Page 1

THE

2019

InBUSINESS USINESS YEARBOOK

CONNECTING IRISH BUSINESS

CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

InBUSINESS YEARBOOK 2019

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP: Why Your Business Should Join

THE

PEOPLE-FIRST APPROACH RBK MANAGING PARTNER

David Gleeson ON EXPANSION, FOSTERING EXCELLENCE AND PROVIDING TAILORED SOLUTIONS

9

2.70

@ChambersIreland

95

772009 393018

000 InBusiness YB 2019_Cover.indd 1

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The Dillon Eustace client list includes leading national and international corporates and institutions. From our largest to our smallest clients, the international quality of our service and expertise is assured. Banking

Dispute Resolution

Listing Services

Capital Markets

Distressed Investing

Litigation

Commercial Property

Financial Services

Mergers & Acquisitions

Compliance

Insolvency

Regulatory Compliance

Corporate Finance

Insurance

Structured Finance

Corporate Recovery

Investment Funds

Tax

To discuss how Dillon Eustace can help your business, and learn more about our services, contact Mark Thorne, Managing Partner, on mark.thorne@dilloneustace.ie or phone 01-6670022. dilloneustace.com

Advert template.indd 1 246913_1C_Dillon Eustace_JM_IBYB19.indd 1

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Editor: Adam Hyland Art Director: Alan McArthur

COVER STORY

Editorial Assistant: Leona Murphy (Chambers Ireland) Editorial Contributors: Pauline Lowe (Chambers Ireland)

W

Chartered Accountancy and Business Advisory firm, RBK, continues to expand, but retains a focus on the core values that have led to its success, Managing Partner David Gleeson tells InBUSINESS.

ACCESSIBLE, AFFORDABLE, EXPERT ADVICE IS OUR KEY DIFFERENTIATOR AND MAKES US A REAL ALTERNATIVE IN THE MARKET.”

ith the Irish economy in good health, businesses of every size are looking to expand. Allied with that growth comes the need for additional financial, accounting and taxation services. It’s no surprise, therefore, that RBK is enjoying significant growth of their own. “We had a very good year in 2018 and so far, this year is positive too,” says Managing Partner David Gleeson. “The economy is performing well, and with that comes increased demand for many of our services, particularly in Taxation, Corporate Finance and Transactional Support Services.” The Midlands-based organisation has come a long way since it was founded in 1958 and celebrated its 60th anniversary last year. Through organic growth and astute mergers, the firm has expanded over the decades to become Ireland’s largest independently branded accountancy and professional advisory firm. It established a Dublin presence in 2001 to add to offices in Athlone and Roscommon, and with a team of 17 partners and staff of almost 200, RBK has also branched out to the global market being the sole Irish member of the Leading Edge Alliance (LEA). LEA is the second largest

THE

PEOPLE-FIRST

Design Assistant: James Moore

APPROACH

Front Cover Photography: Paul McCarthy

Paul McCarthy

RBK Managing Partner, David Gleeson at Make Space Studio, The Chocolate Factory, Dublin

30

Managing Director: Gerry Tynan Sales Director/Chairman: Diarmaid Lennon

Published by: Ashville Media Group, Old Stone Building, Blackhall Green, Dublin 7 Tel: +353 1 432 2200 Email: info@ashville.com Web: www.ashville.com On behalf of: Chambers Ireland, 11 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, D02 FY84 Tel: +353 1 400 4300 Email: info@chambers.ie Web: www.chambers.ie

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

30

COVER STORY:

The people-first approach

CHAMBERS IRELAND 2018

Chambers Ireland: The Year in Pictures

FOREWORD

Rising

TO THIS YEAR’S MANY

Challenges

Brexit uncertainty, rising business costs, housing and skills shortages are among the challenges facing Irish business in 2019, but there is reason to be optimistic about the resilience of our economy, writes Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland.

OUR FOCUS FOR THE YEAR AHEAD In consultation with our Network, we’ll be working on a handful of issues of both immediate and long-term impact for business. As always, the competitiveness of the Irish economy and Irish businesses will be at the top of our list. Rising costs and global threats mean that it’s becoming a much more challenging environment to operate in. Ensuring that the competitiveness of the economy is a priority for Government will be central to our work. Beyond economic competitiveness, we expect to finally gain some clarity on the nature of the UK’s departure from the European Union. Unfortunately, at the time of writing, a Withdrawal Agreement has not been ratified. In the absence of this ratification, we must prepare for the worst. A “No Deal” Brexit is the worst possible

The Irish Government

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland

SKILLS AND LABOUR MARKET PARTICIPATION Skills and labour shortages are a challenge being experienced right across the EU and Ireland is no different. Technological change is a major driver of economic growth, but can also contribute to displacing traditional jobs and industries. We believe that investment in life-long training and education will go a long way in addressing emerging skills gaps and jobs displacement. We must also look at labour activation in a more focused way during the year ahead. In our Budget 2019 submission, we highlighted that more could be done to boost productivity in the economy if Government took steps to enable and support more women to enter (in many case re-enter) the work-place. By making childcare more affordable, female labour market participation will improve and the economy will subsequently benefit.

Policy Update

HOUSING Over the past few years, the housing crisis has dominated discussions across Ireland. The intensity and complexity of the housing crisis, in terms of supply and affordability, has been identified by our Network as a nationwide risk for business. The under-supply of affordable housing is particularly harmful to business through increased cost of living affecting wage pressures, businesses’ ability to attract appropriately skilled workers and high rental costs for companies located in urban areas. Not only is this a threat to Ireland’s current competitiveness but it will negatively impact our future economic growth. Chambers Ireland will work over the next year with government to make sure that initiatives are introduced that will support an increased supply of appropriate and affordable housing across the country.

The Chamber Network: The Year in Pictures

IRELAND AS A LOW CARBON ECONOMY outcome for Irish business and so over the coming months we will be working with our member chambers in preparing for what could be a much-changed trading relationship with the UK. Businesses not only require advice, but will likely require financial aid and assistance to help them through a very turbulent period. We will be making the case to Government and to the European Union that the special circumstances demand special assistance if Irish businesses are to weather the storm. Brexit and the threat to competitiveness are not the only two areas we plan to focus on, however. Our Network has also identified three priority issues that require our attention for the coming year.

Rising temperatures and more extreme weather events proved that climate change is no longer a distant threat, but a visible reality. The Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) 2019 reported that existing climate efforts to reduce carbon emissions will not enable Ireland to achieve either its EU 2020 or 2030 targets. Chambers Ireland will be working with its Network of chambers this year to identify ways that businesses can be supported to transition to a greener, more circular economy. CONCLUSION A turbulent year awaits us, but within every crisis, there will also be opportunities for Ireland and the business community to distinguish itself. We look forward to engaging with and advocating for our Network in the coming year to build a more competitive, resilient and sustainable economy.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

7

Despite the many challenges to Irish business in 2019, there is cause for optimism, writes Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland

PAGE

82

MEMBERS DIRECTORY

PAGE

85

CORPORATE PARTNERS

CHAMBERS FOREWORD:

Rising to this year’s many challenges

DIRECTORY

closed out the year recording a surplus of a100million, the first since the economic crash in 2008. This has been an impressive achievement for Government and a testament to the strong performance of the Irish economy in challenging times. However, as we face into 2019, we cannot ignore the sense of foreboding in the air. There is still huge uncertainty in global markets for the year ahead and the Brexit deadline is ever closer, with a formal deal still not agreed upon. Further, with increases to VAT, minimum wages, commercial rates and other costs to business, there are growing concerns as to the competitiveness of Irish business, despite the best efforts of Irish entrepreneurs. Our members were concerned as to the lack of provisions in Budget 2019 to support our competitiveness and we would hope that the Department of Finance will listen more carefully to business on issues such as Capital Gains Tax reform and additional supports for entrepreneurs. as part of Budget 2020. Looking ahead, 2019 brings with it at least two sets of elections - local and European. We will be paying close attention to what happens in Brussels following the election of a new Parliament and President of the Commission. Ireland is one of the most pro-European countries in the Union, with the lasts Eurobarometer poll noting that a total of 85 per cent of people believe that Ireland should remain in the EU. However, our support for the EU does not mean that we are complacent as to its impact on our economy and our policies. Maintaining sovereignty on setting our own tax code will be an issue we will be strongly advocating for in the year ahead.

08

001 InBusiness YB 2019_Contents.indd 1

Chamber Membership

CHAMBERS IRELAND 2018

FOREWORD

6

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

About Chambers Ireland

31

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

RBK Managing Partner David Gleeson talks to InBUSINESS about retaining the core values that have led to its success

All articles © Ashville Media Group 2019. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher. Opinion and comments expressed herein are not necessarily those of Ashville Media or Chambers Ireland. ISSN 20093934

Message from the President

International Association in the world, creating a high quality alliance of 226 firms focussed on providing financial and business advisory services, who operate from 62 offices in 110 countries. SUCCESS With their range of services mirroring their organisational growth, the recipients of the 2018 InBusiness Recognition Award for Best Financial and Business Advisory Company continues to go from strength to strength. But what is the secret to RBK’s success? “Accessible, affordable, expert advice is our key differentiator and makes us a real alternative in the market,” Gleeson says. “Having a standout team of experts in a number of fields throughout our offices is a key factor in delivering value to our clients. With a team of very senior and highly skilled Partners and Directors at the helm, we serve the diverse needs of our expanding client base.” Another thing that makes RBK stand out is their “people first” approach. “We start with identifying clients’ family or personal goals and try to understand how their business(es) fit in with these goals,” explains Gleeson. “What supports do they want from us in making business decisions? That is what drives us and informs us on the services to provide. We always have at least two senior points of contact with each client, and it is so important to be able to identify where we can provide advice and support to help them in their business decisions. We strive to be seen as being Partners

Production Manager: Jane Matthews Production Executive: Nicole Ennis

[CHAMBERS NEWS]

PAGE

85

STRATEGIC PARTNERS

PAGE

86

CORPORATE PATRONS

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

81

Chambers Ireland Directory

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InBUSINESS USINESS YEARBOOK

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CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

InBUSINESS YEARBOOK 2019

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP: Why Your Business Should Join

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InBUSINESS USINESS CONNECTING IRISH BUSINESS

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CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

RBK MANAGING PARTNER

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

David Gleeson ON EXPANSION, FOSTERING EXCELLENCE AND PROVIDING TAILORED SOLUTIONS

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InBUSINESS WINTER 2018

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FIFTY-THREE SIX TAKING SPORTS MARKETING TO A NEW LEVEL

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MICHAEL MURPHY ON LASTING 100 YEARS IN BUSINESS

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SMART SOLUTIONS FOR THOSE ON THE ROAD

InBUSINESS AUTUMN 2018

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A LOOK INSIDE WEWORK’S NEW DUBLIN PREMISES

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THE

2019

InBUSINESS USINESS CONNECTING IRISH BUSINESS

YEARBOOK

CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

InBUSINESS YEARBOOK 2019

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP: Why Your Business Should Join

THE

PEOPLE-FIRST APPROACH RBK MANAGING PARTNER

David Gleeson ON EXPANSION, FOSTERING EXCELLENCE AND PROVIDING TAILORED SOLUTIONS

a2.70

@ChambersIreland

95

772009 393018

Go to chambers.ie for the online edition

06

[ SITE FOR SORE EYES ] For our cover shoot with David Gleeson, we again chose the MakeSpace studio at the trendy location of the Chocolate Factory on Dublin’s King’s Inn Street. Once an actual chocolate factory where iconic brands such as Toblerone were produced, the site is now home to many small businesses and individuals in the creative sectors.

Diary Planner Key Dates for Irish Business in 2019

20

A focus on Europe Chambers Ireland continues to work with Eurochambres to ensure a stable, protrade and business-friendly environment

www.chocolatefactory.ie

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LEINSTER • MUNSTER • CONNAUGHT • ULSTER Dublin transport under strain as working population surges, National Opera House extends sponsorship, Naas wins night-time economy

Fermoy claims cleanest town award, innovation centre construction begins in Ennistymon, Limerick tourism boost as city to host Tag Rugby World Cup

Plans for joint development of Castlebar and Westport, Sligo sees unprecedented investment, NUI Galway leads the way with medtech projects to treat chronic diseases

02

Letterkenny wins enterprise award for local economy, Cavan secures funding for four outdoor recreation projects, Monaghan sees funding for road development and improvement rise by 22% on last year

CMYK: 83 / 0 / 8 / 0

CMYK: CMYK: 49 / 0 / 100 / 0 0 / 0 / 0 / 100

HEX: 40B3DF

HEX: A8CB17

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RGB: 168/203/23

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Font:

• Din Medium • Din Regular

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Champions in CSR

DUBLIN’S GRIDLOCK THREAT Investment in public transport needed in the capital to meet the demands of an everincreasing working population.

The 2018 Chambers Ireland CSR Awards Winners WATERFORD’S REGENERATION North Quays and Tramore development plans

03

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

02

EXPANSION BRINGS JOB BOOST

In Association with

An Bord Pleanála call action on expansion of Wicklow studio where hit TV show Vikings is filmed

1

Our Local Government InBUSINESS Supplement continues to look at the important role played by local authorities in Irish enterprise

In Association with

EXCELLENCE IN CSR COMMUNICATIONS Diageo Ireland St James’s Gate Quarter – Conversations at the Gate project St James’s Gate – Conversations at the Gate is a programme designed to engage with local and national stakeholders to share Diageo’s ambition and understand the views of as many people as possible on what an urban quarter should be. For the launch, the PR value came to a4,200,649.41.

EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENT - LIC Deloitte Deloitte’s Green Agenda project Now in its 10th year, Deloitte’s Green Agenda programme continues to make a positive impact on the environment. The programme addressing environmental issues has allowed Deloitte to embed sustainability into the firm’s operations while promoting employee awareness. Green Champions assist the environmental team in raising awareness and encouraging employee engagement.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – PARTNERSHIP WITH CHARITY - LIC Diageo Ireland

53 Celebrating 200 Years of the Dublin Pub – Diageo and LVA ALONE Partnership

In association with the Licensed Vintner’s Association, Diageo’s master brewers created Dublin Amber Ale to celebrate 200 years of the Dublin pub in 2017. With 50 cent from each pint sold given to ALONE for their Befriending Network, and for the construction of homes for the elderly, over a225,000 was raised.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – PARTNERSHIP WITH CHARITY - LIC Vodafone Ireland Ltd Vodafone and Childline – Working Together to Keep Children Safe by Keeping them Connected

56

Vodafone Foundation Ireland and ISPCC Childline commenced a five-year partnership in 2016, with the aim of keeping children safe by keeping them connected. With a new text service in place and the online webchat and website being rebuilt, their marketing campaign sees Childline reach out to children to normalise talking and promote resilience. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENT - MNC Lidl Ireland A Better Tomorrow Having joined Bord Bia’s Origin Green Sustainable Development programme in 2017, Lidl Ireland developed targets to be achieved by 2020. Environmental achievements on the ‘A Better Tomorrow’ project included ISO50001 energy management accreditation, zero waste to landfill, and a food redistribution programme, which saw 149 tonnes of food donated to charities.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – VOLUNTEERING - LIC Earth’s Edge Explore, Experience, Evolve The Earth’s Edge “Explore Experience Evolve” programme saw Earth’s Edge partner with Warrenmount Presentation, a disadvantaged girls’ school in Dublin, to promote confidence, wellbeing and fitness amongst the students by offering training in outdoor skills. With students selected based on attendance and good behaviour, it was a useful motivational tool.

57

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

Excellence on the Ground

The 2018 Excellence in Local Government Award Winners

82

The contacts for forums and working groups in Ireland

001 InBusiness YB 2019_Contents.indd 3

AWARDS 2018 2018

61

External Representation

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

CSR

E RS

[ Local Government InBUSINESS ]

CSR

2018 AWARDS 2018

Engaging Our National Stakeholders

Chambers engaged with a number of key organisations throughout the year across our network

CSR CATEGORY WIN

TEGORY WINNERS CA

N

22

16 CSR

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18

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Pat McDonagh, Owner Supermac’s, Trócaire Supporter.

“ my business has helped children children go go to to

school and and provided provided

water to

vulnerable villages in in

zimbabwe “

Find out what your business can do by partnering with Trócaire: Please contact us on 00 353 1 629 3333 or visit trocaire.org Trócaire Head Office, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland Irish Charity No. CHY 5883

Advert template.indd 1 Trocaire Corporate Ad A4 FINAL.indd 1

27/02/2019 16:15 05/09/2016 09:51


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 AFFILIATED CHAMBER LOCATIONS

Northern Ireland Chamber of Commerce and Industry

County Meath

Tullamore & District

Drogheda & District

Dún Laoghaire - Rathdown Bray & & District

County Kildare

Arklow & District

County Carlow

County Tipperary

New Ross & District

Enniscorthy & District

Dungarvan & West Waterford

Bantry

42 Affiliated Chambers

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

005 InBusiness YB 2019_Chamber Map.indd 5

Cobh & Harbour

8,000

1,230

business members represented across the country

Lobbying Returns submitted across the Chamber Network since Sept 2015

Further details of each affiliated Chamber can be found between pages 83 to 84

5

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 2019 KEY DATES

JANUARY

2019 KEY DATES*

10th 16th 21st Chamber Brexit Event

Chamber Executive Forum

Lobbying Returns due

FEBRUARY

19th 20th 27th Brussels Trip

Marie Keating “Getting Back to Work After Cancer” Brochure Launch

Brussels Trip

MARCH

1st 4th 8th 28th 29th Chamber Awards application deadline

Chamber CSR Awards International Women’s Day Governance Applications 2019 Training open

Brexit

APRIL

1st CSR Awards application deadline

4th 10th ELG Awards Applications open

Chambers Awards 2019

MAY

9th 15th 16th 21st 24th *As of January 2019

6

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ELG Awards application deadline

Chamber Executive Forum

Chamber Executive Forum

Lobbying Returns due

Local & EU Elections

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 2019 KEY DATES

JUNE

World Chambers Congress, Rio de Janeiro

SEPTEMBER

5th 19th 21st 24th 25th Chamber Executive Forum

CSR Awards

Lobbying Returns due

OCTOBER

8th Budget 2020

Chambers Ireland AGM

Pre-budget Lobbying Day

2019 KEY DATES*

12th-14th

NOVEMBER

13th 28th Chamber Executive Forum

Excellence in Local Government (ELG) Awards

DECEMBER

24th Chambers Ireland offices close for Christmas InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2018 FOREWORD

Rising

TO THIS YEAR’S MANY

Challenges

Brexit uncertainty, rising business costs, housing and skills shortages are among the challenges facing Irish business in 2019, but there is reason to be optimistic about the resilience of our economy, writes Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland.

The Irish Government

closed out the year recording a surplus of ď Ą100million, the first since the economic crash in 2008. This has been an impressive achievement for Government and a testament to the strong performance of the Irish economy in challenging times. However, as we face into 2019, we cannot ignore the sense of foreboding in the air. There is still huge uncertainty in global markets for the year ahead and the Brexit deadline is ever closer, with a formal deal still not agreed upon. Further, with increases to VAT, minimum wages, commercial rates and other costs to business, there are growing concerns as to the competitiveness of Irish business, despite the best efforts of Irish entrepreneurs. Our members were concerned as to the lack of provisions in Budget 2019 to support our competitiveness and we would hope that the Department of Finance will listen more carefully to business on issues such as Capital Gains Tax reform and additional supports for entrepreneurs. as part of Budget 2020. Looking ahead, 2019 brings with it at least two sets of elections - local and European. We will be paying close attention to what happens in Brussels following the election of a new Parliament and President of the Commission. Ireland is one of the most pro-European countries in the Union, with the last Eurobarometer poll noting that a total of 85 per cent of people believe that Ireland should remain in the EU. However, our support for the EU does not mean that we are complacent as to its impact on our economy and our policies. Maintaining sovereignty on setting our own tax code will be an issue we will be strongly advocating for in the year ahead.

8

008 InBusiness YB 2019_Foreword_REV.indd 8

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

28/02/2019 10:54


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2018 FOREWORD

OUR FOCUS FOR THE YEAR AHEAD In consultation with our Network, we’ll be working on a handful of issues of both immediate and long-term impact for business. As always, the competitiveness of the Irish economy and Irish businesses will be at the top of our list. Rising costs and global threats mean that it’s becoming a much more challenging environment to operate in. Ensuring that the competitiveness of the economy is a priority for Government will be central to our work. Beyond economic competitiveness, we expect to finally gain some clarity on the nature of the UK’s departure from the European Union. Unfortunately, at the time of writing, a Withdrawal Agreement has not been ratified. In the absence of this ratification, we must prepare for the worst. A “No Deal” Brexit is the worst possible

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland

SKILLS AND LABOUR MARKET PARTICIPATION Skills and labour shortages are a challenge being experienced right across the EU and Ireland is no different. Technological change is a major driver of economic growth, but can also contribute to displacing traditional jobs and industries. We believe that investment in life-long training and education will go a long way in addressing emerging skills gaps and jobs displacement. We must also look at labour activation in a more focused way during the year ahead. In our Budget 2019 submission, we highlighted that more could be done to boost productivity in the economy if Government took steps to enable and support more women to enter (in many case re-enter) the work-place. By making childcare more affordable, female labour market participation will improve and the economy will subsequently benefit.

HOUSING Over the past few years, the housing crisis has dominated discussions across Ireland. The intensity and complexity of the housing crisis, in terms of supply and affordability, has been identified by our Network as a nationwide risk for business. The under-supply of affordable housing is particularly harmful to business through increased cost of living affecting wage pressures, businesses’ ability to attract appropriately skilled workers and high rental costs for companies located in urban areas. Not only is this a threat to Ireland’s current competitiveness but it will negatively impact our future economic growth. Chambers Ireland will work over the next year with Government to make sure that initiatives are introduced that will support an increased supply of appropriate and affordable housing across the country.

IRELAND AS A LOW CARBON ECONOMY outcome for Irish business and so over the coming months we will be working with our member chambers in preparing for what could be a much-changed trading relationship with the UK. Businesses not only require advice, but will likely require financial aid and assistance to help them through a very turbulent period. We will be making the case to Government and to the European Union that the special circumstances demand special assistance if Irish businesses are to weather the storm. Brexit and the threat to competitiveness are not the only two areas we plan to focus on, however. Our Network has also identified three priority issues that require our attention for the coming year.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

008 InBusiness YB 2019_Foreword_REV.indd 9

Rising temperatures and more extreme weather events proved that climate change is no longer a distant threat, but a visible reality. The Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) 2019 reported that existing climate efforts to reduce carbon emissions will not enable Ireland to achieve either its EU 2020 or 2030 targets. Chambers Ireland will be working with its Network of chambers this year to identify ways that businesses can be supported to transition to a greener, more circular economy. CONCLUSION A turbulent year awaits us, but within every crisis, there will also be opportunities for Ireland and the business community to distinguish itself. We look forward to engaging with and advocating for our Network in the coming year to build a more competitive, resilient and sustainable economy.

9

28/02/2019 10:55


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27/02/2019 31/01/2019 15:55 10:54


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Amidst the ongoing political

and economic uncertainty, which has become the new normal for many of our neighbours, 2018 was another year of encouraging economic growth, with growing global visibility and confidence for Ireland. SMEs across Ireland, including indigenous companies, constitute as one of the biggest employers across the country, accounting for 80 per cent of total employment in the Irish economy, which also make up the majority of Chamber membership nationwide. A decade on from a generation-defining economic downturn, 2018 saw employment levels rise to a record 2.27 million. Recent figures from IDA also show that a record 230,000 people are working for multinationals which have been attracted to establishing footing within Ireland. To complete this picture, the first surplus in over a decade was recorded to have been collected at the end of 2018, which occurred against projections of a deficit to close out last year. We also remain one of the top-ranking countries globally in which to do business. While these are significant milestones in our recovery and future growth prospects, Brexit still looms large. With the UK’s departure expected to take place this March, further clarity on our future relationship with the UK is yet to be provided. 2019 is also expected to be a year of weaker global growth, with lowered growth forecasts for the EU and trade disruptions between the US and China together creating widespread economic risk. Since many of these challenges remain beyond our control, Irish business must prioritise resilience in the year ahead. Economic resilience must be supported by prudent economic planning from Government if we are to maintain our position as a competitive and open economy which punches well above our weight. 2018 continued the trend of collaboration between Chambers, and mergers of Chambers, with the establishment of County Meath Chamber, merging our affiliated Navan and Kells Chambers together with a number of other Chambers in the county. A strong Chamber with critical mass is hugely beneficial to its respective County, acting as a beacon for economic activity within and beyond its County, and facilitating development at regional level and visibility at national level. We also established a new initiative in 2018 in the form of our inaugural Budget Dialogue Day, where Chamber representatives from across the country assembled in Dublin to engage with Ministers and their local TDs and Senators on key policy interests and challenges for businesses, including making childcare more affordable, future skills needs and the high cost of living across Ireland. The Dialogue was a brilliant success and we’re looking forward to the next one in the runup to Budget 2020 later this year. Chambers Ireland’s annual Corporate Social Responsibility Awards in September and Excellence in Local Government Awards in November met the high levels of expectation surrounding them both in the build-up to each Award ceremony, with exceptional shortlists for each Award ceremony, setting the benchmark on what can be achieved within indigenous and international companies and local authorities across the country today. On a final note, I am proud to have been elected as the latest President of Chambers Ireland and I feel privileged to be in the position to collaborate with the many talented people within the Chamber Network for the year ahead.

Siobhan Kinsella President, Chambers Ireland

“ECONOMIC

RESILIENCE MUST BE SUPPORTED BY PRUDENT

ECONOMIC PLANNING

FROM GOVERNMENT IF WE ARE TO

MAINTAIN OUR POSITION AS A COMPETITIVE AND OPEN ECONOMY WHICH

PUNCHES WELL ABOVE OUR WEIGHT.”

I wish you all a successful 2019.

A Message

from the

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 SPONSORS

SPONSORS Chambers Ireland wishes to thank its sponsors for their continued support.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2018 ABOUT CHAMBERS IRELAND

Who : we are

By engaging with our network of local chambers across the country and encouraging better business practices for long-term development at local, regional and national level, Chambers Ireland works to advance Irish business at home and abroad.

THE WORK OF CHAMBERS IRELAND A glance at Chambers Ireland’s main areas of activity:

REPRESENTING IRISH BUSINESS INTERESTS

As a lobbying organisation, we represent Irish business interests at local, regional and national level to the Irish Government, while also exerting influence through our presence on key policy-making boards and councils.

SUPPORTING BUSINESS AND STRENGTHENING THE NETWORK

Chambers Ireland supports SMEs and larger businesses in Ireland through the Chamber Network. We provide information and advice to businesses on a range of topics and issues.

INTERNATIONAL INFLUENCE

Chambers Ireland is an active member of both EUROCHAMBRES and the International Chamber of Commerce, which represents businesses at EU, pan-European and international level. Chambers Ireland engagement on these important business platforms ensures greater visibility and competitiveness for Irish business on a global stage.

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As the largest business organisation nation-wide, Chambers Ireland’s primary aim is to advance Ireland’s competitiveness through developing the best environment for all businesses at all levels, while facilitating the growth of the Irish Chamber network. The Irish Chamber network consists of both local and regional Chambers and which are governed by a board of directors. Chambers Ireland acts as one voice on behalf of this network. We monitor the relevant policy issues that businesses care about and are affected by, and represent the views of business to Government, through research, lobbying and representation on policy-making boards and councils influential to Government, including the Advisory Group on the National Planning Framework, the National Competitiveness Council, the National Corporate Social Responsibility Stakeholder Forum and more. Our membership and participation on these fora is strengthened by our policy taskforces, a public affairs forum and the chief executives forum. INTERNATIONAL PROFILE In addition to these various levels of domestic influence, Chambers Ireland also engages at a European and international level, as a member of the Paris-based International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the largest business representative organisation worldwide, and as a member of EUROCHAMBRES, the association of European Chambers of Commerce and Industry. As a member of the ICC, Chambers Ireland acts as the Irish national committee of the ICC, which allows us to advocate the interests of our members to the intergovernmental organisations that legislate on international trade. The work of the ICC includes arbitration and dispute resolution, promoting the importance for open trade, business self-regulation, fighting corruption and more. Chambers Ireland is also one of the national chamber of commerce members of EUROCHAMBRES, the voice of the business community at EU level, representing more than 20 million businesses across Europe. EUROCHAMBRES aims to improve the conditions of the Single Market to facilitate trade within and beyond the EU, through engagement with EU institutions and coordinating projects to benefit businesses.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP

Chamber Executives outside the Merrion Hotel in Dublin during one of many events held to promote better networking and collaboration between Chambers

Chambers: THE VOICE OF

BUSINESS IN IRELAND By joining your local Chamber, you’ll receive members-only benefits, exclusive advertising, networking opportunities and increased publicity for your organisation, along with representation at a national level through Chambers Ireland.

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With 42

accredited Chambers around Ireland, businesses in the Chamber Network are widely represented across the country. The Chamber Network is Ireland’s largest business representative organisation, working to promote the enhanced economic and social development of communities in order to make them a better place to work, live and do business. Local economic development is one of the Chamber Network’s core policy priorities. The strength of the local economy is vital for the success of any business. Chambers work to encourage and promote local economic development for their communities and deliver significant results for their members.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP

HERE ARE THE KEY AREAS WHERE CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP CAN BENEFIT YOUR BUSINESS:

 OUR VOICE WITH Y GOVERNMENT Chambers around Ireland represent their members at meetings with local authorities and politicians and during events throughout the year. Have your say in local government through the Chamber advocacy efforts. Chambers lobby their Local Authorities on many issues that need to be addressed for their members.

EXPANDING YOUR MARKET Membership of the Chamber allows businesses to access new customers and provides the opportunity to diversify their supply chain. We can help businesses find potential new markets and identify where to get the resources they need to develop.

BETTER NETWORKING Members of Chambers are invited to many networking events. This opens up opportunities for members to do business with other companies in their Chamber’s network. It has been recorded that 60 per cent of members do business at Chamber events through meeting with other members and their contacts. You can connect and engage with a broader audience and expand your network through your local Chamber.

 ESULTS THROUGH R COLLABORATION Gain a competitive edge over non-members with exclusive training opportunities on current topics. Chambers organise training across a variety of topics. The Chamber should be the first place you approach with any business issue. With the resources and experience we have available in our network, we can supply you with the information you need in a timely manner.

 ELPING YOU H GROW YOUR BUSINESS Enhance your reputation and increase awareness through membership. Chamber members have the benefit of the Chamber President, CEO, Board and staff promoting their business. At networking events Chamber personnel always keep their members in mind when they are speaking to other business owners, whether they are national or international companies.

 EPRESENTING R YOUR BUSINESS INTERESTS

The Chambers Chief Executive Forum on April 10th, 2018

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Chambers play a key role in representing business at national and local level. We have developed relationships with key stakeholders and represent the views of business to them to ensure the environment for business is kept at a competitive level. We are a voice of business on the important issues of skills, costs for business, trade, housing, infrastructure and climate change.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBERS IRELAND: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

CHAMBERS IRELAND: The Year in PICTURES

CHAMBERS IRELAND CSR AWARDS LAUNCH

InBUSINESS looks back over the last 12 months with some snapshots of Chambers Ireland work in representing members both nationally and internationally.

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive of Chambers Ireland, with Dil Wickremasinghe, Co-Founder & Director of Insight Matters (left) and Lorna Cross, Finance Director of BAM Ireland (right), launched the 15th edition of the annual Chambers Ireland CSR Awards at the AIB Bank Centrey

ENGAGEMENT WITH BCC & NICCI ON BREXIT

CHAMBER NETWORK BUDGET DIALOGUE DAY 2018 The Chamber Network met with their local TDs, Senators and Government Ministers for an engaging series of Budget-focused discussions in Dublin. Pictured from left is Chambers Ireland Chief Executive Ian Talbot; County Meath Chamber Chief Executive Paula McCaul; Chambers Ireland President Siobhan Kinsella; European Affairs Minister Helen McEntee; and County Meath Chamber President John V Farrelly

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive of Chambers Ireland (right); Dr Adam Marshall, Director General of the British Chambers of Commerce (left); and Ann McGregor, Chief Executive of Northern Ireland Chamber of Commerce and Industry (centre) made a joint statement in October calling on both Brexit negotiating sides to redouble efforts to reach an agreement

CHAMBER NETWORK PRE-BUDGET SUBMISSION LAUNCH The heads of Chambers throughout the Network came together in Athlone to launch the Chambers Ireland Pre-Budget Submission 2019

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ELG AWARDS 2018 Pictured here celebrating the 15th edition of the Chambers Ireland Excellence in Local Government Awards during the ceremony itself is Chambers Ireland Chief Executive Ian Talbot (left), Chambers Ireland President Siobhan Kinsella (centre), and Minister John Paul Phelan (right)

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBERS IRELAND: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

ENGAGEMENT WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS Chambers Ireland regularly engages with the Department of Business, Enterprise & Innovation on the interests of the Chamber Network. Pictured here is the Chambers Ireland team meeting Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation Heather Humphreys T.D.

SKILLNET IRELAND LAUNCH Chambers Ireland attended Skillnet Ireland’s launch of its new brand and title in May 2018, with its message of promoting upskilling within enterprise, and engaged with then Minister for Education and Skills Richard Bruton T.D. at the event, and also with Skillnet Ireland Chief Executive Paul Healy and Skillnet Ireland Chairperson Brendan McGinty

CHAMBERS IRELAND PRESIDENTS PAST & PRESENT

BUSINESS FOR PEACE AWARDS IN OSLO

Incoming President Siobhan Kinsella (left) and outgoing President Niamh Boyle (right) are pictured with Ian Talbot after the Chambers Ireland AGM in September

Chambers Ireland Chief Executive Ian Talbot, South Dublin Chamber President Margaret Considine and Chief Executive Peter Byrne attended the Business for Peace Awards in Oslo in March, to celebrate Mr. Martin Naughton being bestowed with the Business for Peace Award, its first ever Irish Honouree.

NATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD MEETING At the Chambers Ireland National Advisory Board meeting in October 2018, Chambers Ireland and senior representatives of Chambers Ireland’s partner companies met with Minister of State Seán Kyne T.D. to discuss policy and business priorities

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EUROCHAMBRES 60TH ANNIVERSARY EUROCHAMBRES, the Association of European Chambers of Commerce and Industry, celebrated its 60th anniversary in February 2018. Pictured here celebrating the anniversary alongside Chambers Ireland Chief Executive and Eurochambres Deputy President Ian Talbot is Ben Butters, Director of Eurochambres (left) and Malcolm Harbour, Senior Adviser, Chair of the Single Market Roundtable, European Policy Centre (centre).

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 POLICY

Navigating through uncertain times

As the global economy faces a challenging 2019, Chambers Ireland’s focus will be to ensure Irish business remains competitive and sustainable, writes Policy and Research Executive Pauline Lowe.

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L

ast year, Ireland witnessed a year of economic growth and business prosperity. While 2019 is set to bring similar levels of development, changes to the Irish and global economy lie ahead. From the UK’s departure from the European Union (EU) to the May European and local elections, 2019 will be a challenging year for Irish businesses operating domestically and abroad. As Chambers Ireland is the largest business network in Ireland, our 2019 focus will be based on an analysis of the various geographic regions and economic sectors, so that we are well positioned to understand the concerns of Irish businesses and the agile climate in which they operate. To keep Irish business informed and engaged with upcoming policy changes, Chambers Ireland will be establishing a number of taskforces to support our work. These forums that will occur several times a year will give us the opportunity to better engage with key stakeholders to ensure that prosperity and competitiveness for Irish business remain at the top of the agenda.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 POLICY

SKILLS GAP/FUTURE JOBS Technological changes and the process of digitalisation are major drivers of productivity growth. On the one hand, these changes have improved the quality of products and services, however, on the other hand, technological and digital advances are displacing traditional jobs and industries. We believe that investment in training and education will go a long way in addressing skills gaps. That is why it is imperative that we prepare for these changes and create a dialogue with workers in traditional jobs who are at risk of displacement, so we can ensure they are upskilled. As the UK leaves the EU, companies have begun moving their operations to the other EU Member States to remain a part of the single market and keep access to European labour. Ireland has become a top destination for company relocate. Having said this, if the Irish workforce is not skilled sufficiently for these positions, the opportunity presented becomes redundant. Therefore, in order to remain competitive and qualified, it is vital that our workforce is presented with upskilling opportunities and the necessary tools to compete for jobs. HOUSING Over the past few years, housing has dominated discussions across Ireland. Issues surrounding housing have manifested into a crisis and become one of the biggest issues facing both Ireland’s society and economy. The intensity and complexity of housing has been identified as a risk for business. The under- supply of affordable housing is particularly harmful to business through increased cost of living affecting wage pressures, businesses’ ability to attract appropriately skilled workers and high rental costs for companies located in urban areas. Not only is this a threat to Ireland’s competitiveness, it will also impact our future economic growth. Chambers Ireland will work over the next year with government to make sure that we secure sufficient and affordable housing for citizens and business.

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“THE IMPACT

OF BREXIT ON IRISH BUSINESS AND THE

FUTURE OF EUROPE ARE YET TO BE DETERMINED. NEVERTHELESS,

CHAMBERS IRELAND ARE COMMITTED TO PROGRESSING

IRISH BUSINESS AT HOME AND ABROAD.”

 RANSITIONING TO A T LOW CARBON ECONOMY Transitioning to a low carbon economy has been identified as a key priority for government and the Chambers network. Rising earth temperatures and more extreme weather events have proven that climate change is no longer a distant threat, but a visible reality. The Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) 2019 announced that Irish existing climate efforts to reduce carbon emissions will not enable Ireland to achieve either its EU 2020 or 2030 targets. Not only does this have a significant impact on the sustainable future of Ireland, but it also harms businesses that depend on limited resources. As a result, Climate action has become an urgent action for government and Irish citizens at home. Chambers Ireland believes that transition to a low carbon economy will secure a greener and more sustainable Ireland, and will also provide secure supplies of affordable and competitive energy to businesses, but only if the right stakeholders are involved in the process. In 2018, the Commission set out to realise the business transition to the circular economy and phasing out the use of singleuse plastics. Moving from linear production to a circular business model is set to reduce supply chain costs by reusing materials, decreasing the business dependency on importing materials and creating new jobs. While we recognised that there is a need to combat the effects of climate change, more is needed to help businesses transition to become circular. With the rising costs of doing business and recent changes to VAT, Irish businesses face many financial challenges which threaten business operations. Therefore, adding more costs without creating a dialogue that supports business to transition will only create problems, rather than tackling the main issue of making our planet more sustainable. FINAL Political and economic instability have become the status quo in international relations. The impact of Brexit on Irish business and the future of Europe are yet to be determined. Nevertheless, Chambers Ireland are committed to progressing Irish business at home and abroad. We will continue to navigate through these uncertain times, while keeping Irish business at the vocal point of direction.

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CHAMBER FEATURE EUROCHAMBRES

A FOCUS on

Europe CHAMBERS IRELAND CONTINUES TO WORK WITH EUROCHAMBRES TO ENSURE A STABLE, PRO-TRADE AND BUSINESS-FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT.

A

s part of our work representing the interests of Irish business, we work closely with EUROCHAMBRES, the European Association of Chambers of Commerce and Industry, which voices the interests of more than 19 million member enterprises in 45 European countries through a network of national, regional and local Chambers. Chambers Ireland engages with EUROCHAMBRES across different policy areas and has representatives on several EUROCHAMBRES policy committees, including the Trade and Investment Committee; the Finance and Economy Committee; the Better Regulation Committee; the SME Policy Committee; and the EU Single Market Committee. Ian Talbot, Chief Executive of Chambers Ireland, is the Chairperson of the EUROCHAMBRES Finance and Economy Committee.

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OUR WORK IN 2019 Throughout 2018, Chambers Ireland identified several key areas of importance to our members that required our focus. These included: • Completing the Single Market, particularly the Digital Single Market • Supporting SMEs and Entrepreneurs • Promoting the need for more trade agreements, specifically SME-friendly deals • Advocating for an international response to corporate tax challenges CHAMBERS IN BRUSSELS FOR 5TH EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT OF ENTERPRISES A delegation from the Irish Chamber of Commerce Network, led by Chambers Ireland, visited Brussels in October 2018 to participate in the fifth edition of the European Parliament of Enterprises,

the largest exercise at European level in economic democracy. Twelve entrepreneurs, representing Chambers across Ireland, formed part of the Irish delegation and took the opportunity to address key EU figures including Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström and Chief Brexit Negotiator Michel Barnier, and met with key European Commission officials to discuss matters of importance to the Irish business community. The Chambers represented as part of the Irish Chamber delegation included Cork Chamber, Dublin Chamber, County Kildare Chamber, Limerick Chamber, County Meath Chamber, Sligo Chamber, Waterford Chamber and Wexford Chamber. The delegation also attended a breakfast at the European Parliament, hosted by Sean Kelly MEP and his team, where MEPs briefed the delegation on their

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CHAMBER FEATURE EUROCHAMBRES

current policy briefs and the work of their committees. Also attending the breakfast were MEPs Mairéad McGuinness, Deirdre Clune and Marian Harkin. EUROCHAMBRES ECONOMIC SURVEY Following the Chamber visit to Brussels in October, the results of an EU-wide survey of businesses were released in November. The survey of European businesses, published and coordinated by EUROCHAMBRES, revealed that while the overall 2019 outlook among European businesses is positive, labour costs and a lack of skilled workers have been identified as their biggest concerns for 2019, while Brexit remains a minor concern. Conducted over Autumn 2018, the survey of more than 45,000 respondents from 26 countries across Europe, asked businesses to rank the main challenges they believed they faced in 2019. As with the results of the 2018 survey, the 2019 survey confirms that Irish businesses are once more feeling significantly more exposed to the impact of Brexit than businesses in the rest of Europe. Further to this, the impact of Brexit has become even less of a concern for most European businesses since last year’s survey, with a drop from 9.2% to just 7% of European businesses in the 2019 survey ranking the UK’s departure from the EU as their main concern for the year ahead. It is clear that, with the negotiations still ongoing at the time of the survey being conducted, businesses have looked beyond the uncertainties of Brexit and are more concerned with labour costs, a lack

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Fiona Candon, then President of Sligo Chamber at the European Parliament of Enterprises

of skilled workers and the lack of domestic demand. Here is a glance at the key findings of EES 2019: • Labour costs now ranks as 1st (compared to 3rd last year) among the challenges for 2019 • The prospect of Brexit remains the number one challenge only for Irish businesses • Domestic sales expectations are positive, with businesses anticipating national sales staying at 2018 levels or possibly increasing slightly • Export sales are revised declining for 2019, probably due to a rising fear of emerging trade barriers in the near future • Employment expectations for 2019 have slightly declined compared with 2018 expectations, with the Labour Force size expected to be smaller • As with the trend in export sales and employment expectations, investment forecasts are also revised declining for 2019.

INTO 2019 While the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement text has been produced, which outlines the procedures for an agreement between the UK and the EU over how it will leave the bloc, which has also been endorsed by the Irish Government, it has not been ratified and a “no-deal” scenario between the UK and the EU is still possible. Chambers Ireland has been ensuring that its members are aware of all tools being made available to assess risks, and we will continue to advise that these notices and communications are acted upon. Beyond Brexit, Chambers Ireland will continue to engage with the ongoing debate surrounding the future of Europe with a view to ensuring that the EU continues to be a stable pro-trade, businessfriendly environment.

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CHAMBER FEATURE STRATEGIC NETWORK ENGAGEMENT

IRISH WATER INFRASTRUCTURE BRIEF 018 helped us focus on how important it is to have reliable and continuous access to water. The development work of Irish Water ensures that we have robust water infrastructure to serve the growing population. Irish Water representatives, both national and local, briefed Chambers throughout the country on the importance of ensuring we have a robust network, not just now, but also into the future. They engaged with Chambers Ireland and our local Chambers to ensure that projects are being delivered with as little disruption to local business communities as possible. These briefings enable Chambers around the country to learn about the business opportunities that solid water infrastructure will bring to the area.

2

Maria O’Dwyer, Head of Connections and Developer Services at Irish Water; Richard O’Headhra, Business Stakeholder & Communications Coordinator at Irish Water; Luke Hanahoe, Vice President of County Kildare Chamber; Allan Shine, CEO County Kildare Chamber; and Maureen Bergin, President of County Kildare Chamber.

Engaging National Our Stakeholders

It is important for Chambers Ireland to have an important relationship with other national organisations, as their area of work has a telling effect on our Chamber members. We have engaged with a number of key organisations throughout the year across our network.

IDA AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT oreign direct investment is very important to the continued prosperity of our country. Regions continue to benefit from the continued work of IDA in making Ireland attractive to foreign direct investment. We met with Mary Buckley and Ken Whitelaw of the IDA during the year and support the role that they play in generating job prospects throughout the country.

F

Chambers representatives meet with Mary Buckley (front row, centre) and Ken Whitelaw (front row, far right) of the IDA

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CHAMBER FEATURE STRATEGIC NETWORK ENGAGEMENT Chambers Ireland Chief Executive Ian Talbot pictured with Paul Kelly, Chief Executive of Fáilte Ireland, Miriam Kennedy, Fáilte Ireland’s Head of the Wild Atlantic Way and Chamber Executives from around the country

FÁILTE IRELAND’S REGIONAL PLANS ourism has become a vital part of the success story that is the Irish economy. It is a particularly important industry in regional Ireland. It supports the activities of many of our local members. Chamber Executives met with the Senior Regional Executive of Fáilte Ireland at our Chamber Executive Forum in July. Fáilte Ireland outlined the importance of tourism to the Irish Economy and the role the Chambers play in keeping this high on the national agenda. They also outlined their plans for the various regions.

T

Members of Fingal Dublin Chamber pictured with ESB Networks staff at a briefing event.

ESB NETWORKS KEY UPGRADES aving a robust grid network which safeguards the supply of electricity now and into the future is vital for business nationwide. The ESB along with EirGrid ensure that our business community have the grid infrastructure in place. This year, ESB Networks did a number of events in conjunction with our Chambers throughout the country. They updated local members on the key upgrades being made to the local grid, the technological developments being made in the sector, and discussed the opportunities which this presented for business.

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CHAMBER FEATURE INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Fostering

sustainable growth THE ICC IS WORKING TO GIVE A DIRECT VOICE FOR TRADE IN A CHANGING GLOBAL ECONOMY.

T

he International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is a global organisation based in Paris, which Chambers Ireland supports, that provides a forum for businesses and other organisations to better comprehend the nature and significance of the major shifts taking place in the world economy. The ICC’s key areas of work include policy advocacy, promoting international trade and investment, and working to fight corruption and piracy throughout the world economy. ICC Ireland is involved in several areas identified as being of importance to Irish businesses and the Irish economy: arbitration, customs and trade, digital economy, environment and energy, advertising and corporate responsibility, with the following commissions in place to address them:

further the goals of the International Chamber of Commerce. ICC VISIT ICC Ireland and its National Arbitration Committee organises an annual visit to the ICC Court in Paris, where members from the Bar Council, Law Society and Chartered Institute of Arbitrators are invited to attend. These visits provide an opportunity for members to understand the workings of the court and to network with teams that distribute cases to arbitrators globally. The visits also give members the chance to profile

the expertise of Irish arbitrators and showcase Ireland as a venue. OGP VISIT TO ICC COURT OF ARBITRATION In January 2018, Ian Talbot, Secretary General of ICC Ireland, accompanied representatives from the Office of Government Procurement (OGP) to the International Chamber of Commerce’s Court of Arbitration in Paris. ICC IRELAND IN 2019 • Trade Matters The ICC, supported by ICC Ireland, continues its campaign to promote why trade matters to the global economy. The campaign promotes the ways trade supports jobs, small business and sustainable development and debunks myths around globalisation. • UN Observer Status Since being officially granted Observer Status by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly in December 2016, the ICC continues to use this unique platform to represent its members at the world’s greatest international forum. The ICC’s representation continues to provide a direct voice for business in the UN system promoting policies that foster sustainable and inclusive growth, job creation and economic cooperation.

• Commission on Arbitration and ADR • Commission on Customs and Trade Regulations • Commission on Environment and Energy • Commission on Corporate Responsibility and Anti-Corruption • Commission on Digital Economy • Commission on Marketing and Advertising ICC IRELAND IN 2018 Throughout the course of 2018, the team in ICC Ireland worked with our partner organisation in Paris to

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ICC Ireland Secretary General Ian Talbot with Arbitration members in meeting in Paris in March 2018

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBER NETWORK: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

CHAMBER NETWORK:

THE YEAR IN PICTURES

2018 was another busy year for the Chamber Network. InBUSINESS highlights some of the events that took place around the country.

SHANNON Pictured at the annual Mid-West Lean Network conference, sponsored by Three and held in the Analog Devices Building at the University of Limerick (from left): Claude Costelloe, network chair and general manager, Zimmer Biomet Ireland; Helen Downes, CEO, Shannon Chamber; Jean Francois Michel, account director, Three Business, conference headline sponsor; and Adrian Furey, vice president, Global Reconstruction, Supply Chain, Zimmer Biomet.

TIPPERARY (L-R) Liam Brown of LIT Tipperary presents Louise Kennedy with the 2018 President’s Award, with T.J. Kinsella Chamber President at the County Tipperary Business Awards 2018

SLIGO

Sligo Chamber President, Fiona Candon, and Minister for Finance & Public Expenditure and Reform, Paschal Donohoe, at the Sligo Chamber of Commerce & Industry Annual President’s Dinner and Business Excellence Awards 2018.

WATERFORD WEXFORD 2018 Wexford Business of the Year Award sponsored by Wexford County Council.Winner - Wexford Bus. Image (l-r) Enda Kavanagh, CEO Wexford Chamber; Barbara Anne Murphy, Wexford County Council; Lorene Crowley, Wexford Bus; Amy Pettitt, Wexford Bus; Mark Kinsella, Wexford Bus; and Niall Reck, President, Wexford Chamber.

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Pictured attending the Waterford Chamber Annual Dinner were (l-r) Brendan McDonald, South East Regional Manager, IDA Ireland; Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs, Simon Coveney TD Guest Speaker; Kathryn Kiely, President, Waterford Chamber; Cllr Declan Doocey, Mayor of Waterford City & County; AnnMarie Tierney La Roux, Head of Regional Development, IDA Ireland; Frank Ryan, Chairman IDA Ireland, Guest Speaker; Senator Paudie Coffey.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBER NETWORK: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

CARLOW An Taoiseach voices his support of the achievements of Carlow businesses at the 2018 Carlow Business Awards. Pictured L-R (Front) Eoin Kehoe, Brian O’Farrell (CEO County Carlow Chamber), An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, Yvonne Jones (President County Carlow Chamber), Josephine Mullally, Eileen Brophy. (Back) Fergal Brosnan, David McNamara, Derry Maher, Andrew Lambert, John Brophy, Dr Martin Meagher, Colin Duggan, Gary Evans, Derek Shannon, Philip McDonald, John Grace

MEATH County Meath Chamber Official Launch. Pictured (l-r): Kevin Steward, DOS Meath County Council; Bill Sweeney, County Meath Chamber; Jackie Maguire, CE Meath County Council; Joe English, Head of Enterprise, Meath County Council; Ian Talbot, Chambers Ireland; Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Enterprise & Business; Michael Mulvey, President Dundalk Institute of Technology; Paula McCaul, CEO County Meath Chamber.

COBH & HARBOUR TRALEE Cobh Chamber President Michael McCormack and Shop Local winners.

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Dick Spring, Business Development Ambassador for Tralee Chamber

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBER NETWORK: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

NEW ROSS

DUNDALK

All of the 2018 winners pictured at the New Ross & District Business & Community Awards

Dundalk Chamber sell over a2 million worth of shop local Gift vouchers in 3 years.

DLR ENNISCORTHY Cllr Marie Baker; Aileen Eglington, President DLR Chamber; Minister Josepha Madigan; Gabby Mallon, CEO DLR Chamber; Philomena Poole, CEO DLR County Council; & Tom Dalton, Celtic Grace, pictured at the DLR Chamber President’s Lunch in December 2018.

DUNGARVAN

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Maree Lyng, President of the Enniscorthy & District Chamber with Jimmy Gahan, Development Officer of the Enniscorthy & District Chamber at the opening of Grant’s Pharmacy new store, Rafter Street in Enniscorthy

Dungarvan & West Waterford Chamber Spring Dinner 2018 at Woodhouse Estate, Stradbally. Pictured are sponsors Regina Mangan, Liberty Blue Estate Agents; David Walsh, Better Finances & Sean Cleary, Dungarvan Credit Union, with Joe Roche, Chamber President, and Jenny Beresford, Chamber CEO.

ENNIS Truly Inspirational and Clare-born business woman Breege O’Donoghue told the impressive story of Penney’s growth and internationalisation at the packed Chamber luncheon on September 7 at the Old Ground Hotel, Ennis.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBER NETWORK: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

Food Fleadh Ballina ran from 27 – 30 September 2018, by Ballina Chamber of Commerce and coincided with the internationally acclaimed music programme Other Voices. Pictured (l-r): Cllr Michael Lofts, Ballina Municipal District Council; Chef Gerard Luskin, Food Fleadh and Ballina Chamber of Commerce; Tina O’Reilly, Producer of Other Voices; Chef Ronan Fox, Food Fleadh Ballina; Aileen Galvin, Managing Partner, Sync & Swim PR; Hugh Rouse, President Ballina Chamber of Commerce; Chef Rory Culkin, Food Fleadh Ballina; Tom Gilligan, Director of Services, Mayo County Council.

BALLINA

LIMERICK LETTERKENNY

Limerick Chamber President’s Dinner, Best Overall Award 2018 sponsored by LIT (L to R): 2018 Dr. Mary Shire, President Limerick Chamber; Mary Considine, Shannon Group; Ray O Driscoll, Shannon Group; Rose Hynes, Shannon Group; Professor Vincent Cunnane, President LIT / Sponsor; Matthew Thomas, Managing Director, Shannon Group.

Letterkenny winning the Bank of Ireland National Enterprise Town Award. Pictured at the prize giving event in Kilkenny are: Clare McNickle, Vice -President, Letterkenny Chamber; Pascal Donohoe, TD, Minister of Finance; Toni Forrester, CEO Letterkenny Chamber; Francesca McDonagh, Chief Executive, Bank of Ireland; Seamus Neely, Chief Executive, Donegal County Council.

DUBLIN Dublin Chamber President Anne O’Leary (pictured) used the occasion of the Chamber’s Annual Dinner to showcase the latest outputs from the hugely influential Dublin 2050 project. Ms O’Leary outlined to the 1,600-strong audience the findings of the Chamber’s successful National Conversation initiative, which saw a series of workshops carried out around the country in the summer of 2018 to identify how Ireland’s main cities can work better together.

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CORK An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar addresses 600 guests at Cork Chamber’s Dublin Dinner held in association with EY. Pictured from left to right: Conor Healy, Cork Chamber CEO; Paula Cogan, Cork Chamber Vice President; An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar TD; Bill O’Connell, Cork Chamber President.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2019 CHAMBER NETWORK: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

MULLINGAR

Winterfest Mullingar 2018, Mullingar’s first ever Ice-Skating Rink, was part of Mullingar Chambers Winterfest Christmas celebrations to drive Mullingar as a family destination. Pictured (l-r) Back Row: John Geoghegan, Orla Duncan, Mark Brindley, Berty Dunne (Mullingar Chamber); Front Row: Hannah and Evan Palmer. Daithi Maher, Ice Rink Manager.

KILKENNY Julian Hughes of Hughes Farming, accepting the Business of the Year Award from Cathal Smyth, Operations Manager of main sponsor State Street at the 2018 Kilkenny Business Awards held in the Lyrath Estate Hotel. Also present are Mayor of Kilkenny, Peter ‘Chap’ Cleere and President of Kilkenny Chamber of Commerce, Marion Acreman.

SOUTH DUBLIN South Dublin County Business Person of the Year 2018. Pictured (l-r): Frank Nevin, Director of Economic, Enterprise & Tourism Development, South Dublin County Council; sponsor of the Business Person of the Year award, Tom Moran, Red Cow Moran Hotel; and Business Person of the Year 2018, Karen Moran, Red Cow Moran Hotel; Peter Byrne, CEO, South Dublin Chamber; and Marty Whelan, MC.

DROGHEDA

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LONGFORD Members of Longford County Council and Longford Chamber of Commerce launching the Longford Business Expo, which took place on 28 - 29 September, 2018, in Riverside Shopping Centre, Longford.

Drogheda Chamber hosted their Annual Christmas Networking Lunch with guest speaker Bobby Kerr, Irish entrepreneur, dragon, businessman and broadcaster – sponsored by State Street. Pictured: from the Drogheda & District Chamber, Back Row (Left to Right): Brenda Rowley, Robert Murray, Breanndán Casey, Ken Rooney, Shona McManus, Chamber President, Bobby Kerr - Guest Speaker, Irene McKeown, Brian Hanratty. Front Row (Left to Right): Tony Campion, Linda Ennis, Miriam Simon & Jayann Maher

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COVER STORY

Paul McCarthy

ACCESSIBLE, AFFORDABLE, EXPERT ADVICE IS OUR KEY DIFFERENTIATOR AND MAKES US A REAL ALTERNATIVE IN THE MARKET.”

RBK Managing Partner, David Gleeson at Make Space Studio, The Chocolate Factory, Dublin

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InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019


Chartered Accountancy and Business Advisory firm, RBK, continues to expand, but retains a focus on the core values that have led to its success, Managing Partner David Gleeson tells InBUSINESS.

THE

W

ith the Irish economy in good health, businesses of every size are looking to expand. Allied with that growth comes the need for additional financial, accounting and taxation services. It’s no surprise, therefore, that RBK is enjoying significant growth of their own. “We had a very good year in 2018 and so far, this year is positive too,” says Managing Partner David Gleeson. “The economy is performing well, and with that comes increased demand for many of our services, particularly in Taxation, Corporate Finance and Transactional Support Services.” The Midlands-based organisation has come a long way since it was founded in 1958 and celebrated its 60th anniversary last year. Through organic growth and astute mergers, the firm has expanded over the decades to become Ireland’s largest independently branded accountancy and professional advisory firm. It established a Dublin presence in 2001 to add to offices in Athlone and Roscommon, and with a team of 17 partners and staff of almost 200, RBK has also branched out to the global market being the sole Irish member of the Leading Edge Alliance (LEA). LEA is the second largest

PEOPLE-FIRST

APPROACH

International Association in the world, creating a high quality alliance of 226 firms focussed on providing financial and business advisory services, who operate from 62 offices in 110 countries. SUCCESS With their range of services mirroring their organisational growth, the recipients of the 2018 InBusiness Recognition Award for Best Financial and Business Advisory Company continues to go from strength to strength. But what is the secret to RBK’s success? “Accessible, affordable, expert advice is our key differentiator and makes us a real alternative in the market,” Gleeson says. “Having a standout team of experts in a number of fields throughout our offices is a key factor in delivering value to our clients. With a team of very senior and highly skilled Partners and Directors at the helm, we serve the diverse needs of our expanding client base.” Another thing that makes RBK stand out is their “people first” approach. “We start with identifying clients’ family or personal goals and try to understand how their business(es) fit in with these goals,” explains Gleeson. “What supports do they want from us in making business decisions? That is what drives us and informs us on the services to provide. We always have at least two senior points of contact with each client, and it is so important to be able to identify where we can provide advice and support to help them in their business decisions. We strive to be seen as being Partners

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EXPERTISE Although tax advice continues to be one of RBK’s main service offerings, their expertise in other areas has enabled them to merge that personalised approach with industry-leading services across numerous other areas. Their Corporate Finance team has a wealth of experience to advise clients in raising finance, selling businesses, mergers and acquisitions, transaction support, valuation services and financial modelling. In 2018, RBK also joined forces with John Finn of Treasury Solutions to announce a new service offering called ‘The Treasury Hub’. This combines the experience and expertise of firms nationwide, accessing the technical knowledge and financial market intelligence needed to offer a premium quality treasury management service. Other areas of expertise include Credit Unions and Not-for-Profit’s, which have seen a lot of regulatory and compliance changes in recent years. “We have a strong presence in the Credit Union sector, where we act for over 60 Credit Unions. We provide a full service offering to them which includes External Audit, Internal Audit, Outsourced Risk Management and Compliance, Strategic Planning, Merger Assistance, Forensic Reviews, HR Support and Outsourced Payroll Services,” Gleeson says.

WE GET INVOLVED IN ALL TYPES OF BUSINESSES AND PROVIDE A MULTITUDE OF SERVICES THEY WANT OR NEED ACCORDINGLY."

32

THE BREXIT CHALLENGE Apart from its Treasury Hub offering, RBK’s international presence and expertise means they are well-equipped to help clients with what is the biggest single challenge facing Irish businesses at present: Brexit. “RBK is working closely with our clients to share the latest knowledge and best practice, especially in the current Brexit market and the challenges faced by Irish businesses trading with the UK,” Gleeson says.” With a dedicated International Tax offering, we are well placed to advise clients who wish to explore or expand export development and/or source goods/services abroad. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

Paul McCarthy

“We also have a dedicated Charity and / supporters of our clients’ business through the various Not-for-Profit team who have a lot of experience and stages of their business lives. We work with them, rather expertise in the sector. They can add value to NFP than for them.” operations including for example, benchmarking, That focus on the individual also applies to SMEs, who where we have access to a wide database of best have been an integral part of RBK’s business service from practices and advise on what works and what doesn’t, the outset. “When we started out, SMEs were a big part of our business, and they continue to be to this day,” Gleeson as well as providing a wide range of practical services says. “We get involved in all types of businesses and provide a such as advice on bespoke accounting software to multitude of services they want or need accordingly. Whether ensure compliance with SORP (accounting and it be Audit, HR, Payroll, Wealth Management, Technology reporting framework).” Solutions, Corporate Compliance or Forensic Accounting & Litigation RBK Managing Partner, David Gleeson at Make Space Studio, Support, we can lay them out The Chocolate Factory, Dublin for the client and they can choose what they want to avail of. It’s an all-encompassing service offering that is tailored to the needs and budgets of each individual client.”


This is very much to the forefront at the moment with the impending Brexit challenges faced by Irish businesses trading with the UK. “We are also looking at all alternatives such as other markets and considering alternative distribution channels for our clients - what is it they should be doing in their particular circumstances to overcome the challenges Brexit presents?” RESOURCES Brexit is not the only challenge the financial sector is facing in 2019, as Gleeson sees it. “Another major challenge is human resources. In our sector, demand is outstripping supply when it comes to finding the right people with the right experience and expertise, but we continue to invest heavily in talent because our organisation is only as good as the abilities of our staff. We have a policy of hiring the brightest and most talented people from the third level colleges, to ensure the best possible quality of service for our clients. We have also invested heavily in the latest technology, firstly to ensure an efficient and cost-effective service, and secondly to ensure our staff enjoy a better work/life balance. We are a training firm who provide opportunities for staff to relocate between offices and have the opportunity to relocate later as their personal circumstances change.” That emphasis on a good work/life balance is one of the reasons why RBK has retained its HQ in the Midlands. “We like to think that we can provide the best environment for the people in our organisation,” Gleeson says. “With our base in Athlone we can provide a very good work/life balance, with much less commuting time, and a lower cost of living. Having moved up through the ranks of RBK himself after joining from UCD some 35 years ago, Gleeson says that seeing talented team members follow in his footsteps is very rewarding, and that it is very important to map out their potential career path from the outset. “It is important that we do set out for our staff what their career prospects with us will be, because they then know what they have to do in order to progress,” he says. Gleeson admits that with the firm’s expansion, finding that work/life balance for himself is “difficult, but very important”. So, what does he do to unwind? “I have a big interest in sport – GAA, rugby, football – but I also focus on family life. My life revolves around my family, as it should.” Back to matters of business though, Gleeson talks about his ambitions for RBK in 2019. “It is important that we adapt and continue to grow our presence in Ireland and abroad,” he says. “We grew by 40% in the last three years, and we plan to grow further with possible mergers so that we can increase the range of services we can offer to clients. Ultimately, our goal is to provide the best possible service to our clients.” Regardless of the challenges facing businesses today, and RBK’s continued growth, their core values of providing that excellent, tailored personalised service to clients remains. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

PART OF THE

COMMUNITY

Established in 1958, RBK has grown from a small, regional practice to a nationwide, indigenous firm with an in-depth skill set and services profile. Despite this expansion, the firm prides itself on remembering where it came from, and takes steps to ensure it doesn’t forget the community that has supported it throughout its 60year history. Partners and staff are encouraged to give back, whether in terms of financial support, time, expertise or compassionate support.

COMMUNITY ENDEAVOURS

Charitable donations

Fundraising

Pro bono work

Educational/ training opportunities

Equality in the workplace

Sports sponsorship

Environmentally friendly initiatives

Staff welfare programmes

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08/02/2019 12:15 06/02/2019 15:00 27/02/2019 16:17


PARTNER PROFILE AIB

BACKING

Customers

THROUGH BREXIT

The one certainty right now with Brexit is how uncertain it is, and it is difficult to predict the outcome. AIB’s Chief Economist Oliver Mangan gives his view on Brexit and how the different scenarios could affect Irish SMEs, particularly around the impact of sterling.

Oliver Mangan, AIB Chief Economist

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

035 InBusiness YB 2019_PP_AIB.indd 35

BREXIT

is very much to the front and centre of attention as the clock ticks down to the UK’s exit from the EU. From an Irish economy perspective, given the country’s close trading links with the UK, the outcome of the Brexit process will be a key determining factor in the performance of Irish SMEs that trade with our nearest neighbour and, indeed, the wider Irish economy. The focus at the moment is on the UK parliament. A key development recently in this regard is that Parliament has begun to assert itself on Brexit. This was clearly evident in the resounding rejection of Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement. There is also strong opposition in Parliament to a no deal Brexit. However, Parliament is finding it difficult to reach agreement on what type of deal it wants in order to prevent a hard Brexit. There is no clear majority support for other alternatives, from the Withdrawal Agreement, to a Norway plus-style close economic relationship with the EU, or a second referendum. As a result, there is a real risk in the current parliamentary logjam that no Brexit option will be able to command majority support. A key aspect for Irish businesses to consider in relation to Brexit is the impact on sterling. The currency has remained relatively stable against the euro over recent months, despite the mounting uncertainty over Brexit. Indeed, EUR/GBP has mostly traded in a narrow 87-91p since September 2017. The market seems to be taking the view that some way will be found to avert a hard Brexit. However, a hard Brexit is the default position in the event that a stalemate persists. If fears start to build that a no deal scenario looks likely, sterling will come under pressure. EUR/GBP is likely to rise to the 93p level it hit in summer 2017. It could reach the 95p mark last seen during the financial crisis in 2009. EUR/GBP may even hit parity if the UK crashes out of the EU with no deal in a very disorderly Brexit. This would represent a fall of over 10 per cent from current levels. It is worth noting that the Bank of England has said the currency could fall by as much as 25 per cent in such circumstances. On the other hand, even if the UK Parliament manages to ratify an amended version of the Withdrawal Agreement, it will still not be clear for a number of years what the longterm EU-UK trading relationship is going to be. Uncertainty will persist and further difficult negotiations with the EU on trade will lie ahead for the UK. As a result, the upside for sterling may be limited in this situation, with EUR/GBP moving down to around 85-86p. The most positive scenario for sterling could well be another referendum. If the UK voted to remain, then the euro could fall back towards 80p versus sterling. However, another vote to leave, which could well happen, would see sterling fall sharply. Our base remains that given the majority of MPs in Parliament are pro-EU, they will act to avoid a hard Brexit. Thus, if they cannot reach an agreement in the coming weeks, we expect there will be at least a short extension to the Article 50 deadline to allow more time to resolve the impasse in the UK Parliament. Overall, there is still considerable uncertainty about the final outcome of Brexit. 35

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PARTNER PROFILE AIB

Brexit’s IMPACT RECOGNISING

Anne Finnegan, Head of Food, Fisheries & Brexit Sectors in AIB, advises Irish SME businesses on how they can prepare for the impact Brexit may have on their business depending on their sector and business model.

SUPPLY CHAIN Examine your supply chain, you may be directly or indirectly trading with the UK, which gives your business a Brexit exposure. Consider your trade outside the UK, a significant amount of goods traded between Ireland and other EU countries or beyond are transited via the UK. In a hard Brexit, the cost of this trade may increase due to delays at ports, additional customs compliance procedures or the use of alternative routes. Businesses trading perishable goods either to or via the UK should consider the impact of delays on the viability of this trade.

DIRECT TRADE Businesses that are importing from or exporting to the UK (including Northern Ireland) have a Brexit exposure. In a hard Brexit scenario, where the UK is outside of the EU Single Market, the EU Customs Union and in the absence of a Free Trade Agreement, businesses will experience significant costs and disruption. Goods traded between the EU and UK may be subject to WTO tariffs the level of which depends on the exact product specifications. Goods imported into Ireland from the UK and vice versa would be subject to import VAT, even in a soft Brexit scenario, which would increase working capital requirements.

Anne Finnegan, AIB Head of Food, Fisheries & Brexit Sectors

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035 InBusiness YB 2019_PP_AIB.indd 36

 usinesses engaged in trade with the UK should consider the B impact of potential border delays, customs and other checks on lead times. You may need to discuss with your suppliers and/ or customers as some businesses may need to increase inventory levels to manage delays. This again may give rise to additional working capital requirements. Where goods traded are perishable, the challenges become more complex and the continuity of this trade may be in jeopardy. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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PARTNER PROFILE AIB

 usinesses supplying goods to customers in B the UK should discuss the impact of Brexit with their customers. Some UK businesses expect goods to be delivered duty paid, which means that Irish exporters become an importer into the UK post-Brexit. This would necessitate a relationship with HM Revenue and Customs in the UK. Some businesses may need to look for alternative suppliers or markets for end products. We would encourage businesses to start this process immediately, and to understand not only the options available but the impact that this will have on the business margin. INDIRECT TRADE While a business may not trade directly with the UK, it is likely that they are sourcing inputs and supplies that originated in the UK or are selling to customers that in turn sell into the UK market. In effect, they are indirectly exposed to Brexit.

“ULTIMATELY, BUSINESSES

INDIRECTLY TRADING WITH THE UK ARE NOT IMMUNE TO MATERIAL EFFECTS OF

A HARD BREXIT AND SHOULD TRY TO IDENTIFY

THE FINANCIAL IMPACT ON THE BUSINESS TO ENABLE CONTINGENCY PLANNING.“

 usinesses that are not directly trading with B the UK should examine their supply chains to identify possible exposure to the UK market. They should talk to suppliers and customers to discuss identified Brexit risks and any plans they may have. You should try to understand if inputs or suppliers may cost more and if lead times for suppliers may increase. What impact would this have on your businesses, and do you need to consider new suppliers or holding more stock? Ultimately, businesses indirectly trading with the UK are not immune to material effects of a hard Brexit and should try to identify the financial impact on the business to enable contingency planning. PEOPLE Businesses should consider what impact a Hard Brexit may have on their employees. People who travel between the EU and the UK for business may face restrictions. Similarly, those who travel across the border to go to and from work may also face implications.  usinesses should engage with their staff and have plans in place B to mitigate against any potential constraints with the movement of people.

HOW CAN WE HELP? If you want to find out more about how Brexit may impact your business, contact your Branch to speak with your local Brexit Advisor. Or visit www.business.aib.ie/brexit-ready-check to take your company through the Brexit Ready Check

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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Insight from an Irish business on the border:

HARVEY’S POINT HOTEL Named the top hotel in Ireland by Trip Advisor five years in a row, the popular Harvey’s Point Hotel in Donegal Town was established in 1989 and the hotel has proved to be a popular destination for UK visitors, including those from Northern Ireland. Michael Cullinan, the hotel’s financial controller, points out that the UK market is important to Harvey’s Point Hotel, as it is to the wider tourism industry, with approximately 4 million visiting these shores every year and spending in the region of a1.3 billion a year. He notes that circa 40 per cent of their business comes from Northern Ireland. AIB has taken steps to try prepare Irish SMEs for the impact it may have on their Business. One of the main initiatives AIB introduced was the Brexit Ready Check Tool which can be found on the AIB website and was designed with the purpose to help businesses in Ireland prepare for Brexit. Michael tells us of his experience using the Brexit Ready Tool for Harvey’s Point Hotel. It was through Harvey’s Point Hotel’s relationship with AIB that Michael discovered the Brexit Ready Check Tool. Michael explained he liked how all the key exposure areas were highlighted very clearly and detailed on one page. He notes the main benefit and learning from the tool was that it “helped them look at things they can control such as market diversification.” He adds: “We have increased our focus on Ireland and mainland Europe as part of a drive to attract more special interest groups and conferences and realise value from the various awards we have received.” Michael advises all Irish Business owners should use the Brexit Ready Check. He explains: “Even if you don’t think your business will be affected you’d be surprised of indirect exposure,” which the tool helped them to identify. He further points out that a lot of their suppliers in Harvey’s Point Hotel are across the border and it helped them to prepare for what might happen.

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PARTNER PROFILE ONE4ALL

Rewarding

great staff NATIONWIDE The Spotlights, a joint initiative between One4all and Chambers Ireland, recognises SME staff members who go that extra mile.

The Spotlights, now in its fourth year, is an employee awards programme from One4all in association with Chambers Ireland – Ireland’s largest business organisation. The programme has been created for SMEs to find Ireland’s best employee – that person who always goes the extra mile – by offering colleagues the opportunity to shine a spotlight on these unsung heroes. A person can be nominated for their work ethic, skill, positive attitude, being supportive of their colleagues, or any other reason of note. The reasons for nomination can be as varied as the nominees themselves. In 2018, Aoife Harris of Waxperts was named as Ireland’s best employee after her colleagues nominated her for her outstanding work. In second place was Anne Cunnane of Ballyhaunis Chamber, and in third place was Martin Scanlon of Winters Property. Each year, businesses are encouraged to nominate their chosen employee or work colleague, asking nominators to explain why they feel their colleague should receive recognition. Anyone at an Irish SME can 38

038 InBusiness YB 2019_PP_One4all.indd 38

be nominated for one of these awards. Those nominations are then judged by an independent panel of business leaders, including members of Chambers Ireland. As well as receiving the award, The Spotlights rewards the winner with a a500 One4all Gift Card as well as a trophy to commemorate the award. Runner-up prizes of a300 and a200 gift cards and trophies for second and third place respectively are also awarded. Michael Dawson, CEO of One4all, said of the 2018 Spotlights: “The quality of entrants in 2018/19 has truly been exceptional and we always enjoy reading about all the great work going on at SMEs all over the country. I want to congratulate Aoife, as well as our second and third place winners, and thank everyone who nominated colleagues for an award. At One4all, we believe that employees are at the heart of every business; we are proud to help SMEs in Ireland shine a light on the great work being done

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PARTNER PROFILE ONE4ALL

daily, and to help deepen relationships between employees and their staff.” Ian Talbot, Chief Executive Chambers Ireland, commented: “We are extremely excited to announce Aoife Harris as the overall winner of the 2018 Spotlight Awards. This is a wonderful opportunity for Chamber members and the wider business community alike to get their employees and companies engaged in a very positive process that rewards the many unsung heroes that help us all achieve success and who go that extra mile. The Spotlights programme reminds employees that great work doesn’t go unnoticed and is appreciated by their colleagues. We at Chambers Ireland are proud to support such an initiative.” GIFT CARD INITIATIVE Chambers Ireland and the Gift Voucher Shop (GVS)/One4all have joined forces to offer Chambers the option of using a GVS gift card as a local Chamber retail voucher. The Chamber Gift card contains a unique code, which means it can only be spent in local retailers that are signed up to the scheme. Each Chamber can have its own custom-made card designed in conjunction with GVS in-house design. Now operating successfully in Cork, Sligo, Galway, Thurles and Mallow, the cards are accepted in a wide range of retailers in each location. The cards allow your company to thank staff and customers with individual rewards and are ideal for businesses looking to improve employee motivation or customer loyalty with regular incentives. The Chamber Gift Card is operated and managed by One4all and has been developed to help businesses reward and motivate staff and increase customer engagement. All Chamber gift cards can be purchased online, and customers can check their balances and the list of participating retailers through the links below:

 ork Chamber Gift Card: C www.corkchamber.ie/cork-chamber-gift-card/ Sligo Chamber Gift Card: www.sligochamber.ie/sligochamber-gift-card Galway Chamber Gift Card: www.galwaychamber.com/giftcard/ Thurles Chamber Gift Card: www.thurleschamber.ie/thurleschamber-gift-card Mallow Chamber Gift Card: www.mallowchamber.ie/gift-card

WHY CHOOSE CHAMBER GIFT CARDS? BIK SAVINGS

Reward your employees with up to a500 on a Chamber Gift Card completely tax-free under the Small Benefits Exemption scheme. Your reward will be exempt from Income Tax, Universal Social Charge (USC) and employee & employer’s PRSI.

FLEXIBLE

Accepted in over 80 outlets in-store and online with selected partner’s right across each of the individual locations. Chamber Gift Cards offer a huge range of options for your staff. Whether they want to treat themselves to a new outfit, a fancy meal or the latest technology, their reward will be meaningful to them.

SECURE

The Gift Voucher Shop (GVS) is a subsidiary of An Post. Over 98 per cent of GVS/One4all corporate clients would recommend the company because they can be trusted to deliver rewards and benefits schemes on time and on budget.

CONVENIENT

One4all’s friendly sales team will work with you to manage and deliver your order, ensuring smooth and secure delivery of your purchase. All orders are dealt with on an individual basis and we are happy to talk through specific requirements over the phone or online.

GVS will manage all order taking, processing and fulfilment, which removes the administration and costs involved. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

038 InBusiness YB 2019_PP_One4all.indd 39

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PARTNER PROFILE HOUSE OF WATERFORD CRYSTAL

A

Cut

Waterford Crystal have been creating exquisite crystal pieces since 1783, and share their craftsmanship with the world through their iconic giftware, trophies and factory tours.

Through 236 years,

Waterford Crystal and the visionary characters behind its evolution have crafted a unique story in glass. Imagine the times, in 1783, when Beethoven was publishing his first works and the world’s first hot air balloon was launched in Paris, in Waterford City George and William Penrose petitioned Parliament for aid to establish the manufacture of flint glass in their Waterford Glass House. A luxury collection of the finest crystal continues to be made by skilled craftsmen at the House of Waterford Crystal factory situated in the heart of Waterford City, in Ireland’s Ancient East. A significant tourist attraction, the House of Waterford Crystal welcomes 200,000 visitors annually from across the world. GUIDED FACTORY TOUR On the tour, visitors witness mould making – a technique at Waterford that has remained unchanged throughout the centuries, as the Master Blowers shape the molten crystal flawlessly with the use of wooden moulds and hand tools. The next part of the tour is truly magical, as visitors enter the blowing department where they see glowing balls of crystal transformed into majestic shapes as they are put through the 1300-degree furnace. The Waterford Crystal pieces are then hand marked for precision and accuracy, and then cut, sculpted and engraved. Skills have passed from master to apprentice. Fresh ideas have reinvigorated iconic sparkling cuts in contemporary ways. While getting this behind the scenes sneak peak of this highly skilled method of crystal manufacturing, visitors also see the high standards that the House of Waterford Crystal has for each piece that leaves the factory. The crystal is inspected at each stage of production, so each piece, no matter how small, goes through six inspections, and if it fails to reach the Waterford Crystal standards at any stage it is smashed and returned to the furnace to be re-melted so that the piece can be started again. Visitors next witness the cutting department. The Master Cutter must rely on his own skill to judge the amount of pressure that is required to hold the crystal to the wheel; too much pressure will cause a cut through to the other side. Each of our craftsmen has trained for a minimum of eight years to master their craft. They are 40

040 InBusiness YB 2019_PP_Waterford Crystal.indd 40

ABOVE responsible for giving each piece the clear and sparkling cut that is the distinctive hallmark of Waterford Crystal. The final stages of the tour are the engraving and sculpting departments. The Master Sculptors at Waterford work three dimensionally, using their skill to sculpt the desired piece from a solid block of crystal. Days, weeks, and even months can pass before a sculpted piece is completed. The type of copper wheel engraving used at Waterford Crystal is called ‘Intaglio’, which means reverse. It can take from hours to days to complete the engraving on many of our international sporting trophies and limited-edition inspiration pieces. RETAIL STORE & BRAND EXPERIENCE Visitors can experience over 12,000 square feet of crystal heaven in the largest retail and showcase of Waterford Crystal in the world. The retail store represents everything we make in crystal, including a showcase on golf and sport, which is a major part of our international business. The main feature in the retail store is a centre dining table, with 12 Waterford Crystal Chandeliers on display. The lifestyle displays communicate the various brand stories including, Jeff Leatham and the core Waterford Crystal patterns. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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PARTNER PROFILE HOUSE OF WATERFORD CRYSTAL

Precision through craftsmanship

Elegance born of flame

WORLD SPORTS Waterford Crystal continues to provide some of the most prestigious trophies to the world’s great sporting events, all made at the facility. The list of famous trophies produced by Waterford Crystal for the sports industry alone is simply staggering; the Irish Open Trophy, the Honda Classic and the Masters Snooker trophy to name just a few. Waterford Crystal also designed the spectacular Times Square Ball – a crystal ball which forms a prominent part of a New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square in New York, colloquially known as the ball drop. There is huge pride in Waterford Crystal throughout Ireland and it is little wonder that it is one of the most popular items used to mark such special occasions. Even though our audience is beyond Ireland, namely in the US, Australia and the UK, everyone at home wants to be part of something that is part of the fabric of Ireland and our heritage. A lot of thought goes into our products, which are inspired by Irish heritage, by our landscape, our music and the arts. It is not just about the amazing shapes or the designs of the products, but the stories behind those designs. In many cases these designs reflect Irish culture in terms of castles, music and art. If you wish to recognise a special achievement or give a special gift for a celebration, Waterford Crystal is one of the first places people look. In the same way, Waterford Crystal is present in so many homes around the world – some very famous homes – it could be a fine wine glass, tumbler, a giftware piece or a chandelier. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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CORPORATE & SPORTS Our corporate and gift awards program caters for rewarding your employees or clients. We can customise a piece from our core range that can allow you create your own unique message or logo on the item. Our product range includes Waterford Crystal, House of Waterford Crystal, Jeff Leatham, Marquis, Elegance, Lighting and our beautiful Waterford Crystal Jewellery Collection. Should you require your items gift wrapped and individual cards written, we can include these as part of your order. Our worldwide shipping service allows you the flexibility to deliver 24/48 hours to Ireland, UK or USA. Our dedicated Sales Manager, Tom Walsh, can be contacted at tom.walsh@fiskars. com or +353 (0) 51 841499.

CONTACT For more information contact: waterfordvisitorcentre.com houseofwaterfordcrystal@fiskars.com Tel: + 353 (0)51 317000 Digital & Social Media: Facebook: House of Waterford Crystal Twitter: @WaterfordCrystl Instagram: @waterfordcrystalfactory

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28/02/2019 14:28


PARTNER PROFILE EMBASSY OF BRAZIL

THE

Growing Business OF

BRAZIL A number of factors

explain the rising growth trajectory of Brazilian agribusiness over recent decades. The success of Brazilian agriculture is often attributed to the stock of national resources, given the country’s continental dimensions and its predominantly tropical climate. Until 30 years ago, the leading food-producing countries were those with temperate climates, where grain and livestock production had been developed to suit those climates better. As a result, the various technological packages available until then were not suitable for natural conditions in Brazil. Moreover, a considerable portion of Brazilian soil, including the Cerrado (savanna) biome, has low fertility and high acidity, issues that limit agricultural production. Most importantly, the majority – about 66 per cent – of Brazil’s total area is covered by native vegetation. Therefore, current output levels were attained by developing production techniques and systems suited to the tropical climate conditions. ADVANCES IN TECHNIQUES Discoveries and innovations in agricultural sciences, including soil chemistry, physics and fertility, plant physiology, crop management, pest, disease and weed control, animal nutrition and health, genetics, agricultural meteorology, irrigation and mechanisation were all decisive in this achievement by Brazil’s agriculture and livestock sector. As a result of this development, grain production has grown by about 407 per cent since the 1976/1977 harvest, equivalent to 4.1 per cent per year, while the planted area grew only 1.2 per cent a year, representing productivity gains of 2.9 per cent per year. Meanwhile, overall meat production has increased by 205 per cent since 1990, and chicken meat output, specifically, has gone up 438 per cent in this period. Also, double cropping and winter crops deserve special mention: they 42

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Technology, productivity and entrepreneurship have resulted in Brazil’s booming agribusiness sector.

involve re-using planted areas for a new crop in the same harvestyear, and are increasingly common in Brazil, where soy production is often followed by maize. This scientific development has been made possible by agricultural research focused on Brazilian conditions and led by agricultural science universities, institutes and state research entities, as the renowned Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa), established in 1973. A network of state and federal agencies that promote science, technology and innovation fostered an environment that facilitated research and development in the private sector. The farmers who moved from the traditional production regions of the South/Southeast and settled at the agricultural frontier on the Cerrado, in the centre of Brazil, were bold enough to test their own seeds and adapt their techniques to the new climate and soil conditions. Part of the increased production and technological development seen today is thus due to the enterprising spirit of those pioneer farmers. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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PARTNER PROFILE EMBASSY OF BRAZIL

INVESTMENT More recently, productivity gains in Brazil have attracted multinational companies and overseas investors, who have also begun to develop modern agricultural technologies adapted to tropical conditions. Examples of this foreign participation are common in the genetic improvement of seeds and cultivars, and in development of machines and equipment. Also, in the South/Southeast, the introduction of integrated pig and poultry production systems guaranteed product supply for processing in small family agroindustrial units – which ultimately gave rise to traditional firms in the sector. These factors led to larger-scale production of grains, livestock and cultivation over extensive areas in the Cerrado regions. It also enabled those who invested in processing to bring added value to production. Evidence of the technological development of Brazilian agribusiness can be seen in its use of modern chemical inputs, such as fertilizers and pesticides. Today, in kilograms per hectare of arable land, Brazil’s consumption (2.3 kg per hectare) is considerably below that of EU countries such as the Netherlands (20.8), Belgium (12) and France (6), while Asian countries use these inputs more intensively. Furthermore, Brazil is a tropical country where the incidence of pests, diseases and weeds is greater than in countries with temperate climates. Also, two or more harvests are produced per year in much of the country, so the use of these advanced input materials is balanced, and in accordance with developed-country standards. If compared by chemical inputs used per unit produced, these materials are used proportionately even less intensely in Brazil than in European countries, since Brazil’s production volume per hectare is far greater than in those countries. SUSTAINABILITY OF BRAZILIAN AGRIBUSINESS The environmental policy framework developed and introduced in recent years reflects a balance of interests InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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Mass soybean harvesting at a farm in Campo Verde, Mato Grosso

“PRODUCTIVITY

in Brazilian society, aiming to achieve full convergence between production and environmental protection. Policies to combat deforestation in the Amazon and ATTRACTED Cerrado, to regulate land use under Forest Code MULTINATIONAL requirements (such as creating preservation areas COMPANIES on private properties and introducing zonings of AND OVERSEAS production), and to combat climate change, all converge INVESTORS, to encourage the development of sustainable agribusiness. WHO HAVE ALSO Brazil is one of the world’s leading food producers BEGUN TO and, at the same time, is among the countries with DEVELOP the largest areas of preserved vegetation. The growth MODERN trajectory of Brazilian agriculture has been guided over AGRICULTURAL the recent decades by the endeavour to maintain and TECHNOLOGIES expand output while protecting the environment. ADAPTED TO Agribusiness accounts for around 20 per cent of TROPICAL Brazil`s GDP, while using less than 10 per cent of the CONDITIONS” country’s area in plant production and between 20 and 30 per cent for livestock. It is extremely complex to detail land use precisely and rigorously in a country of continental dimensions such as Brazil, where some 2/3 of the area is under native forests and 85 per cent of the population live in urban environments. Although different research groups differ in their definitions of use categories and interpretations of satellite images, and despite the difficulty of data collection in remote areas, advances in image technology and processing methods have diminished the divergences. A recent study by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in partnership with NASA revealed that plant crop areas cover 64 million hectares, or about 7.6 per cent, of Brazil’s territory. Over recent decades, Brazil has developed a broad legal and regulatory framework for environmental preservation. It aims to guarantee that agricultural and livestock farm production will develop with an appropriate level of environmental protection, allowing Brazil to attain a leading position in the sustainable supply of food and environmental services.

GAINS IN BRAZIL HAVE

To read the complete article, visit www.easy-brasil.com. For further information contact the Embassy of Brazil in Ireland: email secom.dublin@itamaraty.gov.br or phone (01) 416-1216 43

28/02/2019 14:28


PARTNER PROFILE ESB

Generation

In 2018, ESB launched Generation Tomorrow, a programme promoting STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths) education with the goal of empowering young people to reach their potential and power their collective brighter future.

Tomorrow

One in four

Irish adults expect robots and AI to take over their jobs within the next six to 10 years, according to a recent Red C poll. That means that younger generations will face an increasingly challenging employment landscape as humans are replaced by machines across a range of industries and roles. It is estimated that 65 per cent of children entering primary school today will ultimately end up working in jobs that don’t yet exist. So how can we help equip future generations with the skillsets to embrace and thrive in this new world, and to prepare them for Generation Tomorrow? THE IMPORTANCE OF CREATIVITY AND CRITICAL THINKING The World Economic Forum Future Jobs report (2016) identified the three most important skills of the future as being complex problem solving, critical thinking and creativity. Tomorrow’s job candidates must be able to collaborate, creatively problem solve and communicate. These are skills developed mainly through social and emotional learning (SEL) and reinforce the importance of developing resilience at a young age by enabling young people to understand that failure is an important part of how we learn and find solutions to problems. These skills aren’t only necessary to help individuals to thrive - they are essential in tackling the global challenges facing humanity, such as climate change. To become the 44

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innovative problem-solvers of the future, children need to be equipped not only with scientific and technical skills, but also with the freedom to create and experiment. LEADING THE TRANSITION TO A LOW CARBON FUTURE ESB’s Generation Tomorrow programme supports the work of a number of partners including; Camara Education Ireland (organisers of TechSpace and ESB Creative Tech Fest); RDS (organisers of ESB Science Blast, a science programme for primary school pupils); University of Limerick and the MaREI (Centre for Marine and Renewable Energy) and Cool Planet Experience, the world’s first permanent visitor centre dedicated to climate change.

TechSpace provides young people with access to a space where they can use technology to create, invent and inspire through Digital Creativity and STEAM. ESB Creative TechFest is the annual showcase of work from across the TechSpace network. Young people also have the opportunity to engage in workshops and experience new technologies.

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PARTNER PROFILE ESB

Young people can reach their potential and power a brighter future through ESB’s Generation Tomorrow programme

ESB’s Chief Executive Pat O’Doherty believes that supporting STEAM education is important in the context of ESB’s commitment to leading the transition to a low carbon future, powered by clean electricity: “By helping young people to develop scientific literacy and critical thinking skills through programmes that encourage curiosity and discovery, we can help them not only to become creative and innovative problem solvers, but also active and engaged citizens, capable of making informed choices to tackle climate change and other global challenges.” The impact of informal learning initiatives such as ESB Science Blast and TechSpace, that emphasise inquiry-based learning and skills development are recognised internationally as having a substantial impact in supporting positive learning outcomes for young people. THE IMPORTANCE OF ASKING QUESTIONS It has never been more important for our young people to develop the confidence to question and critically assess the world around them, believes Michael Duffy, CEO of the RDS, organisers of ESB Science Blast. “It’s so important for children to have the cognitive skills to examine and analyse matters for themselves,” says Duffy, “and also to have some understanding of STEAM skills in a world where science and technology are becoming so pervasive in almost all aspects of life.” ESB Science Blast, a programme aimed at 3rd – 6th class and K2 Stage (NI), aims to ignite children’s innate curiosity about the world around them, encouraging them to think about their future and the world we inhabit and to develop the facility to be critical thinkers. With a whole class involvement mandatory, children are asked to collaborate to investigate a question that fascinates them by predicting, measuring, counting or observing, using core skills from the curriculum, before displaying their work and presenting their findings at one of three ESB Science Blast events across the country (Dublin, Limerick and Belfast). Previous investigations included: “Why do I have two eyes if I only see one thing?”; “Why does cake go hard but biscuits go soft?”; “Where do waves come from?”; and “Can I charge my mobile device with a fruit?” The success of the programme lies in getting children to investigate questions that they come up with themselves, and which are relevant to their lives and interest them. “ESB Science Blast is fundamentally about equipping children with the skills and approaches that they are going to need in order to thrive in 21st century society,” says Karen Sheeran, InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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Science and Technology Programme Manager at the RDS. “Our goal is to ignite “IT’S SO children’s innate curiosity IMPORTANT and, through the process FOR of scientific discovery, help CHILDREN instill skills of reason-based TO HAVE THE inquiry, critical thinking, CONFIDENCE resilience and collaboration. TO “We know that not every QUESTION child will become a scientist, WHAT IS but we do believe that PRESENTED TO THEM” scientific literacy is crucially important to empower the next generation, and to fuel Ireland’s ability to compete,” adds Sheeran. “We also believe in possibilities – in opening doors, showing what can be possible for children from all backgrounds, all communities, and of all abilities. This is about igniting what is within each child to achieve.” EMBRACING TECHNOLOGY TO CREATE WITH PURPOSE Embracing existing technology to set young people up for future technological success is at the heart of what Camara Education Ireland aims to do through the TechSpace programme. TechSpace provides young people with access to a space where they can use technology to create, invent and inspire through Digital Creativity and STEAM. TechSpace says: “Our goal is to ensure that young people are empowered not just to become consumers of technology, but to use technology with purpose, to be creators, inventors and extenders of it.It is crucial that young people today play an active role in how technology develops, and use technology to find creative solutions to the challenges they face today and will face in the future.” A BRIGHTER FUTURE Young people today face an unknown future, with global climate challenges, rapid technological advancements and the changing nature of the workplace, all of which affect their future prospects. ESB’s Generation Tomorrow partners are working to create a brighter future for all young people, empowering them now to develop the skills they will need in the future, and to become creative, engaged, lifelong learners. For more information please visit ww.esb.ie/generationtomorrow 45

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PARTNER PROFILE HSA

Guiding BUSINESSES Through

Brexit Yvonne Mullooly, Assistant Chief Executive, Health & Safety Authority, looks at the implications Brexit will present for the trade and supply of Chemicals, Machinery, Transportable Pressure Equipment and for Accreditation.

As the United Kingdom

gets ready to leave the EU on the 29th March the implications of Brexit for many Irish Businesses is starting to get real. Ireland will be the EU country most affected when the UK leaves the EU due to our close trading ties. Some businesses may not think that they will be exposed post Brexit, but if they trade with the UK, including Northern Ireland, or their supply chain is partly dependant on the UK they will be. Once the UK withdraws from the EU it will become a third county but EU legislation will still apply to products placed on the Irish or other EU markets, coming from the UK. Irish companies, who source products from the UK or Northern Ireland, should already have started their preparations scrutinising their supply chains for risks of exposure when the UK leaves the EU.. The Health & Safety Authority is a Competent Authority for a range of EU Regulations and Directives which govern the import, use and placing on the market of a range of products from chemicals, pressure equipment to machinery and lifts. CHEMICALS Chemicals is one area most likely to be most affected. When we think about the trade and supply of chemicals many of us have visions of large bulk containers of industrial chemicals entering workplaces but chemicals are also widely used in the home. Most Irish businesses source their chemicals from UK and Northern Ireland manufacturers or suppliers. Currently, these Irish companies are considered downstream users relying in many instances on UK companies with the appropriate EU registrations and authorisations under REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) but, after 29 March, these UK REACH registrations and authorisations will become non-existent. Irish companies that continue to source their chemicals directly from the UK will effectively become EU importers, taking on the responsibility for the registration, authorisation, notification and other essential safety information requirements in EU REACH and CLP (Classification, labelling and Packaging of chemicals) chemical laws. UK suppliers of

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PARTNER PROFILE HSA

chemicals to Ireland have options to help reduce some of the burden on Irish customers if they want to continue supplying post Brexit. While there are options and business opportunities available, most will need to be in place (legally) before the UK leave. For chemical exports to the UK, Irish companies will now need to also take into account the requirements under the International Rotterdam Convention and the EU’s Rotterdam Regulation. Chemical products containing any of chemicals listed in the Rotterdam Regulation may need explicit permission (consent) from the UK to export into the UK. In order to obtain this permission Irish Companies must first apply for a RIN (reference indication number) through ECHA’s ePIC IT system. A RIN is required in order to clear customs. Those planning to export chemical products containing substances listed in the Rotterdam Regulation should note that notifications to ePIC should be made 35 days before the date of export. MACHINERY For Irish companies importing machinery from the UK after Brexit, if they make it available on the EU market for the first time then they will take on the responsibility of ensuring the appropriate conformity assessment has been carried out by the manufacturer in compliance with the safety requirements in the Machinery Directive (2006/42/EC). TRANSPORTABLE PRESSURE EQUIPMENT Companies should be aware that transportable pressure equipment (TPE) will also be affected. Irish companies using UK notified bodies to carry out inspections of TPE will have to source alternative bodies from within the EU. In addition, Irish companies who are currently distributors of UK TPE will be affected in that they will become importers and thus their obligations under the TPE Directive (2010/35/EU) will change. NOTIFIED BODIES Currently, most Irish manufacturers rely on the services of third party certification through a notified body based in the UK. From the date of withdrawal, UK based notified bodies will no longer be recognised. Companies currently using UK-based notified bodies, to carry out conformity assessments and inspections, will have to InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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source alternative bodies from within the EU. Companies who source a different notified body should be aware that the new notified body shall have a different notified body number which is unique to them and allocated by the Commission appointment process. This may need to be reflected in the documentation and certification associated with products.

Yvonne Mullooly, Assistant Chief Executive, Health & Safety Authority

“WHILE BREXIT

LEAVES MANY

UNANSWERED QUESTIONS FOR MANY SECTORS IT IS

ESSENTIAL FOR IRISH BUSINESSES WHO SOURCE OR SUPPLY PRODUCTS FROM THE UK

TO CONSIDER

THE IMPLICATIONS

AND PLAN THEIR STRATEGY

ACCORDINGLY. ”

ACCREDITATION The Irish National Accreditation Board (INAB) is the sole body in Ireland responsible for the accreditation of notified bodies. Since the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, INAB, which is part of the Health and Safety Authority, has experienced significant growth in applications from organisations re-locating from the UK requiring accreditation. In terms of accreditation INAB, provides accreditation to applicant conformity assessment bodies (CABs) which test, certify and inspect products/services. Apart from meeting the requirements of accreditation and notifying authorities, CABs must demonstrate they are permanently established in Ireland. INAB accreditation is internationally recognised through mutual recognition arrangements between accreditation bodies in each Member State. A list of accredited notified bodies established in Ireland, is available on www. inab.ie and the NANDO database. While Brexit leaves many unanswered questions for many sectors it is essential for Irish businesses who source or supply products from the UK to consider the implications and plan their strategy accordingly. As part of the Irish Government initiatives to support Irish businesses getting Brexit ready the Health & Safety Authority are hosting as well as participating in a series of seminars across Ireland. The next of those HSA seminars will be in Cork on the 28th February and on the 1st March in Limerick. There is also a range of supports on offer from Enterprise Ireland, InterTradeIreland and the 31 Local Enterprise Offices and information on what actions to take. The Authority also provides support to Irish business through their helpdesk. Companies with particular concerns or questions can visit their website at https://www.hsa.ie/Brexit or contact the HSA or INAB by phone 1890 289 389 or by emailing wcu@hsa.ie, chemicals@hsa.ie or inab@inab.ie for further assistance. 47

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PARTNER PROFILE PERMANENT TSB

Building Relationships with

Killian O’Flynn, Head of SME Banking at permanent tsb, explains how the bank focuses on offering personalised solutions to the challenges Irish SMEs face.

SMEs Credit provided

to SMEs was reported at a16.2bn in the most recent SME Market Report published by the Central Bank, excluding finance and real estate-sectors. New lending had increased slightly, led by demand from the agriculture and hospitality sectors. The market share of the three main lenders has begun to fall but remains high at 86 per cent of new lending. permanent tsb is a relatively new challenger in this market, despite its deep retail banking roots across Ireland. Since entering the SME Lending market, its focus has been on the small businesses that serve local communities nationwide. “We offer business banking with a personal touch,” says Killian O’Flynn, Head of SME Banking. He has spent many years engaging business owners across practically all industry sectors about financial needs and identifying solutions to help their business grow. “So much has changed in business over the last 25 years that it is easy to forget the core principles of intimacy, efficiency and innovation,” says O’Flynn, “but they remain the primary value drivers for most successful businesses.” Financial service providers try to differentiate themselves in similar ways to the participants in other industries, each trying to deliver maximum value through a unique combination of service speed, quality and cost. It’s practically impossible to be perceived as the best across all value drivers, so most businesses tend to lead with one while maintaining the others. “We focus on quality, in particular the quality of relationships with our customers,” says O’Flynn. “We want to be the bank of choice for what we do and how we do it.” Business owners must compete in ever-changing conditions that are constantly reshaped by economic, social, technological 48

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and political factors. “They may strive for consistency and the cost efficiency that offers, but they must respond quickly when market moves and customer needs change,” says O’Flynn. Brexit offers a good example of how external threats can flow from social and political interests to a specific economic impact on local business and employment. BREXIT: BACKSTOPS AND BEYOND As the Brexit deadline approaches with no deal in sight, there appears little doubt that many Irish businesses will be negatively affected, in particular those trading directly with the UK or whose supply chains are routed through that country. Some sectors are particularly vulnerable, including agriculture, food, tourism and transport. The most likely impact will come in the form of increased tariffs, border delays, currency fluctuations and gradually differing legal standards. It is difficult to predict the likely impact with precision or confidence at this stage. Small local enterprises may seem to be at lower risk than large corporations, but that is not true in all cases. The first impact may be felt in logistics, but this can quickly move to working capital and the dreaded cash flow squeeze. The impact may expand over time into profit narrowing or even losses. The InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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PARTNER PROFILE PERMANENT TSB

Killian O’Flynn, Head of SME Banking, permanent tsb

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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“WE FOCUS ON QUALITY, IN PARTICULAR THE QUALITY OF RELATIONSHIPS

WITH OUR CUSTOMERS. WE WANT TO BE THE BANK OF CHOICE FOR WHAT WE DO AND HOW WE DO IT.“

Jason Clarke

uncertainly surrounding Brexit is no excuse to ignore the threat. Risk assessment typically starts with understanding industry vulnerability before turning to the specific risk factors of an individual business, such as direct trade levels, payment terms, supply chains and goods handled. Perishable goods are particularly threatened by border delays. Consideration should be given to the relative impact on competitors and to the potential for developing new or alternative markets. Employees who travel to and from the UK may also be affected. Government has already provided a range of supports. Enterprise Ireland offers a Brexit Scorecard to assess risks, as well as preparatory grants and market discovery funds. Technical assistance and mentoring are available from Local Enterprise

Offices. Bord Bia and Fáilte Ireland offer focused readiness and response guidance for particular sectors, while Inter Trade Ireland provides a cross-border advisory service and planning vouchers. It is important to remember that Brexit also offers opportunity for some, and the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland has previously promoted funds to take advantage of such opportunities. The starting point for a business owner is to identify the most likely opportunity and to take action to mitigate any material risks. Identify the options available to you if the risk materialises, such as alternative financing arrangements. All banks have processes for helping SMEs experiencing or at risk of financial difficulties. WHERE TO TURN “Here at permanent tsb we take pride in a reputation for personal service,” says O’Flynn. “We offer a human touch and a willingness to listen, whether your needs are driven by opportunity or threat. We believe in communities, the people that bond them and the businesses that serve them. While we recognise that your banking needs may be complex, we won’t complicate the solutions. We will present the options, features and benefits in plain English and, when it comes to borrowing needs, we will provide a quick and clear response.” Small enterprises are those that employ fewer than 50 people and have less than a10m in annual sales or balance sheet assets. They are often family businesses and operate across most sectors. Most depend on bank debt to enable future growth. The Central Bank’s SME Market Report highlighted the challenge they face in the form of high rejection rates for loan application across the market. “While we are not always able to support an application, we always offer a fair and personal hearing,” says O’Flynn. “SMEs are independent, industrious and enterprising. They want to work with people who are willing to engage them directly in order to understand their financial needs. Many have found it difficult in recent years to build rapport with financial service providers who operate mostly though impersonal channels. We have a different approach at permanent tsb. “Our business managers and support team help guide customers through the application process to increase their chance of a successful outcome. Our primary focus is to identify the most suitable lending product to satisfy their need. We share a customer’s interest in appropriately structured finance within the capacity of the business to repay. Even if we disagree in our assessment and cannot support a proposal, we offer a process for appealing a decision through an independent party.” permanent tsb offers a range of financial services to business owners through 77 branches nationwide, including lending, savings, investment, financial planning and current accounts. Lending products are subject to lending criteria and assessment. Security may be required. permanent tsb p.l.c. is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland. 49

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PARTNER PROFILE

Energy

SEAI

EFFICIENCY WITH

Developing energy efficiency supports for the SME sector is a key focus for the SEAI in 2019.

T

SEAI

he Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) works with businesses, homeowners and communities to transform how we think about, generate and use energy. In 2017, 90 per cent of Ireland’s energy came from fossil fuels, but our vision is for Ireland’s energy to be sustainable, secure, affordable and clean. To achieve this, Ireland must use less energy, move to clean energy, and innovate to create new solutions to meet our energy needs. Leading the transition to smarter and more sustainable energy activities is central to what we do. Since 2011, we have invested more than a400m in sustainable energy projects, and supported more than 230 community energy projects. We work with all businesses, large and small, in Ireland on this energy journey. For 2019, we have a renewed focus on developing supports for the SME sector. SMEs play a vital role in the Irish economy, providing more than 90 per cent of national employment and contributing significantly to GDP and export income. While individually SMEs consume only small to moderate amounts of energy, collectively they account for a significant portion of national and indeed global energy demand. Implementing energy efficiency measures helps SMEs to cut costs, frees up resources that can be invested in more productive activities, and makes them more resilient and competitive. For any businesses interested in considering energy efficiency measures, SEAI offers supports including:

 inancial supports and grants of 30-40 per cent of the cost of specific energy F efficiency measures Training and advisory services Business events and supports One example of the financial supports provided by SEAI is the Smart Lighting grant for business, launched in 2017. The grant was funded by the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment. Lighting is a significant 50

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cost for many SMEs, and is the second highest cost for many businesses after staff costs. New developments in lighting technology, particularly Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology, means that businesses can reduce their lighting bills by 50 per cent or more. One small glass manufacturing company in the midlands of Ireland reported savings of over a3,000 in the first three months following installation of new LED light fittings. Another SME, a large storage company with multiple facilities, reported over 64 per cent savings in energy costs from upgrading their lights across four locations and installing a smart meter. Saving energy makes business sense for you and contributes to a better, cleaner environment for our future. This type of financial support is only one of the ways that we can support you. We are working on more ways to support businesses on their energy journey and help achieve savings to benefit everyone. To find out more about our supports visit www.seai.ie or email business@seai.ie with any queries. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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Helping shape Ireland’s energy future The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) is central to delivering a more sustainable energy future for everyone. Our role is to transform the way we all use energy by moving innovation in Ireland’s approach to energy. Working with the public, businesses, communities and government, we can all help create a cleaner energy future.

Find out how we can help you at seai.ie Your Energy Matters.

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IN CSR

Lidl Ireland was presented with the top accolade at this year’s Chambers Ireland CSR Awards.

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idl Ireland was the recipient of the Outstanding Achievement in CSR Award at the Chambers Ireland CSR Awards held in Dublin on September 20th 2018. Lidl Ireland’s CSR programme demonstrated company-wide engagement and impressed the judging panel by performing consistently well across all aspects of CSR. Speaking at the awards ceremony, Ian Talbot, Chief Executive of Chambers Ireland, said: “Ireland today is a wellspring of vital and inventive CSR practices across the business spectrum and the annual CSR Awards are the perfect opportunity to celebrate and pay tribute to the most exciting projects happening today. Over the past 15 years of the awards, the bar continues to be raised in terms of the level of ingenuity behind each applicant’s projects as well as the depth of engagement with sustainable and socially responsible goals.” This 15th edition of the annual awards was run in association with the Department of Rural and Community Development, partnered with Business in the Community Ireland and sponsored by BAM Ireland. The Environmental Protection Agency sponsored the Excellence in Environment Award and One4all sponsored the Excellence in Workplace Award. Each winner was presented with a specially commissioned trophy designed by Waterford Crystal.

THE CSR AWARDS 2018 CATEGORY WINNERS ARE: EXCELLENCE IN CSR COMMUNICATIONS ■ Diageo Ireland St James’s Gate Quarter – Conversations at the Gate EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – PARTNERSHIP WITH CHARITY - LIC ■ Diageo Ireland Celebrating 200 Years of the Dublin Pub Diageo and LVA ALONE Partnership EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – PARTNERSHIP WITH CHARITY - MNC ■ Vodafone Ireland Vodafone and Childline – Working Together to Keep Children Safe by Keeping them Connected EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENT - LIC ■ Deloitte Deloitte’s Green Agenda programme EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENT - MNC ■ Lidl Ireland A Better Tomorrow EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – VOLUNTEERING - LIC ■ Earth’s Edge Explore, Experience, Evolve

From left: Kevin McCarthy, Secretary General, Department of Rural and Community Development; JP Scally, Managing Director, Lidl Ireland; Niamh Boyle, President, Chambers Ireland; Deirdre Ryan, Head of CSR, Lidl Ireland; Theo Cullinane, Chief Executive, BAM Ireland; Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland

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EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – VOLUNTEERING - MNC ■ VMware International VMware Cork Giving Network project

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – COMMUNITY PROGRAMME – LIC ■ Little Island Industries Development Company Little Island Industries Development Company (LIIDC)

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – COMMUNITY PROGRAMME – MNC ■ Lidl Ireland Lidl Community Works.

EXCELLENCE IN WORKPLACE – LIC ■ eir eir Wellness: Live Life, Live Well.

EXCELLENCE IN WORKPLACE – MNC ■ Boots Ireland Boots & See Change: De-stigmatising Mental Health.

EXCELLENCE IN MARKETPLACE ■ Bank of Ireland Bank of Ireland Workbench

EXCELLENCE IN DIVERSITY & INCLUSION ■ Diageo Ireland Learning for Life Refugee and Asylum Seekers Programme

EXCELLENCE IN CSR BY AN SME ■ OpenApp Rare100

*LIC: Large Indigenous Company | *MNC: Multinational Company

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EXCELLENCE IN CSR COMMUNICATIONS Diageo Ireland St James’s Gate Quarter – Conversations at the Gate St James’s Gate – Conversations at the Gate is a programme designed to engage with local and national stakeholders to share Diageo’s ambition and understand the views of as many people as possible on what an urban quarter should be. For the launch, the PR value came to 4,200,649.41.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – PARTNERSHIP WITH CHARITY - LIC Diageo Ireland Celebrating 200 Years of the Dublin Pub – Diageo and LVA ALONE Partnership In association with the Licensed Vintner’s Association, Diageo’s master brewers created Dublin Amber Ale to celebrate 200 years of the Dublin pub in 2017. With 50 cent from each pint sold given to ALONE for their Befriending Network, and for the construction of homes for the elderly, over 225,000 was raised.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – PARTNERSHIP WITH CHARITY - MNC Vodafone Ireland Vodafone and Childline – Working Together to Keep Children Safe by Keeping them Connected Vodafone Foundation Ireland and ISPCC Childline commenced a five-year partnership in 2016, with the aim of keeping children safe by keeping them connected. With a new text service in place and the online webchat and website being rebuilt, their marketing campaign sees Childline reach out to children to normalise talking and promote resilience.

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EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENT - LIC Deloitte Deloitte’s Green Agenda project Now in its 10th year, Deloitte’s Green Agenda programme continues to make a positive impact on the environment. The programme, addressing environmental issues, has allowed Deloitte to embed sustainability into the firm’s operations while promoting employee awareness. Green Champions assist the environmental team in raising awareness and encouraging employee engagement.

EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENT - MNC Lidl Ireland A Better Tomorrow Having joined Bord Bia’s Origin Green Sustainable Development programme in 2017, Lidl Ireland developed targets to be achieved by 2020. Environmental achievements on the ‘A Better Tomorrow’ project included ISO50001 energy management accreditation, zero waste to landfill, and a food redistribution programme, which saw 149 tonnes of food donated to charities.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – VOLUNTEERING - LIC Earth’s Edge Explore, Experience, Evolve The “Explore Experience Evolve” programme saw Earth’s Edge partner with Warrenmount Presentation, a disadvantaged girls’ school in Dublin, to promote confidence, wellbeing and fitness amongst the students by offering training in outdoor skills. With students selected based on attendance and good behaviour, it was a useful motivational tool.

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EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – VOLUNTEERING - MNC VMware International VMware Cork Giving Network project Through the Cork Giving Network, the VMware Cork workforce of over 1,000 people makes a positive impact by using 40 service learning hours to take part in VMware’s community initiatives. Cultivating relationships with charities and non-profits, the Network organises volunteering opportunities, enabling volunteers to put more into society.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – COMMUNITY PROGRAMME – LIC Little Island Industries Development Company Little Island Industries Development Company (LIIDC) Little Island Industries Development Company (LIIDC) is a partnership between industries who have pooled their resources to benefit local community groups in Little Island and Glounthaune. It provides monetary and advisory support to benefit the community, supporting over 90 individual projects and contributing over 1million in the last 27 years.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – COMMUNITY PROGRAMME – MNC Lidl Ireland Lidl Community Works Lidl Community Works continues to contribute to communities. 2017 saw the launch of a food redistribution programme and Autism Aware stores, while “Charity of the Week” sees 1,000 donated to charity every week for a year. Lidl reached 2million in fundraising for Barretstown, and continued their Ladies Gaelic Football partnership.

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EXCELLENCE IN WORKPLACE – LIC Eir eir Wellness: Live Life, Live Well Providing a workplace environment where employees can reach their potential, eir’s wellness programme “Live Well… Be Well… Think Well” promotes health and wellbeing. Year one saw 300 managers and safety representatives attend a Health, Safety and Wellbeing conference, 1,000 health screenings, and 290 people signing up for the eir Challenge.

EXCELLENCE IN WORKPLACE – MNC Boots Ireland Boots & See Change: De-stigmatising Mental Health. Boots Ireland partnered with See Change, an alliance of 100 organisations through the National Stigma Reduction Partnership, to foster positive change in attitudes towards people experiencing mental health difficulties. More than 250 employees received training on supporting colleagues and breaking down mental health stigma, with an e-learning module also created.

Excellence in Marketplace Bank of Ireland Workbench Launched in 2015 in Grand Canal Square, Workbench connects entrepreneurs, Bank of Ireland colleagues and the community by offering a free space for co-working, launches and events. Some 13,000 people used the space that year,and since then two more spaces have opened in Dublin as well as branches in Galway, Limerick and Cork.

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EXCELLENCE IN CSR BY AN SME OpenApp Rare100 Though rare diseases affect 300 million people worldwide, there is no cure for the majority and many go undiagnosed. No individual institution has sufficient numbers of patients for clinical trials, but with Rare100, OpenApp provides a free web-enabled registry for organisations with fewer than 100 patients, enabling them to gather important data.

EXCELLENCE IN DIVERSITY & INCLUSION Diageo Ireland Learning for Life – Refugee and Asylum Seekers Programme The Diageo Learning for Life Refugee and Asylum Seekers Programme provides education, training and employment opportunities for migrants. Working with the Department of Justice and the Immigrant Council of Ireland, Diageo and its staff train participants towards gaining a City and Guilds certificate and taking a work placement in the hospitality sector.

OVERALL WINNER LIDL Lidl Ireland was awarded the Outstanding Achievement in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) 2018 Award at the Chambers Ireland CSR Awards. Lidl Ireland’s CSR programme demonstrated company-wide engagement and impressed the judging panel by performing consistently well across all aspects of CSR.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2018

EXCELLENCE ON THE GROUND

Clare County Council scooped the top accolade at the 2018 Excellence in Local Government Awards. Clare County Council was named Local Authority of the Year at the Chambers Ireland Excellence in Local Government Awards, which took place on 22nd November 2018. The 15th annual awards ceremony was held in association with the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government and showcases and celebrates the best of local government in Ireland. Commenting on the awards, Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland said: “Once again this year’s awards have proved to be a timely reminder of the tremendous work being done by local authorities, as well as what these authorities contribute to their respective communities and how essential their role is across many different facets of Irish society today. “It is an honour for Chambers Ireland to host the Excellence in Local Government Awards and shine a spotlight on the work and ambition which takes place at local government level across Ireland. The highest of congratulations are due to Local Authority of the Year, Clare County Council, the 16 category winners, the many shortlisted organisations but also, just as importantly, the people who made all these projects and activities happen.”

THE WINNERS Supporting Active Communities Award Sponsored by Lidl Fingal County Council – Fingal Kaleidoscope Intergenerational Project (Seniors & Four Year Olds)

Sustaining the Arts Award Sponsored by House of Waterford Crystal Longford County Council Longford Schools Photography Programme

Best Practice in Citizen Engagement Award Sponsored by ESB Networks Clare County Council – Community Mobilisation Unit: Rural & Community Development Officer

Joint Local Authority Initiative Award Sponsored by Zurich Monaghan County Council www.repairmystuff.ie, Ireland’s Leading Online Repair Directory

Health & Wellbeing Award Sponsored by Healthy Ireland Cavan County Council – Cavan Rainbow Youth: An LGBT Youth Support Service in County Cavan Supporting Tourism Award Sponsored by Fáilte Ireland Waterford City & County Council King of the Vikings - the World’s First Viking Virtual Reality Adventure Promoting Economic Development Award Sponsored by EirGrid Galway County Council Galway & West of Ireland, European Region of Gastronomy Local Authority Innovation Award Sponsored by TEKenable Cork City Council Bishopsgrove Supported Student Accommodation

(l-r): Diarmuid McMahon, President of Ennis Chamber; Ian Talbot, Chief Executive of Chambers Ireland; Cllr Michael Begley, Mayor of Clare County Council; Siobhan Kinsella, President of Chambers Ireland; John Paul Phelan, Minister of State for Local Government and Electoral Reform; and Pat Dowling, Clare County Council’s Chief Executive.

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Sustainable Environment Award Sponsored by ERP Clare County Council The Burren & Cliffs of Moher UNESCO Global Geopark Best Library Service Award Sponsored by Shell Kildare County Council - Athy Community Library

Festival of the Year Award Sponsored by Fáilte Ireland Cork County Council - Youghal Medieval Festival Outstanding Initiative through the Municipal Districts Award Sponsored by LGiU Clare County Council Friars Walk Coach Park Ennis Coach Friendly Destination Enhancing the Urban Environment Award Sponsored by Ervia Kildare County Council - Maynooth Harbour - A Cycling Network Intersection Project Heritage & Built Environment Award Sponsored by AIB Limerick City and County Council - Lord Edward Street Housing Development, Limerick City Disability Services Provision Award Sponsored by EirGrid Monaghan County Council Everybody Plays - Inclusive Playground Policy Commemorations & Centenaries Award Sponsored by An Post Meath County Council Francis Ledwidge Centenary

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BEST PRACTICE IN CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT CLARE COUNTY COUNCIL Community Mobilisation Unit: Rural & Community Development Officer

SUPPORTING ACTIVE COMMUNITIES FINGAL COUNTY COUNCIL

Fingal Kaleidoscope Intergenerational Project (Seniors & Four-Year-Olds)

A six-month consultation process was undertaken where the views of rural communities in decline were sought. The results indicated that rural decline could be attributed to the failure of communities to act collectively; to ensure on-going relevance; to achieve leadership succession and to ensure medium-term financial sustainability. A unique approach to address these failures was undertaken by Clare County Council’s initiative of establishing a 10-person Community Mobilisation Unit including the recruitment of four Rural and Community Development Officers (RCDOs).The Community Mobilisation Unit initiative delivered a number of interventions that engaged growing numbers of citizens and members of the public.

The aim of the Project was to support older people to tackle loneliness, grief and depression while also providing pre-school children with an opportunity to learn about older people. Research showed project benefits including improved mental health, more positive attitude towards life, social benefits and greater personal contentment. A review of the programme showed five main themes of learning among participants – reciprocal learning, development of relationships, novel experiences and learning between young and old, accompanying emotions mutually felt by seniors and children and a change of pace. The success of this project has seen it extended across the country.

HEALTH & WELLBEING CAVAN COUNTY COUNCIL

Cavan Rainbow Youth: An LGBT Youth Support Service in County Cavan

Cavan County Council worked with Cavan Children and Young People’s Services Committee (CYPSC) to develop a new LGBTI+ support service for County Cavan, using Healthy Ireland Funding. The service is hosted locally by Focus Family Resource Centre and managed by a subgroup involving partners from the statutory and community sectors. The service is an important development in supporting the well-being of young LGBTI+ people in a rural county, providing one-to-one support and drop-in centres for group support. The Development Worker also supports services such as schools and youth groups to be inclusive of young people from the LGBTI+ community.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2018

SUPPORTING TOURISM WATERFORD CITY & COUNTY COUNCIL

King of the Vikings - the World’s First Viking Virtual Reality Adventure

King of the Vikings has taken Irish tourism by storm. With its daily 90 per cent occupancy and rave reviews on social media, this attraction with its costumed re-enactor guides, authentic atmosphere and virtual reality technology is hailed as the future of tourism. Its capacity to deliver in a number of languages gives it huge appeal to a broad international audience including non-traditional museum-goers. Word of mouth and online reviews have ensured the phenomenal success of this tourism experience. ‘King of the Vikings’ has galvanized Waterford Council’s plan to promote and sell Waterford as Ireland’s premier Viking destination

LOCAL AUTHORITY INNOVATION CORK CITY COUNCIL

Bishopsgrove Supported Student Accommodation

PROMOTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GALWAY COUNTY COUNCIL

Galway & West of Ireland, European Region of Gastronomy

This multi-agency homelessness initiative aims to redress the educational and support needs of young people from a diverse range of disadvantaged communities. Through this initiative, a homeless young person can be appropriately supported and accommodated from QQI level 3 all the way to University. In its first 10 months, this initiative accepted 45 young people, with 91 per cent maintaining their education. Six young people have moved on from Bishopsgrove in a planned manner, one due to securing full-time employment. Five young people have also secured part-time employment to help them financially whilst studying.

Galway and the West of Ireland have been designated a European Region of Gastronomy for the year of 2018, the first region in Ireland and the UK to attain this award. Galway’s food industry is engrained in its landscape and culture and is the sole industry that can bring economic benefits to every corner of the county. The region boasts over 12,000 farms, 689km of coastline, 52 islands and over 350 restaurants. The marketing and PR of the designation for the region received substantial increases in engagement across social media accounts used to promote the region; Facebook +329%, Instagram +435% and Twitter +53%.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2018

SUSTAINING THE ARTS LONGFORD COUNTY COUNCIL Longford Schools Photography Programme

This creative photography educational programme covers all eight secondary schools in Co Longford, comprising 400-500 students per year. The Programme Facilitator visits each school on a weekly basis. Classes are both academic and practical, and take place both indoors and outdoors. Technical and artistic aspects of photography are covered. Various exhibitions of students’ work take place throughout the year. Various competitions, both local and national, are entered on a yearly basis. As a result of this initiative, thousands of Longford students have learned a new skill, found a form of selfexpression and developed their artistic nature.

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT CLARE COUNTY COUNCIL The Burren & Cliffs of Moher UNESCO Global Geopark

BEST LIBRARY SERVICE KILDARE COUNTY COUNCIL Athy Community Library

The project involved the redevelopment of the former Church to a modern community library for Athy. The library was designed to meet the diverse needs of citizens and to act as a hub of educational, cultural, information and civic engagement resources. The redevelopment of this building provides a new use, guaranteeing its long-term viability and maintenance. Services, resources and spaces have been made available for enterprise development support, life-long learning and community participation. Increased space, accessibility, services and opening hours have been put in place along with a sustainable staffing structure, allowing an increased level of service to the community in the long-term.

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The Geopark programme grew out of a multi-stakeholder project established by Clare County Council in 2007 to seek a collaborative balance between conservation and tourism interests in the Burren Region. The Council has made significant contributions to the sustainable environment of the Burren area with a series of initiatives in sustainable tourism, community education and heritage site management. The Geopark has sustainability as a core element, maximising its influence by working with all agencies and community bodies and by supporting a sustainable environment through its Code of Practice for Sustainable Businesses. The programme has made its biggest impact in the area of sustainable tourism.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2018

JOINT LOCAL AUTHORITY INITIATIVE MONAGHAN COUNTY COUNCIL

www.repairmystuff.ie, Ireland’s Leading Online Repair Directory

This project led by Monaghan County Council is an initiative of the Local Authority Waste Prevention Network (LAPN) and is funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through the National Waste Prevention Programme. Local Authorities, through the three Regional Waste Management Plans, must support the Circular Economy, particularly repair and reuse initiatives. The website aims to fulfil this objective by providing an online link between the repair industry and the consumer. The initial response from the repair industry has been encouraging, with over 200 businesses now listed from every county in the Republic of Ireland.

FESTIVAL OF THE YEAR CORK COUNTY COUNCIL

Youghal Medieval Festival

The Festival has built a reputation for delivering one of the largest, most successful, free events of its nature in celebrating National Heritage Week. Running in August each year, this free festival is now in its 12th year. The weekendlong series of activities are appropriately themed to promote an understanding and appreciation of Youghal’s unique heritage & history. The event takes place in St Mary’s Medieval College Gardens, surrounded by the town’s 13th century town walls. This event aims to “conserve local built heritage”, focusing on the town walls as a wonderful asset, attracting both local, regional and overseas visitors.

OUTSTANDING INITIATIVE THROUGH THE MUNICIPAL DISTRICTS CLARE COUNTY COUNCIL Friars Walk Coach Park Ennis – Coach Friendly Destination

The initiative was developed by Ennis Municipal District over the last three years. Facilities consist of 14 coach parking spaces, bus shelter, coach washing, waste water disposal facilities, CCTV monitoring, free Wi-Fi internet and a drivers’ lounge in the nearby Temple Gate Hotel. The site is located 100m from the town centre and formed part of an under-utilised public space, adjacent to local hotels and with pedestrian linkages to Ennis town centre and County Museum. The coach park provides significant amenities and opportunities for recreation, visits, retailing for passengers and tourists, whilst also generating economic and tourist benefit to Ennis.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2018 HERITAGE AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT LIMERICK CITY & COUNTY COUNCIL

Lord Edward Street Housing Development, Limerick City

ENHANCING THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT KILDARE COUNTY COUNCIL Maynooth Harbour: A Cycling Network Intersection Project

In 2018, two separate multi-phase cycle improvement projects were completed at Maynooth Harbour. The first project was the 38km Dublin to Galway Greenway Project which traverses through Kildare. The Greenway Project commenced in Maynooth Harbour and extended 14km westwards. The second project was the Maynooth North South Cycle Corridor to link housing estates and the M4 business campus in Maynooth with a high-quality cycle facility to the centre of the town and University. The two cycleways join in Maynooth Harbour and as cycling and walking are zero-emissions modes of transport, they have ongoing positive benefits on the local community and environment.

In 2016, Limerick City and County Council (LCCC) began the construction of a regeneration project that included the provision of 81 local authority houses, retail / commercial units and a community space on the site of the former Tait Clothing Factory, which closed down in 1974.This former factory site is recognised as a structure of significant industrial heritage and the home of pioneering production methods, including steam-powered sewing machines and the largest single-span roof of its time. This is a “conservation-throughuse” project, and collaboration between LCCC and EVA International re-positions the former Tait Factory at the centre of Limerick’s social life.

DISABILITY SERVICES PROVISION MONAGHAN COUNTY COUNCIL

Everybody Plays - Inclusive Playground Policy To date, the design of playgrounds in County Monaghan incorporated the needs of children with disabilities through the provision of specialised equipment in a dedicated area. This approach has created further exclusion for children with disabilities, making it harder for them to join in free play with their families and friends. Following an in-depth public consultation, Monaghan County Council developed an inclusive playground policy that recognises inclusive play as meeting all children’s needs in the same place and in different ways. This has been a hugely successful initiative that will make a significant impact on the lives of children with a disability and their families.

COMMEMORATIONS & CENTENARIES MEATH COUNTY COUNCIL Francis Ledwidge Centenary

In 2017, Meath County Council led the celebrations of the life of Francis Ledwidge, the remarkably gifted poet, activist and soldier from the village of Slane. The year-long programme was devised and delivered in partnership with local, national and international bodies. The programme was devised to maximise community participation. The programme also ensured that there would be a lasting legacy from the year as funding and support was provided for new artistic, literary and theatrical works. This event was a collaboration between a number of groups coordinated and managed by Meath County Council.

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ONE TO WATCH DHL EXPRESS

DHL Express Sales Director Janet Cox on leadership, teamwork and staying ahead of the competition Q. You have 20 + years of experience – can you give us some details on the experience and expertise that has brought you to where you are today?

A. I began my DHL journey in 1996 and in my early years worked in Credit Control and Customer Services before joining the Sales team in 2000. I’m proud of the fact that I have worked my way through the Sales organisation from my first role as a Telesales Executive, to Field Sales, before taking on Field Sales Management and then the Sales Director role since the beginning of 2018. Following our restructure in 2009, the sales team played a central role in the successful turnaround of the DHL Express business in Ireland. As a team we emerged stronger and as manager it enabled me to demonstrate that I had the capability to lead the team to success.

Q. What are your duties and responsibilities as Sales Director? A. The top priority for me is to ensure that as a sales team we deliver our revenue target. In order to achieve this, I need to manage my team in such a way that we maintain, develop and grow our existing customer base while also selling the DHL service to brand new customers. It is essential that we maintain our position as market leader for the Express industry in Ireland. To achieve this, we must maintain a continuous improvement mindset to stay ahead of our competition – as I say to my team, ‘standing still is going backwards’!

Q. How is DHL positioned in the current economic climate, and what is your role in improving it?

A. Brexit aside, Ireland’s economy is in a good place and in DHL we

TO WATCH:

Janet Cox DHL Express Sales Director

are growing consistent with that. We recognised early the impact that eCommerce would have on the logistics industry and we have embraced the opportunity this brings. Life Sciences is another area where we are leading the pack and in collaboration with our sister company DHL Supply Chain, we are able to offer bespoke customer solutions which are highly efficient, with high quality shipping options.

Q. What are your ambitions for DHL? A. My aim for DHL is to maintain our position as market leader and to continue to grow our business. In terms of my Sales team, my aim is to continue to retain, motivate and develop the best sales team in our industry – and to sell like never before!

Q. What are your own business ambitions? A. As I’m still relatively new to this role, I am not currently looking beyond the next 12-18 months. My ambition for 2019 is to deliver the best set of sales results DHL Express in Ireland has ever seen. I take great personal pride in seeing the employees I have nurtured and mentored progress within our business, so my personal aim is to continue to develop the talent that we have.

Q. What advice would you give women in leadership roles? A. The most important piece of advice I could give any woman in business is to believe in yourself. If you don’t have confidence in your own abilities, why should anyone else? For me it’s about seeing past gender and judging people on their capabilities. In the last year the number of women on the DHL Board of Directors has increased by 200%. That’s not because there was a decision ‘to bring more women on to the Board’ but was simply because the best candidates for the roles were female. We earned those seats at the table by believing in ourselves and proving that we belonged there. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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BRAVE DREAMS BIGGER KINGS OF CONNEMARA SHELLFISH EXPORTERS

WE’RE BACKING BRAVE

The featured customers received a gratuity. Allied Irish Banks, p.l.c. Is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland.

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RENAULT FLEET CAR PROVIDER

PEACE OF MIND InBUSINESS catches up with Paddy Magee, Country Operations Director, at Renault Ireland to find out what sets the Renault Kadjar apart from competition. Q: Tell me a bit about the Renault Kadjar? A: The Renault Kadjar is a fantastic all-rounder, with comfort and space for the entire family, wrapped in an imposing and stylish body. For 2019, we have a wider range than ever, with powerful new petrol engines and efficient diesels. What sets the Renault Kadjar apart from the competition is the spec – every version in the 2019 Renault Kadjar line-up comes with 7” touch screen, Android Auto®/Apple CarPlay®, climate control, auto lights and wipers and alloy wheels. Q: Why makes the Renault Kadjar an excellent choice for businesses? A: The most important thing in any car choice is to look after the driver. Kadjar’s comfort and generous equipment makes sure everyone’s happy. When it comes to total cost of ownership, Renault Bank’s affordable finance and efficient 1.5 dCi engine means Kadjar is an established winner. And finally, peace of mind – our 5 year warranty is backed by an exceptional network of professional dealerships throughout Ireland.

our dealer network is exceptional – for sales, finance and aftersales, the teams in our dealerships are professionally dedicated to ensuring customer satisfaction. Q: Your response to receiving the InBUSINESS Recognition Award for Best Fleet Car? A: It’s a great reward for Renault Ireland. For me, it’s fantastic to see the Renault Kadjar recognised as the great car it is, but I also see this as a recognition of the benefits of doing business with Renault in Ireland. The team - in Renault Ireland, Renault Bank, and the dealer network - is focussed on ensuring that all customers are able to buy the great value vehicle that’s right for them, and that they can own and operate that vehicle as conveniently and affordably as possible over its lifetime.

Q: How has 2018 been for Renault? A: 2018 has been a fantastic year for Renault Group in Ireland. It has been the final year of our five year plan, and during the course of that five year plan, we have seen Renault Group growing at 113%, compared to 68% for the market. Q: What makes Renault stand out from competition? A: Our design team has done a remarkable job of ensuring that Renault cars have an instantly recognisable look, while giving each car a very distinctive look of its own. We also focus on making our cars a pleasure to live with. The vast majority of Renault models feature touch screen multimedia, hands free key-cards, and automatic lights and wipers. In addition, a five-year warranty and excellent fuel consumption give customers peace of mind and keep costs down throughout ownership. Having our own bank, with a branch in every dealership, means we can tailor finance solutions to suit the cash flow of every private and business customer. And finally,

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TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN

Trinity College Dublin’s Office of Corporate Partnership & Knowledge Exchange is committed to supporting industry, having built up strong relationships with industry stakeholders and agencies.

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rom SMEs to MNCs, short-term projects to long-term collaborations, Trinity College Dublin works with industry stakeholders and agencies to share infrastructure and expertise, tackling industry-relevant research challenges. The college’s Office of Corporate Partnership and Knowledge Exchange (OCPKE) supports both industry engagement and the commercialisation of Trinity research. The office reaches out to the business community in order to develop partnerships which enable industry to benefit from quality teaching, research and infrastructure within Trinity. “The team here tries to help researchers and academics go from idea generation to making an impact,” says Dr Chris Keely, Senior Business Development Manager, OCPKE. Dr Keely brings 20 years of experience working with technologyfocused multinational and indigenous companies, in the areas of new business generation, industry and academic engagement. In his current position at Trinity, he champions and is responsible for the successful delivery of the college’s industry strategy – enabling and supporting the linking and commercial exploitation of academic research with industry. “I head up the research business team, which means helping companies to come and work with our researchers,” he explains. “Our ethos is to try and connect companies to the best set of researchers possible, both in Trinity and externally as well.”

WORKING BOTH WAYS The benefit for companies engaging with Trinity in this manner is that they can access a level of expertise and innovation that might otherwise be unavailable to them. However, the benefits extend beyond the companies themselves, as they too bring something to the table. “There’s a lot of engagement schemes which enable, for example, internships, where we place students in companies for maybe six months,” says Dr Keely. The college runs what it calls a Researcher in Residence programme, where a company puts researchers into the college’s labs to work hand-in-hand with Trinity professors in

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developing common ideas or solving some of the company’s challenges. Schemes such as this are of great benefit to both the college and industry. Dr Keely’s team at Trinity have a strong industrial network, making forming relationships with companies that bit easier. “All the team in my office come from an industry background,” he says. “We have a lot of relationships built on previous engagements. We’d also work with, for example, Enterprise Ireland and IDA in identifying and meeting companies as well.” Ireland has a strong national base of companies with Dr Chris Keely, Senior Business which Trinity can engage, but Development Manager, the university does also look Trinity College Dublin’s, overseas and reaches out to OPKE international companies.

ACADEMIA COLLABORATION WITH INDUSTRY

WHERE EDUCATION MEETS INDUSTRY

SPIN-OUTS Trinity has produced more spin-outs than any other Irish university, many of which have grown to be leading companies. Trinity now accounts for one-fifth of all spin-out companies from Irish higher education institutions. In the last five years alone, Trinity has created over 38 campus companies across all the main sectors of medical devices, pharmaceutical and ICT. Trinity has been heavily involved in the new innovation district area in the Grand Canal Docks, with one campus already located there and another planned. The college is looking to expand on its strong relationships with industry, but always in such a way as to remain conscious of research fundamentals. “Trinity is really about delivering excellence in research and translating this to industry through targeted relationships,” Dr Keely concludes.

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Enterprise-led skills development

60+ Networks

Through our innovative learning networks, Skillnet Ireland is shaping the future of workforce development, workforce planning and workforce innovation in Ireland. WANT TO LEARN MORE?

skillnetireland.ie Skillnet Ireland is funded from the National Training Fund through the Department of Education and Skills.

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SKILLNET IRELAND

Paul Healy, Chief Executive of Skillnet Ireland, discusses how an enterprise-led approach to skills development and investing in workforce planning and innovation, is vital to securing a resilient and competitive workforce.

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he Irish workforce faces many different challenges and opportunities in the decades ahead. As a small economy highly-dependent on global influences, we are also vulnerable to global megatrends. Advances in technology, shifting consumption patterns, changing demographics, and a multitude of competitive and geopolitical forces, including Brexit, are constantly driving new skills requirements for employers. These trends are combined with a convergence and acceleration of technology, characterised by new disruptors such as robotics, AI, automation, internet of things and big data. There is also a clear shift from conventional workplace norms in which people have stable jobs and work full-time, to a situation in which this standard employment model is less dominant. With this level of disruption, we are reminded of the words of Abraham Lincoln: “The best way to predict the future is to create it.” Skillnet Ireland is determined to provide leadership in shaping the future of workforce development, planning and innovation in Ireland. We know that skills supply is met, in various parts, through outputs from Ireland’s higher and further education system, from labour activation and from immigration. However, for the greatest part, the skills that power Ireland’s economy are derived from within employment. For these reasons it is vital that companies and workers are placed at the heart of the response. Through our 60 Skillnet learning networks, we work with 15,000 private firms to provide training to over 50,000 workers each year. Working with over 50 industry partners, including Chambers nationwide, we are engaging in a national conversation on the future of work, specifically in the context of digitalisation and automation. We need to prepare for this disruption and to consider how AI, automation and robotics will impact on the workforce, and in doing so, embrace the value of upskilling and reskilling to counter job displacement. We also champion innovation in lifelong learning, particularly in SMEs, that enables employees and companies to stay ahead of these challenges.

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AGENCY SUPPORT TO SMES AND START-UPS

UNLOCKING THE POTENTIAL OF SMES THROUGH SKILLS DEVELOPMENT The Skillnet Ireland model has been recognised internationally as a best practice approach by the OECD, the EU and the ILO. As a national agency working with the major enterprise groups in Ireland, we are in a position of strength to assess the full labour market landscape, to identify new areas of potential and to facilitate industry-led responses. The solutions delivered by Skillnet Learning Networks are typically facilitated part-time or on a modular basis, offered all year round, available both inside and outside normal working hours, or embedded in the workflow itself. This approach reduces the access barriers for both employers and employees. Ireland draws a great competitive strength from our workforce. A well-educated, well-skilled and adaptable workforce has been a pillar of Ireland’s economic/industrial policy since the 1960s. However, this is not a fixed state; skills are highly dynamic and vulnerable to change, meaning a persistent focus must be maintained on the development of the skills of the Irish workforce. The key to thriving in the modern work environment is to invest in the resilience, adaptability and future skills of our workforce. To find out more about Skillnet Ireland, visit www.skillnetireland.ie

Paul Healy, Chief Executive of Skillnet Ireland

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CATHERINE MORONEY - AIB BUSINESSWOMAN OF THE YEAR

LEADING BY EXAMPLE Head of AIB Business Banking and incoming President of Dublin Chamber Catherine Moroney talks about leadership, Brexit, diversity and being named Businesswoman of the Year. Q. Can you tell us about being the incoming President of Dublin Chamber in 2020? A. Being incoming President is a great honour, and something that really evolved over time. I first joined Dublin Chamber and the Council to get to know other members when I was running AIB’s Dublin business, and I then became actively involved in the Chamber sub-committees that contribute to policy formulation for Dublin. Being involved with Dublin Chamber is a unique opportunity – I could not recommend involvement enough. Q. AIB has a strong emphasis on Diversity & Inclusion. Can you tell us about this and how important it is for your business? A. AIB commenced its Diversity & Inclusion Programme in 2015, and I have been involved with the programme from the start. We began with a focus on gender diversity, which was a key area we needed to address, and this now extends well beyond gender representation. We now have the well-established iMatter programme, which is underpinned with volunteer groups across a number of key areas for Diversity & Inclusion including Pride, Roots (multicultural focus), Abilities and Families. We strive to have diversity of thought at all levels of management and decision-making for the benefit of our employees, customers and stakeholders, and we have undertaken a number of other key initiatives to ensure this happens. Our initiatives include undertaking unconscious bias training for 1,400 people leaders, setting gender targets for Board, C-Suite and Senior Management representation, which were met in 2016 and 2017, with close goal proximity to our management target of 40 per cent. Throughout this time, we have also been contributing to the ecosystem of women in the workforce nationally. We launched the AIB Women in Enterprise Programme and have put over 500 Business Owners through training for ‘Accelerating Business Growth’. AIB has also partnered with the 30% Club to promote gender balance in Financial Services in Ireland.

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Catherine Moroney, Head of AIB Business Banking

Throughout this time, we have also been contributing to the ecosystem of women in the workforce nationally. We launched the AIB Women in Enterprise Programme and have put over 500 Business Owners through training for ‘Accelerating Business Growth’. AIB has also partnered with the 30% Club to promote gender balance in Financial Services in Ireland.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

27/02/2019 16:19


CATHERINE MORONEY - AIB

Q. What are the main challenges you face? A. One of our key areas of focus now is to ensure we assist customers successfully trade through Brexit. Our AIB Brexit Sentiment Survey showed us that less than 8% our business customers have formal Brexit plans in place, with 35% of them having already cancelled or postponed investment plans and a further 13% are now reviewing investment plans in ROI. It is understandable that businesses are reluctant to spend money and time on preparations for yet ‘unknown’ eventualities, however AIB’s message is to be prepared now for areas such as: assessment of supply and sub-supply chain impacts (for example; time delays, tariff application levels, routes to market) and on ensuring your business has sufficient working capital and finance in place along with currency hedging facilities should you require them, to help you trade through Brexit. These preparations will be time well spent. To help businesses get Brexit-ready, AIB launched an online AIB Brexit Ready Check, which is a free, quick to complete and helps you diagnose the key areas of your business that may be more exposed to Brexit risks. I would encourage all businesses to use this tool – it can be accessed on your mobile phone and completed in five minutes. AIB also has 26 Brexit advisors available to customers nationally, as well as relationship managers and AIB treasury teams who are available to provide more specific assistance to our customers. Q. What makes AIB stand out from the competition? A. The only answer that matters to that question is

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It is understandable that businesses are reluctant to spend money and time on preparations for ‘unknown’ eventualities, however AIB’s message is to be prepared for areas such as assessment of supply and sub-supply chain impacts and on ensuring your business has sufficient finance in place along with currency hedging facilities should you require them.

BUSINESSWOMAN OF THE YEAR

Q. How do you find the balance between providing new technology in banking and keeping a connection with the customer? A. AIB achieves this by being at the forefront of digital banking in Ireland where our customers are embracing the digital world in particular the Mobile channel and Contactless payments. AIB has over 1.3 million personal customers digitally active and mobile use is accelerating rapidly, with growth of 43% over the last 12 months. Our digital sales are showing strength as well with 67% of all personal loans drawn down via digital channels in 2017 and circa 50% of applications now originating via Mobile. AIB keeps the balance between technology and connecting with our customers by ensuring that all channels are easeful, connected and complimentary, so that our customers can choose the connectivity that suits them, when and where it suits them – digitally, in branch, or on the phone. We also see a growing business digital adoption with our new Online SME credit application achieving a high satisfaction rating with customers.

what our customers say. We measure net promoter score continuously as that privilege of backing a customer has to be earned in terms of ease of access to people, product and service, and must be underpinned by value for money. I believe our relentless focus on backing our customers to achieve their dreams and ambitions is starting to have a positive impact. Q. What advice would you give to young people taking up leadership roles in business? A. Firstly, focus on your strengths. When it comes to leveraging your abilities, the critical thing is to work in a field that you love and that ‘gives you energy’. Then you will thrive and have the time and energy to develop the management and interpersonal skills you need to perform at board level. Secondly, you must continuously work on developing your knowledge and wisdom. I call it the ‘inch by inch’ process - decide what area of strength you are developing and work on it, an inch a day. Thirdly, keep taking on opportunities to grow, ask for help from those more experienced. Build strong relationships as you go – always with respect, including those with whom you disagree – if you want to operate at Board level. There are no short cuts to building your reputation. Q. How does it feel to have received the InBUSINESS Recognition Award for Businesswoman of the year? A. Initially – surprise, followed quickly by delight - what an honour – thank you! I do believe there is no such thing as an ‘individual award’. I work with a terrific team of people, both within AIB and in the wider business community. Q. How do you switch off from work? A. My favourite endeavour is just spending time with family and friends. I do enjoy cycling too, it’s great to get outdoors and clear the mind. I also love to read, and enjoy cooking, but mastering that skill still evades me.

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27/02/2019 16:20


MICROFINANCE IRELAND CATEGORYPROVIDER FINANCE NAME TO MICRO BUSINESSES AND START-UPS

CHANGING LIVES InBUSINESS catches up with Garrett Stokes, CEO of Microfinance Ireland to find out what sets this not-for-profit lender apart from competitors. Q: How was 2018 for Microfinance Ireland? A: Microfinance Ireland (MFI) is enjoying another excellent year. 2018 was a year of record growth in terms of application numbers. This highlights the ongoing need for microfinance supports such as MFI, for small businesses in Ireland, irrespective of the stage of the economic cycle. MFI was established as part of the Action Plan for Jobs in 2012 and benefits from Government support provided through the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation. A key measure of our success is supporting job creation and sustainment. The number of jobs supported has steadily grown year on year and 2018 again shows further excellent growth in the overall numbers of jobs supported, across the country. Q: How would you describe the overall landscape for your sector at present? A: While the current economy is strong, there are still areas of the country not benefiting from the economic upturn, with higher unemployment levels in some areas over the national average. Certain demographical groups are similarly impacted. In these areas, trading is more difficult, and people can be less inclined to set up a business. There is also the continued uncertainty of Brexit. While the majority of our customers are not exporters, they may still be impacted by any downturn in the economy, decreases in consumer confidence and/ or increases in the cost of raw materials etc if the UK leave the EU without a deal. Q: What makes Microfinance Ireland stand out from the competition? A: Microfinance Ireland has a unique offering in the marketplace. Our mandate is to support microenterprises and start-ups that are struggling to get finance from banks and other commercial lenders. As a not-for-profit lender, we can take a greater level of risk than commercial lending providers. Our lending is unsecured, our rates are affordable, not priced to risk and we have no fees or charges. As we operate a fixed interest rate model, repayments are not subject to fluctuation and this gives our customers certainty

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Garrett Stokes, CEO of Microfinance Ireland

throughout the period of the loan. Our approach is very hands-on and supportive throughout the application process and beyond. In addition to providing loans we also fund the cost of mentoring services, which are delivered through the Local Enterprise Office Network, to our approvedloan applicants. Q: Your response to receiving the InBUSINESS Recognition Award for Finance Provider to Micro Businesses and Start-ups? A: We are delighted to have received this award. As a small not-for-profit lending organisation, it is wonderful for our team, board and stakeholders to get such a strong acknowledgement of the work we do across Ireland, supporting small indigenous businesses and helping them to start up or expand. The majority of these businesses are very small but they are the lifeblood of their communities, bringing services, products and employment to their areas and without them many communities could fail. Many of these businesses struggle to access funding through commercial providers and this is the critical role MFI plays, supporting these businesses and job creation, acting as a catalyst for “changing lives�, returning people to employment and helping people fulfil their business dreams.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

27/02/2019 16:21


IB PARTNER CONTENT KPMG

Commitment to Innovation InBUSINESS catches up with Shaun Murphy, Managing Partner of KPMG in Ireland, to find out what makes KPMG the clear choice for Irish business.

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e are very honoured to receive the InBusiness Accountancy Firm award for the second year in a row. We have great teams who seek to make a difference and I am very proud of the outstanding opportunities and market leading training that is part of a career with KPMG. We work with many great businesses across Ireland from our offices in Dublin, Belfast, Cork

and Galway. Our clients range from household names who have chosen Ireland as an attractive base to access the European market to dynamic, fast growing family and privately owned companies. They differ by size and sector but they all possess a single minded determination to succeed and most particularly, a commitment to innovation. We support such innovation both on a day to day basis through our work with

our clients and through the various awards and mentoring programmes we invest in. We are also Ireland’s largest recruiter of graduates and we are very proud of the tremendous exam results achieved by our people. Furthermore, we are committed to citizenship and CSR programmes and have been recognised for the positive difference our award winning activity has made to the communities in which we operate. We look forward to working with Irish businesses in every sector as they navigate the challenges and seek out opportunities in the year ahead.

Shaun Murphy, Managing Partner of KPMG in Ireland

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LEINSTER • MUNSTER • CONNAUGHT • ULSTER Dublin transport under strain as working population surges, National Opera House extends sponsorship, Naas wins night-time economy

Fermoy claims cleanest town award, innovation centre construction begins in Ennistymon, Limerick tourism boost as city to host Tag Rugby World Cup

Plans for joint development of Castlebar and Westport, Sligo sees unprecedented investment, NUI Galway leads the way with medtech projects to treat chronic diseases

02 WATERFORD’S REGENERATION North Quays and Tramore development plans

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Letterkenny wins enterprise award for local economy, Cavan secures funding for four outdoor recreation projects, Monaghan sees funding for road development and improvement rise by 22% on last year

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DUBLIN’S GRIDLOCK THREAT Investment in public transport needed in the capital to meet the demands of an everincreasing working population.

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An Bord Pleanála call action on expansion of Wicklow studio where hit TV show Vikings is filmed

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DUBLIN TRANSPORT STRAINING AS WORKING POPULATION SURGES According to figures from the CSO, Dublin generated half of all new jobs in Ireland in the last 12 months, highlighting the need for urgent investment in the capital’s public transport infrastructure. The number of people working in the city has increased by 33,000 in the past year. Dublin Chamber CEO Mary Rose Burke said: “The figures confirm Dublin’s role as the engine of Ireland’s economy. But they are also proof that we need to get serious about infrastructure investment. The Government needs to pull the trigger now on the big projects that will keep Dublin moving.”

WHAT’S ON IN

LEINSTER

6TH MARCH INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY, Morrison Hotel, Dublin city

22ND MARCH AGILE INNOVATION SUPPORTS EVENT, SHERATON HOTEL, Athlone, Co Westmeath

21ST MARCH DIGITAL STRATEGIES FOR INTERNATIONAL MARKETS, Kilkenny, Co Kilkenny

10TH-11TH APRIL DUBLIN TECH SUMMIT, RDS, Co Dublin

[ COUNTY WEXFORD ] [ COUNTY WICKLOW ]

ASHFORD STUDIOS EXPANSION

BRINGS JOBS BOOST A major expansion project at Ashford Studios has been given the go ahead by An Bord Pleanála following an appeal. The a90million investment in the Wicklow studios – where hit TV series Vikings is filmed - includes plans for four film studios, a TV studio, office space and a visitor centre, and has the potential to create 1,500 jobs for the region.

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OPERA HOUSE GETS FIVE-YEAR SPONSORSHIP The National Opera House in Wexford has secured a five-year sponsorship deal worth a175,000 from long-standing supporter Datapac. The Opera House will use the investment for modernisation, digital transformation and improved user experience, to increase visitor numbers, promotion of the variety pf performances staged in addition to the annual Wexford Opera Festival, and to maintain the world-renowned status of the establishment. David McLoughlin, CEO, said: “This partnership enables us to not just maintain our state-ofthe-art facilities, but to truly innovate.”

[ COUNTY KILDARE ]

NAAS AWARDED PURPLE FLAG STATUS FOR NIGHT-TIME ECONOMY Naas has been given Purple Flag status, an internationally-accredited award for excellence in the evening and night-time economy of a town, in what will be a major tourism boost. Naas joins Maynooth as one of two Kildare towns awarded the distinction, as well as 27 other towns and cities across Ireland. Hotels, bars, eateries, leisure amenities and visitor attractions can all expect to benefit from the award, the result of a year of work by Kildare Chamber and County Council. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS NEWS: MUNSTER

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INNOVATION CENTRE CONSTRUCTION BEGINS Construction work on a new Multi-Service Innovation Centre located in Ennistymon has commenced. Clare County Council has signed a contract with Jada Projects Ltd. for the development. The Centre comprises hotdesks with business broadband, incubation units for small businesses, meeting rooms, training rooms and full audio-visual facilities. The local authority facility, scheduled to open in September 2019, benefited from funding totalling a1,023,300 under the Government’s a1 billion Rural Regeneration and Development Fund, which aims to breathe new life into Ireland’s smaller towns and villages. The development also received a100,000 under the 2017 Town and Village Renewal Scheme.

1ST MARCH FOUNDER FRIDAY, Limerick city

1ST-3RD MARCH ENNIS BOOK CLUB FESTIVAL, Ennis Co Clare

6TH MARCH BREXIT ADVICE CLINIC, KERRY LOCAL ENTERPRISE OFFICE, Tralee, Co Kerry

1ST-5TH MAY CORK INTERNATIONAL CHORAL FESTIVAL, Cork city

[ COUNTY WATERFORD ]

[ COUNTY CORK ]

WATERFORD RECEIVES REGENERATION FUNDING

FERMOY CLAIMS CLEANEST TOWN AWARD

Waterford is to receive a7.35million in funding under the National Development Plan. The money will help fund two projects under the Urban Regeneration and Development Fund. The Waterford North Quays project, for the construction of a pedestrian bridge linking the city’s North and South Quays, is allocated a6million, while the remainder is allocated to Tramore Town Centre. The North Quays project will connect the site of the proposed retail, tourism, office and residential development in the city centre. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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Fermoy was crowned the cleanest town in Ireland according to the final litter survey of 2018 by business group Irish Business Against Litter (IBAL). An Taisce, who carry out the surveys on behalf of IBAL, praised the Cork town as having “exceeded its usual high standards of cleanliness”. Fermoy’s success, last achieved in 2007, will be marked by a specially commissioned public sculpture in the town this year to the value of a40,000.

WHAT’S ON IN

MUNSTER

[ COUNTY LIMERICK ]

TAG RUGBY WORLD CUP TO GENERATE A5MILLION Limerick has won the bid to become the first northern hemisphere host of the Tag Rugby World Cup. The successful joint bid by the UL Conference and Irish Tag Rugby Association supported by Shannon Region Conference and Sports Bureau, Fáilte Ireland and Limerick City and County Council, has the potential to bring an estimated a5million to the local economy.

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JOINT DEVELOPMENT OF CASTLEBAR & WESTPORT Mayo County Council has appointed environmental and planning consultants to devise a plan for the joint development of Castlebar and Westport. The key objective is to develop a feasibility strategy combining the joint development of both towns into a focal point, to attract foreign direct investment and employment in the region, and as a result, advance integrated economic development in County Mayo. The consultants will liaise with Mayo County Council, Chambers of Commerce, the IDA and others to assess the practicality of developing stronger infrastructural and promotional links between the two towns to present them as a single geographic entity.

WHAT’S ON IN

CONNAUGHT

26TH FEBRUARY ESSENTIALS OF EXPORTING, Clayton Hotel, Ballybrit, Co Galway

1ST-9TH MARCH ROSCOMMON DRAMA FESTIVAL, Roscommon Arts Centre

29TH MARCH – 3RD APRIL GALWAY FOOD FESTIVAL, Co Galway

31ST MARCH – 4TH APRIL MUSIC TO YOUR EARS WESTPORT 2019, Westport, Co Mayo

[ COUNTY SLIGO ] [ COUNTY GALWAY ]

NUI GALWAY LEAD MEDTECH PROJECTS CÚRAM, the NUI Galway-based Science Foundation Ireland Centre for Research in Medical Devices, will be involved in three key industry projects worth a4.8million, following the recent announcement of the Government’s Disruptive Technologies Innovation Fund. CÚRAM’s teams will be driving disruptive innovation in medtech and implants across three projects, targeting chronic illnesses and cardiac disorders. The Government’s Disruptive Technologies Innovation Fund, set up as part of the Project Ireland 2040 capital investment plan, aims to provide finance to projects that tackle national and global challenges in a way that will create and secure jobs into the future.

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UNPRECEDENTED INVESTMENT IN SLIGO

Sligo is seeing a dramatic increase in investment in the area in 2019. Detailing the benefits to Sligo from a wide variety of job announcements and infrastructure, tourism and public realm projects set out for this year, Ciarán Hayes, Chief Executive of Sligo County Council, said the scale was ‘unprecedented’. More than a220million has been committed for projects including the Western Distributor Road, East Garavogue Bridge and N4 Collooney to Castlebaldwin upgrade, as well as the construction of a Surf Centre of Excellence in Strandhill and Mountain Bike Centre in Coolaney, a cultural plaza in Sligo Town and the development of a Yeats Trail around the county. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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ENTERPRISE AWARD FOR LETTERKENNY Letterkenny was recently awarded the overall title in the Bank of Ireland National Enterprise Awards, coming out on top in the regional, national and overall categories. The awards recognise towns where business communities come together to showcase the spirit of enterprise in their local area, with Letterkenny receiving a prize of a20,000. Buncrana, Dungloe and Donegal Town were also nominated for awards. Chief Executive of Donegal County Council, Seamus Neely, said: “Letterkenny is a major centre for business, it has a flourishing SME business sector and is home to leading international companies who are attracted to the town by a highly talented and educated workforce and a supportive business eco-system as well as a superb quality of life offering.”

14TH MARCH ESSENTIALS OF EXPORTING, Four Seasons Hotel, Monaghan

6TH-11TH APRIL AMAZING GRACE FESTIVAL, BUNCRANA, Co Donegal

1ST-9TH MARCH CASTLEBLANEY DRAMA FESTIVAL, IONTAS THEATRE, Castleblaney, Co Donegal

1ST-5TH MAY REXIT ADVISORY CLINIC, Letterkenny, Co Donegal

WHAT’S ON IN ULSTER

[ COUNTY CAVAN ]

OUTDOOR PROJECTS FUNDING FOR CAVAN

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[ COUNTY MONAGHAN ] Cavan County Council has secured more than a715,000 in funding for four projects under the Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme (ORIS). Awarded through the Department of Rural and Community Development, the projects include an upgrade and extension of walking trails at Dun a Ri Forest Park, the development of walking and cycling trails at Killykeen Forest Park and at Golden Mile, Mullagh, and the development of the Cavan Town Railway Greenway. Mr Tommy Ryan, Chief Executive of Cavan County Council, said: “Cavan County Council has invested resources in developing strategic plans to map out the sustainable development of our community infrastructure to ensure we are well-positioned to access funds, and we are now reaping the rewards of these efforts.”

ROAD FUNDING INCREASES BY 22%

Local authorities in Monaghan have seen a 22 per cent increase in local and regional road funding for 2019. Just over a11million has been allocated to the region by the Department of Transport, up from a9.1million in 2018. The Threemilehouse to Newbliss Road has been allocated a250,000 under the specific improvement grant, while 11 bridges are included under the Bridge Rehabilitation Works. Safety Improvement Works will be carried out on seven roads, with funding totalling a205,000.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS ASHVILLE MEDIA GROUP EVENTS DEPARTMENT

Events at ASHVILLE Ashville Media Group’s Events Department to discuss their varied event portfolio, recent successes, and some tips for event management. Q: What is the core mission of the Ashville Media Group Events department?

A: Our main focus is the creation of business events and awards, and unique customer engagement for our brands – to recognise excellence within business and to showcase products and services in Ireland. We create unique events which we own – we’re not like a regular event management company, which we believe is our biggest selling point. Our events allow brands to connect with their target audience across business and consumer sectors. Our events are self-funded and our team is constantly looking for new opportunities to develop high-quality events. With our awards ceremonies, many reflect Ashville Media Group publications while others are developed for unique audiences that we have identified in niche markets. We aim to deliver top-class events across a range of industries including hospitality, business, and maternity, recognising the cream of the crop in each sector. For us, being transparent, honest and fair within our awards and being seen as credible is very important. Our conferences, then, are mainly based around business and law, hosted by leading industry experts, an avenue of business which continues to grow.

excellence, as the quality of our events impacts on attendance and sponsorship. The team really loves taking an event from concept through to reality, rolling out themes and creating activations for clients. Events people are generally very driven and multi-tasking – they might be dealing one day with the Maternity and Infant Awards in the consumer market, and the next with the InBUSINESS Recognition Awards where they’re working with senior executives and CEOs. Our team is quite diverse, with each member bringing their own unique skill-set. We’re always working, a great deal of which is completed in the background, so being a self-starter is a key attribute required for success.

Q: Can you give me some examples of recent successes?

A: The Blog Awards has been very successful since our first year in 2015

finalist The

2018

Blog

Awar

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Q: Can you tell us about the drive and experience of the Events team?

A: We’re a very driven and passionate events division with a focus on

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The Blog Awards Ireland 2018

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS ASHVILLE MEDIA GROUP EVENTS DEPARTMENT

and in 2018 we upped the ante by holding a day of the dead themed event – a really unique experience which generated strong, positive feedback. We had over 500 bloggers in the room which created very strong sponsorship interactions. Last year’s event was another great success, reaching a wide audience across print, online and social media, including almost 20 million impressions on Twitter with #bloggies18 trending as the number one hashtag in Ireland. The Digital Media Awards has also been a great success, with both attendance and entry figures rising while other digital events are falling off within the industry. Over the last four years, the number of people attending the Digital Media Awards has doubled. Fiveyears ago it was 400, now it’s nearly 800. This year’s awards were attended by more than 700 of Ireland’s digital industry. Another long-term success for us is the Law Awards, now in its ninth year. That was our creation from concept and has an average attendance of 600 in the Clayton Hotel. Where there was nothing before, it has now become a staple in the legal calendar.

Q: Have you spotted any rising industry trends of late?

A: We think the biggest thing is that marketing managers are getting smarter. They are quantifying sponsorships, making sure they’re getting the most value out of their money. They’re being smarter around activations and people experiencing their brands – it’s not just a case of throwing logos around. They want active and not passive sponsorship opportunities. They want to engage person-to-person. We think there’s an increase in spend across things like attendance at events. That means companies are spending more money, they’re bringing in more corporate hospitality, they’re treating their staff more. Overall that’s a really positive sign within the industry, as people are seeing the real value of events, and they’re willing to make the investment. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2019

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20 19

The

Blog

Awards

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2018

INSTITUTE OF COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING

Q: How does your team continue to push boundaries?

A: We push boundaries through the development of activations and creating experiences. Every event we work on has a unique theme. We’re creating experiences for people – we don’t want attendees to simply come in and sit down, we want people to engage with the event, to have a very good sense of what the event is doing, why they’re there. Pre and post activation is very important, using avenues like Instagram and Twitter. We employ a dedicated focus on digital and ensure that the conversation is bigger than inside the room, that we’re thinking of the wider audience. The Blog Awards last year had a digital reach of 24 million over the course of the event. We always provide our finalists and our winners with all the collateral they need to digitally promote and push the awards themselves.

Q: Can you share your top tips for event management?

A: First of all, start as early as you can. Say thank you to everybody

you work with – you never know when you might need them to do something last minute. Stay connected and follow up with your clients, keep them aware of the results. Make sure you tell your sponsors and partners of the success of the event. Be smart when using suppliers – never be afraid to question a cost on an invoice. Always get three quotes. For example, we recently got three quotes for an item: one supplier was hiring the item from another supplier and including a 20 per cent mark-up in the quote. Finally, aim for the wow factor and always try to overdeliver. Even when you’re creating a proposal or you’re pitching to a client, always try and overdeliver on what they ask. If they ask for four-star, give them three-star and five-star, because you never know what their budgets are.

Q: How can people get in touch? A: For all events queries, you can contact the Events Department at events@ashvillemediagroup.com or phone 00 353 1 432 2200 (option 3).

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Informing you about the work of local authorities in supporting the business needs of their community... To tell us what your local council is doing for business email sinead.moore@ashvillemediagroup.com

In Association with

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EXTERNAL REPRESENTATION

DIRECTORY

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MEMBERS DIRECTORY

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CORPORATE PARTNERS

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EXTERNAL REPRESENTATION

TITLE OF FORUM / WORKING GROUP

NOMINATION

Advisory Group on Small Business

Emma Kerins

Age Friendly Ireland Implementation Group

Ian Talbot

DBEI Enterprise Forum on Brexit and Global Challenges

Ian Talbot/Emma Kerins

DFAT Brexit Stakeholder Forum

Ian Talbot

Brexit Skills Stakeholder Forum (DBEI)

Emma Kerins

Eurochambres Brexit Working Group

Ian Talbot/Emma Kerins

Labour Employer Economic Forum

Ian Talbot

LEEF Subgroup on Housing

Emma Kerins

LEEF Subgroup on Pensions

Emma Kerins

LEEF Subgroup on Childcare

Emma Kerins

LEEF Subgroup on Employment Affairs

Emma Kerins

National Competitiveness Council

Ian Talbot

National Economic and Social Council

Ian Talbot

OGP Procurement Group

James Kiernan

Retail Consultation Forum

James Kiernan

Skillnet

Ian Talbot

Rural Monitoring Committee

James Kiernan

Eirgrid Consultative Forum

James Kiernan

National Stakeholder Forum on CSR National Stakeholder Forum on CSR Subgroup on SMEs National Stakeholder Forum on CSR Subgroup on Environment

James Kiernan

National Waste Prevention Committee

Pauline Lowe

Advisory Council to the Commission for Taxi Regulation

Mike Jones

Business in the Community Board

Aileen O'Toole

CSO Enterprise Statistics Working Group

Thomas McHugh

Revenue Customs Consultative Committee

Carol Lynch/Emma Kerins

European Economic and Social Committee

Thomas McDonagh

Southern and Eastern Region Operational Programme Monitoring

Thomas McHugh

Business and Human Rights NAP Implementation group

Emma Kerins

Commission for Aviation Regulation – Passenger Advisory Group

Leona Murphy

Ruhama Bridge to Work Advisory Group

Leona Murphy

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ATHLONE CHAMBER 7 Main Street, Athlone, Co. Westmeath, N37 X5K7 Tel: +353 (0)906 498838 Email: info@athlonechamber.ie Web: www.athlonechamber.ie BALLINA CHAMBER Pearse Street, Ballina, Co. Mayo, F26 A4E6 Tel: +353 (0)96 72800 Email: chamber@ballina.ie Web: www.ballina.ie BALLYHAUNIS CHAMBER The Enterprise Centre, Clare Road, Ballyhaunis, Co. Mayo, F35 HC66 Tel: +353 (0)94 963 0311 Email: ballyhaunischamber@gmail.com Web: www.ballyhaunischamber.ie BANTRY CHAMBER c/o Neill Clarke Auctioneers, New Street, Bantry, Co. Cork, P75 TN96 Tel: +353 (0)27 52860 Email: neillbantry@gmail.com BRAY AND DISTRICT CHAMBER 10 Prince of Wales Terrace, Bray, Co. Wicklow, A98 A4X0 Tel: +353 (0)1 282 8248 Email: info@braychamber.ie Web: www.braychamber.ie CARRICK-ON-SHANNON CHAMBER The Quays, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 PW31 Tel: +353 (0)71 962 2245 Email: info@carrickonshannon.ie Web: www.carrickonshannon.ie

CAVAN CHAMBER 81 Church Street, Cavan, Co. Cavan, H12 XH48 Tel: +353 (0)49 437 8104 Email: info@cavanchamber.ie Web: www.cavanchamber.ie

DROGHEDA AND DISTRICT CHAMBER Broughton House, Dublin Road, Drogheda, Co. Louth, A92 CF57 Tel: +353 (0)41 983 3544 Email: enquiries@droghedachamber.com Web: www.droghedachamber.com

COBH & HARBOUR CHAMBER Market House, Arch Building, Casement Square, Cobh, Co. Cork Tel: +353 (0)21 481 3612 Email: info@cobhharbourchamber.ie Web: www.cobhharbourchamber.ie

DUBLIN CHAMBER 7 Clare Street, Dublin 2, D02 F902 Tel: +353 (0)1 644 7200 Email: info@dublinchamber.ie Web: www.dubchamber.ie

COOTEHILL CHAMBER White Star Complex, Market Street, Cootehill, Co. Cavan, H16 X034 Tel: +353 (0)49 555 2842 Email: cootehillchamber64@gmail.com

DÚN LAOGHAIRE-RATHDOWN CHAMBER Avoca House, 8 Marine Road, Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin Tel: +353 (0)1 284 5066 Email: info@dlrchamber.ie Web: www.dlrchamber.ie

CORK CHAMBER Fitzgerald House, Summerhill North, Cork, T23 TD90 Tel: +353 (0)21 450 9044 Email: info@corkchamber.ie Web: www.corkchamber.ie COUNTY CARLOW CHAMBER Carlow Gateway Business Centre, Athy Road, Co. Carlow, R93 C7P6 Tel: +353 (0)59 913 2337 Email: ceo@carlowchamber.com Web: www.carlowchamber.com COUNTY KILDARE CHAMBER Sallins Road, Naas Town Centre, Co. Kildare, W91 EE6D Tel: +353 (0)45 894074 Email: info@countykildarechamber.ie Web: www.countykildarechamber.ie COUNTY MEATH CHAMBER Chambers Buildings, Church Hill, Navan, Co. Meath, C15 YKR4 Tel: +353 (0)46 904 6060 Email: info@countymeathchamber.ie Web: www.countymeathchamber.ie

MEMBERS DIRECTORY

ARKLOW & DISTRICT CHAMBER Arklow Business Enterprise Centre, Kilbride Industrial Estate, Arklow, Co. Wicklow, Y14 X803 Tel: +353 (0)402 26909 Email: chamber@arklow.ie Web: www.arklow.ie

DUNDALK CHAMBER Unit 4, Partnership Court, Park Street, Dundalk, Co. Louth Tel: +353 (0)42 933 6343 Email: info@dundalk.ie Web: www.dundalk.ie DUNGARVAN AND WEST WATERFORD CHAMBER Unit S 32, Block A, The Plaza, Dungarvan Shopping Centre, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford Tel: +353 (0)58 45054 Email: info@dungarvanchamber.ie Web: www.dungarvanchamber.ie ENNIS CHAMBER 54 O’Connell Street, Ennis, Co. Clare, V95 V3KD Tel: +353 (0)65 684 2988 Email: info@ennischamber.ie Web: www.ennischamber.ie

COUNTY TIPPERARY CHAMBER Questum Acceleration Centre, Ballingarrane Science & Technology Park, Clonmel, Co.Tipperary, E91 V239 Tel: +353 (0)52 612 6500 Email: marketing@countytipperarychamber.com Web: www.countytipperarychamber.com

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MEMBERS DIRECTORY

ENNISCORTHY CHAMBER Portsmouth House, Enniscorthy, Co.Wexford, Y21 A6K1 Tel: +353 (0)53 923 2006 Email: admin@enniscorthychamber.ie Web: www.enniscorthychamber.ie President: Maree Lyng FINGAL DUBLIN CHAMBER Chamber Buildings, North Street, Swords, Co. Dublin Tel: +353 (0)1 890 0977 Email: info@fingaldublinchamber.ie Web: www.fingaldublinchamber.ie GALWAY CHAMBER Commerce House, Merchants Road, Galway, H91 C8K1 Tel: +353 (0)91 563536 Email: info@galwaychamber.com Web: www.galwaychamber.com GOREY CHAMBER Gorey Business Park, Ramstown, Gorey, Co. Wexford, Y25 Y2C8 Phone: +353 (0)53 942 1248 Email: info@goreychamber.ie Web: www.goreychamber.ie KILKENNY CHAMBER The Maltings, Tilbury Place, Kilkenny City, R95 T97W Tel: +353 (0)56 775 2767 +353 (0)56 775 2261 Email: admin@kilkennychamber.ie Web: www.kilkennychamber.ie LETTERKENNY CHAMBER Grand Central Complex, Canal Road, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, F92 EK7Y Tel: +353 (0)74 912 4866 Email: info@letterkennychamber.com Web: www.letterkennychamber.com LIMERICK CHAMBER 96 O’Connell Street, Limerick, V94 YYP6 Tel: +353 (0)61 415180 Email: info@limerickchamber.ie Web: www.limerickchamber.ie

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LONGFORD CHAMBER 26 Ballymahon Street, Longford, N39 X883 Tel: +353 (0)87 6604010 Email: info@longfordchamber.ie Web: www.longfordchamber.ie

SOUTH DUBLIN CHAMBER Tallaght Business Centre, Whitestown Business Park, Tallaght, D24 K59A Tel: +353 (0)1 462 2107 Email: business@sdchamber.ie Web: www.sdchamber.ie

MALLOW CHAMBER 3/4 Bridewell Lane, Mallow, Co. Cork P51 EY90 Tel: +353 (0)22 55660 Email: info@mallowchamber.ie Web: www.mallowchamber.ie

THURLES CHAMBER Thurles Community Enterprise Centre Building, LIT Campus, Thurles Co. Tipperary Tel: +353 (0)504 60061 Email: info@thurleschamber.ie Web: www.thurleschamber.ie

MULLINGAR CHAMBER Market House, Market Square, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath, N91 FD8C Tel: +353 (0)44 934 4044 Email: info@mullingarchamber.ie Web: www.mullingarchamber.ie President: Tom Hyland NEW ROSS & DISTRICT CHAMBER Rising Tide Business Centre, 36 South Street, New Ross, Co. Wexford Tel: +353 (0)51 425077 Email: admin@newrosschamber.ie Web: www.newrosschamber.ie NORTHERN IRELAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY Titanic Suites, Level 5, 55-59 Adelaide Street, Belfast BT2 8FE Tel: +44 (0) 28 9024 4113 Email: mail@northernirelandchamber.com Web: www.northernirelandchamber.com SHANNON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER Main office: Suite 14, Shannon Airport House, Shannon Free Zone, Shannon, Co. Clare, V14 E370 Tel: +353 (0)61 475 854 Email: admin@shannonchamber.ie Web: www.shannonchamber.ie SLIGO CHAMBER 16 Quay Street, Sligo, F91 X923 Tel: +353 (0)71 916 1274 Email: info@sligochamber.ie Web: www.sligochamber.com

TRALEE CHAMBER HQ Tralee Building, Dominick Street, Tralee, Co. Kerry, V92 C799 Tel: +353 (0)66 712 1472 Email: info@tralee.ie Web: www.tralee.ie TULLAMORE & DISTRICT CHAMBER Unit 2A - Second Level, Bridge Centre, Tullamore, Co. Offaly Tel: +353 (0)57 932 3698 Email: info@tullamorechamber.com Web: www.tullamorechamber.com WATERFORD CHAMBER 2 George’s Street, Waterford, X91 AH9K Tel: +353 (0)51 872639 Email: info@waterfordchamber.ie Web: www.waterfordchamber.com WESTPORT CHAMBER The Leeson Enterprise Centre, Altamont Street, Westport, Co. Mayo, F28 ET85 Tel: +353 (0)98 27375 Email: info@westportireland.com Web: www.westportchamber.ie WEXFORD CHAMBER Chamber Offices, Hill Street, Wexford, Y35 WR99 Tel: +353 (0)53 912 2226 Email: info@wexfordchamber.ie Web: www.wexfordchamber.ie

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Email: info@aib.ie Web: www.aib.ie

AN POST General Post Office, O’Connell Street, Dublin 1, D01 F5P2

ERVIA Colvill House, 24-26 Talbot St, Dublin 1, D01 NP86

Tel: +353 (0)1 823 0300 www.ervia.ie

ESB ESB Head Office Two Gateway, East Wall Road, Dublin 3, D03 A995

Tel: +353 (0)1 676 5831 Email: info@esb.ie Web: www.esb.ie

ZURICH Zurich House, Ballsbridge Park, Dublin 4, D04 E5N4 Tel: +353 (0)1 667 0666

Email: customerhelp @zurich.ie Web: www.zurichinsurance.ie

Tel: +353 (0)1 874 7232 Email: info@bitc.ie Web: www.bitc.ie

EUROPEAN MOVEMENT IRELAND 8 Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2, D02 W426 Tel: +353 (0) 1 662 5812

Fax: +353 (0) 1 662 5817 Email: info@ europeanmovement.ie Web: www.europeanmovement.ie

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STRATEGIC PARTNERS

BUSINESS IN THE COMMUNITY IRELAND 32 Lower O’Connell Street, Dublin 1, D01 K0V2

Tel: +353 (0)1 705 7000 Email: customer.services @anpost.ie Web: www.anpost.ie

CORPORATE PARTNERS

AIB Bankcentre, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4, D04 NV02 Tel: +353 (0)1 660 0311

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CORPORATE PATRONS

ABBOTT IRELAND 4051 Kingswood Drive, Citywest Business Park, Dublin 24, D24 T021

Tel: +353 (0)1 469 1500 Web: www.abbott.ie

ADVERTISING STANDARDS AUTHORITY FOR IRELAND Tel: (01) 6137040 Ferry House, Email: standards@asai.ie 48 Lower Mount Street, Web: www.asai.ie Dublin 2

ARAB-IRISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 34 Fitzwilliam Place Tel: (0)1 662 4451 Dublin 2 Email: info@aicc.ie Web: www.aicc.ie

BANK OF IRELAND 40 Mespil Rd, Dublin 4, D04 C2N4

BRITISH IRISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Tel: + 353 (0)1 634 3050 13 Merrion Square North Email: info@britishirishchamber.com Dublin 2 Web: www.britishirishchamber.com D02 HW89

CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF ARBITRATORS IRISH BRANCH Fax: 353 (0)1 707 9751 Merchant’s House, Email: info@ciarb.ie 27-30 Merchant’s Quay, Web: www.arbitration.ie Dublin 8, D08 K3KD Tel: 353 (0)1 707 9739

COASTLINE SOLUTIONS Clara House, Glenageary Park, Glenageary, Co. Dublin, A96 XE26 Tel: + 353 (0)1 235 2166

CRH PLC Belgard Castle, Belgard Road, Clondalkin, Dublin 22, D22 AV61

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Fax: +353 (0)1 235 2227 Email: info@ coastlinesolutions.com Web: www.coastlinesolutions.com

Tel: + 353 1 661 5933 Web: www.bankofireland.com

Tel: +353 (0)1 404 1000 Email: mail@crh.com Web: www.crh.com

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Email: consumerinfo@ diageoirl-info.com Web: www.diageo.ie

EBS BUILDING SOCIETY The EBS Building, 2 Burlington Road, Dublin 4, D04 WV00

Tel: +353 (0)1 665 9000 Email: info@ebs.ie Web: www.ebs.ie

ELI LILLY AND COMPANY (IRELAND) LTD. Tel: +353 (0) 1 661 4377 Hyde House, Fax: +353 (0) 1 855 4792 65 Adelaide Road, Web: www.lilly.ie Dublin 2, D02 N446

ENTERPRISE IRELAND The Plaza, East Point Business Park, Dublin 3, D03 E5R6 Tel: +353 (0)1 727 2000

Email: client.service @enterprise-ireland.com Web: www.enterpriseireland.com

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DUBLIN AIRPORT AUTHORITY PLC Head Office, Email: customerrelations@ Old Central Terminal dublinairport.com Building, Dublin Airport, Web: www.daa.ie Co. Dublin, K67 XY76 Tel: +353 (0)1 814 1111

EIRGRID The Oval, Shelbourne Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4, D04 FW28

Tel: +353 (0)1 677 1700 Email: info@eirgrid.com Web: www.eirgrid.com

EMBASSY OF BRAZIL Block 8, Harcourt Centre Charlotte Way, Dublin 2, D02 H662 Tel: +353 1 4756000 Fax: +353 1 4751341

E-mail: brasemb.dublin@ itamaraty.gov.br Web: dublin.itamaraty.gov. br/en-us/contact_ us.xml

KPMG 1 Stokes Place, St. Stephens Green, Dublin 2, D02 DE03

Tel: +353 (0)1 410 1000 Email: webmaster@kpmg.ie Web: www.kpmg.ie

CORPORATE PATRONS

DIAGEO IRELAND St. James’s Gate, Dublin 8, D08 AX97 Tel: +353 (0)1 453 6700

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CORPORATE PATRONS

MASON HAYES & CURRAN Tel: +353 (0)1 614 5000 South Bank House, Email: mail@mhc.ie Barrow Street, Web: www.mhc.ie Dublin 4, D04 TR29

PENINSULA BUSINESS SERVICES Tel: 1890 252 923 East Point Business Park, Alfie Byrne Rd, East Wall Email: info@peninsula-ie.com Dublin 3 Web: www.peninsula-ie.com

SOLAS THE FURTHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY Block 1, Castleforbes House, Tel: + 353 (01) 533 2500 Email: info@solas.ie Castleforbes Road, Web: www.solas.ie D01 A8N0

SSE AIRTRICITY Red Oak South, South County Business Park, Leopardstown, Dublin 18 D18 W688

THE BAR COUNCIL OF IRELAND Tel: +353 (0)1 817 5000 158-159 Church Street Fax: +353 (0)1 872 0455 Dublin 7, Email: thebarofireland D07 YX89 @lawlibrary.ie Web: www.lawlibrary.ie

THE LAW SOCIETY OF IRELAND Fax + 353 (0)1 672 4801 Blackhall Place, Email: general@lawsociety.ie Dublin 7, D07 VY24 Web: www.lawsociety.ie Tel: + 353 (0)1 672 4800

Tel: 1850 812 220 Email: customerservice @sseairtricity.com Web: www.sse.com/Ireland

THOMAS MCDONOGH & SONS LTD Email: thomasmcdonogh@ Dockgate Building, mcdonogh.ie Dock Road, Web: www.mcdonagh.ie Galway, H91 V6RR Tel: +353 (0)91 560700

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45 MAGAZINE TITLES ▲ 10 EVENTS ▲ 3.6 MILLION REACH

DID YOU KNOW

Ashville Media Group is Ireland’s largest publishing and events company. You’ve almost certainly read our magazines or attended our events. Our mission is to connect your brand with the largest audience in Ireland.

(01) 432 2200 ▲ info@ashvillemediagroup.com

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Profile for Ashville Media Group

InBUSINESS Yearbook 2019  

Official publication of Chambers Ireland

InBUSINESS Yearbook 2019  

Official publication of Chambers Ireland