Fall 2020 Auburn Engineering

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STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY Also in this issue // A U B U R N M A K E S ( A D I F F E R E N C E ) // 3 0 How Auburn Engineering’s fight against COVID-19 inspired a new era of campus collaboration


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SUPER STRUCTURE Auburn’s new $22 million Advanced Structural Engineering Laboratory will provide our civil and environmental engineering students one of the premier research facilities in the nation.



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College ranks among Top 30 public engineering colleges

$22 million Advanced Structural Engineering Laboratory now open

Celebrating Auburn’s chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers

Read more about the No. 29 ranking and other exciting happenings across the college.

The nearly 42,000-square-foot facility will change the game for our civil and environmental engineering students.

Formed in the 1980s, the Auburn chapter of NSBE continues to thrive, even amid a global pandemic.

30 Auburn Makes a difference through cross campus collaboration Inspired by the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a group of campus faculty are sparking a revolution in campus creativity.

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A brand new era of Auburn spaceflight

Auburn’s X-ray vision

Nine years after the end of the Space Shuttle program, Auburn engineers are helping to write a new space chapter through public-private partnerships.

125 years ago, A.F. McKissick helped lay the foundation for biomedical imaging, playing an integral role in developing the X-ray.

ON THE COVER // STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY: The front entrance to the brand

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new Advanced Structural Engineering Laboratory has been configured to allow full-scale bridge girders as long as 140 feet.

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Awards........................................................................................................................................................ 58 Cupola Report....................................................................................................................................... 62

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Look for the #GINNing logo to see who we’ve featured on our latest podcasts.

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FROM THE DEAN

FALL 2020 // Volume 30, Issue 2

DEAN Christopher B. Roberts DIRECTOR AND EDITOR, COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING Austin Phillips CONTRIBUTORS Chris Anthony Jeremy Henderson Cassie Montgomery Virginia Speirs Alyssa Turner Lauren Winton GRAPHIC DESIGN Danny Doyle WEB MANAGER Tyler Patterson VIDEOGRAPHY/PHOTOGRAPHY Mary Ballard Marcus Kluttz John Sluis Visit Auburn Engineering online at eng.auburn.edu/magazine for videos, photos, podcasts and more. You may also submit news items, suggestions or comments by clicking the Contact Us tab. Auburn Engineering is published twice yearly by the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. Engineering Communications and Marketing c/o Editor 1210D Shelby Center Auburn, AL 36849 334-844-2444 © 2020 Samuel Ginn College of Engineering,

It’s hard to believe that we are more than nine months into alternate operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. And while 2020 has presented more challenges than we could have ever imagined, I could not be more proud of how resilient our students, faculty and staff have been through it all. We have remained focused on our vision of providing the best student-centered engineering experience in America – even under these extraordinary conditions. In the middle of the summer semester, our students began slowly returning to campus. That increased exponentially in the fall, although we are still nowhere near what could be called “normal” operations. With the move of many classes to remote online and blended instruction, our students and faculty have made the best out of an unfortunate situation, and I’m confident that we’ve all learned many valuable lessons that will pay off in the future. In the spring, our plan is to increase the number of in-person class offerings, while ensuring the safety of our students, faculty and staff remains paramount. In addition, I am so proud of how our staff has worked tirelessly to provide the support services that our students have become accustomed to. From tutoring and advising to career development and student organizations, our staff has been dedicated to serving our students in the safest and most efficient and effective ways possible. This unmatched Auburn Engineering work ethic was evidenced as the college recently maintained its spot among the Top 30 public engineering colleges in the nation, coming in at No. 29 for the second year in a row. It has also proven true through our continued upward trajectory in research grants and awards, with the college having another banner year bringing in more than $72 million. Top that off with our development efforts bringing in more than $30 million, and we are poised to make 2021 even better. I hope you will enjoy this issue of the Auburn Engineer magazine, as we highlight many, many other amazing accomplishments around the college, including the opening of our state-of-the-art $22 million Advanced Structural Engineering Laboratory. Have a wonderful holiday as we close out this unprecedented year, and I look forward to a healthy and happy 2021!

War Eagle!

Auburn University Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer.

Christopher B. Roberts Dean of Engineering 5


HAPPENINGS

Auburn renames civil engineering department to include environmental focus Civil engineering is the oldest department in Auburn University’s Samuel Ginn College of Engineering, but it now has the newest name. In order to reflect its evolving educational mission, the department is now the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. “Changing the department’s name will better reflect environmental engineering as a distinct profession,” said Andy Nowak, chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The department, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary, already offers a specialization in environmental engineering, and the name change will better reflect this concentration. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, environmental engineering is classified as an independent profession with 55,400 practitioners. “The change will improve our competitiveness for students, faculty and funding within the state and beyond,”

Nowak said. “It will enhance our visibility and help highlight the significant accomplishments of our students and faculty in the environmental engineering field.” Nowak specifically hopes the name change will help boost the department’s female enrollment. In 2018, an American Society for Engineering Education study showed that 50.6% of environmental engineering concentrated bachelor’s degrees were awarded to women, compared to 21.9% across all other engineering degrees. “The name change will better reflect the current and future employment trends and, along with our expansive facilities, emphasize the efforts Auburn University and the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering have made as part of our vision to be the best student-centered engineering experience in America,” said Christopher B. Roberts, dean of engineering.

Civil Engineering graduate named ALDOT chief engineer Edward “Ed” Austin, ’91 civil engineering, was recently named chief engineer for the Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT). “My first position at ALDOT was as a graduate civil engineer in our design bureau,” Austin said. “I’ve been at ALDOT for almost 30 years. Getting this new position has been kind of overwhelming, as you can imagine, but I’m very honored by the opportunity.” Austin credits much of his success to his alma mater.

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Ed Austin

“Auburn has always had a strong civil engineering program and still does,” Austin said. “Transportation-wise, it is very strong. The asphalt test track was there when I was in school, still is. Many of the professors that I recognize from my time at Auburn are still teaching and conducting research that has been very beneficial to the student body.”

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Auburn ranked top 30 public engineering college by U.S. News and World Report Auburn University’s Samuel Ginn College of Engineering has again been recognized for its premier engineering education, ranking No. 29 among public institutions in the U.S. News & World Report’s 2021 Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs. This is the second consecutive year Auburn has been ranked a top 30 public engineering institution. In addition, Auburn was also ranked No. 27 for best First-Year Experiences and No. 35 on the Most Innovative Schools list. “U.S. News & World Report continues to recognize our efforts to create an exceptional student-centered engineering experience at Auburn,” said Christopher B. Roberts, dean of engineering. “When students come to Auburn, they receive hands-on experience both inside and outside the classroom, backed by expert faculty and unparalleled student support programs. Our alumni have long known this, but more and more, our engineering peers surveyed by U.S. News & World Report are seeing this, too,” he added. Auburn Engineering offers 13 undergraduate degrees across 10 engineering disciplines as well as a host of graduate programs. The new Brown-Kopel Engineering Student Achievement Center offers one of the most comprehensive, active-learning environments for students in the country.


HAPPENINGS

Frank Cilluffo

Auburn’s Cilluffo testifies before House committee Auburn University’s Frank Cilluffo once again testified in front of Congress in July to address recommendations made by the U.S. Cyberspace Solarium Commission in March. Cilluffo, who serves as the director of Auburn’s McCrary Institute and is a commissioner on the Cyberspace Solarium Commission, testified in front of the U.S. House of Representatives’ Armed Services Committee’s Subcommittee on Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities. Cilluffo was joined by commission Chairman and U.S. Sen. Angus King, I-Maine; commission Chairman and U.S. Rep. Mike Gallagher, R-Wis.; and Commissioner Patrick Murphy, who serves as the Distinguished Chair of Innovation at the United States Military Academy at West Point. In March, the commission unveiled its

report detailing a comprehensive strategic approach with policy recommendations for implementation. After conducting an extensive study including more than 400 interviews, the commission advocated a new strategic approach to cybersecurity — layered cyber deterrence. The desired end state of layered cyber deterrence is to reduce the probability and impact of cyberattacks of significant consequence. The strategy outlined three ways to achieve this end state: shaping behavior by working with allies and partners to promote responsible behavior in cyberspace; denying benefits to adversaries who have long exploited cyberspace to their advantage and to American disadvantage; and imposing costs by maintaining the capability, capacity and credibility needed to retaliate against actors who target America through cyberspace. The official report consists of more than 82 recommendations, which include 54 specific legislative proposals, organized by six key pillars: reform the U.S. government’s structure and organization for cyberspace, strengthen norms and non-military tools, promote national resilience, reshape the cyber ecosystem, operationalize cybersecurity collaboration with the private sector, and preserve and employ the military instrument of national power.

NIH awards $2.6 million grant for cancer immunotherapy research Pengyu Chen, assistant professor of materials engineering, was awarded a $2.6 million RO1 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a biosensor designed to guide a novel immunotherapy for better treating cancer, specifically leukemia. “I am very happy to see NIH continuously fund our research in the field of noninvasive point-of-care diagnosis,” Chen said. “This is promising field with lots of challenges and opportunities to explore.” Chen’s biosensor is designed to evaluate the functions of an engineered T-cell with a protein called chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The technology will enhance the visualization of the communication between CAR T-cells, immune system cells and cancer cells through real-time, direct signals produced from these cells in the tumor microenvironment.

and leadership center of the U.S. Air Force, providing full-spectrum education, research and outreach, through professional military education, professional continuing education and academic degree granting.

McCrary Institute, Air University Join Forces in Strategic Partnership Auburn University’s McCrary Institute is partnering with Air University to examine challenges related to cyber and critical infrastructure security, for the purpose of advancing U.S. national security.

Pengyu Chen

The two entities will combine their extensive expertise on national security issues to spur dialogue and action on pressing problems and practical solutions.

Frank Cilluffo, McCrary Institute director. “Together, our networks and capabilities will be greater than the sum of the two parts. Each side will significantly extend its reach and impact.”

“Our partnership with Air University is an exciting and strategic step forward,” said

Air University, based at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, is the intellectual

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The McCrary Institute, based in Auburn with additional centers in Washington, D.C. and Huntsville, seeks practical solutions to pressing challenges in the areas of cyber and critical infrastructure security. Through its three hubs, the institute offers end-to-end capability – policy, technology, research and education – on all things cyber.

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HAPPENINGS

FAA invests $3 million in Auburn University additive manufacturing research Thanks to a recent $3 million grant from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Center for Additive Manufacturing Excellence (NCAME) at Auburn University will soon initiate a two-year project focused on improving commercial air travel through the use of 3D-printed (or additively manufactured) metal components.

Associate Professor of mechanical engineering. “Such variations make the qualification and certification of AM materials and parts challenging.”

Nima Shamsaei (left) and Steve Taylor

related to understanding how microscopic features in the 3D-printed metal affect overall fatigue and fracture properties.

The project involves fabricating metal parts from multiple industrial-scale metal 3D printers.

Both are key areas in the development of additive manufacturing (AM) specifications that the FAA wants to eventually apply in commercial airlines.

It aims to specifically address issues related to understanding the variability in performance of the same parts made on different machines, as well as issues

“This is what I call the ‘Achilles heel’ of additive manufacturing,” said NCAME director Nima Shamsaei, the PhilpottWestPoint Stevens Distinguished

Interdisciplinary Center for Advanced Manufacturing wins $4.26 million DoD award

These large, original equipment manufacturers have blended their manufacturing physical and virtual domains into an Industry 4.0 environment, achieving positive productivity results.

The Interdisciplinary Center for Advanced Manufacturing Systems (ICAMS) at Auburn University has received a $4.26 million award from the U.S. Department of Defense to explore the digitalization of manufacturing and become a resource for small and medium manufacturers throughout the country. “The most significant way ICAMS can make a difference is in helping small and medium manufacturers understand the technologies they should be utilizing and helping them understand the need for adopting Industry 4.0/Smart Manufacturing concepts, therefore really digitalizing the full supply chain,” said Gregory Harris, ICAMS director and associate professor of industrial and systems engineering. There is a growing digital divide between large manufacturers and the small- to medium-sized manufacturers that make up 85% of the industrial base in the United States.

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The FAA said the partnership is ultimately intended to improve safety by standardizing certification of existing and emerging structural applications of advanced materials, a research area in which NCAME quickly emerged as an international leader, especially in the area of materials used for spaceflight. Established in 2017 through a publicprivate partnership between Auburn and NASA, NCAME is also one of the founding partners of the ASTM International Additive Manufacturing Center of Excellence, which aims to close additive manufacturing standards and workforce gaps.

ICAMS faculty leadership ICAMS researchers hope to help close this gap, in part by promoting advanced Engineering: assistant professor Peter manufacturing principles Liu, assistant professor Konstantinos to create a skilled workforce pipeline Mykoniatis, associate professor Lewis that starts in high school and continues Payton and assistant professor Gregory through community college and beyond. Purdy. “The ideal student coming into this The center is also supported through program is somebody who is a cross a partnership with the City of Auburn’s between a mechanical engineer, Industrial Development Board, which an industrial and systems engineer has provided a facility to house large and a computer scientist. It’s a very equipment and provide a hands-on interdisciplinary environment where learning laboratory for ICAMS students. if you’re interested in computers and making things and realizing innovations, you will thrive. That’s the kind of student we’re looking for,” Harris said.

ICAMS is led by Harris and several additional faculty members from the Department of Industrial and Systems

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Listen to our podcasts with Greg Harris at eng.auburn.edu/ginning


HAPPENINGS

Auburn awarded $1.21 million by Department of Energy to develop nuclear energy technology

Christian Fauer

Mechanical engineering senior awarded prestigious climate control industry scholarship Christian Fauer, a senior in mechanical engineering, has received the Duane Hanson Scholarship presented by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning (ASHRAE). The scholarship is named after the president of Gayner Engineers, a mechanical and electrical engineering consulting firm in San Francisco, California. It is one of seven $5,000 scholarships awarded by ASHRAE each year. ASHRAE is a global society that directly impacts and interacts with the energy efficiency industry by envisioning a healthy and sustainable built environment through its advancements in heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration and allied fields.

The U.S. Department of Energy Xiaoyuan Lou recently awarded Auburn University a combined $1.21 million to develop advanced manufacturing technology for next-generation reactor designs and expand the university’s existing nuclear research infrastructure. The two awards are among the DOE’s $65 million research investment to domestic universities and national laboratories for 93 advanced nuclear technology projects across 28 states. “In the United States, nuclear power represents approximately 20% of the electricity consumed without greenhouse gas emission,” said Xiaoyuan Lou, principal investigator of both awards and associate professor of materials engineering. “Innovative manufacturing technologies and advanced materials are both crucial to the future economic outlook of nuclear power and the development of next-generation reactor designs such as small modular reactor (SMR) and GEN IV advanced reactors.” Through the first award of $1 million funded by the DOE’s Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program, Auburn will lead a joint university-industry team to develop and demonstrate the powder metallurgy-hot isostatic pressing (PM-HIP) cladding and joining strategies to manufacture dissimilar metal pressure retaining components. The second infrastructure award of $210,000 supports Lou to enhance the advanced mechanical testing capabilities at Auburn University. Bart Prorok, interim program chair for materials engineering, is the co-PI on the project. Lou said the new equipment acquisitions would boost the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering’s nuclear research and training opportunities and expand the existing nuclear research programs.

College partners with City of Auburn to meet advanced manufacturing needs As manufacturing continues to shift from a manual to a more advanced industry, the need to better train skilled workers continues to grow. To address local advanced manufacturing needs, Auburn University’s Samuel Ginn College of Engineering and the Industrial Development Board (IDB) of the City of Auburn are partnering to provide resources for Auburn’s workforce. The result of this partnership is the Auburn Advanced Manufacturing Training Center (AMTC). Located in the Auburn

provide solutions to the gap described by manufacturers in the precision five-axis machining, advanced measurement and Industry 4.0 technology skill areas,” said City of Auburn Economic Development Director Phillip Dunlap. Auburn Advanced Manufacturing Training Center

Industrial Park, the center provides space for training and machine prototyping, setup and development. To combat hurdles that may prevent companies from advancing in Auburn, the IDB developed a training center with the help of Auburn Engineering. “AMTC is the result of three years of thoughtful listening and planning to

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“The Samuel Ginn College of Engineering sees advanced manufacturing as an opportunity for intersection and engagement of industry and education,” said Christopher B. Roberts, dean of engineering. “As the AMTC continues to develop and deliver courses to industrial partners, we are pleased to provide expert instruction from our engineering faculty and graduate assistants as a full partner of the AMTC.”

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HAPPENINGS

Auburn grad named ‘rising star’ by Civil + Structural Engineering magazine

Collins McMurray

Chemical engineering sophomore to serve as Miss Auburn University for second term Collins McMurray, a sophomore in chemical engineering, will serve a second term as Miss Auburn University due to the postponement of the 2020 pageant year by the Miss America Organization as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. “Serving for a second year is very unusual, and nationally, it has never happened before,” she said. “I am so excited and honored to be able to serve Auburn University again, as well as represent Auburn at Miss Alabama in June of 2021. I may be a little bit biased but I think Auburn is the best place to represent, so being able to do it two years in a row is amazing.” McMurray plans to use her second year as Miss Auburn University to further promote her platform, “The Importance of the Arts in Education.” With a passion for arts education advocacy, she has cultivated relationships with local art programs and Auburn-area school systems and sees the pandemic as a unique challenge that her platform could help address. “An area that I am really expectant for my platform to grow in is helping school systems that are struggling due to COVID-19,” she said. “The arts in education is so valuable to a child’s growth and development and being online has caused it to be even harder for students to be immersed in the arts. I am hopeful that I will be able to provide students with arts access, even though the format for school looks different this year.”

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Wheeler Crook, ’05 civil engineering, has been named a 2020 “rising star” by Civil + Structural Engineering magazine. Crook is a divisional vice president for Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood, Inc. (GMC), one of the largest architecture and engineering firms in the southeast, where he has worked for 15 years designing and managing engineering and construction of large-scale infrastructure projects. “It was no surprise to hear that Wheeler received this honor,” said Robert Barnes, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering. “Wheeler is precisely the type of Auburn engineer that the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering strives to develop.” Crook has earned multiple awards for his work in the civil engineering industry,

Wheeler Crook

including the 2012 American Water Works Association Young Professional of the Year Award for the Alabama-Mississippi Region and the 2012 GMC Inaugural Leadership Academy Award. He has been published in The Military Engineer and has presented at several regional and national conferences. Crook said he is honored by the magazine’s recognition. “This distinction is not a reflection of my achievements alone,” he said, “but a testament to the amazing people who have surrounded me in educational institutions, Goodwyn Mills & Cawood, and my community.”

Auburn Engineering hires first student initiatives administrator Jenny Sconyers, a former student services coordinator for the Office of Student Services in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering — and Auburn University’s newest Employee of the Year — has been hired as student initiatives administrator, a brand-new position within the college. Jeffrey Fergus, associate dean for undergraduate studies and program assessment, said Sconyers’ primary role in her new position will be to support and give guidance to Auburn Engineering student organizations through fundraising efforts and activity planning, and by connecting them with administrative offices that can facilitate each organization’s goals and mission.

Jenny Sconyers

“I am thrilled to begin my new role,” Sconyers said. “I want to help every engineering student find their place to connect with other students with similar interests.” “I am so excited for the opportunity to work alongside our amazing engineering student organizations and their leaders as we continue to make Auburn’s the best student-centered engineering experience in the country,” she said.

Listen to our podcast with Collins McMurray at eng.auburn.edu/ginning

SAMUEL GINN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


HAPPENINGS

Governor names engineering alumni, faculty to statewide commissions Gov. Kay Ivey recently established two statewide commissions to address innovation, promote entrepreneurial growth and focus on STEM education in the state: the Alabama STEM Council and Innovate Alabama. Innovate Alabama is comprised of a 15-member commission chaired by state representative Bill Poole of Tuscaloosa and includes members with expertise across various industries from economic development to technology solutions. The six-member advisory council includes innovation leaders with ties to Alabama,

Biosystems students and faculty take home ASABE awards Several faculty members and students in the Department of Biosystems Engineering recently took home awards at the annual meeting of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers International.

Virginia Davis, the Dr. Daniel F. and Josephine Breeden Professor of chemical engineering; K-Rob Thomas, ’01 civil engineering and power delivery general manager at Alabama Power; and Tim McCartney, ’80 civil engineering and chair of the Alabama Workforce Council.

Gov. Kay Ivey

including former United States Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice and two Auburn Engineering alumni; Zeke Smith, ’82 industrial engineering, who has been tapped to serve as the president of the Innovate Alabama advisory council, and Chris Moody, ’90 electrical engineering. The Alabama STEM Council will feature three individuals who have ties to the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering: agriculture structures and environment. Donald was selected for his work in improving the profitability of live bird production and increased efficiencies in housing, energy, equipment and environmental control.

Professor emeritus James Donald received the Henry Geise Structures and Environment award.

Hannah Thomascall, ’20, received the 2020 Student Honor Award, which encourages scholarship and activity in student affairs, while senior Kiara McDonald received the 2020 ASABE Foundation Engineering Scholarship.

Established in 1988, the award recognizes outstanding and meritorious significant achievement in advancing the science of

Senior Sydney Williford and graduate student Vivek Patil took home first and second place, respectively, in the Ethics

Aerospace assistant professor reports asteroid surface sampling a success NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission recently completed a complex series of tasks that involved landing on, sampling and departing from Asteroid Bennu, a carbonaceous asteroid more than 321 million kilometers from Earth. Auburn University aerospace engineering assistant professor Masatoshi Hirabayashi, a collaborator supporting the OSIRIS-REx

“Alabama has continued to grow into an advanced manufacturing, aerospace engineering and cybertechnology center of excellence and as a result, the demand for qualified labor in these sectors has skyrocketed,” Ivey said. “The Alabama STEM Council will play a vital role in ensuring that our state’s future leaders have the opportunity to learn STEMbased skills that will help them transition into successful career pathways upon graduation.”

Essay Competition, while juniors Grace Phung and Patrick Redman won first place in the Ethics Video Challenge for their video “Due Diligence.” Second place went to senior Katelyn Wolfe, sophomore Nolan Bennett and junior Brynn Bartholomew for their video “Ethical Management of Hazardous Wastes.” The sampling event highlights the mission team’s ability to pinpoint the spacecraft’s landing position, a feat completed without the benefit of conventional positioning technology, Hirabayashi said.

team’s scientific investigations, reports that the sampling mission was successful and the spacecraft collected at least 2 ounces of the asteroid’s surface material.

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Hirabayashi is also a co-investigator for Hayabusa2, a Japanese asteroid exploration mission focused on targeting Ryugu, a carbonaceous near-Earth asteroid. His research investigates the geophysical features of target asteroids such as Bennu and Ryugu.

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HAPPENINGS

Software engineering senior receives Best Poster Award for PolyFold research An Auburn Engineering student has received the Best Poster Award in the 11th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology and Health Informatics for a collaborative research project. Andrew McGehee, a software engineering senior, led the design of the poster, “PolyFold: an interactive visual simulator for distance-based protein folding,” alongside fellow Auburn students Sutanu Bhattacharya and Rahmatullah Roche and computer and software engineering assistant professor Debswapna Bhattacharya. PolyFold is an interactive visual simulator for distance-based protein folding. PolyFold aims to provide an intuitive, easy-to-use visual interface that exemplifies the process of distance-based protein folding to researchers and nonexperts. It embeds powerful stochastic optimization algorithms with ondemand customizations and interactive

Alice Smith

manipulations in present-time to fold a protein molecule. It is achieved through the satisfaction of spatial constraints derived from a protein’s inter-residue distance matrix. “Our group has worked diligently over the past couple of years in developing this open-source protein folding simulator to accelerate scientific discovery and promote citizen science,” Debswapna Bhattacharya said. “This award is a testament to the hard work Andrew and the team have devoted to the project and the potential it has in advancing computational biology and bioinformatics.” McGehee’s work is supported by an Auburn University Undergraduate Research Fellowship. He attributes his success to his advisor’s guidance, Auburn’s excellent education and the department’s extra-curricular community.

Visit our magazine online at eng.auburn.edu/magazine for videos and photos of all these stories.

Civil and Environmental professor awarded $1.3 million DoD grant Natalie Cápiro, assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental engineering, has been awarded a $1.3 million grant by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, an environmental science and technology program for the Department of Defense, for her project “Development of Predictive Tools for Assessment of Natural Attenuation Capacity and Treatment Transition at Chlorinated Solvent Sites.”

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Natalie Cápiro

Cápiro’s project aims to develop a quantitative understanding of the relationships between the processes that govern long-term attenuation at contaminated sites that are characterized by complex hydrogeology and failure of prior remediation efforts.

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Industrial and systems engineering professor named a 2020 Woman of Impact Alice Smith, the Joe W. Forehand/ Accenture Distinguished Professor, has been named a Woman of Impact by Yellowhammer Multimedia. Smith, a professor of industrial and systems engineering, is the first Auburn University faculty member to receive the distinction. She joins Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey as one of the few Auburn women to have received the award since its inception in 2018. “I am especially pleased to be the second (I am told) woman so honored with this award with Auburn connections – the first being our Governor Kay Ivey. My work over the past 40 years on the challenges and achievements of women in STEM, especially engineering, are a huge part of this recognition and I hope that the Yellowhammer Women of Impact Awards will continue to inspire young women and girls to follow their dreams and aspirations,” Smith said.

According to Cápiro, current nationwide estimates of costs and predicted cleanup times required for the restoration of federal and state hazardous wasteimpacted groundwater sites are underestimated. The cleanup timeframe for sites with complex hydrogeology can exceed acceptable timeframes, which are typically considered to be 30-50 years. Cápiro’s work aims to develop a holistic remediation approach accounting for natural attenuation processes that control chlorinated solvent contaminant persistence in groundwater, while providing long-term cost-saving measures and safeguarding drinking-water supplies.


HAPPENINGS

Listen to our podcast with Dremere Woods at eng.auburn.edu/ginning

Auburn aerospace engineering sophomore named a Top 100 Intern by WayUp Dremere Woods, sophomore in aerospace engineering, was recently named to WayUp’s Intern 100 list for 2020.

New additive printers boost NCAME capabilities It’s been only three years since Auburn University, through a public-private partnership with NASA, established the National Center for Additive Manufacturing Excellence (NCAME) inside the recently renovated Gavin Research Laboratory. Yet, due to rapidly growing collaborative interest from additive manufacturing (AM) industry leaders, it’s already getting cramped inside the center’s state-of-the-art facilities. “But that’s a good problem to have,” said NCAME director Nima Shamsaei, the Philpott-WestPoint Stevens Distinguished Associate Professor of mechanical engineering. “We’re obviously pleased that leading companies appreciate our vision and expertise.” One of the center’s newest machines is the TruPrint 3000, a new universal medium-format machine produced by leading German industrial machine manufacturer TRUMPF, that allows a large build volume ideal for general industry applications. A second new addition is a Coherent CREATOR, a top-line 3D-metal printer for fabricating prototype and short production run components, was gifted to NCAME by Coherent Scientific. Shamsaei said that NCAME, as a founding partner of the ASTM Additive Manufacturing Center of Excellence, will also use the new machines to conduct R&D in support of standardization.

Woods has spent two semesters as a technical intern with GE Aviation, a subsidiary of General Electric and one of the top aircraft engine suppliers in the industry. Over the summer, one of his coworkers suggested Woods apply for the Intern 100 award. “Because of the pandemic, I was only able to work for GE Aviation for one-third of the time I was supposed to,” Woods said. “Even so, I was still able to learn a great deal and accomplish a lot with them. I am extremely honored to be recognized by WayUp through GE Aviation.” One of the main reasons he was selected for the title was because of an optional project he worked on within his co-op, Woods explained. For the project, Woods was a member of a team that created an online survey designed to discuss diversity and inclusion. The successful survey won first place in the project’s competition.

Dremere Woods

“On top of my regular aviation responsibilities, I participated in this optional competition and I did well with both,” Woods said. “That’s when people began to recognize that I had the potential to receive the award from WayUp, because I went above and beyond.” Woods said that he has already accepted another co-op opportunity with GE Aviation in the summer of 2021, despite getting offers to work elsewhere. He said he plans to continue to work hard on the track to graduation. WayUp is a recruiting platform designed to connect employers with students and recent grads to fill internships and entry-level positions. Launched in 2018, WayUp’s annual Intern 100 list recognizes the contribution of interns to the workforce.

Council of Engineering Graduate Students hosts expanded Finish in Five competition The Council of Engineering Graduate Students hosted the 2020 Finish in Five competition, presenting Billur Kazaz, graduate student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the top prize of $500 for her presentation titled “Deep learning-based aerial stormwater inspections.” Vinita Shinde, chemical engineering graduate student, and Jacob Larson, graduate student in mechanical engineering, were awarded second and third prize, respectively. The event was redesigned to abide by coronavirus restrictions. In the initial round, faculty judges reviewed 60 video

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Finish in Five winners

submissions. The top 10 participants presented a live 5-minute summary of their research in front of a panel of judges. “It’s very difficult to take a technical subject and break it down for a general audience, much less a general scientific audience. I thought everyone did a fantastic job,” said Christopher B. Roberts, dean of engineering.

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HAPPENINGS

NCAME cultivates additive manufacturing vendor partnerships for NASA Inside a state-of-the art 50,000-square foot South Dakota facility, within view of Mount Rushmore, one of the largest examples of subtractive manufacturing in the world, sits one of the world’s largest additive manufacturing machines, or 3D printers for metal parts. “The 557XR is for blown powder laser directed energy deposition (DED),” said Nick Wald, general manager of RPMI, the pioneering Rapid City-based additive manufacturing (AM) company behind the massive professional grade system. “It’s a big machine.” And, thanks to the latest developments in Auburn University’s public-private partnership with NASA, it’s got a big job to do.

RPM Innovations (RPMI) is one of several leading specialized technology vendors in a domestic advanced manufacturing supply chain cultivated by Auburn University’s National Center for Additive Manufacturing Excellence (NCAME). The supply chain is integral to a growing AM research and development contract from NASA for improving the performance of the liquid rocket engines that will return astronauts to the moon and beyond. Titled Rapid Analysis and Manufacturing Propulsion Technology (RAMPT), the project aims to evolve light-weight, largescale novel AM techniques like DED — RPMI’s specialty. “RAMPT aims to develop and advance new manufacturing technology, with the primary application being a largescale thrust chamber assembly for liquid rocket engines,” said RAMPT coprincipal investigator Paul Gradl, a senior propulsion engineer at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville. “This large-scale demonstrator nozzle is critical to demonstrate the technology’s potential and to spur innovation in small commercial businesses in the industry. It’s a forward-thinking public-private partnership,” he added.

Auburn Cyber Research Center names interim director Associate professor Daniel Tauritz has been named interim director of the Auburn Cyber Research Center, according to an announcement from Dean of Engineering Christopher B. Roberts. In this role, Tauritz will lead more than a dozen faculty and staff affiliated with the center, which integrates cutting-edge engineering technology with research to develop innovative methods of protecting our nation’s cybersecurity. The center’s research has focused on four main thrusts: secure software engineering, cloud security and forensics,

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Three Auburn engineers featured in cybersecurity episode of ‘Reinventing School’ Three Auburn engineers were recently featured on a new episode of “Reinventing School,” a web series that examines the future of education as schools have increasingly shifted to digital platforms in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The episode featured Frank Cilluffo, director of Auburn University’s McCrary Institute for Cyber and Critical Infrastructure Security, and two students advancing in the cyber security field: software engineering senior Charlie Harper and computer science sophomore Vicki McLendon. Harper is president of Auburn’s Ethical Hacking Club, of which McLendon is also a member. The episode, titled “Cyberattack!,” explored the ways in which a giant cyberattack could disrupt industry and schools.

and other areas. I am confident in his ability to elevate the center’s impressive body of work through this new role.”

Daniel Tauritz

artificial intelligence (AI) for security and advanced manufacturing security. “Daniel was already playing a key role in the Auburn Cyber Research Center, so he was an excellent choice to lead the center during this interim period,” Roberts said. “He has an impressive record of applying AI approaches to solving national security problems in cyber, critical infrastructure

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Tauritz’s primary research interest is the creation of novel AI techniques to solve complex real-world problems, with an emphasis on applications in the national security and cyber domains, ranging from adversarial models in cyber (physical) security to evolving graph algorithms for network security. The associate professor of computer science and software engineering is an internationally recognized researcher in the AI subspecialties of evolutionary computing and the automated design of algorithms employing hyper-heuristics.


HAPPENINGS

Aerospace students, alumnus honored by aeronautics institute

Bryan Beckingham

Improving fuel efficiency with NSF award Ion-containing polymer membranes are found in many energy generation and storage devices. Using artificial photosynthesis, these devices convert water, sunlight and carbon dioxide into energy in an electrochemical cell, such as a solar fuel cell. Maximizing the efficiency of solar fuel cells requires understanding the relationships between polymer membrane structure and the transport of ions and molecules. Chemical engineering assistant professor Bryan Beckingham will explore the relationships between ion-containing polymer membrane structure, membrane physiochemical properties and membrane-transport behavior with a $259,036 award from the National Science Foundation. The project, “Cooperative Transport in Ion-Conducting Membranes,” seeks to provide guidance for the future design of ion-containing polymer membranes to improve the efficiency of solar fuel cell devices. Through lab experiments, Beckingham will examine transport properties such as permeability, solubility and diffusivity for a neutral solute (methanol), an ionic solute (acetate) and complex mixtures of the two. Beckingham, with his graduate students, will be utilizing infrared spectroscopy in a novel way that will allow them to examine the diffusion behavior of multiple species at once, streamlining the characterization process.

Listen to our podcasts with Daniel Taurtiz and Zac Young at eng.auburn.edu/ginning

Two students from the Auburn University Department of Aerospace Engineering and an alumnus of the department have been recognized by the Huntsville Section of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Timothy Marquardt received the Graduate Student of the Year award; Anna Grace Miller received the Undergraduate Student of the Year award; and aerospace engineering alumnus Mark Miller received the organization’s Toftoy Award. Doctoral candidate Timothy Marquardt was nominated for the Graduate Student of the Year award for his research into swirl-enhanced hybrid rocket combustion physics, for his analysis of both hybrid and nuclear thermal rocket propulsion engines for NASA and for outstanding academic performance. He is a member of the Advanced Propulsion Research Laboratory at Auburn University and is advised by its director, Joe Majdalani, the Hugh and Loeda Francis Chair of Excellence in the Department of Aerospace Engineering. Undergraduate honoree Anna Grace Miller is a 2020 graduate of the Department of Aerospace Engineering. In her time as an Auburn Engineering student, Miller served as vice president of Sigma Gamma Tau Aerospace Engineering Honor Society,

Anna Grace Miller, Mark Miller and Timothy Marquardt

as a Cupola Engineering Ambassador and as a member of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, which represents the top 10% of Auburn students. She was also selected to be the College of Engineering Graduation Marshal at the 2020 spring commencement ceremony, which was rescheduled due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Holger Toftoy Award is presented in recognition of outstanding technical management in the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. The 2020 recipient of this award is Mark Miller, a two-time Auburn aerospace engineering graduate who earned a bachelor’s degree in 1984 and a master’s degree in 1985. He is vice president and division manager of the missile and aviation systems division at Dynetics, a division he originally established at the firm. The Department of Aerospace Engineering named Miller as its 2012 Outstanding Alumnus. He presently serves on the Auburn Alumni Engineering Council and on the department’s advisory board.

Mechanical engineering senior wins SEC Pitch entrepreneurial competition Zac Young, a student in Auburn’s Entrepreneurship Program, resident in the New Venture Accelerator, and senior in mechanical engineering, found a way to make power lines safer for linesmen to install, more effective and cost-efficient. Using lessons learned from the entrepreneurship offerings afforded him by Auburn University and the Harbert College of Business, Young is able to cultivate his business idea.

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Zac Young

Young took first place and a $5,000 prize in the virtual SEC Pitch Competition. Young, owner of Vulcan Line Tools, created the Wave Timer — a small device that measures sag, tension and the temperature of power lines in a matter of seconds.

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STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY 16



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Located at the corner of West Samford Avenue and Shug Jordan Parkway, Auburn’s new 42,000 square-foot Advanced Structural Engineering Laboratory is a technological marvel. “If I’m a student who wants to be a structural engineer,” said Steve Taylor, associate dean for research, “Auburn is the best place to go to school in the nation.”

America has an infrastructure problem. Auburn now has a $22 million solution. It’s at the corner of West Samford Avenue and Shug Jordan Parkway, it’s nearly 42,000 square feet, and it’s spectacular. “The U.S. is dealing with significant issues related to aging infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, railways, airports, waterways, and water and wastewater facilities,” said Steve Taylor, associate dean for research. “It’s a safety issue, but also an economic development issue. Without safe and functional transportation networks, our economy fails. Without safe and functional water and wastewater systems, our economy fails. Auburn researchers in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering will now be able to better contribute to designing newer, cost effective infrastructure solutions for years to come thanks to the new Advanced Structural Engineering Laboratory (ASEL).”

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“Advanced” is almost an understatement. The ASEL, one of the largest structural engineering labs in the world, is a technological marvel. The facility, which opened in early December, includes a high bay laboratory with a strong wall and strong floor specially engineered to handle extreme structural testing loads; a geotechnical chamber within the strong floor; a concrete materials research and testing laboratory; wind testing capabilities that can replicate hurricane-level loads; and faculty and graduate student spaces. “The new technology and functionality obviously excited our faculty when we first discussed building the ASEL, but another huge plus was that there would be so many things close together on one research campus,” Taylor said. “For years, we’d had an excellent structural testing lab that’s part of the Harbert Engineering Center, but we had outgrown it.

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We’d come to the point that we needed to replace it, due in part to its surroundings.” Indeed, one of the most attractive aspects of the lab, is the ease of access. Due to its location on the engineering campus, the previous structural testing lab, which was built in 1988, could only accommodate elements 40 feet in length or under. “And even that took a lot of work,” said Robbie Barnes, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering. “Let’s just say that a few signs may or may not have been bent. But with the new facility, we can bring in elements like full-scale bridge girders that are 140 feet long. A lot of care was put into the design to ensure that a long vehicle, be it a truck or trailer, can basically just back right up to the building.” Plenty of care was also put into providing peace of mind once that vehicle’s cargo is inside; the ASEL’s strong floor is twice

as large, and features anchor points that hold 10 times the load as the floor in the previous lab, which will be repurposed for other academic and research use. But the ASEL’s most unique feature may be the 4,700-cubicfoot geotechnical test chamber within the strong floor footprint — one of the few test chambers in the nation included in a university laboratory — that will allow the department’s geotechnical researchers to conduct testing on foundations, anchorages and towers previously only possible in the field. “After a devastating season of hurricanes in the Southeast, we are reminded of the fragile nature of some aspects of our critical infrastructure,” said Justin Marshall, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and the director of the ASEL. “The unique capabilities of the ASEL will allow for full-scale, controlled testing including the soil, the foundation

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The $22 million ASEL includes a high bay laboratory with a strong wall and strong floor specially engineered to handle extreme structural testing loads.



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The college’s previous structural testing lab could only accommodate elements 40 feet in length or under. The 42,000 square-foot ASEL allows researchers to bring in elements like full-scale bridge girders that are 140 feet long.

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In addition to its incredible research amenities, the ASEL includes graduate student study spaces.

and the structural system to develop and evaluate innovative, high-performing, resilient and cost-effective infrastructure that will endure and perform well into the future.”

Alabama. When you have what is arguably the best lab of its kind, you are signaling to the world that Alabama is the place to do business.

Marshall calls the ASEL “game-changing.” Andy Nowak, chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, goes a step further.

“I remain committed to working in partnership with Auburn University as we move our state forward into the next century,” she said.

“It really is a revolution in structural engineering,” Nowak said. “It creates completely new opportunities. It changes the way we think about solving structural and material engineering problems. What was impossible is now possible.”

The unprecedented investment in Auburn’s structural and geotechnical engineering expertise not only coincides, but pairs perfectly, with the college’s continued efforts to elevate its transportation engineering initiatives; many of the full-scale structures and components that the ASEL can test, such as guardrails, long-span bridge girders and other bridge foundation systems, are integral to transportation infrastructure.

And Nowak is excited about who will be doing it. “In addition to helping us secure research grants and projects, the ASEL will help us to recruit the best faculty and the best students,” he said. Taylor agrees. “We now offer one of the best laboratories in the country — if not the best,” Taylor said. “If I’m a student who wants to be a structural engineer, this is the best place to go to school in the nation.” But the ASEL isn’t just a recruiting tool for the university, it’s a huge one for the state.

“As it is in many other areas of research, I’m proud to say that Auburn is now one of the top destinations in the world for structural engineering,” said Christopher B. Roberts, dean of engineering. “Whether it’s developing new innovations or finding ways to significantly lengthen the life of our existing infrastructure, while decreasing costs to taxpayers, the ASEL allows our faculty in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering to take the lead in solving some of our nation’s most pressing problems. That’s what industry experts have come to expect from Auburn Engineering,” he added.

“Auburn University continues to serve a pivotal role in the development of our state’s second-to-none workforce,” said Gov. Kay Ivey, a 1967 Auburn University graduate. “I am proud to celebrate the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering’s new Advanced Structural Engineering Laboratory and the fact that this is not only a giant step for Auburn but a giant step for

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Visit our magazine online at eng.auburn.edu/magazine for an enhanced version of this story with videos and photos

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// B Y C A S S I E M O N T G O M E R Y

A FAMILY WITHIN THE AUBURN FAMILY This is what the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) has become for so many Black students in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. First formed in the late 1980s, the Auburn University chapter of NSBE continues to thrive, even amid a global pandemic, because of the passion of its members and a dedicated network of alumni supporters.



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Each fall, NSBE hosts a week of social and athletic events to welcome new and returning club members.

Adia Foster, current chapter president, is a junior studying software engineering. Her NSBE membership seems destined from birth. She is the daughter of two Auburn Engineering alumni — Bernard, ’92 industrial engineering, and Mendolyn, ’92 electrical engineering — who met at NSBE’s Fall Regional Conference (FRC). Her father would later serve as the Auburn chapter president. “I went through phases of wanting to be a doctor and then a teacher, but I would always come back to being an engineer. Once I decided I wanted to study engineering, there really wasn’t any other school that, in my opinion, compared to Auburn Engineering, especially as close as I wanted to be to home. It was a no-brainer,” said Foster, a Montgomery native. She joined NSBE and attended FRC that first semester because it was what her parents did their freshman year. The conference is a chance to travel to another city, compete against engineering programs from throughout the Southeast and form bonds with classmates that last throughout college and beyond. What Foster found at her first NSBE conference opened her eyes to the value that an organization such as NSBE can offer to students such as herself. “Everywhere you look at FRC, there’s Black people dressed up in professional attire – just business professional from head to toe. A lot of us don’t ever get to see that,” she said. “It’s

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The NSBE 2019-20 executive board at a themed gathering. Adia Foster, current chapter president, is pictured at center.

hundreds of people who look like us dressed professionally and doing great things in engineering.”

A community of support The organization was founded by six Purdue University students in 1975 in an effort to combat a high dropout rate among Black engineering students – a rate that reached as high as 80% in the late 1960s. Today, NSBE has more than 600 active collegiate, professional and pre-collegiate chapters with more than 24,0000 members in the United States and

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NSBE welcomes professional speakers and recruiters to its weekly meetings.

explained. “I was the only Black student at my school and whether you’re going from being the only one like me or you were surrounded by Black people, now you might be the only in your engineering class. Just because you’re the only one in that class, you are not the only one overall. And that’s where NSBE comes in.” Jeffrey Fergus, associate dean for undergraduate studies and program assessment, is the faculty advisor for the Auburn chapter. He emphasizes the value of NSBE as a support system for Black engineering students. NSBE members meet with prospective Auburn Engineering students.

abroad dedicated to advancing the organization’s mission: “To increase the number of culturally responsible Black Engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.”

“In addition to organized professional development programs, NSBE provides a community of support to help its members persevere in times of struggle and celebrate in times of success,” he said. “Such support is important for all students, but the opportunity to spend time with other Black engineering students is especially important for NSBE members, because they are often the only or one of a few Black students in their classes.”

Organizations such as NSBE offer Black students an oncampus community of peers with shared life experiences.

Navigating difficult circumstances

“I would say there are two groups within the Black student population at Auburn. There’s the group that grew up with only Black peers and then there’s the group of students who were the only Black student at their high school,” Foster

The Auburn NSBE chapter is comprised of nearly 100 active members who, during a regular non-pandemic semester, would meet weekly in the Brown-Kopel Engineering Student Achievement Center to listen to guest speakers cover a range

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NSBE has more than 15,000 collegiate members across the United States and abroad.

of topics from the history of voting rights in the South to negotiating a salary offer. This year, with coronavirus precautions restricting indoor meetings and large gatherings, chapter events have looked different, though enthusiasm and participation remains high. Weekly chapter meetings have transitioned to Zoom, but the format has opened the door to greater participation from professional speakers and recruiters who may not normally have been able to travel to Auburn for an in-person event. “One of the biggest benefits to virtual meetings is that we’ve had the opportunity to have representatives from far more companies join our meetings and speak to our students than ever,” Foster said. “Some of these people would never have been able to come to Auburn in person – take the Microsoft representative who joined from Seattle, for example. We’re using the virtual format to our advantage.” Transitioning online has also allowed the Auburn chapter to welcome its first full-time distance learning member who is completing an online computer science degree. “He’s our first member who has been a part of the online programs that the College of Engineering offers, but he’s been able to join all of our meetings and attend everything, so that was an awesome benefit,” she said.

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Virtual events can only go so far, however. In a regular year, students would normally look forward to attending and competing against other engineering schools at FRC, throwing themed get-togethers, hosting the annual Cultural Fashion show and celebrating one another’s achievements at their annual awards banquet. Foster and the organization’s executive board hope to hold as many of these events as possible during spring semester. “Hopefully, next semester, we can get to do some of our fun events that we didn’t get to host this fall,” Foster said. “There’s so many things we want to do and we’re trying not to overload everyone, but we also want to get as many of them on the schedule as possible.”

Leaving a lasting impact NSBE is one of many Auburn Engineering student organizations that enjoy the support of dedicated alumni who give of their time and resources to ensure the success of the next generation. “Alumni provide examples of what students can look forward to becoming when they graduate. They can provide useful advice on how to succeed and encouragement by sharing how they may have also struggled at times as a student but persevered,” Fergus said. “The Samuel Ginn College of

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Past NSBE members, including Mendolyn (Brooks) Foster and Bernard Foster (top row center and right), gather for a gala dinner.

Engineering and NSBE have many dedicated alumni who provide inspiring examples of success and generously spend time with our students.” Jeremy Woods, ’16 software engineering, is one such dedicated NSBE alumnus. His enthusiasm for NSBE started before his college days as a member of the Birmingham NSBE Jr. chapter. “I knew that I wanted to be an engineering major and I already had a relationship with the organization,” he said. “While I was at Camp War Eagle, I was approached by members of that year’s executive board and decided to give it a shot.” Woods, now a software engineer at Google and a member of the Auburn Engineering Young Alumni Council, recently established the Jeremy Woods Endowed Scholarship in engineering. The endowed scholarship, which was matched by Google, will provide meaningful support to engineering students, with preference given to students who participate in NSBE. He also volunteers as a Google Engineer and does recruiting at Auburn that focuses on groups such as NSBE, the Society of Women Engineers and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. “When I first graduated, I would normally have communication with the Auburn NSBE executive board and provide feedback

and advice when possible. Since then, most of the students I know personally have graduated so I have switched to trying to leverage my resources in favor of underrepresented groups who are pursuing engineering. The scholarship prioritizes students in NSBE because that was a big part of my college experience,” he said. “I know college organizations run on alumni support and I think it is important to support the organization that I feel supported me.” MaTais Caldwell, a senior in computer science and NSBE membership chair, appreciates the time and energy alumni pour into the organization. “Alumni are living examples of the results of working hard and being committed to the mission of the organization,” Caldwell said. “I feel that the alumni can help give the new members a head start by explaining some of the steps they took to be successful and what pitfalls to avoid.” For Caldwell, who joined NSBE for the chance to network among his peers and the opportunity to grow as a leader, there has never been a question of whether he would remain involved with the organization after graduation. “I believe it’s paramount that alumni are involved in chapter events,” he said. “I do plan on being involved with NSBE for the rest of my life. I feel it is not only right, but my obligation to help the next generation of NSBE members succeed.”

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AUBURN MAKES (A DIFFERENCE)


Thanks in large part to the college’s vast 3-D printing resources, Auburn engineers were quick to respond to the COVID-19 crisis with innovations that made headlines across the country. But their individual efforts to fight the virus soon inspired a new era of collaboration among Auburn makers that promises to spark a revolution in campus creativity. This is the story of Auburn Makes.


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Research engineers Garon Griffiths (left) and Christian Brodbeck (right) used 3-D printers to produce face shields for frontline medical workers over the spring. The effort was one of several Auburn Engineering initiatives intended to combat the spread of COVID-19 that inspired the Auburn Makes program.

Right now, there are at least 90 3-D printers on Auburn’s campus — that’s the official number on the spreadsheet Mike Ogles put together back in late March. There’s 13 in the maker spaces inside the Brown-Kopel Engineering Student Achievement Center, two in the Auburn University Biomechanical Engineering lab.

development capitals of the world, establishing even just a loose network of faculty with additive capabilities, however sophisticated, made sense.

And, of course, there are plenty over in the Gavin Engineering Research Laboratory at the National Center for Additive Manufacturing Excellence (NCAME) where Ogles, director of NASA programs for the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering, also serves as associate director for business development. It adds up fast.

“But, you know, that’s the irony,” Ogles said. “COVID-19 obviously put plenty of campus initiatives on hold. But it actually helped launch Auburn Makes.”

Ogles had been thinking about conducting a census of professors and researchers who had access to 3-D printers for a while. For a school that, thanks to NCAME, has quickly established itself as one of the additive manufacturing research and

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But he never got around to it. Things happened, like they always do. People get busy, projects get tabled, pandemics shut down the world.

It started with a phone call. “Gov. Ivey’s office contacted us, basically wanting to know how many 3-D printers the college had access to in case they needed to martial them into service to compensate for possible personal protective equipment (PPE) shortages,” said Steve Taylor, associate dean for research in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. “They were preparing for the worst.”

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As soon as he hung up with the governor’s office, he dialed Ogles. “He said ‘Mike, remember that project you wanted to work on with the 3-D printers? Well, we need you to do it — quickly,’” Ogles said. “In a day and a half I’d found 85.” And, as fate would have it, some were already being put to emergency use. Harnessing Expertise and Resources Over the weekend of March 20, a team of mechanical and electrical engineering faculty conceived and tested the RE-InVENT, a device that could quickly and inexpensively convert CPAP machines into ventilators, which hospital administrators feared could possibly be in short supply in the early days of the pandemic. Research engineer Garon Griffiths, who oversees the maker spaces in


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Eldon Triggs, a lecturer in aerospace engineering, provided his laser-cutting services to the Auburn Makes face shield effort. “The whole idea,” said Triggs, “was to put Auburn’s principles into practice, especially during this really critical time.”

the new Brown-Kopel Engineering Student Achievement Center, is quick to downplay his role in developing the innovation. Michael Zabala is quick to celebrate it.

call-to-arms. Garon was kind of a utility player, using the 3-D printers in Brown-Kopel to facilitate a lot of what was happening. It was very much an all-hands-on-deck situation.”

“We really needed adapters so that we could plug in a pressure gauge for the RE-InVENT,” said Zabala, assistant mechanical engineering professor. “Ordering them would have taken too long, so Garon volunteered to print them for us.”

Two of those hands belonged to Griffiths’ fellow research engineer Christian Brodbeck, who as advisor to the Auburn chapter of Engineers Without Borders, is no stranger to volunteering his time.

The RE-InVENT went on to receive national attention and was submitted for FDA approval. “Garon is a good example of the volunteerism that was motivating a lot of our faculty in those uneasy first weeks of the pandemic,” Taylor said. “Tom Burch and Michael Zabala had just begun their incredible work on the RE-InVENT when we got the call from the governor’s office, but several others were also answering their own

In late March, Brodbeck and engineering safety manager Emmanuel Winful spearheaded a massive drive to collect and deliver campus donations of gloves, goggles, lab coats, face masks, hand sanitizer and other PPE to East Alabama Medical Center (EAMC). He also helped coordinate the effort that truly demonstrated the problem-solving potential of harnessing the college’s expertise and resources. “When we took what we’d collected to EAMC, we realized that they were also

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really in need of face shields,” Brodbeck said. “With a new understanding of all of the 3-D printing capabilities that we had, we knew that was something that we could definitely work on. No one wanted to just be sitting there. We wanted to be doing something.” For the next few weeks, BrownKopel became the capital of “Doing Something” at Auburn University. “Mike Ogles gave me the spreadsheet, and we asked those on campus with a 3-D printer if they could spare one so we could start printing face shield frames,” Griffiths said. “If they said ‘yes,’ we distributed the parts file that we had downloaded.” The campaign cranked into high gear, but occasionally had to get lo-fi. “It was pretty obvious that just a frame wouldn’t do much to stop the spread of the virus,” Brodbeck said. “We obviously wanted to provide the

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F E A T U R E S // A U B U R N M A K E S actual shields as well, but in the spring, the polycarbonate material that they’re made from was in really high demand. Everybody was trying to get it. So we improvised.” You’re welcome, Office Depot. “Yeah, we wound up using overhead projector sheets,” he said. “They weren’t ideal, but they did the trick in a pinch. We hit pretty much every office supply store in town and purchased thousands of them.” And thousands of rubber bands. “The back strap of the regular shields was elastic, but elastic was another material that was in short supply,” Brodbeck said. “Rubber bands would kind of pinch, but they also worked in a pinch. They at least held it to your face.” After assembly came distribution. Most shields were slated for EAMC, but word had gotten around — running low on face shields? Call Auburn. Requests poured in from medical and dental clinics across the state and region, and even the Alabama Department of Corrections. Thousands of masks were produced and delivered in boxes that included information about the production process — and a copy of the Auburn Creed. “The whole idea,” said Eldon Triggs, a lecturer in aerospace engineering who lent his laser-cutting services to the face shield effort, “was to put Auburn’s principles into practice, especially during this really critical time.” However, by mid-spring, the urgency surrounding PPE supply was beginning to wane. The promise demonstrated in the incredible collaboration, however, was growing more and more apparent. “Steve Taylor wondered what we could do if we kind of got the band back

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In addition to face shields for faculty, the Auburn Makes team 3-D printed plexiglass partitions that were installed throughout public spaces across the engineering campus to provide students an extra barrier of protection against viral spread.

together before it really broke up, and also tried to bring in some others from across campus,” Ogles said. “It seemed like the natural thing to do. That we could continue to make a difference by pooling all the expertise and resources at Auburn’s disposal just seemed obvious, whether it related to fighting the virus or not.” First, they needed a name. “Well, America Makes is a national leader in additive manufacturing innovation being the flagship of the National Network of Manufacturing Innovation Institutes, and they are funding several research efforts at Auburn University in additive manufacturing,” Taylor said. “They’ve recently been heavily focused on connecting medical providers in need of PPE with manufacturers with 3-D printing capabilities. So calling what we were doing Auburn Makes seemed like a perfect choice.” Next, they needed a mission statement. Enter Jerrod Windham, an associate professor in the School of Industrial and Graphic Design who had

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enthusiastically volunteered his 3-D printers for the face shield effort, and ultimately volunteered to articulate Taylor’s vision. — Auburn Makes provides makers, and those who wish to be, a path to transform ideas into reality. Auburn Makes is an inclusive network of makers and fabrication resources with the goal of fostering innovation, ingenuity and creativity through the collaborative, hands-on exploration of advanced manufacturing technologies. Auburn Makes is not housed in any one college or department of Auburn University, but exists to bridge those traditional boundaries and, therefore, is available to all active Auburn students, faculty, and staff interested in further developing creative problem solving and leadership skills. — “I think Jerrod captured it perfectly,” Ogles said. “Once we had a defined direction with the sort of difference we were looking to make, we tried to hit the ground running.” And, at first, it was pretty familiar ground. Over the summer, Brodbeck


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Auburn Makes now boasts 17 experts from across Auburn University including (pictured above from left to right): Garon Griffiths, makerspace engineer; Eldon Triggs, lecturer in aerospace engineering; Jeff Estep, analytical instruments manager for the College of Sciences and Mathematics; Christian Brodbeck, research engineer; Jordan Roberts, lecturer in mechanical engineering; and Gary Hawkins, information technology specialist for Auburn University Libraries.

and Griffiths once again fired up the network of printers to produce face shields, this time for Auburn faculty. Through a refined process — and, finally, with actual polycarbonate — 3,000 face shields were produced at a rate of 100 per day. “Those,” said Brodbeck, “we were a little prouder of.” But he probably takes the most pride in the group’s most recent major undertaking — the plexiglass partitions installed throughout public spaces across the engineering campus to provide students, faculty and staff an extra barrier of protection against viral spread. “We needed to do it quickly,” Brodbeck said. “We looked at buying them, but we realized we could make them at a fraction of the cost. Steve Taylor sent me a picture he had found on Twitter from another SEC school that had partitions held together with blue painters tape. He said, ‘Whatever we do, let’s make it a little more advanced than that.’” So, instead of heading to Home Depot, Brodbeck went to the Department of Aerospace Engineering — specifically the lab of assistant professor Vrishank Raghav.

“We tested air flow over several designs, and it turned out that the optimal design for, say, deflecting a cough, was actually a straight partition,” Brodbeck said. “Having Vrishank’s expertise was invaluable.” In just three weeks shortly before inclass instruction resumed, the college was able to produce and install 120 partitions, all held together not with painters tape but 3-D printed brackets bearing the name Auburn Makes. Taylor can’t wait for what’s next. “I think Auburn Makes is going to be something that can really make an impact,” he said. “By branding and building on the spirit and brainpower behind those early efforts — things like the facemasks and RE-InVENT — we’re hoping to establish a permanent presence that can serve as a resource for students and anyone at Auburn looking to see an idea or a prototype to fruition.” Including Taylor, Ogles, Brodbeck, Zabala, Griffiths, Triggs, Windham, Jordan Roberts, who runs the Department of Mechanical Engineering’s Design and Manufacturing Lab, and James Johnson, another research engineer in biosystems engineering, Auburn Makes now boasts 17 experts from across

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Auburn University — from engineering to industrial design, from the Athletics Department to the Ralph Brown Draughon Library. The group holds weekly meetings, and recently launched an interactive website that Ogles hopes will help truly tap the initiative’s potential. “The site features a map that shows all of the equipment and expertise we have at our disposal,” Ogles said. Need help? Need a lathe? A lasercutter? Submit a request. Need a 3-D printer? Get on the map, see which one is closest, and hit submit. Sort of like Uber for additive manufacturing services? “Well, I guess you could think of it like that. But at the same time, Auburn Makes is not just 3-D printing,” he said. “A lot of the pioneering projects obviously were additive manufacturing focused, but the scope is now a lot larger than that. We can offer access to a lathe, we can do laser-cutting. Thanks to Dana Marquez in the Athletics Department, we even have a sewing machine.” He paused. “But yeah, OK,” he said. “We definitely have a lot of 3-D printers.”

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// B Y C H R I S A N T H O N Y

A NEW ERA OF SPACEFLIGHT Nine years after the end of the Space Shuttle Program, Auburn engineers help write a new chapter in U.S. space history through a unique public-private partnership. 10

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It was a long wait, but it was worth it.

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3,250 days after the Space Shuttle Atlantis launched on July 8,

2011, marking the end of NASA’s 30-year Space Shuttle Program, a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft propelled by a Falcon 9 rocket returned astronauts to space from American soil earlier this year, beginning a new era of U.S. spaceflight. Not only did the May 30 launch mark the first manned space flight from the U.S. in nearly nine years, ending America’s reliance on the Russian Soyuz program for space travel, but it was also a significant milestone in NASA’s new Commercial Crew Program. As the successor to the Space Shuttle Program, Commercial Crew is using private companies – currently SpaceX and Boeing – to conduct orbital spaceflights and ferry astronauts to and from the International Space Station. The May launch of NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission was the first of many missions planned by SpaceX, Boeing and NASA. Commercial Crew recently continued with the November launch of the SpaceX Crew-1 mission, the program’s first fully operational mission that shuttled four astronauts to the International Space Station. “We are now going into operational missions that are commercial in nature, where NASA is a customer,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said following the Crew-1 launch. “Our goal has been, and will be, to be one customer of many customers in a very robust commercial marketplace in low-Earth orbit… We’ve seen amazing work from SpaceX already. There’s more coming from Boeing. But I think this ecosystem – this very virtuous cycle of continuous development – is going to pay benefits to the American taxpayer and space exploration.” Since the Commercial Crew Program began in earnest in 2010, engineers and scientists around the country have dedicated countless hours to advance the program. This public-private partnership has significant economic benefits, with more than 1,000 suppliers employing workers in all 50 states to support commercial crew spacecraft systems, according to NASA. Given Auburn Engineering’s distinguished record in our nation’s space history – from the four astronaut alumni from the college to the many NASA projects Auburn Engineering faculty have worked on – it’s no surprise that many Auburn Engineering alumni played key roles in making the Commercial Crew Program a reality. We profile three of those alumni in this story.

A Falcon 9 rocket blasts a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft into low-Earth orbit during the May 30 launch of the Demo-2 mission.

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Steven Sullivan and his team are pictured in the Hangar AE Firing Room at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida during the May 30 Demo-2 mission launch.

STEVEN SULLIVAN Chief engineer of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program Steven Sullivan, ’86 electrical engineering, serves as a member of the technical authority guiding NASA’s direction in developing U.S. crew transportation services to the International Space Station and other low-Earth orbit destinations. Prior to being named the chief engineer for the Commercial Crew Program, he was the Processing Chief Engineer, overseeing the final five years of the Space Shuttle Program. “At the beginning of the Commercial Crew Program, I worked with the NASA design centers, specifically the Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center and NASA Headquarters, to devise the design/build requirements to be fulfilled by NASA’s commercial partners,” said Sullivan, a 35-year NASA veteran who works from the Kennedy Space Center. “These requirements addressed the spacecraft (capsule), launch vehicle (rocket), and launch complex and systems that handled the spacesuits and environmental controls, life support, safety aborts, ISS docking, vehicle recovery and ground controls, just to name a few.” Once NASA named the final two Commercial Crew Program partners ­— SpaceX and Boeing — Sullivan’s role transitioned from writing requirements to verifying their implementation. “I have spent the last six years working intimately with NASA,

SpaceX and Boeing engineers verifying that each partner’s vehicles, systems and subsystems satisfy NASA’s flight safety requirements,” he said. Sullivan, who began his tenure at NASA as a co-op student while attending Auburn, said the Commercial Crew Program has offered unique engineering challenges due to SpaceX and Boeing choosing non-traditional design solutions and using systems that have not been used in recent programs, such as parachutes for a splashdown landing. NASA assembled crossdisciplinary teams to evaluate these systems. “These collaborative engineering teams worked together to understand the physics, margins and performances within the environment that were previously unknown, especially in the propulsion, pyrotechnic and parachute systems,” he said. “The NASA team performed an extraordinary amount of independent assessment work and modeling, leveraging the experience and expertise from multiple NASA centers.” Sullivan said he is honored to work with talented engineers and scientists at NASA, as well as those at SpaceX and Boeing, to demonstrate that the Commercial Crew Program is the right model to lead America’s space program forward. “The U.S. space industry, partially funded by the U.S. government and supported by NASA, is strong and growing rapidly due to the fast-paced efforts, extraordinary achievements and ingenuity of private companies,” he said.

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F E A T U R E S // C O M M E R C I A L C R E W

Catherine Sanders is pictured on the A-2 test stand with the A-3 test stand in the background at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.

CATHERINE SANDERS Launch vehicle propulsion systems manager for NASA’s Commercial Crew Program Catherine Sanders, ’90 mechanical engineering, leads engineering insight for human-spaceflight certification of the Atlas V and Falcon 9 propulsion systems, specifically the liquid engines and stage propulsion, thrust vector control and solid propulsion systems. She has served in this role since 2016. For the recent SpaceX launches, Sanders and her team, who work from the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, assessed risk for the Falcon 9 propulsion systems. “For all elevated propulsion-related risks, our team worked with SpaceX to develop mitigations and determine flight rationale to ensure safety of our astronauts with the ultimate goal to certify SpaceX’s human spaceflight system for operational crew missions to and from the International Space Station,” she said. As the team approached the Demo-2 launch day in May, they felt good about the propulsion system health in prelaunch. Although, that did little to ease the nerves. “I think everyone held their breath at launch all the way through two stages of flight to spacecraft separation,” said Sanders, who has worked in the space industry for 30 years – 10 years with Boeing and 20 years with NASA. “I cannot even communicate the elation and satisfaction of our

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accomplishments leading up to that day.” One of the main engineering challenges in this role is to certify systems already built and in operation against program-specific requirements not in place during the original development of the launch vehicle. Ultimately, the commercial partners have responsibility for design, development, testing and evaluation, while NASA is responsible for ensuring compliance to requirements. “Everyone on our team is very experienced technically, and it is hard to not direct some of the decisions needing to be made by the partner,” Sanders said. “However, we all have the same goals and the safety of our crew is paramount.” Growing up in Huntsville and having a father who worked for NASA Marshall, NASA had a large impact in her life and she always knew she wanted to “work in space.” Now, she sees her work on the Commercial Crew Program as a way to leave a lasting mark on the industry. “I liken the situation to development of the United States Interstate Highway System funded through federal acts to enable improvement and construction of roads. Once basic infrastructure was developed, the transportation industry took off,” Sanders said. “I see what we are doing as a similar venture – ushering in a new era of U.S. spaceflight will have countless impacts on our lives, economy and certainly other ways we cannot even predict.”

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F E AT U R E S S. CARLOS JOHNSON Principal software engineer at SAIC S. Carlos Johnson, ’97 computer engineering, is part of an engineering team made up of NASA, SAIC and other contractors whose responsibilities for the Demo-2 launch included helping to analyze the on-board flight computer software design to ensure the safety critical software was thoroughly designed to detect any possible anomaly in each phase of the flight. Different software functions are performed for each launch phase, from countdown to launch, ascent to orbit, rendezvous to docking with the International Space Station, undocking to de-orbit and re-entry to safely landing on Earth. “Upon detection of an anomaly, the software must be designed to mitigate the problem either by safely adjusting the software to bypass the problem area or switching to a backup system,” said Johnson, who has worked in his current role since 2014. “Our prompt reporting of software issues found during our analysis allowed developers to quickly make corrections to resolve the issue and perform regression testing under tight schedules.” For Johnson, the biggest engineering challenge was simultaneously performing technical reviews of the onboard flight computer software design for each of the four private companies – SpaceX, Boeing, United Launch Alliance and Sierra Nevada. “The next biggest challenge was in keeping everything compartmentalized in order to safeguard the proprietary rights of each company’s software design,” he said. “This became especially difficult during technical review meetings where you had to be fully aware of who was in attendance and which company design was being critiqued.” Although he began as a chemical engineering student, he quickly found his passion in computer engineering, which put him on his current career path where he has spent 23 years in software engineering roles for companies like Northrop Grumman, L-3 Communications and SAIC.

S. Carlos Johnson is pictured at Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A in Florida as the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket are ready for launch.

“Computer engineering was a great fit and now working at the Kennedy Space Center has been a perfect opportunity, where I still can say ‘War Eagle!’ in the halls to other Auburn alumni,” he said. He considers himself blessed and honored to be in a position where he is part of space history in the making. “It is the most humbling experience to be a small part of a big step forward for launching America,” Johnson said. “I am working with the most talented and diverse group, and feeling grateful for the time and knowledge they share to make this a reality. “Thanks to the newly formed Space Council, the space program is booming again with hundreds of companies wanting to jump in and launch their rockets and satellites,” he added.

[ About Commercial Crew ] NASA’s Commercial Crew Program has worked with several American aerospace industry companies to facilitate the development of U.S. human spaceflight systems since 2010. The goal is to have safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the International Space Station and foster commercial access to other potential low-Earth orbit destinations. NASA selected Boeing and SpaceX in September 2014 to transport crew to the International Space Station from the United States. These integrated spacecraft, rockets and associated systems will carry up to four astronauts on NASA missions, maintaining a space station crew of seven to maximize time dedicated to scientific research on the orbiting laboratory.

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F E AT U R E S

// B Y J E R E M Y H E N D E R S O N

125 YEARS of AUBURN’S X-RAY VISION In 1892, A.F. McKissick helped lay the foundation for Auburn football. Four years later, he did the same for biomedical imaging. Here’s the untold story of Auburn Engineering’s pioneering role in the scientific breakthrough that changed the world.

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The Atlanta Constitution’s coverage of A.F. McKissick’s X-ray experiments included a portrait of the 26-year-old Auburn electrical engineering professor.

In 2012, Auburn University acquired the nation’s third actively shielded wholebody 7 Tesla MRI. The $8.5 million machine — still one of just seven in the South — provided Auburn University’s MRI Research Center game-changing access to dimensions of detail once unimaginable in cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging. Eight years later, the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering remains a national leader in medical imaging research. The director of Auburn’s first electrical engineering laboratory would be proud. On Friday, Nov. 8, 1895, as Auburn’s football team rode north to Nashville for its inaugural game under head coach John Heisman, the world changed. Word of what German mechanical engineer Wilhelm Röntgen had first seen in his laboratory — that

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morning in America, that evening in Würzburg — began popping up across the Atlantic the first week of January 1896. Newspapers began running brief but tantalizing tales about some sort of “new photography.” There had been a blurb on the supposed discovery in the Saturday, Feb. 8, 1896, edition of The Atlanta Constitution. And Anthony Foster McKissick had laughed. For 24 hours, he thought it had to be a mistake, a miscalculation. Maybe even a misprint. Then came Sunday. There was an abridged account of a Harvard professor’s replication of Röntgen’s experiments under the headline: “A Giant Stride in Science: How Objects Are Photographed Through Opaque Bodies - The Cathode Ray.” It was almost too fantastic to believe. McKissick read the story. He


F E AT U R E S read it again. He read it to his wife. She saw the look in his eyes. So did his students. In 1891, Alabama A&M president Leroy Broun had hired the 23-year-old McKissick to take charge of what the school was calling the first electrical engineering department in the south. He’d graduated with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering from the University of South Carolina in 1889, and had spent the past two years in pivotal positions at Westinghouse Co. and the Congaree Gas and Light Company, the first electric company in Columbia, S.C. His position on the gridiron was just as pivotal. At 6’0, 210 pounds, McKissick was easily the biggest man on Auburn’s first football team — professors were permitted to play in those early years — and the natural choice for center in 1892. He was good. He loved the game. He loved science more. What he couldn’t get out of his mind as he hurried from his home on South Gay Street to the electrical laboratory in the basement of Samford Hall on Monday morning, Feb. 10, 1896, were the bones of Röntgen’s wife’s hands. The papers said the barium platinocyanide screen actually captured the shadows of her metacarpals and phalanges, wedding ring and all. He looked in the corners and under tables. He finally found several vacuum tubes just sitting around, just waiting for a wizard to fill them with a new form of energy. He settled on one of the pointed four-inch Crookes tubes containing tiny platinum wires, same as Röntgen had reportedly used. That was the easy part. The electricity was where things would get interesting. He told his students the amount of power needed could, were they to join hands, instantly kill half of them. No one flinched. It was going to be a fun week.

Auburn faculty members pose behind Samford Hall. Electrical engineering professor A.F. McKissick is on the top row, first from the left.

They spent most of Monday building a new alternator. When they finished, they cranked 100 volts into the high frequency Tesla induction coil that the students had built that past fall. Suddenly, they had 15,000 volts. They then sent that bolt of lightning through a spark-gap and a condenser and turned it into a casket-friendly 100,000 volts. McKissick held a five-inch piece of wood to the cylinder. It burned in two. That was enough fun for Monday.

lying around. He found a box of Seed’s Extra-Rapid Dry Plates buried in the lab. They’d been there for at least two years. He dusted one off and slipped it into a plate holder. He looked around for a test subject. His eyes settled on a small saw. He put it on top of the photographic plate, then covered it with a thin wooden board. He picked everything up and placed it beneath the glowing tube. They watched and waited.

On Tuesday, it was time. They connected the new alternator to the Crookes tube, stood back, and threw the switch. The platinum wires sizzled. The tube filled with a soft, glowing white light that only a handful of Americans had ever beheld. This was it. They now shared the room with an invisible force that the world was calling X-rays.

After two and a half minutes, they removed the plate and carried it to a makeshift dark room.

McKissick didn’t know much about photography. But he was pretty sure he had some photographic plates

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The outline began to appear almost immediately. Without a camera, and through solid wood, they had photographed a saw. McKissick couldn’t believe it. He was beaming. His students were beaming. The tube was beaming. They shut off the power. One of the students immediately took off for the post

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office to wire Atlanta for fresh plates. Until they arrived, McKissick thought he could borrow some from Mr. Abbott, the Loveliest Village’s resident photographer. If no one was sitting for a portrait, surely he could spare some in the name of science. Absolutely, Abbott said. The original board the class had used to obscure test subjects was less than an inch thick. On Wednesday, they went with something thicker and denser. It made no difference. The outline of the scissors, blades open, was perfectly clear. So was the dollar inside the change purse. They put a clasp and a key inside a cardboard box. Miller Reese Hutchison, one of McKissick’s star students, and later chief engineer for Thomas Edison’s laboratory, took the plate into the dark room and grabbed the bottle of Rodinol. Jaws dropped. It was as if the box hadn’t even been there. But nothing prepared them for the bones. McKissick would have done it himself were there not any takers. But there were plenty. Hands shot into the air. He examined them, looking for the most scientifically interesting. He settled on a boy with a right index finger bent oddly to the left, hoping to capture as many clearly defined twists and turns and abnormalities as he could.


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Because his mind was already there — surgeries! Fractures, breaks, bullets! Under the Röntgen rays, in theory, you could locate them instantly. He had the boy stand as far back as he could while keeping his hand still on the plate. McKissick flipped the switch. Eight minutes later, he flipped it off. The negative image was perfect. They saw the faint outline of the flesh. They saw the dense darkness of the bones. They heard the reverent silence of the room at the advent of a miracle.

Word traveled fast A.F. McKissick, the South’s premiere practitioner of the new photography! One of the country’s most experienced Röntgen ray exhibitionists! The coverage started in the Constitution and didn’t stop. On Thursday, he’d quickly carried 15 or so of his best plates with him to

Atlanta and dazzled the Constitution’s newsroom with the results of, as the paper called it, “the new light.” They gave him nearly half a page — illustrations of the plates, even his portrait — under the headline “First X Ray Pictures Brought To Atlanta Yesterday!” The Opelika Post was eager for its own peek at the rays as soon as he returned. So was a writer from a leading southern scientific journal. McKissick opened up the lab and obliged them, same as he would for hundreds more over the coming months. He was already an old pro at scientific demonstrations. Not two weeks earlier, he’d once again shown off some of his favorite experiments during yet another campus lecture on Nikola Tesla.

But the X-ray was now the showstopper. The finale was always the inside of the hand. It was sorcery. McKissick mania continued through the spring and well into the summer. Within a few days of the Constitution’s story, he’d become a regional celebrity, not just a feather in Auburn’s cap — a plume: the captain of the cathode, a name to know and revere, “an Apostle of Science,” The Birmingham News proclaimed. To celebrate George Washington’s birthday, Birmingham’s school children were instructed to write McKissick’s name on the board next to Röntgen’s as a tribute to a southerner who was, in the field of science, currently honoring the first president’s legacy of leadership perhaps more than any man in America. One rival institution was not amused.

He made sparks jump between friends and lit up wires formed to spell the engineering genius’ last name.

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The University of Georgia did its best to keep up, boasting that

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Throughout 1896, companies across the country gifted McKissick equipment to aid in his celebrated research. Thomas Edison’s Edison Manufacturing Co. donated a pair of handheld “Edison Glasses” that offered a fluid look at whatever — or whomever — they were trained on.

X-ray experiments conducted by its professors deserved equal attention. McKissick’s name remained the biggest by a mile and, as a result, earned him the biggest toys. Companies began showering him with gifts and equipment. Boston-based L.E. Knolt Apparatus Co. delivered the finest Crooke’s tube available, by which McKissick, with only a fiveminute exposure, produced perhaps the clearest picture of the inner hand in the world at the time. Two voltmeters came from the Weston Electrical Instrument Company in Newark. Four transformers from the Water, Light and Power Company of Anderson, South Carolina. But what really turned the electrical lab into a revolving door of local curiosity seekers was the fabulous fluoroscope from the Edison Manufacturing Co. Rather than waiting on a static image to develop, the handheld “Edison Glasses” gave operators a fluid, miraculous peek at whatever part of

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the body they were trained on. McKissick was an engineer, but the medical application of the rays had been obvious from the second he saw inside one of his students, and Edison’s ingenious new apparatus was the quickest way to embrace it. People left his lab rubbing their eyes, shaking their heads, declaring the discovery of the X-ray the greatest of the century. McKissick took the show on the road, certain that the surgeons of the South would feel the same. Fluoroscope in hand, he moonlighted as a miracle worker for the rest of the spring and summer, volunteering his X-ray vision to the public, inviting bullet-ridden strangers to come find salvation under Auburn’s magic light. He promised that he could “locate bullets or any metallic substance, or show fractures of the bones in any part of the limbs of the body” for anyone who could travel to the electrical lab accompanied by a physician. They came from all over. A doctor from

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Columbia, Alabama, brought a teenager who’d suffered 13 years with a pistol ball somewhere behind his knee cap; McKissick lit up the device and found exactly where it was in seconds. A doctor from Sylacauga did the same thing for a child crippled for 18 months after being accidentally shot in the leg. Thanks to McKissick, the child would walk again. The possibilities were endless. “I see no reason,” McKissick even told the Constitution, “why the light cannot be used to photograph the brain.” The first director of Auburn University’s first MRI Research Center is proud. “Wow,” said Tom Denney, director of the MRI Center and professor of electrical and computer engineering. “That’s amazing. As a fellow electrical engineer, I’m honored to play a part in Prof. McKissick’s legacy.” He’s not just saying that. Thanks to a breakthrough gene therapy vector


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A.F. McKissick was one of the first scientists to ponder the possibility of “photographing the brain.” But he couldn’t imagine the degree of detail provided by Auburn’s whole-body 7 Tesla MRI, still one of just seven 7-Ts in the South.

recently developed through brain metabolite testing under Auburn’s 7 Tesla, a 10-yearold child named JoJo suffering from a rare genetic nerve disease may walk again. “Obviously, I’ve known we’ve been conducting some of the most advanced medical imaging research since the 7 Tesla arrived,” Denney said. “But that Auburn actually helped pioneer biomedical engineering? That’s really something to celebrate.”

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IT’S MY JOB BY JEREMY HENDERSON

EDDIE SEAY ’16 Wireless Software Engineering Senior Software Engineer at Chick-Fil-A

Why Auburn? I had a good friend who I grew up with in Nashville who kind of recruited me to Auburn. I knew that I wanted to go to a large, public university in the South and that Auburn, with a strong football program and top-notch academics, felt like a good fit. I knew it had a great College of Engineering, but when I checked it out on the Cupola tour — there was just something different about Auburn. I was interested in building software and writing code, but what drew me to the wireless program was thinking about what skills could help me stand out in the market after graduation. Word on the street is that we have you to thank for the great Chick-fil-A app? Well, the earliest iterations of the Chick-fil-A app technically started quite a while back – as early as 2013. Around the same time, we had a program that was known as “A-List,” which was a grassroots loyalty program that allowed store operators to recognize and reward their most loyal customers. As the program grew, our leadership wanted to expand its reach to reward all customers – more than we could ever do in the existing format. The result of that expansion is what we now know as the Chick-fil-A One loyalty program. In June 2016, we did a major promotional launch of the new program, and that was a really big deal. The promotion offered new members a free Chick-fil-A chicken sandwich for downloading the app and signing up, and it generated the largest spike in app downloads in the App Store’s history – bigger than any launch done by any of the most popular apps you would have on your phone. That was right around the time when I started; it was pretty amazing. Since then, I have served as the staff engineer on the Chick-fil-A App for iOS.

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IT’S MY JOB

AU + UX/UI = APP HE DIDN’T INVENT THE CHICKEN SANDWICH. JUST THE CHICKEN SANDWICH APP.

Around fall of 2017, given the massive growth that Chick-fil-A One had seen, there was a proportionally increasing demand from the business to add more and more functionality to the app – namely Chick-fil-A Delivery. While the existing app was serving customers and operators in ways we never had before, we realized that the app had started to outgrow its original software architecture and that making large-scale enhancements would become increasingly more difficult over time. At that point, my Android counterpart and I embarked on a journey to completely rebuild brand new versions of the Chick-fil-A app for our respective platforms. Between November 2017 and August 2018, my team and I built the Chick-fil-A app that you’re using today. We launched it that August with a completely reimagined user experience and an updated loyalty program that introduced different status levels and the concept of points. Since then, I’ve continued to lead a growing team focused on the engineering efforts on the Chick-fil-A app as well as other iOS apps within the Chick-fil-A commerce ecosystem. I am also closely involved with the development of our iPadbased point of sale app that restaurant team members use for taking orders in the drive-thru. Though this app has been used in restaurants for quite some time, our team began working late last year to refresh the app with an updated interface and enhanced performance. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March this past year, this app became more important than ever, and throughout the course of 2020, our team has worked closely with operators to enable new service models and grow their businesses by using this tool. Over the past year, both of these products have grown to the point that large majority of our sales are flowing through them. It truly is an exciting time to be working on customer technology at Chick-fil-A, and I am fortunate to be a part of it. What’s an average day like? Over time, my average day has shifted from being heavily weighted toward writing code more in the direction of

planning, strategy, leadership and support, but on the days that I am not scheduled for many meetings, I really get my hands in the code to build things. What a given day looks like tends to be most influenced by what part of the week it falls in, but it really does vary. I could be building a new shared framework to be used in either of our apps or I could be in strategy and planning discussions. I could be reviewing pull requests from my team that include new features or bug fixes to the app or I could be coordinating with our Quality Engineering team about what changes to expect in an upcoming release. I could be building a new user-facing feature in the app, or I could be writing the release notes to be published in the App Store. I’m really fortunate that my role allows me to spend a lot of time in different stages of the product development process. Is it safe to say that Auburn prepared you well? Absolutely. I credit Auburn and the experience I had there for a great deal of my success. As an engineer, Dr. Stroud’s digital logic circuits class and Dr. Chapman’s introduction to algorithms classes are two that stand out to me as highly impactful to the way I think about technology as a whole and the way I use it to efficiently solve challenging problems. As a leader, I give Auburn a great deal of credit for empowering me to have a very well-rounded experience. When I gave Cupola tours myself, one of the things I always highlighted — and it’s still true — is that, yes, Auburn obviously gives you a top-notch education, but there’s also so many opportunities to get plugged in other ways around campus and within the College of Engineering that really foster leadership, and I think that’s something that helps Auburn graduates really stand out. I learned the hard skills in the classroom, but I also developed so many soft skills that have allowed me to succeed when working with peers and among teams in the workplace. Chick-fil-A sauce is the best, right? Oh, for sure. But ranch is my second favorite. I eat a lot of the spicy stuff. Ranch on the spicy chicken? That’s good.

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Be the Creed B E T H E C R E E D // S T U D E N T

I believe that this is a practical world

and that I can count only on what I earn.

Therefore, I believe in work , hard work . BY CASSIE MONTGOMERY

DREMERE WOODS Sophomore Aerospace Engineering

Dremere Woods wouldn’t have made it to Auburn without “work, hard work.” The Cottondale native balanced his high school coursework with twice daily practice as a three-sport athlete and a part-time job at a local fast food restaurant. Often, he would not get to bed until 1 a.m., only to get up early again for practice the next morning before school. “Someone at work once asked me, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ and I told him I wanted to be a rocket scientist,” Woods recalled. “This man said, ‘No, you’re going to be stuck working at McDonald’s with me for the rest of your life.’ I told him I have dreams and aspirations bigger than McDonald’s and I’m going to do

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my best to prove all the doubters wrong.” Woods, now a sophomore in aerospace engineering, put his paychecks toward purchasing ACT preparation books in order to raise his score high enough to get into Auburn. And while he didn’t end up with a football scholarship like his high school classmate Seth Williams, Woods did earn a full tuition scholarship as a first-generation college student. “I can’t catch touchdowns like Seth does, but I’ve found my way of catching and making touchdowns through engineering and using my mind,” he said. Only in his second year, Woods is already making an impact on campus and off. He was recently named a university-wide Be the Creed honoree and was one of WayUp’s top 100 interns for his work with GE Aviation. He’s just started an undergraduate researcher position and has his sights set on graduate school with plans to pursue a doctorate.

Listen to our podcast with Dremere Woods and Sushil Adhikari at eng.auburn.edu/ginning


F A C U LT Y // B E T H E C R E E D I believe in education, which gives me the knowledge to work wisely a n d t ra i n s my m i n d a n d my h a n d s to w o r k s k i l l f u l l y. BY JEREMY HENDERSON

SUSHIL ADHIKARI

more than Nepal. The state harvests 40 million tons of trees every year for pulp and paper products, but millions designated for industry still go unused.

Alumni Professor Director, Center for Bioenergy and Bioproducts

Sushil Adhikari, Alumni Professor of biosystems engineering, is from Nepal. He’s proud of Nepal. He misses it. But in terms of providing an environment that could fuel his passion, there’s just no comparison to his home for the past 12 years. Because fuel is his passion, and when it comes to the kind Adhikari is interested in, Alabama’s needle is on full. “Trees can be converted into fuels or chemicals,” said Adhikari, who directs the Center for Bioenergy and Bioproducts, “and we grow a lot of trees in Alabama.” Despite being slightly smaller than Nepal, Alabama has approximately 23 million acres of forest — nearly 1 million

“The goal of our center is to utilize agricultural and forest wastes to create new molecules that can reduce fossil energy,” Adhikari said. “After we take out the pulp and paper industry, we are looking at 30 million tons of trees looking for a new market.” Given the rapidly increasing focus on renewable energy, Adhikari thinks the time to develop that market is now. “People have been growing trees and selling to the pulp and timber industries for a long time,” he said. “But our center is trying to create opportunities beyond just pulp and paper and traditional wood products. We’re focused on producing fuels and chemicals from carbon-negative technologies, as well as sequestering carbon to improve the health of both soil and the atmosphere.”

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B E T H E C R E E D // S T A F F I believe in the human touch, which cultivates sympathy with my fellow men and mutual helpfulness and brings happiness for all. BY AUSTIN PHILLIPS

sanitizing protocols to ensure the safety of the students, faculty, staff and visitors.

DWYNELL PINER High Visibility Cleaner

Shelby Center

“We had to change up the way we did things, but it was all for the safety of our people,” Piner said.

“Hey, sweetheart!” If you’ve been in the Shelby Center since its doors opened in 2007, you’ve probably heard these pleasant greetings from Dwynell “Dee” Piner, a day-shift high visibility cleaner for the facility. Piner is one of three members on the day shift in the Shelby Center, and the crew is responsible for providing a safe, clean and healthy environment for all students, faculty, staff and visitors. Auburn University contracts its cleaning services through ABM, with the day shift working 8 a.m.-4 p.m., and the night shift working 4 p.m.-midnight. The work of Piner and her colleagues has been particularly important this year as the university implemented unprecedented cleaning and

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Although the nature and purpose of her job didn’t change too much, the environment changed dramatically. In March, students were instructed to stay off campus following spring break as the campus moved to remote instruction. Students, faculty and staff slowly returned through the summer and into the fall, but it’s still not been the same for someone like Piner who loves to seeing the halls full. “I miss my people, seeing the students, faculty and staff. I’m used to seeing them every day. It’s just not been the same,” Piner said. In her down time, Piner loves hanging out with her family and friends, playing cards and chatting with her daughter Alexandria, a junior in social work at Miles College.

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A L U M N I // B E T H E C R E E D I believe in honesty and truthfulness, without which I cannot win the respect and confidence of my fellow men. BY LAUREN WINTON

another eight months before starting his career in Dothan, Alabama with Smith’s Incorporated.

JOHN WATSON ’60 Mechanical Engineering Smith’s Inc.

John Watson, ’60 mechanical engineering, knew he wanted to attend Auburn from an early age. He was the first in his family to attend college, but far from the last. His daughter, son and grandchildren have all attended Auburn University. And his graduation weekend was a big deal. “It was a big weekend, my graduation weekend,” Watson said. “I graduated on Friday, I was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Army on Saturday, and I got married on Sunday.” Following six months of active duty in the Army, Watson was offered a teaching fellowship at Auburn and wanted to return for his graduate degree, but he was called back to active duty during the Berlin Crisis, and stayed in the Army

Smith’s Inc. is an engineering firm with whom he soon became president and CEO. Years later, Watson is still involved with Smith’s Inc., and serves on the company’s board. Ever the entrepreneur, Watson has ventured into various businesses outside of mechanical engineering and contracting, including latex, yeast, windows, bricks, fiberglass and general construction. When Watson decided to give back to Auburn, he approached his giving with the same tenacity and determination. The John H. and Gail P. Watson Scholarship Endowment currently supports 18 students on scholarship. He also recently contributed an additional $2 million to the scholarship fund. “I decided to focus the scholarship on the Dothan area. I thought it would have more of an impact on the counties here and help hometown folks,” Watson said.

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FACULTY HIGHLIGHTS

Bryan Beckingham, assistant professor of chemical engineering, and Lauren Beckingham, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, received a $331,833 grant from the National Science Foundation for a project titled “3D Printing of Reactive Porous Media to Enhance Understanding of PorosityPermeability Evolution.”

David Bevly, the Bill and Lana McNair Professor of mechanical engineering, received $443,000 from four awards for GPS and alternative positioning, navigation and timing research in the GPS and Vehicle Dynamics Laboratory.

Ben Bowers, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, received a $250,000 grant from the National Cooperative Highway Research Program to develop construction guide specifications for Cold Central Plant Recycled and Cold In-Place Recycled asphalt pavements. Co-investigators are Adriana Vargas and Fan Gu from the National Center for Asphalt Technology, Brian Diefenderfer from the Virginia Transportation Research Council and Stephen Cross from S. Cross and Associates.

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Mario Eden, the Joe T. and Billie Carole McMillan Professor of chemical engineering and department chair, was elected chair of the Computing and Systems Technology Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and was named to the executive committee for the International Organization for Process Systems Engineering as the Delegate for the Americas.

Jeffrey Fergus, professor of materials engineering and associate dean for undergraduate studies and program assessment, was named a fellow of ABET, the organization that accredits collegiate engineering programs.

Peter He, associate professor of chemical engineering, and his collaborators Jin Wang, Zhihua Jiang and Mario Eden, all from chemical engineering, have been awarded a one-year $280,000 grant from the Department of Energy’s Clean Energy Smart Manufacturing Innovation Institute for a project titled “IoTEnabled Manufacturing Testbeds for Democratizing Smart Manufacturing Knowledge, Technology and Innovation.”

Robert Jackson, the Albert J. Smith, Jr. Professor of mechanical engineering, won a Best Presentation Award at the 2020 International Tribology Research Symposium for his presentation titled “An Investigation of the Elastic Cylindrical Line Contact Equations for Plane Strain and Stress Considering Friction.”

Pradeep Lall, the John and Anne MacFarlane Endowed Distinguished Professor of mechanical engineering, won the IEEE Region 3 Biedenbach Outstanding Engineering Educator Award for 2020.

Elizabeth Lipke, the Mary and John H. Sanders Professor of chemical engineering, was named an associate editor for the journal Science Advances.

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Masoud Mahjouri-Samani, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, was recently appointed senior editor of the Journal of Laser Applications and associate editor of the International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing.

Shiwen Mao, the Earle C. Williams Scholar Chair of electrical and computer engineering, won the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society’s 2020 Jack Neubauer Memorial Award for the paper titled “CSI-Based Fingerprinting for Indoor Localization: A Deep Learning Approach.” It was coauthored with his former students Xuyu Wang and Lingjun Gao, and Santosh Pandey with Cisco.

Scott Martin, assistant research professor of mechanical engineering, received $696,000 from three awards for GPS and alternative positioning, navigation and timing research in the GPS and Vehicle Dynamics Laboratory.


F A C U LT Y H I G H L I G H T S

New Professorship Appointments Robert Barnes was named the Brasfield & Gorrie Associate Professor of civil and environmental engineering. ZhongYang Cheng was named the McWane Professor of materials engineering.

Frances O’Donnell, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, received a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture for a project titled “A landscape-scale approach to wetland mitigation of nonpoint source agricultural runoff.” Collaborators are Matt Waters, assistant professor of crop, soil and environmental sciences, and Steven Brantley and Steve Golladay, research scientists from the Jones Center at Ichauway.

Jakita Thomas, the PhilpottWestPoint Stevens Associate Professor of computer science and software engineering, was recognized by the ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing for her paper, “I Can’t Breathe: Reflections from Black Women in CSCW and HCI,” and its contributions to diversity, equity and inclusion within CSCW scholarship.

Song-Yul Choe was named the William B. and Elizabeth Reed Professor of mechanical engineering. Foster Dai was named the Godbold Chair of electrical and computer engineering. Virginia Davis was named the Dr. Daniel F. and Josephine Breeden Professor of chemical engineering. Michael Hamilton was named the James B. Davis Professor of electrical and computer engineering. Joel Hayworth was named the Elton Z. and Lois G. Huff Associate Professor of civil and environmental engineering. Shiwen Mao was named the Earle C. Williams Scholar Chair of electrical and computer engineering. Guofu Niu was named the Ed and Peggy Reynolds Family Professor of electrical and computer engineering. Cheryl Seals was named the Charles W. Barkley Professor of computer science and software engineering.

Alice Smith, the Joe W. Forehand/ Accenture Professor of industrial and systems engineering, gave the keynote address at the 2020 Midwest Industry Conference hosted by IEEE.

Yin Sun, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, received the Best Paper Runnerup Award of the ACM MobiHoc conference his paper, “Optimizing Information Freshness using LowPower Status Updates via SleepWake Scheduling.”

Rick Williams, senior lecturer of mechanical engineering, co-authored a new textbook, “Engineering Computation: An Introduction using MATLAB and Excel, 2nd edition,” published by McGraw Hill.

Adit Singh was named the Godbold Chair of electrical and computer engineering. Huaguo Zhou was named the Elton Z. and Lois G. Huff Professor of civil and environmental engineering.

Huaguo Zhou, the Elton Z. and Lois G. Huff Professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Chris Correia, professor of psychology, received a $150,000 grant from California Department of Transportation to develop effective countermeasures for severely intoxicated wrong-way drivers.

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THE AWARD GOES TO... Eight outstanding alumni and one longtime employee of the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering were honored during a virtual ceremony in September by the Auburn Alumni Engineering Council for their distinguished professional careers. These alumni include five who were recognized as Distinguished Auburn Engineers, three as Outstanding Young Auburn Engineers and the college’s former director of communications and marketing for his Superior Service.

Distinguished Auburn Engineers

Consulting, Celerant Consulting, Ernst & Young, Dell and Eli Lilly and Company. Evans is a member of the Auburn University Foundation’s Board of Directors, serving on the development committee and as vice chair of the directorship committee. She is also a member of Auburn’s Office of Inclusion and Diversity Alumni Advisory Council and the First Coast Auburn Club.

Sharlene Evans, ’86 Industrial Engineering Sharlene Reed Evans graduated from Auburn in 1986 with a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering. She also earned a master’s in the same discipline from Purdue University in 1990. Evans is currently the Chief People Officer for Myrtle Consulting Group; in this role, she leads the internal people function for the firm and leverages her expertise in organizational strategy, design and change management in support of major business improvement and change initiatives for Myrtle’s clients. She has more than 25 years of global business leadership experience in consulting, and has influenced and shaped some of the world’s most iconic brands, including Kellogg’s, Shell, and Ford. Prior to her time at Myrtle, Evans worked with SSA & Company, Hitachi

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During her time as an Auburn student, she was a member and president of the Tigerettes and a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. She is a life member of the Auburn Alumni Association and a member of Auburn’s Petrie Society.

Nelda Lee, ’69 Aerospace Engineering Nelda Lee graduated from Auburn with a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering in 1969, and earned a master’s degree in management and human resources development at

SAMUEL GINN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Webster University in 1999. Lee began her career as an associate engineer at Heritage McDonnell Douglas Corp., where she became the first woman in flight test engineering at the company. She worked her way from associate engineer to a senior manager position in charge of Boeing Test and Evaluation in St Louis. Lee retired from Boeing in 2014 after a distinguished 45-year career. In addition to her professional achievements, she is a founding member of Auburn Engineering’s 100+ Women Strong Program, where she also serves in an emeritus role on the executive committee, and is an emeritus member on the College of Business Aviation Management Advisory Board. She is also a member of the Auburn University Alumni Marching Band. Lee received the Department of Aerospace Engineering Outstanding Alumna award in 1996 and the Woman of Distinction award from the Auburn Alumni Association in 2014. She was inducted into the State of Alabama Engineering Hall of Fame in 2016 and received the Auburn University Alumni Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. She was inducted in the Women in Aviation Pioneers Hall of Fame in 2004. She previously established the Nelda K. Lee Endowed Scholarship in the Department of Aerospace Engineering


AWARDS and the Nelda K. Lee Endowed Scholarship in the Aviation Center. The Nelda Lee Pavilion in front of engineering’s Brown-Kopel Center is named in her honor. She is a member of the Engineering Ginn and Eagles societies, as well as the university’s 1856 and Samford societies, and she also supports the Auburn University Marching Band and the Gogue Performing Arts Center.

Brooks Moore, ’48 Electrical Engineering Brooks Moore earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Auburn in 1948 and a master’s in the same discipline from Georgia Tech in 1949. Moore was developing underwater mine and torpedo defense systems at the Naval Research Laboratory in Panama City, Florida, when he made the decision to move to Huntsville in 1952. He was one of the first young American engineers hired to work with Wernher Von Braun and his 120 rocket specialists from Germany. They were brought to Huntsville in 1950 and assigned the task of designing precision guided missiles for the Army. Moore was transferred with other members of the Von Braun team to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) when it was created in 1960. His initial position at MSFC was as director of the Guidance and Control Division, and he later became director of the Astrionics Laboratory. One of the major accomplishments of the team in support of the U.S. Space Program was development of the launch vehicle that put astronauts on the Moon. After

the retirement from the government in 1981, Moore continued to support our nation’s space program through his affiliation with several Huntsville aerospace companies. For his professional achievements, Moore was awarded the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, the MSFC Saturn V Award and the MSFC Skylab Achievement Award. He is a 1995 inductee into the Georgia Tech Engineering Hall of Fame and a 1997 inductee into the State of Alabama Engineering Hall of Fame. He also received the 2019 Astronautics Engineer of the Year Award from the National Space Club. Moore has served as a member of the Auburn University Research Advisory Board and as a member of the Auburn Alumni Engineering Council since 1970.

General Electric. Smith led rocket and propulsion research teams assigned to the Saturn V moon rocket, Skylab, J-93 (B-70) and TF-39 (C5-A) jet engines, and the Space Shuttle program. His accolades include NASA’s Distinguished Executive Presidential Rank, Distinguished Public Service Award, Exceptional Achievement Medal, Exceptional Service Medal, Meritorious Executive Presidential Rank, Outstanding Leadership Award and Silver Snoopy Award. He also received the U.S. Army Commendation Medal, the Auburn Alumni Association’s 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award and was a 2012 inductee into the State of Alabama Engineering Hall of Fame. In addition to degrees from Auburn, Smith received a master’s degree in administrative science from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and completed Harvard Business School’s advanced management program. He is the former chair of the Auburn Alumni Engineering Council Research Committee and a former member of the State of Alabama Engineering Hall of Fame board of directors. He is a life member of the Auburn Alumni Association, as well as a member of the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering’s Ginn Society and Auburn’s Foy Society.

Gerald Smith, ’61 and ’71 Aerospace Engineering Gerald Smith earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in aerospace engineering from Auburn in 1961 and 1971, respectively. Smith retired in 1995 as deputy director of NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center, and he later served as acting director of research operations at the Georgia Tech Research Institute; president of Thiokol Propulsion, the world’s largest producer of solid rocket motors; and executive director of the National Space Science and Technology Center in Huntsville. During his 40-year career, Smith held leadership roles at the U.S. Army Electronics Proving Ground, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and

ENG. AUBURN.EDU

Ken Smith, ’81 Civil Engineering Ken Smith graduated from Auburn University with a bachelor’s degree in

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AWARDS civil engineering in 1981. Immediately upon graduation, Ken began working with Alagasco, now Spire Alabama, where he served in engineering, operations, marketing and executive positions. He retired as president of Spire Alabama, Gulf Coast and Mississippi.

project manager to his current position as vice president and division manager of the Atlanta Mixed-Use division. In his current role, Kelley has responsibility for overseeing all business development, preconstruction and project operation functions for the Atlanta Mixed-Use division.

In addition to his professional achievements, he is a member of the Auburn Alumni Engineering Council’s Executive Committee and chairs the Academics and Student Experience Committee. He is also a member of the State of Alabama Engineering Hall of Fame board of directors, and a 2018 inductee into the hall.

Throughout his career, Kelley has remained engaged with Auburn Engineering by returning to campus to help with recruiting efforts and to give presentations to engineering classes. He has worked on the Atlanta area Auburn Civil Engineering Scholarship Golf Tournament for several years and served as a member of the college’s Young Alumni Council from 2015-19. He is also a lifetime member of the Auburn Alumni Association.

He and his wife, Lyn, previously established the Ken and Lyn Smith Family Endowed Scholarship in the College of Engineering, and the Brown-Kopel Center’s Recruiting and Scholarship Office Suites are named in their honor. The Smiths are also members of the Engineering Eagles and Ginn societies, as well as the university’s 1856 and Samford societies.

Outstanding Young Auburn Engineers

Drew Kelley, ’03 Civil Engineering Drew Kelley earned a bachelor’s of civil engineering in 2003 from Auburn University and has 17 years of subsequent experience in the construction industry. He joined Brasfield & Gorrie as an intern and, after graduation, quickly advanced from a project manager to senior

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Kelley also gives back to the community by participating in a variety of civic organizations. He has served on committees for the United Way and the Good Samaritan Health Clinic of Cobb County. He has helped raise funds and volunteered for the Atlanta Dream Center, the Rally Foundation, No Longer Bound, Blue Sky Ministries and the Make-a-Wish Foundation.

Natalie Mills, ’10 Civil Engineering Natalie Mills is a 2010 civil engineering graduate who serves as a regulatory policy analyst for Alabama Power. She also earned a Master of Science in global energy management from the University of Colorado Denver in 2018. Mills joined Southern Company Services in 2010 as a geotechnical engineer,

SAMUEL GINN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

and later served as an environmental assessment engineer where she provided the policy assessment of EPA’s suite of greenhouse gas regulations – the Clean Power Plan – for each of Southern Company’s operating companies. After two years, Mills moved to System Planning, where she performed asset valuations. Nine months later, she transitioned to the fuel forecasting and scenario planning group. In 2019, Mills moved to her current role as a key member of Alabama Power’s team that worked on the recent filing of a certificate for new power generation. In addition to her professional success, Mills is the co-chair of the executive committee of the college’s 100+ Women Strong program. She is also a leader in many other organizations within her Birmingham community including Alabama Power’s iCan Girls in Engineering program and Girls Inc. of Central Alabama.

Emily Traylor, ’10 Wireless Engineering - Software Emily Traylor graduated from Auburn in 2010 with a bachelor’s degree in wireless engineering, software option. She is a graduate student in Auburn University’s Harbert College of Business, working on an executive MBA with a concentration in cybersecurity management. Traylor currently serves as director of product management and portfolio integration for Fullsteam. In this role,


LIFETIME ACHEIVEMENT AWARD she is responsible for the technical integration and operational success of the Fullsteam payment processing platform across the organization’s portfolio of 29 software company acquisitions. Prior to joining Fullsteam, Traylor worked for Equifax where she served as release engineering leader and deputy director of the Equifax Auburn Technology Center. In this role, Traylor helped establish an Auburn talent incubator for the company, hiring nearly 50 recent graduates and leveraging a pipeline of Auburn Engineering talent for the organization’s technology transformation. Traylor remains a dedicated supporter of Auburn Engineering, serving on the Wireless Engineering Advisory Board, as a member of the college’s 100+ Women Strong program and as the vice chair of the college’s Young Alumni Council.

Superior Service

Jim Killian, Retired Director of Engineering Communications and Marketing and Auburn Alumni Engineering Council Secretary Emeritus Jim Killian is the retired director of the college’s Office of Communications and Marketing and the secretary emeritus to the Auburn Alumni Engineering Council. Killian, who earned his journalism degree from Ohio University, served Auburn University for nearly 45 years, including more than 35 years with the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. As director of the college’s Office of Communications and Marketing, Killian took the college’s brand and promoted it among the best engineering colleges across the nation. As secretary of the Auburn Alumni Engineering Council, Killian became synonymous with the College of Engineering as he interfaced with the most distinguished and accomplished alumni for decades. In addition to his roles as director of communications and marketing and secretary of the council, Killian served as adviser to the college’s Cupola Engineering Ambassadors for more than 20 years. In that role, he became a mentor and a teacher to the best and brightest students who served to unify and promote the college. To continue that legacy, Killian and his wife, Karen, established a planned gift that will fund a scholarship for a Cupola Engineering Ambassador.


CUPOLA REPORT This edition of Auburn Engineering’s Cupola Report recognizes donors who have contributed to the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering during the 2019 calendar year. Our students, faculty, leadership and staff remain grateful for the support our alumni and friends provide as we work together to fulfill our commitment to excellence in engineering through instruction and research.

Ginn Society Annual FUNDS

endowments

planned gifts

ENGINEERING EAGLES Engineering Eagles are individuals who make a gift of $1,000 or more each year to Auburn Engineering and its academic units. These gifts provide vital resources for creating and enhancing programs in which our faculty and students thrive. These donors elevate the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering to new heights and help continue the college’s tradition of excellence. Mr. Jeffrey Scott Ackel ’99 Gen. Jimmie V. Adams ’57 & Mrs. Judy T. Adams Mr. Kerry E. Adams ’70 & Mrs. Diane Carden Adams Mrs. Mary Helen Adams-Morales ’81 & Mr. Timothy John Morales Mr. James T. Adkison Jr. ’71 & Mrs. Dianne Booker Adkison ’71 Mr. Lewis S. Agnew Jr. ’04 & Mrs. Kathryn Rooney Agnew

Mr. Stephen Tate Armstrong ’96 & Mrs. Kathleen Meadows Armstrong ’96 Mr. Timothy Michael Arnold ’94 & Mrs. Margaret Schlereth Arnold

Mrs. Virginia Hardenbergh Beck ’60 Ms. Rose-Gaëlle Belinga ’09 Mr. Christopher T. Bell ’83 & Mrs. Allison F. Bell Ms. Leslee Belluchie ’83 & Mr. Rick Knop

Ms. Carrie Leigh Arseneaux ’98

Dr. Larry Benefield ’66 & Mrs. Mary L. Benefield

Mr. Darren Lee Ash ’90 & Mrs. Traci Hubbard Ash ’89

Mr. Antonio D. Benford ’99

Lt. Col. John Michael Askew ’87 & Mrs. Susan

Mr. Christopher L. Bentley ’00 & Mrs. Mary Susanne

Sumners Askew ’87 Mr. Dana J. Augustine

Rehm Bentley ’00 Mr. William D. Benton ’79 & Mrs. Catherine Miller Benton ’78

Mr. Robert S. Aicklen ’73 & Mrs. Patricia P. Aicklen ’74

Mr. Thomas Glenn Avant ’60 & Mrs. Janis Avant

Mr. Charles S. Aiken Jr. ’73 & Mrs. Catherine C. Aiken

Dr. Heather Ann Avery ’10

Ms. Erika L. Akins ’11

Mr. Diaco Aviki ’95 & Mrs. Angela Aviki

Mr. Gabriel Dale Aldridge

Ms. Dion Marlene Aviki ’04

Mr. Jason Alan Beville ’96 & Mrs. Wendy Beville

Mr. John Boswell Allen ’66

Mr. Manucher Azmudeh ’60 & Mrs. Mahvash

Mr. Robert E. Bickert ’82 & Mrs. Lisa Bickert

Mr. Michael Ray Allen ’82 & Mrs. Marcia J. Allen ’82

Azmudeh

Mr. Michael F. Allison ’77 & Mrs. Carol Petty Allison ’78

Mr. Charles Frederick Bach ’58

Dr. Abby Renee Anderson ’03

Mr. James G. Bagley Jr. ’83 & Mrs. Melissa S. Bagley

Mr. J. Gregory Anderson ’88 & Mrs. Kimberly

Mr. William Brian Baker ’93 & Mrs. Christine Martin

Anderson Mr. John P. Anderson ’76 & Mrs. Cynthia M. Anderson ’76 Mr. Pete L. Anderson ’75

Baker ’93 Mr. Peter Willem Baljet ’91 & Mrs. Joy Moorman Baljet Mr. James O’Neal Ballenger ’59 & Mrs. Bettye Bowman Ballenger ’59

Mr. Charles William Berry Jr. ’66 & Mrs. Charlene L. Berry

Dr. Charles Brock Birdsong ’18 Mr. Robert Lee Bishop Jr. ’79 & Mrs. Sara Ann Bishop Dr. William Y. Bishop ’68 Dr. Nancy Pugh Bissinger ’73 Mr. Sean Michael Bittner ’16 & Mrs. Allison K. Bittner ’15 Mr. Robert W. Bledsoe ’10

Ms. Susan E. Anderson ’90

Ms. Beverly Houston Banister ’83

Mrs. Cynthia Louise Bliss ’07 & Mr. Nicholas Bliss

Mr. David Bryant Andrews ’91

Mr. Joseph F. Barth III ’71 & Mrs. Gail Barth

Mr. Nicholas Cotton Blanchard Boehm ’18

Mr. Thomas Denny Anspach ’94 & Mrs. Aneda

Mr. Michael Barton & Mrs. Kristie Gann Barton ’10

Dr. Denise Blanchard Boehm ’80 & Dr. Richard Boehm

Mr. Michael Patrick Batey ’79 & Mrs. Elizabeth Batey

CDR Bobby C. Bolt ’89 & Mrs. Kimberly E. Bolt

Mr. Ben Beasley ’65

Ms. Madeline M. Bonifay ’18

Mr. Malcolm Neil Beasley Sr. ’70 & Mrs. Wilma Beasley

Mr. Russell F. Boren Sr. ’54

Mr. James C. Ard III ’83 & Mrs. Carter Ard ’85

Mr. Jourdan Joseph Beaumont ’14

Mr. Charles Judson Bowers ’69

Mr. Don Thomas Arkle ’77 & Mrs. Cindy L. Arkle ’79

Mrs. Annalisa Drummond Beavers ’15

Mr. Matthew T. Bowers & Mrs. Jennifer Lowe Bowers

Chandler Anspach ’95 Mr. Alan Lee Anthony ’82 & Mrs. Celia Chapman Anthony ’81

*d e cea s e d

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. William Robert Boyd ’90 & Mrs. Pamela Owens Boyd ’92 Mr. Robert Joseph Brackin ’80 & Mrs. Roberta Marcantonio

Mr. J. Edward Chapman Jr. ’56 & Mrs. Martha Lee

Mr. Kevin Thomas Cullinan ’09 Mr. Andrew Reed Cunningham ’82 & Mrs. Laura

Chapman Mr. Wheeler E. Chapman III ’83 & Mrs. Laurianne

Clayton Cunningham Mr. Miles McCord Cunningham ’85 & Mrs. Donna

Chapman

Cunningham

Mr. James Fletcher Bradford ’80

Mr. Clarance Joseph Chappell III ’59

Capt. Jon Christian Bradford ’92 & Mrs. Leigh Anne

Mr. Randall Clark Chase ’85 & Mrs. Beth R. Chase

Mrs. Emily Alice Curran ’10 & Mr. Jack Curran

Mr. Jonathan Franklin Childs ’94 & Mrs. Jennifer

Mr. David Linton Curry ’61 & Mrs. Edris Curry

Bradford ’94 Dr. David B. Bradley ’65

Walters Childs ’95

Dr. Mary K. Boudreaux & Mr. Calvin Cutshaw

Mrs. Dorothy Y. Bridges

Ms. Rupa S. Choragudi ’95

Mr. William J. Cutts ’55

Mr. Reid M. Brooks ’16

Mr. Bradley P. Christopher ’91 & Mrs. Sonya Faust

Dr. Klaus D. Dannenberg ’67

Mr. Dan H. Broughton ’63 & Mrs. Sheila Broughton Mr. David Nelson Brown ’62 & Mrs. Carolyn J. Brown Dr. John Wilford Brown ’57 & Dr. Rosemary Kopel

Mr. James H. Daughtry ’54 & Mrs. Ida Jo O.

Christopher Mr. Terry M. Christopher ’58 & Mrs. Anna Ruth Christopher ’58

Daughtry ’54 Mr. Charles H. Davis ’58 & Mrs. Rebecca Davis

Ms. Michele Candice Clark

Mr. Frederick A. Davis ’72 & Mrs. Bonnie Davis

Mr. William Scott Brown ’71

Ms. Rodmesia La’Triece Clarke ’08

Dr. N. Jan Davis ’77 & Mr. Schuyler H. Richardson

Dr. Thomas Emmett Burch ’79 & Mrs. Patti Dianne

Mr. William C. Claunch ’68 & Mrs. Beverly Claunch

Dr. Virginia Angelica Davis

Mr. Sherwood A. Clay ’68

Ms. Charlotte A. Dawson ’15

Mr. Shawn Edward Cleary ’82 & Mrs. Anne M.

Mr. Michael Boyd Deavers ’93 & Mrs. Robin Lynn

Brown ’57

Burch ’83 Mr. Scott T. Burgett ’95 Mr. Dennis Carlton Burkett ’69 & Mrs. Susan Speigner Burkett Mr. Thomas D. Burson ’58 & Mrs. Frances Wilson Burson ’58 Mr. Henry M. Burt Jr. ’58 & Mrs. Rebecca Burt Mr. Robert Oran Burton ’79 & Mrs. Nancy Burton Ms. Emily Burwell Mr. Daniel M. Bush ’72 Mr. Donald Ray Bush ’63 Mr. Harris Donovan Bynum ’58 & Mrs. Karen Bynum Mr. Robert Flournoy Bynum ’75 Mr. Richard E. Cannon ’63 & Mrs. Ann Cannon Mr. J. Travis Capps Jr. ’94 & Mr. Lee Anthony Mr. John Phillip Caraway ’92 & Mrs. Patricia M. Caraway Mr. James Ronald Carbine ’81 Mr. Russell Lee Carbine ’83 & Mrs. Anna Calhoun Carbine ’83 Mr. Benjamin M. Carmichael ’00 & Mrs. Abby Marie Carmichael ’03 Mrs. Betty McNeice Carroll Mr. Kenneth Andrew Carroll & Mrs. Stephanie Babin Carroll Mr. Patrick Thomas Carroll ’87 & Mrs. Cynthia L. Carroll

Deavers

Cleary ’82 Dr. Prabhakar Clement ’93 & Mrs. Sabina Wilfred

Mr. Michael Arthur DeMaioribus ’76 & Mrs. Leta

Clement ’92 Dr. Raymond Anthony Cocco ’89 & Dr. Susan Ann

DeMaioribus Mr. Jason Eric DeShazo ’98 & Mrs. Nancy Gilbreath

Somers Dr. John E. Cochran Jr. ’66 & Mrs. Carol H.

DeShazo ’99 Mr. Tom L. Devall ’19 & Mrs. Margaret L. Devall

Cochran ’67 Mr. David Wayne Coggin ’81 & Mrs. Cathy H.

Mrs. Carla Marie Deyo ’09 Mr. Keith Alan Dickey ’13 & Mrs. Amanda Martin

Coggin ’82 Dr. Jo Anne Hamrick Coggins ’75 & Mr. Terry James

Dickey ’13 Mr. James A. Dicso ’66 & Mrs. Judith Dicso

Coggins ’76 Mr. Steven D. Cohoon ’12 & Mrs. Brigitte Nicole

Mr. Derek Dwaine Dictson & Mrs. Nikki Dictson Mr. Ray Allen Dimit ’74 & Mrs. Diane Dimit

Cohoon ’14 Mr. James C. Cole ’50

Mrs. Amy Thomas Dobbs ’78 & Mr. Joseph G. Dobbs

Mr. William Hitchcock Cole ’49

Mr. John Thomas Donahue & Mrs. Helen Morgan

Mr. Steven Craig Compton ’76 & Mrs. Leigh Young

Donahue Mr. Robert Bruce Donnellan ’76 & Mrs. Kay L.

Compton ’73 Mr. Anthony D. Conetta ’89 & Mrs. Sherri Conetta

Donnellan

Mr. Robert David Consoli ’85 & Mrs. Amy Consoli

Mr. Mark Henry Donovan ’88

Mr. Eldridge J. Cook Jr. & Mrs. Rhonda Horne

Mr. Jerry Glenn Dooley ’81 Mrs. Carol Hilton Dorn ’84 & Mr. Alan Dorn

Cook ’80* Mr. Timothy Donald Cook ’82

Mr. William G. Dorriety ’84 & Mrs. Donna Dorriety

Mr. James L. Cooper Jr. ’81 & Mrs. Anna B. Cooper

Dr. Nathan T. Dorris ’04 & Mrs. Jerry Lynn Dorris

Ms. Morgan Irene Cooper ’16

Dr. Jonathon Trace Douglas ’98 & Dr. Tara Spears

Ms. Lisa Ann Copeland ’85

Ms. Anne Lynn Casey ’98

Mrs. Patricia G. Corbitt

Capt. Paul D. Cash ’70 & Mrs. Carol S. Cash

Mr. Brad W. Corson ’83 & Mrs. Joan Corson

Mr. Grant Alan Castleberry ’78 & Mrs. Julie L.

Mr. Vincent Russell Costanza ’84 & Mrs. Stacey

Castleberry ’79

Dr. Harry L. Deffebach Jr. ’63 & Mrs. Mary Deffebach

Shehan Costanza ’92

Douglas ’97 Dr. Carol Ammons Dowdy ’70 & Mr. James Allen Dowdy Jr. ’72 Mr. Joseph Evans Downey Jr. ’85 & Mrs. Susan Noland Downey ’90

Mr. Steven Glenn Cates ’85 & Mrs. Lyn Cates

Mr. Frank V. Couch III ’80 & Mrs. Cathy Couch

Mr. Brian Joseph Downs ’07 & Mrs. Alejandra Downs

Mr. Wiley Mitchell Cauthen ’62

Mr. Samuel S. Coursen Jr. ’73 & Mrs. Denise Coursen

Mr. Jonathan David Driggers ’80

Mr. Eric M. Cerny ’99

Mr. Harry G. Craft Jr. ’64 & Mrs. Nell Spivey Craft ’67

Mr. Paul E. Drummonds ’71 & Mrs. Janice S.

Mrs. Margaret King Cerny ’69

Ms. Lynn Sinopole Craft ’05

Dr. Donald A. Chambless ’65 & Mrs. Patricia J.

Mr. Douglas Robert Craig ’90 & Mrs. Alyson B. Craig

Chambless ’66 Mr. John Wendell Chambliss ’73 & Mrs. Fletcher Hanson Chambliss ’83 Ms. Katherine Leigh Champion ’11 Dr. Valeta Carol Chancey ’96 Mr. Thomas Eugene Chandler ’80 & Mrs. Robin Jeanice Chandler

Mrs. Barbara Ann Adkins Crane

Drummonds Mrs. Linda D. DuCharme ’86 & Mr. Richard DuCharme

Mr. Wayne J. Crews ’60 & Mrs. Louise Crews

Ms. Kate Camden Duke ’17

Dr. James H. Cross II

Dr. Steve Richard Duke & Mrs. Robin K. Duke

Dr. John Marshall Croushorn ’94 & Mrs. Angela

Mr. Wendell Harris Duke ’73 & Mrs. Margaret H. Duke Mr. Arthur J. Duncan III ’11

Croushorn Mrs. Ragan White Crowell ’98 & Mr. Daniel Crowell Mr. Chris Mark Crumbly ’88 & Mrs. Lynn O. Crumbly ’88

Mr. Timothy John Dwyer ’85 & Mrs. Julianne Evans Dwyer ’82

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. Ronald M. Dykes ’69 & Mrs. Anne Dykes

Mr. Sibbley Paul Gauntt ’54 & Mrs. Mary S. Gauntt

Mr. Holbert L. Hale Jr. ’64 & Mrs. Julia H. Hale

Mr. Lewis H. Eberdt Jr. ’54 & Mrs. Annette Bailey

Mr. Charles Earley Gavin III ’59 & Mrs. Marjorie

Mr. Jason Leigh Halsell ’93 & Mrs. Nancy Small

Eberdt ’53 Dr. Mario Richard Eden & Mrs. Leeja Eden Mr. Joe D. Edge ’70 & Mrs. Jayne W. Edge ’71 Mr. Charles Ray Edmondson & Mrs. Denise L. Edmondson ’70 Mr. Andrew Keith Edwards ’97 & Mrs. Michelle Meurer Edwards ’98 Mr. C. Houston Elkins Jr. ’77 & Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Elkins ’77

Frazier-Gavin Mr. Thomas Gordy Germany ’77 & Mrs. Melanie R. Germany ’80 Mr. Mohinder S. Ghuman Mr. Larry D. Gibbs ’70 & Mrs. Nell Gibbs Dr. George Edward Gibson Jr. ’80 & Mrs. Gail Howard Gibson ’90 Mr. John Madison Giddens Jr. ’87 Mr. Roger Allen Giffin ’69 & Mrs. Mary Jo Giffin ’69

Halsell Mr. James H. Ham III ’66 & Mrs. Kimberly Ham Mr. J. Robert Hamill ’70 Dr. Phillip G. Hamilton Jr. ’02 & Mrs. Crystal Clare Hamilton ’02 Mr. David A. Hamilton ’67 & Mrs. Cindy Hamilton Mr. Johnnie Marvin Hamilton ’68 & Mrs. Cathryn Reynolds Hamilton Mr. Nathan L. Hanks ’03 & Mrs. Laura Quimby Hanks ’03

Mr. Donald B. Ellis ’61

Mr. Timothy Gilino ’08

Mr. H. Wendell Ellis ’67 & Mrs. Celia Ellis

Mr. Michael V. Ginn

Mr. Nelson L. Hanks ’75 & Mrs. Kathy B. Hanks

Mr. Kyle N. Ellison Jr. ’81 & Mrs. Beverly Evans

Dr. Samuel L. Ginn ’59 & Mrs. Ann Ginn

Dr. Alan M. Hanley ’16

Mr. Thomas Peter Glanton ’12 & Mrs. Curry

Mr. Thomas Jeffrey Hanley ’08

Ellison ’78 Mr. Bruce William Evans ’86 Mr. Corey Ryan Evans ’02 Mr. James R. Evans ’55 Mr. Jim W. Evans ’67 & Mrs. Marsha P. Evans Dr. John Lebron Evans ’84 & Mrs. Jerri Kimbrough Evans Mr. Adrian Terrigo Evans ’87 & Mrs. Sharlene Reed Evans ’86

Stevenson Glanton ’12 Lt. Col. Peter J. Glenboski Jr. ’67 & Mrs. Margot Glenboski Mrs. Gina Victoria Gloski ’82 & Mr. David Michael Gloski Mrs. Amanda Campbell Goad ’00 & Mr. Michael Goad Ms. Amy N. Goddard ’94

Dr. Thomas R. Hanley Mr. Walter L. Hannum ’56 Dr. Andrew Palmer Hanson ’93 & Mrs. Susan Hanson Mr. Leon L. Hardin ’70 & Mrs. Rheba Meadows Hardin ’69 Mr. George C. Hardison Jr. ’76 & Mrs. Marsha Quenelle Hardison ’76

Mrs. Angela Lynn Fanney ’04 & Mr. Lawson Fanney

Mr. Charlie Godfrey & Mrs. Maxine Godfrey

Mrs. Kay Upton Harlow ’81

Mr. Norman Smith Faris Jr. ’59

Mr. Gary Ross Godfrey ’86 & Mrs. Carol J.

Mrs. Lesli Harmon ’18

Ms. Ada Nicole Faulk ’96 Mr. Mark Douglas Feagin ’85 & Mrs. Elan Pardue

Godfrey ’86 Mr. Ralph B. Godfrey ’64 & Mrs. Lynda Godfrey

Mr. Oscar Coursey Harper IV ’89 & Mrs. Patricia Smith Harper ’90

Mr. Shane Goodwin ’00 & Mrs. Brandi Goodwin

Mrs. Glenda Steele Harris ’61

Mrs. Linda Ann Figg ’81 & Mr. Richard Drew

CDR Vernon C. Gordon ’68

Mr. Jeffrey Curtis Harris ’87

Mrs. Ruth Harris Fleetwood

Mr. M. James Gorrie II ’84 & Mrs. Alison Mobley

Mr. Lamar Travis Hawkins ’63 & Mrs. Elaine T.

Feagin ’86

Mr. John N. Floyd Jr. ’85 & Mrs. Amy Jordan Floyd ’86 Mr. Stanley F. Folker Jr. ’68

Gorrie ’84 Mr. Magnus Miller Gorrie ’57 & Mrs. Frances Greene Gorrie ’59

Hawkins ’62 Mr. Lawrence Allen Hawkins ’81 & Mrs. Lisa Hawkins Mr. Albert E. Hay ’67

Mr. Paul Stephen Fontenot ’76

Mr. Wayne M. Granade ’69 & Mrs. Connie Granade

Ms. Karen Hayes ’81

Mr. Mark Joseph Forchette ’81 & Mrs. Addie-Marie

Ms. Betty Ann Ryberg ’84 & Mr. Philip G. Grant

Mrs. Barbara Lynn Hecathorn ’83 & Mr. James

Forchette ’84 Mr. William Mark Ford & Mrs. Beth Ford

Mr. David Martin Gray ’93 & Mrs. Susan Baskin Gray ’92

Hecathorn Mr. Jim Palmer Heilbron ’94 & Mrs. Markell A. Heilbron ’96

Mr. Samuel Hollis Fordham ’16

Mr. Gary Wayne Gray ’69 & Mrs. Jo Evelyn Gray

Capt. Michael Victor Forte ’82 & Mrs. Shelley Forte

Mr. Perry Allen Greathouse ’83

Mr. John P. Helmick Jr. ’56 & Mrs. Claudette Helmick

Mr. Michael R. Fosdick ’74 & Mrs. Renee Fosdick

Mr. Seth Joseph Green ’08 & Mrs. Julia B. Green ’05

Mr. Roger R. Hemminghaus ’58 & Mrs. Dot

CDR Jerry Dean Foster ’93 & Mrs. Constance S.

Mr. Ruskin Clegg Green ’91 & Mrs. Julie Green

Foster ’93 Mr. Earl Richard Foust ’71 & Mrs. Nan Vinson

Mr. Walter Wanzel Griffin ’47 Mr. Gordon H. Griffith ’57 & Mrs. Shirley A. Griffith

Hemminghaus Mr. James Preston Henderson ’69 & Mrs. Linda Moore Henderson ’69

Mrs. Linda Vanstrum Griggs ’75

Dr. Alton Stuart Hendon ’89 & Dr. Gerri Hendon

Mr. Daniel Benedict & Ms. Karin Frament

Dr. Laura Alan Grostick ’03

Mrs. Judy J. Hendrick

Mr. Richard L. Franklin ’49

Mrs. Antoria Arnold Guerrier ’00 & Mr. Jean Ronald

Mr. Michael Thomas Hendrick ’93 & Mrs. Christina

Foust ’71

Mrs. Gwen S. Frazier ’87 LCDR Michael Scott French ’79 & Mrs. Margaret French Mr. William Eugene Friel II ’73 & Mrs. Mary Johnson Morris ’72

Guerrier

L. Hendrick

Mrs. Erica Moore Guffie ’05 & Mr. Michael Guffie

Mr. John Steele Henley II ’63 & Mrs. Geanie Henley

Mr. Mark Allan Gulley ’94 & Mrs. Leah S.

Ms. Melissa Herkt ’77

Gulley ’93 Ms. Ann Rebecca Guthrie ’89

Mrs. Sharon Weidner Hickman ’92 & Mr. Mike Hickman

Mr. G. William Gallops Jr. ’73

Mrs. Jean Guthrie

Ms. Leigh Michele Higby ’18

CAPT Davis R. Gamble Jr. ’74 & Mrs. Patricia

Ms. Jessica Cary Haack ’12

Mr. Patrick D. Higginbotham ’81 & Mrs. Nancy Y.

Gamble Mr. Kevin Benjamin Gammill ’02 & Mrs. Marie N. Gammill ’03

Mr. Robert Otto Haack Jr. ’83 & Mrs. Margaret Fuller Haack ’83 Mr. Keith Shellie Hagler ’98

Mr. Woodrow E. Garmon ’73 & Mrs. Marcie Garmon

Ms. Shannon Haines ’09

Mr. Stephen B. Gass ’18

Mr. William George Hairston III ’67 & Mrs. Paula

Mr. Maury D. Gaston ’82 & Mrs. Nancy Gaston

Hairston

Higginbotham ’80 Mr. Thomas Farrell Higgins ’70 & Mrs. Rita Higgins Mr. Wilson Price Hightower III ’88 & Mrs. Margaret M. Hightower ’87 Mr. Dennis Steve Hill ’79 & Mrs. Ann Reynolds Hill ’77 Mr. Ryan Sessions Hill ’08 & Mrs. Jill F. Hill ’08

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. Ray W. Hiltbrand ’93 Mr. David William Hodo ’05 & Mrs. Andrea Thompson Hodo ’05 Mr. Stats J. Hogeland ’17 Mrs. Carey Russell Holland ’06 & Mr. Patrick Holland

Mr. Herbie Neeley Johnson ’94 & Mrs. Hannah

Mr. Charles Richard Lawley ’04 & Mrs. Chelsea Lawley

Johnson Mr. J. Edwin Johnson ’71 Mr. J. Sam Johnson Jr. ’75 & Mrs. Patricia Davenport

Mr. Thomas W. Lawrence Jr. ’63 & Mrs. Diane S. Lawrence ’63 Mr. Jackson Garrett Lawrence ’18

Johnson ’75

Mr. Duriel Ramon Holley ’03 & Mrs. Olivea Holley

Mr. John Borge Johnson II ’10

Mr. Kyle Craig Leach ’83 & Mrs. Carmen Leach

Mr. James Monroe Holley IV ’75

Mrs. Mary Schambeau Johnson ’10 & Mr. Fielding

Mr. Michael Leach & Mrs. Diana Lynne Leach

Mr. James Philip Hollway ’79 Mr. Michael Dale Holmes ’86 & Mrs. Stephanie Jo Holmes Mr. Randall Cory Hopkins ’91 Mr. Kenneth C. Horne ’84

Mr. Creighton C. Lee ’47 & Mrs. Mary Sue Wright

M. Johnson Dr. Pierce Johnson Jr. ’69 & Mrs. Nancy A. Johnson

Lee

Mr. John Kenneth Jones ’59 & Mrs. Jo R. Jones

Mrs. Deanna Monahan Lee ’95 & Mr. David Lee

Mr. Joshua Dale Jones ’06 & Mrs. Elizabeth M.

Mr. Jason Max Lee ’00 & Mrs. Nichole Lee Ms. Nelda K. Lee ’69

Jones

Mr. Steven D. Horne ’71 & Mrs. Lynn Jones Horne ’79

Dr. Peter D. Jones & Mrs. Elizabeth Zylla-Jones

Mr. Steven Max Lee ’73 & Mrs. Margie Lee

Mrs. Sara Anne Hough ’03

Dr. Bill Josephson ’89 & Dr. Eleanor C.

Mr. Keith Jacob LeGrone ’13 & Mrs. Nicole D.

Mr. Metrick M. Houser ’93 & Mrs. Jackie Houser Judge Albert Oscar Howard Jr. ’60 & Mrs. Melanie Parkman Howard ’86 Dr. Wen-Chiang Huang ’01 Dr. Teresa Hubscher-Younger ’02 Mr. T. Preston Huddleston Jr. ’57 & Mrs. Jo Ann Huddleston

Josephson ’88

LeGrone

Mr. Hagen S. Kaylor ’13 & Mrs. Katie Ott Kaylor ’10

Mr. John Claude L’Engle ’56

Mr. Robert R. Keith Jr. ’63 & Mrs. Donna Vanderver

Mr. Joe Bernard Leonard Jr. ’67 & Mrs. Phyllis Leonard

Keith ’66 Mr. Andrew S. Kelley ’03 & Mrs. Shelley Haisten

Mr. Gregory Charles Lester ’79 & Mrs. Susan W. Lester ’78

Kelley ’03 Mr. David A. Kelley ’71

Mr. Daniel Steven Levis ’06 & Mrs. Jessica Lynn Levis ’06

Ms. Auburn Elizabeth Hudgins ’07

Mr. Kenneth Kelly ’90 & Mrs. Kim Kelly

Mr. Tyce Frederick Hudson ’98

Mr. Reginald Wayne Kemp ’62

Mr. James G. Hughes Sr. ’56

Gen. Leslie Farr Kenne ’70

Dr. Mary Leigh Hughes ’86

Mr. Kirby K. Key ’57 & Mrs. Sarah E. Key

Dr. Ying-Hsin Andrew Liou ’84 & Mrs. Yun Lee Liou

Dr. John Mack Huie ’60

Mr. Michael Timothy Keyser ’15 & Mrs. Kelly Eileen

Mr. Ronald Craig Lipham ’74 & Mrs. Lynda Lipham

Mr. Jackson L. Hulsey ’64 & Mrs. Ellen L. Hulsey Mr. James A. Humphrey ’70 & Mrs. Michele Alexander Humphrey ’71

Mr. Sidney S. Keywood Jr. ’70 Mrs. Laura Clenney Kezar ’08 & Mr. Zach Kezar Mr. James E. Kiel ’69 & Mrs. Cynthia A. Kiel

Dr. Judy Johns Hunt & Mr. Brian Howard Hunt ’90

Mr. Lester Killebrew Sr. ’68 & Mrs. Catherine V.

Dr. Jacqueline Heather Cole-Husseini ’01 & Dr. Naji Husseini Mr. Paul A. Hutchinson ’08 & Mrs. Diane Leigh Hutchinson

Mr. Lum M. Loo ’78

Dr. Hulya Kirkici

Mr. William A. Lovell Jr. ’79 & Mrs. Virginia Goodwin

Mr. Ronald Walker Kirkland ’68 & Mrs. Susan T.

Jackson ’82 Mr. Paul Andrew Jacobson ’94 & Mrs. Mara Lowry Jacobson ’94 Mr. Charles Mathias Jager ’56 & Mrs. Rosemary Smith Jager ’57 Mr. William Russell James ’69 & Mrs. Brenda M. Tanner Mr. John Robert Jay & Mrs. Pamela Sheree Jay Mr. Carl Mack Jeffcoat ’60 & Mrs. Ann W. Jeffcoat Mr. Stuart Blakely Jeffcoat ’98 Mr. Walter Blakely Jeffcoat ’70 & Mrs. Peggy Bratton Jeffcoat Mrs. Carol Anne Jenkins ’81 & Mr. Edward Jenkins Ms. Meha Jha ’14

Buckman Long

Mr. John G. Kircher ’82 & Mrs. Kimbra Kircher

Dr. J. David Irwin ’61 & Mrs. Patricia Watson Irwin ’61

Mr. Robert Alan Jackson Jr. ’82 & Mrs. Tyler Smith

Livingston Mr. William Buck Locke ’63 & Mrs. Judy P. Locke

Mr. Rodney Lon Long ’76 & Mrs. Judy Long

Kingsley

Mr. James Paul Kirkland Sr. ’61

Jackson ’15

Little Mr. Stephen Jager Livingston ’10 & Mrs. Jackie

Mr. Edward Charles Long ’89 & Mrs. E. Hillary

Killebrew ’69 Dr. Oliver D. Kingsley Jr. ’66 & Mrs. Vandalyn

Dr. Liang-Rung Hwang ’91 & Mrs. Jihn Yu Liau ’88 Mr. Joshua Perry Jackson ’05 & Mrs. Emily Daleo

Lewis ’85

Mr. James Brawner Little III ’84 & Mrs. Margaret

Keyser ’14

Dr. Jacqueline H. Hundley ’74 Mrs. Stephanie Greco Hunt ’78 & Dr. Steve Hunt

Mr. David Reynolds Lewis ’84 & Mrs. Susan Jones

Lovell ’80 Mr. Nance C. Lovvorn ’62 & Mrs. Cecile Lovvorn Mr. Raymond Elliott Loyd ’61*

Kirkland ’68 Ms. Katie Kirkpatrick ’95

Ms. Angela Marie Luckie ’91

Mr. Bradley S. Kitterman ’82 & Mrs. Margaret

Mr. Christian Trygve Lund ’15 & Mrs. Margaret Lund

Bradshaw Kitterman ’83 Mr. Ryan Kyle Knight ’00 & Mrs. Susan Knight

Mr. Frank Alex Luttrell III ’83 & Mrs. Shelaine Steen Luttrell

Mrs. Margaret Lowry Knox ’82 & Mr. Kelley G. Knox

Mr. Fred W. Mace ’57 & Mrs. Juanita Mace

Mr. Ashley David Koby ’98 & Mrs. Stephanie C.

Mr. John Andrew MacFarlane ’72 & Mrs. Anne Warren MacFarlane ’73

Koby ’98 Mr. Mark Anthony Kolasinski ’82

Mr. Ray Anthony Madison ’88 & Mrs. Gloria Madison

Mr. Christopher J. Kramer ’94 & Mrs. Mary Horton

Mr. Steven Naylor Malone ’02 & Mrs. Lee Tart Malone

Kramer ’93 Mrs. Julie Sanderson Kravec ’81 & Mr. Henry John

Mr. Harry A. Manson ’58 & Mrs. Linda A. Manson Mr. Salvador Michael Marino ’91 & Mrs. Paula M.

Kravec Mr. David McCoy Kudlak ’86 & Ms. Trisha Perkins

Marino ’92

Mr. Frederick D. Kuester ’73

Mr. Charles A. Marsh ’01

Mr. Thomas D. Lampkin ’75 & Mrs. Barbara

Mr. Joel W. Marsh ’62

Blackstock Lampkin ’75

LCDR Clifton C. Martin Jr. ’74 & Mrs. Mary Ramey Martin ’74

Mr. Michael D. Johns & Mrs. Laurie Johns

Mr. Robert Eugene Lang ’77

Mr. Bobby Joe Johnson ’62

Mr. Michael Todd Lanier ’15

Mr. Gary Clements Martin ’57

Mr. Darren Keith Johnson ’11 & Mrs. Elizabeth

Mrs. Maria Larson & Mr. Scott Eric Larson Sr.

Mr. James P. Martin ’78 & Mrs. Pamela Phillips

Hammer Johnson ’11

Dr. Terry Edwin Lawler ’68 & Mrs. Patricia E. Lawler

Martin ’79

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. Colton R. Martinez ’15 Mr. Alexander Thomas Mathews ’16 & Mrs. Molly

Mr. Mark Steven Miller ’84 & Mrs. Toni Etheridge Miller ’85

Mr. Michael L. Neighbors ’76 & Mrs. Kathy Flournoy Neighbors ’75

Mr. Richard R. Miller ’78 & Mrs. Debra Mincey Miller

Dr. Robert Mark Nelms ’80

Mr. Cary Lynn Matthews ’90

Mrs. Natalie G. Mills ’10 & Mr. Bryan Mills

Mr. J. C. Nelson ’50

Mr. David Austin Mattox ’05 & Mrs. Stephanie Kilgro

Mr. J. Kevin Mims ’79 & Mrs. Katherine Maughan

Mr. Wayne B. Nelson III ’76 & Mrs. Cheryl N. Nelson

McCartney Mathews ’15

Mattox ’09

Mims ’81

Mr. Fred F. Newman III ’81

Mr. J. Wayne Maxey ’65

Ms. Sarah Grace Mitchell ’17

Mr. William K. Newman ’69 & Mrs. Kate M. Newman

Mr. Patrick Clay Mays ’08 & Mrs. Jenna Browning

Mrs. Ila S. Mitchum

Mr. David Draper Newton ’86 & Mrs. Jamie Vernon

Mays Ms. Forrest Worthy McCartney Mr. John Timothy McCartney ’80 & Mrs. Laura Ledyard McCartney ’80 Dr. Michael B. McCartney ’57 & Mrs. Virginia V. McCartney Mr. Will McCartney ’13 Mr. Andrew M. McCay ’05 & Mrs. Ashley J. McCay Mr. Kevin Michael McClain ’93

Mr. Wesley Shane Mize ’94 & Mrs. Jennifer Fletcher Mize ’96

Newton ’88 Mr. W. Russell Newton ’65

Mr. Max A. Mobley ’72 & Mrs. Kathy W. Mobley

Mr. Huan D. Nguyen ’87

Mr. William Lynn Moench Jr. ’76 & Mrs. Pamela

Mr. Karl Richard Nichol ’82

Stephans Moench Dr. Larry Scot Monroe ’79 & Ms. Cynthia Coker Green ’79 Mr. Lawrence J. Montgomery III & Mrs. Mary Montgomery

Mr. Jason Allen Nichols ’98 & Mrs. Lisa Jill Nichols ’97 Mr. Jack Dempsey Noah ’59 & Mrs. Marie Crowe Noah Mr. James David Noland ’92 & Mrs. Andrea Bruschi Noland ’90 Mr. William B. Norton ’75 & Mrs. Lori D. Norton ’78

Mr. David E. McClure ’01 & Mrs. Sherry C. McClure ’01

Mr. Charles N. Moody ’63 & Mrs. Jo Moody

Mrs. Catherine Novak

Ms. Julia Zekoll McClure ’68

Mr. F. Brooks Moore ’48

Mr. Andrzej S. Nowak

Mr. Andrew McCooey ’19

Mr. Jonathan Lathram Moore ’05

Mr. Warren Nickolas Nunn ’93 & Mrs. Kara Nunn

Mr. John Blair McCracken ’08 & Mrs. Julie McCracken

Mrs. Mary Manson Moore ’83

Mr. Guy Edwin O’Connor ’85 & Mrs. Mary G.

Mr. Charles Douglas McCrary ’73 & Mrs. Phyllis

Mr. Steven Daniel Moore ’84 & Mrs. Jennifer Gillis

McCrary Mr. Robert F. McCullough III ’08 & Mrs. Kelli McNeilly McCullough ’03

Moore ’85

O’Connor Mr. Michael Joseph O’Connor ’87

Mrs. Christina K. Moorman ’97

Mr. James Burton Odom ’55 & Mrs. June Odom

Dr. Joe M. Morgan & Mrs. Rita Morgan

Mr. Thomas Lee Oliver II ’86 & Mrs. Denise Woods

Mr. James H. McDaniel ’68 & Mrs. Dotty McDaniel

Mr. Larry J. Morgan ’68 & Mrs. Nancy Morgan

Oliver ’86

Mr. David L. McDonald ’87

Mr. M. John Morgan ’71 & Mrs. Patricia Morgan

Mr. James P. Orr

Mr. Albert F. McFadden Jr. ’81 & Mrs. Hope

Mr. David Allen Morris ’96 & Mrs. Grace B.

Mr. James Mason Orrison ’85 & Mrs. Donna Marie

McFadden

Morris ’95

Orrison

Mr. Jim W. McGaha ’66 & Mrs. Frances McGaha

Mr. Michael Lynn Morris ’98

Mr. Steve P. Osburne ’65 & Mrs. Bobbie Osburne

Mr. George Lee McGlamery ’86 & Mrs. Mary Ann

Mr. Stuart Alexander Morrow ’15 & Mrs. Rachel

Mr. Wynton Rex Overstreet ’59 & Mrs. Charlotte

McGlamery Dr. Gerald G. McGlamery Jr. ’84 & Mrs. Lynette McGlamery

Kimrey Morrow ’15

Williams Overstreet ’60

Ms. Rachel Moss ’96 & Mr. Brian Lawrence

Mr. C. Glenn Owen Jr. ’70 & Mrs. Nancy W. Owen

Mr. David R. Motes ’77

Mr. David Kenneth Owen ’77 & Mrs. Olivia Kelley Owen ’77

Mr. David C. McIlvaine ’93

Mr. Terry Wayne Motes ’75

Mr. Paul Alan McIntyre ’92 & Mrs. Amy Fortenberry

Mr. Kennith Craig Moushegian ’92

Mr. Wayne B. Owens ’64 & Mrs. Vicki M. Owens

Mrs. Michelle Fowler Mozena ’95 & Mr. Terry Mozena

Mr. William S. Pace Jr. & Mrs. Drunell R. Pace

Mr. Robert William Mueller ’85 & Mrs. Patricia Dawn

Ms. Katrina Louise Paolini ’14

McIntyre Mr. John M. McKenzie ’50 Mrs. Carter Michelle McKeon ’11 & Mr. Kevin McKeon

Mueller

Mr. Michael Alexander McKown ’76

Mr. Thomas Mullany ’81

Ms. Jesse A. McLeroy ’19

Mr. Kevin Mullins ’99 & Mrs. Apryl Tarrant Mullins ’97

Mr. Bryan Taylor McMeen ’12 & Mrs. Chelsea Harrison

Mr. Penn E. Mullowney Jr. ’65 & Mrs. Mary Beth

McMeen ’13 Mr. James D. McMillan ’61 & Mrs. Paula Stapp McMillan ’65

Mullowney Mr. Charles G. Munden Jr. ’77 & Mrs. Sandy H. Munden

Mr. Joe McMillan ’58 & Mrs. Billie Carole McMillan

Ms. Jeanne B. Munz

Mr. William R. McNair ’68 & Mrs. Lana McNair

Mr. Scott E. Murff ’92

Mrs. Ashley Suzanne McVicar ’99

Mr. David E. Murphy ’87 & Mrs. Kelli Murray

Mr. John F. Meagher Jr. ’49

Murphy ’86

Mrs. Susan Adair Melians ’86

Mr. Scott B. Murray ’69 & Mrs. Karen M. Murray

Dr. Russell D. Meller

Mr. Vernon C. Murray ’63

Mr. James Bruce Melton ’76 & Mrs. Paula Melton

Mr. David A. Musgrove ’05 & Mrs. Christa M.

Mr. George Aristides Menendez ’70 & Mrs. Elizabeth Oaks Menendez Mr. D. L. Merrill Jr. ’65 & Mrs. Rebecca Lindsey Merrill Mr. John Christopher Metcalf ’13 & Mrs. Jessica Edwards Metcalf ’12 Mr. Morris G. Middleton ’61 Mr. Joseph Austin Miller ’83 & Mrs. Donna J. Miller ’84

Musgrove ’07 Mr. Bryan Duncan Myers ’08 & Mrs. Jennifer Cooper Myers ’08 Mr. Jonathan Neal Myrick ’01 & Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Myrick ’01 Mr. Thomas Freeman Nagel ’85 & Mrs. Christina Nagel

Mr. Trace Duane Parish ’86 Mr. John S. Parke ’55 & Mrs. Constance Garner Parke ’55 Mrs. Cari Jo Parker ’87 & Mr. Clark Parker Mr. James Y. Parker ’70 & Mrs. Susan Jones Parker ’70 Mr. Jerry D. Parker Jr. ’79 & Mrs. Elizabeth Parker Mr. Robert Allen Parker ’84 & Mrs. Susan Southerland Parker ’84 Mr. Earl B. Parsons Jr. ’60 & Mrs. Nancy Parsons Mr. James Matthew Parsons ’07 Mr. Kevin Andrew Partridge ’87 & Mrs. Faye L. Partridge Mr. John Anthony Patton Sr. ’85 & Mrs. Becky Patton Mr. Philip E. Pearce ’12 & Mrs. Megan A. Pearce ’13 Mr. Philip Carroll Pelfrey ’87 Mr. Jimmy R. Pemberton ’58 Mr. Hal N. Pennington ’59 & Mrs. Peggy Pennington Col. William Wright Petit ’89 Mr. Douglas E. Phillpott ’84 & Mrs. Tracy C. Phillpott ’84

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. Charles H. Ping III ’04 Mr. Randall Alan Pinkston ’86 & Mrs. Cynthia W. Pinkston ’80 Mr. Henry W. Poellnitz III ’78 Dr. H. Vincent Poor ’72

Mr. Michael Arthur Rowland ’81 & Mrs. Stacy Neuwien Mr. Joe W. Ruffer ’64 Mr. Anthony John Rukavina & Mrs. Christine Marie Dr. John H. Russell ’72

Mr. Jack B. Porterfield III ’75 & Mrs. Rebecca

Dr. Stephen Allen Russell ’97 & Dr. Melissa Lane

Mr. Leslie H. Porterfield ’79 Mr. Robert R. Porterfield ’88 & Mrs. Arleene Spear

Shivers ’75 Mr. David Jay Shuckerow ’15 Mr. Derrick Sikes ’92 & Mrs. Patsy Sikes ’98

Rukavina

Mr. Gary Walton Popwell ’61 & Mrs. Lynda Popwell Porterfield

Mr. Michael H. Sherer & Mrs. Cathie L. Sherer Dr. Charles Herbert Shivers ’75 & Mrs. Alisa Walker

Rowland ’82

Mr. Matthew Shaw Sistrunk ’11 & Mrs. Hayley Cole Sistrunk ’10 Mrs. Margaret Sizemore

Russell ’95 Mr. Cody Tyler Rutowski ’14 & Mrs. Sarah Perry

Mr. John Hilary Sligh ’70 & Mrs. Jacquelyn DuBose Sligh ’69

Rutowski ’14 Mr. Matthew Ryan & Mrs. Linda Patterson Ryan ’82

Mrs. Jenny Elizabeth Slight ’08

Mr. Patrick Eugene Pride ’82

Ms. Jordan Elizabeth Ryle ’18

Mr. Arthur Lewis Slotkin ’68 & Mrs. Marcella Slotkin

Mr. Robert Lyons Prince ’69

Mr. William A. Samuel ’75 & Mrs. Laura J. Samuel

Mr. David Slovensky ’71

Ms. Elizabeth M. Prior ’19

Mr. Christopher R. Sanders ’84 & Mrs. Jennifer A. Wu

Mr. Austin E. Smith ’10

Mr. John David Prunkl ’90 & Mrs. Lisa Christmas

Mr. J Glen Sanders III ’87 & Mrs. Amy Aurin

Mrs. Brenda Jenkins Smith ’95

Porterfield

Prunkl ’88

Mr. David Floyde Smith ’84 & Mrs. Doris Irwin

Sanders ’88

Smith ’83

Mr. David I. Rach ’69 & Mrs. Patricia Byrd Rach

Ms. Regenia Rena Sanders ’95

Mr. Roger J. Rader ’66

Ms. Terry Mcleod Sanderson

Mr. James K. Smith III ’69

Mr. Thomas Jerome Raispis ’82 & Mrs. Eleanor

Ms. Martha Jane Sarratt ’13

Dr. Jeffrey Scott Smith ’86 & Mrs. Kristi Terry

Lowrance Raispis

Mr. Thomas Al Saunders Sr. ’62 & Mrs. Beth Saunders

Smith ’85

Mr. Murty Polapragada Raju ’92

Dr. Melinda Rixey Sava ’01 & Mr. Trevor Marc Sava ’01

Mr. Jerard Taggart Smith ’97 & Mrs. Cindy Smith

Dr. Polapragada K. Raju

Mr. C. David Scarborough ’65 & Mrs. Murriel W.

Mr. John Raymond Smith ’96 & Mrs. Deborah McGill

Mr. Ven Raju Mrs. Ashley Thompson Ramage ’99 & Mr. Ryan Thomas Ramage Mrs. Denise Sandlin Raper ’92 & Mr. Greg Raper Mr. James Lee Rayburn ’67 & Mrs. Joyce Rayburn Mr. Stephen Kemper Reaves ’88 Mr. William Jasper Reaves ’57 & Mrs. Emily T. Reaves ’58 Mr. David Barry Reed ’84 & Mrs. Virginia J. Reed ’72

Scarborough ’65 Mr. Jonathan L. Schaefer ’16 & Mrs. Erin A.

Mr. Timothy Shawn Smith & Mrs. Karen Susan Smith

Schaefer ’16 Mr. Robert A. Schaffeld III ’91 & Mrs. Carol Wright Mr. Gary Lee Schatz ’78 & Mrs. Susan Nelson Mr. Johannes Williamson Schmal ’11 & Mrs. Saori

Ms. Claire Elizabeth Schrantz ’06

Mr. Taylor Thomas Reedy ’13 & Mrs. Bonnie Lewis

Mr. Ryan Michael Schulz ’01 & Mrs. Kimberly Schulz Dr. Peter Schwartz

Mr. Carl A. Register ’63 & Mrs. Joan T. Register

Mr. Robert H. Scott ’71 & Mrs. Lena Scott

Mr. John R. Reynolds ’70 & Mrs. Shirley K.

Ms. Samantha H. Scott ’12

Mrs. Katelyn Wade Rheinlander ’13 & Mr. Jonathan Rheinlander

Smola II ’07

Mrs. Lori Lynne Self ’90 & Mr. Tim Self

Mr. Charles Robert Sewell ’86 & Mrs. Wanda T. Sewell

Dr. Christopher Brian Roberts & Mrs. Tracy Roberts

Mrs. Katherine E. Shafer ’05 & Dr. John Travis Shafer

Mr. Gary Michael Roberts ’80 & Mrs. Mary Burns

Mr. Andrew J. Sharp Jr. ’72 & Mrs. Jennifer Sharp

Mr. Jeffery Ryan Robinett ’01 & Mrs. Ashley Nunn Robinett ’01 Ms. Casey W. Robinson ’00 Mr. Eugene Robinson ’03 & Mrs. Rachel Robinson Mr. Kenneth William Robuck ’81 & Mrs. Cathy Monroe Robuck ’81 Dr. Thomas Richard Roth ’84 & Dr. Ann Pinski Roth Mrs. Karen Harris Rowell ’79

Mr. John Albert Smyth Jr. ’70 & Mrs. Melanie Whatley Smyth ’70 Mr. N. Oliver Smyth III ’66 & Mrs. Jean Schauss Smyth ’70

Senn ’05 Mr. William Bart Sessions ’58

Mr. Andrew J. Riley ’10 & Mrs. Laura Garikes Riley ’10

Roberts ’74

Smith ’70 Dr. Cassandra Rhodes Smola ’06 & Mr. Walter John

Searcy ’85

Mr. Robert Hillard Senn III ’05 & Mrs. Laura Sims

Mr. Richard Young Roberts ’73 & Mrs. Peggy Frew

Smith ’91 Mr. William James Smith ’67 & Mrs. Susan C.

Mr. Donald Reuben Searcy ’84 & Mrs. Alice Johnson

Mr. Thomas D. Senkbeil ’71 & Mrs. Karen Senkbeil

Roberts

Smith ’74 Mr. Timothy Scot Smith ’91 & Mrs. Sheila Ransone

Mr. Zeke Walter L. Smith ’82 & Mrs. Darlene P. Smith

Mr. Harry Glen Rice ’77 & Mrs. Gail G. Rice Riddle ’06

Mr. Stephen Linwood Smith ’75 & Mrs. Judith R.

Mr. Thomas J. Scott Jr. & Mrs. Betsy S. Scott

Ms. Debbie Rice Mr. David Baker Riddle ’04 & Dr. Stefanie Lycans

Smith Ms. Savannah J. Smith ’18

Schmal ’10 Mr. Taylor C. Schmidt ’11

Mrs. Peggy Reynolds

Mr. Randy Leon Smith ’76 & Mrs. Patricia Smith Mr. Robert Aubrey Smith ’64 & Mrs. Barbara Custard

Schatz ’79

Mr. Wilmer Handy Reed III ’48

Reynolds ’70

Mr. Kenneth Abner Smith ’81 & Mrs. Lyn Smith Mr. Kenneth L. Smith Jr. ’78

Schaffeld ’91

Mr. William Burch Reed ’50 & Mrs. Elizabeth Reed

Reedy ’13

Smith ’92 Ms. Julie Michelle Smith ’13

Mr. Auston Andrew Shaw ’96 & Mrs. Mary Catherine

Mr. Robert Grant Sommerville ’05 & Mrs. Nicole Donnee Sommerville ’05 Dr. Ryan A. Sothen ’09 & Mrs. Holly Holman Sothen ’03 Mr. Michael Anthony Soutullo ’80 & Mrs. Becky C. Soutullo ’80

Shaw ’94 Mr. Charles Allen Shaw ’86 & Mrs. Kimberly Popham

Mr. Steven Edward Speaks ’87 & Mrs. Julie Pace Speaks ’87

Shaw Mr. Stephen Aldridge Shaw ’84 & Mrs. Sharon

Mr. Cecil C. Spear Jr. ’57 & Mrs. Joyce Spear Ms. Jaclyn Elizabeth Spence ’19

Lochner Shaw Mr. Benjamin M. Shelley ’14 & Dr. Haley Ruth

Mr. Mark A. Spencer ’00 Dr. Samia I. Spencer

Shelley ’14 Dr. Jing Shen ’96

Ms. Jane Kathleen Spinks ’08

Mr. Donald Shepherd ’67 & Mrs. Gail Merkl

Mr. Donald Wade Spivey ’90 Mr. Reggie Allen Spivey ’87 & Mrs. Sherri L. Spivey

Shepherd ’67

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. Michael George Spoor ’89 & Mrs. Kimberly Berry Spoor ’89

Mr. John Scott Thompson ’88 & Mrs. Julia Jones Thompson ’87

Mr. Charles Chris Spraggins ’80

Mr. Scott Randall Todd ’94 & Mrs. Robin Smith

Mr. Larry Dale Stamps ’57

Mr. William A. Tomb ’73 & Mrs. Martha Tomb

Mrs. Barbara Lynn Staples ’82

Mr. Arthur Tonsmeire III ’65

Mr. James Lewis Starr ’71 & Mrs. Catherine Ballard

Mr. William McClain Towery ’03 & Mrs. Jacqueline

Starr Mr. Eugene Grant Steele ’80 & Mrs. Jacqueline Guthrie Steele ’78 Mr. Andrew Joseph Steele ’75 & Mrs. Susan Mathisen Steele ’74 Mr. Rodney Chapman Steffens ’73 Mr. David Charles Stejskal ’00 & Mrs. Mindy Allen

Towery Ms. Karen Louise Trapane ’82

Mr. Harry W. Watkins Jr. ’57 Mr. John Holman Watson ’60 & Mrs. Gail Pearson Watson Mr. Joseph D. Weatherford ’71 & Mrs. Kathy Weatherford Dr. Glenn D. Weathers ’65 & Mrs. Katherine Weathers Mr. Jeffrey Bryan Weathers ’96 & Mrs. Lauren Grigsby Weathers

Mr. J. Frank Travis ’59

Mr. Russell L. Weaver ’62

Mr. Thomas Lanier Traylor ’10 & Mrs. Emily Wood

Ms. Mary Krysta Weed ’05

Traylor ’10 Mr. Daniel Andrew Traynor ’78 & Mrs. Mical A. Traynor ’80

Capt. William S. Weeks ’73 & Mrs. Connie Weeks Mr. Erich Jarvis Weishaupt ’97 & Mrs. Jennifer Fenton Weishaupt

Mr. Corbin Tubbs & Mrs. Christy Tubbs

Dr. Bryan Joseph Wells ’01

Mr. Mark E. Stepnowski ’16

Mr. Bolton W. Tucker ’08 & Mrs. Lindsay Ille Tucker ’09

Mrs. Morgan Mahogany Welsh ’09

Mr. Johnnie D. Stewart ’62

Dr. Michael Larry Tuggle Sr. ’57 & Mrs. Dede D. Tuggle

Mr. James Wade Wesson ’73

Stejskal ’01

Mr. John Monro Stickney ’64 & Mrs. Priscilla Stickney Mr. William Stewart Stocks ’15 & Mrs. Jami Heard Stocks ’15

’60 Mrs. Laura Crowe Turley ’87 Mr. Dwight J. Turner ’79

Dr. Linda J. Stone ’79 & Mr. Jeffrey Ira Stone ’79

Mr. Hugh Ed Turner ’61

Mr. William Bryan Stone II ’85 & Mrs. Marian Haynie

Mr. Dewitt Uptagrafft ’72 & Mrs. Joan Uptagrafft

Stone Mr. Benjamin Preston Straub ’13 & Mrs. Kayla Marie Straub ’13 Mrs. Charles L. Strickland

Mr. George Egbert Uthlaut ’54 & Mrs. Dorothy S. Uthlaut ’54 Mr. Hans F. VanBrackle ’76 & Mrs. Margie L. VanBrackle ’75

Mrs. Kara L. Strickland ’99

Mr. Mark David Vanstrum ’79

Mr. Thomas D. Stringfellow ’65 & Mrs. Marianne M.

Mr. Michael J. Varagona ’78 & Mrs. Janet W.

Stringfellow ’65

Varagona ’78

Mr. Gary L. West ’74 & Mrs. Kathy Ashcraft West ’76 Dr. Randy Clark West ’87 & Mrs. Ronda Vaughn West ’85 Mr. William H. Whitaker Jr. ’55 & Mrs. Margaret R. Whitaker ’56 Col. James Robert Whitley Jr. ’61 & Mrs. Chris Whitley Mr. Mark Alan Whitt ’05 Mr. Dwight L. Wiggins Jr. ’62 & Mrs. Bonnie Wiggins Mr. Garris David Wilcox ’95 & Mrs. Kimberly Wilcox Mr. Matthew John Wild ’10 & Mrs. Alexandria Crooks Wild ’11 Lt. Col. Ralph C. Wilkinson ’57 & Mrs. Rosalie A. Wilkinson

Ms. Megan K. Stroud ’04

Mrs. Maryanne M. Vaughan ’83

Dr. Paul Cavert Stumb ’82

Mrs. Lori Antony Vaught ’85 & Mr. H. Rick Vaught Jr.

Dr. Jeffrey C. Suhling & Mrs. Jane N. Suhling

Mr. David Troy Veal ’91 & Mrs. Robyn Ann Veal

Mr. David Carriell Sulkis ’79 & Mrs. Kathleen C.

Mr. John Edward Vick ’62 & Mrs. Faye Vick

Mr. Andrew Payson Williams ’18

Mr. Ray Jarrell Vinson ’63

Mr. Ken Curb Williams ’79 & Mrs. Deborah Andrews

Sulkis ’79

Mr. Andre Jarvis Williams ’00 & Mrs. Cameka Scott Williams ’01

Williams ’79

Ms. Betty Moore Summerlin

Mr. Nathan Thomas Vogt ’02 & Mrs. Zeneida Vogt

Mr. William R. Summers Jr. ’83 & Mrs. Dana Summers

Mr. William Carl Voigt III ’87 & Mrs. Sandra Ryan Voigt

Ms. LaRae Williams

Mr. Michael Kevin Swinson ’85 & Mrs. Jennifer

Mr. Walter Karl Vollberg ’73

Mrs. Monika H. Williams ’97

Col. James S. Voss ’72 & Dr. Suzan Curry Voss ’71

Mrs. Nicole Williams ’00 & Mr. Christopher George

Mr. Ira C. Waddey Jr. ’65 & Mrs. Ann M. Waddey

Mr. Thomas J. Williams ’87 & Mrs. Dana Williams

Mr. Richard Turner Wade ’69

Mr. Trent Edward Williams ’03 & Mr. Lui Rogliano

Mr. James D. Wadsworth ’72 & Ms. Debbie Smith

Capt. James Melton Willis ’84 & Mrs. Natalie Dodd

Swinson Mr. Stephen Keith Swinson ’81 & Mrs. Virginia Pierce Swinson ’80 Dr. Thomas Fletcher Talbot ’52 & Mrs. Donna Klinner Talbot ’57 Mr. George Harold Talley II ’91 & Mrs. Lisa Hooper Talley Mr. William Trent Taylor ’03 & Mrs. Courtney Barnett Taylor ’04

Mr. Charles S. Wagner & Mrs. Jane A. Wagner Mr. Casey Haynes Waid ’96 & Mrs. Shannon Haynes Waid ’94 Mr. Brad Walker & Mrs. Andrea Lynne Walker Mr. James Nickolas Walker ’06 & Mrs. Kala G. Walker

Willis Mr. Clyde E. Wills Jr. ’68 & Mrs. Sue H. Wills Mr. Brock McLaren Wilson ’09 & Mrs. Laura Ann Wilson ’09 Mr. Charles A. Wilson ’96 & Mrs. Elizabeth Boles Wilson ’97

Mr. Glenn E. Taylor & Mrs. Sheila B. Taylor

Mrs. Erica Brook Walsh ’98 & Mr. Ryan Walsh

Mr. John Albert Taylor ’53

Mrs. Roxann Foster Walsh ’94

Mr. Donald G. Wilson ’58 & Mrs. Dorothy T. Wilson

Mr. Samuel Adam Temple ’09 & Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth

Mr. John Thomas Walter Jr. ’55 & Mrs. Jean Hall

Mr. Jason S. Wilson ’01 & Mrs. Brittany Wood

Temple ’10 Mr. Michael Franklin Templeton ’73 & Mrs. Ellen F. Templeton ’72 Mr. Jordon W. Tench ’10 & Mrs. Meghan O’Dwyer Tench ’08 Mr. James W. Thomas ’18 Mr. Jerry Franklin Thomas ’63 & Mrs. Elizabeth R. Thomas

Walter ’57 Mr. George Russell Walton ’80 Mr. David Charles Wang

Wimberly

Ms. Stephanie Marie Wang

Mrs. Jennifer Hall Winn ’05

Ms. Leslie Ann Ward ’90

Mr. Walter Stanley Woltosz ’69 & Mrs. Virginia Woltosz

Mr. William E. Warnock Jr. ’74 & Mrs. Rebecca C.

Mr. William B. M. Womack ’75

Warnock Mr. Conner Warren ’67 & Mrs. Dorothy Warren ’69

Mr. John Wesley Thomas ’60

Dr. William C. Warren IV ’75 & Mrs. Lynne Warren

Mr. K-Rob Thomas ’01 & Mrs. Marcia Leatha

Mr. Robert Morgan Waters ’71 & Mrs. Linda Barnes

Thomas ’01

Wilson ’09 Mr. Michael B. Wimberly ’76 & Mrs. Nancy M.

Waters ’70

Ms. Denise Dale Wood ’80 Mr. Douglas Jeffrey Wood ’84 & Mrs. Laurie Hayden Wood Mr. Gary E. Woodham ’62 & Mrs. Elizabeth N. Woodham ’76

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CUPOLA REPORT Dr. Chwan-Hwa Wu & Mrs. Shau-Hwa C. Wu

Mr. Robert Harrison Wynne Jr. ’68

Mr. Philip S. Zettler ’61 & Mrs. Betty Zettler

Dr. Zhangwen Wu ’98 & Mrs. Mei Ling ’97

Mr. Duane Dale York ’76 & Mrs. Happy Smith York ’78

Dr. Xinyu Zhang & Mrs. Xianghui Wang

Mrs. Gloria Wynn

Mr. Scott Alan Yost ’82

Mrs. Emily Johnson Zieman ’02

ANNUAL FUNDS Many Auburn Engineering donors choose to make annual gifts each year in support of students, faculty and ongoing college operations. These funds take the shape of scholarships, fellowships, departmental support and Funds for Excellence. Unlike endowments, these funds are given each year and are not maintained by principal or earnings. We would like to recognize those who established Annual Funds during the calendar year 2019. 100+ Women Strong Transfer Student Annual Scholarship

Honda Manufacturing of Alabama, LLC Annual Fellowship

David W. Brooks Annual Scholarship

Industrial Oils Unlimited Annual Scholarship

Brad Corson Annual Fund for Excellence

Raymond and Eleanor Loyd Annual Dean’s Scholarship

Kevin & Marie Gammill Annual Scholarship

Carl and Mary Martin Annual Scholarship

Jim and Lynn Hecathorn Annual Scholarship

Russell ‘War Lion’ Annual Scholarship

ENDOWED FUNDS Endowments are gifts that provide Auburn Engineering perpetual income and are essential for the long-term security and growth of the college. The Auburn University Foundation invests the principal of the endowed fund and the allocated income is used to support programs and initiatives designated by the donor. The following were established in 2019: 2019 Chemical Engineering Leave a Legacy Endowed Scholarship

Roger & Dot Hemminghaus Endowed Scholarship

Alabama Textile Education Foundation Endowed Fund for Excellence

Thomas A. Hereford Jr. Endowed Scholarship

James & Bettye Ballenger Endowed Fund for Excellence

Hoar Construction Endowed Scholarship

Robert & Lisa Bickert Endowed Scholarship

James & Karen Killian Cupola Engineering Ambassador Endowed Scholarship

Robert L. & Sara A. Bishop Endowed Scholarship

Bud Kuester Endowed Scholarship

Sean & Allison Bittner Endowed Scholarship

Laxmi & Dr. P.K. Raju Family Endowed Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering

Robert & Lelia Boggan Endowed Scholarship

Leach Family Endowed Scholarship

Bobby & Kim Bolt Endowed Scholarship

Jill Savage Prettyman-Lukoschek & Rainer Lukoschek Endowed Fund for Excellence

Patrick L. Byrne Endowed Fund for Excellence

John A. & Anne W. MacFarlane Endowed Cupola Scholarship

John Clopton Endowed Scholarship

John & Anne MacFarlane Endowed Distinguished Professorship

Joe Dixon & Jayne Webster Edge Endowed Scholarship

Bill & Lana McNair Auburn Creed Endowed Scholarship

For the Betterment of Civil Engineering Endowed Scholarship

Jennifer Morgan Nichols Endowed Scholarship

Thomas M. Frassrand & Claudia J. Cola Endowed Scholarship

Office of Development Endowed Scholarship

Gwen & Matthew Frazier Endowed Scholarship

Parker Family Engineering Endowed Scholarship

Captain Davis R. Gamble Jr. Endowed Scholarship

John & Becky Patton Endowed Scholarship

Giddens/Shaw Electrical Engineering Endowed Scholarship

Denise Sandlin Raper Endowed Scholarship

Gary & Carol Godfrey Endowed Scholarship

Gary L. & Susan Nelson Schatz Endowed Scholarship

Dunk Hale Endowed Scholarship

Dr. & Mrs. Frank Swinson Family Endowed Scholarship

Hamilton Family Endowed Scholarship

James D. Wadsworth Endowed Scholarship

Albert E. Hay Endowed Fund for Excellence

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CUPOLA REPORT GINN SOCIETY Auburn Engineering’s Ginn Society is named for the visionary and philanthropic leadership of Samuel L. Ginn, a 1959 industrial management graduate and the college’s namesake. The Ginn Society acknowledges cumulative gifts of $25,000 or more to the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. Mr. Joseph W. Ackerman ’60

Mr. Charles Judson Bowers ’69

Mr. Frank M. Cater ’61 & Mrs. Dorothy M. Cater

Gen. Jimmie V. Adams ’57 & Mrs. Judy T. Adams

Mr. Paul C. Box* & Mrs. Marilyn L. Box

Mr. Steven Glenn Cates ’85 & Mrs. Lyn Cates

Mr. James T. Adkison Jr. ’71 & Mrs. Dianne Booker

Mr. Robert Joseph Brackin ’80 & Mrs. Roberta

Mr. Wiley Mitchell Cauthen ’62 & Mrs. Jo Ann

Adkison ’71 Mr. Lewis S. Agnew Jr. ’04 & Mrs. Kathryn Rooney Agnew

Marcantonio Mr. Rodney Bradford ’67* & Mrs. Shirley A. Bradford Dr. David B. Bradley ’65

Mr. Robert S. Aicklen ’73 & Mrs. Patricia P. Aicklen ’74

Mr. J. B. Braswell

Mr. Charles S. Aiken Jr. ’73 & Mrs. Catherine C. Aiken

Mr. John R. Bray ’57 & Mrs. Quinlyn Bray*

Mr. John Boswell Allen ’66

Dr. Daniel F. Breeden ’57 & Mrs. Josephine M.

Ms. Jennifer D. Alley Ms. Barbara Allison Mr. John P. Anderson ’76 & Mrs. Cynthia M. Anderson ’76

Breeden Mr. Felix C. Brendle Jr. ’73 & Mrs. Gail Williams Brendle ’76 Mr. William D. Bridges ’60* & Mrs. Dorothy Y. Bridges

Mr. Pete L. Anderson ’75

Mr. Dan H. Broughton ’63 & Mrs. Sheila Broughton

Ms. Susan E. Anderson ’90

Mr. Dwight Truman Brown ’69 & Mrs. Mary Ellen

Mr. Gerald B. Andrews Sr. ’59 & Mrs. Claire S. Andrews ’73 Mr. Thomas Denny Anspach ’94 & Mrs. Aneda Chandler Anspach ’95 Mr. Stephen Tate Armstrong ’96 & Mrs. Kathleen Meadows Armstrong ’96 Mr. Timothy Michael Arnold ’94 & Mrs. Margaret Schlereth Arnold

Brown Dr. John Wilford Brown ’57 & Dr. Rosemary Kopel Brown ’57

Cerny ’69 Mr. Peter Judson Chamberlin ’81 & Mrs. Genie Chamberlin Mr. Joe Mark Chambers Jr. ’72 & Mrs. Elizabeth M. Chambers ’76 Ms. Katherine Leigh Champion ’11 Mr. James M. Chandler III ’84 & Mrs. Valerie Chandler Mr. J. Edward Chapman Jr. ’56 & Mrs. Martha Lee Chapman Mr. Wheeler E. Chapman III ’83 & Mrs. Laurianne Chapman Mr. Clarance Joseph Chappell III ’59 Mr. Randall Clark Chase ’85 & Mrs. Beth R. Chase

Mr. L. Owen Brown ’64 & Mrs. Brookes Brown

Mr. Jing-Yau Chung & Mrs. Alice Chung

Mr. William Scott Brown ’71

Mr. Shawn Edward Cleary ’82 & Mrs. Anne M.

Mr. David C. Brubaker ’71 & Mrs. Theresa Brubaker Mr. Thomas D. Burson ’58 & Mrs. Frances Wilson Burson ’58

Mr. Thomas Glenn Avant ’60 & Mrs. Janis Avant

Mr. Henry M. Burt Jr. ’58 & Mrs. Rebecca Burt

Mr. Diaco Aviki ’95 & Mrs. Angela Aviki

Dr. Gisela Buschle-Diller

Mr. Manucher Azmudeh ’60 & Mrs. Mahvash

Mr. Daniel M. Bush ’72

Azmudeh

Cauthen* Mr. Otto Peter Cerny ’69* & Mrs. Margaret King

Mr. Donald Ray Bush ’63

Cleary ’82 Dr. Prabhakar Clement ’93 & Mrs. Sabina Wilfred Clement ’92 Dr. Jo Anne Hamrick Coggins ’75 & Mr. Terry James Coggins ’76 Mr. Eldridge J. Cook Jr. & Mrs. Rhonda Horne Cook ’80*

Mr. Charles Frederick Bach ’58

Mr. Harris Donovan Bynum ’58 & Mrs. Karen Bynum

Mr. Timothy Donald Cook ’82

Mr. James G. Bagley Jr. ’83 & Mrs. Melissa S. Bagley

Mr. Robert Flournoy Bynum ’75 & Mrs. Gretchen

Mr. James L. Cooper Jr. ’81 & Mrs. Anna B. Cooper

Mr. James O’Neal Ballenger ’59 & Mrs. Bettye Bowman Ballenger ’59 Mr. Robert Orrville Barnes Sr. ’50* & Mrs. Wanda Barnes Mr. Edward Parr Barrett ’48* & Mrs. Agnes B. Barrett Mr. Joseph F. Barth III ’71 & Mrs. Gail Barth

Luepke Bynum*

Ms. Lisa Ann Copeland ’85

Mr. Patrick L. Byrne ’71

Mr. James Hugh Corbitt ’58* & Mrs. Patricia G. Corbitt

Mr. James D. Caldwell ’29* & Mrs. Elizabeth G.

Ms. Mary F. Cordato

Caldwell Mr. Robert Howard Campbell ’97 & Mrs. Elizabeth W. Campbell

Mr. Bradley William Corson ’83 & Mrs. Joan Corson Mr. Samuel S. Coursen Jr. ’73 & Mrs. Denise Coursen Mr. Joseph Lamar Cowan ’70 & Mrs. Jo Ann Culpepper Cowan ’69

Mr. Michael Patrick Batey ’79 & Mrs. Elizabeth Batey

Mr. Roger J. Campbell ’59 & Mrs. Judith E. Campbell

Mr. Ben Beasley ’65

Mr. William E. Cannady ’42* & Mrs. Lois Cannady

Ms. Trudy Craft-Austin

Mr. Martin L. Beck Jr. ’49* & Mrs. Virginia Hardenbergh

Mr. J. Travis Capps Jr. ’94 & Mr. Lee Anthony

Mr. Theodore P. Crane Jr. ’58* & Mrs. Barbara Ann

Beck ’60 Mr. Christopher T. Bell ’83 & Mrs. Allison F. Bell Dr. Larry Benefield ’66 & Mrs. Mary L. Benefield Mr. Charles William Berry Jr. ’66 & Mrs. Charlene L. Berry Mr. Robert Lee Bishop Jr. ’79 & Mrs. Sara Ann Bishop Dr. William Y. Bishop ’68 & Mrs. Rosemarie Bishop* Dr. Nancy Pugh Bissinger ’73 & Mr. Allan Harry Bissinger ’75* Mr. Sean Michael Bittner ’16 & Mrs. Allison K. Bittner ’15 Mr. Robert W. Bledsoe ’10

Mr. John Phillip Caraway ’92 & Mrs. Patricia M. Caraway Mr. Russell Lee Carbine ’83 & Mrs. Anna Calhoun Carbine ’83 Mr. Donald Edward Carmon ’88 & Mrs. Dianna Carmon Mr. Benjamin F. Carr Jr. ’60 & Mrs. Nancy Brunson Carr ’63 Mr. James Harrison Carroll Jr. ’54* & Mrs. Betty McNeice Carroll Mr. Patrick Thomas Carroll ’87 & Mrs. Cynthia L. Carroll

Adkins Crane Mr. Wayne J. Crews ’60 & Mrs. Louise Crews Dr. Malcolm J. Crocker & Dr. Ruth Catherine Crocker Mrs. Ragan White Crowell ’98 & Mr. Daniel Crowell Mr. Kevin Thomas Cullinan ’09 Dr. Ralph S. Cunningham ’62 & Mrs. Deborah Cunningham Mr. Malcolm A. Cutchins Jr. ’79 Dr. Mary K. Boudreaux & Mr. Calvin Cutshaw Mr. William J. Cutts ’55 Dr. Julian Davidson ’50* & Mrs. Dorothy Davidson Mr. Charles Edward Davis ’59* & Mrs. Charlotte Davis

Dr. Denise Blanchard Boehm ’80 & Dr. Richard Boehm

Mr. Philip Randall Carroll ’82

Dr. N. Jan Davis ’77 & Mr. Schuyler H. Richardson

Mr. Russell F. Boren Sr. ’54 & Mrs. Hazel Boren*

Dr. Tony J. Catanzaro ’84 & Mrs. Tracey H.

Brig. Gen. Robert L. Davis ’74 & Mrs. Barbara Baker

Ms. Mildred Diane Boss ’72

Catanzaro ’83

Davis ’72

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. Walter R. Day Jr. ’53* & Mrs. Jane Day

CAPT Davis R. Gamble Jr. ’74 & Mrs. Patricia Gamble

Mr. John Larry Hardiman ’75 & Mrs. Wanda Hardiman

Dr. Harry L. Deffebach Jr. ’63 & Mrs. Mary Deffebach

Mr. Maury D. Gaston ’82 & Mrs. Nancy Gaston

Mr. George C. Hardison Jr. ’76 & Mrs. Marsha

Mr. Michael Arthur DeMaioribus ’76 & Mrs. Leta

Mr. Sibbley Paul Gauntt ’54 & Mrs. Mary S. Gauntt

DeMaioribus Mr. Donald Eugene Dennis ’54 & Mrs. Patricia McNaron Dennis*

Mr. Charles Earley Gavin III ’59 & Mrs. Marjorie

Smith Harper ’90

Frazier-Gavin Mrs. Evelyn Geisler

Mr. Derek Dwaine Dictson & Mrs. Nikki Dictson

Mr. John William Gibbs ’72 & Mrs. Patricia Gibbs

Mrs. Amy Thomas Dobbs ’78 & Mr. Joseph G. Dobbs

Dr. George Edward Gibson Jr. ’80 & Mrs. Gail Howard

Mr. Robert Bruce Donnellan ’76 & Mrs. Kay L.

Quenelle Hardison ’76 Mr. Oscar Coursey Harper IV ’89 & Mrs. Patricia Dr. Elmer Beseler Harris ’62* & Mrs. Glenda Steele Harris ’61 Mr. Lamar Travis Hawkins ’63 & Mrs. Elaine T. Hawkins ’62

Gibson ’90 Mr. Michael V. Ginn

Mr. Lawrence Allen Hawkins ’81 & Mrs. Lisa Hawkins

Mrs. Carol Hilton Dorn ’84 & Mr. Alan Dorn

Dr. Samuel L. Ginn ’59 & Mrs. Ann Ginn

Mr. Albert E. Hay ’67

Mr. William G. Dorriety ’84 & Mrs. Donna Dorriety

Mr. Thomas Peter Glanton ’12 & Mrs. Curry Stevenson

Ms. Karen Hayes ’81

Donnellan

Mr. Christopher R. Dozier ’89 & Mrs. Barrett Johnston Dozier ’86 Mr. Melvin Lee Drake Jr. ’77 & Mrs. Diane Rowan Drake ’77

Mr. William F. Hayes ’65 & Mrs. Patricia Walkden

Glanton ’12 Mrs. Gina Victoria Gloski ’82 & Mr. David Michael Mr. Charlie Godfrey & Mrs. Maxine Godfrey

Mrs. Linda D. DuCharme ’86 & Mr. Richard DuCharme

Mr. Gary Ross Godfrey ’86 & Mrs. Carol J. Godfrey ’86

Mr. Wendell Harris Duke ’73 & Mrs. Margaret H. Duke

Mr. Ralph B. Godfrey ’64 & Mrs. Lynda Godfrey

Mr. George Robert Dunlap Jr. ’49 & Mrs. Geraldine P.

Mr. Christopher Lynn Golden ’96 & Mrs. Carmen

Dunlap* Mr. Timothy John Dwyer ’85 & Mrs. Julianne Evans Dwyer ’82 Mr. Ronald M. Dykes ’69 & Mrs. Anne Dykes Mr. Lewis H. Eberdt Jr. ’54 & Mrs. Annette Bailey Eberdt ’53

Hayes Mr. Cotton Hazelrig & Mrs. Maggie Hazelrig*

Gloski

Ingrando Golden Mr. M. James Gorrie II ’84 & Mrs. Alison Mobley

Mrs. Barbara Lynn Hecathorn ’83 & Mr. James Hecathorn Mr. Jim Palmer Heilbron ’94 & Mrs. Markell A. Heilbron ’96 Mr. John P. Helmick Jr. ’56 & Mrs. Claudette Helmick Mr. Roger R. Hemminghaus ’58 & Mrs. Dot Hemminghaus

Gorrie ’84 Mr. Magnus Miller Gorrie ’57 & Mrs. Frances Greene

Dr. Alton Stuart Hendon ’89 & Dr. Gerri Hendon Mr. Tommy Glenn Hendrick ’70* & Mrs. Judy J.

Gorrie ’59 Dr. Griffin Keith Gothard ’88

Hendrick

Dr. Mario Richard Eden & Mrs. Leeja Eden

Dr. Katina Kodadek Gothard ’97

Mr. John Steele Henley II ’63 & Mrs. Geanie Henley

Mr. Joe D. Edge ’70 & Mrs. Jayne W. Edge ’71

Mr. Jefferson Lavelle Grant Jr. ’69* & Mrs. Elizabeth

Mr. Thomas A. Hereford Jr. ’74

Mr. C. Houston Elkins Jr. ’77 & Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Elkins ’77 Mr. H. Wendell Ellis ’67 & Mrs. Celia Ellis Mr. Joseph Etheridge & Mrs. Vicky Etheridge Mr. Bruce William Evans ’86

Mr. Robert Herkt* & Ms. Melissa Herkt ’77

Grant Mr. Stanley L. Graves ’67 & Mrs. Patsy Hyche

Mr. Patrick D. Higginbotham ’81 & Mrs. Nancy Y. Higginbotham ’80

Graves ’70 Mr. David Martin Gray ’93 & Mrs. Susan Baskin

Mr. Thomas Farrell Higgins ’70 & Mrs. Rita Higgins Mr. Wilson Price Hightower III ’88 & Mrs. Margaret M.

Gray ’92

Hightower ’87

Mr. Corey Ryan Evans ’02

Mr. Gary Wayne Gray ’69 & Mrs. Jo Evelyn Gray

Mr. James R. Evans ’55 & Mrs. Janice Evans*

Mr. Ruskin Clegg Green ’91 & Mrs. Julie Green

Mr. Dennis Steve Hill ’79 & Mrs. Ann Reynolds Hill ’77

Mr. Jim W. Evans ’67 & Mrs. Marsha P. Evans

Mr. Walter Wanzel Griffin ’47 & Mrs. Mary Jane Griffin*

Mr. Michael Dale Holmes ’86 & Mrs. Stephanie Jo

Mr. Norman Smith Faris Jr. ’59 & Mrs. Judith Jones

Mr. Micheal Griggs* & Mrs. Linda Vanstrum Griggs ’75

Holmes

Mr. H. Vince Groome III & Mrs. Ashley Groome

Dr. James Stephan Hood ’84 & Mrs. Kelly T. Hood

Ms. Ada Nicole Faulk ’96

Mr. Mark Allan Gulley ’94 & Mrs. Leah S. Gulley ’93

Mr. E. Erskine Hopkins ’46

Mr. Steven Scott Fendley ’91

Mr. Toby Eugene Gurley ’65

Mr. Randall Cory Hopkins ’91

Ms. Ann Marie Ferretti ’75

Mr. Glenn Harold Guthrie ’62 & Mrs. Carol Guthrie

Mr. Steven D. Horne ’71 & Mrs. Lynn Jones Horne ’79

Mrs. Linda Ann Figg ’81 & Mr. Richard Drew

Mr. Billy Guthrie ’57* & Mrs. Jean Guthrie

Mr. Duke Cameron Horner ’47* & Mrs. Shelby J.

Mr. Paul R. Flowers Jr. ’66 & Mrs. Barbara Meeker

Mr. Robert Otto Haack Jr. ’83 & Mrs. Margaret Fuller

Faris ’58*

Flowers ’68 Mr. John N. Floyd Jr. ’85 & Mrs. Amy Jordan Floyd ’86

Mr. Keith Shellie Hagler ’98

Mr. Stanley F. Folker Jr. ’68

Mr. William George Hairston III ’67 & Mrs. Paula

Mr. William Mark Ford & Mrs. Beth Ford Mr. Joe W. Forehand Jr. ’71 & Mrs. Gayle Parks Forehand ’70 Mr. Phillip Alan Forsythe ’81 & Mrs. Margaret Long Forsythe ’81 Capt. Michael Victor Forte ’82 & Mrs. Shelley Forte Mr. Philip Gordon Fraher ’88 & Mrs. Kimberley W. Fraher ’88 Mr. Richard L. Franklin ’49 & Mrs. Jeanne E. Franklin* Mr. Thomas M. Frassrand ’76 & Ms. Claudia J. Cola Mrs. Gwen S. Frazier ’87 Mrs. Gwenn Smith Freeman ’73 Mr. Christian G. Gackstatter ’84 & Mrs. Karen Gackstatter

Horner Mr. Clarence H. Hornsby Jr. ’50* & Mrs. Lynn Hornsby

Haack ’83

Maj. James M. Hoskins ’81 & Mrs. Bertha T. Hoskins ’80 Ms. Barbara Alison Howell ’83

Hairston Mr. Holbert L. Hale Jr. ’64 & Mrs. Julia H. Hale

Mr. Alan P. Hudgins ’74* & Mrs. Joi Hudgins

Mr. James H. Ham III ’66 & Mrs. Kimberly Ham

Mr. James G. Hughes Sr. ’56 & Mrs. Billie Webb

Mr. J. Robert Hamill ’70 Mr. David A. Hamilton ’67 & Mrs. Cindy Hamilton Mr. Johnnie Marvin Hamilton ’68 & Mrs. Cathryn Reynolds Hamilton

Hughes* Mr. James A. Humphrey ’70 & Mrs. Michele Alexander Humphrey ’71 Ms. Kristin L. Hunnicutt

Ms. Susan Owens Hamilton ’73

Ms. Susan H. Hunnicutt ’79

Mr. Frank Arthur Hamner ’88 & Mrs. Lauren Frey

Dr. Judy Johns Hunt & Mr. Brian Howard Hunt ’90 Mr. Bruce Edward Imsand ’74 & Mrs. Katherine V.

Hamner ’90 Mr. Nathan L. Hanks ’03 & Mrs. Laura Quimby

Imsand Dr. J. David Irwin ’61 & Mrs. Patricia Watson Irwin ’61

Hanks ’03 Mr. William R. Hanlein ’47 & Mrs. Sue Hanlein* Dr. Andrew Palmer Hanson ’93 & Mrs. Susan Hanson

Mr. Charles Mathias Jager ’56 & Mrs. Rosemary Smith Jager ’57

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. William Russell James ’69 & Mrs. Brenda M. Tanner

Mr. Creighton C. Lee ’47 & Mrs. Mary Sue Wright Lee Mr. John S. Lee ’83 & Mrs. Dorothy Pappas Lee ’80

Mr. Paul Alan McIntyre ’92 & Mrs. Amy Fortenberry McIntyre Mr. James D. McMillan ’61 & Mrs. Paula Stapp

Mr. Carl Mack Jeffcoat ’60 & Mrs. Ann W. Jeffcoat

Ms. Nelda K. Lee ’69

Mr. Charles William Jenkins ’72

Gov. William Byron Lee ’81 & Mrs. Maria Dinenna Lee

Mr. Michael D. Johns & Mrs. Laurie Johns

Mr. Edwin Lamar Lewis ’72 & Mrs. Becky S. Lewis ’72

Mr. Joe McMillan ’58 & Mrs. Billie Carole McMillan

Mr. Bobby Joe Johnson ’62

Mr. Ronald Craig Lipham ’74 & Mrs. Lynda Lipham

Mr. William R. McNair ’68 & Mrs. Lana McNair

Mr. Charles Travis Johnson ’65

Mr. Stephen Jager Livingston ’10 & Mrs. Jackie

Mr. Charles Phillip McWane ’80 & Mrs. Heather A.

Col. David S. Johnson ’75 & Mrs. Penelope D. Johnson ’74 Mr. Darren Keith Johnson ’11 & Mrs. Elizabeth Hammer Johnson ’11 Mr. J. Sam Johnson Jr. ’75 & Mrs. Patricia Davenport Johnson ’75

Livingston

McMillan ’65

McWane

Mr. Rodney Lon Long ’76 & Mrs. Judy Long

Mr. John F. Meagher Jr. ’49 & Mrs. Agnes N. Meagher*

Mr. Lum M. Loo ’78

Mr. Jeff T. Meeks ’73

Mr. Ralph Edward Wheeler ’79* & Ms. Jenny Loveland

Mr. E. Martin Melton ’62 & Mrs. Gale Melton

Mr. William A. Lovell Jr. ’79 & Mrs. Virginia Goodwin

Mr. George Aristides Menendez ’70 & Mrs. Elizabeth

Lovell ’80

Oaks Menendez

Ms. Kathryn L. Johnson ’78

Mr. Thomas H. Lowder ’72 & Mrs. Susan Lowder

Mr. D. L. Merrill Jr. ’65 & Mrs. Rebecca Lindsey Merrill

Mr. Roger Warren Johnson ’84 & Ms. M. Jane

Mr. Thomas M. Lowe Jr. ’49* & Mrs. Bettye Mathison

Mr. Peter H. Meyers ’59 & Mrs. Darlene Meyers

Major ’74 Mr. William D. Johnston & Ms. Ronda Stryker Mrs. Dolphine D. Jones & Mr. John David Jones ’47*

Lowe Mr. Raymond Elliott Loyd ’61* & Mrs. Eleanor Haywood Loyd ’59*

Mr. Morris G. Middleton ’61 Mr. Charles Donald Miller ’80 & Mrs. Lisa Q. Miller Mr. Joseph Austin Miller ’83 & Mrs. Donna J. Miller ’84

Mr. John Kenneth Jones ’59 & Mrs. Jo R. Jones

Mr. Donald R. Luger ’62 & Mrs. Sharon M. Luger

Mr. Stephen R. Miller ’72 & Mrs. Kyle Miller

Mr. Joshua Dale Jones ’06 & Mrs. Elizabeth M. Jones

Mr. Rainer Lukoschek ’85 & Mrs. Jill Prettyman

Mr. J. Kevin Mims ’79 & Mrs. Katherine Maughan

Dr. Peter D. Jones & Mrs. Elizabeth Zylla-Jones

Lukoschek ’85

Mims ’81

Dr. Bill Josephson ’89 & Dr. Eleanor C. Josephson ’88

Mr. Fred W. Mace ’57 & Mrs. Juanita Mace

Mr. Max A. Mobley ’72 & Mrs. Kathy W. Mobley

Mr. Robert R. Keith Jr. ’63 & Mrs. Donna Vanderver

Mr. John Andrew MacFarlane ’72 & Mrs. Anne Warren

Mr. William Lynn Moench Jr. ’76 & Mrs. Pamela

Keith ’66 Mr. Byron R. Kelley ’70 & Mrs. Melva B. Kelley Mr. Kenneth Kelly ’90 & Mrs. Kim Kelly Lt. Col. Randolph H. Kelly ’76 & Mrs. Leigh Pinkston Kelly ’77 Gen. Leslie Farr Kenne ’70 Mr. Carver Gager Kennedy ’52 & Mrs. Martha McQueen Kennedy ’54 Mrs. Laura Clenney Kezar ’08 & Mr. Zach Kezar Mr. Lester Killebrew Sr. ’68 & Mrs. Catherine V. Killebrew ’69 Mr. James L. Killian III & Mrs. Karen Killian Mr. Thomas Keith King Sr. ’58 & Mrs. Julia King

MacFarlane ’73 Mr. Charles Albert Machemehl Jr. & Mrs. Hope A. Machemehl Mr. James J. Mallett ’55 & Mrs. Martha Mallett Capt. Robert Allen Malseed ’77 & Mrs. Linda Gayle Malseed

Stephans Moench Dr. Larry Scot Monroe ’79 & Ms. Cynthia Coker Green ’79 Mr. Lawrence J. Montgomery III & Mrs. Mary Montgomery Mr. Charles N. Moody ’63 & Mrs. Jo Moody

Mr. Harry A. Manson ’58 & Mrs. Linda A. Manson

Mr. Chris Anthony Moody ’90 & Mrs. Sarah K. Ahn

Mr. Steven John Marcereau ’65 & Mrs. Rebecca

Mr. Michael Joseph Moody ’84 & Mrs. Jana C. Moody

Marcereau Mr. Salvador Michael Marino ’91 & Mrs. Paula M. Marino ’92 LCDR Clifton C. Martin Jr. ’74 & Mrs. Mary Ramey Martin ’74

Mr. Phillip Franklin Moon ’71* & Mrs. Jane Holley Moon ’73 Mr. F. Brooks Moore ’48 & Mrs. Marian F. Moore ’53* Mrs. Mary Manson Moore ’83 Dr. Joe M. Morgan & Mrs. Rita Morgan

Dr. Oliver D. Kingsley Jr. ’66 & Mrs. Vandalyn Kingsley

Mr. Gary Clements Martin ’57 & Mrs. Judi Martin*

Mr. Larry J. Morgan ’68 & Mrs. Nancy Morgan

Mrs. Mary Peery Kirkland ’94 & Mr. Christopher R.

Mr. James Garrett Martz ’84 & Mrs. Julie Evans Martz

Mr. M. John Morgan ’71 & Mrs. Patricia Morgan

Mr. Jewell C. Maxwell Jr. ’75 & Mrs. Vivian Irene

Mr. David Allen Morris ’96 & Mrs. Grace B. Morris ’95

Kirkland Mr. Terry Allen Kirkley ’57* & Mrs. Mina Propst Kirkley ’54 Mr. Ryan Kyle Knight ’00 & Mrs. Susan Knight Ms. Leslee Belluchie ’83 & Mr. Rick Knop Mr. Ashley David Koby ’98 & Mrs. Stephanie C. Koby ’98 Mr. Christopher J. Kramer ’94 & Mrs. Mary Horton Kramer ’93 Mr. David McCoy Kudlak ’86 & Ms. Trisha Perkins Mr. Frederick D. Kuester ’73 Mr. Thomas D. Lampkin ’75 & Mrs. Barbara Blackstock Lampkin ’75 Mr. Judson T. Landers ’71 & Mrs. Betty Ann Landers

Maxwell

Mr. David R. Motes ’77

Mr. Jesse Duane May ’85 & Mrs. Brenda Carol May

Mr. Kevin Mullins ’99 & Mrs. Apryl Tarrant Mullins ’97

Mr. Patrick Clay Mays ’08 & Mrs. Jenna Browning

Mr. Charles G. Munden Jr. ’77 & Mrs. Sandy H.

Mays Ms. Forrest Worthy McCartney Dr. Michael B. McCartney ’57 & Mrs. Virginia V. McCartney Ms. Sheila J. McCartney Dr. Thurman Dwayne McCay ’68 & Dr. Mary Helen McCay

Munden Mr. Kenneth Howell Murphy ’87 & Mrs. Cindy Kilgo Murphy Mr. Scott B. Murray ’69 & Mrs. Karen M. Murray Mr. Michael L. Neighbors ’76 & Mrs. Kathy Flournoy Neighbors ’75 Dr. Robert Mark Nelms ’80

Ms. Julia Zekoll McClure ’68

Mr. Wayne B. Nelson III ’76 & Mrs. Cheryl N. Nelson

Mr. Charles Douglas McCrary ’73 & Mrs. Phyllis

Mr. William K. Newman ’69 & Mrs. Kate M. Newman

McCrary

Mr. Huan D. Nguyen ’87

Mrs. Maria Larson & Mr. Scott Eric Larson Sr.

Mr. James H. McDaniel ’68 & Mrs. Dotty McDaniel

Mr. Charles G. Nicely ’72

Mr. Harald F. Lassen ’57 & Mrs. Betty Coston

Dr. Donald McDonald ’52 & Mrs. Ann McDonald

Mrs. Nicole Wright Nichols ’00

Mr. Albert F. McFadden Jr. ’81 & Mrs. Hope McFadden

Mr. Jack Dempsey Noah ’59 & Mrs. Marie Crowe

Lassen ’54* Mr. Homer C. Lavender Jr. ’66 & Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Lavender Dr. Terry Edwin Lawler ’68 & Mrs. Patricia E. Lawler Mr. Michael Leach & Mrs. Diana Lynne Leach

Mr. George Lee McGlamery ’86 & Mrs. Mary Ann McGlamery Dr. Gerald G. McGlamery Jr. ’84 & Mrs. Lynette McGlamery

Noah Mr. Darren Glenn Norris ’82 & Mrs. Kimberly H. Norris Mr. Mark W. Norton ’13 Lt. Col. Mervin Lee Norton ’50

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. William B. Norton ’75 & Mrs. Lori D. Norton ’78

Mr. Harry Glen Rice ’77 & Mrs. Gail G. Rice

Mr. Martin Ogugua Obiozor ’99

Mr. Lee Wiley Richards ’88 & Mrs. Artie Richards

Mr. James Burton Odom ’55 & Mrs. June Odom

Mr. Christopher James Riley ’02 & Mrs. Darcy Delano

Mr. Thomas Freeland Odom Jr. ’87 & Mrs. Katherine McLamb Odom Dr. James Tracy O’Rourke Jr. ’56* & Mrs. Lou Ann Turner O’Rourke ’56 Mr. James Mason Orrison ’85 & Mrs. Donna Marie Orrison

Dr. Christopher Brian Roberts & Mrs. Tracy Roberts

Mr. Kenneth L. Smith Jr. ’78

Mr. Gary Michael Roberts ’80 & Mrs. Mary Burns

Mr. Randy Leon Smith ’76 & Mrs. Patricia Smith Mr. Stephen Craig Smith ’86 & Mrs. Jody A.

Roberts

Mr. Wynton Rex Overstreet ’59 & Mrs. Charlotte

Mr. Richard Young Roberts ’73 & Mrs. Peggy Frew

Owen ’77 Mr. Timothy Ray Owings ’89 & Mrs. Stephanie Owings Mr. Howard E. Palmes ’60 & Mrs. Shirley Palmes

Mr. Jerard Taggart Smith ’97 & Mrs. Cindy Smith Mr. Kenneth Abner Smith ’81 & Mrs. Lyn Smith

Ringer ’59

Mr. James O. Roberts ’87

Williams Overstreet ’60

Smith ’83 Mr. Douglas W. Smith ’12 & Mrs. Jill Smith Mr. Gerald W. Smith ’61 & Mrs. Joyce Carr Smith ’61

Riley Dr. Joyce Reynolds Ringer ’59 & Mr. Kenneth Wayne

Mr. Steve P. Osburne ’65 & Mrs. Bobbie Osburne

Mr. David Kenneth Owen ’77 & Mrs. Olivia Kelley

Mr. David Floyde Smith ’84 & Mrs. Doris Irwin

Smith ’88 Mr. Stephen Linwood Smith ’75 & Mrs. Judith R. Smith ’74

Roberts ’74 Mr. Jeffery Ryan Robinett ’01 & Mrs. Ashley Nunn

Mr. Timothy Scot Smith ’91 & Mrs. Sheila Ransone Smith ’91

Robinett ’01 Mr. Kenneth William Robuck ’81 & Mrs. Cathy Monroe

Mr. William James Smith ’67 & Mrs. Susan C. Smith ’70

Robuck ’81

Mr. Donald James Parke ’82

Mr. A.J. Ronyak & Mrs. Patricia Ronyak

Mr. Zeke Walter L. Smith ’82 & Mrs. Darlene P. Smith

Mr. Jerry D. Parker Jr. ’79 & Mrs. Elizabeth Parker

Mr. William W. Rowell ’78* & Mrs. Karen Harris

Mr. John Albert Smyth Jr. ’70 & Mrs. Melanie Whatley

Mr. Robert Allen Parker ’84 & Mrs. Susan Southerland Parker ’84 Mr. Earl B. Parsons Jr. ’60 & Mrs. Nancy Parsons Mr. Kevin Andrew Partridge ’87 & Mrs. Faye L. Partridge

Smyth ’70

Rowell ’79 Mr. William J. Rowell ’69 & Mrs. Gloria Rowell

Mr. Danny Gerald Snow ’62 & Mrs. Sharon M. Snow

Mr. Kenneth B. Roy Jr. ’50 & Mrs. Nan Christian

Mr. Roger L. Sollie ’74 & Mrs. Kathy H. Sollie Dr. Ryan A. Sothen ’09 & Mrs. Holly Holman

Roy ’53* Mr. James S. Roy ’57* & Mrs. Margaret Roy

Sothen ’03

Ms. Charlotte Howell Rutherford ’77

Mr. Cecil C. Spear Jr. ’57 & Mrs. Joyce Spear

Mr. Matthew Ryan & Mrs. Linda Patterson Ryan ’82

Mr. Mark A. Spencer ’00

Mr. Joseph A. Saiia ’69 & Mrs. Mary Graves Saiia ’69

Dr. Samia I. Spencer & Dr. William A. Spencer*

Mr. William A. Samuel ’75 & Mrs. Laura J. Samuel

Mr. Paul Joseph Spina Jr. ’63 & Mrs. Bena Ann Spina

Mr. Hal N. Pennington ’59 & Mrs. Peggy Pennington

Ms. Regenia Rena Sanders ’95

Mr. Reggie Allen Spivey ’87 & Mrs. Sherri L. Spivey

Mr. Chris J. Peterson ’71 & Mrs. Janice Potts

Mr. Sid Sanders ’62

Mr. Michael George Spoor ’89 & Mrs. Kimberly Berry

Mr. Joseph Stanfield Jr. ’67 & Mrs. Nancy Whiteside Payne Stanfield ’64 Mr. Frederick Allen Pehler Jr. ’77 & Mrs. Rebecca Camp Pehler ’81

Peterson ’74

Mr. Charles Philip Saunders ’74

Mrs. Kathryn Knox Petit ’91

Mr. Thomas Al Saunders Sr. ’62 & Mrs. Beth Saunders

Col. William Wright Petit ’89

Mr. C. David Scarborough ’65 & Mrs. Murriel W.

Mr. Douglas E. Phillpott ’84 & Mrs. Tracy C. Phillpott ’84 Dr. Michael S. Pindzola & Dr. Rebekah Hand Pindzola

Scarborough ’65 Mr. Gary Lee Schatz ’78 & Mrs. Susan Nelson

Spoor ’89 Mr. Eugene Grant Steele ’80 & Mrs. Jacqueline Guthrie Steele ’78 Mr. James Joseph Stevenson Jr. ’71 & Mrs. Janet Stevenson Mr. James H. Stewart Jr. ’60 & Mrs. Zula Stewart

Schatz ’79

Mr. Lonnie H. Pope Sr.

Dr. Richard T. Scott Jr. & Mrs. Blair M. Scott

Mr. John Monro Stickney ’64 & Mrs. Priscilla Stickney

Mr. Jack B. Porterfield III ’75 & Mrs. Rebecca Porterfield

Mr. Donald Reuben Searcy ’84 & Mrs. Alice Johnson

Dr. Linda J. Stone ’79 & Mr. Jeffrey Ira Stone ’79

Mr. Gerald L. Pouncey Jr., Esq. ’82 & Mrs. Bonnie Pouncey

Searcy ’85

Mrs. Susan Nolen Story ’81 & Dr. Joseph Story

Mr. L. Dupuy Sears

Mr. Charles L. Strickland ’68* & Mrs. Charles L.

Mr. William R. Powell ’67 & Mrs. Kathleen Powell

Mrs. Lori Lynne Self ’90 & Mr. Tim Self

Mr. Robert Lyons Prince ’69

Ms. Carol Richelle Sellers ’01

Mr. John David Prunkl ’90 & Mrs. Lisa Christmas

Mr. Thomas D. Senkbeil ’71 & Mrs. Karen Senkbeil

Prunkl ’88 Mr. John Paul Raispis ’83 & Mrs. Jackie Anne Raispis Dr. Polapragada K. Raju Mr. David Fredrick Rankin & Mrs. Jane Copeland Rankin Mrs. Denise Sandlin Raper ’92 & Mr. Greg Raper Mr. Thomas Leonard Ray ’69 & Mrs. Barbara Ray Mr. James Lee Rayburn ’67 & Mrs. Joyce Rayburn Mr. Albert Miles Redd Jr. ’59 & Mrs. Susan Warburton Redd Mr. William Allen Reed ’70 & Mrs. Martha Reimer Reed ’69 Mr. William Burch Reed ’50 & Mrs. Elizabeth Reed Mr. Carl A. Register ’63 & Mrs. Joan T. Register

Mrs. Katherine E. Shafer ’05 & Dr. John Travis Shafer Mr. E. Todd Sharley Jr. ’65 & Mrs. Tempie Bagwell

Strickland Mr. Charles C. Stringfellow ’50* & Mrs. Jane Platt Stringfellow Mr. Thomas D. Stringfellow ’65 & Mrs. Marianne M. Stringfellow ’65 Mr. Jon Stryker

Sharley ’63 Mr. Charles Allen Shaw ’86 & Mrs. Kimberly Popham

Ms. Pat Stryker Mr. John William Sublett Jr. ’79

Shaw Dr. Mark Dewey Shelley II ’93 & Mrs. Elizabeth V.

Dr. Thomas Fletcher Talbot ’52 & Mrs. Donna Klinner Talbot ’57

Shelley Dr. Charles Herbert Shivers ’75 & Mrs. Alisa Walker

Mr. George Harold Talley II ’91 & Mrs. Lisa Hooper Talley Mr. Lois Ray Taunton ’56

Shivers ’75 Mr. William Dean Shultz ’95 & Mrs. Joy R. Shultz

Mr. John Albert Taylor ’53 & Mrs. Mary Taylor*

Mr. John M. Sikes ’60 & Mrs. Sandra Sikes

Mr. Robertson Winn Taylor ’85 & Mrs. Joyce Taylor

Dr. R. E. Simpson ’58 & Mrs. Peggy Fanning

Dr. Sherry Pittman Taylor Mr. Jordon W. Tench ’10 & Mrs. Meghan O’Dwyer

Simpson

Tench ’08

Mr. William R. Register ’56* & Mrs. Jean M. Register

Mrs. Margaret Sizemore

Ms. Mary Nell Reid ’91

Ms. Janine M. Slick

Dr. Mrinal Thakur

Mr. Edgar L. Reynolds ’70* & Mrs. Peggy Reynolds

Mr. David Slovensky ’71

Mr. Jerry Franklin Thomas ’63 & Mrs. Elizabeth R.

Mr. Fred H. Rhinehardt ’54 & Mrs. Barbara Rhinehardt

Mr. Barrett B. Smith ’68 & Ms. Emily J. Adkins

Thomas

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. K-Rob Thomas ’01 & Mrs. Marcia Leatha Thomas ’01 Dr. Jason Bryon Thompson ’93 & Mrs. Tamara Owen

Dr. Robert L. Vecellio & Mrs. Pauline Vecellio*

Mr. Gary L. West ’74 & Mrs. Kathy Ashcraft West ’76

Mr. William Carl Voigt III ’87 & Mrs. Sandra Ryan Voigt

Dr. Randy Clark West ’87 & Mrs. Ronda Vaughn

Mr. Walter Karl Vollberg ’73

West ’85

Col. James S. Voss ’72 & Dr. Suzan Curry Voss ’71

Mr. Leroy L. Wetzel ’59* & Mrs. Nell S. Wetzel

Mr. Stephen F. Thornton ’63 & Mrs. Sharon Thornton

Mr. Ira C. Waddey Jr. ’65 & Mrs. Ann M. Waddey

Mr. Stuart Warren Whatley Jr. ’84 & Mrs. Catherine C.

Ms. Karen Louise Trapane ’82

Mr. James D. Wadsworth ’72 & Ms. Debbie Smith

Mr. Thomas Lanier Traylor ’10 & Mrs. Emily Wood

Mr. Joe W. Waid Jr. ’70 & Mrs. Ann Haynes Waid ’85

Thompson ’97

Traylor ’10 Mr. Daniel Andrew Traynor ’78 & Mrs. Mical A. Traynor ’80 Mr. Darryl Keith Trousdale ’87 & Mrs. Susan D. Trousdale ’92 Mr. Bolton W. Tucker ’08 & Mrs. Lindsay Ille Tucker ’09 Mr. Terry Lee Tucker ’98 & Mrs. Christy Collins Tucker ’97 Dr. Michael Larry Tuggle Sr. ’57 & Mrs. Dede D. Tuggle ’60 Mrs. Laura Crowe Turley ’87 Mr. Dwight J. Turner ’79 Mr. William J. Turner Jr. ’57 & Mrs. Jane Turner ’57 Mr. John W. Turrentine ’69 & Mrs. Jane Hall Turrentine ’68 Mr. George Egbert Uthlaut ’54 & Mrs. Dorothy S. Uthlaut ’54 Mr. Jeffrey Norman Vahle ’85 & Mrs. Harriet Woodbery Vahle ’84 Mr. Mark David Vanstrum ’79 Mr. Michael J. Varagona ’78 & Mrs. Janet W. Varagona ’78 Mr. Gary William Vaughan ’01 & Mrs. Summer E. Vaughan ’01

Dr. William Fred Walker* & Mrs. Myrna McGuire Walker Mr. John Thomas Walter Jr. ’55 & Mrs. Jean Hall Walter ’57 Mr. William J. Ward ’55 & Mrs. Rubilyn Wells Ward Mr. William E. Warnock Jr. ’74 & Mrs. Rebecca C. Warnock Mr. Conner Warren ’67 & Mrs. Dorothy Warren ’69 Mr. J. Ernest Warren ’65 & Mrs. Janice Warren Mr. Marvin Key Warren III ’98 & Dr. Lisa Ann Bradshaw Warren ’01 Mr. Robert Morgan Waters ’71 & Mrs. Linda Barnes Waters ’70

Whatley ’85 Mr. William H. Whitaker Jr. ’55 & Mrs. Margaret R. Whitaker ’56 Mr. Dwight L. Wiggins Jr. ’62 & Mrs. Bonnie Wiggins Lt. Col. Ralph C. Wilkinson ’57 & Mrs. Rosalie A. Wilkinson Mr. Richard D. Williams III ’51 & Mrs. Mary V. Samford Williams* Mr. Trent Edward Williams ’03 & Mr. Lui Rogliano Mr. George Edmond Williamson II ’67 & Mrs. Carol F. Williamson Mr. Clyde E. Wills Jr. ’68 & Mrs. Sue H. Wills Mr. Brock McLaren Wilson ’09 & Mrs. Laura Ann Wilson ’09 Mr. Donald G. Wilson ’58 & Mrs. Dorothy T. Wilson

Mr. Harry W. Watkins Jr. ’57

Mr. Walter Stanley Woltosz ’69 & Mrs. Virginia Woltosz

Mr. John Holman Watson ’60 & Mrs. Gail Pearson

Mr. William B. M. Womack ’75

Watson Mr. Joseph D. Weatherford ’71 & Mrs. Kathy Weatherford

Mr. Norman E. Wood ’72 & Mrs. Victoria Barney Wood Mr. Robert Harrison Wynne Jr. ’68 Mr. Terrell Higdon Yon III ’83 & Mrs. Carmen Yon

Dr. Glenn D. Weathers ’65 & Mrs. Katherine Weathers

Mr. Duane Dale York ’76 & Mrs. Happy Smith York ’78

Mr. Erich Jarvis Weishaupt ’97 & Mrs. Jennifer Fenton

Dr. Gretchen Michele Yost ’87 & Dr. Norman Doggett

Weishaupt Mr. Robert W. Wellbaum III ’93 & Mrs. Christine J. Wellbaum ’93 Mr. James Wade Wesson ’73

KEYSTONE SOCIETY The engineering Keystone Society consists of alumni and friends who recognize the importance of private support in the college’s ongoing success. These members have risen to the challenge of moving the college boldly into the future by making the highest commitment of annual giving – $50,000 or more – to the college’s unrestricted fund over a five-year period. Our sustaining members continue this commitment for more than five years. These gifts allow Auburn Engineering to be nimble in planning and take advantage of emerging educational opportunities. Mr. Thomas Denny Anspach ’94 & Mrs. Aneda Chandler Anspach ’95

Mr. Kevin Thomas Cullinan ’09

Mr. Glenn Harold Guthrie ’62 & Mrs. Carol Guthrie

Mr. William J. Cutts ’55

Mr. Robert Otto Haack Jr. ’83 & Mrs. Margaret Fuller

Mr. Michael Patrick Batey ’79 & Mrs. Elizabeth Batey

Dr. Julian Davidson ’50* & Mrs. Dorothy Davidson

Ms. Leslee Belluchie ’83 & Mr. Rick Knop

Mr. Charles Edward Davis ’59* & Mrs. Charlotte Davis

Mr. Felix C. “Kit” Brendle Jr. ’73 & Mrs. Gail Williams

Mr. Michael Arthur DeMaioribus ’76 & Mrs. Leta

Brendle ’76 Mr. James Harrison Carroll Jr. ’54* & Mrs. Betty McNeice Carroll Mr. Patrick Thomas Carroll ’87 & Mrs. Cynthia L. Carroll Mr. Steven Glenn Cates ’85 & Mrs. Lyn Cates Mr. J. Edward Chapman Jr. ’56 & Mrs. Martha Lee Chapman Mr. Randall Clark Chase ’85 & Mrs. Beth R. Chase Mr. Shawn Edward Cleary ’82 & Mrs. Anne M. Cleary ’82

DeMaioribus Mr. Joe D. Edge ’70 & Mrs. Jayne W. Edge ’71 Mrs. Linda Ann Figg ’81 & Mr. Richard Drew

Hairston Mr. Robert Harding Harris ’47* Mr. William F. Hayes ’65 & Mrs. Patricia Walkden Hayes

Mr. C. Warren Fleming ’43*

Mr. John P. Helmick Jr. ’56 & Mrs. Claudette Helmick

Mr. Phillip Alan Forsythe ’81 & Mrs. Margaret Long

Maj. James M. Hoskins ’81 & Mrs. Bertha T.

Forsythe ’81

Hoskins ’80

Mr. Charles E. Gavin III ’59

Mr. John Kenneth Jones ’59 & Mrs. Jo R. Jones

Mr. Charles E. Gavin IV ’82* & Mrs. Kimberly Kocian

Mr. Byron R. Kelley ’70 & Mrs. Melva B. Kelley

Gavin ’83 Mr. Gary Ross Godfrey ’86 & Mrs. Carol J. Godfrey ’86

Mr. James L. Cooper Jr. ’81 & Mrs. Anna B. Cooper

Mr. Ralph B. Godfrey ’64 & Mrs. Lynda Godfrey

Mr. Joseph Lamar Cowan ’70 & Mrs. Jo Ann

Mr. Christopher Lynn Golden ’96 & Mrs. Carmen

Culpepper Cowan ’69

Haack ’83 Mr. William George Hairston III ’67 & Mrs. Paula

Ingrando Golden

Mr. Lester Killebrew Sr. ’68 & Mrs. Catherine V. Killebrew ’69 Dr. Oliver D. Kingsley Jr. ’66 & Mrs. Vandalyn Kingsley Mr. Minga Cecil LaGrone Jr. ’51* & Mrs. Novan LaGrone Gov. William Byron Lee ’81 & Mrs. Maria Dinenna Lee B old = su st ai n i n g m e m be r

74

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CUPOLA REPORT Mr. Ronald Craig Lipham ’74 & Mrs. Lynda Lipham

Mr. Earl B. Parsons Jr. ’60 & Mrs. Nancy Parsons

Mr. Thomas M. Lowe Jr. ’49* & Mrs. Bettye

Mr. Daniel J. Paul Jr. ’64* & Mrs. Nancy Moses

Mr. John Albert Smyth Jr. ’70 & Mrs. Melanie Whatley Smyth ’70 Mr. Paul Joseph Spina Jr. ’63 & Mrs. Bena Ann Spina

Paul ’64

Mathison Lowe Mr. John Andrew MacFarlane ’72 & Mrs. Anne Warren MacFarlane ’73 Dr. Michael B. McCartney ’57 & Mrs. Virginia V.

Mr. Hal N. Pennington ’59 & Mrs. Peggy Pennington

Mr. James H. Stewart Jr. ’60 & Mrs. Zula Stewart

Mr. Gerald L. Pouncey Jr. ’82 & Mrs. Bonnie Pouncey

Dr. Linda J. Stone ’79 & Mr. Jeffrey Ira Stone ’79

Mr. Richard Davison Quina ’48* & Mrs. Marjorie Quina

Mr. Anthony Joseph Topazi ’73* & Mrs. Patricia C.

Mr. Thomas Leonard Ray ’69 & Mrs. Barbara Ray

McCartney Mr. Charles Douglas McCrary ’73 & Mrs. Phyllis

Mr. William Jasper Reaves ’57 & Mrs. Emily T.

Uthlaut ’54

Reaves ’58

McCrary Mr. James D. McMillan ’61 & Mrs. Paula Stapp

Mr. William Burch Reed ’50 & Mrs. Elizabeth Reed Mr. Carl A. Register ’63 & Mrs. Joan T. Register

McMillan ’65

Topazi ’73 Mr. George Egbert Uthlaut ’54 & Mrs. Dorothy S. Mr. Jeffrey Norman Vahle ’85 & Mrs. Harriet Woodbery Vahle ’84

Mr. Joe T. McMillan ’58 & Mrs. Billie Carole McMillan

Mr. Edgar L. Reynolds ’70* & Mrs. Peggy Reynolds

Mr. Mark David Vanstrum ’79

Mr. William R. McNair ’68 & Mrs. Lana McNair

Mr. Harry Glen Rice ’77 & Mrs. Gail G. Rice

Mr. William J. Ward ’55 & Mrs. Rubilyn Wells Ward

Mr. Morris G. Middleton ’61

Mr. Richard Young Roberts ’73 & Mrs. Peggy Frew

Mr. William E. Warnock Jr. ’74 & Mrs. Rebecca C.

Mr. Charles Donald Miller ’80 & Mrs. Lisa Q. Miller

Warnock

Roberts ’74

Mr. Joseph Austin Miller ’83 & Mrs. Donna J. Miller ’84

Mr. Charles Philip Saunders ’74

Mr. Leroy L. Wetzel ’59 & Mrs. Nell S. Wetzel

Mr. David R. Motes ’77

Mr. George M. Sewell ’59* & Mrs. Rita Gillen Sewell

Mr. Dwight L. Wiggins Jr. ’62 & Mrs. Bonnie Wiggins

Dr. Robert Mark Nelms ’80

Mr. Albert James Smith Jr. ’47* & Mrs. Julia

Mr. Walter Stanley Woltosz ’69 & Mrs. Virginia Woltosz

Mr. David Kenneth Owen ’77 & Mrs. Olivia Kelley Owen ’77

Collins Smith ’99* Mr. Douglas W. Smith ’12 & Mrs. Jill Smith

Mr. Howard E. Palmes ’60 & Mrs. Shirley Palmes

Mr. Zeke Walter L. Smith ’82 & Mrs. Darlene P. Smith

PLANNED GIFTS Planned gifts are pledged today to benefit the college in the future. These gifts include bequests, life income plans, charitable gift annuities, IRA distributions and gifts of life insurance. Planned gifts enable donors to manage their investments while leaving a lasting legacy for Auburn Engineering. The following were established in 2019: Mr. John P. Anderson ’76 & Mrs. Cynthia Mace

Mr. Albert E. Hay ’67 Mr. James Hecathorn & Mrs. Barbara Lynn

Anderson ’76 Mr. James O’Neal Ballenger ’59 & Mrs. Bettye

Mr. John Andrew MacFarlane ’72 & Mrs. Anne Warren MacFarlane ’73 Mr. Dwayne Lawson Maddron ’84

Hecathorn ’83 Mr. Thomas A. Hereford Jr. ’74

Mr. William R. McNair ’68 & Mrs. Lana McNair

Mr. Ben Beasley ’65

Ms. Kathryn L. Johnson ’78

Mr. Michael L. Neighbors ’76 & Mrs. Kathy Flournoy

Mr. Robert Lee Bishop Jr. ’79 & Mrs. Sara Ann Bishop

Mr. James L. Killian III & Mrs. Karen Killian

Mr. Patrick L. Byrne ’71

Mr. Rainer Lukoschek ’85 & Mrs. Jill Prettyman

Bowman Ballenger ’59

Mr. Thomas M. Frassrand ’76 & Ms. Claudia J. Cola

Neighbors ’75 Mr. Walter Stanley Woltosz ’69 & Mrs. Virginia Woltosz

Lukoschek ’85

Mrs. Gwenn Smith Freeman ’73

We have made every attempt to accurately reflect donor information. If you notice a discrepancy, please contact Rachel SoloRio in the Office of Engineering Development at 334-844-2736 or rachelsolorio@auburn.edu.

ENG. AUBURN.EDU

For a listing of donors who gave prior to 2019, please see previous Spring issues of the Cupola Report at eng.auburn.edu/magazine.

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