fan of the band prior to being asked to jam! With gruelling tour schedules over the years Karnivool have played the big stages, the huge festivals and have made

Sound Awake was Steve’s first record with Karnivool. Themata was recorded prior to Steve joining the band. Steve explains his studio experience and how it differs from a live performance. SJ: "Live performances, I generally play really hard. I focus on being energetic, being spontaneous and playing like an animal. In the studio my approach is different. I spend a lot of time getting my

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kit to sound right. Between different tracks, it could mean tuning the kit higher or lower, changing snares or cymbals. It’s so important to get the sounds right. Getting things to sound and feel right is very important to me. I then lay the groove down first and then add the fills later. Studio performance needs to be precise – there’s nowhere to hide."

•19" A Custom Projection Crash • 19" K Hybrid China • 20" A custom Crash or 20" ReZo Crash • 20" Oriental Crash of Doom22" A • Traditional Ping Ride or • 22" K Custom Crash Ride • 1 x cymbal stack sporting old and broken cymbals - 13" hi- hat top, 17" crash and 20" crash.

Steve plays a Pearl Reference kit. Shell sizes are:10" x 8", 16" x 16", 18" x 16", 22" x 18" with the addition of an 8" rototom.

Drum heads for toms are Remo clear emperors on top and ebony ambassadors on the bottom. The snare head top is either a coated emperor or a controlled sound head. Bass drum heads are Powerstroke III’s. Sticks used are Vic Firth Extreme 5A’s.

Snare choice is a Pearl Reference 14" x 6.5" brass snare. Cymbals are by Zildjian consisting of :

Australian Drummer asks Steve about Karnivool’s plans for 2012.

• 8" A Custom Splash • 10" A Custom Splash • 14" A Custom High Hats

SJ: "We’re doing a national tour in June and July that I’m really looking forward to. We are also releasing a DVD before we hit

the road. The DVD will have a history of the band as well as live footage from the Forum in Melbourne. There will also be highlights from some of the best shows we’ve done. We also start on a new album later in the year. It’s going to be a busy year!" Tickets for Karnivool’s mid year shows can also be purchased via their website: www.karnivool.com.au. Australian Drummer would like to thank Steve for taking the time to talk to us. You can also follow Steve and Karnivool on Facebook, Twitter, Myspace or their website: www.karnivool.com.au


au.roadrunnerrecords.com facebook.com/makethemsufferau


Distributed by Australis Music Group. Call 1800 624 460 to find your nearest 2 Box retailer.

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ELECTRONIC DRUMS

THE ELECTRONIC DRUM REVOLUTION

THE

ELECTRONIC DRUM REVOLUT ON

There is no denying electronic music is bigger than ever. Look at the changing landscape of both music production and live music and how the modern drummer is able to adapt their skill set to multiple electronic platforms. Words by | Australian Drummer

T

he influence of the computer on every aspect of music is undeniable and understanding the digital aspects of your instrument are a fundamental tool to take your drumming into multiple genres. With solid drumming experience, the digital possibilities are endless. The electronic revolution is often met with both embrace and inertia from drummers; somewhat going against the true artform of drumming, the digital platform can be seen to take away from the organic and human element of drumming by adding a 'control+delete' aspect to the equation. Of course, this allows a greater ability for inexperienced rhythmists to build nearperfect rhythms with limited knowledge of advanced drum techniques like syncopation and complex time signatures (by the aid of computer). The embrace really comes from the fact that an experienced drummer can really utilise this digital tool to take their skills to their max, combine their acoustic setup with electronic triggers and samplers and adapt their drumming easily into fullfledged music production and recording. THE ELECTRONIC DRUMKIT: The most simple way (technically) of taking your drumming to a digital frontier is with

the use of an electronic drum kit. The electronic drumkit was created in 1978 but didn't really find its way into the drum scene until the 90's, with the introduction of Roland's TD-10 model. Taking a basic rubber-pad setup into the currently more preferred mesh-pad - echoing the feel of an acoustic kit and making it an easier jump for the acoustic player. Mesh heads are a twolayer taut woven mesh of fibbers fitted with several electronic sensors, propelling both the sound and feel of electronic drums into a more comfortable territory. The current electronic drumkit market offers a range of

programming is touch-of-a-button stuff. You can find these kits for under $500 and they are steadily growing as an entry level product for drummers as they offer a silent, portable solution for city spaces. Industry-leader, Roland, offer a range of products in this price range. There is also a growing range of brands like Ashton who are offering a similar product at more competitive low-end prices. It's worth doing your homework here if you’re looking for an economical electronic solution. Going into the higher end of electronic

"The digital platform can be seen to take away from the organic and human element of drumming by adding a 'control+delete' aspect to the equation" competitive prices and electronic features, catering to drummers who either want to have a more portable setup or drummers who want to have a large scope of electronic capabilities. Lower end kits often feature rubber pads and are great choices for players looking to slowly step into the realm of electronics. The features are often simple and

drumkits requires a fair bit of research. You'll either want to find something that is as close to your acoustic setup as possible, but electronic, or, a kit that offers a high degree of integration with other electronics such as samplers and computer devices. Prices are high and there are some beautiful kits on the market and to go into detail here would be an article in itself. We recommend doing some hardcore googling of features

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ELECTRONIC DRUMS

THE ELECTRONIC DRUM REVOLUTION

higher end electronic kit. It's also a great option to visit your local music retailer and talk to them about kits and test some out - this aspect of purchase is often forgotten about in this retail climate, but is the best (and quickest) way to get a good understanding of what you are buying. The bottom line is that the electronic kit provides a much easier integration into both live and recording settings. Eleviating the painful task of micing up and offering a huge range of often user-set sounds. Technically you could even record your current acoustic kit, convert the sounds on the computer to samples and then run them through your electronic kit as a setup - this gives you a sound bank of acoustic drum kits at the touch of a button. The added features of high sensitivity touch response on most higher end kits applies an even greater organic feel to the electronic kit. MUSIC PRODUCTION FOR DRUMMERS: In todays music, genre's are almost a thing of the past. The computer allows digital sounds and capabilities to be integrated into any musical style… and why not? The ability to bend, distort and tweak any sound on a computer is endless and electronic music is heard in everything from pop music to metal and jazz these days. As a drummer, using music software to produce beats is an extremely easy way to explore new genres and create rhythms that you can easily integrate with your current acoustic setup

with the addition of samplers, triggers, etc. Getting your head around production software can be a time-consuming exercise, but extremely rewarding if you are looking at creating electronic music and/or beats. The industry leaders in electronic music production software (Ableton, Reason, Fruity Loops, Logic) feature a technical layout that requires time to understand. With some self-motivated learning you can be making your own music in little time at all and with a backed knowledge of drums you are at an advantage in producing realistic and organic beats in an electronic forum. Many of these programs feature integration of your electronic drum kit so that you can play live and record into them, then go back and reposition the individual beats. You can also explore avenues of melody as these programs also feature synths and pads you can build on-top of your beats - essentially allowing you to create full-fledged electronic music. If you’re interested in exploring production, we recommend downloading a demo of any of the mentioned software and proceeding from there. ELECTRONICS IN ACOUSTIC KITS: Late in 2011, Aquarian announced its newest drum head technology called the INHEAD®. In the same vein as Zildjian's acoustic/electronic cymbals, the INHEAD® is a drum skin that fits onto a regular acoustic kit and converts the sound into a electronic format, essentially

bridging the gap between the acoustic and electronic drum kit. The INHEAD® is just one technology that symbolises the demand for electronic integration in drums and is a much better option for drummers than triggers as it eleviates cross-talk and double-firing. Currently, it is only compatible with snares and 14" toms but is planned to extend to a full kit. So if you are interested in electronic/acoustic technology we recommend you keep your eyes out for new information. Zildjian have also created an adapted acoustic/electronic cymbal, that again allows an acoustic kit to be transmitted into electronic format. The cymbals combine low volume acoustic cymbals, an innovative new dual-head mini microphone system, and a controller/mixer with preset tone modeling that allows the user to experience an array of tones and/or add effects to each real cymbal. The cymbals come in a full range of models including rides, hi-hats, and Chinas. As drummers, it's definitely important to at least understand the capabilities of the craft, if its something you want to take seriously. Electronics in drumming are a growing trend and offer an expanding platform for playing, production, recording and portability. It's essential to know the basics and understand the acoustic kit, but in a world where almost everything is digital, it's in a drummers best interest to explore and invest in the electronic revolution.


MIC IT!

MIC IT!

HOME RECORDING ON A BUDGET

HOME RECORDING ON A BUDGET Words by | Australian Drummer

Whether you’re in a start-up band, or you’re an audio-engineering nut, we’ll get you sorted with the knowledge on what’s big in home recording.

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MICING TIP! “Don’t immediately reach for the EQ knob, and don’t over do it with the reverb. These are two of the biggest newbie mistakes. Rather than fiddling with EQ (equalization) if you don’t like the way something sounds, try changing the source first.”

AUDIO-TECHNICA AE2500 Considered amongst the best kick drum Mics ever made, the Artist Elite AE2500 dual-element instrument microphone features a cardioid condenser and a dynamic capsule combined in one housing. The dynamic element delivers the aggressive attack of the beater; the condenser captures the round tonalities of the shell. Two layers of resistive mesh form multiple densities over the dynamic element’s side-entry ports, exercising precise control over the time at which off-axis signals arrive at the diaphragm. The condenser diaphragm is optimally tensioned and aged for longterm consistency and stability. 5 Pin XLR to 2 x 3 pin XLR lead is included with the Microphone. Elements Condenser, dynamic (Dual Element) Polar Pattern Cardioid

AUDIO-TECHNICA ATM650 This hypercardioid dynamic Mic is ideal for snare drums. It features a new multistage flat grille design for precise positioning close to the sound source. Equipped with a neodymium magnet for highoutput performance, the ATM650 has a frequency response tailored for clear sound reproduction of snare and percussion. A-T’s innovative dual-wall floating construction banishes handling noise. At this price it represents amazing value. Element Dynamic

AUDIO-TECHNICA ATM250 The ATM250 hypercardioid dynamic Mic is tailored for Toms and other percussion instruments exhibiting high transients. Its rich, warm low-frequency response gives the microphone excellent presence. The microphone is equipped with a rare earth neodymium magnet and a tight hypercardioid polar pattern. Includes a professional isolation clamp to provide secure mounting, versatile positioning and effective dampening of unwanted mechanical noise. Element Dynamic

Polar Pattern Hypercardioid

Polar Pattern Hypercardioid

Frequency Response 80-17,000 Hz Open Circuit Sensitivity -51 dB (2.8 mV) re 1V at 1 Pa (condenser) -54 dB (1.9 mV) re 1V at 1 Pa (dynamic)

Frequency Response 40-15,000 Hz\ Open Circuit Sensitivity –54 dB (1.9 mV) re 1V at 1 Pa

Frequency Response 20-17,000 Hz (condenser) 30-10,000 Hz (dynamic) Open Circuit Sensitivity -51 dB (2.8 mV) re 1V at 1 Pa (condenser) -54 dB (1.9 mV) re 1V at 1 Pa (dynamic)

RRP: $945

RRP: $185

RRP: $345


MIC IT!

HOME RECORDING ON A BUDGET

AUDIO-TECHNICA ATM350 As an alternative to ATM250, this small “clip on” Mic offers a big sound and is ideal for Toms, especially when low profile visual requirements are paramount, such as in television performances or video clip recording. It is supplied with AudioTechnica’s versatile UniMount® clip. The low-profile ATM350 is an exceptional cardioid condenser microphone designed to clip to brass, upright bass, reeds, piano, snare, toms, and violin. The microphone offers a crisp, clear, well-balanced response, even at high SPLs. It features an integral 80 Hz hi-pass filter on the in-line power module. Its cardioid polar pattern reduces pickup of sounds from the side and rear for effective protection against feedback. Element Fixed-charge back plate permanently polarized condenser Polar Pattern Cardioid

AUDIO-TECHNICA ATM450 One of the new stars of the Audio-Technica Artist Series, the ATM450 cardioid condenser is perfect for cymbals and overheads on drums. The microphone is equipped with an integral 80 Hz hi-pass filter that provides easy switching from a flat frequency response to a low-end roll-off. The ATM450 also features a switchable 10 dB pad that lowers the microphone's sensitivity, providing higher SPL capability for flexible use with a wide range of performers and system configurations. The microphone’s extended flat frequency response makes it ideal for high SPLs as well as for live and amplified acoustic instruments. Includes a professional isolation clamp to provide secure mounting and effective dampening of unwanted mechanical noise. Element Fixed-charge back plate permanently polarized condenser Polar Pattern Cardioid

Frequency Response 40-20,000 Hz

RRP: $475

As part of the Audio-Technica 40 Series, this small cardioid diaphragm condenser Mic comes with a reputation for quality on stage and in the studio. It is ideal for drum overheads when quality is the most important consideration. Featuring directcoupled balanced outputs for clean signals in high-output conditions, the microphone is totally free of the distortion associated with conventional transformer-coupled outputs. Its fast response to transients contributes to the open, transparent reproduction of even the most difficult-to-capture instruments. The microphone is fully RoHS-compliant – free from all substances specified in the EU directive on the reduction of hazardous substances (RoHS). Element Externally polarized (DC bias) capacitor Polar Pattern Cardioid Frequency Response 20-20,000 Hz

Frequency Response 40-20,000 Hz

Low Frequency Roll-off 80 Hz, 12 dB/octave

AUDIO-TECHNICA AT4051b

Low Frequency Roll-off 80 Hz, 12 dB/octave

RRP: $325

RRP: $895

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HEADER

DESCRIPTION


GAVIN Hansen

DRUMMER FOR THE POOR

GAVIN HANSEN DRUMMER FOR THE POOR AUSTRALIAN DRUMMER TAKES FIVE WITH GAVIN HANSEN, DRUMMER FOR THE ICONIC AUSSIE PUB-ROCK BAND 'THE POOR'. Words by | Australian Drummer

G

avin Hansen has been active on the scene since the late 90's. He has played with some of the big names and endured the changing face of Australian live music. Australian Drummer caught up with Gavin to get the lowdown on his career... How long have you been playing the drums? How did you start out?

GH: I started playing drums when I was

about 10 years old, as friends of the family had a kit and I always used to want to play it whenever we went to their house and then I would always hassle my parents for a drum kit and always play the kit at school. What drummers have inspired you and influenced your drumming style?

GH: The drummers that inspired me to

play were John Bonham, Stewart Copeland & Rob Hirst. The drummers who have had more influence on my style would have to be John Bonham (Led Zeppelin) & Ian Paice from (Deep Purple). Tell us a little about your history?

GH: At school I played in the school band

and the school also had a Scottish drum marching band that I played in which was very cool as those marching snares sound great and have so much attack.

I was in a covers band through high school that used to play local pub gigs and then I broke my wrist playing football at school and didn’t play drums for a couple of years. It wasn’t until I left school and was at a drunken party one weekend that I got up and had a jam and realized how much I’d missed playing drums. Not long after that I was jamming in another covers band when we started to write our own songs and then focused on that. The band was called Rattlebone and was based on the North Coast of NSW and the Gold Coast.

“ GET OUT AND JAM TOGETHER. LET'S FACE IT, THERE IS ONLY SO MUCH PLAYING ALONG TO THE IPOD YOU CAN HANDLE...” After that band fell apart I moved to Melbourne where I answered an add for a local band called Black Seed. I played with them for many years and to this date I am still great mates with those guys. All the time Black Seed and Rattlebone were going I was mates with the guys out of Sydney band The Poor and would always catch up and had played on bills with them.

One day I called them to see how they were and they had just lost their drummer so it was a natural thing to head up to Sydney and hang out and make a noise with them. Other bands that we had projects out of from the above bands were Lump which was based on the Gold Coast and was made up of a mixture of guys from The Poor and Black Seed so I guess we kept it all pretty tight. Rattlebone and The Poor were and still are more straight-up rock, where Black Seed and Lump were heavier. As well as being a part of these great bands with an awesome bunch of lads I’ve been lucky to do some great session work along the way and play with many awesome musicians. What projects are you working on at the moment? GH: We are currently writing new material for a new The Poor album which is very exciting and we are having a lot of fun with it because the last two albums had a mixture of old and new tracks on them but this one is going to be written from scratch with no limits on how it should sound, if we like something we write it and if it comes up well it will make the cut...

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Do you prefer performing live in front of a crowd or recording in the studio? GH: To be honest I like doing both as I dig the process of laying down and creating a song and everything that goes with it in the studio with sounds etc. and of course I love playing live where you can bring those bunch of songs to life.

(I like the old school deep toms) 16" floor, but of late when doing shows away from my own kit I have been using a 16" & 18" floor which is really cool. I use Sabian cymbals: 22" ride, 14" hate, 19" crash & 2 x 20" crash’s with a 17" china. I also use Pro Mark sticks and Aquarian heads.

You can’t describe the feeling of being on stage with the bunch of guys you have created the songs with and also the feeling of seeing people enjoy the show and sing along to those tunes...

“SHE’S A ROCK RIG!”

Describe your set-up at the moment. Does it differ for live performance and recording? Is there anything in particular about your set-up that lends itself to your unique style of playing?

in the pipeline that will be very cool depending on if everyone involved can spare the time, but apart from that drummingwise I am focusing on the new material for The Poor.

GH: My set-up is pretty basic and

The Poor have recently had some old and current albums released in Europe and we are talking about possible timelines to head over there as well...

straight to it.

My main kit at home is a Tama Starclassic with 24" kick, 12 & 13" power rack toms

What's next? Have you got any big projects in the pipeline that you can tell us about? GH: There are a few ideas floating around

Do you have any advice or tips to offer up and coming drummers? GH: Yeah, try not to be slack when it comes to warm-up routines and also basic rudiments and try not to spend too much time in that room by yourself, find some other players and get out and jam together. Let's face it, there is only so much playing along to the iPod you can handle...

Anything else that you want to mention? GH: I’d like to thank Tama, Sabian, Pro Mark & Aquarian for their support over the years. They are awesome brands with awesome products, and been a great help to me and it would be hard to be in the position I am in without their support...

"ROCK ON !!!"


“It’s Intriguing. Stripped down (yet with chorus and orchestras). Beautiful (but sinister), ambient (yet somehow in your face). It’s extraordinary and otherworldly...” CLASSIC ROCK MAGAZINE

MIKAEL AKERFELDT (OPETH) and STEVEN WILSON (PORCUPINE TREE)

are

THE SELF-TITLED DEBUT ALBUM Feat ‘DRAG ROPES’

ALSO AVAILABLE: 2 DISK LIMITED DELUXE EDITION

MAY 4

au.roadrunnerrecords.com stormcorrosion.com


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AUSTRALIAN DRUMMER

DRUMTECH

PROFESSIONAL DRUM TECH, HAYDEN VASSALLO GIVES US THE LOWDOWN ON TUNING AND REPLACING HEADS. Words by | Hayden Vassallo

My name is Hayden Vassallo and I have been working as a drum tech for the past 6 years. I have toured with Australian drummers: Joe Accaria, Jackie Barnes, Terepai Richmond, Dave Jenkins Jr. to name a few, bands and artist such as Jimmy Barnes, Pete Murray, David Campbell and am currently on tour with X Factor Winner, Reece Mastin. I first started touring in 2006 on the Human Nature Motown tour around Australia and since then I have flown all over the world to tech for Australian and International acts. I'm the guy responsible for setting up the drummer's kit the same way every show day, cleaning it, fixing anything broken from the gig before, changing the drum heads and of course tuning the kit. Tuning drums is a very personal thing, every drum sounds different and unlike the guitar, there are no set tunings for the kit. Some drummers like big sounding drums tuned really low with a lot of sustain, others like smaller drums, higher pitched with a lot of attack. When I'm changing drum heads I like to take the drums off the kit and put them

on a flat surface. This just makes it more comfortable to work on and move the drum around when you need to. I then loosen all the tension rods around the rim of the head I am changing and once all are undone I take the rim and the old head off the drum. At this time I like to take a soft dry cloth and wipe over the bearing edge (the part of the drum where the head touches the drum) and the inside on the rim. This removes any unwanted stick chips and dust that may interfere when trying to tune later on. After the rim and shell is clean and ready, I place the new head on the shell, making sure it is sitting flat and even, I then put the rim back on the drum. Before starting to tighten the tension rods I like to place both my hands on the center of the drum and apply a little pressure until I can hear the head start to crack. This sets the head better on the drum, and stretches it to keep it in tune a little better. Now that the head is on the drum, stretched in and the rim is in place, I tighten all the tension rods with my fingers to make them 'finger tight' (as tight as you can get them with your fingers). Now I am ready to begin the tuning process.

First thing that I do, using a star pattern and going across the drum, (not around) is turn each tension rod a 3/4 turn with a drum key, this consistently applies pressure to the drum and keeps the head even. I then hit the drum with a stick and listen to note produced. If the drum head still sounds floppy and too low I then tap around the drum, about 4cm from each tension rod and make sure each tap is the same (or close enough) pitch as the last. If not I turn each tension rod one at a time in small increments until the note is the same around the entire drum. Once the head is in tune with itself I then decide if the tuning of the head should come up (tighten) and by how much. For smaller drums like rack toms, the tension in the head will be a lot tighter than floor drums and kicks. A little trick that I tend to use after I have tuned the drums is to dampen the head. This shortens the note of the drum and can help get rid of any overtones that the drum produces. Overtones are when the drum changes note during the sustain. Some overtones like the big growl of a floor tom can be good, but others can sound like a basketball bouncing.


DRUMTECH

TUNING & REPLACING HEADS

To get rid of unwanted overtones I either use a little bit of gaffer tape, about 5cm long, pinch the middle of it and place it near the edge of the head (normally near the logo.) This works for both the batter and resonate heads of the drum. Another technique that I use is to fold a tissue up into a square and tape it to the head. There are also a variety of products on the market such as Moongel and various studio rings. They all have similar effects, it simply depends on the look and sound that you are after. When it comes to kick drums, once I have tuned the head and like the note being produced, I cut a hole in the front head and fold up one of mum's best shower towels and place it nice and flat on the bottom of the drum, making sure that the towel is touching both heads. This cuts out the boom in the drum and creates a nice thud. The more you place in the kick the shorter the note and the more muffled it will be.

GLOSSARY OF DRUM TUNING: 1. B  atter-Head: The skin on the top of each drum (the one that you strike). 2. R  esonant Head: The skin on the bottom of each drum. 3. M  uffling: The process of reducing 'ring' emitted from a drum. 4. T  ension rod: The long threaded rods that secure the rims and drum head to the drum. The tensions rods are adjusted directly with a tuning key. 5. S ustain: The length of sound produced from a strike. 7. A  ttack: The sound made instantly as the stick strikes the head.

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HEADER

DESCRIPTION


JACKIE BARNES

KEEPING THE DREAM ALIVE

JACKIE BARNES KEEPING THE DREAM ALIVE AUSTRALIAN DRUMMER CAUGHT UP WITH JACKIE BARNES FOR A CHAT ABOUT DRUMMING AND LIFE ON THE ROAD WITH HIS OLD MAN JIMMY...

Words by | Australian Drummer

Y

ou would expect the son of legendary Australian rocker Jimmy Barnes to have raw musical talent flowing through his veins, and you would be correct. Australian Drummer managed to secure some time in Jackie Barnes' busy schedule to quiz him about his life as a professional drummer... You have been surrounded by music for your whole life. What was it that made you choose to persue drumming over all of the other musical avenues that you could have taken? JB: I remember watching my father from side of stage when I was little and thinking that I would love to sing like him, but then at the same time I would look up the back of the stage and see the drummer going off and I always thought that looked like the most fun. I have played many other instruments over the years but I always come back to drums. How long have you been playing the drums? How did you start out? JB: I started when I was around 3. I would watch dad's sound checks and his drummer at the time Tony Brock would bring me up and sit me on his lap and show me around the drums. So I learnt the hands first because my feet couldn't reach the pedals, then eventually the feet came into play.

What drummers have inspired you and influenced your drumming style? Who taught you? JB: It is so hard to pin down my influences to a few drummers, I'd have to break them down into genres. For rock my biggest influences were Ian Paice, John Bonham, Steve Prestwich and Tony Brock. For soul and funk James Gadson and Zigaboo are the standouts for me. I am a huge fan of world music and I love drummers like Mokhtar Samba, Karim Ziad and Jean-Philippe Fanfant. I know I have missed out on so many great drummers and my influence list is constantly changing. I have been blessed with great teachers over the years, Tony Brock, Steve Prestwich, Neil Martin, Tony Jex, James Gadson, Joe Galeota, Kenwood

“I WOULD LOOK UP THE BACK OF THE STAGE AND SEE THE DRUMMER GOING OFF AND I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT LOOKED LIKE THE MOST FUN...� Dennard and Dave Dicenso have all been wonderful teachers. Tell us a little about your drumming history? What styles have interested you?

JB: Obviously Rock has been a huge part of my life. Growing up like I did I was lucky to be exposed to great music. My father has an amazing collection of musical influences, and it is not just limited to rock. He introduced me to The Meters, which then introduced me to Zigaboo's drumming. They are still my favourite band of all time. I actually still play through the whole album "Rejuvenation" at the start and end of every practice session. Since I studied at Berklee College of Music I was exposed to a lot of world music, in particular African drumming. I was lucky enough to travel to Ghana and stay in villages learning about traditional drumming. That was a life changer and now I have learnt to appreciate music from every corner of the globe. What projects are you working on at the moment? JB: At the moment I am working on a lot of great projects. I have been writing a lot since signing with EMI Music Publishing two years ago and I have been really excited to be working with a great singer/guitarist named Adam Eckersley. Also I am continuing working with my father and writing with him. There is also the possibility of returning to Berklee later in the year to teach there along with my father.

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And finally I am involved in a wonderful project called "Rhythm of the Universe", which is 90 people from 90 different countries singing together to raise money for scholarships for young musicians. This group was started by Berklee students and I am lucky enough to be representing Australia for this and I hope to bring the whole group to Australia for a concert over the next few years. Do you prefer performing live in front of a crowd or recording in the studio? JB: I love playing drums period. Whether that's on stage or in a studio or anywhere else, as long as I am making great music that's all that matters. Describe your setup (exotic wood) at the moment (Kits, cymbals, heads, etc). Does it differ for live performance/recording etc? Is there anything in particular about your setup that lends itself to your unique style of of playing? JB: My live set up is a TAMA Starclassic Bubinga kit with Zildjian Cymbals, Remo Heads and Vic Firth Sticks. The Bubinga is such a warm sounding wood with power and projection to match. I've started playing concerts with a new limited edition Starphonic Spotted Gum snare drum which is absolutely killer, It is loud and heavy sounding with the warmth and depth of a hardwood shell. In the studio I have a 100% Walnut Starclassic. It is not only a

beautiful looking kit but records so well. It is versatile, has a lot of punchiness to it and it is really different to any other kit I have recorded on. With my set up I love playing around with different tunings to bring out the versatility of my drums. I love open tones of the drums and tend to shy away from deadening my drums too much.

too much but I have a project I am working on, which is still in its skeletal form that I think will once again change my outlook on music. It involves a lot of collaboration with people from all walks of life.

What is your drumming schedule like? How often are you playing the drums?

JB: My biggest tip to any young drummer is to be open to playing different styles of music, go out and look for great musicians to collaborate with and never limit yourself to just one style or influence. Be adaptable and professional when it comes to touring and recording, and most importantly listen to the music. A lot of drummers practice in their own little isolated space where it is all about what you are doing, but that doesn't apply to playing live or in the studio, you really have to pay attention to every element of the song and fit in to that. My best practice sessions are where I play along to a playlist and just enjoy listening to the tunes at the same time. Practicing alone will make you technically gifted, but listening will make you a musician.

JB: My schedule is pretty crazy. As soon as dad is on the road it is a lot of travel with not a lot of down time. At the moment I have a little bit of time to relax while he is doing Chisel stuff but next month we start touring again and that means anything from two to five shows a week. I try to practice every two days in the studio, when I am away on tour I always hear and practice new rhythms on the road and I am always listening to music. What is it like touring with your old man? JB: It's awesome, he is my best mate, we completely understand each other musically and we are always challenging each other to bring out the best performances. What's next? Have you got any big projects in the pipeline that you can tell us about? JB: I'd love to keep recording and touring with lots of different artists. But I would also love to get more into films and documentaries about music. I can't say

Do you have any advice or tips to offer young or up and coming drummers?

Anything else that you want to mention?? JB: Just a thank you to my endorsers TAMA Drums, Zildjian Cymbals, Remo Heads and Vic Firth Sticks. Thanks for all the support and for making amazing gear!


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TIM MADDEN

DRUMMER FOR MAKE THEM SUFFER

TIM MADDEN MAKE THEM SUFFER

AUSTRALIAN DRUMMER CAUGHT UP WITH TIM MADDEN, DRUMMER FOR AUSTRALIAN HARDCORE BAND "MAKE THEM SUFFER" AS HE PREPARES FOR THE RELASE OF THEIR MUCH ANTICIPATED DEBUT ALBUM "NEVERBLOOM".

What was it made you chose to persue drumming over all of the other musical avenues that you could have taken? TM: I always had an interest in guitar but could never quite 'get' it (laughs). When I first played drums I knew that it was the instrument for me. I remember when I was a young teenager, Slipknot's album 'Iowa' just came out and I was just amazed with Joey Jordison's playing. When I heard the thundering double bass in Heretic Anthem, I was just like 'I wanna do that!' How long have you been playing the drums? How did you start out? TM: I have been playing for almost 11 years, I started when I was 14. I always talking about playing drums but never did anything about it until my sister came home with a number for lessons, from that day I've never looked back.

TM: I've played in a few local metal bands over the years and I've always mainly stuck to a real heavy style of playing, lots of double bass and blasts etc.

TM: Whilst we are back home and getting the record ready I have been playing every chance I get... some days it varies but usually I'll try and get in from 4–8 hours.

Over the last year or so I have been really getting into a lot of different styles and trying things I've never done before which is quite motivating.

Do you like touring?

What projects are you working on at the moment? TM: The only project I'm working on at the moment is the Make Them Suffer release, I'm very proud of this record and I cant wait for everyone to hear it. In the future I hope to do some more musical stuff and I'm really interested in getting into the clinical side of drumming. Do you prefer performing live in front of a crowd or recording in the studio?

What drummers have inspired you and influenced your drumming style? Who taught you?

TM: Definitely playing live, so much better when you have the crowds atmosphere and you can just go nuts!

TM: Early on I was big on Joey from Slipknot and David from KoRn, then within my first year of drumming I went to a Dave Lombardo clinic and that blew my mind as a teenager. These days my influences would be Thomas Lang, Marco Minneman, Mike Mangini, Derek Roddy and George Kollias (lots more but thats my top five)

What kind of set-up are you currently rocking? TM: I'm playing a Sonor S Class at the moment, standard double bass kit with TRX Cymbals and I'm using Remo Heads and Vic Firth Thomas Lang sticks (chunky and heavy!)

Tell us a little about your drumming history? musical styles, etc?

What is your drumming schedule like? How often are you playing? Practicing etc?

TM: Yes! love it. I cant wait to get back on the road... playing different venues, seeing the sites and meeting new people. sometimes the long hours of travel can get really exhausting but at the end of the day you're doing what you love. What's next? Have you got any big projects in the pipeline that you can tell us about? TM: Our debut album coming out in May and then lots of touring. Do you have any advice or tips to offer other drummers? TM: PRACTICE! Something I wish I focussed a bit more on as a kid. Get in there and do all the boring stuff because it all pays off... rudiments etc. Learn to love it! Anything else that you want to mention? TM: Im getting ready to do a few drumming videos soon so keep a look out for that stuff! Im starting lessons aswell so anyone interested can reach me through Facebook.

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NEXT ISSUE SIMON PHILLIPS

IN CLOSING Australian Drummer would like to thank all the contributors who have made this publication possible, along with all our fans who follow us on facebook for the latest drumming news. We will continue to have frequent updates on where you can find the best drumming clinics in Australia, and the latest udpates on new product developments.

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ISSUE TWO • MAY 2012 Follow us on facebook for regular updates, comps, and other cool stuff! WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/OFFICIALAUSTRALIANDRUMMER

For all media/advertising enquiries please contact: MARKETING@AUSTRALISMUSIC.COM.AU

DISCLAIMER: All prices, discounts are from the recommended retail price set by the importer/wholesalers. Due to current economic situation, price changes may occure during promotional period. Some local selling prices may vary. All information, specifications and prices mentioned in this catalogue are subject to aritst’s error. Australian drummer


Australian Drummer Issue 2