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ISSUE 1 :: SUMMER 2020

THE BRAND NEW ARTP IX MAGAZINE PAYS TRIBU TE TO A CLASSIC

MATTARTPIX.COM


ISSUE 1 :: SUMMER 2020

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Created by Matt ArtPix

? N E H T S I H T what's all

agazine! m n w o y r e My v ts, all with c je b u s f o re ed nd a mixtu fi l ’l u at’s featur o h y w e f o t s Insid o !M artworks ged theme n in t w o e g y a t m h in av , wit collections n w o y m k for sale. c o t s is from y m f eo s and som o t o h p d n a agazine m a s a s r a ye t, d for many e k r o d to Dorse w e g v o m e Havin c sin all ndon, I've o L in Combining r . e r n e d a r t desig e ag e as a vint ogether. t im t e ll in z u f a g g a m goin I’ve put this , e c n ie r e that exp

do ... a r e h t r u f So without

MATTARTPIX.COM


0 2 0 2 R E M M : U : S 1 E U ISS what's in it?

PAGES 4 -11 // FAVE VINTAGE MAGS –PICTURE POST PAGES 12 & 13 // FOR SALE –BEN CHAIRS

–MAN UTD PAGES 14-17 // RETRO FOOTBALL PAGES 18-25 // MUSIC –LOUIS ARMSTRONG

VIOLA DANA PAGES 26 & 27 // PICK A CARD! – PAGES 28 & 29 // MEDALS –LIFE SAVING MEDAL PAGES 30-35 // CLASSIC MOVIES –CITIZEN KANE

SK CALENDAR DE – VÉ OU TR T JE // OB 37 & 36 S PAGE TO – ATOMIUM O H P X I P T R // A 9 3 PAGES 38 & PAGES 40 & 41 // ARTPIX AR TWORK –GRETA GARBAGE PAGES 42 & 43 // WHERE TO FIND ME –CUSTOMS HOUSE COMICS PAGE 44 // COLLECTORS’ CORNER –

. . . E T A D P U NEWS

N ABLE TO E E B ’T N E V A H US I DUE TO THE VIR ONG TIME. L A R O F S T E K GE MAR DO ANY VINTA NY NEWS ON A H IT W E T A -D O BUT KEEP UP-T WEBSITE! D N A E G A P K O BO MY BLOG, FACE

NOW HAVE A PEEP! 3


Read all about my favourite vintage magazine ...

PICTURE PICTURE

Post Post ND A E V I T A NOV N I T S O SM TIME S T I F O BRITAIN’ E N I Z A G A M STYLISH

IT LED T PHOT HE WAY I N OJOU RNAL AND R ISM EALIS M

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ORY T S E H T FOLLOW IQUE N U S I H T OF ED T R A T S , E MAGAZIN N A I R A G N U BY THE H ANT R O L N A F STE


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PICTURE POST WAS THE BRAINCHILD OF THE DYNAMIC HUNGARIAN PHOTOJOURNALIST AND FILMMAKER STEFAN LORANT.

y July, he was on his way, having convinced Edward Hulton, owner of the newly-formed Hulton Press, to back him. The new maga zine would be picture-led, with a bold, politically aware and compassionate approach. He pinpointed areas no other titles covered, primarily the 'everyday person', and wanted specifically to talk about subjects that would spark debate amongst those who would read it. Lorant assembled a team of experienced journalists to begin this venture, and also recruited two German photographers, Hans Baumann and Kurt Hubschmann, who went under the guises of Felix H. Man and Kurt Hutton. As editor Lorant used all his substantial creative powers to choose the right photos and stories, and then come up with inventive rough layouts for his team to get working on. Tom Hopkinson, his assistant editor, would assign the writing duties, and often on Lorant's command, would commission some of the best-known authors and thinkers around to write articles for the maga zine. J.B Priestley, H.G. Wells and Jerome K. Jerome all wrote for them.

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se fresh The cover design also reflected the full-bleed ideas, with a single, dramatic minimal, photograph catching the eye, and panel at uncluttered text condensed in a red the bottom of the page. y tucked The Picture Post logo was also neatl ich away in another red panel, all of wh aim: achieved the one simple, but clear

TO MAKE IT ! T U O D N A ST

effective This wonderful design still looks pact, yet today, giving the photograph full im l popping with the easily recognisable logo stil out at you. a small I love the way that on some covers a person's fraction of the photo, like the top of o. A neat head, is nudged in front of the log signs. trick, still being used on modern de ly big and The maga zine also felt satisfying ges and heavy, with often over 80 pa ep x 26cm measuring an impressive 35cm de ney). wide, (that's 14 x 10 inches in old mo

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dent Despite this seemingly confi med attitude, their beginnings were for under a cloud of apprehension. , the 1938 was a year of great uncertainty g ever situation in Europe was growin re and darker, and war was looking mo time more likely. It didn't feel like a good this. to start an expensive venture like spirits Even as the first issue went to press they were low, wondering how many would would sell, and whether anyone actually be interested. psed Incredibly, only four months had ela d the between Lorant's initial idea, an er 1st, first issue being printed on Octob shops but there was still reluctance from to stock it.

THEN THE ASTONISHING NEWS CAME THROUGH ...

SOLD OUT!

ning Lorant had obviously hit upon a win ... two formula ... and it didn't stop there million months later they were selling one 00 by copies a week, going up to 1,350,0 ed at the following February. They peak around 1.9 million. 8

The public had really taken to thi s new maga zine, with its strident outlook and perfectly captured tone. The photo essays could be about anything and everything, a windo w into the world of everyday people in an y walk of life. They presented the wo rking classes as never before, with dig nity and without ever being condescen ding or patronising. At the time, these photographic stories were often the only way to see how people lived their lives in differen t parts of the country, let alone all aro und the world. The maga zine had a huge social conscience and, despite outwardly trying not to take any particular po litical stance, naturally leant to the left. It was never afraid to question autho rity, and always with the thought of cre ating debate of important topics at its cor e. Intelligent articles, still often writte n by well-known names, strengthened the feel that this was a stand-alone maga zine. The readers themselves added to that, with the letters pages frequ ently containing interesting and lively op inions and ideas.


HOWEVER, THE MAGAZINE WAS ABOUT TO FACE ITS STERNEST TES T YET.

The inevitable war started in September 1939, with Picture Post not even a year old. It took the responsibility in its stride though, quickly realising people would turn to the magazine for photos and information, perhaps not forthcoming from official sources. It provided balanced and insightful thought, plus photo stories of the reality of what was starting to happen. But when they saw fit, they would still question and probe the performance and conduct of those in charge.

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THE EVEN WORSE WAS TO FOLLOW, AS MAN TWO GERMAN PHOTOGRAPHERS, THE AND HUTTON, WERE INTERNED ON THE ISLE OF MAN AS 'ENEMY ALIENS'. HITTING HARSH REALITIES OF WAR WERE THE OFFICES OF THE MAGAZINE.

pped in Assistant editor Tom Hopkinson ste n realised to take the role of editor, and soo as many he only had a full-time staff of five, were now in the services. of canny He pulled together a fresh group steadied and experienced old hands and the ship. ga zine He was determined to ma ke the ma unit, with an efficient and modern working d most the best writers and designers, an the best far-reaching and prophetic of all, picture library ever seen.

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best They already had some of the Bert photographers around, including took Hardy and Bill Brandt, who both red many iconic images of Blitz-batte London. the Hopkinson would go on to edit maga zine for the next ten years. of Despite the obvious restrictions ation travelling abroad, getting inform zine and censorship issues, the maga even carried on as confidently as before, ally when paper rationing had eventu s. reduced it to just twenty-eight page


By the early 1950s, they now had striking full-colour covers, with more cover text than before, bringing them in line with a more modern style. That familiar red and white logo still resolutely stayed the same throughout, though! But despite this bright new era, sales started to dip. The mass availability of television began to change people's tastes, advertisers were drifting away, and Picture Post 's around-the-world photojournalism could now readily be seen on the small screen. The magazine, however, still seemed a relevant and viable proposition, but other factors had crept in to advance its gradual decline. Successive new editors never stayed long enough to stamp their mark, and over time the magazine fell into the lethal trap of losing the confidence of its loyal readership, the death knell of any publication. It had become confused as to what it stood for, with a changing of values and style. Readers must have lost heart as they saw the magazine losing its moral compass.

Y THEY RATHER POETICALL TO OF THE REPEATED THE PHO USED ON TWO FLYING WOMEN R, SOME ITS VERY FIRST COVE RLIER. NINETEEN YEARS EA NCEIVABLE IT DOES SEEM INCO E TO THAT IT WASN'T ABL GACY IS SURVIVE, BUT ITS LE SIVE ONE. A LONG AND IMPRES

It led the way in how to present photos, people and places in a stimulating and stylish way, laying the foundations for a host of Sunday supplement magazines thereafter.

As envisaged by Hopkinson, Edward Hulton set up an archive to store the vast collection of photographs accumulated by the magazine. This became the Hulton Press Library, and was the biggest and best-known photo library in the industry. It still survives today, after various changes, as the Hulton Archive, having been bought by Getty Images in 1996. Also, people kept their Picture Posts, not just the inevitable Coronation issues with the Queen in 1953, but all their copies. They became a social history of an incredible period in time. Ordinary people's lives were held up to be extraordinary in this magazine. An everyday scene would be placed next to a head of state, film star, or fashion model.

D THAT EQUALITY AN LED NEUTRALITY APPEA TO EVERYONE.

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One of the many items I have for sale in the ArtPix Storeroom are these Ben Chairs, which have become an essential part of the Mid-Century scene.

BEN C 12


ID CENTURY JOY

1964

The iconic chairs, with the unmistakeable curved arms, were made in the Somerset town of Frome. I have FOUR of them, made in 1964, for sale. Get in touch if you would like them!

CHAIRS 13


i n united 1968 the fir became club t st english o win t europe he a n cup disaster ir a h ic n u ragic M After the t ger Matt a n a m d e it to bring d e in 1958, Un t n a w s alway for the Busby had p u C n a e Europ home the porters. p u s s t i d club an with the d n a , n o s eemed s y Ten year n i t s e d embley, final at W d Devils. e R e h t h t to be wi st was e B e g r o e tic G The majes ers, and w o p is h f ht o at the heig uld once o w n o lt r a stadium, s u Bobby Ch o m a f e at the again shin rld Cup o W e h t n wo where he'd rs earlier. a e y o w t only

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ORIGINAL MATCH PROGRAMM

E


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Having negotiated the Maltese side Hibernians and Sarajevo in the first two rounds, United narrowly beat Gรณrnick Zabrze 2-1 on aggregate in the Quarter-finals, after losing the away leg 0-1. This set up an epic Semi-final with Real Madrid, and after a 1-0 win at Old Trafford in the 1st leg, they fought to a 3-3 draw in the return leg in Spain to set up the Final with Benfica.

MAN Utd V benfica wednesday 29 MAY 1968 WEMBLEY STADIUM ATTENDANCE: 92,225 FINAL SCORE after extra time:

man utd 4 benfica 1 GOALSCORERs: bobby Charlton 53, 99 George best 92 brian kidd 94

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TEAM 1 alex stepney 2 shay brennan 3 tony dunne 4 Pat crerand 5 bill foulkes 6 nobby stilES 7 george best 8 brian kidd 9 bobby charlton 10 david sadler 11 john aston SUSTITUTE: 12 jimmy rimmer MANAGER: matt busby


t u o k c Che an Utd THE Mllage co ow! bel

I DO A WHOLE RA NGE OF RE TRO FOOTBALL DESIG NS OF ALL DIFFE RENT TEAMS AND PLAY ERS. YOU CAN SE E THEM ALL ON MY WEBSITE!

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MUSIC

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a tribute to the great jazz musician 21


August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971 Born in New Orleans in Louisiana. Nicknamed Satchmo, but was also known as Satch, and Pops. Recognised as one of the most influential all-time giants of jazz. Adept as a trumpet and cornet player, vocalist and composer. Accomplished actor, appearing in many films. Famed for his rich, gravelly voice and sense of humour. Attributed to help starting the 'scat' style of wordless singing.

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o


ouis Daniel Armstrong

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Started playing in bands around 1917, including later in a riverboat band on the Mississippi. Big break joining King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band in Chicago, 1922. Started making records as a solo artist in 1925. Now touring USA regularly. Fame grew further in 1930s with radio and film appearances. Toured Europe for first time, including the UK in 1932 and 1933. In 1947 formed Louis Armstrong and His All Stars. Appearance on one of first USA TV broadcasts in 1948. Featured on Time magazine cover 1949. Became major star throughout the 1950s, with string of hits, and dueting with big hitters like Ella Fitzgerald. Extensive world tour in 1952. In 1956 plays to 100,000 people at concert in Ghana. Also that year appears in High Society movie with Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly. Huge tour of Africa 1960-1963. In 1964 knocks the Beatles off Number 1 slot with Hello Dolly. Another Number 1 with What a Wonderful World. Recorded theme tune for 1969 James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service. 1970 Newport Jazz Festival presents tribute to Louis. Plays and tours right to the last in 1971. 24


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Collecting cigarette cards has the wonderful name of

CARTOPHILY!

First used as marketing gimmicks, given away in packets, to hook you into keep buying the brand to complete a set. Soon they became a whole mini-world of information and illustrations.

This card features the American silent movie actress VIOLA DANA. Starting on stage and in vaudeville, she went on to appear in over 100 films between 1910 and 1933. 26


CINEMA CELEBRITIES SERIES SET OF 25 N0. 24 – VIOLA DANA PRODUCED BY W. SANDORIDES & Co. LTD WITH LUCANA CIGARETTES ISSUED IN 1924 27


M E DA LS Presented by the charity organisation for proficiency in all forms of safety and saving lives on water.

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p in 1891 u t e s s a w ty ie c o The S venting re p f o im a e th h wit medals were drowning. These 1892. first given out in ere is the h n w o h s le p m a x The e e original th f o n io rs e v h rt fou warded to a s a w d n a , n ig s de ruary 1930, b e F in s rp o C . .B J e necessary having passed th pable of tests to prove ca ater. saving lives on w

The Latin inscription on the reverse of the medal reads QUEMCUNQUE MISEUM VIDERIS HOMINEM SCIAS, which translates to WHOSOEVER YOU SEE IN DISTRESS, RECOGNISE HIM AS A FELLOW MAN. 29


TIC A M D E IN RE C ’S ATU S E LL E FE G, E C W IN D R N O S, M O EF N L E I S OR R D IVE F ING A NIQU U AT IT ECH US O D T V E T , O O G G N M N N N R I I I T ELL O G H N G E LI YT AN BEIN . R Y STO VING TILL ODA S T LEA ACY CED LEG EREN F RE

CITIZ EN K This Classic Movies feature is all about highlighting some of cinema,s most influential, breathtaking and quirky films. So where better to start than this 1941 masterpiece ...

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CITIZEN KANE IS THE LIFE STORY OF M


KAN E

MEGALOMANIAC CHARLES FOSTER KANE 31


NE A K H T I W TS R A T S M G L I N I H C T THE F U L C ED, B H T A E D RE O F ON HIS E B , E B GLO W O N S ... Y D R A TO O W L INA F S I H G N I UTTER ROSEBUD We move to a meeting of newsreel journalists trying to piece together a film of his life but struggling to find an angle. Puzzled by his strange last word, a reporter is sent to interview several of the protagonists in his life story to find that missing piece of the jigsaw. The film then jumps back and forth tieing together the life of Charles Foster Kane. As a five-year-old he inherits a fortune from a goldmine left to him in a will. However, his luck is double-edged, as his mother sends him away, under the guardianship of a banker, to gain an education. The pain of that memory never leaves him. When he reaches 25, the time arrives to access the trust fund money, and instead of idling his life away, he resolves to 'do something'. 32

THIS DECISION LEADS ON TO HIS EXTRAORD INARY LIFE ...


He buys an ailing newspaper, the New York Inquirer, and turns the dusty old place into a no holds barred, headlinegrabbing scandal sheet. Sales skyrocket and his passion and drive for the job bring him success upon success, but also enemies. Trusted colleagues also begin to have their doubts.

To console his reputation and status he marries Emily Norton, a niece of the President, but fatally embarks on an affair with a singer that changes the whole course of his life. Fuelled and emboldened by his unparalled power, he elects to run for Governor of New York, and it seems to be a matter of routine that he will cruise to victory.

Welles' inspiration for Kane was presumed to be the newspaper magnet William Hearst, and his actress wife Marion Davies. Hearst's crazy Xanadu-style palace, and the lifestyles of them both, are brilliantly captured in a chapter in David Niven's superb book, Bring on the Empty Horses. 33


However, his affair with Susan Alexander is exposed by a political rival, wrecking his chances, and unravelling his political career. With his judgement beginning to waver, he embarks on an excrutiating endeavour to propel the opera-singing career of Susan, by now his second wife. Proving to be out of her depth on Broadway, she becomes a laughing stock, tainting his reputation further. Battered by life, and the relationship with his wife strained even further after her suicide attempt, they retreat to his purpose-built palace Xanadu.

This enormous and extravagant folly starts to become a prison, strangling the life out of them both. Kane has filled it with his huge collection of priceless antiques and artworks, but the trappings of success aren't enough to fill the void. The final straw is when Susan leaves him, and he smashes her bedroom to pieces in frustration, until finding the snowglobe in a corner of the room. He takes it and forlornly trudges away, to be left alone to contemplate his long life and his childhood memories.

ORSON WELLES

Welles was an extraordinary character. As an actor, writer, producer and director, he was already heavily involved in theatre and radio by his early 20s, before his film career had even started.

At the Mercury Theatre he combined the two for his infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938, which led to national fame and notoriety. The RKO Radio film company duly snapped him up, and set him on his maverick filmmaking way.

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It's incredible to realise Citizen Kane was his first movie, such is the boldness and craft it exudes. His career remains an enigma though, never truly accepted by Hollywood, he trod his own path throughout, but produced a high-quality and varied body of work.


CITIZEN KANE WAS NOMINATED FOR NINE ACADEMY AWARDS BUT ONLY WON ONE OSCAR, FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

CITIZEN KANE IS AL SO A TECHNOLOGICAL M ARVEL, ONE OF THOSE FILM S WHERE ALMOST EV ERY FRAME IS AN ARTW ORK.

This is where Welles excelled. Bringing in skilled camera people like Gregg Toland, he was able to master techniques of the wide-angle lens, and the new trick for the time of deep focus lenses, where everything in shot remained in focus. Also, to create an unusually-angled frame for one scene, he even had a hole cut in the studio floor (as pictured) to get an on-the-floor viewpoint.

© All Citizen Kane film stills are taken from www.imdb.com

FILM FACT

His use of lighting, sound, music and narration were bold and unheard of at the time. His influence on the late 40s Noir films is clear, but it is that unrestricted style of filmmaking, where all ideas are included, which is still a benchmark for innovative filmmakers today. It is widely regarded as the greatest film of all time, and there is absolutely no reason to doubt that.

! M L I F E H T H C T A W ? UD B E S O R S WHAT WA 35


Objet trouvé translates to

‘FOUND OBJECT ’

3 9 1 h c n n e e l r a F C k s e D

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s 0 3 ar d n e

This object was found at a fantastic brocante market in the village of St Germain de l’Herm, in the Auvergne region of France. It has pride of place on the mantelpiece at ArtPix Towers, and serves as a handy way to remember the French days and months! Just imagine what significant days this calendar has seen. For instance, in 1944 it would have sat on a desk somewhere in France, when one morning its owner turned the dials to

MARDI 6 JUIN ... little knowing what was happening elsewhere in the country.

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Th i bu s i f Th lt f ant e or ast sh 1 ic th 95 o of wca 8 B e E s ru xpo stru th ed At ct 58 th sse e om ur l e iu e s At e x s m h c w as omic ien Wor ibi ti ld’ tio as th f a s e n ce ge, ic w Fa . nt i on w re de r pi ith rs ec e. the

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X I TP

ARTWORK AR

Here’s one of my own digital collage artworks!

Greta Garb age

Silver s legend creen G r as you’ eta Garbo, v seen he e never r befor e!

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The radio I used is an ArtPix Family heirloom, having been bought by my parents in 1962!


e

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. . . E M D N I F O T E R E WH

the customs house west bay, dorset

I SELL A RANG E MY OWN DES OF IGNS, AN D A MIX O F ALL SORTS O F VI NTAGE STUF F!

@Customs_HouseWB 42

/CustomsHouseWB


AND...

HAVE A LOOK AT MY WEBSITE AND BLOG!

MATTARTPIX.COM , On here you ll find a massive selection of my digital artworks, photos, retro designs and vintage stock. Have a flick through all the galleries! And also check out the News page for updates on markets and fairs.

MATTARTPIX.BLOGSPOT.COM My blog will tell you the latest news of any vintage markets, showcase any new artworks or stock. I also write on any subject I fancy, but usually with a vintage theme attached!

You can also find me on Facebook ... @MattArtPix

ISSUE 2 of WILL BE OUT IN AUTUMN 2020 KEEP AN EYE OUT ON MY WEBSITE AN D BLOG FOR MORE NEWS! ARTPIX Magazine Issue 1: Summer 2020. Editor, Designer, Photographer & Picture Researcher: Matt ArtPix! Proofreader: Carya Gish. Many thanks to Carya of Arcane Publishing for her help and support on this project. Please check out her websites: www.missgish.com and www.arcanepublishing.net LEGAL GUBBINS ETC. All designs, photographs and text are the property of me, Matt ArtPix. Anyone wishing to use anything for any purpose, would you be kind enough to ask first please. Thank you! Unless credited, all vintage images in this magazine are from original items and realia from my own collections. If any copyright issues have been infringed, please let me know, and I’ll happily rectify this with a proper credit, or delete the image if necessary. Although connected to my ArtPix business, this magazine is a completely free and a not-for-profit enterprise.

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1970S and 80s comics

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ArtPix Magazine Issue 1  

Vintage-themed magazine by Matt ArtPix, with articles and features including music, classic movies, retro football, plus photos and digital...

ArtPix Magazine Issue 1  

Vintage-themed magazine by Matt ArtPix, with articles and features including music, classic movies, retro football, plus photos and digital...

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