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R O T I S I V Y R E L L I T DIS  E C N E I R E P EX PART 4

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ALY N A & S C ETRI

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A visitors program is an expense. To ensure you’re getting a return requires determining explicit objectives, measuring them, and then taking corrective or enhancement action on those measurements. Remember that for a visitors program, the product is delivery of a quality guest experience that accomplishes specific business objectives (from Part III). An experience is a series of engaging and educational moments which tells your brand story and builds to a conclusion which encourages the participants to take action (from Part II). Arguably the most important component of a guest experience, the tasting closes the visit and is often the best moment to convert the visit into a sale or generate other business value (from Part I). Just like a distillery manufactures spirits, a visitors program exists to manufacture guest actions. The difficulties of measuring and analyzing the success of a visitor program stems from the soft nature of actions and the complexities of capturing them in a reportable format. But there are techniques that can be used to determine the level of success and course-correct as needed.

OKR BASICS

WHAT’S VALUABLE TO MEASURE

OKR stands for ‘Objectives and Key Results.’ The alwayshelpful Wikipedia defines OKR as: “a framework of defining and tracking objectives and their outcomes. Fundamentally, OKRs answer the two questions “What do we want to achieve?” and “Did we achieve those things?” The specifics of both of those questions and their answers must be recorded in order to be analyzed. It’s very easy to skip the hard work of that step, but it’s also very easy to spend money with no return on a visitors program — and possibly not even know that’s happening.

So what are the actions you want visitors to take? Those are the foundation of your metrics.

WHAT CAN’T BE MEASURED The most common justification for having a visitors program is “raising brand awareness.” And while there are techniques for measuring that metric at regional, national or global scales, it’s a futile effort to try to directly determine how much a visitors program is impacting the brand at that level. It’s a safe assumption that if you’re accomplishing the other more easily measured metrics outlined below that awareness of your brand will rise as a direct result.

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Here’s a common list:

» Visitor counts Be sure to compare like days — ­ days of the week, holidays, local events, etc. cause drops and spikes.

» Bottle sales Bottle sales per visitor is the most useful metric. For example, do you sell 1 bottle per 10 visitors, or 1 per 50? While visitor count is a difficult metric to move — especially for your visitors center staff — bottle sales per visitor is a metric that you and they can take action to increase.

» Non-alcohol merchandise, especially branded merchandise Again, per visitor is the most useful number here.

» Socials: • Yelp and other public reviews • Sign ups for your e-newsletter and social media follows • Correctly tagged social media posts from at your distillery

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Artisan Spirit: Winter 2017  
Artisan Spirit: Winter 2017  

The magazine for craft distillers and their fans.