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OCTOBER 2017

smar t parenting • healthy homes

WELCOME, BABY!

Serving Austin’s Families Since 1992

Diaper Rash 101 Get Help and Support from Any Baby Can

Is It More Than the Baby Blues?

PLUS:

ARTICULOS EN ESPAÑOL

INSIDE!

CALENDAR | EDUCATION GUIDE | YOUNG WRITERS CONTEST


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October 2017 austinfamily.com

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OCTOBER 2017

smart parenting • healthy homes

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Any Baby Can

columns

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Lifelines

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The Learning Curve

26 30 48

Baby Carriers and Injury: What You Need to Know

Considering a Private School? Do Your Research, but the Visit is Key

Family Matters

There Are Good Mothers Who Stay at Home and Good Mothers Who Work

Family Connections

Apps & Wearables Take Parenting to New Levels

Just for Grins

Developmental Milestones Parents Actually Care About

follow us: tune in:

Catch Austin Family live on “Good Day Austin” every Friday morning and “Despierta Austin” the first Friday morning of each month.

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Beyond the Baby Blues

calendar

32 32 38 39

Museum Exhibits Family Events

Parenting Events Story Times

in ever y issue

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Diaper Rash 101

en español

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Asuntos Familiares

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Piensa Positivo

Hay Buenas Madres que se Quedan en Casa y Buenas Madres que Trabajan

Valentía

Play It Safe Recalls

Around Austin Kidzone

extras

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Boo-nanas and Mum-sicles

Young Writers Contest Cover Kids Contest

FILM REVIEW

Smart Screen Time

THIS MONTH’S REVIEW:

Education Guide

Focus on Doctors

BY JACK KYSER Battle of the Sexes Read online at: www.austinfamily.com/films

October 2017 austinfamily.com

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® BY S H E R I DA M O C K “The days are long, but the years are short.” Whoever said that about parenthood had it right—you’ll spend endless days reading and re-reading favorite stories, changing countless diapers and singing lullabies, all the while thinking you just can’t stand the boredom. Then one day, you’ll look up and see your “baby” packing the last bit of necessities for her first year of college. Welcome to parenting.

October 2017

Volume 25, No.7

PUBLISHER Kaye K. Lowak

EDITOR Sherida Mock: editor2003@austinfamily.com

COPY EDITOR Barb Matijevich

This month, we’ve packed our issue with articles about the beginnings of the journey. Sarah Lyons holds forth on the sometimes prickly topic of diaper rash. Barbra Cosentino addresses the common myths about postpartum depression. Betty Richardson offers guidance on how to make the decision about whether and when to go back to work. Brenda Schoolfield puts a spotlight on the potential for injuries from baby carriers. I had the pleasure of chatting with Alexandra Alfau of Any Baby Can. And Carrie Taylor gives us her humorous take on developmental milestones. But we’re about more than babies this month. It’s the season for private school open houses, and Margaret Nicklas has some advice on what to look for and what to ask. Check out our Education Guide for great resources: preschools, private schools, enrichment programs and more. And to give October a hint of sweetness, try the Boo-nana and Mum-sicle treats brought to you by YMCA of Austin. Happy fall, y’all!

ADVISING EDITORS Dr. Betty Kehl Richardson, Barb Matijevich

CALENDAR EDITOR Betty Kemper: calendar2003@austinfamily.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sherida Mock, Dr. Betty Richardson, Jack Kyser, Richard Singleton, Carrie Taylor, Brenda Schoolfield, Margaret Nicklas, Sarah Lyons and Barbra Cosentino.

TRANSLATION Maribel Ruvalcaba

GRAPHIC DESIGN Susie Forbes & Kim Crisler

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Jordan Ashley Photography

ADVERTISING SALES Kaye K. Lowak: kaye2003@austinfamily.com

We are dedicated to serving the Greater Austin area by providing up-to-date information and ideas that promote smart parenting and healthy homes. We promote our clients’ businesses by increasing their customer bases and enhancing their public images.

Austin Family is published monthly by KKKemper Inc. Mailing Address: P.O. Box 7559, Round Rock, Texas 78683-7559 Phone Number: 512-733-0038 On the web at: www.austinfamily.com Advertising rates are available upon request. While we use great care in creating our display ads, mistakes can happen. Austin Family and the publisher are not liable for any damages arising from any typographical or mechanical errors beyond the cost of the ad. Austin Family does not necessarily endorse any of the advertisers, products or services listed in this publication. We do not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. Subscriptions are available for $30 per year. Copyright 2017. All rights reserved

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. No portion of Austin Family may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

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Play it product recalls

sa fe

Government Recalls Stacking Toys, Natural Soap and Rompers Hallmark is recalling about 5,800 plush stacking toys because the toys have fabric hats and bows that can detach, posing a choking hazard. The recall involves Disney-licensed plush animal stacking toys with rattling rings. Affected units were sold at Hallmark Gold Crown stores nationwide and online at hallmark.com and amazon.com between June 2016 and July 2017 for about $30. Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled toys and take them away from children. Contact Hallmark to receive a prepaid shipping label for returning the recalled toy and for a $40 Hallmark Gold Crown gift card. Handi-Craft Company is recalling about 23,000 bottles of natural bottle and dish soap because the soap can contain harmful bacteria. Exposure to bacteria poses a risk of respiratory and other infections in immunocompromised individuals. The recall involves Dr. Brown’s Natural Bottle and Dish Soap sold separately and with Dr. Brown’s bottle brush as a bottle cleaning kit. Affected units were sold at 4 Our Little Ones, Babies R Us, Bebeang, Buy Buy Baby, Drugland Pharmacy, Family First Pharmacy, Global Nutrition Trading, Macro and Turquoise stores nationwide and online at amazon.com from September 2016 to June 2017 for between $3 and $7. Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled bottle and dish soap and contact Handi-Craft Company for instructions on receiving a replacement. Bottles and dishes cleaned with the recalled soap should be boiled or sanitized in the dishwasher. Fabri-Tech is recalling about 6,500 infant rompers because the buttons on the shoulder straps can detach, posing a choking hazard to children. The recall involves red and white checkered rompers with a toolbox design on the front. Affected units were sold at Cracker Barrel Old Country Stores from April 2017 to July 2017 for about $20. Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled rompers and return them to any Cracker Barrel Old Country Store for a full refund or contact Fabri-Tech to receive a prepaid shipping label for returning the recalled romper for a full refund. The US Consumer Products Safety Commission works to protect the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from more than 15,000 types of consumer products.

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G O TO W W W. AU ST I N FA M I LY. C O M F O R W E E K LY U P DAT E S O F A RO U N D AU ST I N N E W S

Must-DoThis

College Scholarships Simon Youth Foundation is seeking applicants for the Austin-area college scholarships it will award in May 2018. Each year, community scholarships are awarded in every community that is home to a Simon Mall, Mills or Premium Outlets center. The application period is open now and ends Feb. 15, 2018. Any high school student who will be graduating in the class of 2018 and lives in the designated community surrounding a Simon property is eligible. Applicants can check their eligibility by entering their ZIP code at syf.org/scholarships. Simon properties in the Austin area include Barton Creek Square, The Domain, Lakeline Mall, Round Rock Premium Outlets and San Marcos Premium Outlets. Recipients will receive up to $1,500 toward tuition and other educational expenses at an accredited college, university, vocational or technical school. In addition to community scholarships, an Award of Excellence will be given to a top candidate in the Austin area. The Award of Excellence is a $10,000 award given out over four years.

Month 6-7

Chalk Walk Round Rock

13-14, 20-21, 27-28 Haunted Halloween Trails Pioneer Farms

21-22, 28-29

“Not Afraid of the Dark” Ballet Austin Studio Theater

In 2017, the Simon Youth Foundation awarded $1.6 million to 335 students nationwide. For more information, visit syf.org/scholarships.

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Hockey

Counseling for Vets

The Texas Stars hockey team opens a new season Oct. 6 against the Chicago Wolves at the H-E-B Center in Cedar Park. The regular season runs until Apr. 14, 2018. The Texas Stars are the primary development affiliate of the NHL’s Dallas Stars team.

The Samaritan Center recently opened a walk-in clinic offering free counseling sessions to veterans and military family members. Part of its Hope for Heroes program, the clinic offers an option for military families who find it difficult to schedule appointments ahead of time, or who want to try counseling before making a commitment. The clinic, at 8956 Research Blvd., is open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Fridays. The Hope for Heroes program was established in 2007. Staff members are selected for their military experience, clinical expertise with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), and competency with military culture.

The Texas Stars hockey season begins Oct. 6. Photo courtesy of Texas Stars.

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For more information, call 512-466-4454 or email erin@samaritan-center.org.

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The Texas Book Festival comes to town Nov. 5 and 6. Photo courtesy of Texas Book Festival.

Texas Book Festival The Texas Book Festival takes place Nov. 5 and 6 on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol and along Congress Ave. Participating authors include Dan Rather, Jeffrey Eugenides and Claire Mesud. More than 280 writers are part of the lineup. The Texas Book Festival is free and open to the public. Every year, more than 40,000 attendees enjoy live music, book signings, readings, panels, food trucks, kids’ activities and more. For more information, visit texasbookfestival.com.

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Bump Bowls A local artist is now making ceramic bowls based on plaster casts of pregnant bellies. Ericka LaManna of Austin began making her Maternity Bowls for clients in April.

Local artist Ericka LaManna makes ceramic art from casts of pregnant bellies. Photo courtesy of Ericka LaManna.

“As far as I know, I'm the only artist in Texas who makes these,” says LaManna. At a baby shower in January, LaManna saw a plaster cast being made of a friend’s belly. LaManna thought the cast would make a great starting point for creating a durable ceramic version. Lauren Chenoweth recently ordered a bowl. “I did a maternity photo session with my first pregnancy and I wanted to do something special for my second pregnancy,” she says. Cindy Willing posed her newborn in the bowl for photos after the birth. “It was amazing how my son fit right in,” she says. “Now, my bowl sits featured in my living room. It is beautiful and I love talking about it.” Casting takes about 10 minutes, and the bowl is finished in three to six weeks. LaManna says the bowls are food and oven-safe.

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399,482

Annual births in Texas

Doctor Availability

Dell Medical School celebrates its first class with a White Coat Ceremony in September 2016. Photo by Thomas Meredith courtesy of Dell Medical School.

This year’s report on healthcare in Austin finds access to doctors is up 30 percent. The annual Community Benefit Report is a joint creation of the Dell Medical School and Central Health, the local healthcare district serving people in Travis County. Several factors played into the increase, according to the report. Its authors cite more medical residents in clinics and hospitals, more medical students working in the community, the redesign of a prenatal and postnatal care system at the medical school, and a focus on mental and behavioral health as contributors to the uptick. “This work is all about taking an entire health care system to a higher level,” says Mike Geeslin, Central Health President and CEO.

Source: Texas Department of State Health Services, 2014

3%

Babies born between midnight and 7 a.m. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015

$233,610

Cost to raise a child from birth to age 17 Source: US Department of Agriculture, 2015

In 2012, Travis County voters approved a tax increase to improve its healthcare system, including the creation of Dell Medical School. “This community’s vote really was visionary,” says Dr. Clay Johnston, inaugural Dean of the Dell Medical School. “As we progress, we can be a model for how other communities approach health.”

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skills,” says Randy Freedman, Director of Student Programs at SWE and coordinator of the Invent it. Build it. program.

Girls in STEM

The Society of Women Engineers (SWE) brings its annual event Invent it. Build it., to Austin to engage girls in STEM activities and provide them resources that will help them pursue a path in engineering and technology.

The Girls Program for grades 6-8 works with SWE members from around the world on hands-on engineering activities. The High School Girls Program for grades 9-12 connects girls with real engineers to receive on-the-spot mentorship and discussions that cover everything

from picking the right college to pursuing the right engineering degree. Parents and educators can attend the Parent/Educator Program, where they will learn about engineering careers and scholarships and received college admission resources for their children or students. The cost of the girls’ programs is $7, and the cost of the PEP program is $5. For more information, visit inventitbuildit.swe.org.

Middle school and high school age girls, educators and parents can participate in Invent It. Build It. 2017. Photo courtesy of the Society of Women Engineers.

The event will take place Oct. 28, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center as part of WE17, the largest conference and career fair for women engineers. “Girls who attend Invent it. Build. it. leave with a better understanding of engineering and a strengthened confidence in engineering-related

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Young artists in grades 8-11 can apply for grants through Nov. 15.

Arts Grants

Young artists in Texas can get help pursuing their passion from the Texas Commission on the Arts (TCA) and the Texas Cultural Trust. The Young Masters grant program provides students in grades 8-11 with financial help to pursue advanced study in visual arts, literary arts, music, theater, dance, musical theater and media arts. Young Masters are awarded grants of $5,000 per year for two years and named at an event in Austin in April. Since starting in 2002, the Trust and TCA have named 139 Young Masters and awarded $857,500 in grants. Applications, information and guidelines are available at tinyurl.com/youngmaster. Applications and required supporting materials must be submitted by Nov. 15, 2017.

Do you think you have conjunctivitis (pink eye)? You and/or your child may be able to participate if you (or they): • have had pink eye symptoms (e.g. redness, watering/ discharge, or irritation) in at least one eye for no more than the past 3 days • are interested in taking part in a research study for up to 13 days • are willing to travel to the study center for appointments. Qualified participants may receive the non-antibiotic investigational drug and study-related procedures and visits at no cost. Health insurance is not required to participate.

To nd out more, and to see if you qualify, call:

1-877-739-1975 www.PinkEyeResearchStudy.com

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The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards culminate in a ceremony in Washington, DC. Photo courtesy of Prudential Spirit of Community Awards.

Call for Entries The nation’s largest youth volunteer recognition program is accepting entries through Nov. 7, 2017 for its 2018 awards. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards recognize middle school and high school students who make meaningful contributions to their communities through volunteer service. The awards will name 102 state honorees and 230 distinguished ďŹ nalists. Each May, the top 10 youth volunteers are named in a ceremony in Washington, DC, and each receives $5,000, a gold medallion, a crystal trophy for their nominating organization and a $5,000 Prudential Foundation grant for a charitable organization of his or her choice. For more information, visit spirit.prudential.com or call 855-670-4787.

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Three Decades of Ensuring That Any Baby Can BY S H E R I DA M O C K

If you ever find your family facing a childhood medical or developmental challenge, you’ll be grateful for the services offered through Any Baby Can, an agency dedicated to giving all e to be children the chance healthy and happy. s Alexandra Alfau has worked with the organization for nearly 30 years, joining on when it was called CEDEN Family Resource Center in 1988. A physical therapist by training, she started out as a parent educator, making home visits with the Early Childhood ood Intervention (ECI) program. In 1994, 994, she The Care program includes a summer camp moved up to ECI program director, and for siblings of children who have cancer. Photo courtesy of Any Baby Can. three years ago took on the role of chief program officer. Alfau sat down with us recently to talk about Any Baby Can and her tenure there.

AF: What services do you offer?

Alfau: Every service we provide is related to the family and children, and

they are all home visiting programs, except for the parenting classes.

We have the Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) program for children 0 to 3 years old with developmental delays or a medical diagnosis that will lead to a delay. We have the Healthy Fair Start program that uses the Parents as Teachers curriculum and works with children 0 to 5 years old who are at risk of developmental delay or at risk of abuse and neglect.

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

Alexandra Alfau has worked for Any Baby Can for nearly 30 years. Photo courtesy of Any Baby Can.

Under the sam same Parents as Teachers program, w we work with teen moms in the T Tandem program. It’s a collab collaboration with LifeWorks, Peo People’s Community Clinic an and Austin Child Guidance C Center. We provide sservices for teen moms a and work with the child u until the child is 2 years o old. An Another big program— whic which is the only one in the area— area—is the Nurse-Family Partners Partnership. We work with firsttime moms under 180 percent of the poverty le level and at less than 28 weeks gestat gestation. Nurses visit the pregnant mom and we keep working with both the mom and child until the child is 2 years old. That’s an important period. We work with them on attachment, how to nurture the baby, how to be a good mom. The Care program works with children with a medical diagnosis and childhood cancer. That program provides medical case management to the family. We make sure they can navigate all the resources that are available to them in the community. We don’t provide any treatment; it’s just the support. Part of that program

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is Camp Grey Dove, a summer camp for siblings of children with cancer. We provide parenting classes using the Nurturing Parenting Program, which is an evidence-based curriculum.

AF: How do clients get referred to you?

Alfau: Some referrals come from Dell Children’s. We have walk-ins,

If You Need Help Visit anybabycan.org or call 512-454-3743.

If You Want to Help Volunteers are needed for monthly client activities, office help, fundraisers, client parties and the annual Adopt a Family campaign in November.

parenting classes, if they can pay we charge them $10 or $15 for the course. For the ECI program, it depends on their medical needs, the expenses they have—we take all those things into consideration.

AF: Do you have any favorite stories from your work?

Alfau: When I was still providing

direct service, I was working with a family because their child was 2, and he was not walking. All the doctors and specialists couldn’t find anything wrong in this child. Why was he not walking? He was sitting and scooting himself with help from his hands. And that’s weird, because when you have a child that age that is not walking, they’re probably crawling. Well, I knew the mom had other children, including a child with special needs, but I never saw them because they were in school at the

Visit anybabycan.org or email mail volunteer@anybabycan.org. org.

AF:W AF: What have you learned in your time lea here? he

self-referrals. Sometimes they need to be enrolled in a program. Sometimes they just need information. Sometimes they need diapers. We work hard to make sure we assist in any way we can, to everybody.

Alfau: A I have learned so

m much. One thing is you need tto find what you like to do. Then T it doesn’t feel like a job. I want w to keep supporting people. pe I think that’s why I took the challenge this late in my career care to become chief program off f icer Even my children were ff officer. asking me, “Mom, aren’t you about to retire?” And I said, “Well, I think I can still give a little bit more.” af

AF: What do clients s pay for services?

Alfau: Clients don’t pay for most

services. In some cases, we bill ill Medicaid or private insurance, especially for the ECI and medical case management. For some of the

time that I was visiting the family. But one day I came at a different time. And guess what? That’s how the older brother with special needs was moving around the house. So, the child was mimicking his older brother. her. From that day on, I tried something g different. I stood him up and gave him light support by y touching his shoulder or holding his s hand. I worked with ith him for Children with a week, and he developmental walked. Wow. It was delays get help through the Early incredible. As a Childhood therapist, Intervention program for ages 0 to 3. sometimes you Photo courtesy of need to give the Any Baby Can. client mental support: pp support that if you y fall, I’m here next to you.

The Healthy Fair Start program works with children ages 0 to 5 and their parents. Photo courtesy of Any Baby Can.

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8 Myths Busted About Postpartum Depression BY BA R B R A W I L L I A M S C O S E N T I N O

ecoming a mom is

B

supposed to be magical, and most

often it is. But for the estimated one in eight women who suffer from perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs), new motherhood can deliver disappointment and despair. What kind of mom can’t look at her baby without weeping? Why does someone who desperately wanted children wonder if she made a mistake? Just about every woman going through PMADs believes she’s alone, and the pain can be excruciating. In 2016, the Journal of the American Medical Association published updated screening guidelines to increase awareness of maternal mental health disorders. Hopefully, this will lead to more quickly identifying mothers in distress and clear up some commonly held misconceptions.

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

Here are some of the most prevalent myths:

Myth #1: Postpartum depression (PPD) feels the same for everyone.

Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders include PPD but also anxiety, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and—the most rare—postpartum psychosis. Many women experience symptoms of more than one at the same time. Depression and anxiety are more prevalent during pregnancy than previously thought, and their occurrence puts a woman at higher risk for problems postpartum.

Myth #2: PPD begins right after the baby is born.

They’re known as the “baby blues:” feelings of tearfulness, anxiety and being overwhelmed that begin a day

or two after delivery. According to Postpartum Support International, the baby blues are very common and caused primarily by roller-coaster hormone fluctuations. These uncomfortable but mild symptoms normally ease in the first two or three weeks. True postpartum depression can begin any time during the first year after birth. Surprisingly, many women do fine for several months and then develop symptoms. These might be precipitated by returning to work, weaning the baby or other external factors, but experts believe they primarily result from a mix of genetics, stress and hormonal imbalances.

Myth #3: Moms who are excited to welcome their babies don’t experience PMADs.

Perinatal disorders can happen to any mother, but there are certain factors— a difficult pregnancy or delivery,

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previous history of depression or anxiety, social isolation, history of early loss or trauma and current stressors such as financial problems—that increase the risk. Having symptoms of anxiety or depression doesn’t mean the baby is unloved or unwanted. Even women who struggle with infertility can experience prenatal or postpartum depression.

Myth #4: Frightening, intrusive

thoughts (thinking about death, wanting to hurt yourself or fears of hurting the baby) are proof of postpartum psychosis.

Intrusive, repetitive and unwanted thoughts are generally caused by anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorders, rather than psychosis. Women are usually so horrified by these thoughts—which they have no intention of acting upon—that they do everything they can to ensure their infants’ safety, including having others care for the baby and putting anything dangerous out of sight. According to the American Psychiatric Association, postpartum psychosis occurs in just one to two mothers per 1,000 deliveries and is a true psychiatric emergency in which the woman loses touch with reality and suffers from extreme agitation, delusions or hallucinations.

Myth #5: Breastfeeding is so

natural, every mom should easily succeed at it.

Some newborn babies latch onto the breast immediately, can suck well and can get all their nourishment from

nursing. For others, the process doesn’t go smoothly, and it can take days or even weeks to establish a comfortable and effective breastfeeding routine. Mothers who can’t nurse successfully and those who choose not to breastfeed often experience feelings of failure and shame, especially because of how often they hear that “breast is best.” Whether they are breast- or bottlefeeding, moms should be supported as they help their babies grow and thrive.

Myth #6:Once the baby sleeps through the night, PMADs will resolve.

Sleep deprivation and exhaustion can clearly contribute to a new mom’s state of disequilibrium. But these are more often the result of a mental health disorder rather than the cause, since anxiety, depression and obsessive thinking can seriously interfere with restful sleep. It’s important to tell health care providers about all symptoms, not just sleeprelated ones, to reach a proper diagnosis. Sleeping pills are not the solution, but they may be prescribed on a short-term basis.

Myth #7:If meds are

recommended, you must stop breastfeeding.

Several antidepressant and antianxiety drugs are considered safe for breastfeeding mothers. Perinatal psychiatrists—MDs who specialize in working with women throughout the childbearing cycle—are skilled in evaluating each woman’s needs individually. Because untreated mental health disorders can sometimes affect infant development, recommendations

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for medication are based on an assessment of risks and benefits. LactMed, part of the Toxicology Data Network of the National Institute of Health’s online US National Library of Medicine, provides a comprehensive database on drugs and how they might affect a breastfeeding mom.

Myth #8: Moms who don’t bond

with their babies right away may permanently damage the motherchild relationship.

Although it’s disappointing when pregnancy, birth or new motherhood doesn’t lead to the perfect “Hallmark moment,” bonding doesn’t always happen instantaneously. Yes, babies are innately adorable and wonderful, but it can take some time to experience that deep sense of connection and love, especially for women struggling with depression, anxiety or other unsettling feelings. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders usually respond well to treatment, which can include therapy/counseling, medication or a combination of both, as well as the care and support of spouses, partners, family and friends. Although it can be difficult to find time, basic self-care strategies such as getting adequate rest and exercise, eating healthfully and learning to relax are important steps to take in feeling more like your normal, pre-baby self. Support groups, both online and inperson, can provide camaraderie as you navigate the ups and downs of new motherhood, overcome challenges and emerge as a new mother: strong and unbroken, ready to fully embrace your new role. Barbra Williams Cosentino, LCSW, RN, is a psychotherapist and has written for many national, regional and online publications.

October 2017 austinfamily.com

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Baby Carriers and Injury:

BY B R E N DA S C H O O L F I E L D

What You Need to Know Over 1.3 million young children go to the emergency department every year because of injuries related to nursery products like baby carriers, cribs, mattresses, strollers, baby walkers and

surfaces, such as a counter, table, chest of drawers or the top of the car. Compared to other nursery products, baby carriers were over five times more likely to be related to a caregiver fall, according to a recent study. If the caregiver trips and falls while toting a baby in a carrier, she risks falling on top of the child or causing more injury by adding momentum to the fall.

high chairs. Baby carriers are the most frequent cause of those visits; over half of injuries to babies younger than 6 months old are related to baby carriers.

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Many falls from carriers happen because children aren’t buckled in properly. Sometimes it’s because the parent or caregiver doesn’t take the time to make sure the child is securely fastened in. Children fall out of carriers that are being carried—such as from the house to the car. Children fall out of carriers that are placed in a shopping cart or stroller. Falls can happen when the carrier is placed on higher October 2017 austinfamily.com

Sometimes product defects cause falls. In fact, of all the products recalled in the US, nursery products top the recall list. For example, Osprey recalled a child backpack carrier a few months ago because of a design flaw—a child seated in the carrier could slip through the leg openings. Chimparoo baby carriers were recalled because the side strap could loosen unexpectedly and cause the child to fall out. Other problems include handles that can loosen over time and cause you to drop the carrier. Injuries from falls in babies and young children can be very serious. One example is traumatic brain injury, caused by a bump or blow to the head that damages the brain. Sometimes the injury can cause problems with thinking, speech or emotions. Really severe injury can cause permanent brain damage or even death. Researchers report that traumatic brain injuries in the home have increased more than 200 percent in children younger than 5 years old.

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Baby carriers are associated with more head or neck injuries compared to other nursery products. One reason is that younger children are predisposed to head injury, because their heads are large in proportion of their bodies. This affects children’s center of gravity. They tend to fall head first and can’t catch themselves with their arms as well as older children.

Check the Recall List The US Consumer Product Safety Commission maintains a list of all recalled products. Visit cpsc.gov to make sure your nursery products are safe.

What You Can Do

9. Check the recall list before you buy a stroller or baby carrier, especially if you get one secondhand. Even if a friend or relative has been using it, check the recall list just to be safe. The product could have been recalled after they purchased it. af

Brenda Schoolfield is a freelance medical writer who splits her time between Austin and Seattle.

1. Always fasten buckles immediately after placing your child in a carrier. Don’t put this off!

2. Make sure the child is securely fastened in. You may need to tighten the straps. Don’t leave any buckles unfastened.

3. Don’t put the carrier on high surfaces, such as the top of the car.

4. Don’t put the carrier on slippery surfaces, such as the top of a glass table.

5. Don’t set the carrier on soft surfaces, such as a sofa or bed. The carrier could tip over and cause the child to suffocate.

6. Make sure the carrier’s handles are locked into position before picking up the carrier. Also, inspect the handles from time to time to make sure they aren’t loose or damaged.

7.

Keep traffic areas of your home free of tripping hazards.

8. Avoid carrying a child in a carrier down a flight of stairs. If you must, use one hand to hold onto the hand railing. Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

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Do Away with Diaper Rash BY SA R A H LYO N S

As parents, we do everything in our power to avoid an uncomfortable and painful rash for our little ones, but realistically, even the most diligent mom or dad has to deal with diaper rash in the first few years of parenthood. Knowing the common culprits of diaper rash and how to treat them will help keep baby happy and rash free. 20

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Common Culprits of Diaper Rash # 1: Infrequent Diaper Changes We have the best intentions when it comes to changing our babies, but sometimes things happen and that wet diaper stays on a little too long causing red, sore, irritated skin. Even the most absorbent diaper can allow wetness to touch the skin, and that can leave baby’s bottom red and irritated.

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# 2: Yeast Infection The diaper area is warm and moist, making it easy for infections like yeast to grow and flourish. Yeast passes through the child’s digestive system and eventually lands in the diaper next to the warm, damp skin. This can result in a rash in the folds of the skin. Regular diaper creams won’t improve this type of rash. It’s best to speak to your doctor about treatment, which may include an antifungal cream.

# 3: Allergies and Sensitivities It is possible your baby is sensitive to the brand of diapers or wipes you are using. Your child could also have an allergy to a new food that is causing loose stools, which in turn cause added irritation and wetness in the diaper area. With some trial and error, you may be able to narrow down the cause of the rash and help your child’s rash improve greatly with a few small changes.

Treat and Prevent Diaper Rash - Clean and Dry Make sure your baby is clean and dry before putting on a new diaper. Remember to pat the area dry rather than rub, which will further irritate skin.

- Air Dry Let your baby go diaper free. When weather allows, spend some time outside sans diaper. The fresh air will help the skin heal faster.

- A Gentler Clean Use mild, alcohol free wipes or try using a squirt bottle of water to gently clean skin.

Even the most absorbent diaper can allow wetness to touch the skin, and that can leave baby’s bottom red and irritated.

- Read the Label Use a diaper cream with zinc oxide or petroleum jelly on the ingredient list. Apply a protective layer of cream to help prevent future rash.

- Go Green Chances are, your baby will develop a diaper rash at least once before potty training is complete.

pediatrician to see if he or she can recommend a probiotic that is safe for your baby. “The good bacteria can help combat the yeast and restore a normal flora to your baby’s gut,” says pediatrician and mom Jenna Roberts.

Cloth diapers made with natural fabrics are gentler than disposable diapers, which may contain chemicals that can irritate your baby’s skin.

- Try Homemade Making homemade wipes or diaper cream allows you to decide what ingredients touch your baby's skin, and therefore avoid any harsh ingredients that store bought products may contain.

- Healthy Belly Probiotics can help prevent yeast infections. Check with your

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- Try Something New Experiment with a new brand of diaper or wipes, change your cloth diaper detergent, make sure your baby has a properly fitting diaper, take note of any reactions to new foods and remember that every baby is different, so what works for one child may not be a good fit for another. Chances are, your baby will develop a diaper rash at least once before potty training is complete but with these tips, your little one should be comfortable and rash free in no time. Sarah Lyons is a mother of six who has lots of experience in changing diapers.

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BY M A R GA R E T N I C K L AS

Considering a Private School?

Do Your Research, but the Visit is Key

re you looking for a private school for your preschooler? Are you curious about what private schools may offer your older child that your local public school may not? Researching options online, calling campuses and talking to your friends are all pretty standard. But a visit—at least to those schools on your short list—should also be part of your plan. Luckily, many private schools offer open houses and other opportunities throughout the year for parents to check out their physical space, see teaching in action and meet key personnel in charge of operations.

A

The Austin area is home to a wide variety of private schools. The online

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resource “Private School Review” (privateschoolreview.com) lists nearly 150 private schools located in Travis, Williamson and Hays Counties. While not an exhaustive list, the site provides a wealth of useful information about the schools registered with the site. It also has a handy “compare schools” function that can be helpful in narrowing down campuses to consider, contains links to schools’ individual websites and has information about events such as open houses.

There are many factors to consider when looking at a potential school for your child. General reputation, the ages or grade levels served, the location and the cost are

bound to to op the list. What type of top accreditatio on the school has and how accreditation students typically transition to or from public schools are also important issues to consider. Other essential elements may include the school’s teaching philosophy, any special or unique programming and, if applicable, its religious affiliation. Roughly half of the schools listed by the Private School Review are religiously affiliated, most as Christian or Roman Catholic. It’s worth noting that such schools vary in the degree to which observance of specific practices or teachings is required—a factor you may wish to explore with any religiously affiliated schools you are considering. Many schools offer or even require one-on-one meetings with prospective students’ families as part of application or enrollment. These are great opportunities to discuss your detailed questions and the individual needs of your child. Many schools also offer a schedule of tours or give tours by appointment. Open houses, if available, can be a great starting point. You will get an overall impression of the school, benefit from hearing the general information presented and see the school in a relatively anonymous fashion before you are invested in a particular outcome.

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Adriana Rodriguez, founder and head of the Austin Eco Bilingual School, says she holds weekend open houses three times a year for families wanting to check out her school’s north or south locations. Attendees get to see how the school—which serves infants through first graders only—is designed and organized; meetings and tours can be set up subsequently for interested parents. At the Hill Country Christian School of Austin, traditional open houses are not held. Instead, parents have ongoing opportunities to visit in small groups and see classes in progress. These tours are not announced ahead of time, says Head of School Tim Hillen, which means prospective families are more likely to get an honest look at the school’s programs and operations. Hillen, a veteran administrator with over four decades of teaching and administrative experience, advises parents to check out classrooms, halls, the lunchroom and the bathroom to gauge their level of comfort with any campus. Parents visiting his school are encouraged to look into classrooms, ask questions and talk to students directly, he says.

approachable? Does the school seem to have a robust process for handling parent questions and concerns as well as student needs? Impressive facilities are nice. But at the end of the day, good communication and positive relationships among students,

teachers, parents and administrators may be more essential to your child’s success and happiness at school, something that is best observed in person. af Margaret Nicklas is an Austin-based freelance journalist, writer and mom.

Start Early. Start Right. Challenger School offers uniquely fun and academic classes for preschool to eighth grade students. Our students learn to think for themselves and to value independence. The results are unmatched at any price! Come see for yourself! Observe our classrooms any time— no appointment needed.

Visiting the campus of a prospective school will give you a view of the condition, quality, spaciousness and design of the physical space. It can show you how well equipped the school is in terms of its library, athletic programs, computing and technology support, art, drama and music. Just as important, it will give you an idea of how parents and students are treated and how communication may flow once your child is enrolled. This may be conveyed in attitude and action as well as in words. How are questions answered? Is dialogue encouraged? Are teachers and administrators

An independent private school offering preschool through eighth grade

Avery Ranch (512) 341-8000 15101 Avery Ranch Boulevard, Austin Pond Springs (512) 258-1299 13015 Pond Springs Road, Austin Round Rock (512) 255-8844 1521 Joyce Lane, Round Rock

I n s p i r i n g Ch i l d re n t o A c h i e v e S i n c e 1 9 6 3 © 2017, Challenger Schools. Challenger School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

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2017-2018 PRIVATE PRIVA VAT VA ATE SCHOOLS

Infantt - Ki Kindergarten ndergarten d rt

ACE ACADEMY 3901 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF SAINT MARY’S 910 San Jacinto, Austin CHALLENGER SCHOOL 15101 Avery Ranch Rd., Austin 1521 Joyce Ln., Round Rock 13015 Pond Springs Rd., Austin HILL COUNTRY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL of Austin 12124 RR 620 N., Austin HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC SCHOOL 9400 Neenah Ave., Austin HYDE PARK SCHOOLS 3901 Speedway, Austin JARDIN DE NINOS INTERLINGUA 8707 Mountain Crest Dr., Austin 2700 W. Anderson Ln., Austin 107 R.R. 620, Ste. 300, Lakeway ST. ANDREWS LOWER SCHOOL 1112 W. 31st ST. AUSTIN CATHOLIC SCHOOL 1911 San Antonio St., Austin ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 300 E. Huntland Dr., Austin ST. HELENS CATHOLIC SCHOOL 2700 E. University Ave., Georgetown ST. IGNATIUS, MARTYR CATHOLIC SCHOOL 120 W. Oltorf, Austin ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC SCHOOL 2114 St. Joseph, Austin ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL 520 Washburn St., Taylor ST. STEPHENS EPISCOPAL SCHOOL 6000 FM 3237, Wimberly ST. THERESA’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL 4311 Small Dr., Austin WAYA PRESCHOOL 1314 Exposition blvd., Austin

1stt - 5th 1

www.austingifted.org 512-206-4070 www.smcschoolaustin.org 512-476-1480 www.challengerschool.com 512-341-8000 512-255-8844 512-258-1299 www.hillcountrychristianschool.org 512-331-7036 www.holyfamilycs.org 512-246-4455 www.hp-schools.org 512-465-8344 www.austinbilingualschool.com 512-432-5317 512-299-5732 512-466-2409 www.sas.org 512-299-9800 www.staustinschool.org 512-477-3751 www.stfrancis-school.org 512-454-0848 www.shclions.org 512-869-3244 www.st-ignatius.org/school 512-442-8547 www.slcsaustin.org 512-614-6622 www.stmarystaylor.org 512-352-2313 www.ststeveschool.org 512-847-9857 www.st-theresa.org 512-451-7105 www.waya.org/preschool 512-475-2528

ACE ACADEMY CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF SAINT MARY’S CHALLENGER SCHOOL HILL COUNTRY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL of Austin HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC SCHOOL HYDE PARK SCHOOLS JARDIN DE NINOS INTERLINGUA ST. ANDREWS LOWER ST. AUSTIN CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL ST. HELENS CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. IGNATIUS, MARTYR CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. STEPHENS EPISCOPAL SCHOOL ST. THERESA’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL SANTA CRUZ CATHOLIC HIGH The Boys School of Austin 5206 Balcones Dr., Austin

see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K www.theboysschoolofaustin.org 512-553-2690

6th - 8th ACE ACADEMY CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF SAINT MARY’S CHALLENGER SCHOOL HILL COUNTRY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL of Austin HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC SCHOOL HYDE PARK SCHOOLS ST. ANDREWS MIDDLE ST. AUSTIN CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL ST. HELENS CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. IGNATIUS, MARTYR CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL ST. STEPHENS EPISCOPAL SCHOOL ST. THERESA’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL SANTA CRUZ CATHOLIC HIGH

see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K see listing in Inf - K

9th - 12th

SPECIAL NEEDS ACE ACADEMY 3901 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin LET IT SHINE www.austinchilddevelopment.com 3701 W. Slaughter Ln., Austin

www.austingifted.org 512-206-4070

512-948-3063

HILL COUNTRY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL of Austin HYDE PARK HIGH SCHOOL 11400 N. Mopac Expre. SAN JUAN DIEGO CATHOLIC SCHOOL 800 Herndon Ln., Austin SANTA CRUZ CATHOLIC HIGH 1110 Main St., Buda ST. DOMINIC SAVIO CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 9300 Neenah Ave., Austin

see listing in Inf - K www.hp-schools.org 512-465-8333 www.sjdchs.org 512-804-1935 www.sccstx.org 512-312-2137 www.saviochs.org 512-388-8846

CHARTER SCHOOL N.Y.O.S N .Y Y.O O.S S 12301 N N. Lamar, Lamar Austin

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www.nyos.org PreK PreK-12th 12th 512-583-6967

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Education Guide MONTESSORI PRESCHOOLS

BETHANY LUTHERAN FFINE INE A ARTS RTS A ACADEMY CADEMY 10010 Anderson Mill Rd, Austin BRIGHT HORIZONS 4613 Bee Caves Rd, West Lake Hills BRIGHT HORIZONS AT ROUND ROCK 7210 Wyoming Springs, Round Rock BRIGHT HORIZONS FAMILY CENTER 2411 W. Braker Ln., Austin BUTTERFLY GARDEN 207 Chisolm Tr., Round Rock 10802 Kit Carson Rd., Austin COUNTRY HOME LEARNING CENTER 1310 US Hwy 183 North, Austin 6900 Escarpment Blvd., Austin EXTEND-A-CARE FOR KIDS 77 area campuses FINE ARTS ACADEMY Allandale Avery Ranch KIDDIE ACADEMY OF PFLUGERVILLE 2617 Kelly Ln., Pflugerville KIDDIE ACADEMY OF CEDAR PARK 1602 Medical Pkwy., Cedar Park KIDDIE ACADEMY OF ROUND ROCK 5080 N. AW Grimes Blvd., Round Rock

LET IT SHINE 3701 W. Slaughter Ln., Austin SPICEWOOD COUNTRY SCHOOL 6102 Spicewood Springs Rd., Austin STEPPING STONE SCHOOLS Locations throughout Austin Metro

www. www bethany-umc.org/finearts bethhany umc org///fi finea 512-258-6017 www.brighthorizons.com/austinfamily17

512-640-1879 512-341-0733 512-833-7090 www.thebutterflygarden.net 512-636-1069 www.countryhomelearningcenter.com 512-331-1442 512-288-8220 www.eackids.org 512-472-9402 www.dancediscovery.com 512-419-7611 512-658-2996 www.kiddieacademy.com/pflugerville 512-270-9988 www.kiddieacademy.com/austin 512-920-3028 www.kiddieacademy.com/roundrock 512-270-9988 www.austinchilddevelopment.com 512-948-3063 www.spicewoodcountry.com 512-346-2992 www.steppingstoneschool.com 512-459-0258

RESOURCES AUSTIN LEARNING CENTER 3355 Bee Cave Rd., Suite 203, Austin Tutoring, SAT/ACT BRAIN BALANCE 3267 Bee Caves Rd., Suite 118, Austin 920 N. Vista Ridge Blvd. #600, Cedar Park ECOACADEMY FOCUS BEHAVIORAL ASSOCIATES 19019 TX-71 Spicewood, TX Applied Behavioral Analysis KIDSPA AUSTIN 5700 W. Slaughter Ln., Austin 10526 W. Parmer Ln., Austin Drop-in child care MOSAICS WEIGHTED BLANKETS 12741 Research Blvd., Austin Non-drug therapy for ADHD, ASD, SPD,

www.austinlearningcenter.com 512-330-9007 www.brainbalancecenters.com 512-328-7771 Behavioral issues www.ecoacademy.org www.focusbehavioral.com 512-646-9789 www.kidspaaustin.com 512-301-5772 512-828-5772 www.mosaicweightedblankets.com 512-567-8943 Anxiety or Insomnia

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ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS

ARMSTRONG G COMMUNITY COMMUNITY MUSIC MUSIC SCHOOL SCHOOL 404 Camp Craft Rd., Austin AUSTIN GIRLS CHOIR 3710 Cedar Street #215, Austin BITS, BYTES AND BOTS Austin area locations CAFÉ MONET 4700 W. Guadalupe, Austin 4477 S. Lamar Blvd., Austin CREATIVE BRICK BUILDERS 220 Sundance Pkwy, Round Rock DANCE DISCOVERY Allendale (Dance, Musical) Avery Ranch (Theatre) FUN2LEARN CODE Austin area locations GYMBOREE 4220 S. Lamar Blvd, #150, Austin 9333 Research Blvd., C-2, Austin 1335 E. Whitestone Blvd. #5120, Cedar Park HEARTSONG 2700 W. Anderson Ln., Austin JUMP GYMNASTICS 2919 Manchaca Rd., Austin 2117 Anderson Ln., Austin KIDSACTING Austin area locations MAD SCIENCE Austin & San Antonio locations MASTER GOHRING TAI CHI KUNG FU 6611 Airport Blvd., Austin NITRO SWIMMING 15506 Hwy 71, Bee Cave 1310 Toro Grande Blvd., Cedar Park SUNRISE NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH PROGRAM 4430 Manchaca Rd., Austin SYNERGY DANCE STUDIO 3425 Bee Cave Rd., Austin TexARTS 2300 Lohman’s Spur, Lakeway WAYA 1314 Exposition, Austin YMCA AUSTIN Travis, Hays & Bastrop Co locations YMCA WM. CO. Wm. Co locations

www www.acmsaustin.org acmsaustiin o 512-474-2331 www.girlschoir.com 512-453-0884 www.bbbcomputer.com 512-415-4120 www.cafemonet.org 512-906-2200 512-892-3200 www.creativebrickbuilders.com 512-388-9003 www.dancediscovery.com 512-419-7611 512-658-2996 www.fun2learncode.com 512-900-8380 www.gymboreeclasses.com 512-444-9626 512-451-8644 512-259-7529 www.heartsongmusic.net 512-371-9506 www.jump-austin.com 512-593-6226 www.kidsactingstudio.com 512-836-5437 www.austin.madscience.org 512-892-1143 www.mastergohring.com 512-879-7553 www.nitroswim.com 512-861-7946 512-259-7999 www.sunriseaustin.org 512-444-3326 www.synergydancestudio.com 512-327-4130 www.tex-arts.org 512-852-9079 www.waya.org 512-473-2528 www.austinymca.org 512-335-9622 www.ymcagwc.org 512-792-2697

COLLEGE CREDIT AUSTIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE Locations in Austin-metro area Earn college credit in high school

www.austincc.edu/startnow

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BY B E T T Y R I C H A R D S O N

Q

My husband and I have a one-month-old baby. By himself, my husband doesn’t quite earn enough to pay our bills. I can either to go back to work in two weeks, or he’ll have to take a second job. Recently, I read a review of the book Being There by Erica Komisar, which stresses the importance of mothers staying home with their children. Now I’m feeling guilty about going back to work, but worried that if my husband works two jobs, our baby won’t see much of him. What advice do you have?

A

I decided to read Being There before answering you. Komisar, a psychoanalyst, makes a strong case for being home with your children. She points to substantial research that confirms the more time a mother can devote to the first

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three years, the better the chance her child will be emotionally secure and healthy throughout his life. She cites a 2009 study by researchers at Bar-Ilan University about touch reducing the stress hormone cortisol. And she argues that no one can take a mother’s place because of the special bond between mother and child. As I read this book, I thought of all the people I’ve seen in therapy who had a stay-at-home mom but believe they have problems because of terrible mothering. I thought about the kids I’ve worked with who have severe behavioral problems at home and school and who also have a stay-athome mom. It’s really more about the mothering behaviors than just being at home with the child, isn’t it? Can you be a good mother if you return to work? In my opinion, it’s important for your child to feel loved, safe and cared for. It’s important to help your child accomplish developmental tasks and develop good social behavior. This can happen even if you decide to go back to work—provided you can find good child care and when you’re home, you’re nurturing and attentive to your child’s needs, as well as your own. There are good mothers who stay at home and good mothers who work. To get a better idea of what good

parenting is, think about googling “Parenting Classes in Austin” for you and your husband. Taking parenting classes will give you some good ideas about parenting and most probably increase your self-confidence in your style of parenting. I suggest you put aside your guilt about returning to work and focus on what will work best for your family. If you’re wanting to be home with your baby a little longer, perhaps you can look at options like returning to work part-time and gradually moving to fulltime, rather than abruptly moving to full-time work. Or maybe your husband can take on a bit more work while you take on part-time work. Or maybe you’ll need to return to work full-time as soon as possible. Look at your work options and your budget.

While Komisar is sold on the idea of moms staying home, she does recognize that some mothers need to work. To help the mother who goes to work, Komisar provides a great guide for interviewing prospective caregivers and suggestions for choosing a daycare. Komisar also provides many ideas for how to be present for your child. I suggest you read Being There with the mindset to take away what is helpful and will work for you, and dismiss what won’t work for you. af Betty Richardson, PhD, RNC, LPC, LMFT, is an Austin-based psychotherapist.

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BY B E T T Y R I C H A R D S O N

P

Mi marido y yo tenemos un bebé de un mes de edad. Por sí solo, mi marido no gana lo suficiente para pagar nuestras facturas. Puedo volver a trabajar en dos semanas, o él tendrá que tomar un segundo empleo. Recientemente, leí una reseña del libro “Being There” de Erica Komisar, que enfatiza la importancia de que las madres permanezcan en casa con sus hijos. Ahora me siento culpable por volver a trabajar, pero me preocupa que si mi marido trabaja dos empleos, nuestro bebé no lo verá mucho. ¿Qué consejo tiene?

R

Decidí leer “Being There” antes de responderte. Komisar, una psicoanalista, hace un fuerte argumento sobre el estar en casa con sus hijos. Ella señala la investigación sustancial que confirma que entre más tiempo una madre le puede dedicar a los primeros tres años, mejor será la

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posibilidad de que su hijo esté emocionalmente seguro y sano a lo largo de su vida. Ella cita un estudio del 2009 hecho por investigadores de la Universidad de Bar-llan sobre el tacto que reduce la hormona del estrés llamada cortisol. Y ella argumenta que nadie puede tomar el lugar de una madre debido al vínculo especial entre madre e hijo. Mientras leía este libro, pensé en todas las personas que he visto en terapia que tenían una mamá que se quedaba en casa, pero creen que tienen problemas debido al terrible cuidado maternal. Pensé en los niños con los que he trabajado, que tienen graves problemas de comportamiento en casa y en la escuela y que también tienen una mamá que se queda en casa. Realmente es más sobre el comportamiento del cuidado maternal que simplemente estar en casa con el niño, ¿no es así? ¿Puede ser una buena madre si regresa al trabajo? En mi opinión, es importante que su hijo se sienta amado, seguro y cuidado. Es importante ayudar a su hijo a realizar tareas de desarrollo y desarrollar un buen comportamiento social. Esto pude ocurrir incluso si usted decide regresar al trabajo, siempre y cuando pueda encontrar una buena niñera y cuando esté en casa, estar cuidando y atenta a las necesidades de su hijo, así como las suyas. Hay buenas madres que se quedan en casa y buenas madres que trabajan. Para tener una mejor idea de lo que es la

buena crianza de los hijos, piense en googlear “Clases de crianza en Austin” para usted y su esposo. Al tomar clases de crianza le dará algunas buenas ideas acerca de la crianza de los hijos y lo más probable es que aumentará la confianza en sí mismo en su estilo de criar a sus hijos. Le sugiero que deje a un lado su culpa acerca de volver al trabajo y enfóquese en lo que va a funcionar mejor para su familia. Si desea estar en casa con su bebé un poco más de tiempo, tal vez puede ver opciones como volver a trabajar a medio tiempo y gradualmente moverse a tiempo complete, en lugar de entrar bruscamente a trabajar a tiempo completo. O tal vez su marido puede asumir un poco más de trabajo mientras usted toma un trabajo a medio tiempo. O tal vez tendrá que volver a trabajar a tiempo completo tan pronto como le sea posible. Mire sus opciones de trabajo y su presupuesto. Mientras Komisar está convencida en la idea de que las madres se quedan en casa, ella reconoce que algunas madres necesitan trabajar. Para ayudar a la madre que va a trabajar, Komisar proporciona una gran guía para entrevistar a posibles niñeras y sugerencias para elegir una guardería. Komisar también proporciona muchas ideas sobre cómo estar presente para su hijo. Le sugiero que lea “Being There” con la mentalidad de tomar lo que es útil y que trabaje para usted, y descartar lo que no funciona para usted. af Betty Richardson, PhD, RNC, LPC, LMFT, es una psicoterapeuta situada en Austin

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Apps and Wearables BY R I C H A R D S I N G L E TO N

Take Parenting to NEW LEVELS

The level of creativity and technological sophistication of emerging adults boggles the imagination. There’s no frontier that isn’t being reshaped by the innovative and intriguing implementation of new apps and devices. To call it a revolution would be an understatement. Really, it’s becoming part of the evolving experience of what it means to be a human in the modern era.

Pregnancy, y for example. It’s where we y, all get our start. But, as you might imagine, the modern experience of pregnancy is radically changing. For generation after generation, having a baby was disconnected from technology. Only recently in human history did modern medicine start to shape the way we plan for bringing new life into the world. Now, from before conception and onward, new arrivals are prepared for in ways that could have never been imagined, just few decades ago. And, over the past few years the pace of progress has raced even faster. Enter the world of parenting apps.

Many of us may remember the early days of the Baby Einstein products. Started back in 1996, just a few years before my daughter was born, the first wave of educational VHS tapes for kids emerged. Yep, VHS. Are you laughing or crying right now?!

Times have changed. Fast forward 20 years. We’ve blissfully moved on from tapes, CDs and such to the world of apps. At the basic level, music apps apps the baby growing in mum’s tummy for th are a big hit. They come with funny names like Ritmo, Bellybuds, name Lullabelly and Sound Beginnings. Lulla But, we’ve been jamming out for our kids-to-be for ages. What else is on kidsthe modern m menu as the next gene generation of babies are rocking out to their gestational grooves? Well, after baby hears one too many onehit-wonders streaming into their ever-shrinking cocoon, at some point, they’re going to want to make their grand debut. And there’s an app for that. Bloomlife is a revolutionary app that monitors contractions – even the ones that might go unnoticed. Featured on ABC, CNN, WhattoExpect.com and beyond, this first of its kind wearable is an award-winning indication of where things might be headed for the future. Bloomlife helps you navigate to the big event. What next? Well, there’s no app for that. There are some for right after, though. It’s not too long after the blessed arrival when you start to realize that “this thing’s a machine” – a diaper destroying machine, that is! We all know parenting is a 24/7 adventure. No app can parent for us, but when

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technology, like TweetPee from Huggies, is able to help us monitor wet diapers, we might as well be willing to listen. Some diapers speak for themselves! No app needed! Sleep is serious business for new parents and babies. So, apps that monitor baby’s sleep so that mom and dad can get some shut-eye themselves are nice options to explore. Angelcare, iBabyGuard and Sensible Baby’s Smart One have various levels of monitoring and sophistication for tracking baby’s nightly noddings.

neighborhood sitters. So, take a break. You deserve it. As you might expect, we’re only skimming the surface of what’s available in the world of baby-to-be and baby tech. If you can imagine it, there’s likely someone providing that service. Be creative, seek out

solutions and enter an exciting new world of options. What an adventure awaits you and your baby! af Richard Singleton, MACE, MAMFC, LPC, is the executive director at STARRY in Round Rock.

INFANTS ∙ TODDLERS ∙ PRESCHOOL BEFORE & AF TER SCHOOL ∙ SUMMER CAMP

Babies wake up at strange hours, and when they’re awake it’s often because they’re hungry. When you’re exhausted, it’s easy to forget what you were trying to remember about baby’s last frenetic feast. Apps like Lansinoh Baby help track feedings, so when you’re groggy and baby is hungry, the details you need are easily accessible. As babies grow, they’re naturally going to experience the ups and downs of germs, viruses and just plain old ickiness of life. Owlet is a nifty little sock that baby can wear to measure heart rate and oxygen levels. So, when baby isn’t feeling well and you want some reassurance that his or her vitals are doing just fine, you have some solace that your underthe-weather little one is a fabulous little germ assassin. Finally, after all the hard work of carrying, delivering and caring for baby, at some point you’re going to want a night out. No doubt you have an army of friends and family to help in that regard, but in today’s busy world, even they are sometimes spoken for. An app like Bambino might be just the answer. Bambino can help you find, book and even pay trusted

Curiosity-Launching Learning Experiences Kiddie Academy® has the teachers, tools and inspiration it takes to nurture oversized confidence and big ideas. It’s all part of becoming an amazing adult, and begins with our Life Essentials® philosophy.

Kiddie Academy ® of Pflugerville 2617 Kelly Lane Pflugerville, TX 78660 512-989-7777

Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

Kiddie Academy ® of Cedar Park 1602 Medical Parkway Cedar Park, TX 78613 512-986-7355

Kiddie Academy ® of Round Rock 5080 North AW Grimes Blvd. Round Rock, TX 78665 512-270-9988

®

kiddieacademy.com/austin

October 2017 austinfamily.com

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October Halloween Events are Shaded Museum Exhibits pg 32

C O M P I L E D BY B E T T Y K E M P E R

Family Events pg 32

Museum Exhibits 50 Years of Public Broadcasting

Through Nov. 12. LBJ Presidential Library, 2313 Red River St. lbjlibrary.org or 512-721-0200.

Merci, Texas

Through Dec. 31. Texas Capitol Visitors Center, 1100 Congress Ave. tspb.state.tx.us or 512-463-4630.

American Spirits

Through Jan. 7. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com or 512-936-8746.

Austin at Mid-Century

Through Jan. 14. Austin History Center, 810 Guadalupe St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7480.

Pong to Pokémon

Through Mar. 18. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com or 512-936-8746.

Family Events SUNDAY 1

Fall Festival and Corn Maze ++

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. $14. bartonhillfarms.com.

Rosita y Conchita in English and Spanish ++

11 a.m. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. $8 child and $12 adult. scottishritetheater.org.

Free Skate Lessons ++

11 to 11:45 a.m. Playland Skate Center, 8822 McCann Dr, Austin. $8 skate rental. playlandskatecenter.com or 512-452-1901.

Free First Sundays

12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. FREE. thestoryoftexas.com or 512-936-8746.

Harvest Fest

1 to 4 p.m. Heritage House Museum, 901 Old Austin-Hutto Rd., Pflugerville. FREE. library.pflugervilletx.gov.

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Sunday Funday

Parenting Events pg 38

1 to 4 p.m. Neill-Cochran House Museum, 2310 San Gabriel St. FREE. nchmuseum.org or 512-478-2335.

Pumpkin Hunt ++

1 to 5 p.m. Evergreen Farms, 242 Monkey Rd., Elgin. FREE. evergreen-farms.com or 512-281-4833.

Courthouse Tours ++

1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Williamson Museum, 716 S. Austin Ave., Georgetown. FREE. williamsonmuseum.org or 512-943-1670.

Bluegrass Jam!

2 to 4 p.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad, Leander. FREE. leandertx.gov or 512-259-5259.

MONDAY 2

A Moon of My Own ++

9:30 and 11:30 a.m. Rollins Studio Theatre at the Long Center, 701 W. Riverside Drive. $6. pollytheatre.org or 512-743-7966.

TUESDAY 3 Family Flicks

4 p.m. Lake Travis Library, 1938 Lohmans Crossing. FREE. laketravislibrary.org or 512-263-2885.

Family Nights ++

6 to 7 p.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. FREE. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

Adulting for Teens

6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Round Rock Library, 216 E. Main St., Round Rock. FREE. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-7012.

National Night Out Austin

7 to 9 p.m. All over Austin. FREE. austintexas.gov/nno.

WEDNESDAY 4 Sprouts ++

10 to 11 a.m. Johnson Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse Ave. FREE with admission. wildflower.org or 512-232-0100.

Story Times pg 39

Community Night ++

5 to 8 p.m. The Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. By donation. thinkeryaustin.org or 512-469-6218.

Arts and Crafts ++

6 p.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr, Austin. FREE. wblibrary.org or 512-789-3188.

Austin Barn Dancers ++

7:30 to 9:45 p.m. Hancock Rec Center, 811 E. 41st St. FREE. austinbarndancers.org or 512-453-4225.

THURSDAY 5

Living History Days

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. FREE with pre-registration. thestoryoftexas.com or 512-936-8746.

Fall Festival

5 to 8 p.m. Elgin Library, 404 N. Main St., Elgin. FREE. elgintx.com.

First Thursday Austin

5 to 8 p.m. Downtown Austin. FREE. firstthursdayaustin.com.

Starry Nights

5:30 to 7 p.m. Girlstart, 1400 W. Anderson Ln. FREE. girlstart.org or 512-916-4775. CONTINUING: A Moon of My Own see Monday 2.

FRIDAY 6

October Farm Fun ++

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature's Way, Elgin. $7. elginchristmastreefarm.com or 512-281-5016.

Chalk Walk

10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Centennial Plaza, 301 W. Bagdad St., Round Rock. FREE. roundrockarts.org.

First Friday Art Walk

5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Downtown Bastrop. FREE. domorebastrop.com.

First Friday on the Square

6 to 8 p.m. Downtown Georgetown. FREE. visit.georgetown.org.

Submit Your Event Visit austinfamily.com and click “Submit your event.” The deadline is the 5th of the month preceding the month of the event. If your event charges more than $15, send details to kaye2003@austinfamily.com for approval. View the magazine online at austinfamily.com

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Taylor, the Unforgettable

WildFest

Boo at the Zoo ++

Sculpture Garden Festival

6 to 8 p.m. The Williamson Museum, 716 S. Austin Ave, Georgetown. FREE. williamsonmuseum.org or 512-943-1670.

6:30 to 9 p.m. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Tr. $17.50. austinzoo.org.

Music in the Park

7 to 10 p.m. Milburn Park, 1901 Sun Chase Blvd., Cedar Park. FREE. cedarparktexas.gov.

Star Party ++

9 p.m. Texas Museum of Science and Technology, 1220 Toro Grande Dr., Cedar Park. FREE. txmost.org or 512-961-5333. CONTINUING: Sprouts see Wednesday 4.

SATURDAY 7

Round Rock Market Days

8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Central Plaza, 301 W. Bagdad, Round Rock. FREE. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-924-2327.

Texas Teen Book Festival

8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. St. Edward's University, 3001 S. Congress Ave. FREE. texasteenbookfestival.org.

Madrone Canyon Hike

8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Laura's Library, 9411 Bee Cave Rd. FREE. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Brushy Creek Lake Park, 3300 Brushy Creek Rd., Cedar Park. FREE. allthingswildrehab.org or 650-520-6534. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lions Foundation Park, 355 Loop 332, Liberty Hill. FREE. lhsculptures.com or 512-470-1326.

Monthly Book Sale

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pleasant Hill Branch Library, 211 E. William Cannon Dr. FREE. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3940.

Pumpkin Hunt ++

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Evergreen Farms, 242 Monkey Rd., Elgin. FREE. evergreen-farms.com or 512-281-4833.

October Farm Fun

10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature's Way, Elgin. $7. elginchristmastreefarm.com or 512-281-5016.

Fall Festival and Corn Maze ++

10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 Farm to Market 969, Bastrop. $14. bartonhillfarms.com.

First Saturday at the Carver

12 p.m. Carver Museum and Cultural Center, 1165 Angelina St. FREE. austintexas.gov.

Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

Giant Chess ++

12:30 to 3 p.m. Wooldridge Square Park, 900 Guadalupe St. FREE. giantchess.org.

Williamson Co. Symphony Orchestra

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Hill Country Bible Church, 12124 Ranch Rd. 620 N. FREE. wilcosymphony.org or 512-789-5073. CONTINUING: Courthouse Tours see Sunday 1; Boo at the Zoo see Friday 6; Chalk Walk see Friday 6; October Fall Fun see Friday 6.

SUNDAY 8 Family Days

12 to 4 p.m. Umlauf Sculpture Garden, 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. FREE. mlaufsculpture.org.

October Farm Fun

12 to 5:30 p.m. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature's Way, Elgin. $7. elginchristmastreefarm.com or 512-281-5016.

Concerts in the Park

7 to 10 p.m. Milburn Park, 1901 Sun Chase Blvd., Cedar Park. FREE. cedarparktexas.gov or 512-401-5528. CONTINUING: Courthouse Tours see Sunday 1; Fall Festival and Corn Maze see Sunday 1; Free Skate Lessons see Sunday 1; Pumpkin Hunt see Sunday 1; Rosita y Conchita see Sunday 1; October Fall Fun see Friday 6.

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MONDAY 9

SATURDAY 14

CONTINUING: Family Nights see Tuesday 3; October Farm Fun see Friday 6.

Guided Hikes

CONTINUING: October Fall Fun see Friday 6; October Farm Fun see Friday 6.

TUESDAY 10

WEDNESDAY 11

CONTINUING: Arts and Crafts see Wednesday 4; Austin Barn Dancers see Wednesday 4; Community Night see Wednesday 4; October Fall Fun see Friday 6; Sprouts see Wednesday 4.

THURSDAY 12

Sip, Shop and Stroll

5 to 8 p.m. Downtown Elgin. FREE. elgintx.com or 512-229-3213. CONTINUING: October Fall Fun see Friday 6; October Farm Fun see Friday 6.

FRIDAY 13

Ghost Tours on The Square

7:30, 8, 8:30 and 9 p.m. Williamson Museum, 716 S. Austin Ave., Georgetown. $15. williamsonmuseum.org or 512-943-1670.

Haunted Halloween Trails ++

7 to 11 p.m. Pioneer Farms, 10621 Pioneer Farms Dr. $15. pioneerfarms.org or 512-837-1215. CONTINUING: Sprouts see Wednesday 4; Boo at the Zoo see Friday 6; October Farm Fun see Friday 6; Star Party see Friday 6.

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

Fort Croghan Day

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Old Fort Croghan, 703 Buchanan Dr., Burnet. FREE. fortcroghan.org or 512-756-8281.

9 to 11 a.m. Bright Leaf Preserve, 2222 and Creek Mountain Rd. brightleaf.org or 512-459-7269.

Market Days on the Square

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Downtown Georgetown. FREE. thegeorgetownsquare.com.

Walk with a Doc

9 to 10:30 a.m. San Gabriel Park, 445 E. Morrow St., Georgetown. FREE.

Hands on History

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Williamson Museum, 716 S. Austin Ave., Georgetown. FREE. williamsonmuseum.org or 512-943-1670.

Doll Show and Sale

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Williamson Conference Center, 1209 N. IH-35, Round Rock. $6 adults; $2 children under 12. austindollshow.com or 512-323-9639.

Pumpkin Festival ++

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature's Way, Elgin. $7 to $9. elginchristmastreefarm.com or 512-281-5016.

Oktoberfest

11 a.m. to 7 p.m. German Free School Building, 507 E. 10th St. $10 adults at gate.

Second Saturdays

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Laguna Gloria, 3809 W. 35th St. FREE with registration. thecontemporaryaustin.org or 512-458-8191.

Extol Skate Jam

12 to 4 p.m. North East Metro Park, 15500 Sun Light Way, Pflugerville. FREE. extolskatejam.com.

Rosita y Conchita in English and Spanish ++

11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. $8 child and $12 adult. scottishritetheater.org.

Diwali Festival of Lights

5 to 12 p.m. 400 Barsana Rd. FREE. radhamadavdha.org. CONTINUING: Courthouse Tours see Sunday 1; Boo at the Zoo see Friday 6; October Fall Fun see Friday 6; Pumpkin Hunt see Saturday 7; Fall Festival and Corn Maze see Saturday 7; Giant Chess see Saturday 7; Haunted Halloween Trails see Friday 13.

SUNDAY 15

Diego and Frida

12 to 5 p.m. Mexic-Arte Museum, 419 Congress Ave. FREE. mexic-artmuseum.org.

Pumpkin Festival ++

12 to 5:30 p.m. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature's Way, Elgin. $7 to $9. elginchristmastreefarm.com or 512-281-5016.

View the magazine online at austinfamily.com

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Pumpkin Carving/Painting

6 to 8 p.m. Fleming Center, 802 N. Ave. C, Elgin. FREE. elgintx.com. CONTINUING: Courthouse Tours see Sunday 1; Fall Festival and Corn Maze see Sunday 1; Free Skate Lessons see Sunday 1; October Fall Pumpkin Hunt see Sunday 1; Rosita y Conchita see Saturday 14.

MONDAY 16

October Fall Fun ++

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature's Way, Elgin. $7. elginchristmastreefarm.com or 512-281-5016. CONTINUING: October Fall Fun see Friday 6.

TUESDAY 17

CONTINUING: Family Nights see Tuesday 3; October Fall Fun see Monday 16.

WEDNESDAY 18

CONTINUING: Arts and Crafts see Wednesday 4; Austin Barn Dancers see Wednesday 4; Community Night see Wednesday 4; Sprouts see Wednesday 4; October Fall Fun see Monday 16.

THURSDAY 19 Third Thursdays

10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Blanton Museum of Art, 200 E. MLK Blvd. FREE. blantonmuseum.org or 512-471-5482.

Movies in the Park: Death Becomes Her (PG-13)

7:15 p.m. Pan Am Park, 2100 E. 3rd St. FREE. bit.ly/2kTTmh6. CONTINUING: October Fall Fun see Monday 16.

FRIDAY 20

Wait Until Dark ++

7:30 a.m. TexARTS Theatre, 2300 Lohmans Spur. From $40. tex-arts.org.

Gem Capers

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Palmer Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Rd. $8 adults, $2 ages 13-18. agms-tx.org or 512-458-9546. CONTINUING: Sprouts see Wednesday 4; Star Party see Friday 6; Boo at the Zoo see Friday 6; Haunted Halloween Trails see Friday 13; October Fall Fun see Monday 16.

SATURDAY 21 Pet Fest

7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Plaza Pavilion Park, San Marcos. FREE. preventalitter.com.

Halloween at Twin Lakes

3 to 8 p.m. YMCA, 204 E. Little Elm Tr., Cedar Park. FREE. ymcagwc.org.

Touch a Truck

9 a.m. to noon. Old Settlers Park, 3300 E. Palm Valley Rd., Round Rock. FREE. Canned food donations encouraged. roundrocktexas.gov.

Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

Austin Arbor Day

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Austin Nature Science Center, 2389 Stratford Dr. FREE. austintexas.gov.

Hairy Man Spooky Fest

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Brushy Creek Park, 8600 O’Connor Dr., Round Rock. $2 or two nonperishable food items. bcmud.org.

Pfall Chili Pfest

12 to 5 p.m. 100 E. Main St., Pflugerville. FREE. pfallchilipfest.com.

Trunk or Treat for Special Needs

5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Seton Medical Center, 201 Seton Pkwy., Round Rock. FREE. roundrocktexas.gov.

Eagle Fest

3 to 6 p.m. Summit Elementary, 12207 Brigadoon Ln. FREE; activity tickets for purchase. summitteagles.org. CONTINUING: Courthouse Tours see Sunday 1; Boo at the Zoo see Friday 6; October Fall Fun see Friday 6; Fall Festival and Corn Maze see Saturday 7; Pumpkin Hunt see Saturday 7; Giant Chess see Saturday 7; Haunted Halloween Trails see Friday 13; Pumpkin Festival see Saturday 14; Wait Until Dark see Friday 20; Gem Capers see Friday 20.

SUNDAY 22 Buddy Walk

12 to 4 p.m. Union Ranch, Georgetown. ds-stride.org/dsactbuddywalk.

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CONTINUING: Pumpkin Hunt see Sunday 1; Courthouse Tours see Sunday 1; Fall Festival and Corn Maze see Sunday 1; Free Skate Lessons see Sunday 1; October Fall Fun see Friday 6; Rosita y Conchita see Saturday 14; Pumpkin Festival see Sunday 15; Wait Until Dark see Friday 20; Gem Capers see Friday 20;

MONDAY 23

CONTINUING: October Fall Fun see Monday 16.

TUESDAY 24

Book Character Pumpkin Decorating Contest ++

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Round Rock Library, 216 E. Main St., Round Rock. FREE. roundrocktexas.gov.

Gymb-O-Ween Costume Party

2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Gymboree Play & Music, 1335 E. Whitestone Blvd., St. #S120, Cedar Park, FREE for members, $10 nonmembers 512-259-7529 CONTINUING: Family Nights see Tuesday 3; October Fall Fun see Monday 16.

WEDNESDAY 25

Gymb-O-Ween Costume Party

3 to 5 p.m., Gymboree Play & Music, 4220 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 150, FREE for members, $10 nonmembers 512-444-9626

Gymb-O-Ween Costume Party

3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Gymboree Play & Music, 9333 Research Blvd., Suite C-240, FREE for members, $10 nonmembers.

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

CONTINUING: Arts and Crafts see Wednesday 4; Austin Barn Dancers see Wednesday 4; Sprouts see Wednesday 4; Community Night see Wednesday 4; October Fall Fun see Monday 16; Book Character Pumpkin Decorating Contest see Tuesday 24

Book Character Pumpkin Decorating Contest see Tuesday 24; Wait Until Dark see Thursday 26.

THURSDAY 26

Breakout! Monster Mash

4:30 p.m. Round Rock Library, 216 E. Main St., Round Rock. FREE. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-7034.

Culture Nights

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. AGE Cafeteria, 3710 Cedar St. FREE. austinpowwow.net.

Wait Until Dark ++

7:30 p.m. TexARTS Theatre, 2300 Lohmans Spur. From $40. tex-arts.org. CONTINUING: October Fall Fun see Monday 16; Book Character Pumpkin Decorating Contest see Tuesday 24.

FRIDAY 27 Spooktacular

5 to 8 p.m. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. FREE. thestoryoftexas.org.

Mueller Fall Concert

7 p.m. Mueller Park Amphitheater, Philomena and Robert Browning St. FREE. muelleraustinonline.com. CONTINUING: Sprouts see Wednesday 4; Star Party see Friday 6; Boo at the Zoo see Friday 6; Haunted Halloween Trails see Friday 13; October Fall Fun see Monday 16;

SATURDAY 28 Barktoberfest

8 a.m. Brushy Creek Lake Park, 909 S. Bagdad Rd., Cedar Park. FREE. centraltexasspca.org or 512-260-SPCA.

4th Flea

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Price Center, 222 W. San Antonio St., San Marcos. FREE. 512-392-2900.

Invent it. Build it.

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Austin Convention Center, 500 E. Cesar Chavez St. $7. societyofwomenengineers.swe.org or 877-793-4636.

Spooktoberfest

9 a.m. Austin State Supported Living Center, 200 Lavaca St. FREE. austinspooktober.org.

Viva la Vida Festival and Parade

12 to 8 p.m. Mexic-Arte Museum, 100-200 E. 4th St., FREE. mexic-rtemuseumevents.org.

Arts and Crafts Festival

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cedar Park Rec Center,

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1435 Main St., Cedar Park. FREE. cedarparktexas.gov or 512-401-5528.

Fall Folly

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 4622 S. Lamar Blvd. FREE. holycrossatx.org or 512-892-0516.

Grand Opening

10 a.m. New Central Library, 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. FREE. library.austintexas.gov.

Halloween Costume Day

10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Catch Air, 13450 US-183. Regular admission. catchair.com.

Hogeye Festival

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 109 Depot St., Elgin. FREE. elgintx.com.

Health Awareness and Music Festival

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Givens Park, 3811 E. 12th. FREE.

October Fall Fun

10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature's Way, Elgin. $7. elginchristmastreefarm.com or 512-281-5016.

Fable Fest

11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Elizabeth Milburn Park, 1901 Sun Chase Blvd., Cedar Park. FREE. cedarparkbooks.org or 512-401-5630.

Dia de los Muertos

2 to 3:30 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512 990-6375.

Halloween at the Y

Boo Bash

Dia de los Muertos

October Fall Fun

2 to 9 p.m. Dell Diamond, 3400 E. Palm Valley Blvd., Round Rock. $9. ymcagwc.org. 2 to 10 p.m. Centennial Plaza, 301 W. Bagdad St. roundrockballetfolklorico.org or 512 659 5667.

Halloween Carnival

3:30 to 6 p.m. Pan Am Rec Center, 2100 E. 3rd St. FREE. austintexas.gov or 512-978-2425.

Dolphin Fest

12 to 5 p.m. Davis Elementary, 5214 Duval Rd., FREE. Activity tickets separate. davisdolphins.net.

Fall Family Fun Fest

1 to 5 p.m. Pavilion at Great Hills, 11819 Pavilion Blvd. FREE. intergenerationalday.org. CONTINUING: Courthouse Tours see Sunday 1; Boo at the Zoo see Friday 6; October Fall Fun see Friday 6; Pumpkin Hunt see Saturday 7; Fall Festival and Corn Maze see Saturday 7; Giant Chess see Saturday 7; Haunted Halloween Trails see Friday 13; Rosita y Conchita see Saturday 14; "Not Afraid of the Dark" see Saturday 21; Book Character Pumpkin Decorating Contest see Tuesday 24; Wait Until Dark see Thursday 26.

Noon to 4 p.m. Downtown Georgetown. FREE. thegeorgetownsquare.com.

12 to 5:30 p.m. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature's Way, Elgin. $7. elginchristmastreefarm.com or 512-281-5016.

Halloween Children's Concert

1 and 4 p.m. AISD Performing Arts Center, 1500 Barbara Jordan Blvd. $14 and up. austinsymphony.org.

Movie Matinee: Spiderman Homecoming (PG-13)

2 p.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. library.pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

SUNDAY 29

Last Straw Fest

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Umlauf Sculpture Garden, 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. FREE. umlaufsculpture.org or 512-445-5582.

Pick us up at HEB, Whole Foods and Central Market

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Spooktacular Halloween Event

CONTINUING: Courthouse Tours see Sunday 1; Fall Festival and Corn Maze see Sunday 1; Free Skate Lessons see Sunday 1; Kids Chess Open Play see Sunday 1; Pumpkin Hunt see Sunday 1; October Fall Fun see Friday 6; Rosita y Conchita see Saturday 14; Book Character Pumpkin Decorating Contest see Tuesday 24; Wait Until Dark see Thursday 26.

MONDAY 30

CONTINUING: October Fall Fun see Monday 16; Book Character Pumpkin Decorating Contest see Tuesday 24.

TUESDAY 31

Fall Fun Festival

9 to 11:30 a.m. Old Settlers Park, 3300 E. Palm Valley Blvd., Round Rock. 2 canned food donation. roundrocktexas.gov.

Hometown Halloween Festival

3 p.m. Downtown Round Rock, 221 E. Main St., Round Rock. FREE. downtownroundrocktexas.com or 512-218-5447.

6 to 8 p.m. Heritage Square, Downtown Taylor. FREE. ci.taylor.tx.us. CONTINUING: Family Nights see Tuesday 3; October Fall Fun see Monday 16; Book Character Pumpkin Decorating Contest see Tuesday 24.

Parenting Events Any Baby Can offers free parenting classes in English and Spanish and a postpartum support group. 6207 Sheridan Ave. FREE. anybabycan.org or 512-454-3743.

Bridges to Growth offers early childhood parenting classes. 805 W. University Ave., Georgetown. georgetownproject.org or 512-864-3008.

The City of Austin offers free car seat checks and Safe Baby Academy classes. Appointments and reservations are required. Email mspubed@austintexas.gov or call 512-972-SAFE (7233).

La Leche League of Central Texas hosts regular meetings in addition to play dates and gatherings. All breastfeeding mothers, babies and mothers-to-be are welcome to attend. texaslll.org.

YMCA offers a free Childhood Obesity Intervention Program. austinymca.org or 512-236-9622.

SUNDAY 1

Austin School Expo: North

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 1420 Toro Grande Blvd., Cedar Park. FREE. austinschoolexpo.com or 512-815-3161.

Austin School Expo: South

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 2100 E 3rd St. FREE. austinschoolexpo.com or 512-815-3161.

FRIDAY 6

Kinder Info Session

9:30 a.m. St. Andrews, 1112 W. 31st St. FREE with registration. sasaustin.org or 512-299-9800.

WEDNESDAY 11 K-8 Open House

10 a.m. The Girls' School, 2007 McCall. FREE. thegirlsschool.org or 512-478-7827.

FRIDAY 13

Special Needs Support Group

2 p.m. Elgin Library, 404 N. Main, Elgin. FREE. elgintx.com or 737-247-8142.

THURSDAY 19 Open House

9 a.m. St. Francis School, 300 E. Huntland Dr. FREE. www.stfrancis-school.org or 512-225-1834.

Open House

5:30 p.m. Griffin School, 5001 Evans Ave. FREE with registration. www.griffinschool.org or 512-454-5797.

K-12 Preview Event

6:30 p.m. Regents School, 3230 Travis Country Circle. FREE with registration. regents-austin.com or 512-899-8095.

SATURDAY 21 HOPE Seminar

8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Austin Stone, 1150 McNeil Rd., Round Rock. FREE. rmhc-ctx.org or 512-472-9844.

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

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Admissions Event

Family Storytime

Toddler Storytime

Admissions Event

Evening Storytime

Preschool Storytime

9 a.m. Headwaters School, 9607 Brodie Ln. FREE. headwaters.org or 512-804-2708.

10 a.m. Headwaters School, 6305 Manchaca Rd. FREE. headwaters.org or 512-443-8843.

WEDNESDAY 25 K-8 Open House

10 a.m. The Girls' School, 2007 McCall. FREE. thegirlsschool.org or 512-478-7827.

Story Times Contact your local library for more information about times and ages.

MONDAYS

Libraries closed Oct. 9

Terrific Toddlers Story Time

9:30 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd. leandertx.gov or 512-259-5259.

Baby Time

10 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

Infant Storytime

10:30 a.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

Baby Story Time

10:30 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188.

Preschool Story Time

10:30 a.m. Lake Travis Library, 1938 Lohman's Crossing. laketravislibrary.org or 512-263-2885.

Baby Time

11 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

Toddler Storytime

11:15 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188.

12:30 p.m. Laura’s Library, 9411 Bee Cave Rd. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045. 6:30 p.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

TUESDAYS Baby and Me

9:15 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd. leandertx.gov or 512-255-2569.

Children’s Story Time

9:30 a.m. Dripping Springs Library, 501 Sportsplex Dr. dscl.org or 512-858-7825.

Baby Bounce

9:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551.

Toddler Storytime

9:45 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov.

Lapsit Storytime

9:45 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. FREE. cedarparktexas.gov.

Bilingual Story Time

10 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

Toddler Time

10 a.m. San Marcos Library, 625 E. Hopkins St. sanmarcostx.gov or 512-393-8200.

All Ages Storytime

10:15 a.m. Pleasant Hill Branch, 211 E. William Cannon Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3940.

All Ages Storytime

10:15 a.m. Carver Branch, 1161 Angelina St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-1010.

Toddler Storytime

10:15 a.m. Spicewood Springs Branch, 8637 Spicewood Springs Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3800.

Toddler Storytime

10:15 a.m. Hampton Branch, 5125 Convict Hill. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9900.

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10:30 a.m. Buda Library, 303 Main. budalibrary.org or 512-295-5899.

10:30 a.m. Elgin Library, 404 N. Main St. elginpubliclibrary.org or 512-281-5678.

Bilingual Storytime

10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Preschool Storytime

10:30 a.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

Spanish Dual Language Storytime

10:30 a.m. 1105 E. Cesar Chavez. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3625.

Toddler Storytime

10:30 a.m. 1938 Lohman's Crossing. laketravislibrary.org or 512-263-2885.

Lapsit Storytime

10:45 a.m. Elgin Library, 404 N. Main St. elginpubliclibrary.org or 512-281-5678.

Bilingual Story Time

11 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

Hora de Cuentos en Español

11 a.m. North Village Branch, 2505 Steck Ave. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9960.

Preschool Storytime

11 a.m. 8637 Spicewood Springs Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-3800.

Preschool Storytime

11 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov.

Preschool Storytime

11 a.m. Hampton Branch, 5125 Convict Hill. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9900.

Preschool Time

11 a.m. San Marcos Library, 625 E. Hopkins St. sanmarcostx.gov or 512-393-8200.

Sensory Storytime

11:15 a.m. Carver Branch, 1161 Angelina St. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-1010.

October 2017 austinfamily.com

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Homeschool Storytime

Now Enrolling for 2017-18 Act Stage Film

Dance Ballet Tap Jazz Hip Hop and more!

Sing Group Solo

Enroll Today! tex-arts.org 512-852-9079 x104

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

All Ages Storytime

1:30 p.m. Buda Library, 303 Main. budalibrary.org or 512-295-5899.

10:15 a.m. Howson Branch, 2500 Exposition. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8800.

Storytime and Craft

10:15 a.m. St. John Branch, 7500 Blessing. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7570.

Family Storytime

6 p.m. Buda Library, 303 Main. budalibrary.org or 512-295-5899.

6:30 p.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188.

WEDNESDAYS Babytime

9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Toddlertime

9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Preschool Story Time & More

9:30 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd., leandertx.gov or 512-255-2569.

Tales for Tots

9:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551.

Children’s Story Time

10 a.m. Dripping Springs Library, 501 Sportsplex Dr. dscl.org or 512-858-7825.

Spanish Dual Language Storytime Baby Story Time

10:30 a.m. 1938 Lohman's Crossing. laketravislibrary.org or 512-263-2885.

Preschool Storytime

10:30 a.m. Buda Library, 303 Main. budalibrary.org or 512-295-5899.

Preschool Storytime

10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Preschool Storytime

10:30 a.m. 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551.

Preschool Express

10:30 a.m. Kyle Library, 550 Scott St. cityofkyle.com or 512-268-7411.

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Toddler Storytime

10:15 a.m. Milwood Branch, 12500 Amherst Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9880.

Toddler Storytime

10:15 a.m. Hampton Branch, 5125 Convict Hill. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9900.

Tot Time

10:30 a.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

Toddlertime

10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

All Ages Storytime

11 a.m. 5500 Manchaca Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8700.

All Ages Storytime

11 a.m. 651 N. Pleasant Valley Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7372.

All Ages Storytime

11 a.m. 4721 Loyola Ln. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9940.

All Ages Storytime

2 p.m. 3101 Oak Springs Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9920.

Spanish Dual Language Storytime

2:15 p.m. 211 E. Wm Cannon Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-4940.

Bow Wow Reading

3:30 p.m. 2505 Steck Ave. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9960.

Arts and Crafts

6 p.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-789-3188.

Pajama Storytime

6 p.m. 5833 Westminster Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9840.

THURSDAYS

Preschool Storytime

9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Babytime

9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Tales for Tots

9:30 a.m. Georgetown Library, 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551.

Story Time

10 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

Baby Lapsit

10 a.m. Kyle Library, 550 Scott St. cityofkyle.com or 512-268-7411.

All Ages Storytime

10:15 a.m. 5833 Westminster Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9840.

Toddler Storytime

10:15 a.m. 2200 Hancock Dr. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8820.

Preschool Storytime

10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Preschool Storytime

10:30 a.m. 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551.

Toddlertime

10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Tot Time

10:30 a.m. Laura’s Library, 9411 Bee Cave Rd. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

Preschool Pals Story Time

10:30 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. beecavetexas.com or 512-767-6620.

Toddler Time

11 a.m. Kyle Library, 550 Scott St. cityofkyle.com or 512-268-7411.

Story Time

11 a.m. Pflugerville Library, 1008 W. Pfluger St. pflugervilletx.gov or 512-990-6375.

Spanish Dual Language Storytime

11 a.m. 853 W. Rundberg Ln. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-9860.

Sign Language Storytime

11 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-989-3188.

Sensory Storytime

11:15 a.m. Ruiz Branch, 1600 Grove Blvd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-7500.

Preschool Pals Story Time

11:15 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. beecavetexas.com or 512-767-6620.

Pajama Storytime

6:30 p.m. 5500 Manchaca Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8700.

FRIDAYS Babytime

9:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Story Time

10 a.m. 1938 Lohman's Crossing. laketravislibrary.org or 512-263-2885.

Baby and Me Lapsit

10 a.m. Leander Library, 1011 S. Bagdad Rd. leandertx.gov or 512-255-5259.

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

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Toddlertime

Preschool Storytime

Family Fun Storytime

Spanish Dual Language Storytime

10:30 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400. 10:30 a.m. 402 W. 8th St. library.georgetown.org or 512-930-3551.

11:15 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-789-3188.

Toddler Tales Story Time

2:15 p.m. 5803 Nuckols Crossing Rd. library.austintexas.gov or 512-974-8840.

Toddler Storytime

10 a.m. Cedar Park Library, 550 Discovery Blvd., Cedar Park. cedarparktexas.gov.

10:30 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. beecavetexas.com or 512-767-6620.

10:30 a.m. Wells Branch Library, 15001 Wells Port Dr. wblibrary.org or 512-789-3188.

Los Cuentos Bilingual Storytime

10:30 a.m. Kyle Library, 550 Scott St. cityofkyle.com or 512-268-7411.

Family Storytime

11 a.m. Round Rock Library, 216 E. Main St., Round Rock. FREE. roundrocktexas.gov.

Toddler Tales Story Time

11:15 a.m. Bee Cave Library, 4000 Galleria Pkwy. beecavetexas.com or 512-767-6620.

SATURDAYS

Family Storytime Family Storytime

11 a.m. Round Rock Library, 221 E. Main St. roundrocktexas.gov or 512-218-5400.

Family Storytime

12:30 p.m. Westbank Library, 1309 Westbank Dr. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

SUNDAYS

Sensory Story Time 11 a.m. Laura’s Library, 9411 Bee Cave Rd. westbanklibrary.com or 512-327-3045.

Pre-K through 12th Grade HHH Over 15 Austin Area Locations

Sing

Dance

Act

Laugh Full-Scale Musical + Play Productions

Professional Sets, Costumes, Lights, Sound, LIVE Music!

Beauty and the Beast •Wizard of Oz • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory • The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Triple Threat

Adventures in Acting

Imagination Friends

Glee! Show Choir

Sing • Dance • Act Pre-K Intro to Theatre

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Epic Theatre Fun

Movie Music Magic

www.kidsActingStudio.com S • 512-836-5437

October 2017 austinfamily.com

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SMART SCREEN TIME PBS KIDS iis constantly l tinkering with ways to not only engage kids in educational content but to drive them to action using their newfound knowledge. The latest outcome of this work is the return of THE RUFF RUFFMAN SHOW, a short-form animated digital series designed to help kids ages 4-8 learn core science concepts through videos, gameplay and hands-on activities. The canine host extraordinaire Ruff Ruffman, along with his assistants Blossom and Chet, answers questions from real kids, takes on challenges and learns the value of perseverance—all while modeling science inquiry skills. All 20 videos of THE RUFF RUFFMAN SHOW are now available on PBS KIDS digital platforms, including klrukids.org and the free PBS KIDS Video App (Android, iOS, Roku and Apple TV). Segments from the series are airing on the PBS KIDS 24/7 channel (18.4 locally) and on the live stream (also on klrukids.org and via the PBS KIDS Video app). Related games are available on the free PBS KIDS Games App and klrukids.org, and a RUFF RUFFMAN app is free on a variety of tablet and mobile devices. One of the online RUFF RUFFMAN games, Fish Force, represents a breakthrough for PBS KIDS in that it adjusts to the child based on performance and behavior. This is the first of many new adaptive games for young children that PBS KIDS will roll out in the coming months. While we are very excited to see Ruff back in action, we know that the key to inquiry is human interaction. We ask you to embrace the non-stop “Why” questions and to pose some questions of your own right back at your kids. Please don’t freak out too much if they bring (non-poisonous) creatures in from outside and lastly, recognize that a filthy kid is a happy kid!

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Benjamin Kramer, PhD, is the director of education for KLRU-TV, Austin PBS.

October 2017 austinfamily.com

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Support your child’s development with

PIENSA POSITIVO by Leslie Montoya, life coach and host of Despierta Austin

Valentía

En los momentos difíciles de la vida, las ganas se desploman; es allí cuando la valentía es necesaria. Pero me he dado cuenta que muchas veces se confunde la valentía con el enojo. El enojo te pone en un estado emocional negativo que, con el tiempo, cansa, dándonos la impresión de que la única manera de sacar la valentía es estando enojado. La valentía no es enojo; la valentía es energía. Detecta que personas, situaciones o estado mental te ayudan a generar valentía. No solo logres tu meta si no te sientas feliz. No te enojes para activar tu valentía. ¡Piensa Positivo!

Signup to attend a free demo class Mention this ad at the demo and receive a free music CD.

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Courage

In difficult moments in life, our strengths seem to vanish; that is when the value of courage is needed. However, at times it’s easy to confuse courage with anger. Anger sets you in a negative emotional state that, with time, drains energy, giving the impression that it’s the only way to bring out the courage. Courage is not anger; courage is bravery. Identify what people, situations or mental states help you bring out courage. Don’t just pursue your goals—feel happy and emotionally stable. Don’t trigger your courage with anger. Think Positive!

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focus on

DOCTORS

advertisement

Dr. Rachel Montgomery, Lonestar Pediatric Dental Dr. Montgomery graduated from Baylor University in Waco, and followed up by attending the University of Texas Dental School in Houston. Her residency was completed at the Boston University School of Dental Medicine, with a specialty in pediatrics. Rachel can most likely be found spending time with her husband Marty and their precious boys. See ad on page 19 Dr. Marty Montgomery, Lonestar Pediatric Dental Dr. Marty Montgomery comes from a family where all the children were drawn to dental careers early in life. A graduate of Baylor University in Waco, Marty attended Tufts Dental School in Boston. He completed his residency at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, specializing in pediatrics. See ad on page 19 Dr. Betty Richardson Dr. Richardson earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in nursing, and a PhD in psych/mental health nursing. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist and a licensed professional counselor. She has over 30 years of experience working with individuals, couples, families, children and adolescents. See ad on page 36 Dr. Crystal Salinas, a Board Certified Pediatrician, finished Medical School at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center in Lubbock & pediatric residency at Dell Children’s Medical Center. “Growing up, my dream job was to be with kids all day. It was my pediatrician who inspired me. He made me think that he exists only to make my life better. I want to do the same. I strive to create ‘wild yet precious’ potential for each child, every day.”

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

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KID

Boo-nanas and Mum-sicles

Give them an education they’ll carry FOREVER.

This activity is all treat and no tricks: it makes a sweet alternative to the candy you may find elsewhere this season. You’ll go bananas for this frighteningly delicious treat! What You Need: • 4 large, fresh bananas • 1 cup nonfat greek vanilla yogurt • 2 tablespoons powdered sugar • mini sweet-sweet chocolate chips • 16 popsicles sticks • 1/3 cup creamy natural peanut butter (or honey for allergy substitutes) • rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper What You Do: 1. Peel all four bananas. 2. For Boo-nanas, cut two bananas in half crosswise, then slice each piece in half the “long” way. You should have four long, narrow banana pieces. Carefully insert a popsicle stick into the bottom of each banana piece and place it on the baking sheet. 3. For Mum-sicles, cut the pointy ends off the two remaining whole bananas. Slice each banana crosswise into three equalsized “logs.” Carefully insert a popsicle stick into one end of each log and place it on the baking sheet. 4. Put the baking sheet in the freezer for at least 30 minutes or overnight. 5. Once the bananas are frozen, combine the yogurt and powdered sugar in a small bowl. Dip all pops into the yogurt mixture. Add mini chocolate chip eyes to the Boo-nana pops. (Do not add eyes to your Mum-sicles yet.) Put all pops back on the baking sheet and freeze for at least 1 hour. 6. To finish the Mum-sicles, heat peanut butter (or honey) in a small, microwave-safe bowl for 30-45 seconds, or until smooth and creamy. Drizzle across each Mum-sicle to create spooky bandages, then add mini chocolate chips for eyes. Return pops to the baking sheet and freeze for about 30 minutes. 7. Let the pops soften at room temperature for a few minutes before enjoying!

CONSIDER CATHOLIC EDUCATION AT A SCHOOL IN YOUR AREA Cathedral School of Saint Mary Holy Family Catholic School ELEMENTARY St. Austin Catholic School & MIDDLE SCHOOLS St. Gabriel’s Catholic School St. Helen Catholic School, Georgetown

HIGH SCHOOLS

St. Ignatius Martyr Catholic School St. Louis Catholic School St. Mary’s Catholic School, Taylor St. Theresa’s Catholic School Santa Cruz Catholic School, Buda

St. Dominic Savio Catholic High School St. Michael’s Catholic Academy San Juan Diego Catholic High School

TO L E A R N M O R E V I S I T W W W. C S DAT X . O R G

Tip: Store pops in a freezer bag for up to 2 months. Recipe and images courtesy of wellplated.com.

The YMCA of Austin is a dynamic association of men, women and children joined together by a shared commitment to nurturing the potential of kids, promoting healthy living and fostering a sense of social responsibility. We believe that lasting personal and social change can only come about when we all work together to invest in our kids, our health and our neighbors.

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JUST FOr GRINS

BY CA R R I E TAY LO R

As my second child continues to grow and develop—the latter term being used loosely, as he is behind in more than one category—I’m forced to conclude that I’ve birthed underachievers. And that’s okay. I love them anyway. But when my pediatrician recommended we take my 9-monthold baby to therapy because he wasn’t trying to toddle around yet, I came to another conclusion: I wish I were a 1950s parent. I bet moms in the 50s didn’t follow their children around, wondering if they were hitting every milestone. No, they were busy smoking and hiding their coffee mug full of special “mom juice” as they prepared a six-course meal for their husbands. Okay, maybe we modern moms have it better, but I really wish we could

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October 2017 austinfamily.com

give ourselves a rest from worrying about every. Little. Milestone. Little Johnny will walk and try to pull objects off every touchable surface when he’s good and ready. Here are 10 milestones parents really care the most about: 1. When they sleep through the night, and your eyes no longer look like they’re carrying emotional baggage. 2. When they can hold their own bottles. 3. When they stop putting everything in their mouths. 4. When they can entertain themselves for more than five minutes at a time. 5. When they can get their own cup of water.

6. When they can get you a cup of water (or at least hook you up with a refill from the fridge). 7. When they offer to feed younger siblings (and can do so without inflicting too much harm). 8 . When they can make their own breakfast/lunch/snack/pre-dinner snack/dinner/post-dinner snack. 9. When they stop having public tantrums and ruining your Target trips. 10. When they are (FINALLY) toilet trained. 11. BONUS: When they learn to aim, and the house doesn’t smell like a gas station bathroom. Carrie Taylor is a freelance writer, editor and mother of two boys.

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Austin family magazine october 2017  

Austin Family October 2017

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