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AUREL VR Architecture


AUREL VR Aurel von Richthofen Dipl. Arch. ETH / SIA M. Arch. Princeton Registered Architect D13286 KlosterstraĂ&#x;e 44 10179 Berlin Germany avr@aurelvr.com www.aurelvr.com Germany +49 163 987 0376 Oman +968 9566 3485

Colophon Š AUREL VR Oman, 2013 photos and drawings by Aurel von Richthofen Graphic Design: Studio Laucke Siebein Typeface: F Grotesk Collaborators: Kaveh Arbab, Rushabh Parekh, Mohammed Nazmy, Andy Pittman, Josh Lawrence, Thomas Pearce, Tom Pompeiani, Tanja Kulminska, Carlos Ramos da Silva, Sergei Mikhailenko, Haitham Al Busafi, Michaela Schweizer, Magdalena Kupfersberger, Thomas Hurrell, Alessia Pegorin, Riccardo del Fabbro, Estrella Sanz Alonzo


Contents Research

Prologue  4, 5, 6, 7 Research Towards Sustainable Patterns of Urbanization in Oman  8, 9, 10, 11, 12 Gulf Encyclopedia for Sustainable Urbanism, Oman  13, 14, 15 Parametric Urban Design Model / Qurm  16, 17 Brooklyn Smart Dots  18, 19 Wave Breaker  20, 21 Subway Sorter  22, 23 Teaching  25 – 39 Projects  41 – 89

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Prologue

Prologue: Research/Teaching/Tools/ Practice What is Design? My research interests as well as my teaching philosophy and architectural practice are rooted in the fundamental question of architecture and urbanism: What is design? Since I started my studies in architecture in 1998 at ETH Z端rich I have approached this question from various angles exploring more formal and digitally-driven avenues at first. During my post-graduate studies at Princeton University, I expanded this search to a set of questions ranging from the understanding of design before form, to procedural approaches of design, to design-thinking and finally to systems theory and cybernetics in the shape of parametric urban models.

Research These interests led to a series of self-initiated research projects on networks (Subway Sorter), fields (Wave Breaker) and systems (Smart Dots) during my time in the United States and Berlin. All of these projects involved custom made software tools. These tools were the result of the search for a way to represent the dynamic and informal nature of architecture and urbanism. By overcoming traditional means of architectural representation these research projects revealed new possible forms of design. Since my arrival at the German University of Technology in Oman (GUtech) in 2010, I initiated, contributed to and organized four major research and consultancy projects. I co-investigate on The Research Council Oman (TRC) founded project Towards Sustainable Patterns 4


Prologue of Urbanization in Oman. Indicators of sustainable design are integrated into an urban parametric sustainability model, ultimately resulting in a compact city for Oman. I liaise the Harvard-lead Gulf Encyclopedia for Sustainable Urbanism (GESU) project. This study will lead to an in-depth study of the past, present and future of Gulf cities. My contribution covers dwelling typologies on the regional, urban and architectural scale, recorded with digital tools. I am the co-author of the Eco-Friendly House competition entry by GUtech and the main contri­ butor to the Mutrah Redevelopment and Master Planning consultancy project. I am keen to transport the findings of my research on architecture and urbanism in and outside of academia. I have presented my research on Muscat Capital Area on eight international conferences with four publications over the last two years.

Teaching My main motivation to teach architecture and urbanism is to enter a dialogue with young architects. I have taught architecture in the United States, Europe and Oman to undergraduate and graduate students for more than five years. All these students come from different social and cultural backgrounds. At the Ohio State University (OSU), I taught graduate design studios and undergraduate Bachelor theses. In Berlin and Karlsruhe, I led a series of seminars on design and theory. The cultural differences in an Arab, Muslim country like Oman demand a particular cultural sensitivity, pedagogical confidence and thorough re-conception of what architecture and urban design ought to be. Oman has been propelled from the middle ages to the 21st century in less than a generation’s time span. The dialogue with young Omani students at GUtech has been overwhelming. In Oman, there is a real chance to empower the next generation – young muslim women in particular – to actively shape their society 5


Prologue through design. I am teaching architectural thinking through methods such as computer aided design (CAD). The model as information entity has become a central tool in my pedagogical approach. I initiated the first network of CAD student Experts in Oman. Wherever possible I involved students and young researchers in my projects, for instance interns for the Mutrah Redevelopment and Master Planning project or my founded research.

Tools Design and representation go hand in hand. My CAD classes establish the ground for architectural representation in studio. This representation before design parallels my approach to design before form. While students experiment with different digital tools they understand their model as a dynamic information entity and representation of their design intent. They learn that one model can have different forms of representation depending on the architectural question addressed to it. These include standard forms of representation such as plans, section and elevations, but also Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) models and Building Information Modeling (BIM). Parametric design is a powerful tool to transgress the limits of standard design software. Moreover it requires a rigorously structured approach to design which helps students to formulate and articulate their design intention. Geo Information System (GIS) mapping is a key element of urban analysis. With advanced modeling tools, students interpret and render their vision of urban design. Digital tools and design-thinking become ever more interrelated as the scope and accessibility of computational tools penetrate every day design education. Based on my ground work over the last three years a future design curriculum at GUtech will take these considerations into account.

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Prologue

Practice Research in architecture and urbanism is relevant in as much as it is applicable to real-life conditions. Architectural projects meet these conditions since they usually have a client, a site and a program. Therefore, architectural projects lend themselves to experimentation. To practice architecture allows to develop experimental design because of the reallife constraints put onto the design process, namely its materiality, structural and tectonic principles, ecological and climatic performance, and, last but not least, usage by people. The majority of my projects consist of open international competition entries. Competitions are chosen to manifest ideas forming a larger research project. Design complements writing. My earlier projects such as the Zurich Elephant Park and Nouvelle ComÊdie de Genève are reminiscent of the search for innovation through formal expression. Projects like the tensegrity series (Tensegrity Tower, Connecting Link, Maribor Bridge) defy gravity by innovative combination of structure and geometry. Radical projects like New Bowkunde Delft, Tetra City and Einheits Denkmal defy scale, as they represent rule-sets rather than formal manifestations. Later competition entries like the Veyey and Crissier schools explore program and form in conjunction with materiality and construction. Finally, realized projects like the 580 Park Avenue renovation demonstrate the strength of architectural practice, namely to define the living environment.

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Research

RESEARCH: Towards Sustainable Patterns of Urbanization in Oman I n s t i t u t i o n : German University of Technology in Oman (GUtech) and Sultan Qabous University (SQU), sponsored by The Research Council Oman (TRC) C o n t r i b u t o r s : Principle Investigator Dr. Sonja Nebel (GUtech), Co-Investigators Dr. Awni Shabaan (SQU), Dr. Alaa Mandour (SQU), Aurel von Richthofen (GUtech) Y e a r : 2011–2013 B u d g e t : 140.000 Euro

Urbanization patterns in Oman are characterized by dispersed settlement structures both in the urban expansion areas of the Capital Area of Muscat as well in the areas of rural to urban transition. The predominant separation of functions further augments the needs for car based mobility. The single villa on a walled plot is the favored residential building type. These urbanization trends meet limited land resources. Due to the geophysical and climatic setting of the country 75 % of the countries total surface is covered by desert and not fit for permanent settlement. Another large part is mountainous and hard to access. Thus the remaining land has to be shared for different purposes of the Omani society. While land consumption by residential use, services and transport infrastructure is increasing steadily, suitable land for agriculture is decreasing. The current development has a lasting effect on the rural-to urban transition creating an irreversible facts in Oman. The research projects aims at detecting driving forces of the ongoing urbanization trends in Oman and at developing strategies and programs to control and guide the resulting urbanization patterns towards a resource saving, climatically adapted, socially, culturally and economically balanced urban 8


Research development. The management of land as a limited resources is at the center of attention. Thus the research program focusses on land use, land use change, land use planning, land registration systems, land ownership, allocation and purchase, land value and land markets. AL KHOUDH

BA (sum of built area) 8,8% of 1 sqkm

CA (circulation area) 16,3% of 1 sqkm

void/parking/green space

The research objectives are threefold: PA (plot area) 61,5% of 1 sqkm

0 25 50 75 100

150

200 m

GA (green area) 0% of 1 sqkm

scale 1:5000

latitude: 23° 35’ 23” N

N longitude: 58° 08’ 39” E

A) Providing empirical data and information on crucial issues of urbanization in Oman; describing and analyzing land use and urbanization patterns in selected case study areas of urban expansion and rural transition. Literature on the proposed topic related to Oman is very limited and few statistics are available. Relevant data collection on an empirical base plays a crucial role for the project. Therefore two complementary case studies are carried out to reveal specific characteristics of the parallel processes of urban expansion and rural-urban transition. The case studies provide a comprehensive and detailed survey on social, economic, and environmental implications of land use and settlement patterns. B) Contributing to the current scientific national and international discourse on urbanization; understanding processes and mechanisms of urbanization in Oman. 9


Research The specific development in Oman asks for a comprehensive view on urbanization trends that occur at the same time in more urbanized and in currently urbanizing areas. The interface between rural transition process and urban expansion process is examined by two case studies. This dual approach and focus one on the urban expansion and one on the rural transition component of the overall process. These mechanisms are interactive factors deriving from social and cultural contexts, from economic conditions and from environmental settings. They are influenced by overall national development policies, by rural-urban inter-relations and by local conditions. These mechanisms include different actors such as the state, civil society and private sector, wherein the focus is laid on landrelated issues regarded as crucial to future development of the country. C) Developing application-oriented instruments to guide and control sustainable development in Oman; including locally adapted strategies, programs, and implementation frameworks to manage future balanced development in the country. Outcomes include scenarios of sustainable development, indicators for sustainable land use and settlement patterns, strategies and action plans for selected areas, recommendations for the reform of physical planning standards with the help of parametric modeling, concepts for sustainable land management and action Plans for further interventions including the design of a compact city for Oman. Two complementary case studies are carried out that allow detailed insights in and reveal specific characteristics of parallel processes of urban expansion and transition on the local level. Systematic mapping of land use and settlement patterns in selected areas together with interviews conducted with key informants and representatives from governmental institutions accumulate up-to date data to be correlated with urban development policies, physical planning standards, and residential 10


Research building types. Findings of the to case studies contribute to the comparative evaluation of urbanization and the development of a sustainability profile.

Case Study Area A – New Al Khoud – stands for the phenomenon of urban expansion in larger Muscat Capital Area. The New Al Khoud neighborhood is located at the western fringe of Muscat Capital Area along the southern expressway. The neighborhood has been developing since 2007 and offers a typical show case for urban expansion phenomena. Case Study Area B – Fanja – stands for the phenomenon of rural to urban transformation in Interior Oman. Fanja is located along the Muscat Nizwa highway in the province of Bidbid. Fanja used to be a traditional oasis settlement until it became a residential neighborhood due to its relative proximity to Muscat Capital Area. Findings from these case study areas are translated into a database to extract and compare indicative figures of density and land-use. These feed into a proposed set of strategies and programs implemented as parametric models, that allow to compare the geometric, spatial consequences of strategic decisions and to extrapolate further data feeding back into the database. 11


Research Final results will respond to crucial issues of sustainable urban governance in Oman: • A comparative documentation and evaluation of urbanization patterns in Oman • Reviewed physical planning standards / building regulations • Recommendations for sustainable land management and urban governance • Climate responsive urban design manual • Indicators for monitoring sustainable urban development in Oman • The design of a compact city for Oman, based on a parametric urban design model

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Research

Gulf Encyclopedia for Sustainable Urbanism, Oman I n s t i t u t i o n : Local Universities: German University of Technology in Oman (GUtech) and Sultan Qabous University (SQU), Lead by Harvard University C o n t r i b u t o r s : Dr. Shaibu Garba (SQU), Aurel von Richthofen (GUtech), Nader Ardalan (Harvard) Y e a r : 2012 – present B u d g e t : 16.000 Euro for the research on Oman TRC -towards sustainable patterns of urbanisation-

Maps on Muscat scale 1:

GIS map

0

5

10

15

20

25 km

North

Harvard University leads a holistic study focusing on sustainable urbanism in the Gulf Region. This research surveys the eight countries that border the Gulf waters and includes the Sultanate of Oman, Kuwait, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, UAE and Iran focussing on the future of urbanism in the coastal region, on a sustainable basis, both environmentally and socio-economically. The coastal region have been selected since coastal cities have an impact on each other through the water body, regardless of their own country, and Gulf region is on a key geo­ political location, amidst global trade routes and with substantial natural resources. 0

5

10

15

20

25 km

North

The methodology is based on a rigorous understanding of the past, present and future development trajectories in the region as well as on the most current knowledge of sustainability. The past will be analyzed to help answer how urban growth has Country: Oman

City:

Name of diagram: GIS Map

Date:

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Research coped with environmental conditions and society needs, while the present will examine both deviation of local traditions together with the new cosmopo­ litan culture in the region. The underlying concept is that future urban growth should study and learn from the past, and understand how the present is being shaped by forces resulting from future projections and aspirations. The analysis of human settlements in the past it will try to offer a synthetic explanation of their emergence, evolution and transformation. This explanation will bring together the descriptive part of the analysis and the theoretical concepts and guidelines: The descriptive analysis, regarding mostly mappings of physical and artificial systems together with their interaction and their quantitative analysis, will be coupled with theoretical concepts from the sociocultural and socio-economic analysis. This synthesis forms an outline of the complex interrelations between the numerous elements of the natural and built environment and will start identifying in what ways they can be considered sustainable within their historical context. This synthetic approach will be largely built upon visual material – maps, graphs and timelines – that will compare and combine information from the various chapters and case studies of the book organized around key concepts. This comparative and synthetic material surrounding the selected concepts will also have a value for the broader scope of the research: To start framing a platform for revisiting the notion of sustainable urbanism for the present and future. Since the research on the past is only the initial stage of the project and the ultimate goal is to frame the guidelines for a sustainable future of the Gulf, the key concepts selected will ideally be carried through in the present and future phase of the research in order to map their transformations and investigate their potential in the present or future context. These concepts interrelate to sustainable processes. 14


Research The research will try to offer meaningful guidelines and concepts along which the transformations that occurred can be mapped in the present and future phase. GUtech and SQU figure as local partners providing empirical data on the urbanization in Oman in general and Mutrah and Muscat in particular. The focus of this research contribution is mainly data collection & documentation across architectural and urban scales. The research compiles Omani building typologies such as residential, commercial, civic and religious buildings in plan, section and elevation. This process goes with in depth analysis of urban form and collection of neighborhood data. This data is further interpreted with daylighting, shading and configuration analysis. On the regional level, the research provides a plan showing the evolution of the urban form of Muscat from 1970 to 2010 with a focus on one representative transitional year.

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Research

Parametric Urban Design Model / Qurm I n s t i t u t i o n : aurel VR C o n t r i b u t o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Carlos Ramos da Silva and Sergei Mikhailenko Y e a r : 2011 B u d g e t : 2000 Euro

Oman is currently developing the Oman National Spatial Strategy (ONSS), the first spatial plan for the country. A major part of the stated objectives aim to optimize utilization of land and natural resources by proper allocation of land for development of economic sectors, social and physical infrastructure while protecting the environment including natural and cultural heritage. Further­more it intends to identify the strategic needs of the country in terms of infrastructures and services. Finally, it aims to achieve a balanced urban growth for cities and to promote rural development, improve and upgrade the social services and infrastructure in both urban and rural areas, and integrate planning activities and policies and availing required data for planning purposes and decisions making through the establishment of efficient planning system for the purpose of the proper implementation of the National Spatial Strategy. The Petrol Development Oman (PDO) camp in Qurm, Muscat Capital Area, was built in the 1970s and is prone to redevelopment. In the larger context of urbanization processes of Muscat Capital Area it serves as a testing ground for the stated objectives delineated in the ONSS. A mechanism for dynamic program distribution, participatory land allocation, climate responsive urban design is implemented by means of a parametric urban design model. Sustainability – as defined by the UN millennium goals – needs to address multiple dimensions simultaneously: economical, ecological, social and cultural aspects of sustainability. Therefore the case study 16


Research °C 45+ 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 <0

of the PDO camp bases its economical viability on the integration of ecological, social and cultural parameters particular to the site, climate and culture of Oman. Mapping methods trace environmental, cultural and programmatic parameters and feed them into a cohesive urban design mechanism. The developed tools interpret environmental data to generate urban design according to rules governed by climatic fitness criteria. The software prototype optimizes the climatic performance of the building envelope, distribution of program, accessibility within the plot and land-use and, as a result, produces a coherent urban design that is considerably more Increased Confort Zone patterns of sustainable than the “cooky-cutter” = most developments inEnergy the Gulf. This mechanism – Reduced Demand developed for the site in Qurm – can be adapted and applied to any site in Oman or the Gulf region from the scale of a few houses to larger mixed use developments. Prevailing Winds

NOR T H

50 km/ h

345°

W ind Fre q ue nc y (H rs )

hrs

1 5°

594+

Location: Muscat, Sultanate of Oman

Date: 1st January - 31st December Time: 00:00 - 24:00

330°

30°

534

© W e athe r T ool

475

40 km/ h

415

31 5°

45°

356 297

30 km/ h

237

300°

60°

178

118

20 km/ h

<59

285°

75°

10 km/ h

mm 1 .0 + 0 .9 0 .8 0 .7 0 .6 0 .5 0 .4 0 .3 0 .2 <0 .1

W EST

E AS T

255°

1 05°

240°

1 20°

225°

1 35°

21 0°

1 50°

1 95°

1 65°

SOU T H

Comfort Percentages

VP

SELECTED DESIGN TECHNIQUES: 1. passive solar heating 2. thermal mass effects 3. exposed mass + night-purge ventilation 4. natural ventilation 5. direct evaporative cooling 6. indirect evaporative cooling

NAME: Muscat LOCATION: Oman WEEKDAYS: 00:00 - 24:00 Hrs WEEKENDS: 00:00 - 24:00 Hrs POSITION: 24.6° , 46.7°

5.2

© W e athe r T ool

4.8

4.4

4.0

3.6

3.2

%

MULTIPLE PASSIVE DESIGN TECHNIQUES

Before

After

Dec

Year

2.8

80

2.4

2.0

60

1.6

1.2

40

0.8

20 0.4

45

50

0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

passive energy systems envelope

natural lighting

- thicker walls - composite layers - bio-degradable insulation

SIGN

cooling - cross ventilation

- top lighting

- side lighting buffer zone

inner room - stack ventilation - double envelopes which act as buffer zones

- light shelves

- evaporative cooling tower - external blinds shading green roof

inner room

- internal shading - green roofs

day

night

- night ventilation

- external overhang shading

- earth sheltering

anning

Integration of Site features site features (vegetation, slope, sun-exposure, sea-view, wind)

vegetation

slopes

shadows - 08:00

shadows - 09:00

shadows - 10:30

shadows - 12:00

shadows - 14:00

shadows - 16:00

shadows - 18:00

color slope analysis

shadows - 07:00

wth - land valuation - access optimization

ccess

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Research

Brooklyn Smart Dots I n s t i t u t i o n : aurel VR C o n t r i b u t o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Lydia Kallipoliti, Mitchel Joachim, programming Kaustuv Debiswas Y e a r : 2008 B u d g e t : 2000 Euro

Description: Brooklyn Smart Dots originates in the radical re-conception of street traffic and proposes an intelligent surface of communicating luminous dots. With the advent of mechanical transportation came the necessity to mediate traffic flows based on the voluntary acceptance of rules and regulations by each traffic participant. Exceeding speed limits or disregarding traffic signals, for instance, could have deadly consequences. Because there was no immanent feedback mechanism, each traffic participant had to account for oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own possible failures and of those of the others and the system. The confidence in the traffic participantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to compensate system failure was a compromise in lack of a better technological solution. The set of rigid traffic rules stood in sharp contrast to the highly dynamic nature of traffic. Smart dots aims to re-introduce swarm-intelligence into the shared space of pedestrian, mechanized and motorized traffic. A field of Smart Dots registers vehicular and pedestrian motion, computes possible trajectories and collisions, projects traffic patterns, and communicates anticipatory solutions back to the participants in form of color coded visual information. Pedestrian and bikers will react to a bright visual signal, while automotive machines will be equipped with visual sensors. As a result traffic is visualized as a dynamic system and displayed as a forecast within the very space it is happening. Implemented in a Java scripting language (Processing), vehicular classes and smart dots constantly update their states based on the dynamic information of the system. The system requires simple rules 18


Research such as the avoidance of collision, maximum speed regulations, priority of right-over-left to escape chaos. The application can be used to model simple traffic situations, such as intersections and merging traffic. The simulation can be used to compute maximum traffic participants and to resolve traffic jams situations.

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Research

Wave Breaker I n s t i t u t i o n : aurel VR C o n t r i b u t o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Carlos Ramos da Silva and Sergei Mikhailenko Y e a r : 2011 B u d g e t : 3000 Euro

Architectural drawings, such as design sketches, plans, sections, axonometrics and perspectives, underwent a dramatic shift since the advent of computer aided design (CAD) tools. While most CAD tools reproduce conventional drafting methods, they tend to be reductive in their programmatic rigidity. Users are forced into a linear and predefined design process and often frustrated by the lack of haptic feedback. The structural complexity of CAD programs often obscures the underlying generative methods. Boundaries of drafting software are expanded by introducing scripting and coding. The expression of data (text and numbers) inside the drawing aims to re-introduce the haptic quality of conventional drawing. A procedural approach of layering graphic elements and data with a constant visual update empowers the designer/ programmer to harness the computational power of CAD applications. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wave-breakerâ&#x20AC;? project challenges conventional architectural drafting methods as it is a land-art and landscape installation. The project narrates the story of seemingly abandoned industrial artifacts 20


Research (the concrete precast wave-breakers) in a desert landscape. It combines the technical precision of construction documents with the poetry and fragility of landscape drawings. Plan nor section suffice, rather a map of layers of information â&#x20AC;&#x201C; landscape, artifacts, data â&#x20AC;&#x201C; form the new digital environment. The underlying code regulates distribution, arrangement and rotation of the objects.

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Research

Subway Sorter C o n t r i b u t o r s : Aurel von Richthofen, based on a Java-based program written by David Rutten Y e a r : 2009–2011 B u d g e t : 2000 Euros 225 St 207 St

225 St

207 St 161St

149 St 125 St

168 St

148 St

161St 168 St

145 St

149 St

148 St 145 St

86St

125 St 96 St

125 St 59 St Lex 59 47St

72 St

96 St

Lex 53

86St 42 St

42 St

59 St

42 St 34 St

Lex 59

34 St

Lex 53

47St 34St

Grand Central

34St 14 St

Grand Central

Union Sq

14 St

Union Sq

14 St

W4 St Broadway

W4 St Broadway

Chambers Canal

Chambers

Canal Fulton

Chambers

Canal

Wall

Fulton

Bowling Wall Bowling

Top: Subway mapping in equitemporal space

The design-research leading to Subway Sorter is rooted in an ongoing interest in the representation of traffic – here in the form of public underground transportation – as a means of spatial-temporal mapping of the city. Starting from the subway system of Manhattan, this comparative study models several metropolis’ of the 21 century.

24 / 25

Subway Sorter is based on the idea that most essential information to the user of a subway network is the time it will take to reach the destination. Spatial information is secondary, as the space travelled is not visible. Subway Sorter inputs subway systems and re-organizes each segment on a time based scale. As the geography distorts a new map appears: Connection nodes between lines tie the system together, local stops in a line bulk out while the space between express stops shrinks, the linear shape of Manhattan inflates and wedges around the radiating satellites of Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx. The systems of Paris and London re-organize to a grid-like map, while the star shaped plan of Moscow is resilient to the transformation. 22


Research Implemented as an iPhone (1G) application in alpha stage Subway Sorter would feed on live subway operator data. Localization tracks the users position. The map re-adjusts and computes time and connections in a single dynamic map. 225 St

207 St

225 St

207 St

161St

149 St 125 St

168 St

148 St

161St 168 St

145 St

149 St

148 St

86St

125 St

145 St

96 St

125 St 59 St Lex 59 47St

72 St 96 St

Lex 53

86St 42 St

42 St

59 St

Lex 59

42 St

Union Sq

14 St W4 St

Union Sq

14 St

Grand Central

34St 14 St

Grand Central

34St

34 St

34 St

Lex 53

47St

Broadway W4 St Chambers

Broadway

Canal Chambers

Canal Fulton

Chambers

Canal

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Fulton

Bowling Wall Bowling

Top: Subway mapping in equitemporal space 24 / 25

S1

Oranienburg Bernau

S2 S8

Hennigsdorf S1

Wittenau

U8

Oranienburg

Alt-Tegel U6 S75 U2 U9

Osloer Str.

U8

Hennigsdorf

S8

Wartenberg

Pankow

S2

Wittenau

U2

Alt-Tegel U6

Bernau

Pankow

Wartenberg

S75

Osloer Str.

U9

U5

Gesundbrunnen Gesundbrunnen

Honow

Strausberg Nord S5

Strausberg Nord S5

Jungfernheide

U5

Honow

U7 Rathaus Spandau

Jungfernheide

U7 Rathaus Spandau Spandau S75 S9

Alexanderplatz

Spandau S75 S9

Alexanderplatz

Zoologischer Garten

Friedrichstr.

Friedrichstr.

Stadtmitte Ostkreuz

Warschauer Str.

Potsdamer Platz

Westkreuz

S3

Ostkreuz

Warschauer Str.

Stadtmitte

Potsdamer Platz

Zoologischer Garten

Westkreuz

Erkner

S3

Erkner

Yorckstr. Heidelberger Platz

Yorckstr.

S1

Papestr.

S41S42

Heidelberger Platz

Potsdam Hbf

Neukolln

Innsbrucker Platz U7

S47

S47

S41S42

Papestr.

Innsbrucker Platz U7

Spindlersfeld

Neukolln

Spindlersfeld

S46

Konigs Wusterhausen

S8 S85

Grunau U6 Alt-Mariendorf S8 S85

Alt- U6 Mariendorf

Grunau

U7

S46

Rudow

Flughafen Berlin-Schonefeld

Rudow

S45 S9

Orry-la-Ville Coye

Pontoise U7

Konigs Wusterhausen

Aeroport Charles de Gaulle

Saint-Denis-Universite

S1

Potsdam Hbf

Flughafen Berlin-Schonefeld S45 S9

Bobigny Pablo Picasso

La Defense Union Square

Gare du Nord

Green Line Gare de l’Est

Airport Free Zone

Burjurhan

Porte des Lilas

Green Line

Saint-Lazare

Gulf of Arabia

Union Square

Rashidly

Jaddal 2

Airport Free Zone Republique

Burj Dubal Burjurhan

Gulf of Arabia

Mairie de Montneull

Chatelet Les Halles

Concorde

Saint-Michel Jaddal 2 Notre Dame

Champ de Mars Tour Eiffel

Rashidly

Burj Dubal Nation

Gare de Lyon

University

Red Line

Chateau de Vincennes

Montpamasse Bienvenue University

Dubal Jebel Al Port

Dubal

Red Line

Jebel Al Port

Mairie d’Issy Versailles-Rive Gauche

Villejulf-Louis Aragon

Chatillon-Montrouge

Cretell-Prefecture

Northern

Robinson Saint-Martin-d’Etampes

Metropolitan Jubilee

Northern Metropolitan

Jubilee

Bakerloo

Victoria

Bakerloo

Central

Central

Victoria London Overground Paddlington

London Overground

Willesden Junction

Farringdon Baker Street Stratford

Baker Street Paddlington

North Action

Farringdon

Orry-la-Ville Coye

Green Park

Hammersmith & City

Whitechapel

Bank

Shadwell

Action Town

Aeroport Charles de Gaulle

Saint-Denis-Universite Monument

Waterloo & City

South Kensington

Stratford

Oxford Circus

Notting Hill Gate

Whitechapel

Bank

Circle

Earl’s Court

Willesden Junction

Hammersmith & City

Oxford Circus

Notting Hill Gate

Pontoise

Action Town

North Action

Picadilly

DLR

Canary Wharf

Circle Earl’s Court

Bobigny Pablo Picasso

Replacement Bus Service

Monument

DLR

Canary Wharf

Waterloo

South Kensington

Orry-la-Ville Coye

Pontoise

Waterloo

Picadilly

Shadwell

Waterloo & City

Green Park

District

Aeroport Charles de Gaulle

Replacement Saint-Denis-Universite Bus Service

Transport for London La Defense

District

UNDERGROUND

Gare du Nord

Gare de l’Est

Transport fordes London Porte Lilas

Bobigny Pablo Picasso UNDERGROUND

Saint-Lazare

Gare du Nord

La Defense Republique

Gare de l’Est

Mairie de Montneull

Chatelet Les Halles

Concorde

Republique

Saint-Michel Notre Dame

Champ de Mars Tour Eiffel

Porte des Lilas

Saint-Lazare

Gare de Lyon

Nation

Mairie de Montneull

Chatelet Les Halles

Concorde

Chateau de Vincennes

Montpamasse Bienvenue

Saint-Michel Notre Dame

Champ de Mars Tour Eiffel

Nation

Gare de Lyon

Chateau de Vincennes

Montpamasse Bienvenue

Mairie d’Issy Versailles-Rive Gauche

Villejulf-Louis Aragon

Chatillon-Montrouge

Cretell-Prefecture

Robinson Saint-Martin-d’Etampes Mairie d’Issy Versailles-Rive Gauche

Villejulf-Louis Aragon

Cretell-Prefecture

Robinson Saint-Martin-d’Etampes

Orry-la-Ville Coye

Pontoise

Aeroport Charles de Gaulle

Saint-Denis-Universite

Orry-la-Ville Coye

Pontoise

Bobigny Pablo Picasso

Saint-Denis-Universite Aeroport Charles de Gaulle

Gare du Nord

La Defense

Bobigny Pablo Picasso La Defense

Gare de l’Est

Gare du Nord

Porte des Lilas

Saint-Lazare

Gare de l’Est

Saint-Lazare

Porte des Lilas

Republique

Concorde

Republique

Mairie de Montneull

Chatelet Les Halles

Saint-Michel Notre Dame

Champ de Mars Tour Eiffel

Gare de Lyon

Chatelet Les Halles

Concorde

Saint-Michel Notre Dame

Champ de Mars Tour Eiffel

Gare de Lyon

Mairie de Montneull

Nation

Nation

Chateau de Vincennes

Montpamasse Bienvenue

Chateau de Vincennes

Montpamasse Bienvenue

Cretell-Prefecture VersaillesRive Gauche Mairie d’Issy Versailles-Rive Gauche

Villejulf-Louis Aragon

Mairie d’Issy

Saint-Martin-d’Etampes Robinson

Villejulf-Louis Aragon

Cretell-Prefecture

Robinson Saint-Martin-d’Etampes

23


Teaching


contents Teaching Prologue  4 – 7 Research  8 – 23

Teaching Urban Oman  28, 29, 30 Metabolism Redux  31 Bürolandschaft – Complex  32 Open Source School  33 Updating Semper  34 Winery in Geneva  35 Sport Urbanism  36 Digital Design and Representation  37, 38, 39 Projects  41 – 89

27


Teaching

Urban Oman

The research project “Towards Sustainable Patterns of Urbanization” founded by The Research Council Oman (TRC) has lead to various collaborations with other international academic institutions. As co-investigator on the project in Oman, I have been coordinating these exchanges and channeling them into significant contributions to the larger research project while providing the students with academic frame-work, access and exposure. The partner university of the German University of Technology in Oman, Rheinisch Westphälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH) in Germany, sends graduating students to Oman to work their Master thesis in urban design. Their work focusses on re-densification strategies within the large sub-urban sprawl of Muscat. Their thesis claims that urban density is key to measure urban sustainability in a city that expanded very fast and where large distances increase the demand for mobility and consumption of resources. Two diploma candidates at Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, ETH Studio Basel contribute to an urban portrait of Muscat and Oman. After a semester of analytical research 28


Teaching they will produce an urban design based on the thesis that water had a particular role in the development of vernacular urban patterns. Due to its scarcity and the extreme climate, water was put to many uses by means of sophisticated “falaj” systems – a century old irrigation system, that shaped farming and settlement patterns, thereby forming a unique social and cultural landscape. A contemporary approach to urbanism in Oman re-addressing water could lead to a new, including, ecological and social urbanization pattern. Three Technische Universität Berlin students working on their Master thesis in urban management examine detailed processes of urbanization ranging from climate responsive urban design to rural urban linkages to good governance and land-use allocation in Oman. These written theses contribute to the research reports. Students at undergraduate level at GUtech learn research methods by applying Geo-Information Systems (GIS) while drawing maps and diagrams of research focal areas.

I n s t i t u t i o n : Rheinisch Westphälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH) Y e a r : 2013 – present T y p e : Co-Examiner on MA Thesis Urban Design S t u d e n t s : Two masters candidates I n s t i t u t i o n : Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, ETH Studio Basel Y e a r : 2013 – present T y p e : Co-Examiner on Diploma Thesis Architecture S t u d e n t s : Two diploma candidates I n s t i t u t i o n : Technische Universität Berlin Y e a r : 2012 T y p e : Co-Examiner on MA Thesis Urban Management S t u d e n t s : Three masters candidates I n s t i t u t i o n : German University of Technology in Oman Y e a r : 2012–2013 T y p e : Elective Seminar on Geo Information Systems S t u d e n t s : 36 Undergraduate students I n s t i t u t i o n : German University of Technology in Oman Y e a r : 2011 T y p e : Consultancy / Research workshop towards the urban redevelopment of the historic core of Muscat, namely Muttrah S t u d e n t s : 15 Undergraduate students

29


roads_circulation

roads_circulation

buildings

buildings

green area

green area

vacant area

vacant area

Teaching Qurm Children Museum Qurm Children Museum

The Royal Opera House The Royal Opera H

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°36'55.92" Latitude: N 23°36'55.92" N Longitude: 58°28'51.72" Longitude: E 58°28'51.72" E

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°36'48.71" Latitude: N 23°36'48.7 Longitude: 58°28'4.45" Longitude: E 58°28'4.4

Area

Area

Roads:of344192 m² Roads: 344192 m² TRC -towards sustainable TRC -towards patterns sustainable of urbanisationpatterns urbanisationLandmark_Corporate Landmark_Corporate roads_circulation

roads_circulation

buildings

buildings

green area

green area

vacant area

vacant area

Buildings: 519460 m² Buildings: 519460 m² Green area: 1009044 Green m² area: 1009044 m² Vacant space: 1294249 Vacant m²space: 1294249 m² Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 10,8 % Roads: 10,8 % Buildings: 16,4 % Buildings: 16,4 % Green area: 10,8 %Green area: 10,8 % Vacant space: 40,8Vacant % space: 40,8 %

OmanTel HQ

OmanTel HQ

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°35'6.26" Latitude: N 23°35'6.26" N Longitude: 58°11'47.26" Longitude: E 58°11'47.26" E Botanical Garden Botanical Garden GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°36'21.87" Latitude: N 23°36'21.87" N Area AreaE Longitude: 58° 9'46.96" Longitude: 58° 9'46.96" E Roads:of94247 m² Roads: 94247 m² TRC -towards sustainable TRC -towards patterns sustainable of urbanisationpatterns urbanisationBuildings: 31415 m²Buildings: 31415 m² Green area: 43982 Green m² area: 43982 m² Vacant space: 2965662 Vacant m²space: 2965662 m² Area Area Landmark_Educational Landmark_Educational Roads: 122582 m² Area Roads: 122582 m² Area Percentage Percentage Buildings: Buildings: Roads: 3 %188252 m² Roads: 3 %188252 m² roads_circulation roads_circulation Green area: 138858Buildings: Green m² area: 138858 m² Buildings: 1% 1% Vacantarea: space: Vacant m² space: m² Green 1,42726876 % Green area: 1,42726876 % buildings buildings Vacant space: 94,4Vacant % space: 94,4 % green area green area Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 4 % Roads: 4 % vacant area vacant area Buildings: 6 % Buildings: 6 % Green area: 4,1 % Green area: 4,1 % Sultan’s School School Vacant space: 85,9Vacant %Sultan’s space: 85,9 % GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23˚ 53’ 36.64” Latitude: N 23˚ 53’ 36.64” N Longitude: 58˚ 27’31.21” Longitude: E 58˚ 27’31.21” E Nawras HeadquaterNawras Area Headquater Area

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°35'33.97" Latitude: N 23°35'33.97" N Area Area Longitude: 58°24'31.82" Longitude: E 58°24'31.82" E Roads: 508492 m² Roads: 508492 TRC -towards sustainable TRC -towards patterns sustainable of urbanisationpatterns of urbanisationMuscat Hills Muscat Hills m² Buildings: 936900 m² Buildings: 936900 m² GPS coordinates GPS Green area: 328639Green m² coordinates area: 328639 m² Latitude: 23°34'11.41"N Latitude: 23°34'11.41"N Vacant space: 3180123 Vacant m²space: 3180123 m² Area Area E Landmark_Shopping Landmark_Shopping Longitude: 58°18'11.67" Longitude: 58°18'11.67" E Roads:631425 m² Area Roads:631425 m² Area Percentage Percentage Buildings: 694041 Buildings: 694041 Roads: 15,98 % m² Roads: 15,98 % m² roads_circulation roads_circulation Green area: 31434 Green m² area: 31434 Buildings: 29,46 % Buildings: 29,46 % m² Vacantarea: space: 1822661 Vacant m²space: 1822661 m² Green 10,33 % Green buildings buildings Area Area area: 10,33 % Vacant space: 44,23Vacant % space: 44,23 % Roads: 34557 m² Roads: 34557 m² green area green area Area Percentage Area Percentage Buildings: 62831 m²Roads: Buildings: 62831 m² Roads: 19,9 % 19,9 % vacant area vacant area Green area: 188495 Green m² area: 188495 Buildings: 21,8 % Buildings: 21,8 % m² Vacantarea: space: 2827432 Vacant m² space: 2827432 m² Green 1% Green area: 1%

MCA (city center center Vacant space: 57,3Al-Seeb) Vacant %MCA (city space: 57,3Al-Seeb) % Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 1,1 % Roads: 1,1 % GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Buildings:23°35'58" 2% Buildings:23°35'58" 2% Latitude: Latitude: N N Green area: 6 % Longitude: Green area: 6% Longitude: 58°14'52" E 58°14'52" E Gutech Halban Gutech Halban Vacant space: 90 %Vacant space: 90 %

Country: Oman

Country: Oman

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°38'11.17" Latitude: N 23°38'11.17" N Area AreaE Longitude: 58° 2'45.38" Longitude: 58° 2'45.38" E Roads: 292168 m² Roads: 292168 m² Buildings: 716282 m² Buildings: 716282 m² m² area: 251327 m² Name of diagram: Landmark Name of diagram: Landmark Date: City: MuscatGreen area: City:251327 MuscatGreen Vacant space: 1875530 Vacant m²space: 1875530 m² Area Area Roads: 118385 m² Area Roads: 118385 m² Area Percentage Percentage Buildings: m²Roads: Buildings: m² Roads: 9,328828 % 9,328828 % Green area: 23965 m² Green area: 23965 m² Buildings: 22,8% Buildings: 22,8% Vacantarea: space: 171178 Vacant m² area: space: 171178 m² Green 8% Green 8%

Vacant space: 59,7 Vacant % space: 59,7 % Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 3,6 % Roads: 3,6 % Buildings: 0,9 % Buildings: 0,9 % Green area: 0,7 % Green area: 0,7 % Vacant space: 94,8 Vacant % space: 94,8 %

Area

Area

Landmarks_ scale Landmarks_ 1:25.000 scale Roads: 469388 m² Roads: 469388 m²

Buildings: 836890 m² Buildings: 836890 m Green area: 359324Green m² area: 359324 Vacant space: 969404 Vacant m² space: 96940

Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 14,8 % Roads: 14,8 % Buildings: 26,3 % Buildings: 26,3 % Green area: 11,3 %Green area: 11,3 % Vacant space: 30,5Vacant % space: 30,5 %

Muscat Bank

Muscat Bank

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23˚ 34’ 42.93” Latitude: N 23˚ 34’ 42. Longitude: 58°17'32.89" Longitude: E 58°17'32. The Stadium The Stadium

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°34'23.13" Latitude: N 23°34'23.13 Area Area Longitude:58°23'58.12" Longitude:58°23'58.1 E Landmarks_ scale Landmarks_ 1:25.000 scale Roads: 471238 m² Roads: 471238 m² Buildings: 433539 m² Buildings: 433539 m Green area: 37699 Green m² area: 37699 m Vacant space: 2199114 Vacant m²space: 21991 Area Area Roads: 445510 m² Roads: 445510 m² Area Percentage Area Percentage Buildings: Buildings: m² 15 12006660 Roads: 15 12006660 % Roads: % Green area:125501 m² area:125501 Buildings: 13,8 % Green Buildings: 13,8 % m Vacant space: m²area: space: Green area: 1,23179410 % Vacant Green 1,231794 % Vacant space: 70 %Vacant space: 70 % Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 1,3 % Roads: 1,3 % Buildings: 37,7 % Buildings: 37,7 % Green area: 4 % Green area: 4 % Sultan space: Qaboos56,9 Univeristy Sultan space: Qaboos56,9 Univ% Vacant Vacant %

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°35'27.33" Latitude: N 23°35'27.33 Longitude: 58°10'19.86" Longitude: E 58°10'19.8

Area

Area

Landmarks_ Landmarks_ 1:25.000 Roads: 613374 m² Roads: 613374 m² Shangri La scale Shangri La scale

Buildings: 689188 m² Buildings: 689188 m² GPS coordinates GPS Green area: 142355Green m² coordinates area: 142355 m Latitude: 23°32'59.82" Latitude: Nm²space: 23°32'59.8 Vacant space: 1731754 Vacant 17317 Longitude: 58°39'30.74" Longitude: E 58°39'30. Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 19,52 % Roads: 19,52 % Buildings: 21,93 % Buildings: 21,93 % Green Area area: 4,53 %Green Area area: 4,53 % Vacant % space: Roads:space: 23437 54,02 m² Vacant Roads: 23437 54,02 m²

Buildings: 83671 m² Buildings: 83671 m² Green area: 62943 Green m² area: 62943 m Vacant space: 3012594 Vacant m²space: 30125

Fuala (AL-Qurm) Fuala (AL-Qurm) Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 1,9 % Roads: 1,9 % GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Buildings:23°37'25.40" 2,6 % Latitude: Buildings: 2,6 % Latitude: N 23°37'25.40 Green area: 0,7 % Longitude: Green area: 0,7 % Longitude: 58°29'27.84"E 58°29'27.8 Vacant space: 94,6Vacant % space: 94,6 M % Knowledge Oasis Muscat Knowledge Oasis

GPS coordinates GPS coordinates Latitude: 23°34'2.11" Latitude: N 23°34'2.11" Area Area E Longitude: 58°10'11.77" Longitude: 58°10'11.7 Roads: 307876 m² Roads: 307876 m² Buildings:1068141 m² Buildings:1068141 m Green area: m² area: 289026 Date:289026Green Vacant space: 1467123 Vacant m²space: 14671 Area Area Roads: 189989 m² Roads: 189989 m² Area Percentage Area Percentage Buildings: m² Buildings: m² Roads: 9,8130766 % Roads: 9,8130766 % Green area:34% 105116Green m² area:34% 105116 Buildings: Buildings: Vacant space: m²area: space: Green area: 9,22750697 % Vacant Green 9,227506 %

Vacant space: 46,7 Vacant % space: 46,7 % Area Percentage Area Percentage Roads: 6 % Roads: 6 % Buildings: 4,2 % Buildings: 4,2 % Green area: 3,3 % Green area: 3,3 % Vacant space: 86,5 Vacant % space: 86,5 %

30 Muscat Grand Mall Muscat Grand Mall GPS coordinates

GPS coordinates

MCA (City Center Qurum) MCA (City Center Q GPS coordinates

GPS coordinates


Teaching

Metabolism Redux This theoretical seminar held at The Ohio State University (OSU) examined Japanese architecture, culture and aesthetic between 1960 and 1970. The seminar revisited so called Metabolism in architecture and urbanism by studying Japanese movies and pop culture of the time. Students produced a synchron-optical chart that correlated internal and external cultural influences, places, events, publications and protagonists with Metabolist projects. This extensive map served as a background for a student performance in re-reading the recent history of Metabolism and also served to critically transpose Metabolist concepts to the contemporary discourse on architecture, megastructures, landscape urbanism and urban planning. I n s t i t u t i o n : The Ohio State University Y e a r : 2008 T y p e : Theory Seminar S t u d e n t s : 12 undergraduate and graduate students

31


Teaching

Bürolandschaft – Complex This seminar held at The Ohio State University (OSU) explored German architecture, culture and aesthetic from 1960–70, a period which re-defined modern architecture in Germany, while coinciding with the cultural and aesthetic revolution of Paris in 1968. German post-war movies served as cultural backdrop to establish a critical architectural theory. The movies were analyzed with methods of film critique for their innovative use of scenic space, narration and social context. By doing so students developed critical tools to discuss cybernetics, information and systems theory. These tool were transposed to re-assess German architecture and urbanism. Students re-qualified Frei Otto’s tensile structures and the Bürolandschaft (an open non-hierarchical office arrangement) to draw conclusions on contemporary architecture in a networked and globalized context. I n s t i t u t i o n : The Ohio State University Y e a r : 2009 T y p e : Theory Seminar S t u d e n t s : Eight undergraduate and graduate students

32


Teaching

Open Source School This 2nd year bachelor design studio at TU Berlin introduced parametric planning processes for the design of a school in South Berlin. Students experimented with one-to-one material models aiming at the creation of a particular spatial effect. These models were presented to the primary school pupils and transformed based on their feedback. These physical models we translated into digital parametric models. The reduction of an elusive physical effect into a mathematically controlled parametric model required a radical re-conception of design processes. The parametric design component allowed the students to integrate user feedback. I n s t i t u t i o n : Technische Universit채t Berlin Y e a r : 2010 T y p e : Design Studio, Assistant to Visiting Professor Susanne Hofmann S t u d e n t s : 80 undergraduate students

33


Teaching

Updating Semper This seminar geared at fashion design students combined critique of style theory with tectonic design experimentation. Reversing Gottfried Semper’s style argument wherein fashion holds tectonic principles (Bekleidungstheory), architectural theory and structural evaluation are put to use to describe style in fashion design. The result is a collaborative spatial installation, designed and fabricated by the students. The installation is neither a wearable garment nor an architectural intervention, but a hybrid in scale, material and tectonic. I n s t i t u t i o n : Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin Y e a r : 2010 T y p e : Design and Theory Seminar S t u d e n t s : 16 undergraduate students

Entwurf Muster/Stoffwecksel Erklärung

Plan

Schnitt

Foto

Bissen

gegen den natürlichen Fadenlauf des Materials

Steppung/Absteppung

durch Volumenflies erzeugte 3 dimensionale Quadratstruktur

partielle Faltenlegung

gegen den natürlichen Fadenlauf des Materials, abgesteppte Falte

Raffung

im Material geraffte Bahnen

Raffung

im Material Schachbrettmusterartig geraffte Bahnen

Volumen

durch einhalten von Mehrweite erzeugtes Volumen

Prozess Fotos

34

Detail Foto


Teaching

Winery in Geneva This graduate design studio explored a layered urban landscape in Geneva, Switzerland. The winery is understood as cultural, ecological and architectural project. The cultivation of land, the production of wine and the respective landscape architectural design mutually re-enforce each other. After an analytical mapping of the larger context, students worked with physical and digital models. Their projects we located within the striated space of the the urban landscape. The projects resulted in an architecture informed by the specific parameters of landscape, production and inhabitation before formal representation. I n s t i t u t i o n : The Ohio State University Y e a r : 2008 T y p e : Graduate Design Studio S t u d e n t s : 16 graduate students

35


Teaching

Sport Urbanism This undergraduate bachelor thesis studio examined the potential of sport facilities to organize and structure urban space. The thesis site was set on the former Berlin central airport of Tempelhof, an area 3 times a large as Central Park in New York. The injection of a highly performative sports program triggered a multitude of responses towards the configuration of landscape, infrastructure and large scale architecture. A parametric model served as spatial diagram. 10001 POINTS

I n s t i t u t i o n : The Ohio State University Y e a r : 2009 T y p e : BSc Thesis S t u d e n t s : Eight undergraduate students

20001 POINTS

After running the script you recommended a number of times, the line yielded the beszt results at these two intervals. The interesting thing that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expected, was how well sinusoidal-like patterns emerge in the denser regions of the line, that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t follow the direction of the line. The gradual change between each wave amplitude yields a new underlying pattern.

36


Teaching

Digital Design and Representation

Digital Design and Representation stand at the core of the education of architects and urban designers. Due to the proliferation and ubiquity of computers, the increasing computer literacy amongst incoming students and the fundamental shift in the profession towards the digital, digital design and representation needs to re-assess and re-qualify design thinking all together. Neither the computer, nor the program, nor the computer user are supposed to replace the classical role of the architect. Instead, the architect needs to embrace and understand the fundamental capacities and limitations of the digital. The overarching pedagogical concept is the model as information entity. This virtual model can be enhanced with information as needed and later queried in various ways to produce various forms of architectural representations ranging from the classical plans, sections and elevations to advanced forms like building information models (BIM) or computer aided manufacturing (CAM) files. At the undergraduate level, computer aided design (CAD) courses introduce fundamental tools for design alongside concepts of representation. Digital Fabrication continues the digital chain â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from inception to production of architecture and urbanism. Parametric Design expands the limits of standard software tools and allows to manipulate data and generate new programmatic and formal relationships. 37


Teaching I n s t i t u t i o n : German University of Technology in Oman Y e a r : 2012–2013 T y p e : Coaching of GUtech Student Expert Network S t u d e n t s : 16 undergraduate students I n s t i t u t i o n : German University of Technology in Oman Y e a r : 2012–2013 T y p e : Computer Aided Design classes St u d e n t s : 120 undergraduate students over the last 3 years I n s t i t u t i o n : Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe Y e a r : 2011 T y p e : Parametric Industrial Design Seminar S t u d e n t s : 14 graduate students I n s t i t u t i o n : The Ohio State University Y e a r : 2007–2009 T y p e : Digital Design and Representation Classes S t u d e n t s : 160 undergraduate students over 2 years I n s t i t u t i o n : The Ohio State University Y e a r : 2007–2009 T y p e : Digital Fabrication and Manufacturing Classes S t u d e n t s : 160 undergraduate students over 2 years

38


UPAD 2011 / CAD II / Arabic Patterns 2.0 Student name: Student ID:

Assistants: Tom Held & Veit Knickenberg Assistants: Tom Held & Veit Knickenberg

Assist.Prof. Aurel von Richthofen

A

Student name:Amal Al Kalbani

Student ID:2008-0073

Assist.Prof. Aurel von Richthofen

UPAD 2011 / CAD II / Arabic Patterns 2.0

Student ID:2008-0073

UPAD 2011 / CAD II / Arabic Patterns 2.0

Student name:Amal Al Kalbani

Assist.Prof. Aurel von Richthofen Assistants: Tom Held & Veit Knickenberg

UPAD 2011 / CAD II / Arabic Patterns 2.0 Assist.Prof. Aurel von Richthofen Student name: Jokah al-harthy ID: 2008-0075 Assist.: Tom Held & Veit Knickenberg

Teaching

1:100 1:100 Axonometric Axonometric

B

B B

A

B A

Section:AA Section:AA

1:100 Plan

1:20 Transformation 1, 2 ,3 1:100 &4 Axonometric

1:25 combined polyline pattern

39

A

not to scale 1:100 1:100 Plan Model Plan Photograph 1:100 1:100 Axonometric Axonometric Section Section

Section:BB Section:BB

1:100 1:100 LongLong and short and short section section

1:10 Original tile

1:100 Long and short section

1:20


Projects

41


Contents Projects Prologue  4 – 7 Research  8 – 23 Teaching  25 – 39

Projects EcoHaus   44, 45, 46, 47 House like Her   48, 49 Qurm Villas   50, 51 Haus Frehn   52, 53 580 Park Avenue   54, 55 Hotel & Park Heiden   56, 57 School Crisser   58, 59 School Vevey   60, 61 Elephant Park   62, 63 Nouvelle Comédie   64, 65 Sucre-glace  66, 67 Maribor Bridge   68, 69 Connecting Link   70, 71 Tensegrity Tower   72, 73 New Bouwkunde   74, 75 Einheits Denkmal   76, 77 Tetra – City / House   78, 79 Euro Marseille   80, 81 Splügen Rest Stop   82, 83 Infographics Saxony   84, 85 Urban Village   86, 87 Mobility Museum   88, 89 43


EcoHaus

e co haus

44


EcoHaus C o - a u t h o r s : Nikolaus Knebel, Aurel von Richthofen and Martin Werminghausen with UPAD students of GUtech P l a c e : Halban, Oman Y e a r : 2011–2013 S i z e : 180 m2 T y p e : Faculty-lead Student Design Competition C l i e n t : The Research Council Oman / GUtech

E c o H a u s : The EcoHaus is a guest house for visiting faculty on the campus of the German University of Technology in Oman. The design integrates sustainable design principles, including passive energy concepts, the use of local plants for filtration of used water, a modern mud-brick wall for insulation. The eco-friendly house will be the first of its kind the Middle East. The EcoHaus consists of two key components. An interior rectilinear two-story block contains the bedrooms and bathrooms, as well as the technical room and a laundry room. This volume is placed in the centre of a large circular wall. The orientation of the EcoHaus follows two directions. One is along the path of the sun: the circular wall is cut open towards the campus on the north side, however, no direct sunlight reaches the inner block of rooms. The other is informed by the design of the campus, through which the orientation of the inner rectilinear rooms complements the angles of the campus buildings. The spaces between the rectilinear volume and the round wall are used for the common areas, including the entrance loggia, kitchen and dining room, living room, a sitting area on a gallery, and a TV and reading area – most of these have a double-story height. The path to the bedrooms on the upper floor is a gradual transition from communal to private spaces. The average-sized bedrooms appear spacious as all furniture except for the bed is integrated into one built-in furniture that combines shelves, cupboards, shoe rack, suitcase deposit, seat, desk, and windowsill. The windows are very large, and due to the strict North orientation and the large roof overhang direct solar radiation through the window is avoided. From the bed and the desk the guests enjoy views over the campus park. The landscape design for the EcoHaus is comprised of a series of outdoor spaces that flow seamlessly from the north façade of the building, extending into the landscape and connecting the building to the campus. A stripe of reed beds on the north-east parallel to a slope, reaching towards a single specimen tree: the famed Frankincense Tree, gives a clear and vibrant direction to the entrance of the indoor living space. The outdoor area has a hierarchy of space and experience, with the private loggia space that blends interior and exterior spaces, the semi-private garden in the northwest that acts as an interface between the public and private, and the more public, open outer terrace in the northeast that provides visual connections to the larger landscape corridor of the campus.

45


EcoHaus

LOCAL MATERIALS

temperature in °C

moisture in %

28,00

80,00

27,50

75,00

ACTIVE VENTILATION

SOLAR ENERGY

not only the operation of building, but also the production and transportation of materials consumes energy. This “grey energy”, the provenance, and the lifecycle of materials has to be considered. The ECO HAUS will be built with locally sourced, sun-dried mud-bricks. Employing local craftsmen gives an economic and social dimension, too.

kWh

KWh

RADIANT COOLING

during the hot summer months and the days of the transitions periods, the building is operated with active ventilation for hygienic air-changes. In the ECO HAUS, outside air is cooled, dehydrated and distributed to the guest rooms. From there it is either exhausted directly through the bathrooms, or it flows to the communal areas. Energy is regained from main exhaust air through an enthalpy wheel.

in muscat, the sun shines nearly every day of the year and solar irradiation levels are among the highest in the world. It is an ideal place for using solar energy. In the ECO haus photovoltaic and solar thermal panels are installed on the roof. The energy is fed into the campus grid, and then again sourced from there.

radiant cooling ceilings regulate the temperature of the ECO HAUS. Hea in the rooms are dissipated by a wate tem which is integrated into the ceilin flow can be reduced to the minimal a of fresh air. A radiant instead of a con heat transfer between body and surr ings creates higher comfort and cons less energy.

cooling load in W

4000

8000 14000

3500

27,00

70,00

26,50

65,00

26,00

60,00

25,50

55,00

1500 1000

25,00

50,00 45,00

24,00

40,00

2500

Jan

Feb

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GROUND FLOOR 1:50

the German uniVersity of technoloGy in oman team: Faculty + Students: Department of Urban Planning and Architecture, Consultant: Hoehler + Partner, Contractor: Larsen & Toubro, Municipality: Muscat Municipality, EBC - Institute for Energy Efficient Buildings and Indoor Climate (RWTH Aachen), Earthen Constructions: Ziegert Roswag Seiler, Transsolar - Klima Engineering, Chair for CAAD (RWTH Aachen), Landscape: Andrew Burton Anderson, Water Treatment: Bau

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EcoHaus

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House like Her

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House like Her A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Carlos Ramos da Silva and Sergei Mikhailenko P l a c e : Sur, Oman Y e a r : 2011 S i z e : 220 m2 T y p e : Study commission C l i e n t : Undisclosed

horiz

H o u s e l i k e H e r : The House Like Her – an artist studio and home – is located by the sea south of Muscat along the magnificent coastline of the Indian Ocean between Quriat and Sur. Linked by the new coastal high-way to the capital the location offers the serenity and unspoilt beauty unique to Oman. The house is rectangular in shape with three closed and one open side orientated away from direct sun light, yet offering spectacular sea views. A compact envelope assures that heat gains are kept to a minimum. Floor-plans are wide and open. All main functions such as living, working, dining and sleeping are organized on the ground floor. The large roof acts as a large secondary outdoor living room. All functions on this roof have a specific purpose in the overall energetic performance of the house. A shaded terrace offers spectacular views and keeps direct sun-light away from the house. An array of photovoltaics provides electricity. The swimming pool on the roof acts as thermal insulator to the house and is chilled by sea water. The house comes with a system of movable walls and pods. These pods are roughly the size of a small room, lightweight, equipped with smart technology, on movable tracks and act like large pieces of furniture. They perform on various levels: Each pod has one specific function such as being a library, working area or guest bedroom. Depending on the use of the house, these pods can be moved towards the central areas next to dining, living or sleeping area or stored away. Through their re-configuration within the house, the pods create privacy where needed. The pods are ‘plug-ins’ to the house that can be exchanged and ‘up-graded’ in the future without the need to remodel the whole house. Adaptability and flexibility is key towards sustainable design solutions. The terminology of computers is not accidental in design of the sustainable house of the future. Smart sensors embedded in the architecture react to the inhabitants behavior. When the residents leave the house, the house goes into sleep-mode like a laptop computer. The house automatically reduces the air-conditioning and dims lights. The house awakes automatically before residents return. In the night the house replenishes the underground air register and cools the swimming pool on the roof like an accumulator to reduce the energy demands during the day. The house is literally programmed. Both hardware and software can be updated in the future, if needed. ‘Plug-ins’, ‘apps’ and ‘pods’ are integrated into a comprehensive sustainable design solution. The materials use in construction reflect the concept of sustainability. The walls are made of locally sourced stones and rammed earth with a structural concrete frame. These materials reduce the initial energy demand for production and transportation. The house also features recycled elements that were salvaged from an old Omani dhow and transformed into shading devices for the roof and the windows.

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Qurm Villas

qurm villas

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Qurm Villas Qurm Villas A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Michaela Schweizer P l a c e : Qurm, Oman Y e a r : 2011 S i z e : 800 m2 T y p e : Study commission C l i e n t : Undisclosed

Q u r m V i l l a s : The Qurm Villas originate in the clients desire to built four houses for his four grown up kids: In order to avoid a quarrel between the siblings all villas needed to be the same size and layout, but each with a different orientation and expression. The four villas are designed like genetic siblings. Based on parametric principles to distribute program and negotiate site constraints such as view, sloping terrain and privacy, each villa carries the identity of the inhabitants while being similar to the generic model. The villas feature particular spaces depending on individual preferences setting the hierarchy for the following secondary residential, circulation and service spaces. The resulting villas form a dense group that occupies the site in reminiscence of vernacular Omani tribal settlements. At the same time the houses cast shade onto each other and create a favorable micro-climate. The facade pattern breaks the cubic volumes into even smaller elements according to a mathematical quadtree logic similar to the traditional mashrabiya: an Arabic term given to a type of projecting oriel window enclosed with carved wood latticework.

Property Line

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Haus Frehn

haus frehn 52


Haus Frehn

Haus Frehn

aurelVR architecture - Berlin

A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Alessia Pegorin, Riccardo del Fabbro, Estrella Sanz Alonzo P l a c e : Golzen, Germany Y e a r : 2013 S i z e : 230 m2 T y p e : Study commission C l i e n t : Undisclosed

H a u s F r e h n : Haus Frehn is a countryside home South of Berlin for a couple with separate guest house. The site is located in the scenic Spreewald of Brandenburg in a predominantly rural setting. The house doubles up as administrative building for the owners organic sea buckthorn farm. The plants with distinctive orange fruits surround the building. The modern, square house with a square annex contrasts with the rolling hills and forests of the region. The house is built on Passivhaus design principles and features a modern timber-frame construction. The main house is organized on one level around a small patio, while the guest house has a mezzanine level.

Haus Frehn

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580 Park Avenue

580 park av enue

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580 Park Avenue A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Lydia Kallipoliti P l a c e : Manhattan, Ny, USA Y e a r : 2007–09 S i z e : 300 m2 T y p e : Renovation C l i e n t : Undisclosed

5 8 0 P a r k A v e n u e : 580 Park Avenue is the complete remodeling of a 300 m2 prewar apartment on Park Avenue, Manhattan, New York. The renovation uses innovative materials from renewable resources to render an exquisite modern apartment. The Cabinetry has been fabricated to measure. Contrasting rich and precious materials with light paints and fabrics 580 Park Avenue is an exclusive ‘Pied a Terre’ on the Upper East Side. Due to tight city codes and building regulations the five bathrooms have been designed like airplane bathrooms: In order to offer a maximum of comfort, flexibility and beauty in a relatively small space all functions have been seamlessly integrated in a single continuous surface. The kitchen has been transformed into a place of encounter around a highly innovative kitchen island. The hanging hood is a thermochromic light piece that registers entropic activity. The renovation was completed with a highly qualified team of contractors from Europe.

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Hotel & Park Heiden

hotel & park heiden

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Hotel & Park Heiden N

A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Alessia Pegorin and Riccardo del Fabbro

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P l a c e : Heiden, Switzerland Y e a r : 2012 S i z e : 2000 m2 T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Gemeinde Heiden

H o t e l & P a r k H e i d e n : Hotel & Park Heiden is a new business hotel and adjacent park in 19th century spa-town Heiden on lake Constance in Switzerland. The new hotel marks the Western edge of a contiuous park landscape and ties into the historic fabric of the town. The building continues the typology of representative townhouses reminiscent of the former glory. Like a cornerstone, the hotel building offers a destination for and redirects pedestrian circulation into the park, while respecting the protected trees and monuments. The hotel comprises two volumes. A plinth containing the public functions of the business hotel and an upper volume with hotel rooms overlooking the park, the spa town and the landscape beyond. The facade of the upper volume offers a double skin made of translucent polycarbonate material in front of the main concrete structure. This interstitial space is the location of balconies surrounding the Northern and Southern facade. This double skin creates a subtle game of light that dematerializes the upper part of the building during the day. Translucency and light reflection turn the building into a hovering cloud. During the night it reflects the occupancy of the individual hotel rooms like a gigantic lantern, while keeping the privacy of the guests. The plinth features a functional circulation, separating service parts from the guests and day-visitors. The construction is made of a light-weight concrete shell with expressive directional openings that frame selective parts of the park on the ground and first level. The tight envelope and efficient structural system add to the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;minergieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; standard for sustainable design reached in Switzerland. The 19th century park is updated with a geometric network of pathways, shortcuts and patios, weaving existing and new elements together.

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School Crisser

s ch o o l

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School Crisser A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Alessia Pegorin, Magdalena Kupfersberger, Thomas Hurrell and Riccardo del Fabbro P l a c e : Crissier, Switzerland Y e a r : 2012 S i z e : 1600 m2 T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Commune de Crissier

S c h o o l C r i s s e r : School Vevey is a design for an elementary school in Crissier, a small village in the Swiss Romandie. The design includes eight class rooms, a sports hall and related administrative spaces. The program demands a relatively large building set within the core of the village consistingcirculation of smaller scale pitched-roof houses. To mediate the scale difference between school and neighsalle de gym boring buildings the shape of the roof is folded twice. The internal organization wraps classrooms and sport hall around a semi-open circulation system. The building is made of a modern timber construction.

VOLUME selon SIA 416 (2003) surfaces utiles principales

système constructif développement de la toiture

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632 m2

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492 m2

rez-de-chaussée:

917 m2

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325 m2

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locaux enseignement salle multifunctionnelle locaux de service salle de gym

programme et circulation

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School Vevey

school vevey

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School Vevey A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Alessia Pegorin, Magdalena Kupfersberger, Thomas Hurrell and Maja Karolina Zdrojewska P l a c e : Vevey, Switzerland Y e a r : 2012 S i z e : 12000 m2 T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Commune de Vevey

S c h o o l V e v e y : School Vevey is a design for an secondary school in the town of Vevey on the shore of lake Geneva including three sport halls, student restaurant, library, auditorium and 70 class rooms. Located in the valley of a former milling river Veveyse with old manufacturing buildings nearby, the school occupies the flat grounds slightly uphill from a the schools existing sports complex. The classrooms, administrative spaces and library are organized in a circular fashion on two floors hovering above the open ground level. The sports halls, student restaurants and auditorium form three plinth-like volumes pushed into the ground for the upper ring of class rooms to rest on. This architectural move frees visual connections across the site re-establishing a link from the road to the Western side of the plot to the river on the East. Ground level plinth and cantilevering ring of classes frame the school patios. The main entrance on the first level is reached through a scenic external staircase that continues the patio space onto the first level. The inner circulation features four elevator and staircase cores. The central corridors are wide and modulated by open pockets every three to four classrooms. All classrooms have large windows fronts. The modular grid in floor plan allows for later transformation and expansion of the school. The diagrid structure of the facade reflects the inner forces of the cantilever along the facade. The double story external diagrid gradually transforms from a vertical column structure towards the Northern end towards a space-frame diagrid on the Southern end where it bridges almost 20 meters. The structure is made of laminated wood beams and clad with Polyurethane varnish. The large roof surface is used to collect storm water and for photovoltaic cells. The flat shape of the building exploits a difference in air pressure created by air drafts, similar to uplifting effect of an airplane wing, thereby guaranteeing a natural ventilation.

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Bois lamellé-collé 450 x 1000 Revêtement en polyuréthane 3mm Larmier-eau Connexion fenêtre : Cadres de fenêtres en aluminium Ombrage à l'extérieur Barrière vapeur Plafond : Couche de polyuréthane Isolation acoustique Plaque Kerto Q Bande Kerto Kerto S d = 75mm ABC Spax 5x70 Isolation Bande Kerto Q Chauffage au sol longeant les fenêtres

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Bois lamellé 150 x 1000 Bois lamellé 300 x 1800 Paroi : Coque extérieure en béton de 150mm Barrière vapeur Isolation de 150mm Coque en béton intérieure porteuse de 300mm Sol: Revêtement Regupol AG IS 13mm Membrane de bitume Isolation de 150mm Coque de béton intérieure porteuse de 300mm Sous-sol: Membrane de bitume Isolation de 150mm Coque intérieure porteuse en béton de 300mm

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Prise de position: Le bâtiment est conçu en anneau qui épouse les limites du terrain et offre ainsi un élément marquant du voisinage urbain qui s’intègre aussi bien à l’Avenue des Crosets qu’à la Veveyse. On peut remarquer sur tous les côtés la structure portante suspendue qui repose sur un socle à l’étage. L’accès à l’école a lieu par 2 passages couverts menant à la grande cour intérieure d’où partent 4 accès verticaux ainsi que le grand escalier extérieur, et qui conduisent au restaurant, à l’aula, au complexe sportif, à la bibliothèque et aux salles de classes. Le passage dans la cour et jusqu’à la Veveyse est entendu comme espace partiel-

Cour intérieure

cité passives et actives: le concept d’énergie différencie les moyens actifs et passifs de réduire la consommation d’énergie. La forme aplatie du bâtiment réduit la hauteur de façade et, par conséquent, l’élévation de la température en été. Un labyrinthe thermique sous la partie arrière du bâtiment veille à la climatisation de l’air en hiver comme en été avant son entrée dans le bâtiment. Par la cour intérieure et les deux passages se produit – comme pour une aile d’avion – une pression basse qui aère les salles de classe de façon naturelle. L’eau de pluie est récoltée sur les surfaces planes du toit et utilisée dans le bâtiment. De même, l’eau grise est filtrée dans le lit de roseaux et réintroduite dans le circuit. Les

que ressource naturelle renouvelable, ce matériau est de CO2 neutre et d’origine locale. Il est rendu ignifuge de par sa composition stratifiée en PU. Le programme spatial est clairement divisé. Les domaines publics, tels les salles de sports, le restaurant et l’aula, sont répartis sur le socle du rez-de-chaussée autour de la cour de passage. La bibliothèque et l’administration scolaire se situent au premier étage auquel on accède par l’escalier extérieur prolongeant la cour. Les salles de classe sont groupées sur 2 étages en anneau intérieur encerclant la cour. Toutes les salles de classes ont de grandes baies vitrées. Les couloirs médians

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Coupe C-C 1:200


Elephant Park

eleph ant park

Hauptweg 62 Entdeckungsweg

Seitenweg


Elephant Park A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Rushabh Parekh, Scott Kittle, Josh Lawrence, Anthony Prousi, Matt Canterna P l a c e : Zurich, Switzerland Y e a r : 2008 S i z e : 4000 m2 T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Zoo Zurich

E l e p h a n t P a r k : Elephant Park is a design for an elephant house with inner and outer spaces as extension to the Zurich zoo. The design maximizes visitor experiences though undulating layout in the landscape. The Elephant Park negotiates a series of programmatic constraints based on the nature of designing for elephants and humans alike, moving away from the classic separation of exhibit and observer. Conceived as an environment the Park exploits human-elephant contacts in a maximum of ways. A diagram of the “Vitruvian Elephant” in analogy to Leonardo da Vinci’s famous drawing examines the range and reach of animals to derive a set of key proportions. Translated into a parametric model this diagram is applied to all zones of overlap between human and elephant spaces. In order to maximize these overlaps all spaces follow a loose organic geometry. As a result, visitors can observe the animals from closest possible distances and from all angles, without visual barriers. Far from being a simple extrusion in plan, the scheme gently drapes down the hillside. Visitors stroll over the grass roof landscaped as savannah to peek through termite mound-shaped light funnels. Pathways encompass all exterior elephant ranges and reconnect to lead visitors inside where the same diagram regulates the experience. Linking two different scalar economies (human / elephant) the system constantly adapts to differentiate moments of architectural specificity. SERVICE BUILDING

C3 Elephant Bulls Area

E6 Utility Vehicles

E9 technology

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Main Entrance from African Mountain Path

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Nouvelle ComĂŠdie

nouvelle comĂŠdie 64


restaurant

d

N o u v e l l e C o m é d i e : Nouvelle Comédie is a compe­ tition design for a new classic and contemporary theater and opera house in Geneva, Switzerland. Nouvelle Comédie is a hybrid. For the sake of programmatic flexibility all main spaces are organized on one horizontal plane. Acoustic requirements on stage and seating given, constrained by the site, the resulting form is a simple massing diagram. Thus the section resembles Antoine de St. Exuperie’s hat-turnedelephant-eating-snake drawing from the Little Prince. The architectural exploration is bound to the thin layer of the facade. The skin necessarily becomes the mediating surface this Le of volume produit project. est posé sur une platteLes niveaux des étages respectent les difLes volumes se situent – optimaux du point férents niveaux topographiques et sont de vue écologique – à l’intérieur d’une enforme plane qui, grâce à une isolation mécanique, réduit Nouvelle au maximum les vibrations disposésexplores de sorte que l’entréea principale veloppe extérieure unifiée. Cette enveloppe Comédie sophisticated fractal de la nouvelle gare sous-terraine voisine ouvre sur l’esplanade publique (401.85), est à la fois un toit, une terrasse extérieure et une fassade. L’eau de pluie est récoltée (CEVA), et en même temps évite les barrialors que le lobby et les entrées dans les triangulation system. Applied on the surface in creases and ères de niveaux. De cette façon, tous les salles se situent au niveau inférieur (397.00). par les toits fracturés et sert au refroidissedécors et accessoires nécessaires peuvent Ce mode d’entrée « inverti » agrandit ment passif et à la régulation du microclicorners of the volume an effect of dematerialization is être transportés facilement des ateliers de l’esplanade et allie théâtre et espace public. mat du bâtiment. La forme tectonique fracproduction dans les deux salles, en évitant en résulte un espace urbain ouvert, lieu tale imprime à la face du bâtiment côté achieved. The scalar Ildecongruence of the fractal breaks ainsi de coûteuses installations de monteconvergence entre ville et culture. gare son caractère cristallindown spécifique. Côté ville, le bâtiment s’ouvre et laisse entrer la charges. lumière dans les studios,ever les loges et les the solid geometry derived by the inner program into ateliers par un rideau de vitres imprimées La double fassade décorative smaller facets. These facets project in and (sérigraphie). out, creating a réduit l’incidence du rayonnement solaire. transparente permet une contibi-fold illusion of increased depth and scaleLanuitéfassade within less than visuelle et un échange entre la production et l’espace urbain. half a meter of facade thickness. The recursive nature of A l’intérieur, les visiteurs ont accès non seulement aux domaines de représentation fractalization controls depth by “generations” of fractals. du lobby, de la salle de théâtre et du bar mais également à ceux des ateliers, Generations increase locally on the skin depending on thedes salles de répétition et des studios qui sont directement reliés au domaine des visiteurs. desired effect of dematerialization. Le visiteur devient ainsi une part active et essentielle du projet FRACTALE pour la The folded nature of fractalization places Nouvelle Nouvelle Comédie de Genève. Comédie within a series of surface/facade projects that aim to re-write complex surfaces with simple parametric rules.

salle et scène frontale

hall d'accueil

plan du niveau de l’esplanade publique (401.85 m) à l’échelle 1/500

direction artistique

és te

P l a c e : Geneva, Switzerland Y e a r : 2008 S i z e : 8000 m2 T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Ville de Genève

salle modulable

e

A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Rushabh Parekh

salle modulable

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Nouvelle Comédie

ateliers de montage et de maintenance

accès des décors et livraison

foyer

salle et scène frontale

plan du niveau de la route de desserte (~395.50 m) à l’échelle 1/500

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Sucre-glace

sucreglace

66


Sucre-glace A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Thomas Pierce and Tom Pompeiani P l a c e : St. Cergues, Switzerland Y e a r : 2010 S i z e : 6000 m2 T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Commune de St. Cergues

S u c r e - g l a c e : Sucre-glace is a design for a compact ice-rink and sports stadium in the mountain resort of St. Cergues in the Swiss Jura. The design responds to the setting of within the village and the existing facilities of the centre du Vallon. The organization of the sports rink is straight-forward and functional. The entrance leads visitors to the viewing ranks, while the athletes enter from a link to the neighboring building. Technical rooms are hidden under the grades to the West of the design. A parking is located under the building. The light-weight composite envelope consists of a translucent membrane and wooden space-frame and is supported by positive air pressure. A grid of wooded knot consisting of three perpendicular beams each form a space-frame with a static height of three meters. The thickness of the beams relates to the structural loads. The beams are loaded predominantly with pressure. Resulting forces run in parallel direction to the wooden fibers. Steel cables and a polyethylene membrane take the tensile forces. The later closes the envelope climatically. Wood is used as renewable material. All materials can be recycled. The complex spatial knots are resolved using parametric design and digital manufacturing. On site construction will be reduced to a minimum. The smart combination of wood beams, steel cables and polyethylene membrane results in a lightweight building with a minimal carbon footprint.

su

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Elévation sud C-C, éch

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2.4.1.1 Surface de Jeux 1738

2.4.1.16 Terrasse 70

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2.4.1.2 Degagements sur pourtours exterieurs des rambardes 480 2.4.1.13 Buvette 70

2.4.1.6 Location 30

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2.4.1.3 Entree 51.2

2.4.1.7 Infirmerie 20.5

2.4.1.31 Acces Pietons depuis Parking

2.4.1.5 Bureau 15

2.4.1.23 Loc. Electr. 8

2.4.1.10 San. Hommes 22

2.4.1.8 Sono Techn. 25

2.4.1.24 Rambardes 80.4

2.4.1.18 Surfaceuse 58.2

2.4.1.17 Loc. Mat. 38.7

2.4.1.21 Loc. Techn. 48.2

2.4.1.19 Prod. Froid 72 2.4.1.20 Fosse a Neige 10

+1038.0m

2.4.1.22 Deg. Fosse a Neige 10

+1032.0m

2.4.1.25 Acces Service Hauteur 4,5m

D

B

C

2.4.1.4 2.4.1.14 Caisses Cuisinne 10 10.9

2.4.1.12 San. Hand. 4

2.4.1.26 Acces Gradins

67

C

Plan rez-de-chaussée,


Maribor Bridge

mari­ bor bridge 64397 / 2

Context: The proposed new footway and bicycle bridge Lent–Taborsko nabrežje in light of Maribor's preparation to the European Capital of Culture in 2012 is a light-weight construction combining air beams and tension cables in a new structural concept called “Tensairity”. The design calls for a modern solution that bridges Drava River at the location of the oldest bridge in Maribor, between the old port – Lent, and the Tabor bank (Taborsko nabrežje), and significantly shortens paths for pedestrians and bicyclists, thereby improving connections in the city centre at both banks of the river. Spanning the 130 meters wide riverbed of Drava River in three elegant articulated girders, supported by two columns anchored in the riverbed, with a height clearance of 3.60 meters the new footway bridge is designed to become the recognizable and innovative, transparent and neutral structure of the city. Structural System: The new structural concept Tensairity is a synergetic combination of a pneumatic structure and a cable-strut structure. The main function of the pneumatic structure is to stabilize the cable-strut structure. Tensairity structures have a multitude of very interesting properties. The beam or shell like structures are very light, thus ideal for foot and bicycle bridges. Furthermore Tensairity structures are load adaptable. The load-deformation response of Tensairity girders can be controlled by the air pressure which allows the girders to adapt to changing load conditions.

Axonometric Diagram

bridge-way and steel bracing foundations

Static Diagram

259,10 256,00

Tensairity girder diagram

253,00

clearance 3,60

Lent

Tensairity is a machine and not a beam: The fundamental Tensairity beam consists of a cylindrical airbeam, a compression strut tightly connected with the airbeam and two cables spiraled around the airbeam and attached at each end with the compression strut. The compression strut can have minimal dimensions leading to the light weight property of the new structural concept. Furthermore, the pressure in the airbeam is solely determined by the load per area and independent of the span and slenderness of the beam. Therefore, the synergetic combination of an airbeam with cables and struts is ideally suited for wide span structures. In the case of the new footway and bicycle bridge LentTaborsko nabrežje, a sequence of interlocking girders span the river. Materialisation: The airbeams are made of translucent EPFT material, standard in contemporary construction industry and recyclable. The girders rest on steel bracing and concrete foundations. The bridge-way is clad in local wood. They are equipped with spotlights with color changing capabilities. The light shines through the glassy end plates into the pneumatic structure and illuminates the Tensairity girders from inside. The color of each Tensairity beam can be dynamically changed and controlled by software and interesting light patterns over the whole bridge structure can be realized. Neutral and transparent during the day, the bridge can display dynamic lights during the night. The orchestration of the light will be the work a scenographer and may be integrated into the festive activities of the European Capital of Culture in 2012. Artist may program the bridge to resonate the ambient light of a second sun-down or use it to reflect the city's state of mind and emotion.

Adaptive load response of a tensairity girder

Tensairity Airbeams with tension cables (red)

The controllable adaptiveness of Tensairity structures to changing load conditions is the most outstanding feature of Tensairity compared to conventional trusses or girders. The adaptability is an inherent feature of the structure itself and follows from its design and concept. As a consequence, Tensairity girders can be viewed as a machine, where energy is converted into work. The energy in form of the compressed air is used to lift a weight. The machine aspect of Tensairity structures can give a different look on civil engineering structures. In light weight structures, the live load normally dominates the dead load and thus mainly defines the design of the structure. Such a girder is therefore designed for a maximal live load which is normally given by the building regulations. Most of the structures never experience the maximal load during their life time. The price for a nevertheless relative security is that most structures are under almost all conditions way to strong and way too heavy. In contrast, a Tensairity girder can be adapted to the current load situation simply by pressure variation. This enables an important safety concept for Tensairity. The idea is to design the Tensairity structure in such a way that the load-bearing capacity of the bending stiff elements in the girder is large enough to carry the dead load of the structure even with zero overpressure.

Tabor

Drava

Force Diagram

Deflexion Diagram (with tension lines)

Structural diagram with tension cables (along geodetic paths) 256,00 254,90 253,00 clearance 3,60

Tabor

Drava

Lent

Section through tensairyt beams 254,70

Short section scale 1:100

Situation plan scale 1:1000

259,10 256,00 254,70

254,90 clearance 3,60

Lent

Drava

253,00

Tabor Long Section scale 1:200

Plan scale 1:200

68


Maribor Bridge A u t h o r : Aurel von Richthofen P l a c e : Maribor, Slovenia Y e a r : 2010 Size: – T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Maribor European City of Culture 2012

M a r i b o r B r i d g e : Maribor Bridge is a design for new footway and bicycle bridge Lent–Taborsko nabrežje. The proposed bridge is a light-weight construction combining air beams and tension cables in a new structural concept called “Tensairity”. The bridge crosses Drava River next to the oldest bridge in Maribor, between the old port – Lent, and the Tabor bank (Taborsko nabrežje), and significantly shortens paths for pedestrians and bicyclists, thereby improving connections in the city centre at both banks of the river. Spanning the 130 meters wide riverbed of Drava River in three elegant articulated girders, supported by two columns anchored in the riverbed, with a height clearance of 3.60 meters the new footway bridge is designed to become the recognizable and innovative, transparent and neutral structure of the city. The new structural concept Tensairity is a synergetic combination of a pneumatic structure and a cable-strut structure. The main function of the pneumatic structure is to stabilize the cable-strut structure. Tensairity structures have a multitude of very interesting properties. The beam or shell like structures are very light, thus ideal for foot and bicycle bridges. Furthermore Tensairity structures are load adaptable. The load-deformation response of Tensairity girders can be controlled by the air pressure which allows the girders to adapt to changing load conditions. As a con­ sequence, Tensairity girders can be viewed as a machine, where energy is converted into work. The energy in form of the compressed air is used to lift a weight. The synergetic combination of an air-beam with cables and struts is ideally suited for wide span structures. In the case of the new footway and bicycle bridge Lent–Taborsko nabrežje, a sequence of interlocking girders span the river.

The air-beams are made of translucent EPFT material, standard in contemporary construction industry and recyclable. The girders rest on steel bracing and concrete foundations. The bridge-way is clad in local wood. They are equipped with spotlights with color changing capabilities. The light shines through the glassy end plates into the pneumatic structure and illuminates the Tensairity girders from inside. The color of each Tensairity beam can be dynamically changed and controlled by software and interesting light patterns over the whole bridge structure can be realized. Neutral and transparent during the day, the bridge can display dynamic lights during the night. The orchestration of the light will be the work a scenographer and may be integrated into the festive activities of the European Capital of Culture in 2012. Artist may pro- gram the bridge to resonate the ambient light of a second sun-down or use it to reflect the city’s state of mind and emotion.

64397 / 2

paration to the nsion cables in a rava River at the rsko nabrežje), in the city centre

ported by two dge is designed

a cable-strut Tensairity struclight, thus ideal ormation adapt to chang-

Axonometric Diagram

bridge-way and steel bracing foundations

Static Diagram

259,10 256,00

Lent

Tensairity girder diagram

253,00

clearance 3,60

Tabor

Drava

connected with mpression strut. e new structural d independent with cables and ge Lent-

dustry and n local wood. e glassy end of each Tensairs over the whole y dynamic lights egrated into the esonate the

Adaptive load response of a tensairity girder

Tensairity Airbeams with tension cables (red)

outstanding t feature of the n be viewed as a d to lift a weight. ures. In light design of the y the building e price for a ng and way too ssure variation. cture in such a o carry the dead

Force Diagram

Deflexion Diagram (with tension lines)

Structural diagram with tension cables (along geodetic paths) 256,00 254,90 253,00 clearance 3,60

Tabor

Drava

Lent

Section through tensairyt beams 254,70

Short section scale 1:100

Situation plan scale 1:1000

69 259,10 256,00


Connecting Link

connecting link

70


Connecting Link A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Marc Schmit and Sebastian Hefti P l a c e : Vienna, Austria Y e a r : 2009 Size: â&#x20AC;&#x201C; T y p e : Competition Client: Stadt Wien

C o n n e c t i n g L i n k : Connecting Link is a design for a light-weight tensegrity and air-balloon pedestrian bridge with supportive shell, literally supported by air. An extremely lightweight construction made of an pressurized air-balloons, tension cables and beams crosses the Wienfluss river, avoiding cumbersome vertical structures that could disturb the sensitive landmarked setting in the inner city of Vienna. Due to its low profile the bridge pays homage to the adjacent Radetzky bridge and ties into the structural and aesthetic logic of bridge engineering in Austria. The design calls for an asymmetrical pivotal bridge: The longer truss rotates, while the shorter part is fixed. The longer truss spans 36m towards the Hermann Park. A rotation of 110 degrees allows ships to pass if needed. Both arms are in perfect balance while open and brace each other in closed position to accept higher loads. The constructive principle has 4 elements: A light weight aluminum deck takes tension forces, the pneumatic beams (tensairity balloons) with circumferential tension cables form the actual cantilevers, counterweights attached balance the system, lateral beams, finally, carry tension and pressure loads into the foundations. The bridge is clad with folded fiberglas panels and reveals a characteristic pattern of openings on the side at the intersection of folds and tensairity beam. The translucent quality of the bridge mediates construction and environment. At night, lights inside the air-beams illuminate the structure from inside. A slight ramp leads towards the center-point of the bridge where people rise above the platform to observe the scenery. Technological innovation, static system. materialization coalesce in the architecture of the bridge and the design of the surroundings.

71


Tensegrity Tower

tensegrity tower

72


Tensegrity Tower A u t h o r : Aurel von Richthofen P l a c e : Dubai, UAE Y e a r : 2008 Size: – T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Thyssen Krupp Elevators

T e n s e g r i t y T o w e r : Tensegrity Tower is a design for an iconic monument of 170 meters height in Dubai. Tensegrity Tower is the pure exhibition of structure. Calling for an iconic tower devoid of program the elevator company sponsored competition merely indicated a desired height of 170 meters. Under economic constraints skyscrapers are normally used to multiply the footprint in the endless stacking of floor plates. Not in this tower without specifications on program, floor area ratio nor skin: A tensegrity system heightening the ingenuity of its own structure. The static principles behind tensegrity systems were discovered and exhibited by Russian Constructivist Karl Ioganson in 1921, but were not received in the West at the time. Ioganson called his invention spatial construction emphasizing the novel spatial capacities of the system. His art was meant to forecast engineering developments in buildings, bridges and machines. Re-discovered by Kenneth Snelson – a student of Buckminster Fuller – in the 1950ies, and coined by the later as tensional-integrity, the system reduces all tensile members of the static system to a minimum thickness, where they can only act in tension. The remaining compression members are arranged such that they never touch each other, giving the impression of a structure magically suspended in the air. The tower has been fabricated as a sinthered model and tested for structural performance.

R8BX7

top +170 m

tower principle

relaxed surface

base unit

2 units with surface

observation deck +165 m

lower observation deck +115m

tensile members tensile surface compression members

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM : TENSEGRITY

lobby +24m

programmatic adaptation

local adaptation

paraboloid tower

cafe +72m

elevated entrance level

landscape topography

STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION FRONT ELEVATION 1:250

73

SIDE ELEVATION 1:250


New Bouwkunde

ne w bo uw足 kunde

74


New Bouwkunde A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Kaveh Arbab, Rushabh Parekh, Mohammed Nazmy P l a c e : Delft, The Netherlands Y e a r : 2008 S i z e : 20000 m2 T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : TU Delft

N e w B o u w k u n d e : New Bouwkunde is a radical design for a new school of architecture at Technical University of Delft. The program called for more than 2000 spaces. These were organized algorithmically and optimized for spatial efficiency. Study, project and research within a school of architecture are normally shaped by an intimate relationship of scholars and students within a tight educational community. Not at Delft where the sheer number of more than 5000 students of architecture outgrow any sense of personal scale. The school is in fact a campus within a campus, a system of complex programmatic requirements and nested spatial hierarchies. The previous school avoided the dilemma of size vs education by creating a machine for learning, absorbing students and teachers alike, dwarfing the individuals against its multistory labyrinth and forcing them into pre-described patterns of thinking. Ironically the original concrete building collapsed after a short circuit in a coffee maker set fire in 2007. Resisting the idea of a single machine, New Bouwkunde is a cluster of cellular bubbles. Cells come in different types responding to programmatic requirements. The cells re-combine according to temporal and local specificities of the university environment. Studio cells, office cells, auditoriums and labs form micro clusters. Larger programmatic cells, such as libraries and restaurants attract those clusters again. Each cell constantly negotiates its position within the cluster and within the overall field. A shift in programmatic use will result in a new constellation. Each cell is equipped with a semi-translucent membrane. This membrane contains and protects the learning environment. The membrane acts as projection screen from the inside and communication device from the outside. The visual information of each cell reinforces the system. Thus the design achieves local specificity within a large cluster, bridging size and locale.

Cyanea

A series of tests produced an optimized plan of concentric circles, relating both requirements and organization of program. The ideal plan is a multi-centric cluster of bubbles.

Faculty Lab Number of Spaces : 4 Area : 500 Radius: 12.6

Restaurant Number of Spaces : 1 Area : 2000 Radius: 25.213

Number of Spaces : 162 Area : 50 Radius: 3.984

Studio Number of Spaces : 350 Area : 25.7 Radius: 2.86

Restaurant Number of Spaces : 1 Area : 2000 Radius: 25.23

Educational Facilities Number of Spaces : 5 Area : 600 Radius: 13.813

Auditorium 1 Number of Spaces : 5 Area : 60 Radius: 4.37

Public Facility small Number of Spaces : 3 Area : 500 Radius: 12.6

Auditorium 2 Number of Spaces : 3 Area : 120 Radius: 6.18

OPACITY 2

Each bubble contains a serving core and raised platforms. The shape of the platform is specific to each program, considering activities that occur in the individual spaces.

The bubbles are composed of a durable, yet flexible EPFT membrane. The membrane transparency can be regulated through a liquid crystal coating. This material control allows not only for an open and free environment, but also an intimate sense of privacy when desired.

Office Number of Spaces : 162 Area : 50 Radius: 3.984

Educational Facilities Number of Spaces : 5 Area : 600 Radius: 13.813

Studio Number of Spaces : 350 Area : 25.7 Radius: 2.86

Restaurant Number of Spaces : 1 Area : 2000 Radius: 25.23

Studio Number of Spaces : 1 Area : 720 Radius: 15.138

OPACITY 1

Faculty Lab Number of Spaces : 4 Area : 500 Radius: 12.6

Restaurant Number of Spaces : 1 Area : 2000 Radius: 25.213

Public Facility Number of Spaces : 1 Area : 1000 Radius: 17.84

Auditorium 1 Number of Spaces : 5 Area : 60 Radius: 4.37

Reflecting on Reyner Banhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rendering of the well tempered environment, the

Public Facility small Number of Spaces : 3 Area : 500 Radius: 12.6

Auditorium 2 Number of Spaces : 3 Area : 120 Radius: 6.18

Public Facility bubbles allow for an interactive and free Number of Spacesat : 1 the same time creating environment, Area :sense 1000 of privacy. The bubbles an intimate Radius: 17.84

form an environment for the students to project their ideas, create and learn.

Studio Number of Spaces : 1 Area : 720 Radius: 15.138

75

BK2008-3205


Einheits Denkmal

einheits denkmal

76


Einheits Denkmal SITUATIONSPLAN M: 1/500

A u t h o r : Aurel von Richthofen +23 M

P l a c e : Berlin, Germany Y e a r : 2009 Size: â&#x20AC;&#x201C; T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Bundesrepublik Deutschland

BEGEHBARE RAUMSTRUKTUR

+16 M

E i n h e i t s D e n k m a l : Einheits Denkmal is a design for a memorial for the German freedom process leading to re-unification in Berlin. The memorial traces vectors across a layered time-space continuum traversing the multi-layered and charged German history. Located at the center of the city the monument aims to educate and commemorate SCHNITT M:1/200 at the same time. Einheits Denkmal differs from traditional monuments in the sense that it avoids metaphorical stateAUSBLICKE ments. It also critiques a younger phenomenon in monument design that seeks intellectual asylum in formal abstraction and fields. Instead, Einheits Denkmal aims to integrate its historical (and monumental) environment by registering vectors transcending imaginary historical strata in a highly dense urban setting. These vectors form a vortex of lines, a dynamic node in space and point to reveal historical connections. The monument is intended to be used and explored by literally walking through it. The monument invites the public to stroll amidst its glass branches and climb its stairs to gain particular look-outs. By this literal appropriation the structure the public becomes a part of the monument and contributes to an idea of production of culture and history. A similar effect has been described in the introverted balcony of the Altes Museum by Schinkel within sight of the projected monument. Einheits Denkmal aims to integrate and update this idea, expanding the production of public space through the monument from a bourgeois to a democratic audience.

+5 M EINGANGS-NIVEAU STADT NIVEAU

WASSERSTAND

GEWOELBE

INTERAKTIVE INFO RAHMEN

GESCHICHTS-FENSTER

SICHT LINIEN

PODEST

STRUKTUR

SITUATIONSPLAN M: 1/500

+23 M

BEGEHBARE RAUMSTRUKTUR

+16 M

+5 M EINGANGS-NIVEAU STADT NIVEAU

WASSERSTAND

SCHNITT M:1/200

77

GEWOELBE


Tetra – City / House

tetra –city / house 78


Tetra – City / House A u t h o r : Aurel von Richthofen P l a c e : Berlin, Germany / world Y e a r : 2009–11 Size: – T y p e : Self-Initiated Client: –

T e t r a – C i t y / H o u s e : The house of the future is a tetrahedron. In fact, it is a set of tetra- shaped rooms forming a little city of tetra-spaces that form a tetra-shaped house. Fractal in geometry, the ideal house can be applied as ideal city on a different scale. Recursive in time, a partial realization anticipates the future expansion. Mathematically, the tetrahedron is the simplest platonic body next to the sphere. It yields a maximum of volume per envelope. It is made of four regular triangles, the simples planar geometries next to circles containing the maximum surface per outline. The tetrahedron has four point symmetries, three linear symmetries, two rotational symmetries. My architectural obsession with tetrahedrons is more than a play on descriptive geometry. Tetra is the search for a new iconic diagram, an update of Le Corbusier’s Maison Domin-o. Corbu’s proposition was barely a project for a building (maison). It exhibited three floors slabs cast in reinforced concrete, held in space by and array of square columns. Naked steps indicated the possibility of a vertical movement. Remarkably, his propagandistic five points to architecture directly derived from this diagram: The continuous landscaped ground, the free floor plan, the pilotis, the elongated window facade & the roof garden. Dom-in-o was the cast for all of Corbu’s later projects. Tetra is tipped over its center of gravity so that it rests on one corner. This minimizes the footprint and all structure cantilevers from there. At the same time the internal floor planes level. The four faces of Tetra are never perpendicular to each other. Instead, two faces form an angle and brace space in horizontal or vertical direction. Tetra neither stratifies space horizontally (free plan) nor vertically (free section) alone, but in all three dimensions at the same time. The structure is plan and piloti in one. The result is free space.

Tetraeder “TT”

Geschosse

Gesch. & Erschl.

Erschliessung

Haut & Strukture

Plan M 1:500

79


Euro Marseille

euro marseille

80


Euro Marseille A u t h o r : Aurel von Richthofen P l a c e : Marseille, France Y e a r : 2002 Size: â&#x20AC;&#x201C; T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Marseille City of Culture 2004

E u r o M a r s e i l l e : The present cathedral of Marseille is an icon malgre-lui. Of no particular historical relevance it was built in the 1930ies as prominent sign overlooking the harbor, dwarfing its surroundings. In order to re-frame and re-direct this sacral building, EuroMarseille utilizes an ancient concept of axial shifting. When a basilica became too small its central axis was simply shifted by 90 degrees around the choir. The old central apsis became the new choir and a larger apsis was added to the structure. As a result the direction of the church shifted by 90 degrees, in some cases several times, as a succession of churches grew one on top of each other. EuroMarseille transposes this planar strategy into three dimensions. Orthogonal tubes extend out of the existing cathedral and wrap around the building and into the adjacent space. Dramatic cantilevers frame an identical external volume by delimiting its edges. Formally and structurally distinct form cathedral the extension nevertheless forces a new conception of sacral buildings itself, a structural tour de force bracketing the sacral space and while dismantling the dominating monumental character of the church.

81


Spl端gen Rest Stop

spl端gen rest

st o p

82


Splügen Rest Stop A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Moritz Schoendorf and Lorenz Kocher P l a c e : Splügen, Switzerland Y e a r : 2002–2003 Size: – T y p e : Self initiated Client: –

S p l ü g e n R e s t S t o p : Splügen is a landscape project located in the Upper Rhine Valley in Switzerland using parametrically designed “fins” to engage the river and manipulate the fluvial landscape. The Upper Rhine Valley is characterized by its pristine alpine ecology, yet, contrasted with a mayor highway connecting Germany and Italy running through it. Articulating the impact of infrastructure on alpine landscape, Splügen Rest Stop is an expanding field of “fins” running along the highway for about one kilometer. The fins act as rhythm-keeper to passing vehicles, creating a cinematic effect of animation in landscape. In return the fins function as noise barrier to the settlement of Splügen. Besides their interaction with the highway and the village, the fins engage the river Rhine as well. The river is directly feed from glacial waters and regularly peeks in spring and fall when melting snow and rain drain into the valley. Fluvial changes are dramatic, eroding large areas of arable land, threatening roads and settlements. The changes in water loads have spurred in recent years, as global climate change impacts the Alps. The fins of Splügen Rest Stop act as piece de resistance, while the river becomes the motor for a gradual transformation of the landscape. Annual floods redirect into the field, sedimentation fills parts of the structure, while water slow down, relieving pressure on the river below. Sedimentation and erosion constantly change the appearance of the field of fins throughout time. Man-made, yet partly reclaimed by nature Splügen Rest Stop is an active landscape-infrastructure hybrid. The design of Splügen Rest Stop started with a parametrically controlled proto-fin. Designed in Maya and implemented in the coding language MEL in 2002, fins propagate by thousands, changing frequency, amplitude, direction and angle through a form-synthesizing feedback loop. After fabricating a series of test models with cnc-technology, the original nurbs-curved shape was translated into a triangulated model of which a 1:1 prototype was fabricated on site. The mock-up was then cast in concrete and placed in the Upper Rhine in early spring 2003. At our next visit a few weeks later the fin was gone.

83


Infographics Saxony

in fo ­‑

­g ra­p hics saxo n y

84


Infographics Saxony A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Thomas Pierce, Tom Pompeiani, Tanja Kulminska in collaboration with Johanna Siebein (graphics) and Andreas Schütz (industrial design) P l a c e : Saxony, Germany Y e a r : 2010–2011 S i z e : variable T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Castles and Gardens of Saxony

I n f o g r a p h i c s S a x o n y : Infographics Saxony is a new signage and orientation system for the Castles and Gardens of Saxony, Germany. The Castles and Gardens of Saxony are a cultural treasure of particular dimensions. The heritage circumscribes historic monuments, buildings, gardens and parks actively used as recreational facilities, museums, event spaces and concert halls. The infographic system aims to unite and transport information about these spaces. The proposed system organizes historical, geographical, architectural and botanical data in temporal and spatial ways. Based on a matrix data is classified, weighed and contextualized. The graphic design responds to this distinction of information domains into present, history and events. The combination of information domains and information levels can be transported to various information media ranging from apps to flyers, posters, signage and spatial landmarks. The signage system follows a holistic approach whereas information is understood as a dynamic component of a stratified cultural landscape. Most prominently, it proposes a spatial display system. As sculptural elements of high recognition value, these displays unfold the information and reach into the landscape. The display system made of laser-cut steel panels can unfold into labels, benches, tables or multi-membered signage panels for indoor and outdoor use. The colorful objects complement the heritage landscape and highlight the added informative value. These elements form a playful addition to the urban furniture and can be recognized easily for as landmarks for orientation. Furthermore they can be used as optical markers for ‘augmented reality’.

85


Urban Village ?文:尺度和?? 中国?于??和空?的感知和西方牛?和笛?儿 式的??存在根本的差?。它可以被描??是? 和景?的?合,并可以在中国文化的各个方面找 到??的表述,最著名的就是中国?林,中国? ??画和中国??建筑。同?,也表?在大?的 城市文脉中。

交通网格

假? 大?作?城市中的村落被深?包?着,并且?? 着迅猛的?展。?去村落的尺度和周?城市中的 ?型存在差?。?个?目??通??作?有机理 并引入新的??,??尺度和??的不同机制。

最老/最旧建筑

分析 ?了理解和保持?量多的基地本身的空??量而 ?行了?方面的分析:基地的?底?系的分析和 之前所做的的清除最旧/最破以及最新/最大的建 筑的决定。剩下的主要建筑?示了?去村落的肌 理并且提供了新的肌理交?的空?。南北和?西 向街景的分析?示了基地??向量的肌理。?些 向量??了??的??网?,?个网?将形成新 的??。

策略:条

?? 条状的系?被作???策略?加在基地上。通? ??向量的影?它?会和村落的肌理?生互?。 条状系??抱了整个基地并整合了剩余的建筑, ?生了和深???的尺度。?个系?引入了一个 交通系??系条和村落,同?也?系了商?和居 住功能。?存的建筑在与条状系?相交的部分被 整合到??中(插件),在非相交的部分?作? ?充(附件)。“屋?景”(roofscape)成?

透?

?底平面 ?存建筑 最近建筑

?西街景 南北街景

_URBAN VILLAGE

Interstitial Urbanism Shenzhen Urban Villages form part of the rapid and un-planned urban transformation of Shenzhen, across the border to Hong Kong. After the declaration of Shenzhen’s special economic zone, within less than a decade, the town grew to a population size of 4.5 million inhabitants, thereby swallowing neighboring villages. This project approaches Chinese culture from two standpoints. An external geographic mapping in scales of ten wants to expose intricate global and local redundancies. A cultural reading of traditional Chinese gardens and the abstraction of Chinese concepts of viewing and motion into a genetic code offer an internal approach. After visiting the site and working with local students of Tonji University a system of stripes is distilled and applied as urban strategy to re-evaluate and integrate further development into the Urban Village.

剩余肌理 ?形网格 剖面 平面

?部 条 区?

urban village 86


Urban Village A u t h o r : Aurel von Richthofen ROOFLEVEL + 45m

5 TH FL + 20m

P l a c e : Shenzen, China Y e a r : 2005 Size: – T y p e : Competition C l i e n t : Shenzhen Biennale 2006

GROUND FL

SECTION A-A SCALE 1:1000

ROOFLEVEL + 45m

5 TH FL + 20m

GROUND FL

SECTION B-B SCALE 1:1000

U r b a n V i l l a g e : Having grown to several million inhabitants in less than a decade the special economic zone of Shenzhen experiments on urbanism after urbanization. Urban Village, Shenzhen represents the reversal of the classic rural setting. Following the expropriation of farmland the village is now surrounded by multi-story high-rise buildings and ten lane highway belts. In return, peasants were granted ownership of their tiny village lots. Following the official doctrine of ‘one country, two systems’ Urban Village, Shenzhen explores fast forward capitalism in building up the lot of a small farm house to ten story apartment buildings. Urban Village, Shenzhen proposes the radical re-organization of this congested space. Instead of mushrooming buildings vertically on tiny lots, the project proposes to slice existing buildings horizontally, close vertical connector such as staircases and elevators (if any) and re-connect the spaces through lofty skywalks as needed. This new system webs the city and offers highest degrees of flexibility. Strategically breaking down spaces horizontally it can mitigate various scales and ultimately reconcile the village’s urban aspiration.

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ROOFLEVEL + 45m

5 TH FL + 20m

GROUND FL

SECTION C-C SCALE 1:1000

ROOFLEVEL + 45m

5 TH FL + 20m

GROUND FL

SECTION D-D SCALE 1:1000


Mobility Museum

mob i li t y mus e u m

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Mobility Museum A u t h o r s : Aurel von Richthofen with Sander Troost P l a c e : Rotterdam, The Netherlands Y e a r : 2002â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2003 Size: â&#x20AC;&#x201C; T y p e : Self Initiated Client: â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

M o b i l i t y M u s e u m : Rotterdam Mobility Museum is a linear structure occupying abandoned tracks next to the railroad station in Rotterdam. The facade is designed parametrically to respond to the surroundings. Its design resembles an illusive creature with metallic scales reflecting the surroundings. Its body is changing in width along a main linear direction of the tracks. Meant to be read en passant, from a moving train or in rushing to the station, the surface mediates between opacity and translucency, thickness and flatness, materiality and immateriality. Conceptually, the project explores the space immediately adjacent to the human body, the few inches of space between skin and clothes. We carefully register this space every day, thereby constructing our individual identity. This space is of architectural interest insofar as it stands in between the body, traditionally seen as private, and the space in which the body exists, necessarily other, thereby public. As a third category of spaces neither private nor public, the in-between extends the body into the public realm, creating a membrane of permeable space. The originating diagram describes a series of doubleeight curves, serving as regulating sections. A second logic of scales is applied to the project, giving Rotterdam Transportation Museum both structural rigidity and revealing its inherent aesthetic logic. The scale folding angle and the scale height correspond to the distance from the central spine. As the membrane inflates, the scales rotate vertical and overlap. As the membrane flattens, the scales relax, allowing light to pass through. To test the geometric qualities the original algorithm was programmed in Autocad Lisp in 2002. The model was laser cut in stainless steel at the physics department of material sciences at ETH Zurich. The assemblage of the model relies on purely mechanical connections: Sections and floor-plates slide into each other, lateral scales fold up along dashed cut lines, creating a gentle pressure fit connection.

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PORTFOLIO

PROLOGUE  4 – 7

Research/Teaching/Tools/Practice: What is Design?

RESEARCH  8 – 23

Towards Sustainable Patterns of Urbanization in Oman Gulf Encyclopedia for Sustainable Urbanism, Oman Parametric Urban Design Model / Qurm Brooklyn Smart Dots Wave Breaker Subway Sorter

TEACHING  25 – 39 Urban Oman Metabolism Redux Bürolandschaft – Complex Open Source School Updating Semper Winery in Geneva Sport Urbanism Digital Design and Representation CV Aurel Freiherr von Richthofen, born in Geneva (1978), is a German national and was trained as an architect in Switzerland and the USA. He holds a Dipl. Arch. from ETH Zurich, and a M Arch from Princeton University. He is a registered architect in Berlin and Zurich. His research focuses on analyzing and interpreting urban space with means of parametric design tools. His current research project – sponsored by The Research Council (Oman) – examines sustainable patterns of urbanization in Oman. The aim of his work is to explore and develop a new urban planning framework addressing social, cultural and climatic needs. Aurel is currently working as an assistant professor of architecture at the German University of Technology in Oman.

PROJECTS  41 – 89 EcoHaus House like Her Qurm Villas Haus Frehn 580 Park Avenue Hotel & Park Heiden School Crisser School Vevey Elephant Park Nouvelle Comédie Sucre-glace Maribor Bridge Connecting Link Tensegrity Tower New Bouwkunde Einheits Denkmal Tetra – City / House Euro Marseille Splügen Rest Stop Infographics Saxony Urban Village Mobility Museum

aurelVR portfolio 2009-2013  
aurelVR portfolio 2009-2013  
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