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NEXT WEEK: FALL SIMCHA CELEBRATIONS

VOL. XCIV NO. 34 | ARTS & CULTURE

The Inside Story on Marilyn Monroe's Life as a Jew

RABBIS GIVE NOTICE

CONGREGATION OR HADASH PLANS TO SEARCH FOR NEW LEADERSHIP.

THE LOWDOWN

I BET YOU DIDN'T KNOW THIS ABOUT LINDY AND NORMAN RADOW.

SPIZMAN’S NEW BOOK

NEW RELEASE DEMONSTRATES LOVING LOUDLY AND SHOWING KINDNESS.

AUGUST 30, 2019 | 29 AV 5779


2 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


PUBLISHER MICHAEL A. MORRIS michael@atljewishtimes.com

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Contributors This Week BOB BAHR FLORA ROSEFSKY MARCIA CALLER JAFFE MARTINE TARTOUR TERRY SEGAL

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Creative Minds Jewish artists, celebs and authors abound. But some may be surprised to learn the connections a few of our biggest stars have with the faith. For starters, find out how the blond sex symbol on the cover of our Arts & Culture issue related with her Judaism. Another little-known discovery may be that author Virginia Woolf had a Jewish husband. We understand that pop artist Andy Warhol had a contentious interest in famous Jewish subjects, including Marilyn Monroe, but what you’ll learn if you visit a local art museum is his fascination with the West. In this issue, we also preview a new film about actor Anton Yelchin of “Star Trek” fame and a retrospective on the life of Oscar-winning writer, director and producer Billy Wilder at Emory University. You’ll learn about two budding talents showing their work at Intown Chabad’s first art and photography exhibit. Artist-freelancer Flora Rosefsky introduces us to the messagedriven work of two photographers, both influenced by Holocaust memories and trauma. Talking about powerful words and artistry, our latest Meet the Press is one of our

most prolific writers. Marcia Caller-Jaffe is known for many of our standing features, including those in this issue, such as Chai Style Homes, The Lowdown, dining reviews and coverage of events around town. This week she also catches up with a retiring Atlanta Symphony Orchestra violinist and talks with gift-giving guru Robyn Spizman about her new book on the benefits of loving-kindness. Showing personal TLC could mean discovering a new restaurant. AJT staffers Jen Evans and Michal Bonell bring us their latest “On the Town,” spotlighting Hampton + Hudson Community Bar and Restaurant in Inman Park. In this week’s news, we reveal that a husband-wife rabbi duo is making aliyah. Change is as inevitable as a touch of cold at summer’s end, offering a hint of the upcoming fall. Right in time for our fall simcha celebration issue. Always the promise of new festivity on the horizon. ■ Correction and Clarification: In a story in last week’s issue, “A Different Door V’dor,” the correct maiden name of the artist’s wife is Lidia Greszes.

THIS WEEK

Cover Photo: Marilyn Monroe 1926 — 1962. // Getty image.

CONTENTS LOCAL NEWS���������������������������������� 4 ISRAEL NEWS��������������������������������� 8 OPINION����������������������������������������� 10 ARTS & CULTURE������������������������ 12 DINING�������������������������������������������� 22 CHAI STYLE����������������������������������� 23 COMMUNITY��������������������������������� 26 CALENDAR������������������������������������� 30 KEEPING IT KOSHER������������������ 32 BRAIN FOOD���������������������������������� 33 OBITUARIES���������������������������������� 34 CLOSING THOUGHTS����������������� 36

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LOCAL NEWS Celebrating Birthright's Success

Chair Doug Ross chats with Mark Holzberg about the rapid growth of Birthright Israel.

Event co-chairs were: Seth and Lisa Greenberg, Rob and Michelle Leven, Gary and Michelle Simon, and Beth and Gregg Paradies.

Dr. Larry Cooper poses with Harry Maziar, the original chair of Birthright Israel’s Southeast region.

By Marcia Caller Jaffe Birthright Israel Foundation hosted an evening of celebration to thank Atlanta leadership and highlight achievements over the last several years. It was a glistening evening at dusk looking out of The Grand Pavilion at Ray’s on the River onto the green sparkling breadth of the Chattahoochee River. This event is always special because it features the young folks who have experienced Birthright Israel and what it means to them, layered in with leaders such as Doug Ross, the Atlanta chair of Birthright Israel, Harry Maziar, the former chair, and Mike Leven, who represented the national Birthright board. Co-chairs for the evening were: Lisa and Seth Greenberg, Michelle and Rob Leven, Beth and Gregg Paradies, and Michelle and Gary Simon. During the event, Michelle Leven announced that

Birthright Israel last year raised the trip eligibility from 18 to 26 years of age by piloting a program for those 27 to 32 years old. Restaurateur Ray Schoenbaum welcomed the crowd with special recognition of his machatunim, inlaws through marriage, Sandra and Clive Bank, whose A Kosher Touch catered the event. “It’s great both of us are in the food business and have no competition,” Schoenbaum said. Tables abounded with artful sushi, chicken shawarma, potato latkes, pareve sour cream, spinach strudel and open-faced tenderloin sandwiches. “I think Birthright is a beautiful thing, as it lifts up the Jewish people in general,” he said. Carole-Ann Levine, vice president of Birthright Israel Southeast, was on hand in the cocktail hour. “Atlanta in the Southeast region is really the jewel in the crown. Doug Ross has really led the charge for seven years and

really brought out the crowd tonight, … more successful, beyond words, in connecting young adults with lay and alumni leaders.” Maziar, the original Birthright Israel Southeast chair, echoed her statements. “Picking Doug Ross as my successor seven years ago was one of the best recruits in my entire career.” Always the life of the party, Mike Leven spoke of witnessing the changes in Atlanta Birthright through the years. He recalled the Canadian liquor magnate Charles Bronfman’s book on giving, “Distilled: A Memoir of Family, Seagram, Baseball, and Philanthropy,” quoting Bronfman when he spoke at the 2015 Atlanta Birthright event for 400 at The St. Regis Atlanta hotel. Bronfman later included the event in his book as a positive example of philanthropy. Leven further correlated Birthright Israel with silver compared to gold “because silver tarnishes and must be constantly tended, … like our connection to G-d and Israel.” He closed by jokingly offering Schoenbaum a discount on a Vegas hotel suite for hosting such a grand event at Ray’s (Noting Leven’s affiliation with the Sands Corp.). Next up were facts about Birthright Israel from the Beth and Gregg Paradies: “In the past 20 years, 700,000 have gone on Birthright Israel, 9,000 from Atlanta. 1 in 5 Birthright alum married another alum. It costs approximately $3,000 to send one participant. Niche trips make up 25 percent of the offerings each year: culinary, arts, yoga, LGBTQ, medical students – all tailoring to special interests. The first ad asking for Birthright participants ran in ‘Rolling Stone’ magazine in 1999.” Recent Birthright Israel participants spoke confidently and passionately: “Growing up, all I remember of my Jewish identify was lox, matzah and my grandparents cussing in Yiddish,” said Melissa McGrath. “Birthright was magical and changed my life.” Max Greenberg and Kyle Simon “can’t wait to go back.” Benji Sklar stole the stage, talking about his emotional time at the Western Wall next to an Israel Defense Forces soldier. He decided subsequently to enlist himself as an IDF paratrooper, going many nights without sleep, but secure in his passion for Israel and in his brotherhood bond with Birthright Israel. Ross, who is also on the national board, said that there was much work to be done and “We need your help, … growing from 75 participants in 2012 to 430 participants in 2018. We need to take care of our own. …These kids return from Israel motivated and inspired. Sometimes donors from other cities are paying [for Atlanta trips]. I challenge you to make a direct and tangible investment in the Atlanta Jewish community.”■

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LOCAL NEWS

National Security Expert Talks Foreign Policy and More By Eddie Samuels Born in Atlanta, Jenna Ben-Yehuda has made her way around the world and now serves as CEO and president of the Truman Center and the Truman National Security Project. She was back in her hometown this week and spoke to the AJT about foreign policy and national security and the role that they play in the lead-up to the 2020 elections. Ben-Yehuda spent over a decade at the State Department in a range of policy, programmatic and intelligence roles, including serving at the U.S. embassies in Panama and the Dominican Republic. She stepped into her current role this spring.

Ben-Yehuda with former DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson and Truman Center Board Chair Stephen Bailey at TruCon.

embassies in the DR [Dominican Republic] and Panama for various stints before moving to the policy side, where I managed democracy and governance policy for the 35 nations of the Western Hemisphere.

sues domestically have strong ties to international ones. One thing we’ve seen in the Trump administration is how much latitude the U.S. president has to make decisions on foreign policy.

AJT: What does your current work AJT: What appealed to you about a career in international relations and for- entail? Ben-Yehuda: Together our sister oreign policy? Ben-Yehuda: My maternal great- ganizations have a nationwide membergrandfather, a rabbi in Savannah, was ship of policy experts, veterans, defense, originally from Lithuania. So that story communications and campaign profesabout coming from another country was sionals all working to advance a progresa central part of my family’s history. And sive vision of national security. I work to set the strategic vision for the on my father’s side, I’m the granddaughter of a Holocaust survivor. So I was work that we do. For example, right now in keenly aware of how global issues can the midst of the run up to a presidential election, we’re working to educate affect people in their daily campaigns to help get them lives. smart on the issues. We moved to Southern And I’m in Atlanta meetCalifornia and I was iming with our local chapter. mersed in the Latino culture and started learning SpanAJT: What does a local ish when I was in seventh chapter do? grade, and I fell in love with Ben-Yehuda: We have 16 Jenna Ben-Yehuda it. Here’s a community of chapters around the country, people who love food and music and are very family-oriented, just like the Jewish and the Atlanta chapter reflects our members in metro Atlanta. Many of them are community that I knew growing up! I continued my Spanish studies academics and business leaders and othalongside international affairs, and I ers are running for Congress. Brenda Lolived overseas and started at the State pez [Romero], Michael Owens and Scott Department when I was 20 years old be- Holcomb are just a few. They focus on issues that affect Georcause I had language skills and they had gia while also discussing the national sea shortage of people who spoke Spanish. curity and foreign policy implications.

AJT: What have you taken away from Truman Center’s efforts to inform the debate on national security in the run-up to 2020? Ben-Yehuda: There is broad consensus on the key national security policies — climate, Iran, support for diplomacy — amongst the major Democratic candidates. Except for this president — who is a tremendous aberration — there has long been broad bipartisan consensus on

AJT: Tell us a little about your time at the State Department. Ben-Yehuda: I was there for 12 years and worked in four bureaus and two embassies. I started working in international parental child abduction in Latin America and West and North Africa, helping children who had been taken by one parent against the wishes of another to bring them back to the United States. I went on to work in the refugee bureau helping displaced people from Colombia as well as mass-migration contingency planning for Cuba. I was an intelligence analyst for five years on Haiti, the Caribbean and Central America. I worked in

Ben-Yehuda Speaks at this year’s Truman Conference.

a range of foreign policy issues. For example, NATO [North Atlantic Treaty Organization] was not a political issue before this president. He made it that way. Among the candidates it really is unsurprising how much agreement there is that the U.S. needs to engage with its allies and not just do it alone. AJT: What do you foresee being the biggest threat the U.S. faces in the coming years? Ben-Yehuda: Climate, without a doubt. ■ This interview was edited for clarity and length.

AJT: What are some of the critical foreign policy and national security issues that are likely to arise with the upcoming election? Ben-Yehuda: While foreign policy and national security have not been significant topics in the debates, I’m holding out hope that the debate in September will change that. The reality is that issues regarding foreign policy impact Americans every single day. The president’s trade war with China is changing prices for farmers, manufacturers and consumers all over the country. The world marches on, and it’s marching on without us. All of the big isATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 5


LOCAL NEWS

Rabbis Bortz, Karpuj Preparing to Make Aliyah By Eddie Samuels It has been a bittersweet week at Congregation Or Hadash, as Rabbis Analia Bortz and Mario Karpuj announced that they are preparing to make aliyah and will be leaving the synagogue by the end of 2020. They announced that transition in a letter to congregants Aug. 22. “With G-d’s help, in the next 18 months we will celebrate our respective 54th birthdays — our third round of chai years. … As we approach, G-d willing, our fourth round of chai years, we have decided that it is time to realize our lifelong dream of making aliyah so that we may live our next chapter in the State of Israel,” the letter read. Or Hadash President Ben Nadler explained that he first found out about their intentions just over a month ago. “We sat down to talk about contract extensions, and iron out the details, and they said, ‘This is very hard for us,’ and I knew right away what they were going to say,” Nadler said, emotions clearly running high. “There has been a lot of sadness and joy at the same time,” Or Hadash Executive Director Scott Allen said of staff reactions to the news. “I think a lot of people expected them to wind up in Israel at some point. We’ve always expected that would be in their future.” The rabbis were careful to note, in speaking to the AJT, that they deliberately left time to make the transition smooth and that their focus would not be shifting

from the day to day. “We really expect this process to be as organic as possible because we are not leaving tomorrow,” Bortz said. “This motivates us to bring even more energy to everything that happens in the next 18 months to make the transition even better. Our personality is to be committed until the last day.” Karpuj added that while the next few days would likely involve a lot of discussion of the next steps, they have to return to business as usual, at least for the time being. “We expect we’ll be talking about it a lot over the next four or five days and then we have to get back to preparing for the High Holidays,” he said. “We’re not leaving any time soon.” Nadler explained that the expectation would be that a job posting for the next rabbi would go up in the late fall after gathering community sentiment. “We want to spend a few months getting input on what they’re envisioning in our future spiritual leadership and what they want us to prioritize,” he said. “Nothing will be finalized until we hear from our congregants.” Bortz and Karpuj are the congregation’s first rabbis and have been instrumental in building Or Hadash since its early days. They have seen transitions from the basement of Sandy Springs United Methodist Church to their own space at The Weber School and now into their newest home, a space of their own. Karpuj said that the original idea to form a congre-

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Rabbis Analia Bortz and Mario Karpuj

gation “was a crazy idea from a crazy small group…” “Of dreamers,” Bortz interjected. “Crazy dreamers,” Karpuj said, laughing, “with two crazy rabbi dreamers with them. I think if you didn’t know anything about us and you ask how long Or Hadash has been here, it would be a surprise to learn it’s only been 17 years.” Bortz agreed and noted that the fine details are where she sees the biggest difference. “The president of our shul is someone who we married and did his baby namings and saw his kids growing up,” she said. “It changes you forever and becomes a part of who you are, seeing the whole lifecycle of a family.” Nadler noted that the growth of lay leadership has been one of the biggest changes since the congregation took off, something Bortz echoed. “It really has gone from a rabbi-centric community to a kehillat-centric one,” she said. “That really was the best change in the last 17 years.” When asked what they would miss the most about their congregation, the tears began flowing. “This is our home and our family and we will miss them in every way,” Karpuj said, clearly emotional. “I have never seen this guy cry so much in one week,” Bortz joked. As far as what accomplishments they are most proud of, Karpuj explained that pride wasn’t the word they would use. “I’m thankful in ways I cannot express, blessed and rewarded,” he said. “This is hands-down the most rewarding experience we’ve had in our working lives.” Bortz explained that their choice 17 years ago to take positions at Or Hadash was not an easy one, but one for which they remain grateful. “I always said that this congregation is like sifting for the gold of the Jewish people,” she said. “I have never met a better congregation.” ■


ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 7


ISRAEL PRIDE

News From Our Jewish Home In interviews with Yeshiva World News and Israel National News, he said he bought the ticket in a store in the town’s center while doing his weekly grocery shopping. After his business went bankrupt, he was going through significant financial challenges and thanked G-d for his newfound luck, while also noting he intended to share a generous tip with the store owner. YouTube screengrab // A Haredi man

going by “Ashkenazi Siman Tov” shows off his winning ticket in an interview with Yeshiva World News.

Struggling Israeli Scores Big

An impoverished ultra-Orthodox man living in the central Israel town of Bnei Brak won more than $140,000 on a scratch-off lottery ticket last week. The $15 longshot was purchased on a whim, and was the first lottery ticket the man had ever bought, according to reports. He goes by the name Ashkenazi Siman Tov, the latter words meaning “good sign” and often used alongside mazel tov.

Today in Israeli History

Ogen’s First Bank Extends Credit

Israel is in the process of building its first social bank, Ogen, which extends low-interest loans to small businesses, first-time homeowners and nonprofits that might otherwise have a hard time finding credit. “We expect to get a license from the capital markets regulator to start giving out loans very, very soon,” Sagi Balasha, the CEO of Ogen, told The Times of Israel. Ogen originated as an organization that provided interest-free credit cards to new immigrants and marginalized the final time. Its majority report, endorsed by eight of the 11 nations on the panel, calls for Palestine’s partition into two states with an economic union. The minority report, backed by Iran, India and Yugoslavia, calls for a federation of Jewish and Arab states.

Matson Photo Service via the Library of Congress // Harold MacMichael, the high

commissioner for Palestine, poses in the sunken garden of his official residence.

Aug. 30, 1944: Rattled by numerous attempts on his life and fearing for the safety of his family, Harold MacMichael resigns as Britain’s fifth high commissioner to Palestine after more than six years, a period of increasing restrictions on Jewish immigration. His refusal to allow entry to the 800 refugees aboard the Struma, which then sank in the Black Sea, and his focus on the economic needs of Arabs were among his actions that angered the Jewish population. Aug. 31, 1947: The U.N. Special Committee on Palestine, formed four months earlier to investigate violence and recommend the next political steps for the British-administered region, meets for 8 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Chaim Weizmann’s chemistry abili ties helped gain him a role in supplying explosives for the British military during World War I.

Sept. 1, 1915: Chaim Weizmann, who is credited with playing a key diplomatic role in the issuance of the Balfour Declaration more than two years later, is appointed as an honorary technical adviser to the British Admiralty on the supply of acetone, an important ingredient in the manufacture of the military explosive cordite. Weizmann, a chemist in Manchester, England, has developed an improved process for acetone production.

groups in Israel, and under Balasha, is transitioning to this new business model with the goal of still helping these groups. Ogen, “anchor” in Hebrew, has provided more than $300,000 through more than 60,000 interest-free loans and has a default rate of less than 1 percent, according to its statistics. Raised from donations from the U.S., Israel, Canada and the United Kingdom, it launched in the early 1990s as Israel Free Loan Association, when immigrants from the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia were building new homes and in need of resources to get on their feet. “Low-income people, uneducated people and new immigrants who don’t know the language, and Haredi (ultraOrthodox) Jews and Arabs and all others, people that are marginalized, they have a really hard time,” Balasha said. “Their social mobility is blocked by a lack of access to credit.”

Intel Launches Artificial Intelligence Chip

As big a power player in the Israeli

Sept. 2, 1935: An estimated 80,000 mourners, roughly a quarter of the Jewish population of the Land of Israel, line the streets of Jerusalem for the funeral of Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook, who died of cancer the previous day. Kook, who made aliyah from Latvia in 1904, was appointed the British Mandate’s first Ashkenazi chief rabbi in 1921. Unlike many Orthodox leaders at the time, he supported the Zionist movement as a step toward divine redemption. Sept. 3, 2011: More than 450,000 Israelis take to the streets around the country in the largest demonstration in Israel’s history, billed as the March of the Million. It is part of a summer of social justice demonstrations focused on affordable housing and relief from the high cost of living. Under the slogan “The government only understands the numbers,” march leaders demand changes from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Sept. 4, 1975: Israel and Egypt in Geneva sign the Second Disengagement Agreement (Sinai II), brokered by U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger through shuttle diplomacy since March 1975. The deal includes Israeli withdrawal from the Sinai’s Abu Rudeis oil fields and Mitla and Gidi passes and the creation of a U.N.-monitored buffer zone. The First Disengagement Agreement,

tech scene as anyone, Intel is launching its first artificial intelligence processor, the tech giant announced Aug. 20. Developed in Haifa, the chip is known as NNPT or Springhill, and is intended for large computing centers. Containing a 10 nanometer Ice Lake processor, the chip can undertake immense workloads with minimal energy use, according to The Jerusalem Post. Intel’s first AI product comes after the investment of $120 million in three AI startups in Israel. “In order to reach a future situation of ‘AI everywhere,’ we have to deal with huge amounts of data generated and make sure organizations are equipped with what they need to make effective use of the data and process them where they are collected,” said Naveen Rao, general manager of Intel’s artificial intelligence products group. The chip will be integral in processors at large companies with needs for complicated computations in AI in the coming years. ■ Compiled by AJT Staff. signed in January 1974, led both sides to pull troops back from the Suez Canal.

The Israeli Olympic team poses with the cast of a Munich performance of “Fiddler on the Roof” on Sept. 4, 1972, hours before the Sept. 5 attack by Black September.

Sept. 5, 1972: Palestinian terrorists with Black September kill two Israeli Olympic team members and take nine others hostage during the Summer Games in Munich. The terrorists demand the release of 236 prisoners and a plane to take them and the hostages to Egypt. The nine hostages and five of the eight terrorists are killed during a botched German rescue attempt at the Munich airport. The other three terrorists are captured but are released the next month after the hijacking of another airliner. ■ Items are provided by the Center for Israel Education (www. israeled.org), where you can find more details.


Jerusalem Film Festival Highlights By Martine Tartour The 36th edition of the Jerusalem Film Festival ended earlier this month. Let’s look back at the event and some Israeli movies and documentaries that might be found at the next Atlanta Jewish Film Festival. Since 1984, for 10 days all around Jerusalem, films are shown on the various screens of the Cinematheque and in theaters associated with this event. It is an international festival that introduces not only Israeli works, but a selection of 150 films from all around the world, from contemporary to documentary, from full-length to short. Unlike the Cannes Film Festival, which gave Lia van Leer the idea of creating the Jerusalem Film Festival, a real freedom blooms here. Professionals rub shoulders with film lovers, as well as with the many students who were able to purchase a $30 pass. If in the past few years we could see Quentin Tarantino with his young Israeli wife, or Jeff Goldblum graciously allowing himself to be photographed, this year international stars were not as present as in the past. We had to settle for Dr. Ruth, the famous nonagenarian sexologist who came to present the documentary that traces her life. But that didn’t matter. It was Lior Ashkenazi, star actor in Israel, who presented the opening film at the Sultan’s Pool, outdoor gardens facing the Old City: “Parasite,” by Joon-ho Bong. The Korean movie is a major success in every country it has been released. Be prepared for the American release Oct. 11 to be amazed as well in Atlanta. In fact, Hollywood has already started planning an American remake. The Jerusalem festival includes several awards: 1 million shekels (about $300,000) in cash prizes are awarded in various competitions. Among them:

documentary films, dedicated to international documentary filmmaking; The Jewish Experience, dealing with issues of Jewish identity and history; In the Spirit of Freedom, concerned with questions of freedom and human rights; and, of course, Israeli film. During his opening remarks, Israeli president Reuven Rivlin announced a new cinema prize named after his wife, Nechama, who died this year on her 74th birthday. Even if we were in the holy city of Jerusalem, there is no censorship of the selected films. For instance, the Swedish film “Queen of Hearts,” (which includes very graphic sex — a woman seducing her teenage stepson), shocked a number of people, but there is no way to refuse even an X-rated film. And here are the award winners: Among the eight Israeli films presented, the very efficient “Chained” by Yaron Shani won the prize for best film. A bullying cop (extraordinary Eran Naim awarded for best actor) dreams of having a child with his new wife. When two teenagers accuse him of sexual harassment, he loses his job and his authority. As Shani expressed in the Berlin Film Festival, where the movie was selected, he “tried to understand what happens when a policeman loses his job, in real life, in Israel.” A charming discovery this year, “Born in Jerusalem and Still Alive,” by Yossi Atia and David Ofek, won the prize for Best First Film. It details a young man’s attempt (Atia) to rid himself of anxiety attacks by guiding tourists in Jerusalem following the footsteps of the Palestinian suicide bombings that had occurred in the area during the years 2000 to 2005. And despite the subject, it is a romantic comedy! “God of the Piano” by Itay Tal is a very touching movie. The best actress award went to Naama Preis (wife of the talented Israeli movie director Nadav

ISRAEL NEWS

Lapid). When she learns that her newborn child is deaf, a concert pianist uses desperate measures. We won’t say which ones. No spoilers! Not surprisingly, the music is superb. No award, but very applauded was “The Day After I’m Gone” by Nimrod Eldar : Yoram (Menashe Noy) and his 17-year-old daughter Roni (Zohar Meidan) barely talk. He believes she has reached the “age of ungratefulness.” Yoram finds it easier to text her that dinner is ready rather than call her. Neither father nor daughter shows any willingness to break the cycle of noncommunication. On the Israeli documentaries side, “One Hundred Percent” by Yael Kipper was awarded the prize for best documentary. The Druze populated village of Beit Jann holds the highest record of high

school graduates in Israel and possibly the world. Magnificent. “A Fish Tale” by Emmanuelle Mayer, highlighting minority populations, received the best documentary in this category. Johnny lives in Israel, but dreams of returning to Africa to use the modern fish farming techniques he has learned in Israel. His wife, Thérèse, sees little hope back in Africa; she is determined to stay for her children. After their visas expire, the tensions in the couple arise. Although it didn’t receive any award, “Lieber-man” by Nurit Kedar, the realistic portrait of the politician who arrived in Israel without a shekel and became a political leader, got major audience reaction. We can’t wait for the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival! ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 9


OPINION

Letter to the editor:

Dr. Deborah Lipstadt, distinguished Holocaust scholar and Emory University professor of Jewish studies, has released her newest book, “Anti-Semitism Here and Now.” She told Bob Bahr, a local journalist, that her message today is that the new antiSemitism is like the old anti-Semitism in many ways. “It is rooted in the New Testament and demonizes Jews for their rejection of the Christian messiah.” According to the ADL, the anti-Semitic marches in Charlottesville, Va., of Aug. 1112, 2017, inspired the violence in Parkland, Pittsburgh, Poway and, recently, in El Paso. The white supremists were chanting, “Jews will not replace us! You will not replace us.” Dr. Lipstadt states that today’s racism and violence is nothing new. She makes an analogy that anti-Semitism is like a piano on which different tunes can be played but the instrument remains the same. So, we have Ilhan Omar from Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan spewing their vile hatred of Israel and Jews. Joining them are the Democratic women, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts. Omar joined with Georgian Congressman John Lewis to write a BDS bill trying to hide the intentions of trying to destroy Israel through this movement. We also have NO condemnation of anti-Semitism from Speaker Nancy Pelosi. We have DEAD silence from Jewish Sen. Chuck Schumer and Congressman Jerry Nadler of New York and other Democrats in Congress. Are they afraid to speak up against anti-Semitism from these four? Are they more concerned about being liked and not wanting to hurt their future re-election campaigns? Do they really care about their Jewish constituents and Israel, our only ally in the Middle East? Is power more important? We have DEAD silence while the Democratic House is preparing a bill to give American taxpayer money, through a government agency, to the Palestinian Authority, so they can continue their “pay for slay” program. Believe me, not one cent has gone to their people to alleviate their squalid living conditions. Dead Israelis cannot cry out about the injustice of subsidizing the families of those who kill Jews. However, WE can cry out and SHOULD cry out about this. However, DEAD silence. Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib wanted to visit Israel as a propaganda tool against Israel and Jews. When Ms. Tlaib was given permission by Israel to visit her elderly grandmother for humanitarian reasons, she declined because she was asked not to make any negative, political remarks against Israel. Years ago, Georgia Democratic Congressman Hank Johnson made his first trip to Israel. He came back not inspired, not balanced about the situation there, but came back and called Jews “termites.” Today’s Democratic Party is NOT the party of our parents or grandparents. It has become the party of hate, the party of divisiveness, the party of anti-Semites and Jew haters, the party of slavery of the past, hijacked by the younger radicals and leftists in the party. No Jew should vote Democratic today. We must stop the silence because we want to be liked by the non-Jews and our fear of rocking the boat. We must open our eyes and see the reality and climate of Jew-haters in the Democratic party. Anti-Semitism is on the rise in Europe and here. Wake up to this reality. Do not be the Jews of Germany who wanted to be good citizens, thinking they would be protected. They ended up with the Nuremberg Laws of 1935, Hitler, yimach shemo [may his name be erased] and the Holocaust. My husband and I are both children of Holocaust survivors who lost most of their families in the Shoah. The Democratic party is no longer a party for Jews. No matter if you like who is in the White House, who happens to be the greatest friend of Israel, or not, no Jew can vote Democratic anymore. Chaya Leah Starkman, Atlanta

The AJT welcomes your letters. We want our readers to have an opportunity to engage with our community in constructive dialogue. If you would like your letter to be published, please write 200 words or less, include your name, phone number and email, and send it to editor@atljewishtimes.com. 10 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


2019–2020

Candler Concert Series

Kronos Quartet with Mahsa Vahdat September 14, 2019 at 8:00 p.m. Brad Mehldau, piano and Ian Bostridge, tenor October 18, 2019 at 8:00 p.m. Joyce DiDonato In War and Peace: Harmony Through Music November 3, 2019 at 7:00 p.m. Royal Philharmonic Orchestra with Khatia Buniatishvili, piano January 15, 2020 at 8:00 p.m.

Jane Bunnett and Maqueque March 19, 2020 at 8:00 p.m.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW 404.727.5050 | arts.emory.edu/AJT

SCHWARTZ CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS

Robert McDuffie, violin and Robert Spano, piano April 10, 2020 at 8:00 p.m.

Joyce DiDonato © Brooke Shaden

Pablo Sáinz Villegas Americano Trio February 29, 2020 at 8:00 p.m.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 11


ARTS & CULTURE The Jewish Marilyn Monroe – Gone but Not Forgotten By Bob Bahr In the late hours of Aug. 5, 1962, Marilyn Monroe took a handful of Nembutal barbiturates, washed it down with a glass of Piper-Heidsieck champagne and died in her sleep. Just over 57 years later, the icon of mid-century glamour is still remembered for the wit, beauty and almost effortless sexuality she brought to a string of Hollywood hits in which she was often cast as the perennial dumb blonde. But often overlooked in an appraisal of her extraordinary career, is the role that Judaism and the American Jewish community played in her life. She converted to Judaism shortly before her marriage in 1956 to Arthur Miller, the Jewish playwright, Pulitzer Prize winner and dramatic genius. He was her third husband. Monroe once told Paula Strasberg, her drama coach at the time, that she felt a special kinship with her newfound faith. “I can identify with the Jews,” she said. “Everybody’s out to get them, no matter what they do, like me.” On the front door of the home where she died, she had affixed a mezuzah with its tiny parchment scroll of sacred Jewish writings. She still had the prayer book with her personal notes written in its pages, a gift from Miller that had once belonged to the Brooklyn synagogue where he had had his bar mitzvah. On her mantle she kept a bronze menorah, which played “Hatikvah,” the national anthem of the State of Israel. It was a present from Miller’s Yiddish-speaking mother. Rabbi Robert Goldburg had worked with her during her conversion and provided her with a number of Jewish historical and religious works to study. About three weeks after her death, he wrote of his impressions of her at the time. “She was aware of the great character that the Jewish people had produced. … She was impressed by the rationalism of Judaism — its ethical and prophetic ideals and its close family life.” For Monroe, who had been born to a single mother with severe psychological illness, had never known her father and was raised in a series of foster homes, the promise of a warm family life was undoubtedly an important part of what attracted 12 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

her to Jewish life. When she rebelled against the exploitation of the Hollywood studio system, broke her contract with 20th Century Fox and fled Hollywood in 1954 for a new life in New York, it was at the urging of Milton Greene, a popular Jewish photographer with whom she founded Marilyn Monroe Productions. For a while she lived with Greene and his wife and helped take care of their year-old son. Even before the move she lived and worked in what was largely a Jewish world. In Hollywood her agent and publicist and an early drama coach and mentor were all Jewish. She owed her early success, in part, to personal relationships with the powerful Jewish studio executive Joseph Schenck and the important talent agent Johnny Hyde, who had originally emigrated from the Jewish Ukraine. Her three psychiatrists were Jewish as well as many of her doctors. One of her closest journalistic confidants was the newspaper columnist Sidney Skolsky. But all that accelerated when she moved to New York and enrolled

in Lee and Paula Strasberg’s Actors Studio, which had trained such stars as Marlon Brando, James Dean and Paul Newman. She quickly fell in with their circle of friends, who made up the theatrical and literary elite of Jewish New York. She volunteered to be the star attraction at a United Jewish Appeal dinner. The poet Norman Rosten and his

wife and children were close friends. She was a regular at a summer of brunches and picnics and cookouts with the Strasbergs in Ocean Beach on Fire Island. She frequently dug into what Paula Strasberg called her “Jewish icebox” there, with its salamis from Zabar’s on New York’s Upper West Side and the honey cakes and fancy European pastries from some of the bakeries started in New York by refugees from Nazi persecution. It was, in the words of one Monroe biographer, “a year of joy,” made even more joyful by a newfound romance with Miller, whose quiet, serious personality she found strangely irresistible. She first met him five years earlier, when she was not yet a star. She told a close friend about the initial meeting, “It was like running into a tree! You know, like a cool drink when you’ve got a fever.” After renewing their friendship in New York, they went for long bike rides in far off corners of Brooklyn, away from the press, and for a while, worked hard to keep their relationship a secret. But by the early summer of 1956, Miller had divorced his wife of 15


ARTS & CULTURE

Both Miller and Monroe had high hopes for their marriage and their professional careers when they married in 1956.

This prayer book, a siddur owned by Monroe with her handwritten notes, sold in 2018 for $18,000.

years, said goodbye to his two children and married Monroe, first in a civil ceremony and then on July 1, under the chuppah at the home of his literary agent. Gloria Steinem, the Jewish American essayist and feminist, wrote a perceptive analysis about the relationship and Monroe’s decision just before their marriage to convert to Judaism. “Miller himself was not religious, but she wanted to be part of his family’s tradition. ‘I’ll cook noodles like your mother,’ she told him on their wedding day. She was optimistic this marriage would work. On the back of a wedding photograph, she wrote ‘Hope, Hope, Hope.’” Her public commitment to Judaism in the mid-50s was just one of the signs that Jews were winning new acceptance in America after the end of World War II and of the changes that the war had brought. American Jews, who had been educated under the GI Bill, were moving up in the world. Anti-Semitic barriers were falling in housing and education, the professions of law and medicine were becoming more open to Jews, and college quotas were, for the most part, ended. So many Jews were moving to new homes in the suburbs that Conservative Judaism was forced to drop its ban on driving to the synagogue on Shabbat. The executive director of the Anti-Defamation League, Benjamin Epstein, called the two decades after the war a “golden age,” in which American Jews “achieved a greater degree of economic and political security and a broader social acceptance than had been known by any Jewish community since the (ancient) Dispersion.” So when Eddie Fisher, the Jewish son of Russian immigrants, married a cute blonde shiksa from El Paso, Debbie Reynolds, in the mid-50s, and Miller married Monroe, some saw the marriages not so much as a threat to the Jewish future as a sign that Jews were finding their place in America. During that time, the Conservative movement opened more than 100 new

synagogues annually. Reform congregations in 1955 had more than 255,000 members, up from just 59,000 in 1940. By the late 1950s, 60 percent of American Jewry belonged to synagogues. It was the last time synagogue membership in America would be made up of more than half of the country’s Jews. After the marriage Modern Screen magazine promoted on its cover a story, “Marilyn Enters A Jewish Family,” which included a photo spread of Marilyn and her new in-laws. Two years later, to make the point even more strongly, Elizabeth Taylor converted to Judaism to honor the memory of her Jewish husband Mike Todd, who had died suddenly in a plane crash. Despite Monroe’s initial hopes for the marriage, the five years she spent with Miller were difficult ones. Her dreams of a family faded after an ectopic pregnancy and two miscarriages. Even though she achieved considerable success in one of the great screen comedies, “Some Like It Hot” in 1959, Monroe was never able to overcome the professional insecurities and psychological problems that led to a serious addiction to prescription medications and alcohol, and ultimately to her sudden death. But although she’s been gone these many years, she is not forgotten. Time has treated the memory of Monroe with kindness. Her estate, most of which she left to the Strasberg family, has consistently earned tens of millions of dollars over the more than 50 years since her death. Last year her name and image made $17 million and she ranked No. 8 on the Forbes list of the highest-earning celebrities who are no longer living. As for that prayer book that Arthur Miller took from his Brooklyn synagogue and Monroe kept to her dying day, it sold at auction last year for $18,000.■ Bob Bahr will be teaching “Anything For A Laugh – American Comedy and the American Jewish Soul” at The Temple this fall. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 13


ARTS & CULTURE

Warhol’s Focus on Jews and the West

“WARHOL and the WEST” follows the same pattern as Warhol’s Jewish series, which included a serigraph of Marilyn Monroe.

By Roni Robbins Andy Warhol was known for his controversial pop art, including a 1980 exhibit of 10 “Jewish Geniuses” of the 20th century. The exhibit included such icons as Marilyn Monroe, Golda Meir, George Gershwin, Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud. Like Warhol’s interest in Jewish celebrities, some may be surprised to learn of his fascination with the West. “WARHOL and the WEST” is a new ex-

14 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Serigraphs of Howdy Doody, Annie Oakley and Geronimo are among the pieces in the exhibit.

hibit at the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville that opened Aug. 25 and runs through the end of the year. The 10 pop art serigraphs in the “Cowboys and Indians” exhibit follow the “same playbook” as Warhol’s Jewish series, Seth Hopkins, executive director of the museum, told the AJT. “Even ardent fans of the American artist, director and producer Andy Warhol aren’t likely aware that the pop icon loved the West. However, the West was a nearly constant influence throughout his life,” Hopkins said.

“Warhol wore cowboy boots more Western genre is immediately recognizoften than not and loved to travel to Taos, able, impressive, daring, inspirational, and Fort Worth and Colorado; and he amassed sometimes confrontational. This body of an overwhelming collection of Native work furthers our understanding of how American art and artifacts. In fact, ‘Cow- the American West infiltrates the public’s boys and Indians,’ his last major project imagination through contemporary art and popular culture.” before his death in The museum ex1987, forms the backhibit is believed to be bone of this major the first to “fully extraveling exhibition.” plore Andy Warhol’s There are more love of the West repthan 100 objects and resented in his art, works in the exhibit, movies, attire, travel including cowboy and collecting.” boots and Indian arThe Booth is one tifacts. They provide of 15 major Western context for the pormuseums in the countraits, 10 approved Andy Warhol had a fascination with the pieces and four ex- West, the focus of a new traveling exhibit try and has a more at the Booth Western Art Museum. contemporary style perimental drafts that were considered for the project, such that lends itself to hosting such a touring as images of John Wayne, Geronimo, Gen- collection, Hopkins said. The Warhol exhiberal Custer and Annie Oakley, Hopkins it, though, is even more edgy than the typical cowboy and Indian series visitors “think explained. The museum is thrilled to be a part of about when they come out to the museum,” the traveling exhibit, which Hopkins de- he said. The Booth Museum scribed as being “thoughtclaims to the be the largest provoking” and “pushing of its kind in the Southeast the boundaries,” as is Warand is an affiliate of the hol’s style. “To be involved Smithsonian Institution. in something this big and The 120,000-square-foot mugroundbreaking is very exseum resembles a modern citing,” he said. pueblo. “The Booth’s permaDeveloped in a partnernent collection of Western ship with the Tacoma Art art, presidential portraits and Museum and the National letters, and Civil War art alCowboy & Western Herilows visitors to ‘see America’s tage Museum, “WARHOL Seth Hopkins is executive story’— the land, people, and the WEST” is a compandirector of the Booth Western ion to the 144-page book of Art Museum in Cartersville. struggles, dreams, and legends — in paintings, sculpthe same name that sheds ture, photography and artifacts.” ■ light on the artist’s interest in the subject. “New scholarship examines how “WARHOL and the WEST” runs from Warhol’s Western work merges the artist’s ubiquitous portrayal of celebrities with Aug. 25 to Dec. 31 at the Booth Western Art his interest in cowboys, American Indi- Museum in Cartersville. For ticket sales and ans, and other western motifs,” according more information, visit boothmuseum.org. to the Booth Museum. “His work in the 770-387-1300.


ARTS & CULTURE

‘Love, Antosha’ is a Different Kind of Love Story By Bob Bahr Everyone loves Antosha in the new film that opens in Midtown Aug. 30. Antosha is the affectionate nickname for Anton Yelchin, a young Russian-born Jewish actor, whose rise to prominence is chronicled in a new documentary, “Love, Antosha.” Yelchin is perhaps best known for his portrayal of the young Pavel Chekov in several Star Trek films. He had a natural gift for acting and in his teens, he was already working steadily opposite some of the biggest stars in Hollywood. They are all here to sing his praises, Frank Langella, Zoe Saldana, Jodie Foster, Jennifer Lawrence and Willem Dafoe, among others. The praise is not just for his acting ability and devotion to his craft, but to the depth and breath of his character and his unquenchable thirst for learning. Martin Landau, the distinguished Jewish American actor, who was 89 when he was interviewed for the documentary, called Yelchin an “old soul.” But the dark secret that hangs over this otherwise sunny and deeply inspiring film is that Antosha is slowly dying. As a teenager, he was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, a relatively rare disease of the lungs and pancreas, that sapped his energy and slowed his breathing. Every day he took a dozen or more drugs to keep going and eventually endured hours of physical exercise and preparation before he could appear before the camera. Nonetheless, his intense curiosity about the world around him never faltered and the love he expressed only grew. “The story of Anton is told from his point of view,” according to Garrett Price, who edited and directed the film. “These reflections were really just a gateway that helps us get inside his head. It had a profound effect on me. It just makes me want to be a better person, a better father, a better son and, truthfully, to live life to its fullest.” No one is more aware of Anton’s love than his parents, Irina Korina and Viktor Yelchin, who were once among the most famous ice skaters in the Soviet Union. Although they were national celebrities, because they were Jewish, they were barred by the Soviets from competing in the 1972 Winter Olympics. Life for many Jews, especially during the last days of communism in Russia, was increasingly difficult, and in 1989 the couple sold everything they owned, leaving fame and fortune behind, and joined what had become a flood of Jewish immigrants to the United States. An estimated 800,000 Jews came to America as political refugees from the Soviet Union. Antosha, the Yelchins’ only child, was only six months old when they arrived in Los Angeles to nurture the precocious child that we see in the many home movies that are such an important part of this film. His parents savored every creative moment with their young son, including the exuberant outpourings of affection that he scrawled on notes to his mother and reflective notes he later wrote continuously in his journal as his health declined. When Anton Yelchin died in 2016 at the age of 27, it was not from cystic fibrosis, but a freak automobile accident.

Anton Yelchin portrayed the young Pavel Chekov in several Star Trek films.

All the scrapbooks and home videos his parents collected of his performances and all the journals their son filled with his deep and probing reflections over his short lifetime serve not just as mementos of a career well spent, but in “Love, Antosha,” as a memorial to a life well lived. ■ “Love, Antosha” opens Aug. 30 at the Landmark Midtown Art Cinema.

The new documentary “Love, Antosha” profiles the short, inspiring life of Anton Yelchin.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Braitberg Takes His Final Bow By Marcia Caller Jaffe He’s driven to Colorado on a motorcycle and played violin with Henny Youngman and for Bob Hope, not to mention jamming with Jerry Farber. He has rebuilt a 1959 Maserati 3500 GT. What David Braitberg will walk away from in a few weeks is more than four decades of playing violin in the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. Born in the Soviet Union, Braitberg’s journey as a child prodigy strums and plucks through France, then Missouri, landing in Atlanta with an incredibly successful audition from a classified ad. Read how he navigated performance anxiety and strikes, and graciously entertained thousands.

Family History David’s grandfather fought in World War I and had nine children, the youngest of which was David’s father Chaim, also a master violinist. David’s parents both escaped Poland to land in Stalingrad. Coincidentally, they grew up as neighbors in Poland, but met

for the first time in Russia during bombing there. David said, “The irony was that they exited war in Poland to be under the similar circumstances yet again.” In Stalingrad, Chaim was the concertmaster of the Stalingrad Opera/Theatre, and mom Szyfra attended medical school. She recently celebrated her 100th birthday in St Louis, where David filmed her singing and dancing (unaided). Chaim relayed that playing the violin saved his life as he traveled the countryside with gypsy troupes in Kazakhstan, playing folk songs and eating meals from a common pot. Farmers along the way traded eggs and bread for his “renditions.” Chaim was also a master chess player, fisherman, and Talmud scholar. He learned how to hold the bow and manipulate strings from a relative who drew art schematics for him to follow. David said, “Dad wanted me to learn violin as a life saving/ fall back to survive wars and pogroms.” David was born in Zbarasz, Soviet Union, which was a quaint fiefdom in the 1400s. When he was 5, the family emigrated to Bordeaux, France.

CENTER STAGE Concert Series ICONIC LADIES OF JAZZ & SOUL Featuring America's Songbird Myrna Clayton OCTOBER 12 AT 8 P.M. SINATRA FOREVER: A Tribute to Frank Sinatra Featuring Rick Michel NOVEMBER 16 AT 8 P.M.

:

'TIS THE SEASON TO BE MERRY Featuring Chloe Agnew and the Atlanta Pops Orchestra Ensemble DECEMBER 6 AT 8 P.M. THE COLOR PURPLE A Concert by Actor's Express FEBRUARY 1, 2020 at 8 P.M.

For Tickets go to: RoswellCAC.com 770-594-6232 16 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Braitberg will retire after 42 years with the ASO, looking back at more than 200 performances a year.

David’s father Chaim taught violin and languages, and conducted the orchestra at the public school in St. Louis that David attended.

At 6, with the help of HIAS, the family landed in St. Louis, where Chaim led the school orchestra and taught Russian in public schools. Chaim was headed for a spot in the St. Louis Symphony when the union noticed that he “checked the box” on the application that he had been a former member of the Communist Party. David said, “The St. Louis Jewish community truly embraced us, and Mom found a way to do diabetes research and teach elements of surgery at Wash U, even though she was not a licensed MD here.”

tive Cheryl Fine, chief financial officer of Piedmont Cancer Institute. They have a daughter attending Georgia State University.

Road to the Pros When asked when he envisioned his own future as a professional musician, he mused, “Actually I was pre-med at Washington University, but took the path of least resistance. Playing violin at weddings and freelance events, the money was coming in. As I matured, I no longer studied violin under Dad, as one can see that not being a healthy relationship. Not coincidentally, my brother is a professional viola player.” In the late 1970s, Braitberg rented a duplex and for 18 months, 12 hours a day, he practiced (perfected) the repertoire of eight to 10 pieces needed for orchestra auditions. Looking back, he said, “Think about the odds. There are only about 20 orchestras in the U.S. that pay a living wage. The average musician auditions 20 to 30 times before landing a spot. I saw an ad in a trade newspaper stating that the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra was seeking a violinist (one of 28 spots). I was 23, and they offered me the position starting the next week!” Braitberg is married to Atlanta na-

Braitberg’s Short Takes Performance anxiety: “I can’t lie. After 42 years in the ASO, 200 concerts a year, and 28 Grammys, nervousness never goes away. No alcohol before a performance and breathing exercises help.” Favorite composers: Mozart, Strauss, Prokofiev. Favorite contemporary music: The Beatles. Dad said that The Beatles were ‘garbage.’ He was wrong. I like violinists Hilary Hahn and Pinchas Zukerman. Your violin: A Jean Baptiste Vuillaume, a master innovative French luthier from the early 1800s. He had many of the tools and varnish recipes of Stradivarius. Some say Vuillaume’s craftsmanship was superior {to Stradivarius}. Surviving a symphony strike: In years past, the management was very rough and had an “us against them” attitude. They would cut out all pay and health insurance for 10 to 12 weeks. Some musicians had to quit. Later they found ways to continue performances during negotiations. Hobbies: Fishing, rebuilding classic cars and motorcycles. Along the way, I was an expert billiards player After retirement: No violin. It’s just a fact, without regular practice, it just doesn’t work. I’ll look forward to taking my boxer/ terrier rescue Trap trout fishing. ■


ARTS & CULTURE

Billy Wilder Film Retrospective at Emory By Bob Bahr Billy Wilder, one of the true giants of Hollywood, is the subject of an ambitious retrospective at the Emory Cinematheque over the next three months. He was born into a Jewish family in what was then the Galicia region of the AustroHungarian empire and is today a part of Poland. Wilder was penniless and knew only The 1924 silent film “Forbidden Paradise,” staring Pola Negri, 300 English words when he arrived in is showing Sept. 4 at the Emory Cinematheque. Hollywood in the early 1930s, but considered himself lucky to have escaped ity that was Paramount. Smart, funny, was a sophisticated and subtle technique Europe just ahead of the Nazi takeover wicked, dirty, urbane, naughty – he was that emphasized, in the words of the film critic and director Peter Bogdanovich, of Germany. His stepfather, mother and ultimately his own character.” grandmother died in the Holocaust. Most of his best work is a part of “oblique dialogue which had a way of Before he died in 2002 at the age of the Cinematheque’s series of screen- saying things through indirection.” “It was the elegant use of the Super95, Wilder had become ings. Such great films a show business legend. as “Double Indemnity,” joke,” Wilder once said. “You had a joke, Matthew Bernstein, “The Lost Weekend,” and you felt satisfied, and then there was a distinguished film “Sunset Boulevard,” “Ace one more big joke on top of it. The joke you scholar and chair of the in the Hole,” “Some Like didn’t expect. That was the Lubitsch touch.” In Wilder’s Hollywood office was a Emory Film and Media It Hot,” and “The Apartsign on one wall, in gilt letters 8 inches Department, put the sement” are being shown. ries together. A number of the high, with the one question that always “Wilder is one of films will be introduced seemed to preoccupy Wilder, “How the greatest American by Bernstein, who was would Lubitsch do it?” The Lubitsch touch will be on full filmmakers of the 20th also a curator for the secentury,” Bernstein said. ries. “He carved out a very Wilder was part of distinctive sensibility in a major exodus of filmmovies that people refer makers who left Europe The 1960 film “The Apartment” to and are inspired by. in the 1920s and 1930s, is part of the Wilder series “The winner of the often because of the deWednesday evenings at Emory, Academy Award for teriorating political conrunning through Dec. 4. best foreign film some ditions there. According years ago [Fernando Trueba] said I’d like to Bernstein, many of them were Jews to thank God and Billy Wilder. So he’s a who left a significant imprint on the film filmmaker of major significance in terms industry during the period. of Hollywood history and in terms of “They expressed a sense of paraAmerican popular culture.” noia about society, a heightened sense Wilder was nominated 24 times for of subjectivity in individual experience. an Academy Award either as a writer, As Jews they had the perspective of being director or producer. He won six Oscars, constant eternal outsiders, constantly including three for “The Apartment,” looking at American society from a more starring Jack Lemmon and removed stance that alShirley MacLaine in her lows them to say and first leading role. He dishow things about Amerirected 14 different actors can culture that someone in Oscar-nominated perAmerican born would not formances and received be so well-positioned to lifetime achievement observe.” awards from the AmeriAmong these influcan Film Institute and the ential Jewish Europeans Academy. was Ernst Lubitsch, who The important film directed the 1939 film critic David Thomson had “Ninotchka,” starring Billy Wilder received the prestigious Thalberg this to say when Wilder Greta Garbo, which is beAward during the Academy died in 2002: ing shown in the Emory Awards in 1988. “He had learnt irony series. Lubitsch’s style of under the Hapsburgs, human nature un- filmmaking had a profound effect on der the covers, and resignation from the Wilder, who was one of the film’s script awesome mix of enterprise and stupid- writers. The so-called Lubitsch touch

display Sept. 4, when the Emory series screens one of his silent classics from 1924, “Forbidden Paradise.” It features a live musical accompaniment by Donald Sosin, one of the world’s leading performers and composers of music for silent films. He was heard last year during a showing by the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival of “The Ancient Law,” a film that was also from the 1920s. Like all the films in the Wilder program at the Emory Cinematheque, admission is free. So not only is it a great entertainment value but it’s an unparalleled opportunity to see great films as they were meant to be seen. “We believe very firmly in the big screen experience,” Bernstein emphasized, “because you cannot see the meticulous details that filmmakers have placed in their films on your iPhone and or even your computer screen. And we also believe in the communal experience of film and the social aspect of film-going, which we think is so important.”■ The next film in the Emory Cinematheque’s Billy Wilder retrospective, “Forbidden Paradise,” is at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 4 in White Hall on the Emory campus.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 17


ARTS & CULTURE

Original Art and Photos on the BeltLine

Schusterman-Lapidus’ “Starry Night”

By Marcia Caller Jaffe Local artist Adam Podber combined creative minds with Intown Chabad Rabbi Eliyahu Schusterman for the first ever “confluence: Art and Photography Exhibition.” Literally “the flowing together of factors and ideas,” confluence is a collaboration between Podber and the rabbi’s daughter, photographer Shelbelle Schusterman-Lapidus. It showcases their young and personal collections as they explore Judaism and Israel using modern methods for original art and photography, premiering at Chabad Intown. The exhibition will be free and open

Adam Podber produces in his Atlanta BeltLine studio.

Adam Podber contemplates Hebrew letters.

“Man Walking Along a Path” is another example of SchustermanLapidus’ reflective pieces.

to the public with an opening reception Sept. 15 and viewing through Nov. 30.

“They are at the top of a hill with a view of mountains. At the bottom of the hill is the final resting place of the Holy Kabbalist (the Arizal) along with the Arizal Mikvah that hundreds frequent weekly. I imagine he is telling his sons teachings of the Holy Arizal.” The photos are mostly color with a few in black and white, with street scenes, Jewish objects, and scenery of the Galilee. Tzfat is a colorful place, she said. The streets are lined with the kabbalistic blue color, the foliage is always at a high saturation of color. People come from different places with “colorful” backgrounds and personalities. Schusterman-Lapidus said of her subjects, “Everything is telling a story, either loudly or quietly, in an external or internal dimension. It’s a matter of slowing down and looking carefully. A lot of my photos have one subject in [them], such as a person or an object that is framed by a scene in which they appear to feel at home. One photo has a carelessly folded tallis, strewn onto a table in a room that is in an abandoned apartment in the center of Tzfat. The walls are crumbling and heavily graffitied. It looks as if this is someone’s room of prayer. They might frequent this quiet abandoned space where they can speak to G-d undisturbed.”

propelled him into a career of art and paying it forward to help others through art therapy. Podber, who attended The Epstein School, Woodward Academy, and The Weber School, was a volunteer at Camp Sunshine (for children with cancer). All of Podber’s works at “confluence” are for sale. “I wanted to create a body of contemporary work based around ethics and how to treat others, as well as ourselves. For this show, I wanted to create work that can be used as a daily reminder of how to act as a human. I explore stylized Hebrew text, specifically words and phrases, an ancient language with a modern aesthetic.” Podber has a strong interest in Hebrew letters. He finds it interesting that the ancient language is still used today. Since he read Hebrew as a boy, he found each letter to have beauty. Podber’s works range from 12-by-12 inches to 60-by-60 inches. He has an industrial design bachelor of fine arts degree from SCAD and focuses on the design process and physical skills when creating art. “I build all my canvases by hand, stretch my own canvas and strive to create pristine high-quality work.” All pieces are hung. The mediums he employs are acrylic paint, spray paint and resin and he will use custom neon for the show. Looking back, Podber said, “I approached Rabbi Schusterman about his ideas on modern art, the intrigue of contemporary Jewish art, and my interest in a new direction of studio work. Rabbi Schusterman came up with the idea to showcase this new body of work in conjunction with high-quality photography. We invite all to come visit the exhibit.” Prices range from $50 to over $1,000. ■

Jewish-Themed Photos Schusterman-Lapidus’ original photography will consist of 12 pieces (selected out of a set of 6,000) for sale and others for visual enjoyment. Israel-based, she said, “My photos highlight major themes within Judaism, such as prayer, education and reflection. In one, there is a father in traditional garb with his sons looking as if he is in deep conversation with one, while the other is staring off into the distance.

Visit our Exhibitions:

Anne Frank in the World: 1929 – 1945

Witness to the Holocaust: World War II Veteran William Alexander Scott III

5920 Roswell Road (2nd level) Sandy Springs, GA 30328 770-206-1554 Exhibit Hours: Tuesday – Thursday - 10 am – 4 pm Friday – 10 am – 2 pm Saturday & Sunday – 12 pm – 4 pm Closed Monday Free Admission 18 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Podber’s Graphic Creativity Podber is making waves in Atlanta with his hip colorful murals and largescale projects – some along the Atlanta BeltLine and at the Roxy Theatre at SunTrust Park. Podber’s story comes from a passionate place where he was diagnosed as a young boy with lymphoma, which


ARTS & CULTURE

New Film Examines Life of Virginia Woolf By Bob Bahr

riod drama feel that we’re used to.” Mediating this romantic relationA new film about author Virginia ship, which is portrayed with a frankness Woolf’s unconventional love life and the that some viewers may find discomfortstresses it produced in the marriage to ing, is Woolf’s sober and selflessly deher Jewish husband opens in Midtown voted husband, Leonard, who grew up a liberal Jew in a well-toSept. 6. do British middle-class “Vita and Virginia” family. is likely yet another atSeveral years after tempt to satisfy our inhe and Virginia were satiable curiosity with married in 1912, they titled Brits and, at the started a company to same time, try to steal publish her novels, the some of the thunder Hogarth Press, which from the well-publicized grew into a large and release next month of successful enterprise. a new film about life at Before it was sold in “Downton Abbey.” 1946 it published 525 The arrival of both titles, including the films is a reminder, if original printing of one is needed, of AmerT.S Eliot’s “The Waste ica’s fascination with Land,” and the works of British upper-class life. Sigmund Freud and his You don’t have to follow New film examines the life of International Psychothe minute-by-minute Virginia Woolf, who had an unconventional marriage to her analytical Association. progress of the latest Jewish husband, Leonard. Hogarth’s list of royal birth to know that we always love British aristocrats, wheth- authors also included such literary stars as er on TV or in our neighborhood multi- Katherine Mansfield, C. Day Lewis, Robert Graves, John Maynard Keynes, Christopher plex theater. While both are set in roughly the Isherwood, and Gertrude Stein. But it was in nurturing and developsame year, 1927, and there are frequent and beautifully framed green landscapes ing the abundant talent of his wife that featuring great houses and long wind- Leonard Woolf found his purpose in life. ing roads, that is where the comparisons They didn’t have any children and probably had a less than between the two films perfect sexual life, but largely ends. Woolf’s husband was “Vita and Virginia” passionate about makis mostly an autobioing sure the world apgraphical tale of the paspreciated his wife’s sionate relationship genius. between the great BritAnd he did it all ish novelist, feminist while attempting to and woman of letters, navigate the ingrained Virginia Woolf, and Vita anti-Semitism that has Sackville-West, a writer been such a prominent of lesser talent who grew feature of British life, up wealthy, pampered then and now. and comfortably cosWhile he was a seted within the British graduate of the presaristocratic tradition. tigious St. Paul’s prep As Gemma Arschool and Cambridge terton, the British acVirginia Woolf’s marriage was University, he develtress who plays Sacksaid to be one of the cornerstones of her success as a writer. oped what he called in ville-West put it recently, there was a deliberate attempt to create a his autobiography a “façade, which if our film that would appeal to a younger audi- sanity is to survive we must present to the outside and usually hostile world as ence. “The 1920s was a time of shaking free a protection to the naked, tender, shiverof the Victorian era and our focus is on the ing soul.” One might add shivering Jewish people doing just that. We want the film to soul to his description. Coping didn’t come easy, even when feel young and fresh. The casting is quite young, I hope it cuts through that stiff pe- his wife made anti-Semitic remarks

With its glimpses into the fractious about his family, which she described in her journal as “nine Jews, all of whom, life of the novelist, one gains a greater with the single exception of Leonard, appreciation of her husband, the person might well have drowned, with the world who provided support and continuity at a difficult period in her life. not wagging one ounce the worst.” Eventually Virginia Woolf, who sufDespite its unconventionality, the marfered from frequent riage was generally condebilitating headaches sidered to be a successand bipolar mental illful one, and if there had ness, succumbed to the been no Leonard Woolf dark forces within her perhaps there might not mind. On March 28, have been the Virginia 1941, she ended her life Woolf that we know so by walking into the rivwell through her writing. er behind the couple’s In “Vita and Vircountry home. ginia,” we have a film In her final words with a strong contemto him, she wrote, “I porary feel that reowe all the happiness minds us of the twists of my life to you…Evand turns that a litererything has gone from ary life often takes. Out me but the certainty of of the relationship with your goodness…I don’t Sackville-West was think two people could born the novel “OrlanThe novel, “Orlando,” which was a have been happier than do,” a turning point in turning point in Virginia Woolf’s career, grew out her relationship we have been.” ■ Virginia Woolf’s career, with Vita Sackville-West. whose popular and “Vita and Virginia” opens Sept. 6 at the critical success guaranteed the future of the Hogarth Press and her literary legacy. Landmark Midtown Art Cinema.

DeKalb Cultural Arts Building 5339 Chamblee Dunwoody Road Dunwoody GA 30338 stagedoorplayers.net 770-396-1726

Nov 22 –Dec 8 2019 Sept 20-Oct 13 2019 Jan 24-Feb 16 2020

Mar 20-Apr 12 2020

July 17-Aug 9 2020 May 22June14, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 19


ARTS & CULTURE

New Book Demonstrates Loving Loudly By Marcia Caller Jaffe

finder. Children love to play “I spy,” so how about “I spy kindness!” Or, appoint your child CEO of the kindness company, a pretend family company, and he or she can notice and hire all the nice people you meet.

The New York Times bestselling author and veteran media personality Robyn Spizman shares an inside view of her newest book “Loving Out Loud: The Power of a Kind Word.” Here, the Atlanta native, mother and grandmother and wife of to Ed Gerson highlights the relevance and usability of her new book. Jaffe: You’ve authored dozens of books. What makes this one extra special? Spizman: “Loving Out Loud” is a tribute to my parents and embodies their love. Growing up as the daughter of Phyllis and Jack Freedman, I was loved out loud. My parents were devoted to making a difference for the greater good of the community and shared themselves abundantly. “Loving Out Loud” empowers readers to open up, deepen our relationships, and enrich our lives and the lives of others. Jaffe: World famous author Dawna Markova wrote your foreword and said she wished she had written this book.

Jaffe: Grandparents are more involved in families today. What do you have to say to them? Spizman: Grandparents are a wellspring of loving-kindness. There are many ways to share that love. We have an “I love you library,” which is a toy closet filled with favorite books and love listening to the kids read to us. My husband Ed FaceTimes and reads a favorite book with our grandsons who live in other cities. When grandparents build a relationship based on a child’s interests, we connect in more meaningful ways. Robyn Spizman’s new book to be released Aug. 27 is “Loving Out Loud: The Power of a Kind Word.”

Robyn Spizman is a New York Times bestselling author and longtime media personality known for her gift giving advice.

What did that mean to you? Spizman: Dawna Markova, the cocreator of the book “Random Acts of Kindness,” ignited a revolution of kind-

ness 50 years ago. She’s a literary icon inspiring what’s right in this world. Her foreword is deeply inspiring, and I am truly grateful for her support. Jaffe: Expand on the double meaning of LOL in the book. Spizman: Most of us know LOL to mean laugh out loud or lots of luck. In my book it means “loving out loud.” Love is the most powerful emotion we can share. When we open ourselves up with a kinder, gentler way of responding to others, we have the power to brighten our lives and the lives of others. Jaffe: If you had to summarize three life lessons from the book, what would they be? Spizman: Lift up, show up and never give up. Lift up: Bring joy to those you love. Don’t just wait to be uplifted; be the person who lifts up others. Show up: Shift your “to-do list” to a “to love list” and notice friends, family members and activities you love and show up. Never give up: Be the love you wish to experience and a positive influence on those around you. Jaffe: What advice would you give to parents rearing children? Spizman: Kids learn by your example, tone of voice and actions. Kinder kids make friends more easily. The chapter on kinder kids includes creative ways to inspire kindness. For example, be a kinder

20 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Jaffe: The book reminds me of my all-time favorite, Dale Carnegie’s “How to Win Friends and Influence People.” What are the timely topics you bring to a new tableau? Spizman: Since the early 1900s, Dale Carnegie taught us about building relationships with sincerity and interest in others. My book springboards loving kindness into all aspects of your life. Dale Carnegie had it right a century ago. I’m excited to share remarkable stories of individuals who are putting “loving out loud” in action. Jaffe: Has the social media revolution affected your writing here? Spizman: The social media revolution has reduced communication to a click. “Loving Out Loud” is about moving from rapid-fire emoticons to thoughtfully expressing your emotions and shares how. Jaffe: Having appeared for over three decades on local and national television like the “Today” show, you are well known for your gift giving creativity. What in the book addresses that? Spizman: From meaningful family traditions to unforgettable gifts that make others feel treasured, “Loving Out Loud” includes endless ideas for gifting and celebrating your signature style. “Loving Out Loud” is all about the little things we can do to make a big impact. In my book, “Loving Out Loud” is the ultimate gift. ■ Check out www.robynspizman.com to learn about “Loving Out Loud: The Power of a Kind Word,” available at www.amazon.com.


ARTS & CULTURE

Art That Sends a Message

Madeleine Soloway draws inspiration from memories and words.

By Flora Rosefsky When I first saw the art of two Atlanta photographers, Sandrine Monique Arons and Madeleine Soloway, at the Shambhala Meditation Center in Decatur, I was blown away by how they push the boundaries of their medium. Whether it’s through collage, mixed media or photography, their work is less about a pretty picture and more about their responses to social justice issues such as gender equality, immigration or themes of the Holocaust. Their art reflects their view of the world through a Jewish or humanitarian lens. Both Arons and Soloway set out to make a strong statement through their work. Intriguing viewers with messagedriven themed works are Arons’ two curated shows: Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia’s “Bearing Witness: Art of the Protest” this weekend at Decatur’s Sycamore Place Gallery, and “MOOD: A Frame of Mind,” part of Atlanta Celebrates Photography, Sept. 21 to Oct. 27, in the TULA Art Center in Buckhead. According to Arons, much of her photography is based on a “multicultural, blended and intertwined relationship” within her own family. She was born and raised in Georgia by a French mother and an American father with Hungarian ancestry. Her maternal grandmother, a Sephardic Jew from Algeria, was married to a French Catholic, and Arons’ husband is Muslim. This blend of different cultures can be seen in her “Frontiers” photography series. In her work, “Moroccan Mirage,” I see a calm blue sea, yet in the middle there is a dry, arid desert, where lamp posts and broken doorways add a sense of mystery. Arons told me the images blend places in the same way she blends languages and identities in her personal life. “The blending is a type of identity that I have learned to live with.” Arons has graduate degrees in psychology, French and photography with a master of fine arts from SCAD.

“Dating-Algorithms-Identity,” digital prints in wooden frames by Madeleine Soloway.

From Sandrine Arons’ “Frontiers” series are the photographic compositions, “Moroccan Mirage” and “This Way Out.”

Sandrine Monique Arons expresses her multicultural background in her work.

After studying the Holocaust in graduate school, including reading victims’ memoirs and diaries, it led her to write a chapter on self-therapy in the 2003 book “The Psychological Impact of War Trauma on Civilians: An International Perspective.” She sees a relationship between those writings and her documentary photography, capturing what she says is the ever increasing need to document history after the Holocaust as a form of continuously bearing witness. Later in her artistic practice, she said, “I began to really understand this importance of memory and the effort to pass down stories, documents and to recollect one’s past.” Holocaust memories and trauma also influenced Soloway’s work. Although born in the U.S., her mother was a Holocaust survivor. Hearing stories about “desperation, flight, and a fight for survival” impacted her identity, said Soloway, who graduated with a bachelor of fine arts from Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston. During the summers of 2016 and 2017, while on break from teaching art at The Paideia School, Soloway traveled to Eastern Europe to explore the melding of history with memory as it related to survival during World War II, the Holocaust and the Soviet occupation. After those trips, she began working on a series of collages using survivors’ memories and what she calls the “meaning and effect of trauma on the past, present, and future generations.” She creates introspective collages incorporating family letters, photos and ephemera in her “Warsaw Project” series. Her photography and mixed media work question what words might “bring people together, or instead, act as a weapon to divide,” she said. The Museum of Contemporary Art juried show “Gathered IV,” which ran from April to June, chose to include Soloway’s provocative work “Dating-Algorithms-Identity,” a 108-by-108-inch installation of 36 individually framed digi-

tal prints. Each represents a personality trait gathered from dating websites and social media commentary. Soloway constantly searches the internet for words, phrases and sentences used in contemporary culture for her work. It shows how language is used in communication in our world of online social media consumption. An example of art eliciting a different response depending on the viewer is Soloway’s armless wooden chair with digital words across its seat: “I am tired of being told to sit down and be quiet.”

The works of Arons and Soloway make you think. You will walk away from their exhibits discussing what you see with friends, family members or colleagues. Both artists interpret memory, often using their multicultural and Eastern European backgrounds as inspiration for their art. To learn more about the artists, visit www.sandrinearons.com or www.madeleinesoloway.com. ■ Flora Rosefsky is a visual artist who uses message-driven art in her work.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 21


DINING Greek Is On Fleek

Roasted cauliflower is a house specialty.

By Marcia Caller Jaffe I’ve always had an affinity for Greek food, partially because of its similarly to Israeli cuisine: the fresh tomatoes, cukes, olives, fresh cheeses, grilled white fish from the sea, pita-like bread, herbs for dressings, and the passion of the hometown chef. This is certainly the case at Vas Kousina, a year-old newcomer making inroads on the Alpharetta dining scene. Vas is chef-owner Billy Liakakos, who oversees the bustling kitchen with authentic details, true to Greek cuisine, along with Victoria Kasarhis, Vas’ wife

22 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Victoria says that traditional Greek men insist on wedges of feta, not crumbles.

of 21 years, who works the floor bringing details to diners who envision themselves in Santorini among the restaurant’s white and blue plastered décor. The fun doesn’t stop with the ambiance. Vas Kousina, which according to Vas has way exceeded its first-year expectations, is going to continue to soar because à la Pano Karatassos in the old days, Victoria and Billy are on-site tending to customers, making sure diners know the history of what they are eating. Our server said, “Be sure and order a whole fish because Billy will come to your table and debone it.” And that he

Vas’ mother makes the baklava in-house. Greek desserts are called Glyka.

Vas Kousina has a full bar in addition to wines imported from Greece.

did, separating and identifying the seg- “jam up,” maybe just ‘cause it was a weekments: cheeks, belly, body, etc. Decades end. Park for free at the Roswell City Hall ago, my own grandmother ate the tail, and walk a very short block. and my brother and our Eastern EuroGreek salad: We knew not to expect pean Zayde fought over the head. There were two fresh fish by the lettuce, but like the feta crumbled in the pound – the traditional Greek sea bass salad. Victoria laughed, “That’s an Ameriand the Gulf red snapper (rotating with can style. Old Greek men like their feta as what’s fresh). Both are around $25 per a huge solid wedge.” pound, and that night A novel talking point: the option started at two A caper berry is not to be pounds – a huge portion confused with a caper. for two – with leftovers They are used to bring out for two nights. the flavor in many Greek Victoria, who learned dishes. It’s olive-shaped from world class master and colored, but jammed chefs in Greece, is a psychowith seeds, a briny flavor therapist by day, and preand served with the stem. pares some of the desserts, It’s the fruit from the caincluding the pana cotta. per bush, and again, acShe shares with cording to Victoria, “used enthusiasm the origins to pop in more flavor and of their sheep’s cheese, is stronger than an olive.” aperitifs, sour cherry preChef owner Vas (Billy) artfully serves, rose petals, pista- debones the whole fish tableside. Greek wines: Mouthchios, figs, Greek honey. “Most everything here is imported, the watering notes and flavors: plum, cinnacheese, the wine, the triple-strained yo- mon, smoke, vanilla, clove, black cherry, gurts. Be sure and try the ‘Gigandes,’ gi- chocolate, honeysuckle. I had the red Omiant lima beans, which are stewed and cron Nemea at $8 a glass. Also, we closed the meal with a very marinated overnight in tomatoes, dill and herbs. … And we do amazing things clear aperitif, made from the sap of an everwith cauliflower. … One of our other sig- green tree, produced only from Kios (Greek nature dishes is the Greek potatoes. Note Island), which will clean anyone’s sinuses. we do not use ‘saucy’ butter. …Vas emulsiDessert, or Glyka: Baklava, baklava fies the lemon with oil to appear creamy.” Vas chimes in, “My parents moved cheesecake to go one step richer, and a chochere with us from New York (1995). We olate log with brandy and walnuts, beautiall liked the change of seasons in Atlanta. fully drizzled on a thin rectangular plate. Mom makes the baklava. And, yes there was some plate break“I continue to try new things. During the week, when we are not so busy, ing, but I’m not ‘fessing up to it. ■ I’m making 4-inch petite gyros, which Vas Kousina at 942 Alpharetta St. has have been a big hit. Since opening in June 2018, we see loyal customers from Sandy seating for 60 (some outdoors) and reservations are recommended. The restaurant at Springs, Dunwoody, all over.” Here are some helpful tips to get the 942 Alpharetta Street is closed Mondays. Its sister restaurant is the traditional Diner Bakmost out of the experience: ing Company in Kennesaw with a full menu, Parking: A totally stressful circling barista bar and huge wedges of dessert.


Photos by Heidi Morton // Linda and Ron Wand “chill” in the master bedroom under the oil they

acquired in Playa del Carmen. Pillow fabrics are from the Jim Thompson house in Bangkok.

Chai Style Home

The living room has a ceramic and glass tile fireplace with painting by Bettie Ward and original Dale Chihuly glass sculptures on pedestals.

California Cool with a Chicken Coop Collecting contemporary glass has become very Marcia: What are the special touches that you as a popular relatively recently in the art world. Glass is designer bring to the table? known for its significance when it is blown, signed by Linda: I (Linda Bressler Designs) accommodate all the artist and displayed in the best possible light source. kinds of styles; today I find most want a transitional Some would add that it has an emotional component look. I like to design unexpected options like adding for collectors who bring back pieces from contemporary lighting to a traditional world travels. home or using an abstract artful fabric on Interior designer Linda Bressler a more traditional chair. I focus on tactile Wand and dentist Ron Wand did just that surfaces like in our kitchen where I (yes, by by reconstructing their entire main level, myself) hand-troweled the sheetrock mud opening up and extending curved walls to imprint a wave pattern, incorporated to maximize the natural light so their art metal tiles in the backsplash and a border and glass could do the talking. The views around the ceiling line. We have a handare to the landscape and beyond. The painted metallic textured wall covering in space is infused with temporal and colorthe master bath. ful experiences that capture persimmon Marcia I had a metal artist customize the railand cinnabar hues from a field of poppies Caller Jaffe ings, each topped by a glass egg separating to a bursting tangerine sunrise. Linda the entrance foyer from the living room. In touts her style as “California contemporary,” but the the center of the foyer is a custom floating spiral light fun begins when Ron goes out back to cluck with his fixture illuminating it. Most of our lighting is customhens. Linda says, “You would not believe how deli- ized by the Lighting Loft. cious our eggs are! They are indeed their own work One of the most fun and practical tips many of my of art!” clients enjoy is selecting a wall or small room (ours is

adjacent to the kitchen and back hall) where we have mounted travel pictures on foamcore fastened to the wall with Velcro, which are easily interchanged for the next adventure. Other decorating tips: collect what you like and fit it into your space. Don’t try to match the art to your furnishings. Just hang it and enjoy what you like! Mix many interesting textures. Don’t be afraid to mix metals, glass, and textured walls – all make the space more interesting. Marcia: What are some of your most unusual and favorite pieces? Linda: Our favorite pieces are the three Chihuly glass pieces in the living room. Also, one of my favorites is the Erté in the entry. The tall glass sculpture from Vespermann Gallery is definitely the most unusual, called “Queen Column” by Susan Pelish and family. They work with recycled materials like industrial discards and sea glass. They strive to capture the moment when everything becomes “as clear as glass.” Another unusual piece is the alabaster shirt we found in Volterra, Italy. I thought it was a wearable shirt

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 23


CHAI STYLE The Wands custom-designed this metal railing with glass eggs to separate the foyer from the great room. In the background is James Rosenquist’s “Brighter Than The Sun.”

Aerial view of living room: The Wands reconstructed their main level space to add curved walls that better showcase art. The tall glass spire on left (Vespermann Gallery) is “Queen Column” by Susan Pelish and family. The asymmetrical bowl is David Goldhagen. Dale Chihuly’s “Basket” lithograph is far right. Bressler is noted for her exceptional eye for color.

and wanted Ron to buy it to wear. When we went in the shop, we realized it was stone! The rose purple bowl on the dining room table is by Dan LaChaussee (Washington State). The glass and acrylic custom cocktail table in the family room is by an Israeli artist Shlomi Haziza (now California). I selected the base hues and the glass kidney-shaped top. The sofa pillows are all hand painted from South Beach. Marcia: How would you describe your art? Ron: Our art is mostly contemporary and colorful, therefore the white walls and lots of grey are accentuated by the art which becomes the highlight of each room. The Alexandra Nechita on the dining room wall is a

serigraph, “True Love,” which she created at age 12 to show unconditional love for her mother and grandmother. We like the textures of New York artist Curt Barne’s painting in the dining room, which is an abstract acrylic and wood. I like the orange and chartreuse cheerfulness of [James] Rosenquist’s “Brighter Than The Sun” heading downstairs. We have a drawing, “Baskets,” by Dale Chihuly, located by his three glass pieces. We also like Frabel and David Goldhagen, who did the elliptical purple glass bowl in the living room. His glass is on display at the Beck Museum as part of Miami’s oldest synagogue [Beth David Congregation] (1912). Another favorite painting by Bettie Ward (Alabama and San Miguel de Allende) is over the ceramic and glass

The Wand dining room features Alexandra Nechita’s “True Love,” which she created at age 12 to show unconditional love for her mother and grandmother.

Linda selected this lucite kidney-shaped table by Israeli artist Shlomi Haziza. The pillows are hand-painted silk. The poster “French Aperitifs” is by Razma.

24 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


CHAI STYLE Ron likes caring for the hens with his grandchildren, who enjoy the feedings and collecting eggs.

The geometric pool shape replicates the angles of the house frame.

tile fireplace. Ward touts that she “grew up around desert flowers in the prairies as the cowgirl daughter of an old-world rancher and whose art represents listening, growth, change and romance.” Marcia: How do you use the outdoors? Ron: It’s very peaceful by the pool. Note that its geometric shape mirrors the angles of the house. (Laughing) My chicken coop needs no explanation. We get about six eggs a day and take very good care of the colorful hens. Note no roosters as it is illegal to have a rooster here. We did have to construct a safer fence to keep out the raccoons.

The Wands brought this alabaster shirt back from Volterra, Italy.

We love having the grandchildren over to enjoy the outdoors. Marcia: You have a passion for glass in surfaces? Linda: Since I like to work with glass and unusual countertops, I used various colors of glass on our circular terrazzo bar top. In the lower powder room I had an “optical illusion” vessel sink set into a concrete fauxfinished countertop with imbedded glass shards. Marcia: Last word? Ron: Frank Lloyd Wright said, “A home is more a home when it’s a work of art.” We agree. ■

Linda suggests to some of her clients that they design their own travel wall with changeable foamcore and Velcro mountings as new trips make memories.

Linda selected this unusual “optical illusion” sink atop her own crushed glass designed vanity for the powder room. Fixtures by Lighting Loft.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 25


COMMUNITY

Meet the Press

Small-Town South to Atlanta High Culture By Roni Robbins When it comes to storytelling, you might compare Marcia Caller Jaffe’s flair for exposing the art, food, designer homes and prominent Jews of Atlanta to the entertainment style of iconic newswoman Barbara Walters. Or perhaps a Southern Jewish take on “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous.” Over the past 11 years, Jaffe has built a reputation for her AJT Chai Style Homes/ Art, showcasing the “tasteful” digs of Atlanta’s high society; her Lowdown with renowned community members; heartwrenching pieces about depression and teen addiction; struggles for acceptance among transgender and black Jews; and her mouth-watering dining reviews. “While I don’t consider myself to be among the greatest journalists, my writing encompasses a life of experiences,” said Jaffe, who was previously advertising manager for the Atlanta Journal Constitution for 37 years. “Writing is inspired by curiosity and uncovering fascinating stories among regular folks. Every time I

go to an event, even seders, I come back with new topics and interviews,” said the prolific AJT freelancer. “More importantly, finding a Jewish connection is a passion.” Jaffe has an insider’s familiarity with the movers and shakers in our midst and keeps a running list of interview subjects, always planning ahead for how to fit them into the AJT’s weekly themes. She cites a wedding she spotlighted in which the eight bridesmaids each carried an adoptable puppy. Another story featured a Jewish couple who raised owls and falcons. There was also the 6-foot-2 Israel Defense Forces soldier in a blond wig, dress, fishnet stockings and heels she took with her to Shabbat services at Ahavath Achim Synagogue. “Through writing for the AJT, I have exchanged shoes with Dr. Ruth, interviewed stars and authors from Nelson DeMille to Alan Alda. I drove Thomas Freidman around, and one might say ‘we clashed a bit,’” she said. “I get follow ups … ‘Come see me in LA.’ (I don’t.) “My most fulfilling interviews were with Savannah native Bruce Feiler, ‘Walk-

Do you enjoy needlework? We do too!!

We are the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Needlework Sharing the pleasure of creating Jewish handcrafted items. We are novice to experienced: quilters, crocheters, fiber artists, weavers,knitters, needlepointers, beaders, cross-stitchers and more. Our members enjoy workshops, lectures, tours, projects and needlework challenges throughout the year. Most importantly, we have a camaraderie that makes everything we do fun!

JOIN US at a meeting by emailing: peachstatestitch@aol.com for date and time. www.PeachStateStitchers.org 26 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

ing the Bible’ series and PBS contributor, for the WNBA Atlanta Dream team. Now and Ken Feinberg, the ‘pay czar’ attorney, a grandmother, Jaffe was once a pinup who negotiated the damages for 9/11, the “Gator Girl” at the University of Florida, BP oil spill, Sandy Hook,” and others. “I where she received a journalism degree. learned to remain nonplussed when out “While I play mahjong twice a week, pops, ‘That’s when an average day is I was in treatment an hour walk with for crack addicrotating friends, tion.’” or while listenFor someone ing to TED Talks, who prides herself a workout and on high culture, swim. That’s a half Jaffe’s roots are day. … Nights are in the small-town filled with covering South. She was events or attendborn in LaGrange, ing advance movie Ga., and grew up screenings.” in Knoxville, Tenn. She considHer father, an imers as her second migrant from Pojob 20 years as vice land, was believed president of the to be the longestBuckhead Business serving president Association, “which As vice president of the Buckhead Business of the Conservaaffords exposure to Association, Marcia Caller Jaffe schmoozes tive congregation prominent speakwith former Atlanta Mayor Sam Massell, in Knoxville. Jaffe ers in retailing or president of the Buckhead Coalition. attended services real estate, many of every Shabbat then and now as a long- whom turn out to be Jewish.” time AA member. Another sideline for Jaffe is bring“In Atlanta, I’m enthralled with the ing people together. “My son says I have depth of Jewish programming, speakers, a place in heaven for successful matchcharitable events and kosher food,” she making, dozens of marriages and relasaid of some of the topics she covers. tionships from 25 to 80. (Only three seHer own life mirrors her fast-paced cures a spot!)” story turnaround. “My mother quoted When she’s not writing or visiting the high holiday prayer book: ‘Time is her two children and two grandchildren, like a moonbeam. Jaffe can be found The minute you reading. “A happy catch it, you open place for me is a your hand and it’s public library, where gone.’ I am conI worked as a teen. stantly running … I read nonfiction, the race with the mostly biographies, rapid movement and subscribe to Arof years. I do sevchitectural Digest, eral things at once the Atlanta Business … even trying to Chronicle, Town & eat while working Country, and cookout, which didn’t books to be able to turn out so well.” write about art and If you ask chefs. Jaffe about her “I keep notes of food critiques, expressions, headshe’s sure to anlines and words that swer, in her feisty ring well. You can’t Southern inflecwrite if you don’t Backstage with a rapper at the former Philips Arena, now State Farm Arena, tion, how she’s read! Mark Twain before cheerleading with the senior WNBA eating her way said, ‘The difference Dream Supremes, which she co-founded. through Atlanta. between the almost That, from a petite former cheerleader right word and the right word is really a who in 2010 co-founded the Dream Su- large matter – it’s the difference between premes, a senior women’s dance squad the lightning bug and the lightning.’” ■


The Lowdown

I Bet You Didn’t Know …

Atlanta is chock full of interesting movers and shakers, some bent on creativity, some on public persona, empire building, activism and/or just plain having fun and living the good life. Lean in to hear some “off the cuff” remarks as to what makes Lindy and Norman Radow tick.

The Radows

Norman Radow, CEO of The RADCO Companies, started with a passion for improving lives by redeveloping neighborhoods. Hundreds of projects later, he was chosen by the Atlanta Business Chronicle last year as one of Atlanta’s Most Admired CEOs. Lindy and Norman are strong believers in philanthropy in the Atlanta Jewish community with its advancement and the security of Israel as family core values. The couple are big supporters of Hillels of Georgia, Kennesaw State University and KSU Hillel. Norman played a large role in elevating KSU from a commuter school to a university on the way to national prominence. At KSU, he was the foundation chair and endowed the Paul & Beverly Lecture Series on Jewish Life and the Paul Radow Endowment, which provides scholarships for engineering students. Lindy is a trustee of the Jewish Women’s Fund of Atlanta, a member of Women’s Philanthropy and a founding board member of MACoM, the community mikvah. Both support AIPAC, the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces, Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, Birthright Israel and Congregation Etz Chaim, where Norman served as president.

Get to know them better right here. Your most exotic trip? Radows: The Maldives. In one day alone we swam with sharks, pilot whales and a whale shark – all before noon! I am often mistaken for … Norm: When I was young, Ben Cross. Lindy: When I was young, Kathy Ireland. Which talent would you like to have? Norm: A gift for languages Lindy: Skill of a pianist Guilty pleasure? Norm: Eating too much really good vanilla ice cream. Lindy: Binge watching Netflix/Prime original shows: “Grace and Frankie,” “The Crown,” “Jack Ryan.” What are you reading? Norm: “The Pillars of the Earth” by Ken Follett Lindy: “City of Girls” by Elizabeth Gilbert, a great read, especially for gals who love NYC. You’ve met a lot of famous folks. By whom were you most awestruck? Norm: Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the first U.N. ambassador who championed Israel. Lindy: When I was 16, I sat next to Alan Alda, watching the original cast in “Cats” on Broadway. I loved him! What’s the best advice you’ve ever gotten? Norm: “Become a lawyer. The only thing you can’t do with a law degree is practice medicine.” Words of wisdom from Paul Radow, my father. Lindy: “Work like an octopus,” work every angle of a problem or opportunity. Words of wisdom from Hal Minchew, my father. If I could change one thing about my spouse … Norm: To get Lindy to buy coffee in bulk! We certainly have the storage for it. Lindy: Lose his obsession with outdoor lighting. I am not kidding when I say he can feel a light [bulb] out 100 yards away. ■ Reported by Marcia Caller Jaffe ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 27


COMMUNITY

Inman Park is Very ‘In,’ Man

Photos Courtesy of Hampton + Hudson // Hampton Hot Chicken Sliders are

made with buttermilk Tabasco aioli.

Atlanta always has new restaurants and areas to explore. Whether your taste buds desire international fare or crave dishes of a more domestic nature, in Inman Park you’ll find a variety of dining options, as well as unique boutique shopping and a fun, hip vibe, just steps away from the Atlanta BeltLine. We were thrilled to be

Michal and Jen with Hampton + Hudson general manager Danielle Patterson.

Jen Evans & Michal Bonell On the Town

28 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

invited to dine at and review Hampton + Hudson Community Bar and Restaurant, a gastro pub with a rustic feel. It serves lunch, dinner, brunch and late-night bites with a focus on locally sourced creative pub fare and classics drinks. The menu is familiar and affordable with a little twist that keeps guests coming back. “We have always had our

We enjoyed the Holy Smokes! cocktail with our first course.

We started our meal with House Deviled Eggs, topped with paprika.

eyes on Inman Park,” said owner Jenn Streck. “Inman Park is such a wonderful community that inhabits all walks of life, from young professionals, to families, to residents that have lived there their whole lives. We loved that it was a walkable neighborhood that is located right off the Atlanta BeltLine. There is something special about seeing the same faces in H+H that makes it feel welcoming,” Streck said. She and husband Billy opened the restaurant in 2016. The name Hampton + Hudson stems from nostalgia for the Streck family. Billy grew up going to Hampton Manor outside Albany, N.Y., with his family each summer. Hudson comes from the Hudson River of New York City, where the couple lived for five years. The 3,500-square-foot pub is designed with a centrally located bright and spacious bar surrounded by a variety of private dining areas that can be used for small and intimate gatherings, as well as rooms for larger events. It also has an expansive covered patio. Led by executive chef Craig Richards, the culinary team works with locally sourced food items that rotate seasonally to create elevated, yet approachable, creative pub fare with as close to zero waste as possible. “We do try our best in all that we do to keep that mindset,” said Billy Streck. “I know in the kitchen they try to utilize all of their produce in several dishes, to help with no waste, and we also use biodegradable straws and recyclable plastic for to-go cups and recyclable to-go boxes as well.” We were seated at a lovely window booth. Small fresh flowers topped and cheered each table. Our hipster waiter told us that the chef had pre-picked our menu, and we declared that we were ready to feast! To start, we were served House

Deviled Eggs topped with paprika along with the signature Hampton Hot Chicken Sliders made with buttermilk Tabasco aioli and served with pickles on a brioche bun. The chicken was superbly tender, and all the flavors rejoiced with each bite. This first course, which H+H call “Making Friends,” was paired the with the delightful “Holy Smokes!” cocktail, made with Banhez mezcal, Domaine de Canton, 18.21 bitters, hibiscus, lime and soda. Yum! Speaking of yum, our next course featured H+H’s popular Blueberry Yum Yum, a refreshing drink made with Brockmans gin, Lustau Blanco, Paven, lemon and simple bubbles (sparkling wine). We were then treated to the amazing, melt-in-your-mouth Poblano and Cheddar Croquettes with onion-top aioli filled with risotto, accompanied by the Wood Grilled Caesar Wedge, topped with capers and brown butter-thyme croutons. Our third and final course was made up of a wonderful Summer Vegetable Pasta made of fusilli, corn stalk, herb butter and seasonal vegetables, and their mouthwatering Chickpea Burger made with fried squash and chipotle aioli on a brioche bun alongside a fabulous Grilled Peach Salad with roasted corn, pickled sweet peppers and an assortment of herbs. With full bellies, we sipped on a glass of Chenin Blanc wine and a beer and then strolled around the trendy neighborhood for some window shopping. Hampton + Hudson is a fantastic community bar and restaurant with an assortment of craft beers, cocktails and locally sourced food. You can check out their menus and more at www.hamptonandhudson.com. ■ To have us review your event or restaurant, contact us at 404-883-2130, jen@ atljewishtimes.com or michal@atljewishtimes.com.


COMMUNITY SIMCHA SPOTLIGHT

B’nai Mitzvah Notices: Ari Mitchell Levy, son of Stacey and Eric Levy, on Aug. 24.

Jolie Erin Levy, daughter of Stacey and Eric Levy, on Aug. 24. Raya Hope Leibowitz, daughter of Jennifer and Scott Leibowitz, on Aug. 31.

Have something to celebrate? Births, B’nai Mitzvah, Engagements, Weddings, Anniversaries, Special Birthdays and more ... Share it with your community with free AJT simcha announcements. Send info to submissions@atljewishtimes.com.

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CALENDAR AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 2

LimmudFest – Ramah Darom, 70 Camp Darom, Clayton. LimmudFest brings together Jews from all different Jewish backgrounds, denominations, ages and lifestyles in the north Georgia mountains. Each person creates their own Jewish experience by participating in workshops, discussions, art, music, food presentations, text-study sessions and more. All of this is made possible by a community of Limmud volunteers. For hours, pricing and more information, www.bit.ly/2OIaB5j.

CANDLE-LIGHTING TIMES

Re'eh Friday, August 30, 2019, light candles at 7:48 p.m. Saturday, August 31, 2019, Shabbat ends at 8:43 p.m. Shoftim Friday, September 6, 2019, light candles at 7:39 p.m. Saturday, September 7, 2019, Shabbat ends at 8:33 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

Helen Kotler, Ph.D., LPC. $25 per session. To join the group, hkotler@jfcsatl.org or call 404-210-9571.

Scholar in Residence: Dorice Horenstein – Temple Beth Tikvah, 9955 Cole-

Support Group – Grief and Loss –

CTeen Shabbaton – Chabad of North

Temple Beth David, 1885 McGee Road SW, Snellville, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. It is critically important to engage in selfcare. During these sessions you will gain spiritual resilience and participate according to your comfort level. Free. For more information, www.bit. ly/2TLWxXf.

Fulton, 10180 Jones Bridge Road, Alpharetta, from 5 p.m. Friday to 8 p.m. Sunday. Teens in grades 8 through 12 are invited to the Southeast Regional Shabbaton in Atlanta, Hosted by Chabad of North Fulton. $36 per teen and $72, including Six Flags ticket. For more information, www.bit. ly/2TAAB18.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

Rosh Chodesh Service – Congregation Etz Chaim, 1190 Indian Hills Parkway NE, Marietta, from 9:15 to 10 a.m. Join Etz Chaim for morning minyan each Rosh Chodesh in solidarity with the Women of the Wall. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/31lbWk4.

Synagogue, 600 Peachtree Battle Ave. NW, Atlanta, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy kosher BBQ, friends and family while listening to the sweet bluegrass tunes of musical guest, Nefesh Mountain. The evening will end with a musical Shabbat family service. The event is for all ages. $15 per child and $20 per adult. For more information, www.aasynagogue.org.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

Lunch & Learn with Rabbi Jesse – Temple Beth David, 1885 McGee Road SW, Snellville, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Topics will vary. Light dairy/pareve lunch will be provided by the rabbi. Free for members, $5 for non-members. For more information, www.bit. ly/2TLrhaM

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2

Divorce & Separation Support Group – Jewish Family & Career Services, 4549 Chamblee Dunwoody Road, Atlanta, from 6 to 8 p.m. Join this biweekly support group facilitated by

30 | AUGUST 30, 2019 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

BBQ and Shabbat Services with Nefesh Mountain – Ahavath Achim

man Road, Roswell, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Horenstein’s new book is “Moments of the Heart.” She was born and raised in Israel and moved to Portland after completing her service as an officer in the Israel Defense Forces. She worked in Jewish education for more than 30 years, transferring her love to Jewish traditions and the Hebrew language. Free. To register, www.bit.ly/30iRTT1.

Community Concert Ft. Nefesh Mountain – Ahavath Achim Synagogue, 600 Peachtree Battle Avenue NW, Atlanta, from 8 to 10 p.m. Nefesh Mountain is the place where bluegrass, old-time and American zroots music meet with Jewish heritage and tradition. $10 per adult. For more information, mhabif@aasynagogue.org or 404603-5749.

Shabbat Friday Night Monthly Musical Service – Congregation Etz Chaim, 1190 Indian Hills Parkway NE, Marietta, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Come be part of the Friday night musical service. Etz Chaim is looking for musicians of all ages, so if you play an instrument that enhances the ruach of Shabbat, join in. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2KGOyGZ.

Across the Divide: Examining Israel Engagement – The Selig Center, 1440

Eating Ethically with Dr. Jonathan Crane – The Cottage at Lost Corner

Spring St. NE, Atlanta, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Join Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, Israel Policy Forum and the ADL in an event designed to change that reality by bringing together important voices representing the upcoming generation of American Jewry to examine the various perspectives on Israel and highlight how younger Jews approach Israel differently from the older generation. Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2Z9bvgd.

Preserve, 7300 Brandon Mill Road NW, Sandy Springs, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Join The Sixth Point and OneTable for a wonderful learning opportunity, Shabbat service and dinner. The Sixth Point welcomes speaker Dr. Jonathan Crane to discuss his research on what it means to “eat ethically” as a Jew. Dr. Crane is both a rabbi and a professor of ethics. $15 per person. For more information, www.thesixthpoint.org/ events/.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

7th Annual Atlanta Kosher BBQ Festival – City Green at City Springs, 1 Galambos Way, Sandy Springs, from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The 7th Annual Atlanta Kosher BBQ Festival is back at City Springs. Join in for another day of bringing the community together over fantastic kosher BBQ. Free. Tasting tickets available for purchase. For more information, www.bit.ly/2zaT9Mk.


AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 9

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

2019 AJFF On Campus – Witness Theater, Pace Academy, 966 West Paces Ferry Road NW, Atlanta, from 7 to 10 p.m. The Atlanta Jewish Film Festival presents two AJFF On Campus events in 2019. The first, in partnership with Pace Academy, will feature a one-day screening on its campus in the Fine Arts Center. Following the one-day event at Pace, On Campus will continue at Emory University with a three-day version of the annual festival, featuring five highly lauded AJFF film favorites and special guest speakers. All AJFF On Campus events are open to students, faculty and staff, as well as the general public. Free for students, $5 for faculty and $15 general admission. For tickets and more information, www.ajff. org/oncampus.

Hebrew Reading Crash Course – Congregation Shearith Israel, 1180 University Drive, Atlanta, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Shearith Israel is pleased to present, in partnership with NJOP [National Jewish Outreach Program], a five-session Hebrew course for community members with little or no Hebrew literacy, interested in learning the alef-bet (alphabet). Free. For more information, www.bit.ly/2yHzpzs

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

“Jane: An Abortion Service” Film and Discussion – Plaza Theatre, 1049

Book Signing: “Extracted” by Dr. Perry Brickman – Robert W. Wood-

Ponce De Leon Ave. NE, Atlanta, from 3 to 5 p.m. NCJW Atlanta, in partnership with ACLU, presents the film and a discussion of life before Roe v. Wade, with a focus on our current fight for reproductive freedom. Featuring guest speaker Heather Booth, Jane’s founder, civil rights activist, feminist and political strategist. For more information and ticket prices, www.acluga.org/ jane.

ruff Library, 540 Asbury Circle, Atlanta, from 7 to 8 p.m. The Tam Institute for Jewish Studies invites you to a book signing featuring “Extracted: Unmasking Rampant Antisemitism in America’s Higher Education” by Dr. Perry Brickman. The event will be held in the Jones Room on the third floor of the Woodruff Library on Emory’s campus. Free. For more information, www.bit. ly/2Ng21IM.

A Labor Day Tradition Sunday, September 1st | 11am - 5pm Monday, September 2nd | 11am - 4pm Jewish Soul Food Free Admission Arts & Crafts

Bagel Eating Contest

Kid’s Activities

Temple Tours

Live Entertainment Find more events and submit items for our online and print calendars at:

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

Noshfest.com Calendar sponsored by the Atlanta Jewish Connector, an initiative of the AJT. In order to be considered for the print edition, please submit events two weeks in advance. Contact community relations director, Jen Evans, for more information at jen@atljewishtimes.com.

Temple Kol Emeth 1415 Old Canton Rd. • Marietta, GA 30062 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 31


Jewish Joke of the Week

KEEPING IT KOSHER Succulent Chicken with Squash

What Are You in Here For? Two kids are in a hospital, each lying on a stretcher next to each other outside the operating room. The first kid leans over and asks, “What are you in here for?” The second kid says, “I’m getting my tonsils out. I’m a little nervous.” The first kid says, “You’ve got nothing to worry about. I had that done when I was four. They put you to sleep and when you wake up, they give you lots of Jell-O and ice cream. It’s a breeze.” The second kid then asked, “What are you in here for?” The first kids says, “A circumcision.” The second kid replies, “Whoa, good luck buddy. I had that done when I was born, and I couldn’t walk for a year.” Joke provided by David Minkoff www.awordinyoureye.com

Yiddish Word of the Week Shmatte - ‫שמט‬ My grandma wears her shmatte every day around the house. A rag; a ragged or shabby garment; (slang) rubbish Origin, 1970s Yiddish: shmatte, from Polish szmata ‘rag’. The English translation: garbage, rubbish, junk; (colloquial) garbage can, rubbish tin.

Cooking and Prep: 3 hours Serves: 4 No Allergens Preference: Meat Difficulty: Easy Occasion: Sukkot Diet: Gluten Free This chicken dish is a whole meal in a pan! Great for Shabbos, Sukkot, or Yom Tov. 1 whole chicken, cut into eighths 2 large shallots 1 butternut squash 2 tablespoons stone-ground mustard 2 tablespoons Tonnelli Red Wine Vinegar 1 tablespoon raspberry vinegar (I used de la Rosa) 3 tablespoons Gefen Maple Syrup 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon dried rosemary 2 teaspoons crushed garlic or 2 cubes Gefen frozen garlic Salt, to taste Pepper, to taste Fresh parsley, for garnish Preheat oven to 400 F. Dice the shallots and the butternut squash. Place in the bottom of a large roasting pan. Place the chicken on top and season with salt and pepper. In a mixing bowl, whisk the mustard, vinegars, maple syrup, olive oil, garlic and rosemary. Pour over the chicken and squash. Cover the roasting pan and cook for two hours. Uncover and baste the chicken with the juices. Continue to cook for 45 minutes uncovered or until the chicken is glossy and well-done. Enjoy! Recipe by: Ashira Mirsky Source: Kosher.com

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BRAIN FOOD

A Matter of Principal

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1. Lavi and Ramah 6. Consul General of Israel Dayan 10. Big first for a baby 14. Like Jackie Chan 15. Glass and Gershwin 16. A fisherman may spin one 17. Archie's tefillin-wearing principal? 20. Author Silverstein 21. "Let ___" 22. Blaster output 23. Fairy tale villain....or hero 25. Wi-Fi relative 26. Zack Morris' principal who loved forming metal menorahs? 33. Famously fried item 34. New pedometer reading 35. Gin flavor 36. Doctors' org. 37. Ferris Bueller's mashuganeh principal? 41. "Little Women" author's initials 42. Stack 44. Isaac's replacement 45. "Greatest" in Arabic 47. Bart Simpson's dreidel playing principal? 51. Give an uzi to 52. Pe'ah, literally 53. Sawyer of note

56. Where Moses died 58. City south of Jerusalem 62. Harry Potter's headmaster who shared Moses' greatest quality? 65. Loathsome 66. It's about to start 67. He sang about only having daughters 68. Sisera killer 69. "What ___ can I say?" 70. Rocky's trainer or trainee?

26. Strong silk-like fiber 27. Where some think the Menorah is being held 28. Brings to ruin 29. "DuckTales, ___-oo!" 30. 1998 Edwin McCain hit 31. Former Fenway star Garciaparra 32. Paraphernalia 33. Pool exercise 38. Make like Max Weinberg 39. Choreographer Lubovitch 40. Yin's opposite 43. Name of many a Reform DOWN temple 1. Crow sounds 46. One preparing challah 2. Make, b'Ivrit 3. 1/500 of the Indianapolis 500 48. Bonanza finds 49. Piece of Fruity or Cocoa 4. Cellar door security cereal 5. ___-Caps (candy) 50. Baal, e.g. 6. Loser? 53. Jones of note 7. Palestinian, e.g. 54. Pelvic bones 8. Statistician Silver 55. Competent 9. Jew follower 56. Partner of void 10. Tzitzit strings, e.g. 57. Birds where Hanukkah falls 11. Running things in a bar out in the Summer 12. Robert of history 59. Wander 13. One may exert pressure 60. Actor Gross with a "lion" 18. Old Italian bread? name 19. They've (finally) started to 61. Mitzvah, perhaps update their in-flight entertain63. Half a laugh ment system 64. "Yadda, yadda, yadda" 24. Indian butter 25. Larry's pal Black

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first international squash competition. He represented the United States in the junior men’s world squash championship, held in Christchurch, New Zealand. The 17-year-old ranked 21 out of 27.

family’s 10,000-square-foot grocery store in Atlanta’s West End. Great Savings had been open since 1960, when Tenenbaum’s father, Sol, opened the store on Lowery Street.

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congregation was to be affiliated with the Orthodox Young Israel movement. Dues were set at about $300 a year.

15 Years Ago// August 27, 2004

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50 Years Ago// August 29, 1969 In 1994, Toco Hills got its fourth synagogue, which was affiliated with the Orthodox Young Israel movement. It recently broke ties with that organization.

■ Mr. and Mrs. Jack Isenberg announced the marriage of their daughter Renie Gail to Alan Robert Topper, the son of Mr. and Mrs. George Topper of Norfolk, Va. ■ Dr. and Mrs. Steven L. Sanders announced the birth of a son, Mark Ira, on July 16, 1969. Mark is the grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Schapiro of Bronxville, N. Y. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES AUGUST 30, 2019 | 33


OBITUARIES

Natalie Hankin Feldman 96, Atlanta

Natalie Hankin Feldman, 96, of Atlanta, passed away peacefully Aug. 23, 2019. Natalie was a native Atlantan and loving mother, aunt and wife. Natalie is preceded in death by her loving husband of 66 years, Arnold, and sister, Harlean Hankin Mandel. Natalie is survived by her daughter, Jana Feldman Kreisberg and son-in-law, Michael Kreisberg, of Atlanta; brotherin-law, Frank Mandel; nieces and nephews, Mark and Michele Mandel of Duluth, Caryn and Larry Gartner of Alpharetta; great nieces and nephews, Andrew and Samantha Mandel, and Steven, Carly, and Julie Gartner. Natalie was an Atlanta Board of Realtors Icon. She worked for Harry Norman Realtors for 37 years before retiring at age 85. She was named “Top Agent Companywide” in 1993 and Branch #1 Agent 18 times. She was among the “Top 20 Agents” with the Atlanta Board of Realtors nine times and assisted the board throughout her career. A funeral service was held Aug. 26, 2019, at the Sunrise Chapel at Arlington Memorial Park with Rabbi Neil Sandler officiating. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Weinstein Hospice, Ahavath Achim Synagogue, or the charity of your choice. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

Theodore G. Kaplan 89, Atlanta

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Theodore Gilbert Kaplan, 89, passed away peacefully, Aug. 24, 2019, while at home with his loving wife and best friend of 55 years, Ann Zeider Kaplan. Ted was born in Hazelton, Pa., and was working in the garment industry when he relocated to the South. As a young bachelor in Atlanta, he was fixed up with Ann, which began a love affair and exemplary marriage, as well as new fatherhood of two sons, Alan, 13 and Stan, 10, at the time. In 1968, Ted and Ann founded together what eventually became Stag Parkway, a national RV supply company, where they worked until retirement. Ted took pride in his successful business partnership with Ann, but also enjoyed an immensely compatible relationship for worldwide travel, entertaining, theater, symphony, friendships and adult learning courses. He also loved meeting friends for lunch and playing golf with his buddies. Ted valued his Jewish faith. He was a long-time member of Ahavath Achim Synagogue, and he, along with Ann, supported many Jewish causes, including the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta. However, Ted’s greatest joy was being with his loving and adoring family. Ted is survived by his wife, Ann, sons and daughters-in-law Alan and Betty Sunshine and Stan and Luci Sunshine; grandchildren Michael and Maya Sunshine, Justin and Jennifer Sunshine, Marshall Sunshine, and Blake and Adam Leiber; and great-grandchildren Ethan and Leo Sunshine, Leo Leiber, and Jackson Sunshine. He will be missed by all who knew him as a loving, humble, generous and gracious man. We love you Poppa. Donations may be made to Jewish Family & Career Services or the charity of choice. Funeral services were held Aug. 26 at Arlington Memorial Park. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999. Sign the guestbook at www. dresslerjewishfunerals.com. Obituaries in the AJT are written and paid for by the families; contact Managing Publisher Kaylene Ladinsky at kaylene@atljewishtimes.com or 404-883-2130, ext. 100, for details.

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‫זיכרונה לברכה‬


OBITUARIES

Jo Anne R. Klein 72, Virginia

Jo Anne R. Klein, 72, passed away peacefully Aug. 23, 2019. She was retired after 10 years as a sales representative for Remedy Staffing in Virginia Beach. Born in Nashville, Tenn., she was the daughter of the late Sidney J. Rosen and Muriel Helen Dorn Rosen. Mrs. Klein was a longtime member of Ohef Sholom Temple and its Sisterhood, was a group advisor for the Temple Youth Group (OSTY), the Auxiliary of Beth Sholom, and was a volunteer for the Beth Sholom Gift Shop. Left to cherish her memory is her beloved husband of 51 years, Kenneth Martin Klein; daughters, Andrea K. Levy (Sam) and Laura Beth Summerfield (Danny), all of Atlanta; and five grandchildren, Sydney Jordan, Jake, Molly and Marin. A funeral service was held Aug. 25 at Ohef Sholom Temple in Virginia with Rabbi Rosalin Mandelberg and Cantor Jennifer Rueben officiating. Burial was held Aug. 27 at Arlington Memorial Park in Sandy Springs. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be sent to Ohef Sholom Temple Youth Group (OSTY), 530 Raleigh Ave., Norfolk, VA 23507. Arrangements in Atlanta by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999. Sign the guestbook at www.dresslerjewishfunerals.com.

Adele Smithloff Michalove 89, Sandy Springs

Adele Smithloff Michalove of Sandy Springs passed away Aug. 25, 2019, onemonth shy of her 90th birthday. Known as Deli to family and friends, she was the daughter of Ben Smithloff and Jennie Maziar Smithloff. She was proud of being a native Atlantan, growing up in Grant Park and graduating from Girls High School in 1947. She attended the University of Georgia before her 1949 marriage to Leonard Michalove, the love of her life. In their 55 years together they had five children, many European travels, a lovely flower garden and a lively social life. Adele was an accomplished jewelry artist and participated for decades in classes at the Spruill Center for the Arts in Dunwoody. After she was widowed in 2005, she learned to read Hebrew and studied for three years to mark her 80th birthday with an adult bat mitzvah at Temple Sinai, of which she and Lenny had been founding members. For the past four years, Adele lived at Huntcliff Terrace, where she charmed the staff and neighbors with her unfailing smile, hugs and warmth. Her devotion to family and friends, her generous hospitality, her rosy outlook and her infectious laugh will be missed. She was beautiful inside and out. Adele is survived by her children Carla, Barbara, Brad (Mary Beth), Amy and Steven; grandchildren Robin Poppsinger, Ariel and Zac Singer, Jenn Anglin, Leah, Johan and David Michalove; great-grandchildren Elex and Bay Poppsinger and Santiago Singer; nieces Linda Stone and Ellen Frankle; nephew Scott Michalove; and sisters-inlaw Charlotte Smithloff and Shirley Michalove. Memorial contributions may be made to the Temple Sinai Social Action Committee or Spruill Center for the Arts. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999. ■

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CLOSING THOUGHTS Elul: Clearing Our Souls Rosh Chodesh Elul bethrough, nail polish regins at sundown Friday, Aug. moved, teeth brushed and 30. Our task this month is flossed. There are no deto become the highest verodorants, perfumes, soaps, sion of ourselves. We begin jewelry, contact lenses, or our preparation as we delve anything that might act as into cheshbon hanefesh, an a barrier between us and accounting of the soul. Hashem. What if we all, in Before we can transthe privacy of our own expeform, though, we must strip rience of Elul, allowed ourourselves down to the core, Dr. Terry selves to be that pure, honacknowledging ways in Segal est, naked and vulnerable in which we’ve deviated from New Moon Meditations the presence of G-d? our paths. If we just conWe take stock of our accern ourselves with the new appearance tions from the past year. Where did we turn without clearing the old, it would be like or split away from ourselves, our teachings, going to bed with makeup on and apply- our learning, and from our Source of all ing more over it in the morning without there is? This process can be painful and washing our faces, painting over chipped uncomfortable, but it can also be freeing. nail polish, or waxing a dirty car so that it As we move toward Yom Kippur and looks shiny. That’s only temporary. atoning for our sins before G-d and each Elul is the time to get clear and deep other, we need to clear our holy vessels of clean our souls. Clean like before a mik- emotional toxicity that can burden our vah. Halachah, Jewish law, stipulates that systems and create dis-ease. Dis-ease can one must be scrupulously clean before develop into disease, if left untreated. immersing, as pristine and unadorned as Fairly recently, I learned about forest when entering this earth. Beyond show- bathing, and am set to begin offering forest ering and hair washing, conditioner is bathing experiences. The forest is the perthoroughly rinsed out, knots combed fect place in which to do the spiritual work

of soul clearing. By way of explanation, forest bathing does not involve rolling around on the forest floor, nor is it standing in the forest in the rain with shampoo and a bar of soap. What it is, is an immersion in the sensory experiences of the forest. Grounding, or earthing, has gained popularity in the last decade or more, as a source of healing. Forest bathing, however, is the English translation of what is referred to as shinrin-yoku, in Japanese. The term was coined in 1982, by Tomohide Akiyama of the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries as a way to appreciate the value of the forest beyond logging. Research supports the healing benefits of unplugging from technology and returning to the woods. Connection to Mother Nature began at the beginning of time, but re-connection now is more than a trendy antidote to the stressors of living in cities. To discharge and release stress is a vital component of healing. B.P. Tokin discovered in the 1930s that forest healing takes place, in part, because of the phytoncides, from the Greek, phyto, meaning plant, and cide, extermination. Plants emit substances, such as essential oils, that protect them from the harmful effects of the environment. It turns out

that, as the plants are protected, so are we, as we share space with them. To spend time in the presence of trees, hold a smooth stone, or listen to a babbling brook, is to encounter sacred, Divine energy. There is reverence upon entering the sanctuary of a forest. No gear or strenuous hiking is required. Just a willingness to be present and open to receiving and sharing, which is different for each person. There are “invitations,” as the sensory exercises are referred to, that foster a deep sense of peace and relationship to the elements of the woods. It is believed that each forest bathing experience gives one exactly what is needed. Meditation Focus: Choose a spot in nature and focus, first on movement, then color, sound, scent and textures. Forest bathe to realign with your neshama, your pure soul. ■

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