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FALL 2019 News Brief celebrates the many achievements of alumni, students and faculty from the Faculty of Health Disciplines. Share your story! Please send a note to fhdnews@athabascau.ca.

FHD experts develop first Canadian edition of popular family practice textbook By developing a new resource for healthcare students and providers, FHD faculty are helping to standardize primary care across Canada — and ultimately improving the health and wellbeing of patients who will benefit from a common approach to care.

A new kind of doctorate responds to new realities The Faculty of Health Disciplines is on the forefront of change as it develops new professional doctorates to meet needs for a different kind of advanced healthcare education. Research based and practice oriented, these programs will be instrumental in Canadians’ health and well-being.

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Future Alumni Award winner helps girls grow up

Front-line experiences implementing NCLEX-RN exam inspire research

Co-developing a curriculum to help girls navigate the many challenges of growing up — by supporting their mental and emotional health and addressing issues like anxiety, depression and friendship — has earned MC student Barb Tiedemann one of AU’s top annual honours.

A multidisciplinary team from FHD worked together to gain insights into what happened during the difficult and stressful introduction of the NCLEX-RN exam.

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Helping people prepare for future care nets student prestigious research grant Cari Borenko Hoffmann is a Canadian leader in advance care planning. A major grant is supporting her thesis work exploring health care providers’ understanding of the legal aspects of ACP.

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Alumni, students and faculty news What’s new? Are you proud of a recent accomplishment or achievement? Have some thoughts or ideas to share with former classmates? Or just want to check in with the gang? Send an e-mail to fhdnews@athabascau.ca and share with the FHD community.

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Share your news! Submit a story! Let us know what you want to read about! Drop us a line and help grow and strengthen the Faculty of Health Disciplines community. Together, we’ll have the conversations that matter to you.

Invest in the future of health care by donating to student awards, research and scholarly activities, and learning resources. Learn more at giving.athabascau.ca, and donate online.

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FHD experts develop first Canadian edition of popular family practice textbook By developing a new resource for healthcare students and providers, FHD faculty are helping to standardize primary care across Canada — and ultimately improving the health and well-being of patients who will benefit from a common approach to care. Thousands of healthcare professionals work in family practice across the nation. Thanks to a team of editors from Athabasca University’s Faculty of Health Disciplines, the first Canadian edition of a book that helps prepare those professionals is now available. After being approached by the publisher, Debbie Fraser (Associate Professor), Dr. Lynn Corcoran (Assistant Professor and Program Director, BN Clinical Affairs) and Dr. Margaret Edwards (Dean) oversaw the reworking of all 22 chapters of Canadian Family Practice Guidelines. The U.S. version of the book is considered by many to be the gold standard reference for family practice nursing and medical students, and primary care practitioners. “In some ways, ‘Canadianizing’ a book can be more difficult that starting fresh,” says Fraser. “Canada and the U.S. are quite different — for example, Canada has socialized medicine, many ethnic and regional differences, and different units of measure — and you also need to work within someone else’s page limits, structure and thinking.” Chapter authors were invited from across the country. The editorial team ensured the writing had a consistent style, so the various parts worked together. The team also worked with the publisher so recommended changes, including some terminology, were implemented throughout the book. “The publisher recognized our expertise and our reach,” Fraser says. “That’s one of our strengths. Our connections made it possible to engage authors from a number of different university settings, which was a great benefit.” The result is a Canadian textbook that will ultimately help patients — by contributing to standardized primary care across Canada, it helps ensure that if a patient or provider moves from one place to another, a common approach is understood. “In many ways, this is a brand new resource,” Fraser says. “It brings national guidelines from a variety of specialties together in one place, which is valuable for students and practitioners. Practice guidelines are always changing, so providers need to stay up to date.” Login Canada is the national distributor for Canadian Family Practice Guidelines. ç RETURN TO FRONT PAGE Fall 2019

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A new kind of doctorate responds to new realities The Faculty of Health Disciplines is on the forefront of change as it develops new professional doctorates to meet needs for a different kind of advanced healthcare education. Research based and practice oriented, these programs will be instrumental in Canadians’ health and well-being.

PD/electives

Healthcare systems and professionals across Canada are under constant pressure to respond to rapid changes and growing demands. An innovative new kind of graduate degree — the professional doctoral program, or professional doctorate — is becoming increasingly relevant in this environment. Intentionally designed to build a foundation of leading-edge knowledge and practice, the professional doctorate has a key role to play in delivering high quality and safe care, effective leadership and the best health outcomes to Canadians. While the credential is more common elsewhere the world than in Canada, more are emerging as the doctoral education landscape changes. AU’s Faculty of Health Disciplines is among the leaders driving change. Three professional doctorates — Doctor of Health Studies, Doctor of Nursing and Doctor of Psychology — are part a suite of five new graduate programs FHD is developing and hopes to offer in the next few years. “Professional doctorates are designed to deliver community impact,” says Dr. Margaret POSTDOCTORAL Edwards, Dean. “They’re DBA DPsych DNP DHS PhD EdD research-based and practiceHealth Health Admin Ed oriented, and fill an increasing CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY need for higher levels of PMD:C PMD:NP education and skills beyond the master’s level, but where a MN:MBA MC MHS:MBA MHS MN research-intensive PhD is not required.” PD BHS BN BA BPA BSc Human (BHAD) AI The emphasis on blending ACP HPC LPN RN knowledge and practice to deliver a tangible impact, is Current/new/collaborative programs – external Current/new programs – FHD reflected in the professional doctorates’ design: Postdoctoral Doctoral CAGS Post-masters

Masters Baccalaureate PD/electives

all AU Faculties/FHD collaboration certificates/diplomas from partner institutions

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all are being designed and will be taught by “scholar practitioners” who have extensive theoretical and practice backgrounds;

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learners in the programs will complete a common first year of study, the Doctoral Studies in Health: Post-Masters Certificate program, to develop an interdisciplinary perspective; and,

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instead of typical doctoral dissertations, learners will complete dissertations by portfolio. Each person will create their own portfolio of professional and academic work, demonstrating their ability to analyze, apply and disseminate research and knowledge.

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DEVELOPING ‘STACKABLE’ CREDENTIALS The proposed Doctor of Health Studies, Doctor of Nursing and Doctor of Psychology programs are part of a suite of five new doctorallevel programs currently being explored by AU’s Faculty of Health Disciplines. The three professional doctorates and a new PhD program, Doctor of Philosophy in Health Disciplines, are being designed to “stack” onto a one-year program, the Doctoral Studies in Health: PostMasters Certificate. All learners in the professional doctorate and PhD programs will complete the certificate program as their common first year of study. Development of the new suite of programs is ongoing. News and updates will be published on the FHD website and in News Brief.

FHD is taking the applicability of the degrees to a higher level by designing them to meet learners’ personal needs as well. “The vast majority of healthcare professionals who wish to advance their education have to balance it with the reality of career or family commitments,” Edwards notes. “Our programs will be offered digitally, which will remove many of the geographic and time barriers associated with traditional programs. “We also recognize that these professionals will likely come to us with a significant amount of clinical experience, so are removing the requirement for clinical placements. Instead, we are developing opportunities for virtual internships, that won’t force people to relocate. “Traditional doctorates can be ‘one size fits all’ and require learners to adjust their lives to fit the program,” Edwards explains. “The AU professional doctorates take a different approach. They recognize that professionals work in a variety of capacities, have different career and personal responsibilities, and need many different kinds of doctoral education. “Professional doctorates are an important addition because they respond to the new realities of healthcare. By doing that, they enable more professionals to expand their knowledge and practice — and to provide better care for patients and clients.”

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Future Alumni Award winner helps girls grow up Co-developing a curriculum to help girls navigate the many challenges of growing up — by supporting their mental and emotional health and addressing issues like anxiety, depression and friendship — has earned MC student Barb Tiedemann one of AU’s top annual honours. Barb Tiedemann, Master of Counselling student and the 2019 recipient of Athabasca University’s Future Alumni Award, is passionate about helping preteen girls navigate the increasingly complicated world in which they’re growing up. Seeing what her own daughter and her friends’ daughters’ experienced — challenges that aren’t necessarily new but are often amplified in this age of technological connectivity — inspired her to return to post-secondary study after more than a decade working as an early intervention consultant supporting families with young children who had developmental delays or disabilities. “The same themes kept coming up in our conversations,” Tiedemann says. “It was the difficulties their girls were having with friendship anxiety, with feeling like they needed to belong, and they were overly concerned with fitting in with a group.” Discovering that few supports were available, and seeing the need for a more holistic approach, Tiedemann reached out to a psychologist and two other women to develop B’tween Girls, an eight-week comprehensive, preventive mental health program helping girls in Grades 4–6 in navigate issues like friendship, belonging, anxiety and conflict resolution. Tiedemann sees enrolling in the MC program as a way to “effect change in a bigger way than just creating this program and facilitating it. “This program has just been phenomenal in teaching me what I need to know, and broadening my perspective on how to reach people, how to respect people and how to support people.” Read more of Barb Tiedemann’s story on The Hub, AU’s online news site. ç RETURN TO FRONT PAGE

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Front-line experiences implementing NCLEX-RN exam inspire research A multidisciplinary team from FHD worked together to gain insights into what happened during the difficult and stressful introduction of the NCLEX-RN exam. They looked at the impact on students and educators — and offer recommendations for implementing such significant changes in the future. The introduction of the NCLEX-RN exam in 2015 was a tumultuous time for Canadian nursing students and nurse educators alike. While used in the U.S., the exam’s computer-adaptive format and the learning being tested were new to Canada — and it caused a huge amount of stress, worry and frustration. With little advance understanding of the exam was coming, universities across Canada, including AU’s Faculty of Health Disciplines, scrambled to respond. FHD quickly initiated an NCLEX-RN working group which attended national and provincial information meetings, and Don’t be afraid. worked to explore the exam and Be familiar. Your guide to navigating the NCLEX-RN resources and to develop Know yourself strategies to support student ! success. ? “I watched students struggle, You’ve It’s time to enrolled write the and it was frustrating,” says and are NCLEX-RN on your way! Kristin Petrovic (Academic Coordinator, Undergraduate Nursing). “It tugged at my heartstrings. We have fantastic nursing programs in Canada and The NCLEX-RN roadmap was one of several resources developed by the I want students to be successful working group to help students navigate the new exam. — but the initial pass rate for the NCLEX-RN was low. “That has far-reaching consequences. Students have a lot on the line, and not passing could derail lives.” This difficult experience led Petrovic, a member of the working group, to work with FHD colleagues Dr. Annette Lane (Associate Professor), Dr. Emily Doyle (Academic Coordinator, Counselling) and Dr. Lynn Corcoran (Assistant Professor and Program Director, BN Clinical Affairs) to delve into what happened, why and what could be done to avoid situations like this in the future. Together, the working group embarked on a multidisciplinary ethnographic research project, a sociological approach that sought to understand the stresses and impact of the exam’s introduction on students, educators and institutions. Each member of the team brought a perspective that enriched the study, as well as its conclusions and recommendations. After you complete your AU Bachelor of Nursing program, you will write the NCLEX-RN, developed by the National Council for State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN). Passing this crucial licensing exam is required for you to become a practicing RN in Canada. This roadmap offers tips on integrating NCLEX-RN preparation throughout your studies. Follow these steps to help guide your journey!

Your learning style, needs and budget will determine what preparation resources are best for you.

Use those that “fit.”

It’s never too early

Visit the NCSBN website at the beginning of NURS 250, and regularly throughout your program, for tips on how to prepare for the exam, and to refresh your memory about the process. ncsbn.org/index.htm

Get to know the NCLEX-RN detailed test plan The NCSBN website’s detailed test plan for the NCLEX-RN (candidate version) shows you what will be tested (categories, subcategories, activities, etc.). This is a great study guide. Print it out and consult it often, to minimize any surprises. ncsbn.org/index.htm

Set your timeline

Start in Moodle

When you’re ready to start preparing for the exam, the NCLEX-RN Information Module in the References & Help section in your Moodle courses is a great place to start.

Stay connected

Follow the NCSBN on Facebook and Twitter, to get timely tips and reminders. Link to social media from the website. ncsbn.org/index.htm

Early in your program, start accessing preparation resources. The intensity of your preparation should increase towards the end of the program. Plan for approximately three months after graduation to prepare. Use the end-ofprogram module found in NURS 441.

Don’t do it alone

Find a study buddy or form a group. Prepare together and watch for any announcements for opportunities to connect with faculty or peer mentors.

Access exam prep resources at AU

There’s more

Learn how to ease exam anxiety and also visit AU Counselling Services for a series of modules on study skills and exams. A comprehensive e-text offering case studies, NCLEXstyle questions and more is available from the AU Library. Check out Prioritization, delegation and management of care by HargroveHuttel (2014)

You can also buy additional resources, which may be useful: • UWorld • Hurst Review (online and in-person review courses) • RNtertainment board game • mobile apps (make sure they are for Canadian students)

counselling.athabascau.ca/exam_anxiety; counselling.athabascau.ca/docs/Exams.pdf; aupac.lib.athabascau.ca/record=b1532820

uworld.com/purchase. aspx?cid=7; hurstreview. com/nclex-canada; evolve.elsevier.com/cs/ product/9780323084635? role=student

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Understand the process

The #1 thing you can do to enhance your preparedness is to visit the NCSBN website to learn about the exam, including application and registration steps, exam day process and more. Check out the FAQ, which will answer many of your questions. ncsbn.org/index.htm

Get the feel of an online, adaptive exam

A resource you pay for, such as Lippincott’s NCLEX-RN PassPoint, may be helpful because it lets you experience an online exam like the NCLEX-RN, which uses computer adaptive learning and alternatestyle questions. Other examples include Elsevier Adaptive Quizzing and Davis Edge for NCLEX-RN. thepoint.lww.com/passpoint; evolve.elsevier.com/education/adaptive-learning/adaptive-quizzing; fadavis.com/product/davis-edge-nclex-rn-instant-access

MARCH 2018

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“I had to take the emotion out of it,” Petrovic says, “because while emotion gets us to think about change, it doesn’t bring about change. We needed to objectively show what happened and, in some cases, even to recognize things that we didn’t know happened.” The group’s paper, “The work of preparing Canadian nurses for a licensure exam originating from the USA: A nurse educator’s journey into the institutional organization of the NCLEX-RN,” was published in the International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship in March 2019. It was also presented at the Hawaii International Conference on Education. “We wanted to know what made the initial implementation of this exam so hard for students,” Petrovic explains. “For example, looking at how the exam was administered, we learned that some students wrote in hotels near where their kids were playing on waterslides, and some were on computers where internet access would drop. “We learned that some students who had been learning in French took the exam in English, due to translation concerns and because they were “We have fantastic nursing only able to study for the exam in English, as most prep materials programs in Canada and I want students to be successful,” says hadn’t been translated into French. Kristin Petrovic, a member of the working group which helped FHD “We learned that in early exam versions, students were asked students and educators respond to the introduction of the NCLEX-RN. questions, and needed to use measurements, relevant in the U.S. but exam. not in Canada. “And we learned that communication throughout was a huge issue.” While each of these issues may not appear significant on the surface, taken together they had a major impact on students, and ultimately on students’ lives. “All these little things added up to problems,” Petrovic says. “In our paper, we wrote about what the FHD NCLEX-RN working group and program did to support students’ success, and about what other countries might want to consider if they also will be taking on this exam. “This will help people and programs do things differently in the future.” ç RETURN TO FRONT PAGE

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Helping people prepare for future care nets student prestigious research grant Cari Borenko Hoffmann is a Canadian leader in advance care planning. A major grant is supporting her thesis work exploring health care providers’ understanding of the legal aspects of ACP — to help ensure that in a health crisis, patients, families and providers are all on the same page. People plan their holidays. They make financial plans. They even make meal plans. But when it comes to their future health and personal care, planning is often haphazard, if it happens at all. Cari Borenko Hoffmann is passionate about changing that, and works on the forefront of advance care planning in Canada. The AU Master of Health Studies student and Lead for Advance Care Planning with the Fraser Health Authority in B.C. is the chair and co-founder of the National Advance Care Practice Community of Practice and member of the National Advance Care Planning Task Group. Recently, she received a prestigious $17,500 Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship for thesis research into a vital aspect of ACP: exploring health care providers’ understanding of the legal requirements and obligations of advance care planning. The award is presented jointly by Canada’s top-tier granting agencies — Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council — to support students who demonstrate a high standard of achievement in undergraduate and early graduate studies. “The crux of advance care planning is for people to start thinking about and reflecting upon what is important to them before they’re in a health crisis,” Borenko Hoffmann says. “It’s a process that ideally starts when people are young adults and healthy; when they have the luxury of time and can reflect and share life goals and preferences with their family, friends and health care providers. “Over time, preferences and life circumstances might change, and advance care planning helps with life’s inevitable transitions. If people wait, however, and if there’s a health crisis, there’s often no time to plan. “When there are no plans and health care decisions are made by family members or friends, they may not be the decisions we would make for ourselves. If we are not talking to and understanding our loved ones wishes, we are merely guessing.” — continued —

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Borenko Hoffmann says research shows that while 70–80 per cent of people think about advance care planning, only 50 per cent talk to someone about it, and even fewer, only around 10–30 per cent, speak with their health care provider. Crisis situations place burdens on families and professionals alike. It’s no surprise, then, that as many as 30 per cent of Canadians receive medical interventions that don’t necessarily align with their wishes. “It is difficult for health care providers to know for sure what to do, because while primary care providers might know a patient ‘Advance care planning well, a specialist may not. And family members aren’t always on requires health care providers the same page. So there’s constant pressure to navigate conflict.” to understand the legalities, Borenko Hoffmann’s thesis will be groundbreaking because it and to have exemplary will explore health care providers’ understanding of ACP legal communication requirements in B.C., and how those obligations contribute to competencies, to ensure providers’ ability to support patients and families through advance care planning processes. consent and incapacity planning tools work as the “There are legal underpinnings and requirements for following patient intends.’ patients’ plans, and knowing this would help doctors, nurses, social workers and others act with more confidence,” she says. “Lawyers may tell people to bring legal papers into the health care system, but the legal and health care systems can be two different worlds, and the health care system might not know what to do with those documents. “Advance care planning requires health care providers to understand the legalities, and to have exemplary communication competencies, to ensure consent and incapacity planning tools work as the patient intends.” With support from the Canada Graduate Scholarship, Borenko Hoffmann hopes to advance this key aspect of knowledge and help grow what is still a relatively small group of specialists, numbering around 100, currently working across Canada. “We still have a lot of work ahead of us,” she says. “But we are trying to move the conversation forward.” Learn more about advance care planning and tap into resources — both professional and personal — on the Speak Up website. ç RETURN TO FRONT PAGE

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Alumni, students and faculty news What’s new? Are you proud of a recent accomplishment or achievement? Have some thoughts or ideas to share with former classmates? Or just want to check in with the gang? Send an e-mail to fhdnews@athabascau.ca and share with the FHD community. Sydney Farkas MN alumna

… is the Provincial Educator/Coordinator for the Oncology Practice Readiness Education Program (O-PREP) in Alberta Health Services where she works to advance and standardize oncology orientation and education. She is a certified oncology nurse with the Canadian Nursing Association, an Adjunct Clinical Associate with the University of Calgary and an Executive Member for ONIGA—South, a Chapter of the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO). She lives in Calgary with her husband Tyler and curious two-yearold son, Ethan. Read more about her experience in a story she wrote for The Hub, AU’s online news site.

Mateo Huezo MC alumnus

… and Dr. Sandra Collins, FHD Professor, recently had their research article — “It’s about Human Connection: Transgender Community Wisdom to Inform Practice” — published in the Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy. Mateo’s research and book, The Trans Community Says, were featured in the Fall 2018 issue of News Brief.

Nicole King MN alumna

… wrote about how enrolling at AU enabled her to complete her master’s degree without leaving where she lived: the remote town of Wabush, Labrador. AU helped her land the job of her dreams, and she shares her experience in an article she wrote for The Hub. Nicole is now teaching nursing students in a baccalaureate program in southeastern B.C. — continued —

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Jennifer Knopp-Sihota Associate Professor

… was among five people invited to represent AU at the inaugural “Women Innovates” event for female innovators held in Edmonton in October 2019. Visit The Hub for a Q&A with Jennifer, who speaks about her world-class research exploring better pain management for people with dementia who live in nursing homes.

Gia Lam MC student

… received the Judith Gibbons Award for Research on Culture and Gender from the Society for Cross-Cultural Research, and presented at the group’s international conference in February 2019. … talks about the flexibility of studying at AU enabled her to complete her program while working around an unexpected health issue. Read more of her inspiring story on The Hub. … was recognized by the Journal of Family Nursing. Her article, “Interactive use of genograms and ecomaps in family caregiving research,” was the tenth most cited among the Journal’s 50 top-cited articles from 2005–2018. … since receiving the Governor General’s Academic Medal – Silver, awarded to AU’s top undergraduate student, in 2016 (and being profiled in the January 2017 issue of News Brief), was the lead author on a 2016 peer-reviewed journal publication for a nephrology research study and welcomed daughter Aevin to the family. She is now a Clinical Nurse Educator and started her Master’s in Public Health at UVic in September.

Christine Quesnel MN alumna

Gwen Rempel Chair, Graduate Programs Keira St. George Post-LPN BN alumna

In memory of Cynthia Tibbetts

… students, faculty and staff were exceedingly fortunate to have Cynthia Tibbetts — who passed away on March 30, 2019 — as a member of the FHD family for the past 20 years. In her honour, the Cynthia Tibbetts Memorial Fund was created through a registered charity, the Alberta Registered Nurses Educational Trust (ARNET). The Fund will ensure that future nursing students benefit from Cynthia’s deep commitment to teaching and learning, and to advancing nursing knowledge and practice. Donations to the Fund are gratefully accepted. — continued —

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Marta Tsoukalas MN alumna

… and her husband, Kosta, both graduated from AU this year. Visit The Hub to read more about their story and how their celebrated their shared achievement.

Jeff Vallance Professor

… took part in the Global Bridges program at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm in September. Created by the Strategic Research Area Health Care Science to Advance Health Care Research Careers for Junior Researchers, Global Bridges is held every two years to support the development of junior researchers, and to create international networks and long-lasting collaborations within health care sciences. Jeff is a Tier II Canada Research Chair in Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Management, and talks about his research in a Q&A on The Hub.

Austin Walker MN:NP student

WELCOME TO THE SFO-V CONFERENCE

GLOBAL BRIDGES 2019 Stockholm, September 9

Global Bridges aims at supporting junior researchers in creating international networks in the area of health care science

LOCATION: Hasselbacken Hotel | Hazeliusbacken 20 Djurgården | Conference room: Galleri Åbom

… received the 2019 AU Award for Graduate Studies, which is presented to the student with the highest grade point average across all AU’s master’s programs.

ì MORE GREAT NEWS ABOUT FHD’S GREAT PEOPLE Check out the FHD section of AU’s news portal, The Hub, for stories about and by alumni, students and faculty. For back issues of News Brief, visit the FHD website.

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Profile for Athabasca University

Faculty of Health Disciplines News Brief - Fall 2019  

Faculty of Health Disciplines News Brief - Fall 2019