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THEBOOMERANG AUSTRALIANS IN FILM

JANUARY 2012


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The Boomerang

THEMONTH

Managing Editor Andrew Warne Editor Matilda Haddad Designer Sam Kramer sam@kramerproductiondesign.com

AiF Volunteers | We would like thank the following people:

Sam Kramer, designer of the Boomerang and invitations Michael Kelleher for website design and IT support Greg Cook Ingrid Bloom Sophie Scarf Steve Greig John Freeman Melissa Bickerton

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Board of Directors Paula Paizes Rob Marsala Andrew Warne Tracey Vieira Michelle Day Ian Sutherland Paul Thomas Cover | Red Dog News Submissions Please email the Editor with any Australian or member film-related news or announcements. Australians in Film | 2800 28th St, Suite 320, Santa Monica CA 90405 Tel: 310 452-5939 | Fax: 323 446-8724

CONTENTS President’s Note

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Reel Alerts

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Red Dog

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Sydney Film Festival

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Ambassador | Callan McAuliffe

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AACTA | Awards Night

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Heath Ledger | Scholarship 2012

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Member Profile | Ben Ballarin

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www.australiansinfilm.org | michael@australiansinfilm.com

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PRESIDENT’snote

Dear Members & Friends, Is it too late to wish everyone Happy New Year? I imagine so. By now most of the New Year’s resolutions have disappeared into afterthoughts as we gear up for another exciting stretch. The beginning of the year always is a little trying with the silly season of awards shows and generally mediocre films but the holiday glow has worn off and we’re ready to get back to work. Except those of us who haven’t quite managed to recover from the magnificent Aussie beaches over Christmas. This group does not include me. There is plenty to keep us busy at Australians in Film, with the International portion of the inaugural Australian Academy Awards. After ten years of supporting and promoting Australian films and our contribution to Hollywood, it seems not only fitting but natural that we now return the favour. The list of nominees announced at the G’Day USA Gala in an impressive one and with any luck the AACTA Awards will now feature on the global awards landscape?

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But for us, the most important announcement of January 15 was the opening of the application process for the fourth Heath Ledger Scholarship. Of all our accomplishments, it is perhaps this effort to provide hopeful Australian actors with the opportunity to pursue their dreams and develop their craft that is the most rewarding. In the name of our close friend and Ambassador, we are able to ensure that Heath’s name will always be associated with help and generosity and to perpetuate his legacy of welcoming to those who shared his passion. So if you are inclined to “have a go in Hollywood” we encourage you to apply by clicking here, and spread the word to your friends and colleagues who may share your plans. The other ambitious program getting underway this month is our Writer’s Lab that we hope will enable those aspiring scribes to refine and further their craft, and is in the final stages of development. The survey sent out to members will allow us to focus on the priorities of our members working in the written world, and refine the process of the competition we intend to inaugurate

this year towards an eventual produced screenplay or series. All of that in addition to our regular screening series that kicked off nicely with Red Dog and Man on a Ledge. So stay tuned for more exciting events and if you haven’t already, please encourage your friends to join AiF. We rely on our membership to survive and grow, and think we offer an outstanding deal that may well help you progress in the business or at the very least provide you with a great night out with a drink and good company. So Happy New Year everyone and I hope to see you soon at one of upcoming events! With kind regards, Andrew Warne

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REELALERTS Joel Edgerton, one of the brightest up-and-coming actors in star-starved Hollywood, has branched into screen writing, selling a spec script titled One Night Stand to New Regency. A drama with comedic elements, the script is described as an honest look at a man and a woman in the aftermath of a one night stand.

Oliver Ackland

The Billy Bob Thornton directed feature Jane Mansfield’s Car starring Frances O’Connor will have its world premiere in competition at the Berlin Film Festival

Frances O’Connor Joel Edgerton

Grant Bowler has been tapped as the lead in Syfy’s new original series Defiance. The project is a live-action drama, written/executive produced by Farscape creator Rockne S. O’Bannon, which was developed concurrently with an online video game by Trion.

Grant Bowler

Filming has begun on ABC’s docudrama Next Stop Hollywood, which follows six aspiring Australian actors as they compete for coveted roles during the US TV pilot season. PRESS ESC TO EXIT

AFL feature film Blinder has unveiled its cast ahead of a 10-week shoot which begins next month in Victoria. The film will star Oliver Ackland (The Slap), Rose McIver (The Lovely Bones), Steve Bisley (Red Hill), Anna Hutchison (Wild Boys), Zoe Carides (Death In Brunswick), Bob Morley (Road Train) and Angus Sampson (Insidious). Ackland plays an ex-footballer who returns home after a long absence to clear his name and reignite an old flame.

Liam Hemsworth will star as ‘Chris’ in Empire State, an indie heist movie written by Adam Mazer (Breach, HBO’s You Don’t Know Jack) with Dito Montiel (Fighting, The Son Of No One) directing.

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REDDOG By Chris Bright Who would have thought that last year’s most successful Australian film would be about a dog, and one that isn’t voiced by a celebrity? Red Dog came from nowhere to smash box office records and recently confirmed its place as the eighth-highest grossing Australian film of all time. But there’s no big secret behind the film’s success. Like all successful films, it brings together a passionate production team, talented director, likeable cast and a story that touches the heart of audiences both young and old. The actual story of Red Dog is now Australian folklore – a charismatic kelpie that roamed Western Australia during the late ‘70s and became a hero to those who lived there. It’s believed he hitched rides across the country, helping people and uniting communities. In the 1980s a bronze statue of the dog was placed proudly at the entrance of Dampier, the small Western Australian mining town where the film was set. Thousands of tourists visit the monument every year, and more have set out to pay their respects since hearing about the legend in the film.

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The film itself is based on a short story written by British novelist Louis de Bernières, who also wrote the bestselling novel Captain Corelli’s Mandolin. “I feel like it was a stroke of luck coming across the story,” said de Bernières, who at the time had been in the region speaking at a local literary event. “A dog that was so independent, sentimental, rather more like a cat but treated everyone as an equal and acted like it had certain inalienable rights – like a right to stop a car and get a lift – I’ve never heard of any other dog like this.” Two years later, de Bernières returned to Western Australia and began compiling the many stories about Red Dog. In 2002, the book was published in England and immediately sparked the interest of film studios around the world. A number of different companies competed for the rights, including Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks, but Australia’s own Woss Group Film Productions finally secured them, by promising de Bernières that it would be set and shot in WA and not relocated elsewhere. Nelson Woss is the film’s producer and owner of Woss Group Film Productions. He spent his childhood

in Western Australia, and it was during this time he first learned the stories of Red Dog. “As a kid, I had heard the amazing stories of how Red Dog brought together the Pilbara community. I often think - how amazing - that one, ordinary dog, could have united so many people. Yet here we are, so many years later, and that ordinary dog has somehow inspired a new community of filmmakers to venture out to the red dust of the Pilbara. Red Dog deserves to be a legend!”

The next step was finding a director who shared Woss’ vision and he found that in Kriv Stenders, who Woss considers “a young and exciting director”. Stenders has won international acclaim with his films The Illustrated Family Doctor, Blacktown, Boxing Day and his 2009 feature, Lucky Country, and was immediately interested in directing Red Dog. “It was such a universal story with such scope and such emotional breadth that

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REDDOG

I just couldn’t resist it. So when the script came my way, it was just one of those moments where I thought: I have to do this film and I know how to do this film,” he recalled.

sense of place,” said Taplitz about the source material. He said that while penning the screenplay, he attempted to structure the story like an old western.

L.A. based screenwriter Daniel Taplitz was assigned the task of adapting the novel and incorporated other remarkable stories they had heard about Red Dog during their research.

In the film, a truck driver arrives in the small town of Dampier and walks into the pub, where townspeople have congregated to aide a sick dog. While confused at first, the driver begins to understand why this animal is so important to the community, as one-byone the townspeople tell their stories and explain how the legend of Red Dog began.

“Louis’ book was fabulous. It is not so much a novel as it is a vignette of stories about Red Dog. What it had was a great tone and feel to it, and PRESS ESC TO EXIT

Obviously, something about the story struck a chord with audiences everywhere. Since its release in August, the film has shattered recent box office numbers and set a record for the sixth highest opening of any Australian film.

“Making the top 10 Australian films of all time is a terrific result for the entire Red Dog team. We are one of only four independent films on the list and there is still some life in ‘the dog’ yet, so we may even reach seventh,” said Woss after hearing the news.

The film has made over $21million at the Australian box office, and is currently the eighth highest grossing Australian film of all time. This puts Red Dog in the ranks of Crocodile Dundee and Mad Max.

Red Dog secured the number one spot in its opening weekend in Australia, beating Hollywood blockbusters Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Captain America, and enjoyed the biggest opening weekend for an Australian film

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REDDOG this year. Woss says they now want to repeat their success overseas. “Our little underdog Australian film is clearly giving the Hollywood blockbusters a run for their money. It is great to see Australian audiences supporting and enjoying a locally produced film,” he continued. “The film has now clearly shown its box office potential in Australia and the team behind it are working hard to translate this local momentum into international box office success. Australia has fallen in love with Red Dog and now it’s time to share our story with the world.” Box office numbers aren’t always the best indication of how good a film actually is, but Red Dog has received enormous praise from critics, film institutes and audiences all over the world. The film received a nomination for Best Children’s Picture at the 5th Annual Asia-Pacific Screen Awards (APSA), the region’s highest accolade in film, where it competed against films from China, Taiwan and the Islamic Republic of Iran. Red Dog had its world premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in February, won the Audience Award

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at the Vail Film Festival in Colorado, opened the Australian Film Festival in London, received a standing ovation at the Dallas Film Festival and was named Best Film at the Showcomotion Young People’s Film Festival in the United Kingdom – in the same week as winning the award, Red Dog also secured U.K. distribution through G2 Pictures. As part of the film’s Australian publicity, it also premiered at this year’s Melbourne International Film Festival to a sell-out crowd. The Red Dog crew then went on to promote the film throughout Australia, attending red carpet premieres in Sydney, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide.

established that they didn’t want the dog portrayed through animation or computer graphic techniques – finding the perfect canine was critical to the success of the film, so they searched all over Australia, before finding their lead in Geelong, Victoria. The overall success of Red Dog is no surprise. In addition to perfect casting, with Josh Lucas as Red Dog’s young charismatic friend and owner, and Australian actress Rachael Taylor as his romantic interest, the directing, costumes, set design and an incredible ‘70s-inspired soundtrack help show that at the heart of Red Dog is a story that all people, not only Australians, can connect with.

The film’s canine lead (whose real name is Koko), even joined the cast on a press tour, attending in-studio interviews and photo shoots. The crowd-pleasing kelpie was only two years old when casting crew discovered him four years ago. They searched all over Australia for the perfect dog, before finding their lead in the Victorian town of Geelong. They say Koko looks almost identical to the actual Red Dog and had a personality that was perfect for the role. During early development conversations, Woss and Stenders

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SYDNEYFILM FESTIVAL Dendy Awards for Australian Short Films The Dendy Awards deadline is fast approaching! Entry to the awards closes on Monday 27th February. Submission of Australian short fiction films (either animation or live action, less than 40 minutes in length) requires filmmakers to complete an online submission form and payment, and send four copies of their film to the Sydney Film Festival office in Sydney. Cash prizes are awarded in three categories: Best Live Action Short ($5 000), The Yoram Gross Animation Award ($4 000) and The Rouben Mamoulian Award for Best Director ($5 000). Past winners include many of Australia’s most respected film-makers such as festival patrons Jane Campion, Phillip Noyce and Gillian Armstrong.

The Awards are recognised by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and

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Sciences and therefore winners in the animation and live action category are eligible for Academy Awards consideration. Recent Dendy Award winners that have gone on to be Academy-nominated include Miracle Fish (SFF Dendy Live Action 2009/82nd Academy Awards) and The Lost Thing (SFF Yoram Gross Animation 2010/83rd Academy Awards).

The Dendy Awards are an important opportunity for Australian short filmmakers to showcase their work.

The shortlisted films will be screened during the festival and this year, for the first time, we’ll also be organising two workshops with the directors and producers of the shortlisted films on the final weekend covering topics relating to working in this format. The FOXTEL Australian Documentary Prize and SFF general program submissions (international films and Australian fiction features) also close on this date, however we will consider late submission in these other categories. For further information, please contact Alana Adye, Freight & Submissions Coordinator on (02) 9690 5306 or alana@sff.org.au Full rules and regulations for all SFF submissions can be found on the Sydney Film Festival website sff.org.au/public/faq/rules-regulations/

Image courtesy of The Syndey Film Festival

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Callan McAuliffeAMBASSADOR By Matilda Haddad

Tourism Australia has announced its youngest ambassador is Callan McAuliffe, who is in Sydney filming Baz Luhrmann’s epic film, The Great Gatsby. On the news of the honor, Callan said, “I am beyond honored to have been invited to join the Friends of Australia team - joining fellow Australian’s whom I remain in awe of. It has to be the easiest job in the world to promote your own country.” “While in Sydney filming The Great Gatsby in my free time my favorite activities have been - climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge and photography at Taronga Zoo. When I have more time, I enjoy abseiling and camping in the outback of Australia where there are endless opportunities to enjoy the peace and Australian nature - not experienced anywhere else in the world.” Callan is in good company, joining a host of other successful Australians in various fields. This is a well-deserved achievement for the 17-year-old, who has been named by Tourism Australia as their youngest friend in their prestigious “Friends of Australia”

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Campaign. To name just a few, he joins Baz Luhrmann, The Wiggles, Curtis Stone, Michael Caton, and Olivia Newton-John in this honor. Callan is known for his work in Flipped (2010), the Steven Spielberg/ Michael Bay production I am Number Four (2011), where he was handpicked for the role of Sam, and the historic miniseries, Cloudstreet (2011), for which he is nominated for an AACTA award.

CALLAN MCAULIFFE - AUSTRALIA’S YOUNGEST FRIEND His biggest role to date is as young Jay Gatsby, to Leonardo DiCaprio’s older Jay, in the upcoming Baz Luhrmann epic, The Great Gatsby. Along with DiCaprio, Callan also stars alongside Tobey Maguire, and fellow Australians, Joel Edgerton, Isla Fisher and Gemma Ward. The film is set for release at the end of 2012. Going from strength to strength, Callan has also been tied to Alex Proyas’ adaptation of John Milton’s epic poem, Paradise Lost, which will star Bradley Cooper and fellow Australian, Dominic Purcell.

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AACTA The AACTA awards, which will be held on January 31st at the Sydney Opera House, are a continuation of the AFI awards albeit with one or two changes to the structure. AACTA have based their structure on Awards ceremonies such as the BAFTA’s and the Academy Awards, and have set their sights on becoming an acronym that carries as much esteem as those aforementioned. As noted on their website, in regard to the date of the ceremony, “Given the aim of elevating international recognition of the AACTA Awards, the Awards will take place in January of each year in order to fall in line and engage with the international Awards period”.

In August of 2011, the Australian Film Institute (AFI) announced the establishment of Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), which the AFI describe on their website as being a new way to recognize “screen excellence in Australia, with the overall aim of elevating national and international understanding of Australia’s existing preeminent film and television awards, the AFI Awards.”

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As is the case with the Academy Awards, the AACTA awards are voted for by members of the Australian Academy, industry peers who represent several chapters which vote for their respective specialties; from screenwriters and editors to distributers and television networks. The newly formed Australian Academy also notes that whilst their organizational structure is based on that of international awards ceremonies, they are working carefully to ensure that the AACTA remains distinctly Australian. So, how does one ensure something remains distinctly Australian? Hire Geoffrey Rush.

Rush has been appointed President of the Australian Academy much to the delight of the industry and anyone remotely interested in Australian cinema. After all, it’s perfectly logically that a man who has won an Oscar, Tony, Emmy, BAFTA, and multiple AFI awards to be the face of Australia’s revamped awards system. When Rush was announced as president of the Australian Academy last August, he joked that his first order of business would be to find a name for the award statue itself. The statue is a human silhouette, which is shaped like the configuration of the Southern Cross. The Academy Award became known as an ‘Oscar’ after Bette Davis quipped that it looked like her uncle Oscar. Rush doesn’t have as high hopes for the statue sourcing its moniker from his uncle Ron, but the optimistic Rush concluded, “As Pres, I’d like to launch a competish to find the name for this little baby.” The Academy has high hopes for their organization and the award they offer for excellence in Australian film and television. The formation of the Academy is part of the ongoing shift within the Australian film industry and an example of the industry recognizing problems in their system and trying to remedy them.

Another example from the past 12 months is that of Screen Australia’s reviews of convergence in media, film and television funding, and cultural policy; all of which have been issues of contention in recent years. These parallel actions taken by AFI and Screen Australia reveal genuine commitment to bettering Australia’s film industry. They have been welcomed by those within the industry, such as George Miller, who is a member of the Australian Academy, that are champions of Australian cinema who have also campaigned for review and change and fought to allow Australian’s to tell whichever stories they choose and still have the support of their government. It’s not audacious to say that the AACTA may one day be held in the same esteem as the BAFTA’s or Golden Globes, as Australian talent can be found in almost every echelon of film industries worldwide. As Rush phrased it during his inaugural speech as president, “You’d be an idiot if you didn’t recognize that Australian artists in front of and in so many categories behind the camera are among the world’s best”. It is possible for Australia to have an awards ceremony, and film academy, which is viewed in the same esteem as our talent is abroad.

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heath ledgerscholarship 2012 Following Heath Ledger’s death in 2008, the iconic shooting star of the Australian film industry may have departed from the screen but has left us with a legacy that eclipses most of his contemporaries. Dedicated to his benevolent spirit and driving work ethic, the 2012 Annual Heath Ledger Scholarship continues to support the next generation of up and coming Australian actors. Breaking in his teeth on television screens around the nation, a young Heath landed minor roles on Australian soap operas and short-lived television series. His penchant for obscure roles and pushing himself as an actor was first seen in Sweat (1996), when he played a homosexual cyclist focused on Olympic glory. Major roles eluded him until 1999, when he was given the lead in the Australian crime thriller Two hands, thrusting Heath and his trademark smile into the public spotlight. Garnishing him attention both locally and internationally, he secured the role that would be his American breakthrough, starring in the romantic comedy 10 things I hate about you the same year.

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Heath immediately became a heartthrob, and although satisfied with his early success, endeavored not to be typecast. This was the beginning of his highly acclaimed and eclectic body of work, securing his place as one of Australia’s greatest character actors. From civil war compatriot, beguiling knight, heroin addict, the charming Casanova and the antihero Ned Kelly, Heath carved a niche for his character driven performances, constantly expanding his body of work, and all the while never resting on his laurels. The next turning point in his career, and the start of what could be considered his most valuable works, came in the form of Ennis Del Mar, the gay ranch hand in Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain. At twenty-six, his portrayal of the confused and ardent love between him and Jake Gyllenhaal’s character, Jack Twist, saw Heath recognized not only with the Best Actor of 2005 Award, from both the New York and San Francisco Film Critics Circles, but a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actor, making him the youngest nominee for the coveted prize. From one love to the next, the harrowing Candy saw Heath alongside Abby Cornish and Geoffrey Rush in his last Australian production. The condemned love story received Heath

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heath ledgerscholarship 2012 an invitation to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

continued support of Ledger family and all of the sponsors.

Under the capable eye Todd Haynes, Heath portrayed part of Bob Dylan’s personality and life in the ensemble film I’m Not There, cementing his place amongst modern day acting royalty. Heath’s epitaph, and the work for which he’ll always be remembered, came in the form of a callous psychopathic clown. Born form his own imaginings and given creative freedom over his character, his movie stealing performance as the Joker assured the Dark Knight as a box-office hit and a worldwide success. Heath’s family accepted his posthumous Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

Dedicated to spotlighting Australian talent, the panel is made up of elite industry professionals which presents a rare opportunity for actors to showcase their skills. Applications for 2012 can be submitted from January 15th to March 15th. The winner and runners up will be announced at the 8th Annual Australians in Film Break Through Awards.

From a Perth boy interested in acting, chess and surfing to a international superstar, Heath was not only regarded for his craft but for his kind and lovable disposition. His boyish charms, daring choices and commitment to the arts has forever allocated a space in the collective hearts of film enthusiasts, and his compassionate nature will continually resonate throughout the film industry. In the spirit of Heath, an ambassador for Australians in Film, the Heath Ledger Scholarship was created. In its forth year, the scholarship has come a long way thanks to superb finalists, the

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To enter, simply visit www.australiansinfilm.org, create a login and sign up for the chance of a lifetime. Entries are open from January 15 to March 15, 2012.

Supporting Australian artists was always a passion of Heath’s and in a statement released by his Father, Kim Ledger said, “We know Heath would be proud of his attachment to this scholarship.” The recipient of the Heath Ledger Scholarship will receive fiscal support to the tune of $10,000 cash, airfare to the United States, an opportunity to further their training with a scholarship to Stella Adler Studio of Acting, and a chance to penetrate the notoriously difficult international film industry. Two runners up will also receive special prizes, and the winner and 10 finalists will receive a year free subscription to Quickflix and Showcast.

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memberprofile BENBALLARIN

What were your greatest acting influences?

Where in Australia are you from?

To tell you the truth, it was my best friend’s sister, Sara, who is an actress. I grew up in a house with three brothers and went to an all-boys catholic school, so sports were more important in my life while I was growing up. It wasn’t until I finished high school that I would talk to Sara about her studies in acting, and began attending as many of her performances as I could.

I grew up in the Melbourne suburb of Essendon, which most people have heard of because of the football team. It’s actually not too far from the house they used in film The Castle. When and why did you move to the States? My acting teacher at the VCA, in Melbourne, told me I needed some life experience, so I took the advice and left Oz. That was seven years ago. New York was supposed to be my first stop, but I fell in love with it and never left. A fellow actor and friend, who had completed a six week theatre workshop in New York, told me stories of the teachers she had worked with and the Broadway shows she saw, and said it was the most amazing and inspiring place a young actor could be in. I was 21 when I moved there, and I didn’t know a single person in the city. Although it was scary at first, in the end it was both educational and a whole lot of fun. For the next seven years, I was lucky enough to study with some amazing theatrical teachers, perform in some great shows under their guidance, while watching amazing theatre in my down time.

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Eventually, she inspired me to start taking acting workshops at The National Theater in St Kilda. My eldest brother was also a big inspiration; he offered me a great amount of support, and although we didn’t grow up in a theatrical environment, he helped me understand that it was never too late to try something new. What have you been working on recently? I recently shot a short film called Sudden Flesh, it was written by a friend, Ashlin Halfnight, and was directed by Simon Cave. That was a lot of fun because I was cast alongside someone I went to school with, and it’s always fun working with an actor who’s work you are familiar with. I also did a Pilot called Shitty Advice For a Dollar, which was directed by Alex Merkin, and was written by Sally Golan. Alex is a well know New York director, he also directed a film called Across the Hall, which was Brittany Murphy’s last film.

Who have you admired working with? Over the past year I have completed a number of workshops with Chris Bayes. Chris is the head of physical comedy/clown at the Yale Graduate Program. Clown is one of the toughest and most challenging things I have ever done, but working with Chris, I learnt more about acting and about being present than with any other teacher or actor. I always suggest to both film and theatre actors, who want to challenge themselves, to take clown classes. Another mentor was Grace Zandarski, who teaches at the Yale Graduate Program, and who has been my voice teacher on and off for the past four years. She teaches Fitmaurice Voicework, is an amazing teacher and is now a good friend. She taught me to always be on my breath, and how to be heard, whether it is in a theatre or on film.

Why did you join AIF? I am very new to Los Angeles, and it sounded like an amazing way to stay in touch with Australian films, directors and actors. I’m looking forward to going to my first screening, and to all the Q&As with great directors and actors. I also hear that you throw great shindigs. Who knows, I might be able to find a contact that can score me some strawberry Fredo Frogs, and a six-pack of VB, which hasn’t come from Canada!

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backpAGE AiF Ambassadors

Don’t be left out in the cold...

Gillian Armstrong Simon Baker Eric Bana Cate Blanchett Bryan Brown Rose Byrne Toni Collette Abbie Cornish Russell Crowe Roger Donaldson Deborra Lee Furness Melissa George Mel Gibson Rachel Griffiths Scott Hicks Barry Humphries Hugh Jackman Nicole Kidman Anthony Lapaglia Baz Luhrmann Robert Luketic Jacqueline McKenzie Julian McMahon George Miller Kylie Minogue Radha Mitchell Poppy Montgomery Olivia Newton-John Phillip Noyce Frances O’Connor Miranda Otto Guy Pearce Richard Roxburgh Geoffrey Rush Fred Schepisi Naomi Watts Hugo Weaving David Wenham Sarah Wynter

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AiF Sponsors We greatly appreciate the involvement and support of our sponsors.

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You or your organization can become a sponsor of Australians in Film. We’d be happy to talk to you to see how we can tailor AiF to best benefit your company. Contact Michael Kelleher for more information. email | michael@australiansinfilm.com

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phone | 310 452 5939

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