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PICTURE EDITOR SUSAN GLEN DESIGNED BY TREVOR THOMPSON & ALESSIO SCIBELLI


CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

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PHOTOGRAPHERS

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PHOTOGRAPHER’S BIOGRAPHIES

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Please find the full stories at: www.arvorimages.com


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INTRODUCTION

In your hands you hold the future. It is a future built by the hands of a talented and multi-national group of press and editorial photographers from Falmouth University. It is a future I am proud to introduce to you. This is work built through conversation, observation, dedication and commitment. Through listening, thinking and perseverance. Inside these pages you will find stories. Stories and visual explorations that reach far beyond the Cornish base from which they were born. Stories that look at a huge range of contemporary issues. Inside this edition you will see work around youth unemployment in Kosovo, Zimbabwean refugees in the UK and a story on Irish Amish Mennonites. You will learn of Africa’s most endangered carnivore and about the issue around immigration in Norway. Closer to home you can read about the decline of the Cornish clay industry, understand how female genital mutilation is affecting British cities, and you get to go couch surfing. You can traverse Cornwall and visit inner city farms. You can educate yourself about home schooling in England.

I have barely begun to touch upon the veritable smörgåsbord of content within. There is so much more. The strength and variety of fresh and engaging content reflects the authors… a diverse group of young photographers whose differing perspectives and experiences strengthen their passion for storytelling. Please follow the links inside to further your knowledge of the stories, and to keep up with the work from the individual authors. My personal thanks go to all the students of 2013, to Susan Glen for picture editing this publication, and to all the staff, students and visitors involved with the Press and Editorial course at Falmouth. My thanks also go to you, dear reader, for taking the time to jump in. Enough words. This is photography. This is the future. DAVID WHITE Course Leader, BA (Hons) Press and Editorial Photography, Falmouth University.


PHOTOGRAPHERS


KEBERO RORY MATTHEWS Thousands of meters above sea level in the mountainous afro-alpine regions of Ethiopia lives the Ethiopian wolf. This diminutive animal, which to some resembles the common European red fox, is in fact the most endangered mammal in Africa. Threatened by disease, loss of habitat and hybridisation with domestic dogs, this Ethiopian endemic often comes close to facing extinction. There are those, however, who have dedicated themselves to the conservation of the animal, including the members of a multinational team of 34 conservationists working together as the Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Program (EWCP). In the southerly Bale-Robe province, where the largest remaining population of approximately 300 wolves remain, lies the remote mountain town of Dinsho where the organisation is headquartered. It is here that the majority of efforts to prevent and react to that which threatens the animal are launched, focussing on two sub-populations in the National Park in the Web Valley and on the Sanetti Plateau.

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1 Abubakhar Hussein waits as another member of the team transfers from horseback to the Land Rover after his animal was showing signs of exhaustion. In the wet season, journeys from headquarters to base camp in the Web Valley must be made by horse as the route is impassable by vehicle. 2 A wolf surveys the frosted landscape after emerging from sleep. Though they are pack animals which will spend some time socialising, the wolves spend the majority of their time alone when roaming or hunting, a trait which makes them unique among the world’s wolf species. 3 Zewidu Agazu, a man from the North of Ethiopia, poses for a portrait. He has travelled near to a thousand kilometres in order to take part in training on how to monitor the wolves having been nominated to the position by the elders and chairmen of his village for his environmental interest and respected status in the community.


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HOME EDUCATION VICTORIA LOUISE MAYRICK 1

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Children are taken out of mainstream education for different reasons to continue their studies at home, this could be for students who have been bullied or ill and disabled children, Home-schooling is sometimes the best way for them to receive an education, those with families that travel a lot also need to still receive an education. However home education can be costly compared to a public school, there is a lot of pressure put onto parents to guarantee a sufficient level of education, and there is a big debate around the social aspects of home education, with it thought that many children are lonely and suffer from lack of social situations. Victoria Mayrick wanted to confront these ideas of why people home educate, finding out if these reasons behind home education bare any truth. There are an estimated 600 families Home Educating in Cornwall it is on the rise within the county. The Education act of 1996 states that children of school age should be educated either by regular attendance at school or otherwise. This project has aimed to find those that home educate in Cornwall and explore the many reasons behind the decision, both from parents and children, within this project a wide variety of individuals have been documented exploring many ways in which ‘or otherwise’ is interpreted; from the traditional approaches to education in the home, forest schooling, de-schooling, child lead learning and many other variations of learning and teaching. By following four different families aged 4-15 and two different educational groups Victoria Mayrick aims to have covered different angles of home education, and therefore subsequently being able to educate others on what it means to home educate in 2013.

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1 The Children at Tamar Lake Forest school initiate a Boys vs. Girls tug of war competition. 2 Lily left school due to anxiety and issues with fitting in, all of which are now thought to be symptoms of an undiagonsed case of Asperger’s Syndrome. 3 Morgan learning how the body works during a science lesson.


CHYAN COMMUNITY - AN ALTERNATIVE LIFE AARON HARCOURT 1

Alternative community, traveller’s, the counter culture, bohemians, New Gypsies; these are all names for a group of people living on the edge of society, an alternative life from contemporary culture and its practices.

1 Two converted vehicles sit amongst the trees at Chyan. Many alternative communities are situated within natural settings, the people within them having a strong connection and appreciation for nature.

When first coming to Falmouth, Cornwall I was enchanted by people living in caravans, yurts, converted buses and boats. I felt drawn to this unique lifestyle and the people that lived and breathed a life contrary to common standards and traditions. I hence began searching for alternative individuals, couples and families living in the Falmouth area as well as exploring themes surrounding this subculture such as eco consciousness, travelling and influences from Roma culture. This is when I discovered Chyan, a small alternative community just outside Falmouth, which is made up of a group of people living in caravans and converted vehicles.

2 A water barrel waits to be brought up to Rae’s caravan after it’s been filled from the stream that runs through Chyan.Chyan is unique in the fact that it has a water source, one that can be used for drinking or washing.

Contrary to stereotypes and various photo-documentaries about alternative living, I wanted this body of work to explore the authenticity of this chosen life, both in the rewards of living an eco-friendly, minimalistic, community based life as well as the difficult lifestyle and dedication they are confronted with on a daily basis. Although there are certain elements of the lifestyle that are quite idyllic, such the close proximity to nature, propensity for travelling and low cost, it can also be an existence of discomfort when living exposed to the elements, working daily to keep warm and dry, having minimal space to live, etc. In saying the latter, the people at Chyan do not see these confrontations as hardships but as part of the life they have chosen. They are aware that they have given up many comforts of a standard western lifestyle but, in doing so, are working towards a more sustainable, earth bonded, peaceful and community oriented existence.

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3 Chris has a wash in the solar heated bathhouse at Chyan. Because the hot water for the showers depends on the amount of sunlight, winter is particularly hard due to cloud coverage and shorter days. However, an electric boiler on a meter heats the bath water separately, which unfortunately ran out of money. Chris having to make do with lukewarm water.


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A NEW HOME SIRIL WIGEN MONTEIRO 1

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At the end of 2010 there were 43.7 million people forcibly displaced worldwide. This is the highest number in 15 years. For citizens of countries who have not experienced acts of war on national ground for generations it is difficult to understand what it means to be a refugee. ‘A New Home’ is an attempt to make the stories of some young refugees available for a wider audience to gain understanding of their situation. ‘A New Home’ focuses on six young refugees who have fled from all over the world to Trondheim, Norway. Some came on their own, leaving friends and family behind. Some have been through a long and traumatic journey that they will never forget. They have all had their life turned upside down but have taken the challenge and have created new lives for themselves.

1 Ali works out regularly at a local gym. “It had been three years since I had talked to my family when I got in touch with them in Norway. For me it was natural but not for my mother. I remember that for the entirety of our first half an hour phone call she cried. She did not think that I had survived. The first 3-4 months I was in Iran I cried all the time because I missed my mum, my brother and my sister. After a while it became natural for me because I found good friends. But my mum did not forget.” 2 Tuva works every weekend at Burger King. She would like to go visit her family in Sri Lanka but it is complicated to arrange it. “We really want to meet. But firstly I need money and secondly I cannot go before I have become a Norwegian citizen, that is in another two years. I only have money from my weekend job, and that money I send to mum and dad.” 3 Men dancing at the Nowruz celebration. There is a large Afghan community in Trondheim.


CODE OF SILENCE JOSIE WOODERSON Despite being illegal in the UK since 1985, an estimated 30,000 girls are at risk of mutilation today. From ritual cleansing and purification to virginity and fidelity upon marriage, the motivations for performing female genital mutilation are many, however it is an abuse of women’s rights in the most intimate sense. It has no medical benefits, and is commonly misconceived as a religious obligation, yet none of the major holy books such as the Qur’an or The Bible make reference to it. A girl’s chastity is controlled either by reducing desire and the possibility of experiencing sexual pleasure, or by sheer obstruction of her vagina. FGM, in many cases, acts as a chastity belt of flesh. In the FGM capital of Europe; London, Dr Comfort Momoh performs deinfibulations (the surgical reversal of the closure of the vaginal opening) on two women a week. Despite many people moving away from countries which typically practice FGM, the expectation to perform the cultural practice is only increased for diaspora communities in the UK in order to maintain their cultural identity as a community. There are a number of charities and organisations that exist to support and advise girls who are at risk, or women who are currently living with the damaging consequences. These services provide a vital role in the safeguarding of women and girls, and in the coming months they will be coming together to hold a summer campaign to raise the profile of FGM in the run up to the most high risk time of year for girls to be cut; the summer holidays.

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1 An art piece used as a platform for educating people about FGM, depicts the different types of mutilation which range from the removal of a part of the clitoris, to total excision of the entire external genitalia and the sewing up of the raw tissue to create just a small hole to allow the passing of urine and menstrual blood. 2 Integrate Bristol is a charity that helps young people from other countries and cultures to integrate and adapt to life in the UK. They aim to give the youth a platform to express their views and ideas, and support those in the community who are bravely trying to eradicate the harmful practice of FGM, through various educational and creative projects. 3 “What we aim to do is educate the youth, so then they have a basis to argue against it. They can still influence the decision if they wanted to. We’re trying to teach them skills to first be happy within themselves, and be strong enough to say what they believe and think, without being embarrassed or ashamed.”


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RO/RO JOSHUA-JAMES CUNLIFFE 1

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Hidden away far within Cornwall’s River Fal lies a ferry; a ferry bereft of its hundreds of passengers. The canteens, lounges and dormitories are completely empty, filled only by a deathly quiet; punctuated only by the work of 6 individuals - the skeleton crew. An ever shifting smorgasbord of British nationals and Europeans are assigned to maintain the ship keeping it safe and ready on the off chance of being called back into service. These multinationals are confined to the ship together, frequently for months at a time - the place where time stands still. Often their best bet for a good income, grinding through the silent monotony is worth it to support themselves and their families. Social opportunities are thin on the ground. and a largely unspoken conflict seeps through the working environment, as more and more Eastern Europeans begin to find work in place of British seafarers locally. The nationalities don’t ever mix socially, and the crew often retreat to their cabins after working hours, left to gaze out onto the Fal’s banks, but rarely walk there.

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1 Alex, Edgar and Normunds sit on the boat of local boatman Rhos Newman, returning from their weekly shopping trip to Truro. Aside from the necessary food shop, the crew will utilise the fast internet access in Cafés to download music or films to ease the monotony of their leisure time. 2 Edgar fishes during a lunch break on the off chance he’ll catch a Mackerel in the early weeks of Spring, whilst Normunds soaks in the sun on his usual chair of choice on the port side, Deck 5. 3 Polgerran Wood stretches out on the banks of the River Fal, as Alexander completes a tri-weekly 30 minute jog. Unable to reach land for a more scenic run, Alex is confined to the Ferry’s vehicle deck, surrounded on every side by steep metal walls. His fitness is supplemented with the on board gym, deep in the belly of the ship.


STACKS SAMUEL GLAZEBROOK 1

Stacks is a journey around the circumference of Cornwall via bicycle. Between the 5th and 20th of April 2013, Samuel Glazebrook cycled four hundred and seventy miles, photographing and interviewing people and places. The work talks about sense of place, trying to visually represent life in parts of Cornwall that often go unseen. Seeking out people on the fringes of society and capturing unique landscape, this selection of pictures conveys a simple but pertinent insight into Cornwall as it is today, while making references to its heritage. Cornwall is a varied county of many climates and landscapes, both of which define the nature, and mood of its inhabitants. The local people hark back to Celtic origins, of which the Cornish language is strongly associated. This is a rural place, where you earn a living working the land or sea. The landscape mirrors this, displaying miles of tilled soil, harbours full of fishing vessels, and the remains of mine stacks. The Cornish built up an incredible reputation as miners, as Cornish legend would suggest, “wherever you may go in the world, if you see a hole in the ground, you’ll find a Cornishman at the bottom of it.” The economy is now no longer fuelled by blood, sweat and tin; there has been a shift. Tourism is at an all time high here, and seasonal crowds flood the small villages on the coast between June and August, creating a diverse population across seasons unlike anywhere else in the country. These pictures take a look at this incredibly unique and beautiful part of the British Isles, seeking out personal stories of those who live within this weather torn and industrially defined landscape.

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1 Jim Ward beneath the Tamar Bridge, Saltash “It’s brilliant being here right on the border, cos I can look at England over there. There definitely is a divide between people over there and here; especially with some older people who’ve been here all their lives. They just don’t wanna go there. Some people refuse to go to Plymouth hospital, they’d rather go to Treliske than ‘over there’.” 2 Chris, working at Warrens pasty factory “I do maintenance here at Warrens pasty factory. I live about 300 yards away. I used to live in the West Midlands but I got a girlfriend down here, they own a local business so I had to move. Yeah it’s nice, nice and relaxed, better than Birmingham, I know that much. I won’t leave now; definitely settled. It’s not to bad here. It’s a nice life.” 3 Connie waiting at a bus stop, Mousehole “I’m originally from Stroud, but I live in Penzance at the minute with my Mum and my Sister. I’m a student at Truro college, and I work in Mousehole. I’m studying to do psychology, geography and world development. I want to move away definitely, it doesn’t feel like there’s much down here for me but I may come back one day. I wanna travel.”


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NORTHSTOWE JEAN-PHILIPPE OFFORD 1

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My project looks at the human consequences of a planned new town called Northstowe that will be built over the coming years on a greenfield site eight Kms north west of Cambridge.

1 Lois Bowser - Lois Bowser is the Northstowe Joint Team Planner. She works at South Cambridge District Council. She is actively involved with the planning of the development.

Northstowe is the first ‘new town’ development after the completion of Milton Keynes. The town will eventually have 10,000 homes with a population of 30,000 and will be built in three phases. The first phase is due to begin around this time next year with the first houses being completed by Christmas 2014. This will mean 1,500 homes being built on what is currently an 18 hole golf course just to the north of the existing village of Longstation.

2 RAF Oakington is an ex military airbase. It was then used from 2000-2010 as Oakington Immigration Reception Centre. Since 2010, it has become disued and will eventually be used as the site for Phase 3 of the development of Northstowe.

My project has been to meet people who are directly affected by the first phase of building at Cambridge Golf Club as well as other existing residents of Longstanton who will be affected in future as the new town grows. Most of the people that I spoke to and photographed were resigned to the new town. Opposition had given way to sorrow and a feeling that their voices were not heard and the power of the developer to get their own way was unstoppable.

3 Colin Chapman is the Course Manager Cambridge Golf Club. He has been working at the golf club for 3 years and lives with his wife in a bungalow on the golf course. Phase 1 of the development will result in Colin losing both his house and his job.


CONFESSIONS GEORGINA BROWN When did you last reveal a secret? Georgina Brown asks young adults what their biggest secrets are or what they feel guilty about, exploring both the historical background to confessing and the reason why these strangers would reveal their innermost secrets to a stranger. Psychologists have long been discussing the affect of confessing, with scientific evidence suggesting that keeping secrets has an adverse affect on health. In comparison revealing secrets is supposed to have positive benefits including; lower stress, a closer and more trusting relationship with the confidant and a often a solution to the problem. Each of us recognise within ourselves the need to confess, with emotions of guilt and shame driving us to confide in a trusted person or to express ourselves through writing. By revealing our secrets we hope for acceptance and forgiveness. In this project strangers have revealed their secrets publicly putting a face to the secret. 1

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1 “I regularly sleep with prostitutes” 2 “I am sleeping with one of my closest friends, no one can know.” 3 “I broke into a friend’s flat and stole a jacket.”


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DIASPORA DIARIES BENJAMIN RUTHERFORD 1

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This body of work reflects upon the harsh realities of seeking sanctuary in the UK, during a time of growing nationalistic sentiment amongst the British public, an exponential influx of refugees into the EU, and the increasing strain from austerity measures. This project not only attempts to shed light on the cause of Zimbabweans, it also raises questions about the efficiency of the UKBA and the UK’s lack of involvement in its former colony. Zimbabwe has been one of the UK’s top ten asylum seeking nations since 2000, at one point being the largest in 2002. The unofficial estimate of all Zimbabweans residing in the UK is now said to be around 300,000. Many still have not had their cases reviewed for more than 12 years, and some have been made destitute as long as 10. The UK now has a predicted 70,000 destitute, homeless and vulnerable individuals unaccounted for. Many having fled the violent political turmoil in Zimbabwe, desperately need the sanctuary that the UK is so eager to claim to provide, yet they have found themselves caught up in a new living nightmare. Ultimately this body of work looks at the importance of community, family and social responsibility.

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1 Crispin M’simbe, a Zimbabwean Refugee, finds shelter from the bitter cold and snow in a friend’s car outside a midnight mass at the Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield. There are said to be as many as 70,000 refused asylum seekers still living in the UK, with an immigration backlog of 150,000 cases. 2 Loneliness, fear, uncertainty, and lack of purpose are said to be the top causes of an epidemic of acute depression and suicides amongst Zimbabwean Women. For many, the only thing they have left is hope; hope that they can begin a real life in the UK or to be able to return back to a safe and free Zimbabwe. 3 Many women have taken to dedicating their time to causes such as the Zimbabwean Association, which is headed by Sarah Harland (pictured left) who is one of the few white Zimbabwean refugees. Here the two ladies along with several other Zimbabwean women help plant traditional Zimbabwean vegetables for the British ‘Sowing New Seeds’ campaign at Spitalfields City Farm in London.


KOSOVO, FORGOTTEN NOT GONE ALEX WALKER 1

The global recession of 2008 has affected many people and continues to do so in 2013. It is not only those who have lost their jobs but also those entering the work force. Much is spoken of the plight in countries such as Spain, Italy and Greece where the recession has hit hardest. However Kosovo, Europe’s newest country, has greater problems to solve. The conflict that engulfed the country in the 1990s culminating in well documented ethnic cleansing, massacres and destruction of 1999 making headline news around the world has been almost forgotten. Overshadowed by events such as the World Trade Centre attacks and the War on Terror, the media has moved on, with the country being left to cope with the long-term aftermath of war. Today, Kosovo has the youngest population of any EU country with over half being under 25 and an unemployment rate of 75 per cent in this age group. Unable to travel freely to other countries or leave without a visa, they are ‘trapped’ inside Kosovo’s boarders, the nineth poorest country in the world. With ever dwindling international aid and corruption, a destroyed manufacturing industry and poor infrastructure due to lack of investment, there is little for young Kosovars to do apart from drink coffee, meet with friends and fill time aimlessly with ever growing frustration about the current situation.

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1 Alban and Ilir Tullumi walk side by side after playing a football game. Both brothers are following divergent paths into their future. However their family ties and values are so strong that this will never separate them. The strength of the nation revolves around extended family and friendship ties, but also the humanity that exists between its people. 2 Ilir Tullumi has dinner late at night with his family. Although optimistic the majority of the time, there are moments where he ponders his future. Disappointment is evident after unsuccessful job interviews, and the endless hoops to jump through for obtaining a scholarship for an Italian University. 3 ‘Newborn’ The large urban sculpture situated in central Pristina celebrates the birth of Europe’s newest country, Kosovo, which came into existence in 2008 having declared unilateral independence. It is adorned with the flags of nations which recognise its status in a desperate bid to gain EU membership, with a white box with the name of the countries that don’t.


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THE AMISH MENNONITES ANDERS HAUGLAND PEDERSEN 1

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Seventeen years ago a small Amish Mennonite community was formed in the Irish village of Dunmore East. Wanting to spread the teachings of the bible into Europe, a few families decided to leave their homes in Pennsylvania to establish the Dunmore East Christian Fellowship. Today the community hosts over fifty Amish Mennonites and are slowly growing. The Amish Mennonites is a protestant religious group dating back to the early 15th century, when a rebirth of looking more deeply into the Bible spread across Europe. Through these close bible studies came a sense of astonishment for the purity of the apostolic church. Despite being tortured, burned and jailed for wanting to reform the state church, groups of sincere Christians came together to form a fellowship in the 15th century. Today these worshippers are known as Anabaptists. By the year 1536, Menno Simons, a former catholic priest, united with the Anabaptists and as a result of his influential work, this group instead became known as the Mennonites. In later years, a young Mennonite priest – Jakob Amman – made his mark on the belief system when he declared his opinion that the church was departing from biblical teachings and therefore should apply a stricter teaching of the bible. Those who agreed with Amman became known as Amish. Many of the Amish and Mennonites emigrated to America as a result of being persecuted for wanting to reform the state church. Today there are over one million Amish with approximately 150.000 of them falling in the category of Amish Mennonites. The term Amish Mennonites simply identifies the church not being exclusively Amish or Mennonite. A profound religious community is found in the small village in Dunmore East. Life is simple and very distant to the outside world. Even though the cold and damp Irish winter has made it hard for the community to adapt, they still find themselves living peacefully.

1 David and Duane are collecting the Mennonite Hymnals after singing at a memorial service for the fishermen that were lost at sea. Yearly, the Fellowship choir is asked to sing at the memorial service at the docs in Dunmore East. With no instruments the choir sings out beautiful tones in the cold Irish weather. They do not used instruments, as they believe it draws the attention away from the song and the lyrics. 2 Hew-Gregory-Smith is one of the bakers at Jaybee’s, the local bakery and bookshop in Dunmore East village, which is managed by the community. The former Anglican vicar, left his priesthood in Wales as a result of the liberal views that crept into the Anglican Church. Together with his wife and five children, they sought a purer and simpler life where they could live by the rules of the scripture. 3 Hannah and Libby are unwinding after a long day of teaching at the Christian Fellowship school. Soon they have to go home to their families to prepare the supper. They both came to Ireland nine years ago to help the Christian Fellowship. The community has been growing slowly, even though it was established seventeen years ago. Hannah and Libby saw a need for help in Ireland and decided to move down to Dunmore East.


BRITISH SUBCULTURES THOMAS PORTER 1

Subcultures of the past have become a large part of our history and reflect on the time period that they were present. This is a look at Subcultures that are evident within our culture today in a time where large corporations and brands appear to be controlling popular culture. However we still have many subcultures that can be seen today. Within these images I want to present the diversity within young culture.

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1 Anthony is a young Illustrator who is inspired by the Mod subculture. Here he stands on the street in which he grew up. 2 Mike is a young beatboxer who is immersed in the hiphop subculture. 3 Joe is a young musician who has caught the attention of festival crowds around the country. Here he is sat in his bell tent that is erected in his back garden. Upon asking him about whether he would place himself into a subculture he stated, �No Subculture do what makes you happy.�


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LIFE SWAP KATIE MOSS 1

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Life Swap is a look in to alternative living, mainly from living off the land that is around us. This project focuses on the hunting and foraging aspects of this lifestyle, the people that I have been working with have a keen passion for what they do, and really immerse themselves within the wilderness, they each have specific knowledge with Survival and Bushcraft training which gives them an advantage to living this way. There use of the five senses of the body is much stronger than the average person, they can pick up on the tiniest of details which gives them a great advantage when out on the forage.

1 Pete collects wild garlic leaves for dinner, they are to be used later on that evening. They are going to be cooked to create a similar dish to the Chinese seaweed, but with a more distinct taste. This was a new recipe that he had read about in one of his foraging books. 2 After sharpening his axe with a steel shaped credit card he uses polish from Halfords, which gets rid of any indentations or scratches caused from the first process. To smooth it out it has to be evenly wiped across the leather belt numerous times, this also helps with sharpening it. When the process is complete the blade is sharp enough to slice paper. 3 Although a keen wood carver and a big part of the bushcraft lifestyle, Pete has been whittling lots of objects during his time living in the woods as he finds the evenings the hardest. He rarely has company, and misses his wife and son a great deal. He makes so many that he has no real need for them and they tend to get thrown on to the fire.

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VILLAGE LIFE NIA HAF COLLIER 1

‘Village Life’ is a documentation of the small, rural village of Stithians in Southern Cornwall. Close to two of the county’s largest towns and only city, Stithians (with a population of around 2,000) sits in the centre of the Redruth, Falmouth and Truro triangle. Despite its proximity to these larger locations the village itself has retained a rural feeling. Surrounded by luscious sweeping valleys there is an unmistakable remoteness to Stithians as you bump down country lanes and see the steeple of the 12th century church emerge amongst farmland and forestry. History books exploring Stithians’ past boasts of the community’s ability to entertain themselves. When transport wasn’t as widely available this was a necessity but in today’s modern age, the villagers still pride themselves on providing plenty of entertainment within the village boundaries. This in turn has created a strong sense of community and a welcoming atmosphere in Stithians. The old granite miner’s cottages of the Foundry juxtaposed with council estates such as Collins Park makes for a lively, vibrant and diverse village. The highly rated primary school attracts young families, whilst the elderly generation are keen to remain living in Stithians because of the strong sense of community. There is also an abundance of social groups, organisations and services available in the village. With three choirs, a bell ringing group, skatepark, bowling club, football, cricket and rugby team, a post office, playing fields, doctors surgery and many more there is plenty to keep everyone and anyone occupied in Stithians.

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1 A chance to catch up and socialize in between courses of the Candle Lit Supper, before the after dinner games begin and the raffle is drawn. 2 Stithians Bell Ringers meet weekly at the Parish Church. Although a number of the members are local the group is open to anyone and all are welcome. Often, Truro bell ringers join the group for evening practice. 3 Stithians Got Talent hopefuls relax during the interval of the annual children’s talent show. The performers included the school choir, guitarists and soloists along with a variety of other acts.


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HARMONY CLOSE IGOR TREPESHCHENOK 1

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“Harmony Close” is exploring the impact of history, memory and surroundings on the emotions and lives of young people residing in the towns of Redruth and Camborne in Cornwall. Transition over the last 100 years changed this place from the centre of the richest mining area in the world to one of the most deprived areas in England. Nevertheless, “Harmony Close” is not just a story of one particular place. The project reflects the global process of de-industrialisation — a historical shift from production to services that has started in Europe in the second half of the 20th century. The closing of factories and mines has had a deep effect on workers, their families and entire towns. However, not only downsized workers have been asking questions about their future. The transition to a postindustrial society has greatly changed the lives of the younger generation. Many new opportunities for young people have appeared in the post-industrial era, which in turn has brought new risks. The path to adulthood has become longer, more varied, less predictable and clear. This have given rise to feelings of insecurity, stress, discomfort and hinders the formation of an adult identity. Economic changes have affected the labour market for young people, education and recreation, relationships with family and friends. Lifestyle of today’s youth is very different from how their parents have lived. Today, 100 million young Europeans between the ages of 15 and 29 are trying to find themselves, are looking for a job, a way out of the crisis and the place to live.

1 Jannali, Carn Brea, Redruth. We live in the age of migration that is part of the processes of de-industrialisation and globalisation. Social conditions and surrounding have the strongest influence on individual achievements and many young peopleof Cornwall are thinking of leaving the county in search of opportunities. 2 Pendraves Street, Tuckingmill, Camborne. Redruth and Camborne used to be the centre of one of the richest mining areas in the world. When mining peaked during the 1860s, there were over 340 mines operating with 50,000 men mining copper and tin. Surrounded by the mines and other related industries, Redruth and Camborne were the thriving centres of commerce. 3 Moye, his family’s garden of a former miners cottage, Redruth. Tourists, as they make their way down to the coast, avoid contact with this bleak and melancholic landscape of old engine houses, miners’ terraced cottages, vast council estates and newly built industrial parks sprawled across converted acres of mining waste.


THIS IS A TRIBUTE INDIA WHILEY-MORTON You can’t afford those sought after tickets to your favorite band’s tour…you have to book an act for your work’s office party…you’re a hotel needing a some entertainment for the evening…or you just want to relive your youth of watching bands with tight leather trousers and big hair. What is your solution, who do you call? A Tribute Band. But what about the people who dedicate their lives to constantly taking on another persona? Surely the act of ‘becoming’ a celebrity every-night, distorts the boundaries of reality, and somewhat begs to question the identity of these people? There are constant battles between the contrast of their reality and the idolised alter egos they take on. The lines of where the act ends and their own identity begins, can become increasingly blurred. Despite all that can be said about the world of tribute acts, it is an industry driven by pure passion. A passion and love for a specific band, a passion for performance, or a passion to earn money in an unconventional way. While each individual tribute artist has their own personal reasons for entering the business, there is no doubt that they all have in common one thing; a passion strong enough to overcome all the empty hall’s mockery and to give it their all. ‘This Is A Tribute’ explores the world of Tribute Artists and questions the motives for pursing individual acts. Why do people choose to be in tribute bands? Is it an utter devotion and love for a specific artist? A form of making a living? Or just a bit of fun at the weekends? Through capturing a variety of tribute artists, the series aims to grasp an understanding of one of show business’s most complex and intriguing areas.

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1 Pete Swan AKA, Alvin Sawdust, a tribute to Alvin Stardust, playing to Lostwithial social club, 2012. 2 Hayley Willis, with her 1 year old baby, Honor, wears her Abba tribute outfit in their home in Buckinghamshire. 2012. 3 Mick Jogger and ‘Kieth Richards’. The duo are part of the tribute band, ‘The Rolling Zones’. 2013.


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NGOMA - THE DRUMS OF BUGURUNI HAMISH ROBERTS 1

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Buguruni School for the Deaf is a primary school in the Ilala district of Dar es Salaam. It was officially opened in 1974 by Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, Tanzania’s revered first president. It charges no fees and is largely dependent upon funding from a UK based charity called Tanzanear. The school’s motto is ‘Education & love is our right’. Christian and Muslim pupils mix happily and peacefully. Often having to take many years off from education in order to help at home, many pupils attend the school until they are 18 years old. They need to spend time at the beginning of their school life learning sign language before they can progress to the mainstream curriculum. In Tanzania deafness is both a cause and a consequence of poverty. It commonly occurs through ignorance or misunderstanding of symptoms or failure to treat childhood illnesses which, in the developed world, are routinely diagnosed and treated. As such, it tends to be more prevalent among poor families who cannot afford adequate healthcare. The consequences can be devastating, as sadly, deaf children are often seen as a burden to their families. They cannot contribute to the family income, and it is not unusual for them to be rejected by their families and become outcasts. The children at Buguruni School come from all over Tanzania and the Zanzibar Archipelago, because it is very unusual for a school for deaf children to be free. About 50% of the children board at the school, so it is very much their second home.

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1 Mercy, is a deaf teacher who helps a lot of pupils who have been through difficulties at home. She is someone they very much look up to as a deaf role model. 2 These pupils are helping each other put their hearing aids on as they can only use them during school lessons. They take them out at the end of the lesson because they are so precious and once they’re damaged it is difficult for them to be repaired. 3 As well as being taught sign language in Swahili, the pupils learn how to pronounce words in order to broaden their confidence in a predominately hearing society.


THREAD MAGAZINE SARAH HOLLIDAY 1

Throughout this year I’ve been working on the production of a fashion based magazine entitled ‘Thread’. The magazine is based on blog culture and brings the online sensation into print, whilst also having its own digital platform. Contributions have been made from journalists, web design, graphic design, fashion designers and photographers from around Europe to make the magazine exciting for its target audience. We’ve used the magazine as a platform to show light on new talent within the fashion industry and create a blogging aesthetic in an editorial market said to be in decline.

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These photographs are part of a series in the creation of a fashion blog style magazine entitled ‘Thread’.


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URBAN UTOPIA LUCY KATE PIPER 1

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Many people consider London to be one of the world’s busiest and exciting cities. However, it can also be one of the loneliest and most overwhelming. It has been identified that urban living provokes feelings of alienation and a loss of self. The scale and density of such a city causing individuals to become swamped in the crowd. The desire to escape and return to the basic human connection to nature has led to advocacy for natural green spaces within urban areas. Under the pretense of alleviating urban depression and fostering community cohesion, the city farm movement began, providing a different heartbeat to the usual fast pace of life. London is host to eleven city farms, the first establishing in 1972. Each one provides its own oasis of calm and a chance for escapism. Whilst animals appear to be the main focus, the underlying context of social interaction and solidarity acts as the base for each farm’s existence. Educational and community programmes play vital roles, offering a place of respite for underprivileged members of society. For many people living in economically depressed areas of London, this is the closest they might ever get to experiencing rural life. Focusing on three locations, this project offers a unique insight into the essence of the city farms of London. Documenting their environments, combined with the individual characters and the bonds they form together, Urban Utopia unearths the personality of each farm. The images reveal hidden aspects of London life, both of social cohesion and ecological re-birth. Such complementary notions of the natural and the civil may not have previously been associated with the concept of a city, but are now with increasing vigor becoming a part of urban existence.

1 In the background is London’s iconic building, The Gherkin, situated in the city’s financial district. Some farms are able to raise money through offering team-building days for nearby corporate companies. This helps to pay the wages for some members of farm staff. 2 Every Tuesday, George and Dunstan, the donkeys at Stepney City Farm are taken for a walk by open volunteers. This provides a chance for the farm to build a rapport with the local community. 3 Nonna Press, 30, from Melbourne, Australia, was sent to Surrey Docks City Farm to complete 160 hours of community service for committing a fraud crime. Following her time at the farm, she often returned to find a place of solitude within the city. She is now living back in her native country.


AS ABOVE / IS BELOW AMY WHALLEY We can not see or hold faith, but we know innately that it exists, whether we are religious or not. Historically we have built structures, designed rituals and rendered facts to address that which can not easily be explained. Spiritualism is just one belief structure, unique in that it manifests itself as a religion, philosophy and a science. Spiritualists follow a set of seven fundamental principles - the most honoured being a belief in a continued future existence, and that people who have passed on into the spirit-world can and do communicate with us. Far from the commonly held misconception of an occult-like status, spiritualism is an officially recognised religious movement with its own churches and Ministers who possess the same rights and privileges as other religions. Out of this a culture of alternative thinking, living and healing has come to define Spiritualism in the last century. In ‘As Above/Is Below’ Amy-Grace Whalley observes Falmouth Central Spiritualist Church and archaic practice in its new age. “Our lives on this plane are in tandem with what awaits us when we have passed, they are in complete balance. As above, it is below” - Deval

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1 George Trudgeon President of the church and his wife Myrna await the congregation in the meeting room. As Myrna’s health improved the couple continued to attend the church three times a week, despite living 25 miles away, until eventually moving to Falmouth so that they could take a more committed role in church life. 2 William Deval’s portrait still hangs in the entrance of the church’s new premises on Quarry Hill. On Armistice Sunday in 1946 Deval took the church’s inaugural service, bringing together a congregation of 93 people who, up until this point, had no one to guide and help develop their spirituality. The church has operated an ‘all-welcome’ policy ever since. 3 The congregation place the names of loved ones who are in need of healing thought or have passed over. A name represents someone who is suffering, whereas an entry with a photograph symbolises a spirit. The photograph on this page is of Alan Trudgeon, son of George and Myrna who died aged just seven and a half in 1967.


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WASTELAND KIM HARRIS 1

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The aim of this project was to provide a photographic documentation of the community of St Dennis prior to the building of a waste incinerator. The incinerator is a waste disposal unit turning waste into energy; the company that is building this is STIA a French establishment. Although this project also considered waste disposal in general, due to the complex nature of waste disposal my focus was primarily on the impact this building would have on the people and the area, touching on social, economic and environmental issues. Retail analyst Victor Lebow articulated the situation that has become the norm for the whole system, “Enormously productive economy demands that we make consumption our way of life. That we convert the buying and use of goods into rituals, that we seek our spiritual satisfaction, our ego satiation, in consumption. We need things consumed, burned up and replaced and desired at an ever – accelerating rate”. Unfortunately there is not an easy way of dealing with waste and the only options are landfill or incineration. Landfill also causes a large amount of greenhouse gasses. Extraction, production, distribution, consumption and disposal make up what is called the ‘The Materials Economy’. This concept looks fine on paper as a linier effect. But we live in a finite planet, which means there are a lot of things missing from the format of consumption. Each of these steps is interacting with other things such as cultures, societies, the environment and the economy.

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1 The incinerator had planed to be built from 2006 but because of a lot of controversy there had been delays. In the town of St. Dennis a group formed called the ‘AntiIncinerator Group’. You will be able to see the incinerator from most places in St. Dennis. Behind the skate park is where the incinerator will be built when plans are approved. 2 Consumption comes with a price. How do many of these people consider their waste on a daily basis? Everything that normally ends up in landfills will be going to the incinerator, turning people’s consumption into energy. Therefore, becoming self sufficient, this will also create jobs. Mike believes it is better for the environment than landfills. What is a better solution? 3 The Incinerator was chosen for this area because of all of the resources that have been used there. Arguably, this village was chosen as it was thought that it had nothing left to offer because the mining industry had declined, leaving the population of the village in a poor socio-economic situation.


INHERIT THE WIND ANNEMARIE BALA The photographic project is a study of the China Clay area, in Cornwall, which is witnessing the fading power of the extraction industry of the British Clay. The images present the inherent connection between the residents and the landscape, and question the impact that the space has had on the people, their sense of identity and their consciousness. The story portrays the endeavours of individuals in the development of their communities that are faced with the uncertainties of the post-industrial era, and represents the global dilemma of the human values in the relationship between man and nature.

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1 Oliver Udy, photographed here in front of disused Town Hall in Nanpean. Oli is a full-time lecturer in photography at Plymouth University. 2 Nik Elvy community artist, photographed in St.Dennis. In the background the man-made hill called Pointy. 3 Mountains of aggregates from Littlejohns Clay Pit, the largest working clay pit in Britain. In the process of extracting Clay, for every ton of clay produced there will be 9 tones of residues, which are partly used as aggregates for other industry, like the construction industry.


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COUCH AVAILABLE MARY ROBINSON 1

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If you think of strangers as being friends you just haven’t met yet, and can open your mind to the idea of putting trust into someone you have never met, your life could be opened up to a whole host of new opportunities and experiences. These strangers, or new friends, are all a part of the couch surfing phenomenon that is sweeping over the world. There are currently over six million couch surfers across 100,000 cities in the world; being a part of the community allows participants to have and instant group of friends, local guides and a free place to stay in various places all over the world. In this increasingly consumer driven world, couch surfing is becoming a part of a new ‘sharing economy’ that is developing as a more sustainable way of life. Social collaboration in communities such as couch surfing is enabling connections between strangers, forming relationships, and encouraging sharing of culture and lifestyle, while travellers also benefit from free lodging. Mary Robinson has been meeting couch surfers for the last eight months, photographically exploring the diverse range of spaces that hosts offer as accommodation to couch surfers from across the world. Money never changes hands; hosts offer a space for travellers, expecting nothing in return but respect and a new friendship. Mary’s work visually documents some of the incredible people and places that are a part of the community. The phrase ‘Couch Available’ appears on host’s profiles to indicate that they are open for surfers to come and stay. The captions used are the couch surfers own description used on the website to explain what their space for surfers is.

1 ‘We have just revamped our old gypsy wagon for surfers to stay in, the bed pulls out to be a (smallish) double, bedding provided. We are currently making a space up on one of the fields, the ‘Shepard’s hut’ this will have space for two surfers also, although it might not be ready till summer 2013. Bathrooms are shared in the house, we live on a farm so animal friendly people only. I don’t smoke, but you can smoke outside.’ - Jane 2 ‘At term-time I live in a lovely 5 berth Swift Conqueror, thats pithched in Treliever Farm caravan park near Penryn, Cornwall. My friend Presiana has another caravan so if you would like to have a bit unusual couchsurfing experience you are very welcome to stay in one of our caravans. Its also possible to put up a tent or have a fire here :). Message at the end of April, building a handmade yurt for surfers.’ - Laima. 3 ‘You may have own room, but maybe have couch. pending on time of year i’ll be working a lot!! on my days i’ll cook for you or even cook together. If time will show you around and hang out hope can be good friends, my home will be yours. chill out,us Cornish re so layed back.’ - Shane


THE LAST WILDERNESS GREG DENNIS Ocean covers seventy percent of our planet, setting horizons and separating continents. As humans, we are not natural inhabitants of water, instead finding home in the safe arms of dry land. The ocean remains a vast wilderness, one of the few places on earth yet to be significantly altered by human activity. Most people in the UK spend very little time in or near the sea, often just wetting their toes a couple of times a year on a summer holiday. The majority don’t have close access to open water, and so using it remains an infrequent endeavour. Since moving to Cornwall, I have become fascinated by the variety of ways in which people on the coast harness the ocean for both work and leisure. It is a way of life that comes to define those that it lures. For some, the ocean is a passionate addiction that is never satisfied; for others, an un-worldly love that brings them back day after day. But however significant the relationship, for each of its disciples, the sea provides escapism; a duration of departure from the responsibilities of real life. This work is a celebration of those who escape to the last wilderness.

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1 Ian descends to watch the progress of one of his students turning on the sea floor. There is more to freediving than just holding your breath; Ian provides the tools that give access to a whole new world beneath the water’s surface. 2 When the tide goes out, Luke and his team head out onto the estuary to check the oysters and mussels. Young shellfish get planted, and shellfish of good size are collected to be processed. 3 Ian performs a routine service of the wave buoy every 6 months to check it is operating correctly. The buoy provides data in conjunction with the main wave device, which converts wave energy into electricity. They are positioned four miles off the coast of Falmouth to provide close access for monitoring and maintenance.


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UNDER THE VEIL EMMA GUSCOTT 1

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Every year in the UK 30,000 girls under the age of 15 are at risk of Female Genital Mutilation and it is estimated that 66,000 in the UK are living with the consequences of FGM. (NHS, 2012) This statistic remains even though the practice was outlawed in 1985 and in 2003 it was made illegal to take girls out of the country to have it performed elsewhere. The procedure involves the cutting or stitching of external female genitalia for non-medical reasons and is carried out for traditional purposes. It is believed that this will purify the woman and make her more desirable for marriage. Since 2003 Police have recorded over 200 reports from victims who fear they may be at risk, but to date in the UK not a single prosecution has been made. There is a changing attitude within practicing communities and the younger generation have initiated the main driving force of abolitionists, as they continue to be educated within a liberal society and recognise other female identities. ‘Under the veil’ documents a group of girls who are actively campaigning against FGM in association with the charity organisation Integrate Bristol. This non-profit organisation is one of the first institutes in the UK to support a number of young people arriving from other cultures, in speaking out against various forms of violence against women. The girls work together to produce contemporary media-based activities that have underpinning educational purposes. Integrate Bristol has provided a platform for young girls and women to discuss issues that are subjects of taboo in their cultures. ‘Under the veil’ voices the opinions of girls and women who are passionate about ending the practice, in the hope to ensure the safety of siblings, friends and innocent girls who may still be at risk of the traumatic procedure.

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1 Safia, 28. Amira, 7. Safia experienced an abusive childhood in Somalia and now lives with the consequences of FGM. Amira will soon turn eight, a common age for girls to be cut. “I won’t take my daughter to visit her family as I’m scared they will do it to her. I don’t want her to suffer the way I have”. 2 Faduma, 14. “My Aunt told me about FGM and she said if I didn’t get it done I was not pure, I would never get married and I’d be a shame to the community. I felt disgusting; I wanted to get it done so that I could live a normal life. I hated being compared to other girls my age”. 3 The group use the social media sites Facebook and Twitter as platforms to raise awareness about their campaign. They show their faces as confident young women who have built a strong organisation to support others. The girls take part in interviews for newspapers, radio shows and television to demonstrate how they are all actively trying to get their voices heard.


BOCIANCY KLAUDIA SOBOL 1

[botzi;ani] n. storks The stork is a bird which migrates seasonally. Polish immigrants are like storks, we love the country where we were born but economic difficulties make us flee, with the hope to return some day and make our nests in the familiar landscape again. Most of Polish immigrants feel torn between two places, missing home, family, deciding where to settle is an emotional journey. Many of us feel looked down on which makes it difficult to integrate with British society.

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1 Ania: Works as a Dentist Assistant. 2 A New Polish Arrival in Town. He is waiting for the room to become available. Temporarily sleeping in the living room. 3 Monika in Her House She is living with her partner’s family. In the middle picture of her Mother-in-law’s granddaughter who lives in Poland.


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GENDER IDENTITY DAISY ATKIN 1

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Gender-identity is something most people go their whole lives without thinking about or questioning. It is integral to our identities and often is the first aspect people notice about us. However for some people it is not that simple and they feel uncomfortable within the gender-identity set for them at birth. Some go their whole lives without ever acting on this, but many others choose to challenge societies views on the set gender binary of male or female. This project looks at transgender individuals, teasing out different identities within this umbrella, finding the similarities and differences between them, as well as looking at opinions around the subject.

1 Amber, Transvestite 2 Ben, Cross-Dresser 3 Tristan, Radical Trans Man


PHOTOGRAPHER’S BIOGRAPHIES


PHOTOGRAPHER’S BIOGRAPHIES

RORY MATTHEWS

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rorymatthews.co.uk @rorymatthews rorymatthews.tumblr.com

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www.victoriamayrickphotography.blogspot.co.uk

Vicki Mayrick is a photographer who specializes in the social documentary field of photojournalism. Her work revolves around social issues personal to both herself and the wider audience, creating images that are able to raise questions about social interest stories as well as answer them. By creating an intimate rapport with her subjects Vicki creates images that are personal and honest whilst being able to depict wider stories through her use of extended captions, which accompany her bodies of work. The majority of Vicki’s work is documented through the style of reportage photography, capturing situations, expressions and stories, as they appear in front of her enabling the true narrative of complex and interesting issues that she captures, to speak for themselves through her subjects.

AARON HARCOURT

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www.aaronharcourt.com

Aaron Harcourt was born and raised in Ontario, Canada. When he was eighteen he began studying and volunteering with University of the Nations and after a few years abroad discovered a ministry in Hawaii called, photogenX, which documented injustice using photography. After three years with photogenX, Aaron returned to Canada to intern with a commercial photographer in Toronto before coming to University Falmouth for BA(Hons) Press and Editorial Photography. While Aaron has been studying he has worked on such projects as, a long-term documentary about his sisters struggle with depression and substance abuse and the journey to recovery, the Melanchton Quarry in Ontario and alternative living as well as many other small works. Although his styles vary, Aaron’s real passion is documentary photography. In completing his education in 2013, he hopes to work with an agency that uses photography to capture current issues that face our world including environmental and social injustice.

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www.sirilmonteiro.com sirilwm@hotmail.com +44 (0) 7756159006 / +479926279

Rory Matthews (b.1992, Swaziland) is a documentary photographer based in the UK whose interests lie in producing in-depth photographic and written stories. Previous work has focussed on a diverse range of subjects, from British communal living to conservation efforts in Ethiopia, but has been united by a sincere interest in the variety of human experience. Soon to graduate, he looks forward to applying his great dedication to the medium to some of the varying opportunities available in the photographic industry.

VICTORIA LOUISE MAYRICK

SIRIL WIGEN MONTEIRO

Siril Monteiro has always had an interest in photography and got her first educational introduction to the medium through a three-year Media and Communication course at college level in Trondheim, Norway. Wanting the experience of working on a long-term project as well as doing something meaningful, she went to Ecuador to photograph children in an orphanage. The photographs were exhibited in five of the biggest cities in Norway as part of the charity project she created called Moments. Through this project she realized that her passion for photography was in humanitarian issues. Read more about the project at www.ecuador-moments.com. Through the degree at Falmouth University she has developed a strong interest in story telling through images. Her subjects are very important to her and she spends a lot of time building relationships with them. Her aim is to make photo stories that contribute to bring attention to issues that need noticing.

JOSIE WOODERSON

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www.cargocollective.com/josiewooderson josiewooderson@live.co.uk +44 (0) 7740 879 684 Josie Wooderson is determined to see an end to social injustice, and her work therefore is based on several human rights violations that she has become increasingly passionate about fighting. As a documentary photographer, she believes she has a part to play in raising awareness of such issues, using the skills that she has been developing as a photographer during the time of her degree in Falmouth to achieve this.

JOSHUA JAMES-CUNLIFFE

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www.joshuacunliffe.com @jjcunliffe www.josahucunliffe.com/blog Joshua Cunliffe didn’t grow up with an innate love for photography, and his passion wasn’t romantically born in a ritualistic passing of camera equipment between generations. It was sort of an accident, really, stumbling across the subject at A-Level in a frantic bid to replace a module that revolved around the alphabet. Quickly discovering an aptitude for the visual language, and fascinated by practitioners like Nick Brandt and Joel Sternfeld, he ventured to explore as many photographic genres as he could. Before moving on to study a degree in photography Falmouth University, Joshua had been awarded a small bursary through his College, and been commended at the Young Wildlife Photographer Awards. University changed his approach and style, immersing him in a world of narrative and giving his passion for photography a solid and meaningful direction. Now 21 and equipped with a fresh and ever developing approach, Joshua Cunliffe is pursuing a future in the Editorial And Documentary spheres.


SAMUEL GLAZEBROOK

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samuelglazebrook.com @samuelgphoto samuelglazebrook.tumblr.com

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www.jpofford.com @jpofford www.jpofford.tumblr.com Jean-Philippe Offord, originally from Cambridge, has just finished studying Press and Editorial Photography at Falmouth University. He is an aspiring photographer whose passion lies in documentary photography. He aims provide a distinctive style of imagery, which seeks to explore new and unique visual stories. Striving to embark on each project with a high level of commitment and a fresh approach, his creative expertise within the field demonstrates his enthusiasm for photography.

GEORGINA BROWN

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www.benjaminrutherford.com @BinRutherford www.benrutherford.tumblr.com

Samuel Glazebrook is a photographer who works hard to portray people, places and culture in an individual and honest way. Passionate about people and image making, he uses his camera as an excuse to meet people, as well as a tool to inquisitively engage with and document those who others may see as just another passer by. Samuel’s current work focuses on the circumference of Cornwall. Using his bicycle to travel, stopping off regularly to talk to people, make pictures and engage with the place he is travelling through. It’s a body of work that creates a sense of place while encapsulating the feeling of journey and wonder lust. This is a theme that will occur more consistently through his future work. His next move is moving to California for three months, and is currently in the process of planning new stories and trips to photograph there.

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BENJAMIN RUTHERFORD

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+44 (0) 7805 406 777

Benjamin Rutherford was born in Zimbabwe and grew up in numerous countries in Southern Africa where he focused his academic studies on Art. After completing his High School Education, he moved to the UK to attend University, after completing a foundation course in Lens based media he chose to study photojournalism. His work currently focuses on culture as well as socio-political issues with a focus on long term projects, one of which focuses on Zimbabwe, looking at the current challenges it faces as well as it’s past, including its relationship with its former colony, the United Kingdom. After winning the 2013 Ferdinand Zweig Award Grant, Benjamin is now preparing to use the grant to undertake a documentary on poaching in Zambia.

ALEX WALKER

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Agbwalker.com @agbwalker Alexander Walker was born in 1991 in London and is currently based in the United Kingdom. His interest in Photography changed from merely a hobby to a passion whilst living in New York in his early teens. Now working as a photojournalist, Alexander has photographed in a wide range of countries gaining a respectful understanding of their cultures and traditions, which he endeavours to incorporate in his work. Specialising in social documentary and reportage, along with corporate and editorial assignments, he firmly believes in the power of the image and its ability to convey great emotion and have a lasting impact.

ANDERS HAUGLAND PEDERSEN

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andershauglandpedersen@gmail.com +44 (0) 7845620287 Georgina Brown is an English photographer who focuses mainly on social documentary photography. Growing up in a large village in Berkshire, she began photographing within her local community at a young age taking portraits of neighbours and documenting local events. She then started photographing weddings of friends and family, this allowed her to gain knowledge and experience of working for clients. In 2008 Georgina travelled to Borneo on an expedition, this fuelled her desire to document other cultures and to share her experiences with the world. Georgina is currently studying Press and Editorial Photography BA at University College Falmouth.

Anders Haugland Pedersen is an inspiring documentary photographer working on long-term projects. His interest lies within capturing the unseen and indigenous cultures around the world through the camera lens. He started his path towards photojournalism when he attended the Pathshala Media Academy for a workshop in documentary photography in 2009, which brought him on to studying the field further. He will graduate with a Bachelor degree in photojournalism from Falmouth University in 2013, and will continue working on his projects while studying further. His projects have taken him around the world documenting different cultures and communities, and he is currently finishing a long-term photographic documentary on the Amish Mennonite sect in Ireland.


THOMAS PORTER

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tomporter92@gmail.com www.tom-porter.tumblr.com

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www.katievictoriaphotography.tumblr.com @katievmoss

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www.niahafphotography.wordpress.com

Photography has always been a part of Nia Haf’s life. Growing up she spent hours watching her father printing in the home darkroom and believed that it was magic making those images appear. Now at twenty-one years old Nia specializes in social documentary photography and the magic of the medium, for her, is still alive. Nia often works in a reportage style, using monochrome images shot in a compositionally traditional manner. Building a relationship with the subject is important to her and long term projects allow her to become intimate with the photographed, resulting in personal in depth portrayals of individuals and communities. It is not only the practical element of photography that interests Nia, she also explores the past, present and future of the medium through short essays which can be found on her blog.

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Igor Trepeshchenok is a photographer from Latvia who through his work poses questions about culture, identity and politics. Over the last few years Igor has worked on producing stories about people and places that face problems introduced by global processes: Latvian working immigrants in the UK; non-citizen issue in Latvia; and deindustrialisation and deprivation in both Cornwall and Latvia. Igor Trepeshchenok has a degree in Press & Editorial Photography from the Falmouth University and he has been a two time participant of The International Summer School of Photography (ISSP). Igor’s work has been featured in several group exhibition in Latvia, England, Russia and Georgia. In the future Igor plans to return to Latvia and work as a freelance photographer and reporter, covering stories from the Baltic Region.

INDIA WHILEY-MORTON

Katie Moss was born and raised in Lymm, Cheshire, she owned her first camera at the age of 5 and since then has found it very difficult to go without one. Her father also a working photographer inspired her to pursue photography from a young age. In 2008 she went to a Priestley college where she was able to study photography, and learn how to use photoshop at a higher level. In 2010 she was offered an unconditional place at Falmouth University where she is currently in her third year of practice. When she came to Falmouth, she knew that this was the place for her. She works best as an Editorial photographer, and enjoys the quick pace that comes with the photographic industry. She is currently represented by the Cartel. In the future Katie plans to continue working within the photographic industry, She wishes to become a stills photographer working on Tv and Film sets. Here she will be able to use the skill sets that she has acquired within her three-year study period at Falmouth.

NIA HAF COLLIER

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www.trepeshchenok.com

Tom Porter is a UK based documentary and editorial photographer. He grew up in Crewe, Cheshire and developed an interest in photography within high school that led him to attend South Cheshire Collage studying for a National Diploma in photography. Within these initial two years of study Tom naturally began working within a documentary and editorial manner, pursuing his passion for photography Tom furthered his study and explored his practice studying Press and Editorial Photography at Falmouth University. Tom’s work has focused on a diverse range of subjects that share one common thread that is people.

KATIE MOSS

IGOR TREPESHCHENOK

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www.indiawhileymorton.com indiawm@gmail.com +44 (0) 7841997780 India Whiley-Morton is a photographer with a desire to create images that reflect personal passions and interests. Her love for photography began at the age of four, when her dad turned the family’s downstairs bathroom into a darkroom. For the last three years she has lived between London and Cornwall, studying Press and Editorial Photography at Falmouth University. These contrasting locations have built up for a diverse portfolio focusing on music, surf, and the documentation of people. Working with those who create, inspire and pursue their own individual passions is something that fuels her work.

HAMISH ROBERTS

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www.cargocollective.com/hamishroberts hamishwroberts@gmail.com Hamish Roberts was born in the London in 1990. His real passion for photography grew when he spent a year travelling around Africa, India and Thailand when he was 18 and since then his camera has gone everywhere with him. Africa remains his first love and he intends to spend more time there in the future. Hamish is soon to graduate from Falmouth University with a BA(Hons) in Press and Editorial Photography. Whilst at Falmouth he has specialised in documentary, portraiture and fashion photography and he has a growing interest in developing short multimedia pieces telling personal stories, particularly about people with disability. Hamish is profoundly deaf, something he sees as being very helpful in his ability to portray people in visual media.


SARAH HOLLIDAY

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Sarahholliday.wix.com/sarahhollidayphotography Sarahrebeccaholliday.tumblr.com

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www.lucypiperphotography.com @lucykatepiper www.lucypiperphotography.tumblr.com Lucy Piper is a young freelance photographer specialising in documentary, portraiture and events. She is soon to graduate from Falmouth University, Cornwall, and is based in the South-West of England. She has done placements at leading photo agency, Rex Features, as well as at international newspaper, The Los Angeles Times. She hopes to work as a staff photographer for a magazine or newspaper following her studies.

AMY-GRACE WHALLEY

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@kimjaneharris www.kimberleyharrisphotography.com

Sarah Holliday is a passionate fashion and social documentary photographer. Having gained experience photographing for a county newspaper, interning at Rex features London photo agency and More! Magazine, she has now had a broad field of work published, including commission work for a nude calendar and publications for the NHS and a world renowned sports magazine. She has currently picture edited for London based magazine, CUB. People and faces are what drive her to create interesting imagery, whether it’s telling a story about a person through documentary or showing off a person’s beauty through fashion; people are her main inspiration. Sarah primarily photographs on-location documentary style fashion and enjoys working with colour film. In the future she wishes to inject the latest fashion magazines with a new style of photography that will introduce a documentary take on modelling and fashion.

LUCY KATE PIPER

KIMBERLEY HARRIS

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amy-grace@agwhalley.com

Amy-Grace Whalley is currently based in the South West. Having gained experience at a local newspaper and as a campaign photographer, her reportage and documentary style reflects a keen focus on social and political concerns. Amy-Grace’s interests lie in picture editing and curation and her own work has been published in both regional and national newspapers in the UK, as well as written work in an academic journal. On completing her degree in 2013, she hopes to use knowledge learnt working alongside professionals at agencies Rex Features Ltd., Cartel Photos and the gallery FishBar, to bring the contemporary issues raised by photojournalism to a wider audience.

Kimberley Harris has completed a six-month internship with Greenpeace International in Amsterdam and a fiveweek internship with Rex Features in London. Along with completing her degree, She also volunteers several hours a week with a charity, Beyond Violence, to help in their social media department and creating multimedias. Kimberley’s interest in world matters has lead her to have an appetite to photograph environmental and humanity issues.

ANNEMARIE BALA

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www.chinaclaycountry.tumblr.com @AnnemarieBala Annemarie Bala was born in Bacau, Romania. At 16, she moved to Italy where she studied to work in the tourism industry. Her passions always have been sociology and psychology which led her to be inquisitive about local and global events and stories that influenced her life and of others around her. After of a few years of work in the tourism industry, she questioned the impact of her work on the places she was selling holidays for. She wanted to learn new skills in order to describe these feelings and questions to a larger audience, and to feel a sense of connection with the life she was leading. Therefore, after a period of investigation and discoveries, she decided to undertake a degree course which brought her to University College Falmouth, in Cornwall. At the end of this course she sees new perspectives of personal and professional development in the world of social-communication and art, where photography plays an important role.

MARY ROBINSON

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www.marygrobinson.co.uk

Mary Robinson was born in Oxford and grew up in the UK. She is a passionate advocator of image driven work, specialising in documentary and editorial photography. Her work and interests revolve around social, environmental and political issues. Having opportunities to travel since a young age has fuelled her desire to explore different cultures and countries, with a passion for people and story telling, she photographically documents stories and landscapes that she finds. For the last three years Mary has been studying for a BA(hons) in Press and Editorial Photography at Falmouth University. Mary is planning a yearlong trip to South America in 2014 to continue creating photo essays abroad.


GREG DENNIS

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gregdennis.co.uk @iamgregdennis blog.gregdennis.co.uk

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emmaguscott.com @EGuscott emmaguscott.tumblr.com Emma Guscott grew up in Devon and has continued to study in the South West since leaving school. Documenting aspects of rural communities has inspired her previous work. Emma’s enthusiasm and respect towards her subjects has allowed her to work closely with small communities and documenting embedded British cultures. Emma is competent with using a variety of photographic mediums, and spent many years experimenting with film cameras and developing her images using traditional methods. This technique enhanced the authenticity of Emma’s work and often brings a feeling of nostalgia for her audience. After graduating Emma hopes to progress within in the industry by moving to London and continuing to work with practicing professionals. Emma is keen to learn and is motivated to heighten her knowledge through practical experience.

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www.klaudiasobol.com www.klaudiasobol.tumblr.com

Greg Dennis loves telling stories. Having grown up in the land-locked county of Wiltshire, Greg found home when he moved to the coast in Cornwall to study Press and Editorial Photography at Falmouth University. Since living in Falmouth, the ocean has become a large part of his life, and he makes the most of living by it, everyday. Greg’s photographic work is inspired by his attraction to the water, and his latest project focuses on people who’s lives are defined by their relationship with the ocean, whether that be for work or pleasure. By spending extensive time with these people, he aims to learn how the ocean has woven itself into different areas of their lives.
Greg loves taking photos because he gets to meet extraordinary people who, if it were not for photographing them, he would have never had the opportunity to meet.

EMMA GUSCOTT

KLAUDIA SOBOL

Klaudia Sobol is a mature student from a Polish town called Kapacz, similar in size Falmouth. She hesitated when starting a higher education abroad because of language barriers, but a short Art, Design and Media course in Newcastle-under-Lyme gave her confidence and clarified she wanted to focus on becoming a professional photographer. This passion lead to her arrival at Falmouth’s Press and Editorial Photography course. She is also interested in writing and painting, and after finishing her degree she may well continue her education with a journalism master degree. Her biggest concerns include environmental issues, as well and giving a voice to minorities.

DAISY ATKIN

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www.daisyatkinphotography.co.uk www.daisyatkinphotography.tumblr.com Daisy Atkin is a young photographer based between Cornwall and Dorset whose strengths lie in portrait and documentary photography. She is about to graduate from the BA(Hons) Press and Editorial Photography at Falmouth University, Daisy’s experiences and portfolio continue to expand with the opportunities offered. After university she is looking into freelance work before travelling in order to expand her experiences and portfolio.


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WE SEE A GREAT DEAL OF THE WORLD


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IT IS OUR OBLIGATION TO PASS IT ON TO OTHERS MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE American Photographer and Documentary Photographer 1904–1971


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