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ART

H A B E N S C o n t e m p o r a r y

A r t

R e v i e w

ASIA DJIBIROVA VICTORIA CASILLAS DAMIAN HORST ELIZABETH ODIORNE DARIA TYURINA JOANNA VANDER VLUGT FLORA ORSOLYA HARTYÁNDI WASIM ZAID HABASHNEH HILDUR ERNA SIGURJÓNSDÓTTIR

ART

LIVING, Mixed media, 2020 a work by Wasim Zaid Habashneh photo by Diana Habashneh


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Joanna Vander Vlugt Wasim Z. Habashneh

Victoria Casillas

Hildur E. Sigurjónsdóttir Flora Orsolya Hartyándi

Elizabeth Odiorne

Canada

Jordan

United Kingdom

Iceland

Hungary

USA

My biggest focus as an artist and a writer is to kick the stereotype. We hear in the entertainment field that a performer or athlete is a triple threat. Well why can't an author also be an artist and an artist an author? Why pigeon-hole creativity? Why must a person be one or the other. I wrote novels and I created art when I was a teenager. I originally wrote my novel The Unravelling in 1999. It was last year that I dug it out, re-wrote it, created the cover and independently published it. My novel The Unravelling was a finalist in the 2019 Canadian Book Club Awards in the fiction category. When I rewrote that novel, my motorcycle art inspired scenes in my novel, and the chase scene in my novel, inspired the book cover.At one point in my life I never thought I would create art again.

Coming from an architectural background I’ve always had great admiration for art and the conceptual thinking processes involved in it. My work focuses on local material that can be utilized to display a meaningful idea where people can relate to and build stories upon.Aiming to create a tangible yet conceptual artworks, my practice is influenced by my surroundings and my approach of perceiving, analyzing and understanding those little things that makes an experience worth living. An important aspect that influenced me was the multicultural background I’ve developed over the years while living abroad which enriched my cultural dosage and led me to create my own fusion of those cultures.As I always say: “an artist is a prisoner to his imagination, jail with no chains”.

I am currently studying Fine Arts at University of Kent. During the last few years I have had the opportunity to investigate and discover sculpture, video art, art installation and how to link different pieces of work in order to tell a story.These processes inspired me to implement ideas into my own art practice and use them when curating my work and that of other artists. I am intrigued by the movement from traditional methods of presenting art, to a new perception in which the aesthetic of visual art is not just focused on the direct view but is enhanced by stimulating different senses in order to produce a change of mood, tapping into feelings which influence the ambience and dynamics of the exhibition and bringing sensory perception to the foreground.

I find it fascinating how we can live in this world and create others. Not only that but to be able to create bridges between them, and in that way also connecting the fine line between life and death, identity and mobile selves, wholes and fragmentations and classical heritage and new imaginations. I do this by creating artwork using photography as my main medium but mixing it creatively with painting, drawing, and writing. Such an approach often ends up with the unexpected and transformative, transgressing my works into vibrant matters. Since I can remember I have been in awe of what is not considered ‘’real’’ or things that are not tangible. This has shaped me into the artist I am today with my vision being a combination of everything magical, whether it comes from this place or another.

I have been working on art projects in which the aim is to help disadvantaged people since I was 16. Later on I became an art therapist and I worked with special-needs teenagers as well. These are emotionally hard jobs, moreover they are strongly influenced by politics, not to mention how poorly payed these jobs are in Hungary. This was the point when it was too much for me. I was absolutely exhausted. I needed some changes. Couple months later I found myself in the middle of the fabulous Dartmoor National Park(UK) as a worker in a youth hostel with my photographer life partner, a lovely local girl with writer veins, a frolicsome boss and uncountable quantities of sheep, wild horses, deer, rabbits, birds, without phone signal, with extremely poor internet connection in the real nature.

Lighten Up is a friendly reminder to not take everything so seriously. This body of work is meant to lift spirits with optimism expressed through vivid colors, large scale and intricate patterns. I am passionate about the timehonored tradition of screenprinting textiles, taking great pride in executing all aspects of the process by hand. I want the viewer to absorb and be engrossed in the original drawings, overlapping shapes and complex compositions. My patterns and motifs reflect the significance of personal achievements and monumental life moments. Through the process of repetition, I wish to instill an overpowering visual sensation when viewing my work – a menagerie of brilliant, saturation of color, layers of delicate linear patterns, embedded with a unique record of personal anecdotes.


In this issue

Victoria Casillas

4

Flora O. Hartyรกndi

34

Elizabeth Odiorne

64

Wasim Z. Habashneh

80

Joanna Vander Vlugt

94

HildurE.Sigurjรณnsdรณttir Damian Horst

Asia Djibirova

Daria Tyurina

Germany

Mexico

Moldova / Russia

I create sculptures, costumes and masks and use the human body to arrange and present these in form of installations, situations and happenings that I then photograph. The images are digitally altered, rearranged and manipulated until I achieve my vision.Before I finished my diploma in graphic design I got myself into a variety of artistic expression. Illustration and painting, sewing, sculpting and music. This path led me to photography as an alchemical furnace, a tool that would allow a conjunction of my work in a common substance.Society widely accept work as means to fullfil desires for things and objects. My work in the advertsing industry dealt with creating desire for things and objects by assigning them emotions, meaning and importance. My art became means of dealing with myself and my ambivalent role in this circle of desire, struggle, fullfilment and self exploitation.

Asia Djibirova was born in July 1980 in Plovdiv, Bulgaria and is a third child in a family of workers. From a very little girl she likes painting. She started painting on the walls with a chalk she stole from school. Wherever she saw a board, she was painting ballerinas only ballerinas, thinking she wanted to become a ballerina like any little girl. their interest in the fine arts, but the parents did not pay attention to this. When she was 10 years old she went alone and enrolled in a drawing course for children. Her parents knew that Asya was at a school in the classroom, and she attended fine arts lessons just because she liked playing with lots of colors. Then she broke off. When she was 13 years old in music standing on the front row and hanging portraits of great composers on her wall.

My name is Tyuria Daria. I was born in Moldova, in the city Chisinau. After school in Moldova I have entered University in Russia, in Moscow. I studied Engineering, I have finished University and PhD in engineering. Engineering is also a creative profession, but still, all the time while studying and working as an engineer I felt lack of creativity, lack of possibilities to express the wide range of feelings and thoughts I had in my head. Because of that I started to learn different art techniques: painting, installations, textile art, digital art, sculpting. Now I can express my inner feelings making art, using these different techniques and my engineering skills. The main purpose of my art is to make our world a better place to live for everyone. Sometimes I show with my works the incredible beauty of our world.

On the cover:

Damian Horst Daria Tyurina Asia Djibirova

114

136 154 186

Special thanks to: Charlotte Seeges, Martin Gantman, Krzysztof Kaczmar, Tracey Snelling, Nicolas Vionnet, Genevieve Favre Petroff, Christopher Marsh, Adam Popli, Marilyn Wylder, Marya Vyrra, Gemma Pepper, Maria Osuna, Hannah Hiaseen and Scarlett Bowman, Yelena York Tonoyan, Edgar Askelovic, Kelsey Sheaffer and Robert Gschwantner.

, Mixed media, 2020 a work by Wasim Zaid Habashneh


Lives and works in Kent, United Kingdom

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video, 2013

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Jordi Rosado

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Victoria Casillas An interview by and

, curator curator

Hello Victoria and welcome to ART Habens. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit https://casillas.co.uk and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. You have a solid formal training, and you recently earned your BA (Hons) in Fine Art from the University of Kent: how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist? Moreover, how does your cultural background due to your Spanish roots direct your current artistic research? Victoria Casillas: From a young age, I used to visit art Museums such as Reina Sofia or Museo del Prado in Madrid, my city of birth and there is no doubt in my mind that both my roots and those artists are embedded in my artistic inspiration. I enjoy comparing the work of artists such as, Picasso, Goya, Velázquez, Murrillo, Dalí, Miro, etc. to their moment in history which shows evidence of their artistic exploration, movements and ideas relevant to their development, which help me to understand how themselves were influenced and being the influence of movements around them. Clear evidence of these testimonies of historical encounters includes Guernica by Picasso, Auto de fe (Goya) Las Meninas (Velázquez) I always refer to them to understand more about the new artistic evolution of art.

Victoria Casillas

through my work in one way or another, negative or positive and it is an important feature of my work, sometimes I feel that it is embedded without approval but once it is there, it becomes a charismatic identity arising to the foreground of my work. For example, El

So in response to your question, I gather that the cultural background has always comes

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Seny analysed and contemplates the problems in the Catalunya area in Spain, The political difference in the region created chaotic opinions, friends became enemies, the division became violent and the manipulation and representation to the rest of the world was, unfortunately, an interesting angle to analyse and observe. Being a student has given me a unique angle and opportunity to explore and research different medias that otherwise would have been impossible for me to have been exposed to, in retrospect, this totally changed my artistic perception of art and the approach to it. Basically, I moved from just murals and painting on canvas to sculpture, installation, and video art. At the University of Kent we were incredibly lucky to have artists invited as guests to present their work to the students and their experiences. Moreover, we were able to have personal tutorials with them and this together with our tutor’s direction enlightened my artistic approach. Furthermore, the course provided me with opportunities to curate and develop a narrative of students’ work in conjunction with mine, as it is the example of The Language of Art. All these lectures and tutorials made me understand and tunnel down a path of approach coming into realisation of how much I enjoy curating and linking the work to a theme or story. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of ART Habens has at once captured our attention for the way you use your visual language in a strategic way to question the relationship established between the art piece and the viewers' perceptual and cultural categories, offering an array of meanings. In particular "VOICES" has intrigued us for the way it highlights the connection between

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multilingualism and sense of place in our unstable contemporary age. When walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how did you develop the initial idea of “VOICES�?

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Red: It resembles similarities with the emblems of the International Red Cross and represents a comforting feeling of humanitarian aid. Blue: It is a colour that symbolizes loyalty, strength, wisdom, and trust.

Victoria Casillas: The idea for VOICES arose upon the UK Brexit referendum, in which I could identify the feeling of betrayal, separatism and xenophobia that some Europeans where facing. Even though the politics were not (and are not) a personal attack. I was able to observe the anguish many Europeans, from personal friends to people in public life, felt when their opinions seemed to be disregarded. I wanted to give them a voice that avoided the judgement of political rhetoric. I found stories from the heart, personal testimonies that tell a bigger story. My artwork avoids the clash of feelings and emotions that is so common to us in the fake news era. It simply tells first person stories. I try to accentuate the human factor, the missing voice that has not been heard.

The fabric used is organza, which is a thin, plain woven, sheer fabric to represent the clarity and transparency of the words. I like how the light catches the writing and projects the shadows of the transcript around the room but personally represents the shadow of the collective that Europeans feel part of, sharing the same land. This shadow representation is important to me, as it draws lines of paths, energizing and connecting a shared space between the viewer and artwork. There was a model story for others to take as an example, my own personal story but I opted out of being in the collective as I felt my story would make the artwork biased. These are the questions suggested in order to have a cohesive format and unified voice: Where are you from? Motive or decision that made you come to UK? Indication of the time lived in the UK? Each personal story without names and please no propaganda.

Since them (2018), I have been working on this piece which consists of a compilation of personal stories of citizens from the 28 European member states who currently reside in the UK. Once I have received the stories, I embroider the words into an organza material in both English and their native language, each story is 150cm x 100cm in dimension. European stories are embroidered in red with the exception of the UK which is in blue, this conveys the conceptual semiotic symbolism of the colour thread.

Although that the concept and theme was covered, my bigger problem was to hang the stories without removing the organic fluency of the material. The material when hung drapes and I needed to introduce spine, without a frame that distract from the profound context of the stories, the acrylic transparent tube help them to stand without fully been stretched, having soft limbs edges which helps in the movement and energize the room.

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After Voices was exhibited at the Tabernacle by Metaforart, Notthing Hill, the public asked to read all the stories so I wrote a book with all stories and details of the work, “VOICES” it is available at @........ You are a versatile artist and over the last few years you have had the opportunity to investigate and discover disciplines ranging from Sculpture, Video art and Installation: what does direct you to such multidisciplinary approach? In particular, are there any experiences that did particularly help you to develop your attitude to experiment with different techniques? Victoria Casillas: I presume my attitude toward experimenting is attached to my inquisitive nature to learn, I see myself as a Jack of many traits and a master of none. I aim to have a story to tell and the role of the material for me is the conduit of communicating, therefore, the material needs to match the tempo of the story and the temperature of the surrounding concept. I intend to recreate or to reconstruct a unique personalised experience. Sometimes the material is predetermined by the environmental conditions and circumstances, this was the scenario for Pausas and Pautas because of Covid-19, in which I could not get the physical material to prepare my original sculpture for my degree’s final show. So, the lockdown inspires me to use frames of people’s lives and video art was an ideal media to contextualise the concept. I was lucky to receive many videos from people in different countries and I managed to build up a library of concepts to observe, analysis, research and edit.

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A couple of experiences come to mind which I think changed the trajectory of my way of thinking and that of sketching. Firstly, I needed to control my urge of directing the material which was difficult, so to sit back and allow the material to breathe and perform was hard to let

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go, however, when achieved, it was a great

disconnect myself for the norm use of tools like

feeling of freedom and became a unique

brushes and began to practice and experiment

connection.

with other instruments such as drawing with wire, thread, sand, etc...for

It is interesting how the material could have a

example Awareness and Carcoma were painted

mind of its own so to watch how it behaves

with my left hand, although that I am

helped me make decisions. I started to

ambidextrous I tent to use more my right hand,

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so exploring other ways, create a new path of seeing and thinking.

provide your viewers with such immersive, and especially multisensory experience?

The exhibition space could be considered such a machine able to synchronise the works of art with visitors, providing them with a shared and enhanced visual experience, that goes behind its aesthetic value. How important is for you to

Victoria Casillas: It is highly important in my

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opinion, art installation is not merely a visual experience, but is attached to a sensory one which can affect vision, hearing, touch, taste,

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and intuition. It is my impression that the

material allows them to move to the breeze of

combination of these senses provides the

people passing by and interacting when the

viewer to submerse themselves in the theme or

story was read or touched . I noticed some of

concept. Voices for me, was a sensory

the viewers emotions; some felt empathy,

exhibition in which each story acquire a human

others laughed and other were undecided

figure when presented standing in a room

about their feeling but nonetheless VOICES was

amongst the viewer, the organic nature of the

a stimulus to the viewer.

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symbolic features of the materials that you include in your artworks — playing in your artistic practice? And how important is for you to create artworks rich of allegorical qualities?

Another example of multisensory experience is “Mia Culpa” (my fault) addresses a symbolic reconstruction of a moment of disheartens, disbelief, and disappointment. Mia culpa is a sitespecific multimedia art installation that intents to bring a sensory element to provoke an individual decision in response to the artwork in which all senses are put to the test and the participation of the viewer is a must. The viewer is presented to question the relationship between human activity and our natural world underlining the personal contribution to environmental damage.

Victoria Casillas: Well, I consider a symbol a language code, sited as an indirect or direct object substituting something else like the associated object, gesture, sound, etc... So, I gather that symbols and objects have a reciprocal connection as the object could be the symbolic message or vice-versa the symbol is presented in an associated object. So, having this in consideration and adding that an object is made of material, we have a triad relation between, symbol, object, and material.

The installation is wrapped in bubble wrap so as you walk into the installation the bubble wrap on the floor pops. “the message is; when it’s gone it’s gone. Each step destroys something” the ceiling projects a sea of plastic and it has been lowered creating a claustrophobic feeling of the space, like swimming under plastic. So the first process was to reproduce the landmark or canvas, including the visual organic texture of the sand, I tried to leave every single decision of the work to a natural format avoiding when possible the human manipulation. The paper pulp was left to the rawest stage and the fracture of the drawing was made by pencils of natural wind.

I believe the symbolism in my work is another layer, it develops itself as the concept evolves. I wanted to believe that I create a fair platform for the viewer, it is important for me not to intervene. I like the idea of allegorical qualities, but I am the hostess of the concept but what the viewers preexisting ideologies brings with them is the moral lesson revealed to their personal’s interpretation. For example, the case in The Journey, a collection of 6 paintings which are a symbolic representation of the controversy between selfinfringement and natural healing process a personal experience that I present as a passage or story.

The sound of the waves is echoed in the framed presentation of soundwave drawings, it looked like a heart monitor which in my opinion creates a connective rhythm and adds to my intriguing exploration of the viewer participation to create experiences.

The Journey is based in disbelief, fears, endurance and healing in which the person and the surrounding nature has been placed into question. I used different location for inspiration and they represent a specific stage in the process of healing. For instance, Awareness and Sarcoma. These two paintings are the first of the collection,

For ‘Voices’ you used organza to represent the clarity and transparency of the words: how do you consider the role of symbols — including the

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poem by Antonio Machado which says “ caminante no hay camino, se hace camino al andar y al volver la vista atras….” ( For travellers there is no path, it becomes a trail as you walk and only seen when you turn your head back….) for me, those words are rebellious, inquisitive, curious of life and learning in summary, adventurous for those who have travelled to different lands to embrace or made settlement away from their original birthplace. This part of the sculpture represents the heart, the will, the power.

painted with the left hand after a medical intervention. They epitomise state of the mental mind when normality becomes a turmoil and the awareness of it, brings strength, hope and fragile composure to embrace the unknown steps to follow. Ordeal reflects and analyses the question of placement balancing the similarity of nature within humanity. It became a self-portrait of silent emotions, identity and reflection. Self-infliction pulls the black matter embedded in fears and compares them to those pockets of hollow emptiness within our brain, the blockages and the imprinted marking eroding on the positive mind. Pushing against the resilient wind of uncontrolled relentless negative thinking. Stone puzzle envisages parallels as to how as humans we look to control the environment around us.

Sound plays a crucial role in your artistic production and we have highly appreciated the way the sound of murmur provides Voices with such a unique ethereal and a bit enigmatic ambience, capable of challenging the viewers' perceptual categories: how would you consider role of sound playing within your creative process? In particular, how do you consider the relationship between sound and visual experience?

In the case of Voices the allegory embeds the object and the texture of it as symbolism, it resembles the paper in which the transcripts is written, the humble honesty and simplicity of the words and experiences of people lives shared without prejudice. It represents pouring your heart with nothing hidden. The material allows me to show that transparency, these emotions were crucial to hold in a similar format.

Victoria Casillas: Sound is a mystical feeling that allows the emphasise of other senses, we learn to speak, before speaking just by listening, so one could say that sound is amongst the primitive sense of learning. I do not believe that words can settle the eyesight as the environment is not static so there is a constant gap between the words and sight but sounds are tight with the environment.

El Seny is full of symbolism, the upper part of the sculpture is made with resin and wire represents both the map of Spain and the face of people’s thoughts, beliefs and personalities, the human mind. The mid part of the sculpture, just wire represents the intertwined lines of communication-based on peoples knowledge or lack of it. Both sides of the press propaganda showing two faces of the coin and lastly the holder or base is made with resin encasing a

Sounds, have a cocktail party effect, it is the phenomenon of the brain's ability to focus one's auditory attention (an effect of selective attention in the brain) on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, as

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when a partygoer can focus on a single conversation in a noisy room. The murmur sounds in VOICES for me resembles of that of people talking in a crowd and I play with the juxtaposition of the stories, depending of the colour of the voice of the person by increasing or decrease the amount of the stories or reducing or risen the level of the sound which I believe acts as stimulus and triggers the attention of the spectator. However, I like to consider the relationship between the sound and visual experience by separating and impairing them, almost like a jigsaw puzzle that impulses the subconscious mind to look for ways of resolving or to make sense of the conundrum. This is the case of The Height of Communication and Mia Culpa, impairing these two senses creating a personal conversation and accommodates the viewers own cultural background to breathe out without me dictating or leading the meaning of my work. The Height of Communication is an overload of visual information; projections, computer/laptop monitors, TV screen and mirrors. Theme of technology, how we use it constantly, the clips on the projections also show films that explore technology in some way. We depend on them too much. On the opposite side of the room a board with few holes, behind it reveals the previous means of media/ material that are now considered old fashioned or obsolete today (gramophone, airmail, radio). Communication is the act of conveying meanings from one entity or group to another by mutually understood signs and semiotic rules.

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My vision: is an observation as how society has behaved in using communication in juxtaposition as how they interact today. Austrian Art historian Ernst Gombrich once underlined the importance of providing a space for the viewers to project onto: your artworks are very dynamic and at the same time convey philosophical aspects: how important is for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to address them to elaborate personal interpretations? Victoria Casillas: Extremely important and I agree with Gombrich the space provided to the viewer and the bouncing of ideas from the art and reflection back into the work, it creates a communication between them and therefore a feedback to indulge. To me the main part of my work is the relationship between my art and the sensory perception of it, how to make connections between the senses as a form of communication and I believe this encourages the senses and explores innovative approaches to contemporary art practice. In my opinion the process of communication must been defined, the senses of smell, touch, vision, audio, intuition, emotional feeling and memories has been highlighted whilst walking through each installation. Making each viewer response differently to another and that line between them is a path of discovery, to me. I feel that my work needs to be participated with and inclusive, in between the space creating a unique confrontation with the viewer to experience different phenomena. Maybe the reason why this is so important to me is because sometimes when you live in another country for so long you lose track of yourself and a feeling of

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not belonging appears within you. Senses such as smell, touch, etc‌ are preambles to an intuitive feeling of what is to follow, in other words an invisible source of information that activate the receptors and prepares the viewer to observe, participate or just view whatever will follow. The misconception is behind the idea that the art is just what the viewer sees when in fact the viewer has already succumbed to the art as their senses have reacted intuitively without the viewer realizing this instinctive reaction. For instance, when visiting any museum or art galleries there is always a moment of transition from everyday life into the unexpected. For example, one could have been walking amongst people in a busy street one minute and pass through the door of a gallery or museum and be transported into a completely different world. Almost as if the person who has entered the gallery has taken a different identity, leaving behind the other person in the busy street. Art installations could recreate in greater intensity the meaning of the artist’s work when the interaction and reaction of all the participants from the artist, objects, to the receiver are involved in the art piece. This combination creates a full experience, a phenomena and a new appreciation of the art work.

fluence of those invisible markers which are responsible for creating the mood in the room.

When the viewer has become a participant inside the art work by holding the objects within the art installation, the artist’s conceptual idea has now been analysed and manipulated by the viewer, these interactions between the viewer and the art fulfill and alter the conceptual message.

These invisible markers captivate and activate

Also, and in addition to the relationship between the object and the viewer there coexists the in-

Another interesting work of yours that has par-

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emotions; whether of fear, vulnerability or acknowledgment which ultimately brings firstly a communication connection and then completes the bond between the viewer and their perception of the art work.

ticularly impressed us and that we would like to

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introduce to our readers is Pausas & Pautas.

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Victoria Casillas: Pausas and Pautas is based on

Reminding us of Behaviorism theories, your in-

observation of behaviour patterns and moments

stallation draws from elements belonging to

of reflection. Presented through life’s mundane

ordinary life's experience — and in particular

routines and passageways. It’s title “Pausas &

this time of pandemic — and familiar settings to

Pautas” groups the concept and subject of this

trigger such a peculiar bond between the art-

Video Art (Installation).

work and the spectator: how do you consider the participatory nature of your relationship

Both words derive from Latin pausa and pacta.

with your audience? In particular, how does

The first one translates into English as a pause or

your everyday life's experience fuel your artis-

to a temporary stop in action or speech. The

tic research?

second word “Pautas” translates as rules of con-

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duct or course of behaviour. Behaviour; is a term

the aim as to switch places with the subject, to

defined by psychologists as an act done by an ani-

share and see from behind their cameras into their

mal in response to any stimulus provided by the

field of vision. Enigmatically, when the spectator is

outside world.

confronted with familiar settings, these frames act as stimulus and therefore trigger a response. It is at

An assumption held by many social psychologists

this point when a personal bond emerges between

when attempting to explain the reasons behind the

the artwork and the spectator.

action of people’s behaviour is that we try to find certain reasons.

In response to how does your everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research?

In response. as to how do I consider the participatory nature of the relationship with the audience is

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Well, I gather I‘m a bit eccentric and crazy and eve-

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a political and cultural nature, do you think that your artistic research respond to a particular cultural moment? Victoria Casillas: Absolutely, I concur with Gabriel Orozco’s quote and I believe that artists are influenced not just from where they are from naturally but also in the education received, nurture which is a parallel link to the culture. Personally, I feel intrigued by the movements around us, we are writing history every day and it doesn’t necessarily need to be just with words, the last few years has been a congestion of events which sometimes generates a ripple effect in some other events but nevertheless all these scenarios are platforms for Art to emerge. It is a paradox that artists are influenced themselves and their art might be an influence. Thus, I indeed believe that my artistic research responds to cultural moments, behaviours, and political views. It takes me to question the topic of Art for politics or does politics need art? Unquestionably as artists are members of the population within that society and as individuals share the same cultural and historical background, with their attributes to represent through art as a message. An artist could be both an artist and a politician or leader. Maybe they could have their own political party! The question lies in who influences whom? One side of the argument is the political discussions, agreements or disagreements could be used to promote the party’s policies via art propaganda. On the other hand, it is up to the artist and how he/she could interpret those same agreements or disagreements as a forum to open parallel discussions outside the governmental chambers. Inside the political forum these discussions are formalised, outside art is informal and able to use free speech and changes the

rything around us have stories and I’m just listening and observing. As you have remarked once, ‘Voices’ highlights multilingualism within communities and the mixture of cultures sharing those spaces within cities, trying to accentuate the human factor. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated, "artists's role differs depending on which part of the world they’re in": as an artist particularly interested in observing people’s interactions in society, studying a way to symbolise controversies of both

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formalities and this is the area of my exploration with artwork like Voices and El Seny. The following artwork explores other questionable areas of our society such as the power of social media and communication in The Height of Communication, “The exhibition almost forces you to interact because you are curious of what will happen. (such as the dancing and the ‘text me’ piece) it feels like a social experiment” or The Journey, using different places for inspiration, representing specific stage in the process of healing. Mia Culpa, it was about how each of us are culpable for the destruction of the earth. The title and the work of art is open to questions. Mia Culpa might be a reference to the fact that in this multi-sensory overloaded world we are missing that caring quality for each other and the planet. Pausas and Pautas . Richard and Laura to write a comment We really appreciate your sapient use of found objects, as paper and organic matter, plastic and recycled material in The Beaches, as well as ready-made objects in The Height of Communication, to add layers to your artworks, eliciting response in the spectatorship: New York City based photographer and sculptor Zoe Leonard once stated, "the objects that we leave behind hold the marks and the sign of our use: like archeological findings, they reveal so much about us". We’d love to ask you about the qualities of the materials that you include — or that you plan to include — in your artworks: in particular, how important is for you to use found materials? Victoria Casillas: Objects repeatedly resonate with people’s memories, predominantly personal items

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and could behave as indicators for glimpses of people’s lives. ‘Human beings and objects are indeed bound together in a collision in which the objects takes on a certain density and emotional value – what might be called a presence’ (Baudrillard, 2005). The position and the space that the object occupies could have a powerful experience in the eyes of the spectators’ subconscious. For instance, mundane objects set the viewer in a familiar scenario, they have to deal with them in real life. However, it is their relationship with these objects in which the viewer plays an important part observing and decoding the art installation. Also, and in addition to the relationship between the object and the viewer there coexists the influence of those invisible markers which are responsible for creating the mood in the room. For example, the darkness of the room may automatically appear as a feeling of coldness or might be interpreted as a political state of a country. These invisible markers captivate and activate emotions; whether of fear, vulnerability or acknowledgment which ultimately brings firstly a communication correlation and then completes the bond between the viewer and their perception of the artwork. So, the materials are as important as the message and found materials have a further story behind the objective lives. Your artworks are in private collections in Luxembourg, UK and Spain, and over these recent years your artworks have been exhibited in several occasions: VOICES has been recently showcased at no format Gallery, in London, and you recently curated The Language of Art. Direct relationship with the viewers in a physical context is definitely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work

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of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm — as Instagram — increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

behaviour from previously online or at a white cube exhibition, it made me question our mental restrictions and that of galleries and cameras, everyone is able to see a replicate of the same artwork but the root of the art could be out of the context.

Victoria Casillas: Kind of a tricky question to answer, although, without a doubt a on growing movement with unforeseen opportunities. I do have an Instagram, twitter and other social media platforms: https://www.instagram.com/artwithvictoria, Twitter: @CasillasMVic Facebook: Victoria Casillas Art, as much as social media is the way forward to promote and experience a worldwide art gallery, a sensory experience provides a different sentiment as we detach ourselves from the unsocial interaction. It is ironic that social media in my view creates antisocial behaviour, individualism and removes the community team essence. I explore this concept on The Height of Communication.

I was speechless and inspired at the interaction of Pausas and Pautas and of the spectators in thesemCovid-19 times, Spain has been presented many cases of the virus and therefore the use of mask is compulsory everywhere, even in the countryside! The spectator pauses, views, compares, analyses, and reflects on themselves and their own behaviour patterns. So I believe as we are always in a changing stage, the relationship change with a globalised audience so it depends on the demand of the audience where the exhibition platform directs on to. We have really appreciated the originality of your artistic production and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Victoria. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

I experienced my online exhibition of my degree’s final show online and I draw to the conclusion that the spectator does not emerge in the art piece and the perception is superficial. In other ways, the profound story of my work vanished in thin air as it does not have those markers to feed the scattered, overloaded networking mind.

Victoria Casillas: I am currently working on another art installation, a sculpture data project in which I am exploring light in movement and applying it to drawing shadows, connection, and tension.

Having said all the above, I managed to organise and curate an open-air exhibition (Expontainidad) during my holiday, Martiherrero (Avila) a town which promotes cultural endeavours and encourage opportunities. So, without much thinking I exhibited my work Pausas and Pautas with a fellow artist Ismael Hernaz, during a summer’s night. I never thought of seeing my work display in an open space, however, by observing a different

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The concept behind is keeping the circle of tradition alive. Things that I am researching at the moment is the behaviour of material in different weather conditions…

An interview by and

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Flรณra Orsolya Ha


rtyรกndi


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Jordi Rosado

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Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi An interview by and

, curator curator

Hello Flora and welcome to ART Habens. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit https://punctuallypunch.com and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. Are there any experinces that did particularly influence your evolution as an artist? Moreover, how does your cultural background direct your current artistic research? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: I was sick very often during my childhood. I spent these times with my incredibly active grandparents. They were doing something all day long: gardening, cooking, baking, tinkering, sewing, embroidering… I was interested in all of these activities and they were ready to teach me everything with no concern for time. My grandpa made me a ’matchbox’ sized baking sheet so when I worked in the kitchen with my grandma, I was able to make my own version of everything she was making. It was the best gift ever! He has given me independence and responsibility.

Flora Orsolya Hartyándi

Later on I have been coming up with my own ideas, projects. I set the bar quite high for myself and they have never said that „You can’t do this. You are too small for this. You shouldn’t try to do this…” moreover they supported me all the time.

haversack by myself from tiny pearls. I designed different scenes in 3 centimetrelong lines like a cartoon. I sewed padding and hand spun a handle. By the time I was finished I felt myself so much better that I could go back to school. Basically, I used to use creating to cure myself and it worked very well.

I was around 6 when I wove a whole

Originally, Hungarians were a wandering

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nation and they believed in supernatural Magic. (We still have a strong cultural connection to herbal healing.) Today we know fully well that the patterns on everyday objects and textile products weren’t just aesthetic, all of them had very specific meaning. This way of thinking had already fascinated me even as a small child. I grew up in an open minded, globe-trotter, culture- and art lover family. Our biggest adventure was when we travelled to Africa from Hungary by car to a film festival. I was ten. The African world totally enchanted me. I was envious that their ancient culture was and is still a part of their everyday life. Couple of years later I could visit Uyghurs land (China) and Asian part of Turkey. I experienced something similar in these places. By the time I became a teenager I was immersing in the different ancient cultures, their symbol and belief systems. I specialized in textiles in high school. I based my masterpiece on ’Sun’ symbols from all over the world. For this special edition of ART Habens we have selected “The End of the World Project”, a stimulating body of works that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your visual exploration of the relationship between traditional craftsmanship and contemporary sensitiveness is the way you sapiently challenged the audience's perceptual parameters: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how did you develop the

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initial idea of “The End of the World Project”? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: I have been working on art projects in which the aim is to help disadvantaged people since I was 16. Later on I became an art therapist and I worked with special-needs teenagers as well. These are emotionally hard jobs, moreover they are strongly influenced by politics, not to mention how poorly payed these jobs are in Hungary. This was the point when it was too much for me. I was absolutely exhausted. I needed some changes. Couple months later I found myself in the middle of the fabulous Dartmoor National Park(UK) as a worker in a youth hostel with my photographer life partner, a lovely local girl with writer veins, a frolicsome boss and uncountable quantities of sheep, wild horses, deer, rabbits, birds, without phone signal, with extremely poor internet connection in the real nature. I could not be more grateful to have had this opportunity. I have started to work on ’The End of the World Project’ in this unrealistically gorgeous place which is full of legends. The project is based on my ironic discovery: In my soul there is a fearful, end of world atmosphere (because of the last years) while my body is in a charming place what could be in the end of the world. I started to focus on not just my feelings, but on the local stories, legends and wonders of nature to create a new world. We spent 8 months in Dartmoor and further 20 months in Great Britain. While we were roaming I was working on ’The End of the World Project’ all the way. Our last stop was Inishturk Island (IRL)with less than 50

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inhabitants.

remarked once, the emphasis in your life have been in a good places: how does your everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research?

Made of 25 art pieces, inspired by the locals, the legendaries and the wildlife, “The End of the World Project” draws a lot from your travels, and as you have

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Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: What is the point

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in talking about something– even through my art – I have no clue or experience of? We have been living in a new society and new life-situations during our travels. My partner is a big existential thinker. We have been talking a lot about the function and driving forces of the given people. We watch ourselves, too. We try to understand human nature. We wonder who does what and

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why is it important? Is it the right way to live?... When I feel I (or we) find a question, -truth, -solution, which is affecting many people, I think I have to incorporate it in my art. With its almost timeless ambience, “The End of the World Project” seems to invite the viewer to complete the work of art by personal associations, creating further

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Flora Orsolya Hartyándi

meanings. Austrian Art historian Ernst Gombrich once underlined the importance of providing a space for the viewers to project onto: your artworks are very dynamic and at the same time convey philosophical aspects: how important is for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to address them to elaborate personal interpretations? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: It is the most important thing ever! I would love to involve them, to be part of my created world and then to trigger thoughts and/or feelings through them. If I can do this, I reach my goal. I am very interested in human psychology, I still try to help to others. In my experience an exhibition can give unusual questioning, a new point of view, people can delve into it for about 15 minutes at least. It can arouse curiosity which can trigger people’s imagination. All of these things can help. So maybe I can give the starting push, the rest is up to the audience. In one of the „The End of the World Project” exhibitions an adult man came up to me looking very upset. He reproached me for my art being very scary. I thought: Oh, Thank God, it is working! Then I said to him: „The end of the world could be scary but not necessarily for everyone”… It's important to remark that the no wast, recycling approach is characteristic of your approach. New York City based photographer and sculptor Zoe Leonard once stated, "the objects that we leave behind hold the marks and the sign of our use: like archeological findings, they reveal so much about us". We’d love to ask you about the qualities of the materials that you

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include — or that you plan to include — in your artworks: in particular, how important is for you to use found and recycled materials? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: I don’t really buy materials but if I must, I try to buy local products. To be honest I do not like shopping. Luckily, everybody worked with textile in my family on my father’s side. This tradition kind of died with my Grandma’s generation, I am the only one who is left, so I inherited lot of materials - remaining textiles, yarns, buttons, tools, etc. – from them. I held them in high esteem and I am happy that all of them will slowly have a new place in one of my artworks, they won’t need to go to the trash. My friends come over often with some leftover materials: „You will surely be able to use them for something”. And my father is a hoarder and collector so if he sees fantasy in something – cut down tree trunk, pebbles, damaged household stuff, exciting materials during his travel - he puts them aside for me. In one word, I am spoiled in that area. I love if something has a past life and I can give it a new chance to live longer in a new function. I also like to cook best from leftovers. Why do we want to throw out everything which we do not need right now? In spite of my huge stock I always start a new art piece from a freshly discovered thing by me. I notice something and I know immediately what I want to make from it. So every artwork is a little bit based on my actual present. They capture the moment... Your artworks have a very distinct visual identity and you often create large

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installations, as The End of the World Project — whose exhibition can be viewed at https://youtu.be/od_dAO4RoB0 — that provide the viewers with such an immersive visual experience: how do the dimensions of the final result affect your workflow? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: During these times when everybody is trying to be in the online world and the real world in the same time, and when people give 3 seconds for themselves to decide if a picture is good or bad (instagram, twitter etc.), it’s not easy to get the viewers to really see what is in front of their noses at an exhibition.. So I try to create complex, alternative worlds, that the viewer inevitably becomes a part of it, cannot be able to remain an outsider: immerse in them, see them, feel them, discover, create a story around what they see, use their imagination. To increase this effect, I made a soundtrack for „The End of the World Project”. I named myself Dj Sheep and I recorded several sheep baas, blowing wind sounds, twittering of birds during our travels and I edited a dynamic atmosphere noise music from them. Lot of people lift their eyes from their phones first when they hear an unexpected sound of a sheep baaing when they arrive. Sometimes it is a funny moment. I love to see their faces when suddenly they arrive in the present and they let in the first impression of my world. Another interesting project of yours that has particularly impressed us and that we would like to introduce to our readers is HOUSEHOLD TRANSFORMATION and we have been impressed with the way it

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highlights the relationship between living space and imagination. Scottish artist Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic works of art are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: In my opinion these two definitions are inseparable. I do not believe in universal reality. Everybody has its own reality with its own belief system. However, there are common points that I am looking for. I think we could affect the world of others and I like to try it. I have been excited about this question since I was a 5-year-old. One time I persuaded one of my classmates to eat an earthworm. I said to her, if she ate the worm, a butterfly will grow inside of her and fly away from her mouth couple of days later. I knew that butterflies do not come from worms. Sadly, she did not. I knew how unreal it was what I said, but she wanted to believe in a miracle and I was an incredible story-teller. The poor girl waited for so long for that butterfly which never came… Thank God I have learned some boundaries in the meantime. I would like to exert influence but not for my own benefit. The „Household Transformation” project was born during the first wave of the covid19. I was living in Germany as a city dweller in a low-stimulus environment when restrictions have been introduced. I read and listened with interest how many different types of mental problems appear.

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How many people have problems with these unexpected changes which they do not see the end of? What else could help us get through such a situation than our own imagination, to fill our new restricted living space with magic? There are people who compared this experience to the war. Who am I to say it is absurd? However, if our imagination can produce such a dramatic reality, then it certainly can create something like paradise or heaven. So, I have started to use broken, damaged household things to build new worlds. I would like to represent the little hackneyed fact, that it is possible to transform a bad situation into something good. We sometimes tend to forget that a work of art is a physical artefact with tactile qualities, and we dare say that your artworks use the insight of the lens to rediscover the concept of materially: how important is for you to highlight the physical aspect of your artworks? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: Absolutely important. I try to smuggle humour, playfulness, hanky-panky into my creations. To achieve this the best method for me is to use unusual materials. So if someone forgets that a work of art is a physical artefact, they will miss these gags and they won’t have a chance to find their own interpretation of what is seen. It would be a shame! My favourite one is the touch of the five senses. I try to exploit in my art process that I am pretty sensitive in this area. That is why I do not have a problem if someone wants

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to touch my creations. Of course everybody thinks it is not allowed because that is social convention. Usually only children go as far as asking about touching the works. When I give a green light to them, they discover the works with relish, carefully and they are surprisingly thorough. The embarrassment disappears and they become truly carefree, limitless explorers. They only touch if it is really necessary to satisfy their curiosity. They tend to come up with very exciting solutions. I like to watch and listen to them. Sometimes they notice things which were hidden even from my eyes. Over the years your artworks have been internationally exhibited in several occasions and “The End of the World Project” was presented at the 30th MEDIAWAVE International Film and Music Gathering, in Hungary: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? Direct relationship with the viewers in a physical context is definetely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm — as Instagram — increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: I have close connection with the organizer team of the 30th MEDIAWAVE International Film and Music Gathering. We worked together in several projects, I had exhibitions and fashion shows in cooperation with them. Wherever I was living at the time, I definitely wanted to be present on such a glorious anniversary. Then the covid-19 virus messed

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everything up a little. This gathering could be realized in the global network where I could present my project. Now, it seems there are less restrictions, so they are trying to organize the ’analogue’ version – as they call it – of the Gathering in a different time…

borders. I like to concentrate on the present. When I am at work I do not really care about my personal life and vice versa. But this oldfashioned lifestyle inhibits me to be successful in the social media world. I am still trying, of course.

I obviously prefer the exhibitions. Exhibiting at a festival is my favourite. Compared to appearing in a museum or gallery, presenting my artwork at a festival is less formal, so visitors are more direct, I can reach different types of people. These events are of shorter durations, couple of days mostly, but that means I can be there from the first moment till the last. I can chat, watch, listen, I get more feedback. These occasions have given me a lot of positive feedback and energy.

We have really appreciated the originality of your artistic production and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Flora. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future? Flóra Orsolya Hartyándi: I really appreciate this opportunity! I got very exciting questions, I had a great time thinking about them and finding my answers to them!

At the same time, if we would not have internet, we would have stayed without showcasing opportunities in the last months.

Well, I am never bored! I have been working on the „Household Transformation” project. I have not finished it, I still have plans for 5-6 artworks, and then I will see when I feel it is completed.

Every era also has an impact on the art life. The fact that the internet has come to the fore has its upsides and downsides as does any major change. Social media within the global network is a separate segment. It has its own operating principle. Someone can easily adapt without any problems, can exploit the opportunities or can pay for a competent person. Other people are in the dark. I belong to the latter team. I do not think it is a big surprise knowing that I was very happy without phone signal and internet connection for months. I have a kind of attachment to personal experiences and to my personal space. I do not want to be available always and everywhere. Moreover, I like to build

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I have already started working on a wirewaved bag collection months ago. But I or my life pushed it into the background all the time. It is progressing very slowly. What is mostly in the foreground now is that we will move again soon. When we arrive to a new place the most important thing for me is to create a home for us. Sometimes this means I repaint, sew, decorate, do DIY projects etc. When I feel comfortable in a new flat/house I can continue my projects I have already started before. An interview by and

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, curator curator


Lives and works in Arizona, USA

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Elizabeth Odiorne

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video, 2013

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Elizabeth Odiorne An interview by and

, curator , curator

Hello Elizabeth and welcome to ART Habens. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit http://www.elizabethodiorne.com and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. You have a solid formal training and after having earned your Bachelors in Fine Arts, you nurtured your education with a Masters in Fine Arts (Summa Cum Laude) concentration in Fibers, that you received from the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, Arizona State University: how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist? Moreover, how does your cultural background — as well as your studies in Spain, France and in the Netherlands— direct your current artistic research?

Elizabeth Odiorne: My college education was a crucial part of my artistic career and personal growth. I discovered my passion in Fibers and had inspiring instructors who remain my friends and mentors today. During graduate school, I had three years to perfect my craft and become a master printer as well as a public speaker with the ability to explain my concept and my process. I also had the opportunity to teach courses in my field and that was an invaluable experience. I love teaching printed textiles and surface design classes whenever possible.

Elizabeth Odiorne

create overwhelmingly visual experiences in my printed textiles. An abundance of pattern, texture, color and scale are all important factors in my work allowing me to captivate the viewer. I am inspired by patterns found in nature and I magnify the complexity of those patterns in my hand drawn motifs.

My studies abroad in Spain, France and the Netherlands significantly influenced my approach to pattern and composition. Touring Antoni Gaudi’s Casa Batlló left a lasting impression on me, the imaginative Art Nouveau architecture was one of my favorite areas of study because it pushes the boundaries of familiar sights. I strive to

The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of ART Habens and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at has at once captured our attention of your visual exploration of the relationship between

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traditional craftsmanship and contemporary sensitiveness is the way you sapiently challenged the audience's perceptual parameters: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how did you develop the initial idea of “Lighten Up”?

Elizabeth Odiorne: Lighten Up is a body of work I started in 2019 for a solo exhibition in Phoenix, AZ. The first piece was initiated to clear my head, get rid of any anxieties and “quiet” my inner critic. I had no intentions for that first piece to be a part of my upcoming gallery show but when I was finished with it I couldn’t stop thinking about how happy it made me feel. I started sketching more bright colored pieces with different compositions that reacted to one another. Ultimately, what started as a piece to dissipate my self-doubt turned into a successful body of work that has been exhibited in North American galleries, as well as online. Lighten Up is meant to lift spirits with optimism expressed through vivid colors, large scale and intricate patterns: we have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances that mark out your artworks, and we like the way they create tension and sense of dynamism: how did you come about settling on your color palette? And how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in your artworks?

Elizabeth Odiorne: Departing from my previous works, using dark fabrics with chemicals that remove color, I chose specific colors for Lighten Up that genuinely made me delighted. There is no way I can look at neon and not feel a sense of joy. The color palette along with multiple layers and motifs in this series, originated from the notion of a fresh perspective. I wanted to give myself a friendly

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reminder to not take things so seriously, and to embrace positivity. With their unique multilayered visual identity, your artworks feature such elaborate shapes and complex compositions, and it's important to remark that your patterns and motifs reflect the significance of personal achievements and monumental life moments: how does your everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research?

Elizabeth Odiorne: We are surrounded by visually intriguing, recurring designs in nature, ranging from simple to intricate. My desire is to capture this beauty for viewers to enjoy. I have developed a “cast of characters� within my imagery. My drawings abstract mundane objects (such as candy bars, gravel, dead flowers and popcorn) and I am able to give them new life in my textiles. I utilize the process of repetition that is significant in the memory of shapes and colors throughout my personal timeline. My most often used motifs have a distinctive meaning that represent specific events in my life. Each printed textile has a personal story that I elude to in the titles of my work, but I fully expect each viewer to have their own interpretation and reach their own meaning to the work. As you have remarked once, you are passionate about the time-honored tradition of screenprinting textiles, taking great pride in executing all aspects of the process by hand. How do you consider the relationship between the cultural heritage from Tradition and Contemporary sensitiveness playing within your artistic practice?

Elizabeth Odiorne: The repetitive actions in each step of my practice are important, as it is expressed in the final pattern in my printed textiles. For me, the entire process

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Orange You Glad

Unsteady

of making a piece is the most satisfying part of being an artist. In my process of screen printing on fabric, I have the ability to make aesthetic decisions as I work and then choose color and composition in response to each step. There is much planning and problem solving in my approach which keeps my studio life exciting. I fully embrace technology when it comes to highlighting my work and my brand. I believe that social media is extremely beneficial for not only networking, but for making the outside

world aware of my work. I utilize my website to present finished textiles and to share my professional experience. I specifically use Instagram to provide a view of in-process work and discover new artists that inspire me.

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Your artworks have a very distinct visual identity and you often create large artworks that provide the viewers with such an immersive visual experience: how do the dimensions of the final result affect your workflow?

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Elizabeth Odiorne

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Round and Round

Elizabeth Odiorne: I began producing larger pieces in 2013 with the goal of filling a gallery space and completely immerse the viewer. In

2015, I was able to achieve an overwhelming experience in my solo exhibition, Printfinite Pattern, where I completely reshaped a

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Theres A Lot Going On

gallery space with floor-to-ceiling sized printed textiles free flowing and suspended from the ceiling. With the size of my work,

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compared to the size of my studio space, I am challenged with the constraint to make one piece at a time; which can be a month-long

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Bright Future

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process, but the end result is momentously rewarding.

Elizabeth Odiorne: Viewers’ personal interpretations are a very important aspect in my exhibited work. I may give a hint to what a piece is about in the title, but I always enjoy hearing what a viewer deciphers. The large scale of my work gives the viewer the opportunity to look at each piece from a distance and absorb the entire composition, but I also invite them to step up close and examine the details and complexities.

We dare say that your artworks seem to invite the viewer to complete the work of art by personal associations, creating further meanings. Austrian Art historian Ernst Gombrich once underlined the importance of providing a space for the viewers to project onto: your artworks are very dynamic and at the same time convey philosophical aspects: how important is it for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to address them to elaborate personal interpretations?

We sometimes tend to forget that a work of art is a physical artefact with tactile qualities, and

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Go Big Or Go Bright


Elizabeth Odiorne

we dare say that your artworks use the insight of the lens to rediscover the concept of materially: how important is for you to highlight the physical aspect of your artworks?

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viewers to see my decision making and planning. My approach is to get people invested and anxious to see the final piece. I enjoy the online art community and have made some wonderful, inspiring connections.

Elizabeth Odiorne: I enjoy exhibiting my installed work in the physical space of an art gallery. There are so many important aspects to experience in person that don’t translate the same in an image. I work primarily on linen or cotton and leave my pieces unframed to highlight the fabric. Viewers are confronted by the large scale of my work and, because my pieces are free-flowing when installed, they have subtle movement as viewers walk around the space which creates an undulating effect.

We have really appreciated the originality of your artistic production and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Elizabeth. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Elizabeth Odiorne: I am so thankful for this opportunity with ART Habens and to connect with a new audience. I have started to create a new body of work consisting of screen printed textiles that have to do with reflection and equality. Currently, in its beginning stages, I am planning a solo exhibition around this work and I invite you to follow along on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/eo_textiles to watch this idea grow and develop. In the future I have an ongoing plan to create an entrancing, disorienting and interactive installation that includes my printed textiles as well as sculpture and other elements that involve all of our senses. I enjoy connecting with creators and love to teach workshops, I look forward to teaching again, once the current pandemic is over and we are all able to safely gather in groups. Please check out my website www.elizabethodiorne.com for future workshops and classes and to stay upto-date on any upcoming exhibitions.

You are an established artist and over the years your artworks have been internationally exhibited in several occasions and you also recently had a two-person show Teeter- Totter was presented at Fresh AF Gallery, DeLand: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? Direct relationship with the viewers in a physical context is definetely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm — as Instagram — increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

Elizabeth Odiorne: I prefer seeing artwork in person and I think the viewer has a better appreciation when seeing art up close with the opportunity to examine and see all of the details. However, showing my work online opens up so many more possibilities for a broader audience to discover my screen printed textiles. In my Instagram https://www.instagram.com/eo_textiles I enjoy showing in- progress videos and inprocess images of my textiles inviting

An interview by and

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‫ﺵْﻱَﻉ‬ I Living August 3, 2020


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Jordi Rosado

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Wasim Zaid Habashneh An interview by and

, curator curator

Hello Wasim and welcome back to ART Habens we already got the chance to introduce our readers to FluoreSAND in a previous edition and we are now particularly pleased to discover the development of your artistic production. In particular, for this special edition we have selected Living, a compelling project that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article. When walking us through the genesis of this captivating work, would you tell us how did you structure your process on a technical aspect, in order to achieve such brilliant results?

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: First of all, thank you for having me once again within your artistic hub. Secondly, the piece “Living” consists of three main parts which area the eye shaped wooden frame, the crystal glass and the human hair. The concept behind those three parts was to create a pupil effect for the viewers to feel that they are seen by it. The piece took approximately a year and a half to collect the human hair, assemble it tuft by tuft and creating the final photo shoot theme of the final piece.

Wasim Zaid Habashneh

send through any work will be received by the right people at the same time. I think that the process which our brain go through to understand the symbols will make the idea memorable with more than one explanation for the same piece depending on the viewer’s experience.

As an artist particularly attentive to the creation of works with allegorical qualities, able to communicate to various level of significance to the viewers, how do you consider the role of symbols, playing within your artistic research?

It's important to remark that Living is made of real human hair that you collected from young individuals. With its powerful symbolic value, the hair draws an allegoric parallel between the materic essence of human body, and the

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: I do adapt symbolism in my art production, and it has played a huge role within the process of creating any piece. I strongly believe that the messages I try to

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Wasim Zaid Habashneh

perceived journey of a single hair – it grows, is cut off, then forgotten: why did decide to include hair in your work and what were the most challenging aspects during the creation of it?

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: Initially when I decided to make this piece, I wanted to use something linked to our human body yet still be appealing and meaningful. As you said: the journey of a single hair somehow resemble the human journey especially in the intertwining complexity of the human beings. It was very challenging to collect the hair, it took a year and half to collect the hair due to many reasons! The biggest challenge came from idea that hair can be used in dark magic and people were afraid of giving it away and they would rather throw it away instead! Reminding the viewers the common fate of passing away, your artwork highlights the ubiquitous connection between human beings: what reactions and feelings would you like to communicate in the viewers with Living?

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: I would love if they can pause and rethink the way they live. We tend to ignore our blessings and take life for granted, LIVING is a reminder that our time is limited and we should make the most out of it. With its unique aesthetics, Living tackles the somber topic of death and Generational succession on a stimulating conceptual aspect: how do you negotiate aesthetics, materiality and the message conveyed in your work?

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: I think that materiality, aesthetic and the artwork message are all connected; each one of those aspects empowers the other not the other way around as many would think! When you

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Wasim Zaid Habashneh

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work on a conceptual level, you will be shocked of how raw materials can be appealing yet simple! Moreover, easily utilized to convey a message. It’s such an organic process that even sometimes it fascinates the artist himself! Another interesting project of yours that has particularly impressed us and that we would like to introduce to our readers is entitled Inimical nostalgia and it has deeply struck us for the way you created such powerful allegory, that challenges the viewer's perception: how did you come up to the initial idea of Inimical nostalgia? In particular, what does fascinate you of our relationship with the past and how do you consider the role of memory playing within your artistic research?

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: The initial idea came to my mind after I noticed the amount of pride we take on our past without making any effort to rebuild it or learn from it; instead, it became a prison for the most of us! I believe that our past is called “PAST� for a reason, it is behind us and we should live in the present with high hopes for the future. Our memories are very selective however sometimes that selectivity can be harmful if we did not have the ability to deal with these selected memories. On a personal note, I urge everyone to take control of their memories and past, own it, learn from it, take what can push you further and discharge the negative burden. As you have remarked, inimical nostalgia reveals the necessity to have a complex cultural relationship with the past in order to benefit

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Wasim Zaid Habashneh

from it in a constructive way: do you think that Art could play an important role in helping the development of contemporary society?

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: I do believe that, but in order to reach that point, art should be introduced to the majority of the people and be accessible to everyone from an early age. I also believe that art is one of few ways that can help us develop a contemporary society that accept diversity and differences. We really appreciate your unconventional use of peculiar materials. We sometimes tend to forget that a work of art is a physical artefact with tactile qualities, and we dare say that your artworks use the insight of the lens to rediscover the concept of materially: how important is for you to highlight the tactile aspect of your artworks?

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: My aim is to create a conceptual yet tangible artwork; it is a fine line between the words conceptual and imaginative for me, I want the viewers to see what I mean yet let their imagination sail away with their thoughts. It is really important and satisfying to see how any material can be utilized in a different way other than what it is meant to, and I think that we inherited everything including how we use stuff! Which is a big obstacle to overcome. As a versatile creative, your professional production encompasses Architecture, Art and Design: what does direct you to such multidisciplinary approach? In particular, are there any experiences that did particularly help you to develop your attitude to experiment with different techniques?

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Wasim Zaid Habashneh

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: Art, Architecture and design are all connected. My attitude to experiment with different techniques came from my interest in breaking out of the inherited methods of using any material. Experimenting with new materials and techniques can expand our

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range of imagination and make us discover new areas in it. You are an established artist and your artworks have been exhibited in several occasions. Direct relationship with the viewers in a physical context is definitely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of

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Wasim Zaid Habashneh

a work of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm — as Instagram — increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalized audience?

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active on social media is important nowadays since not everyone can attend an exhibition due to many reasons, in addition we have seen how Covid-19 changed the way we practice our normal lives and how everyone turned to the online platforms to connect with people.

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: I realized that being

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Wasim Zaid Habashneh

I have tried to connect and show my true character through my Instagram account https://www.instagram.com/wasimzaid.offi cial as I felt that it brings me closes to my audience and I learn more about them as much as they do about me. Art is about expressing ourselves and social media can

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make you reach a wider audience, I suggest that we use it in a meaningful and compassionate way. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts with us again, Wasim. How do you see your evolution as an artist over time? Are there any things that you do fundamentally

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Wasim Zaid Habashneh

different from when you started years ago?

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when it comes to discussing new topics with the public through an artwork, which is very liberating.

Wasim Zaid Habashneh: I think that the audience should answer this first question. Regarding the fundamental differences, I don’t think that I’ve changed any of my initial approaches nor fundamentals, however, I did become more bold and open

I also would like to invite the views to my website: https://www.wasimzaid.com

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Joanna has lived and worked in Victoria, BC for 20 years and she has just recently moved to the small town of Crofton on Vancouver Island.

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

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An interview by and

, curator curator

Hello Joanna and welcome to ART Habens. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit https://www.jcvartstudio.com and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. Are there experiences that did particularly influence your evolution as an artist, when you were a teenager? In particular, what did trigger your decision to create art again? Joanna Vander Vlugt: When I was a teenager, I received as a Christmas present a sketchpad and charcoal pencils. I always drew as a child. The sketchpad and charcoal pencils took my drawing to a new level. I would flip through magazines and draw portraits. I didn’t think twice about the time it took drawing a portrait. My goal was to draw it until I got it right. I could easily spend 4 to 6 hours, or an entire Sunday afternoon and evening drawing. I drew portraits, the human body and I loved drawing clothes. I was creating fashion illustrations but at that time, I didn’t know it.

Joanna Vander Vlugt

her daughters would be independent and never go hungry. I worked at the prosecutor’s office, the Nanaimo Crown Counsel Office. Life happened. I got married, had children and had no time for art. I had though began writing thriller novels.

When I was older, I attended the Vancouver Island University for the legal assistant’s program. I stopped creating art. My Hungarian mother had lived through World War II and she was determined that

I returned to creating art through a long twisting road. I had become a fitness

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

instructor and personal trainer. I wanted to create my own fitness line. I started drawing croquis thinking about my own fitness clothing. I was back drawing fashion and I loved it. I loved it more than being a personal trainer. I gave myself a 6-month break from personal training so I could “get this drawing out of my system.� After 6 months I still wanted to draw. I

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followed my heart stopped personal training and drew all the time. My husband was surprised to see me drawing for 4 to 6 hours. I couldn’t understand his surprise, because I was just doing what I used to do as a teenager. My best friend, also a writer, knew I had a little trepidation, picking up the pencil and

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

drawing again. She gave me the best advice. She said, “draw in your sketchbook, anything, at any time and you don’t have to show your sketches to anyone. Your sketches are for your eyes only.” Her advice was liberating. I did exactly that and when I became confident I started showing her my sketches. She was very happy when I told her I needed a

ART Habens

bigger sketchpad. When I showed her my charcoal sketchbook from a teenager (I still have it), she was mad that I had stopped creating art, but she was glad I was creating art again. I had to promise her that I would never stop again. A fitness client saw my drawings and she asked me to illustrate her husband’s sprint

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

car. It would be his birthday present. His sprint car was my first commission. I had a

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few car commissions. I then saw a fellow personal trainer, standing in front of her

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

orange motorcycle, Woman Empowered Katrina. I asked if I could illustrate her and she was the first of many motorcycle commissions.

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motorcycle series , a stimulating body of works that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article and that has at once captured our attention for the way you use your visual language in a strategic way to express such unique sense of freedom,

For this special edition of ART Habens we have selected your Woman Empowered

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

offering to the viewers an emotional array of meanings: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how do you usually develop your initial idea for your

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artworks? Do you create your works gesturally, instinctively? In particular, how do you consider the role of chance and improvisation playing within your work as a visual artist?

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

Joanna Vander Vlugt: When illustrating the motorcycles, technology and instinct work hand-in-hand. I have been fortunate to work with amazing photographers, especially

ART Habens

Toronto-based photographer, Jeff Turner, who took many of the great motorcycle photos. I was ecstatic when he gave me permission to illustrate his photos. I work from a reference photo on my cell phone.

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

By using my cell phone, I can blow up the image of a tire and draw the minute details on the rims and the spokes. My motorcycle illustrations are detailed and they must be accurate. There are

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times with my marker, I will colour a small blue line, or I will place a green line on the inside of a tire rim. Many times, I have looked at what I’m doing and I’ll tell myself, “believe in the process,” because

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

that green line inconjunction with another shadow, or another colour, makes up a shadow or adds depth which I will only see when the picture is complete. I add layers with my markers just like a painter. I mix my marker ink on a plastic palette much like a painter mixes paint on his/her palette. The improvisation comes with regards to the colours I choose or what I want to do with the background.

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Another practice I do is I mix marker ink. I have a piece of vellum which I will mark up with ink, and then I’ll use another marker and blend the colours to create another colour or a watercolour effect. My goal is to use markers in such a way that they almost look like watercolours. To add intensity and create an effect I’ll use colour pencils. As well I use a blender pen which is alcohol based and it will take marker colour off the page. In the illustration of Stevie and the Motorcycle (Stevie is the actual name of the rabbit), to create the rain drops on the side car, I used the blender pen in a circular motion to pull ink off the page. Stevie the rabbit and Michael the budgie (my friend’s pets) really aren’t sitting on the bike. I wanted to add a bit of whimsy to that illustration and I love animals.

Your artworks feature such wide variety of tones, often market out with unique, thoughtful nuances — as Katie from the Woman Empowered motorcycle series— as well as vivacious tones: how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in an artwork and in particular, how do you develop your textures in order to achieve such unique results?

It's important to remark that your medium is Copic art markers, that you use in many car and fashion illustrations, and that are known for their brightness and blending capabilities: what did direct you to such unusual still effective medium?

Joanna Vander Vlugt: The abstract paintings I admire usually involve bright colours. I wear a lot of jewel tones. With Katie’s illustration, when I blew up that photo on my cell phone, I realized that her gas tank reflected the landscape around her. I thought that fascinating. I had a picture in a picture and I wanted to do that. The rims on her bike wheel reflect the blue of the bike. The gold on the rims, reflect the ground. Bike helmets are so much fun to illustrate, because there is so much reflection, and the white around her visor is actually me letting the paper come through. I’m taking the blue ink out to a very fine white line, which is actually the paper.

Joanna Vander Vlugt: When I saw the fashion illustrations of Hayden Williams and learned that he used Copic markers (at that time), I was blown away. I knew I had to try this medium. I liked the clean lines of the marker, the brightness and the versatility. I could go anywhere with my marker paper and markers and create. As you have remarked in your artist's statement, you enjoy illustrating women

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

bikers, because you are depicting women empowered instead of women as sex objects. Over the recent years many artists, from Martha Wilson to Carolee Schneemann have explored culture’s expectations about what women are supposed to be: as an artist interested in questioning the shapings of the modern woman, do you think that contemporary art could be a conduit for a kind of social criticism capable of making aware a large part of the population of the condition of women in our globalized, still patriarchal societies?

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artworks encourage the viewers to capture beauty in daily life, and in this sense, your approach seems to reflect Edgar Degas' words, when he once stated that “Art is not what you see, but what you make others see." As you have remarked in your artist's statement, in order to see beauty, you just need to pause and look around: how does your everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research? Joanna Vander Vlugt: I remember one day when I had started creating art. I had walked down a street I had always walked down, and I saw a brick building I had passed many times. This particular day I was amazed at the colours I saw in those bricks. Why hadn’t I noticed the colours before? I doubt the people on the street paid any attention to the building. Creating art has opened my eyes. I see like I’ve never seen before.

Joanna Vander Vlugt: Art is the best conduit. There was a time in my life when I thought I would never draw again. I felt like I had lost my creativity. I would never have guessed that 30 years later it would be given back to me, like a gift. When I create a piece of art, especially the motorcycle series, I want my gift to have a purpose.

When I create a picture, I’m trying to open people’s eyes so they can see the beauty in a bike’s gasoline tank or the beauty in the autumn colours of leaves. Mother Nature is the ultimate artist, and she has an awesome palette. We need to be more appreciative of her talent.

There is an entire motorcycle culture of female riders, smart, independent women who love riding motorcycles and getting together to go on group rides and excursion. They maintain their own bikes. Our society has one vision of what a woman should or should not be. I want to kick that stereotype. I love seeing the independence and freedom of a woman riding her motorcycle and I want to illlustrate and celebrate that. When I illustrate a female biker, I’m celebrating her individuality and her being herself.

Your Woman Empoweredseries has deeply struck us for the way you conveyed unique aesthetics and a message of freedom: how important is for you to balance aesthetics and the messages within your works? In particular, how do you consider the aesthetics aspect when creating?

We really appreciate the way your

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

We have appreciated the way you include elements from landscape, that, as in the interesting Twigee Harley fog provide your works with stimulating ambivalent visual identity, and a bit dreamlike ambience, that seems to unveil the bridge between the real and the imagined. Scottish painter Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic paintings are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production?

Joanna Vander Vlugt: When I see Woman Empowered Jen standing on her bike, hands on hips, there are two levels of aethetics. There’s the obvious aesthetic in the blues in her leather jacket, the dark pinks in the gas tank, the colours in her helmet. There’s a deeper beauty that comes from the integrity of the composition. So many women love Woman Empowered Jen, I love that illustration because it shows a powerful woman. The illustrations where the viewer can’t see the woman’s face are the most popular, because the female viewer can picture herself being that woman on that bike having that independence and power. I think through beauty in art, depicted in a non-traditional fashion, many messages can be expressed.

Joanna Vander Vlugt: With Twiggee Harley Fog, the realism must be with the depiction of the motorcycle. I’m illustrating an individual’s bike and it must be accurate. After I’ve illustrated the motorcycle, that is when I “let loose” with the surroundings and try to depict a landscape in a whimsical fashion but still make it recognizable and have depth using markers.

When depicting women empowered, you also provide your artworks such subtle still effective sensitiveness: do you think that your being a woman provides the results of your artistic research with some special value?

Besides creating stunning visual artworks, you are also an author and your novel The Unravelling was a finalist in the 2019 Canadian Book Club Awards in the fiction category, and your motorcycle art inspired scenes in your novel: how do you consider the relationship between your visual artworks and your experience as a novelist?

Joanna Vander Vlugt: Special value? I couldn’t illustrate these women if I didn’t have a love for the subject matter. Sometimes I feel like I’m the only artist in the world who doesn’t illustrate beautiful gardens. There has to be a connection in what I am illustrating or it will not work. The women I illustrate are real, and there is a trust between the rider and me as an artist, and I want to showcase female riders honestly and beautifully and celebrate them.

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Joanna Vander Vlugt: We hear in the entertainment field that a performer or athlete is a triple threat. Why can't an author also be an artist and an artist also an author? I refuse to label or pigeon-hold creativity. I

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Joanna Vander Vlugt

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wrote novels and I created art when I was a teenager. I tell people I write in pictures, it’s like I have a movie reel running in my head, and I want to share that movie with the words I write on the page. When I see a scene, I often want to illustrate that scene through my art. The book cover is based on a chase scene through Fan Tan Alley in Victoria, BC where I live. I loved illustrating Fan Tan alley. When I did the rewrites for The Unravelling, at the suggestion of my editor, I added a new chapter. That chapter was my favorite and it was inspired by the female character riding her motorcycle in the sunset as she rescues her sister. I am working on the sequel to The Unravelling and there will be a marriage of art and writing as I make that book an illustrated thriller novel.

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Art is personal. There are people who do not like my work. That’s all right. Art is personal. We have really appreciated the originality of your artistic production and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Joanna. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future? Joanna Vander Vlugt: I am currently working on a fun project with an American bartender illustrating fancy cocktails. It’s my version of still life. I want to continue illustrating motorcycles, and one day I want to produce a motorcycle illustration coffee table book featuring female riders. I’m also working on the sequel to my thriller novel and I am very excited to make it an illustrated thriller novel. I have created my first abstract art piece using acrylics. I tapped into a different section of my creative side. Motorcycle illustrations are technical. I know the owner of the motorcycle will notice if an engine part is missing or a side mirror. The technicallity is in the drawing, the creativity is in picking and mixing colours and creating the landscape. With my abstract, I’m not picking up a pencil at all. I’m painting unrestricted, jumping on a swirl of paint colour, painting by instinct but still using my eye for colour.

Your art is collected by private collectors world-wide: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? Direct relationship with the viewers in a physical context is definetely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience? Joanna Vander Vlugt: My artwork may not meet the criteria to be shown in a traditional art gallery. Because of the online realm, I have been able to reach an audience that I wouldn’t be able to reach through traditional showings.

Thank you very much for interviewing me and being interested in my artwork. My artwork can be seen on my website at www.jcvartstudio.com and on Instagram @jcvartstudio

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Lives and works in ReykjavĂ­k, Iceland

I was Painted By My Light

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Reflect On The Y


Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir An interview by and

, curator curator

Hello Hildur and welcome to ART Habens. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit https://www.hildurerna.com and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. You have a solid formal training: you studied Photography and New Media at the Academia Italiana in Florence, Italy and you eventually graduated with B.A (Honours): how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist?

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: Those three years led me to my vision and concept as an artist. I really learned how to think outside the box, especially since the schools approach wasn’t as artistic, as much as it was commercial. So I had to push the boundaries when it came to my vision as a creative and therefor pushed my own artistic boundaries as well. My focus started on the deconstruction of the human form after I had done a lot of research on Jaques Derrida, who did extensive work about the concept. From there the idea of it subconsciously started working its way in my work, especially when working with the human form. Having studied art history and various contemporary art forms has also impacted my style enormously and led me to not only work with photography but also with other alternative mediums.

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir

the body of works that we have selected for this special edition of ART Habens —and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article — has at once captured our attention for the way you sapiently explore the subtlety of body language within the theme of human form, challenging the traditional idea of beauty associated to human body: when walking our readers through your usual

Marked out with such unique visual identity,

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Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir

Metamorphosis ll

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setup and process, would you tell us how do you usually develop your initial idea for your artworks?

cut vision at first of what kind of visual language I want to accomplish or convey because I want the process to be authentic to my state of mind at that particular moment and for that to translate onto the final artwork. It can be described as an unconscious ejection of my creativity, feelings and thoughts onto a canvas.

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: The development is very organic and fluid. I usually start by taking photos and ask my subjects to create abnormal and challenging bodily positions to get interesting and unexpected angles on the body. After that I let my creativity take me where it wants to go when it comes to advancing the creative process. I rarely have a clear

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I get inspiration from everything around me and all the time. I think it’s beautiful to be able to let’s say see a raindrop falling on the ground and being able to create something occular from or around such physical event.

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Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir

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Elevated-lll

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So, the development of my initial idea for my artworks is always conjunctional and different, or both because different moments create different inspiration.

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: I work mainly instinctively, and leave much up for chance and serendipity, although I don’t like using such words because it sounds like there’s no effort behind it. Maybe it’s a mixture of both and everything, I don’t have a box I put myself in when it comes to my artistic vision or practices but you can still always see the thread that connects my artworks. Improvising when I’m editing is probably my favourite thing to do in the whole process, there are so many possibilities when it comes

As you have remarked in your artist's statement, your approach often ends up with the unexpected and transformative: do you create your works gesturally, instinctively? In particular, how do you consider the role of chance and improvisation playing within your work as an artist?

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Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir

Unrealistic Expectations

to creating something from nothing and it’s always exciting to find something new to work with whether it be a technique, color, or something like that. Your artworks feature such unique combination between reminders to human form and dreamlike ambience, that provides its figures with ambivalent and a bit enigmatic visual identity, that seems to unveil the bridge between the real and the imagined. Scottish painter Peter Doig once remarked

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that even the most realistic paintings are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production?

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: I consider that relationship to be very important when tapping into my artistic production. In a way all creations are a visualisation of the imaginative, and like you quoted Doig, even with realism,

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Mount Unrealistic Expectations


Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir

there’s always an addition of the non existent. The basis of my interpretation of my work rests mainly on the other worldly field and emotions. It’s quite interesting and exciting to hear what people see in my work because it differs but the foundation of their interpretation is always the same. Connecting the tangible and imagination forces the audience, including myself, look a bit further than our own reality. And that’s what I love about what I create, because who doesn’t want a little magic in their everyday life!

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in the world that has been created in that artwork. Although marked out with abstract style, your artworks are pervaded with effective narrative drive, that you draw from people around you as well as from the environment: how does your everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research?

Each day plays a big part in my artistic research, I try to keep my mind open each day to learn or try something new, even if it’s the smallest thing. My workflow being as fluid and instinctual as it is, it’s bound to be affected by my everyday life. So I think it’s important to keep that in mind subconsciously when I go about my days.

When exploring edges or shapes, your artworks feature thoughtful nuances — as Mount as well as I was Painted By My Light. Moreover, we have particularly appreciated the way they create such enigmatic patterns, communicating tension and such dreamlike ambience. How does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in an artwork and in particular, how do you develop your textures in order to achieve such unique results?

The people I surround myself with play a big part in it as well since I have been so lucky to know people that have played a big part in who I am and how I look at the world, sometimes even a short encounter with a person I don’t know can change something within me whether it be an opinion, education or just anything. For me that’s one of the most powerful tools in my art box. With that, it keeps my work ever changing as well, just like myself. One of my favourite thing to use as well is looking within, as it is often referred to, I meditate, and it’s there where I go on journeys to explore. It’s a powerful vehicle to utilize for inspiration purposes and births of ideas, and has big effects on my work.

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: My reason for using nuances of tones is first of all to not make anything in particular stand out, so the whole form and subject/object can be in full focus. Also, it gives a certain tone to it, I can almost hear the sound each artwork makes and I feel the similarity of colours create that. The textures tend to come from photographs I have taken specifically for texture purpose. Often at times there are a few photographs within one of my artwork, which gives more depth and feel to them. As well as more things to explore

You are a versatile artist: reminding German artist Gerhard Richter's over-layering technique, you create artworks using photography as main medium then mixing it

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Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir

creatively with painting, drawing, and writing: what does address you to such stimulating cross disciplinary practice? How did you come up to the necessity of mixing different artistic disciplines?

the stimulation I need creatively. Not only that but also creating that visual depth is extremely satisfying. In my work I focus more on connecting on a deep level with the viewer in that way so they can form their own concept, which often ends up being a reflection of their own state of mind and existence.

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: Since high school and then university I was working with different mediums, but all separately. After I graduated I didn’t have anything except my computer and photoshop, so I started combining a few of my favourite mediums but digitally. I love photography, but it’s not enough for me, so combining it with drawing and writing and my work often ending up like a painting, gives me all

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We have been fascinated with the way your artworks unveil the point of convergence between classical heritage and new imaginations, with such unique contemporary sensitiveness, highlighting that exploring a past experience can enhance

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Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir

the understanding of the contemporary: how do you consider the relationship between Tradition and Contemporariness playing within your artistic process?

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without having any kind of strict frame telling you where your sensational reactions should be directed, is one of the things I enjoy the most when it comes to art.

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: With both entities theres a sense of stillness. And in my work, creating a sort of statuesque body form combined with a more abstract approach, creates an interesting dynamic in which you can find that static feeling. My approach with this is entirely intuitive and is something that is in my nature with everything I create. The past and present, life and death, classical heritage and new imaginations, these ideologies are a part of everyone and with my work I’m just bringing it into visualisation.

I create some artwork with a clear concept but the other times I will just go with my instinct and see where it takes me. In that kind of process I’m watching the concept being built and when I finish the work, I get that ‘’AHA’’ moment. But even though I have my idea behind my art, I encourage different perspectives and visions. It’s not just mine, but it’s whoever’s engaging with it as well, and it’s important to welcome those connections because other wise you’re only creating the work for yourself and then there’s no space for the work to connect with the viewers.

With their unique multilayered visual quality, your artworks have several different strands but they are all connected to a core vision: how important is it for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to discover the unity of your artistic production? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood?

Over the years your artworks have exhibited in several occasions: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? Direct relationship with the viewers in a physical context is definetely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm — as Instagram — increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: It’s not extremely important for me that they are understood in particular semantic way, in the sense that I don’t want the viewer to feel pressure to add some complicated concept or thoughts to what they’re looking at. On the other hand I encourage it because not only is it incredible to see when someone connect with your work and sees something in it, sometimes things that maybe I don’t. But it works as a platform for the affective imagination which I am all about. Looking at an artwork and really digging deep into its layers,

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: Nothing beats the raw connection that happens when you have the artwork in front of you in real time, but having these other gateways for people from across the world to see work that they might never have seen otherwise is pretty great as well. With the increased availability of social media, as well as even online

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Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir

ART Habens

exhibitions, its creating a larger platform for artists and more opportunities which is fantastic. Although the relationship with the audience might not be the same and not as intimate, it’s our reality now and I think it’s important to embrace it. For example, I use my Instagram page (https://www.instagram.com/hildurernaa) as a way to connect with a wider audience and to share my work that I might not share in an exhibition until maybe way later, so it’s nice to be able to share my work on a platform like that and even then get my audience more excited to see the work presented as a whole during a live event. We have really appreciated the originality of your artistic production and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Hildur. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Hildur Erna Sigurjónsdóttir: I’m currently making plans for my first solo exhibition and working on new materials for it. I’m excited for the future of my artistic production both in the sense of opportunities and exploration within my work. I will continue to learn and seek out subjects that intrigue me and looking forward to see and share what comes from it. An interview by and

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, curator curator

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Hildur Erna Sigurjรณnsdรณttir

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Couch Atlas

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Damian Horst

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video, 2013

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Covered in Horseshit Special Issue

Jordi Rosado

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Damian Horst An interview by and

, curator curator

Hello Damian and welcome to ART Habens. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit www.damianhorst.com in order to get a wide idea about your artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. Are there any experiences that did particularly influence your evolution as an artist? In particular, how does your cultural substratum direct the trajectory of your current artistic research?

Damian Horst: Hello ART Habens! Let's make it short: Born in 1987 in a small town in the Ruhr area in Germany, school, study of graphic design, graduated at 23, played in a band for 6 years, self-employed as graphic designer, specialization in retouching and composing, working in the advertising industry. Advertising industry is not fulfilling. Hence Damian Horst. He's doing other things now, just like he always has. I am picking up where I never left off, I just found a better channel for it. As a child you just do things like that. You didn't ask yourself, "Why am I doing this? But when I ask myself why do i do things the way i do things, not why at all, but only why do these things look like that? Then I listen very deeply into myself and perhaps come to the following conclusion: Curiosity without absolute final satisfaction, that's my drive.

Damian Horst

science-fiction and horror movies when I was a kid, I found it all fascinating, but of course I didn't get it, of course, especially the animes, which always were in Japanese with English subtitles and I didn't know any English at that time. I think a lot of that has definitely

Maybe that's because my older brother always showed me all the crazy anime

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Damian Horst

Dinner With The Demiurge

left its marks on me, especially the excess, the overwhelming of all these weird, disturbing, but exciting and inspiring things. It's kind of a great feeling. It's similar with religion, you don't get anything there either. Fortunately I wasn't brought up religiously,

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otherwise the fascination of the topic wouldn't be so big for me today. When I deal with such topics today, I try to understand only so much of the context to be able to make a rough classification. I do not want to

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Damian Horst

ART Habens

disenchant these things for me. I may reserve a certain infantility for myself.

myself to implement them. So I mean, the things have to get out of your head again.

As far as my current work is concerned, I let myself drift, many ideas come, many go, some stick around longer and then force

You are a versatile artist the body of works that we have selected for this special edition of ART Habens has at once impressed us of for the way

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ART Habens

Damian Horst

Dinner With The Demiurge you structured them to pursue such powerfully thoughtful visual impact: what was your working schedule like? Did you carefully plan each shot?

write it down somewhere, either I write it down in my phone, write me an email, write something on my big white board or whatever. In order to be able to sort myself better, and I am a very unsorted person who today hardly knows what yesterday was, I

Damian Horst: When I have an idea, or a certain thought, a picture in my head, then I

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Damian Horst

have developed a small index card system for myself. This is a small black box, there are many small cards in it, and there I collect all things together. And the nice thing about it is: if I'm stuck somewhere, I can always look in there. You can also spread out the cards in

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front of you and look, which idea might fit to another one, can i combine different things, or combine them into a series? Well, ok, so when I have found something I want to work on, I research for a while, read things, look at pictures, write everything relevant on cards

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Damian Horst

Dinner With The Demiurge

again. Then I sketch things out quite roughly, sometimes more precisely, sometimes more roughly. In the example of the series "Dinner with the Demiurge" the sketches were very rough, hardly any details, but they show pretty

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much what I did later. In my head I already know what I need for the further realization, which I partly buy, but partly I have to make the things myself, i.e. model, sew, paint etc. That is then a very manual part of the work. So when I have everything together, I throw

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Damian Horst

everything into the studio, set up the scene, drink a lot of beer and photograph the whole thing. In my head everything is planned out, but since I am often a model, photographer and stylist at the same time, I take my time in the final implementation

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until everything fits. Luckily my partner is also a photographer and can assist me when it gets too complicated for me. However, due to my impatience I am far away from being a perfectionist, in the end I

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Damian Horst

10 funny Balloon Tricks Every Body Should Learn

10 funny Balloon Tricks Every Body Should Learn

just want to finish, because the photographic part is the part that brings along the most uncomfortable parts, building up, fiddling around, not wanting to do anything wrong, dismantling, cleaning. mostly there is a lot to clean, over spaghetti or in this case everything is full of pudding.

need, the project goes into postproduction, where I finally put everything together until I am satisfied. This is the part that takes the most time. The nice thing about it is that I have the time there, in the studio I want to finish it, in postproduction I can stare at the picture for hours and ask myself: Is this right, or do I need a little more pink somewhere, this process can be more compared to painting.

That's why tarpaulins are probably my most important working tool :D Once I have photographed all the individual elements I

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Damian Horst

ART Habens

everyday life: I like to look at people, to see what they do, how they do it, to ask myself, why do people do these things? I think I live in a permanent state of absolute curiosity and confusion. It’s always nice to get a sneak peak of someone else's life. Especially in real life encounters, on the train, in a que, etc. Austrian historian Ernst Gombrich once remarked the importance of providing a space for the audience to project onto, so that they can actively participate in the creation of the visual experience: how important is for you to trigger the viewer's imagination in order to address them to elaborate personal associations? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood?

Damian Horst: When people look at my stuff and a big question mark is spreading in their minds, a warm, benevolent question mark, not an indifferent question mark, then for me everything is already achieved. - it is always important to me not to tell the stories, but to leave enough space for questions and interpretations. I see my things more like artifacts that have been dug up and now one has to ask oneself what all this is about, putting the pieces of the puzzle together, including me sometimes. I can only use myself and my own experiences as a guideline for these things. I think you need some structure, something that can be recognized, now spoken on a purely figurative level, to get into the picture, you first have to find a reason to look at a picture for a longer time, find an anchor. from there you can then go deeper into the picture and try to decipher the message, or just stay with the anchor and say: yep, this is a ship, it's just lying here now, and I like it. So the balance between: yes, the picture also works as a

10 funny Balloon Tricks Every Body Should Learn

We have really appreciated the combination between unsparing realism and unique ambience that you created in Blitzgeschichten in order to create such a unique aesthetics: how does everyday life's experience fuel your artistic creativity?

Damian Horst: The series “Blitzgeschichten� is unfortunately part of a past, different era, about which Damian unfortunately can't say anything. But I can say something about

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Damian Horst

Darwin loves Jesus

The Exchanged One-melting away

picture, it's a pleasure to look at it and: what the fuck is happening there, what was the person thinking when creating the picture?

Recently I asked myself the question: do I want to model and photograph an object by hand, or should I develop it directly in a 3D environment? - On the one hand I want to make progress in the 3D area to expand my skills and if necessary to incorporate them into my work, on the other hand I work a lot in front of the computer, so it is also simply a pleasure to model real things. And you only have a limited amount of time. I think it all flows together and in the end you will always

Manipulation in visual arts is not new, but digital technology has extended the range of possibilities: how do you consider the role of technology playing within your artistic practice?

Damian Horst: Well, the technology keeps advancing, it also gets easier to use, I try to take everything I can and try to stay up to date.

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Damian Horst

ART Habens

The Pleasures of Christ

The Resurrection of Jesus Christ

use what seems to be the best, fastest, cheapest or most important: funniest method. Above all, art is not something that can be attached to a tool, it's what you do with it and in the end it’s the result that counts.

critically about images: how do you consider the role of photography in our contemporary age, constantly saturated by ubiquitous images?

Damian Horst: I believe this question can only be answered on an individual basis today. For me personally: I like it saturated.

In a controversial quote, German photographer Thomas Ruff stated that ''nowadays you don't have to paint to be an artist: you can just create photographs in a realistic way". Provocatively, the German photographer highlighted the short circuit between the act of looking and that of thinking

And I think this is just the reality we live in now. All the time, all at the same time, from millions of perspectives. It's actually quite beautiful, isn't it? Photography has always

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Damian Horst

adjustments, people use filters, making adjustments with retouching software. It is always only what you are supposed to see. And now we just have a lot of it and that's ok, especially a development that can't be turned back. And why should we leave such a medium to an elitist circle? I also see photography for myself rather simply as a tool that helps me to express myself, through this medium I can best bring together the most diverse handicrafts. Otherwise I don't see myself as able to answer this question on a philosophical level. Sometimes you have to leave things to others. In the end i don’t really care about it. I’m just doing my stuff. How do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? Direct relationship with the viewers in a physical context is definetely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm — and we would lik to invite our readers to visit your Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/damianhorst._ — increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

The origin of clickbait — Growth Phase

Damian Horst: On the one hand it is more difficult to stand out from the masses, simply because there are so many things at the same time, on the other hand it gives you the possibility to share your stuff with at least the potential of millions of people. In addition, it generally lowers the hurdles to come into direct contact and exchange with art and artists.

been a means to capture what you want to show others. And there have always been possibilities of manipulation. I don't mean a photo without manipulation anyway, in the past you had to develop the stuff by hand, and that's where influence was exerted on the picture. The crop itself is always a manipulation aswell. There is no truth in photography, never was.

We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your

Today smartphones make automatic

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The origin of clickbait - Discovery


Kontoangst Menschenopfer - Look Mommy No Angel


Damian Horst

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Kontoangst Menschenopfer - Sacrifice

Kontoangst Menschenopfer - Saldo

thoughts, Damian. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Furthermore, I am currently working on the development of a stage design for the play "A behanding in spokane" for the Rottstr.5 Theater in Bochum. Apart from that I am continuing my excavations, searching my head and my card index box to understand, what else has been bothering me so much lately. It's all about doing, doing, doing. No stopping, not pausing, just doing. Then things start happening.

Damian Horst: I would also like to thank you for the opportunity to share my thoughts here! At the moment I'm still working on the cosmos "Kontoangst – Menschenopfer / Account Anxiety - Human Sacrifice", which I would like to develop further as a project, especially to possibly develop positive ways to deal with such issues. In this context I plan to continue the project online and to try to find out how to make an exhibition online more like a happening.

An interview by and

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, curator curator

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Lives and works in Moscow, Russia

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Daria Tyurina

ART Habens

video, 2013

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Jordi Rosado

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Daria Tyurina An interview by and

, curator curator

You have a solid formal training in Engineering: what did address you to expand your creative potential to the field of Fine Arts? Moreover, how does your cultural background direct your current artistic research? "EVERYTHING IS POSSIBLE� - these words are axiom of my life. I grew up in Moldova, in Chisinau. At school I have studied at the class with a focus on literature and humanitarian sciences, I had a lot of different hobbies and occupations. I liked to draw, to read, even to write poems sometimes. But artistic or even scientific professions usually do not bring good income in Moldova. My mother is a ballerina, she worked so hard that her toes were with calluses and sometimes even with bloody wounds, but she was not paid much. My grandmother and grandfather are chemists – biologists, they were working at the state academy of science. Unfortunately, science at the time of my childhood also did not bring a lot of money.

Daria Tyurina

My father in his youth had chosen to be an engineer. He worked a lot, I saw him only early in the morning, before school. But had a good salary and even in hard

have studied in Moscow State University MAMI

times in our country he could provide our family with

mechanical engineering and became an engineer.

everything necessary. When half of my school friends

Today I built automobiles, helicopters and sometimes

were poor and sometimes even hungry, I was fed,

even planes, it is my work, it feeds me and I love it.

dressed and even sometimes had pocket money to by sweets. Because of that since my early childhood I

Engineering is also a creative profession, but still, all

knew that I also will be an engineer. So, after school I

the time while studying and working as an engineer I

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ART Habens

Daria Tyurina

felt lack of creativity, lack of possibilities to express the wide range of feelings and thoughts I had in my head. Because of that I started to learn different art techniques: painting, installations, textile art, sculpting. Now I can express my inner feelings making art, using these different techniques and my engineering skills. Now I am not only an engineer I also make art. My engineering education helps me a lot. I use modern engineering technologies for creating my 3d works. When I was making series of works “Silent scream” I used almost the same technology that I learned working as an engineer and making molds for fiberglass parts. I adapted the technology of making composite matrix by replacing silicon with dental alginate impression material and fiberglass by plaster bandages to create the exact copy of the existing people faces.

Also, I used a lot of engineering experience to create my sculpture “Salvation”, 3D printing, laser cutting and epoxy pouring. For my work “Coal rain” I used 3D modelling and laser cutting. My artworks are an alloy of creative thoughts and engineering skills. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of ART Habens and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once

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Daria Tyurina

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Daria Tyurina

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Daria Tyurina

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captured our attention for the way you explore the idea of beauty in everyday's life experience, recontextualizing elements from ordinary experience, to invite the viewers to question thetopic themes: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how did you develop your ideas? In particular, do you create your works gesturally, instinctively? And how do you consider the role of chance and improvisation playing within your work as an artist?

Daria Tyurina: Almost all of my works are created with intention to make our world a better place to live for everyone. I draw public attention to the problems whose existence in the modern, progressive world doesn’t want to be admitted, to the social problems that no one wants to talk about – such as racism, chauvinism, violence and so on. Each of my work tells the story of living person, sometimes of my dear people, friends and relatives, that suffered from some of these issues and their consequences. Every work is a message, sometimes this is advice or a request, sometimes it is a cry for help from people who still can't speak for themselves. When I see some problem that needs to be solved, I imagine the feeling that the person has to experience to understand it and transfer it throe the picture. I know that a lot of artists create their works gesturally, instinctively, they improvise a lot. That does not work for me at all. Probably it is because of my engineering background. I create the exact

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Daria Tyurina

imagination of the final work in my head. A lot of time I spend carefully considering every detail, material, technology that can translate the proper thought and feeling into reality. Only when I have exact picture in my head I start working on the real object.

I am sure that when human feels something on his own skin he understands the problem deeper and inside his soul appears the intention to help the one who is facing this issue in reality. Because of that every small part in the artwork has to create the proper atmosphere. For example, when I was exhibiting my work ÂŤDo not screamÂť a lot of people approaching it shuddered and very quickly looked away. But later they returned to it again and looked intently and darkly frowning. One of my friend even told me that after looking at this picture he felt himself being very lucky that he was born a man, because it is still too scary to be woman in our world, especially in the countries that have low level of social development. Later I have even used some of his words to write the description of this artwork. The works from your Silent Scream series seem to unveil the bridge between the real and the imagined. Scottish painter Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic paintings are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production? Daria Tyurina: Every person percept the surrounding word slightly different than the other one. The

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Daria Tyurina

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perception of reality depends on the experience that the exact person got during his life. Because of that two different people looking at the same object can experience different emotions. Let’s imagine the square piece of paper, painted with red. One person, looking at it feels for example excitement and passion, because the woman that he loves often wears red dresses. Other person feels anxiety and fear because several years ago he was at the war and now his mind is connecting red color with wounds and death. Every artist also has his own life experience, his background, that plays a huge role in his artwork. Scottish painter Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic paintings are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us. I totally agree with his statement. Looking at the same situation two artists can percept and reflect it in their artwork completely different. For example, here is the situation from my own life, that I have reflected in my work “Confrontation�. (The hammer in this picture belongs to my grandfather.) I grew up in the patriarchal and traditional family, grandfather is the head of it. He is very autocratic, sometimes even dictatorial, for him exists only one right opinion - his opinion. My grandfather is a racist. All the time I had confrontations with him, I could not understand why some races are considered to be better than the others. I was making friends with everyone, not paying attention at their color of skin or

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Daria Tyurina

race or religion. The last drop was that I have married

universities with honor and speaks seven languages.

a man from a different country. And it does not

For my grandfather the man of a different race is still a

matter that my husband graduated from three

man of the lowest standard. My grandfather expelled

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Daria Tyurina

ART Habens

me from the family and since that time he had never

I could not prove my point of view to my grandfather

spoken with me. Five years had passed from that day.

that time. I failed. I went away. But I will win in this

I still feel the pain.

confrontation in another way. I will dedicate my art to

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Daria Tyurina

show the ideas of equality of people, to spread the

exist and must be solved. I hope I will change at least

thought of unison and globalization. I will attract

someone's mind and fate.

everyone's attention to the social problems, that still

I look at this situation from my position.

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Daria Tyurina

ART Habens

For me in this situation my grandfather seems to be a

become prejudices and the wisdom of ancestors turns

dictator, but maybe for him I am the one who betrayed

into an anchor that does not allow to move forward, to

family and everything he believed for his whole life.

see and accept progress.

It is very difficult to find the very edge where traditions

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ART Habens

Daria Tyurina

Marked out with such powerful narrative drive, each

them everywhere – in the bus, in the plain, in my way

of your work tells the story of living person: how

home from gym, in the market or in the metro.

does your everyday life's experience fuel your

Friends, colleagues, even completely strange people,

artistic research?

whom I have never seen and whom I barely ever see

Daria Tyurina: From the early childhood all my friends

again can suddenly start a conversation with me and

told me their secrets. With time it grew in a very

tell me their whole life. My friends tell me that it

strange property - I constantly meet people who need

happens because I have kind face and talent to listen.

to speak out. I do not search for them. I just meet

Personally I consider it some kind of a curse, because

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these stories are rarely happy. After listening them I

money. The only way I can help is to tell their stories

feel guilt for being healthy, wealthy, happy, for having

to the others by my artworks.

good job and good husband and parents, for having Every of my artworks is a message, sometimes this is

normal life and no opportunity to help all these

advice or a request, sometimes it is a cry for help from

people with something real. I am not a politician, who

people who still can't speak for themselves.

can change the laws, not an inventor of the magical elixir, that can cure every disease, I am not even a

As you have remarked in your artist's statement,

millionaire to help everyone with the power of

every work is a message: in this sense, your artworks

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Daria Tyurina

seem to invite the viewer to complete the work of

ART Habens

them to elaborate personal interpretations?

art by personal associations, creating further Daria Tyurina: Of course with my artwork I can not

meanings. Austrian Art historian Ernst Gombrich

tell the exact story, I can just give a direction where

once underlined the importance of providing a space for the viewers to project onto: your artworks are

the viewer’s imagination can go. Austrian Art historian

very dynamic and at the same time convey

Ernst Gombrich once underlined the importance of

philosophical aspects: how important is for you to

providing a space for the viewers to project onto.

trigger the viewers' imagination in order to address

My works do the exact thing, they convey

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Daria Tyurina

12

philosophical aspects, transfers the feelings. The

do your surroundings as well as the places that you

impression from them has to be a trigger for

have had the chance to visit inspire you?

elaborating personal interpretations and thoughts. Daria Tyurina: Almost the same thing I do with my When inviting the viewers to such unconventional

works that show the beauty of surrounding world. I

aesthetic journey, you create work that show the

just transfer my own impression from visiting cities or

incredible beauty of our world, and this is

from reading some historical facts about it in the color

particularly evident in your CITY FEELING series: how

and in the shape. I find the inspiration in architecture,

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Daria Tyurina

ART Habens

in ethnic music of different countries, even in the

are there any experiences that did particularly help

smells that I breathe in travelling with unknown

you to develop your attitude to experiment with

pathes.

different techniques?

You are a versatile artist and your creative

Daria Tyurina: I have an associative type of thinking. I

production encompasses Painting, Installations,

am from those people who see the sunset in their

Textile art, Digital art and Sculpture: what does direct

head when they smell the pineapple. It is very

you to such multidisciplinary approach? In particular,

importnt for me to paint beautiful citiesscapes on the

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Daria Tyurina

gentle silk with transparent, fluid aquarell tecnique

connected with one idea demands it’s own technique.

and to sculpt the serious problems of society through heavy pieces of gypsum or cement and dense acrylic

Inquiring into the themes of racism, chauvinism,

paint. Because of that every series of works

violence — your artistic production seems to be

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Daria Tyurina

ART Habens

pervaded with such stimulating socio political

respond to a particular cultural moment? Moreover,

criticism. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated,

do you think that artists can raise awareness to an

"artists's role differs depending on which part of the

evergrowing audience on topical issues that affect

world they’re in": does your artistic research

our globalised society, in order to to make our world

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Daria Tyurina

a better place to live for everyone?

stated, "artists's role differs depending on which part of the world they’re in�. I think that duty of

Daria Tyurina: My artistic production responds to a particular cultural moment at the place where I live or

every artist is to raise awareness to an evergrowing

where I travel. As Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once

audience on topical issues that affect our

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Daria Tyurina

ART Habens

globalised society, in order to make our world a

increases: how would in your opinion change the

better place to live for everyone. Because of that I

relationship with a globalised audience?

rise the problems of racism, chauvinism, violence in

Daria Tyurina: I think that the physical context is very

my works. I understand that not all of the people

important for the artworks. Of cource digital or small

want to look at the art that makes them to see

two dimensional works can be translated to the online

negative parts of this world.

galleries. For example the series of my digital works dedicated to Australia and latest “Water-Soil” works

It is more pleasant to look at the peaceful landscape.

looks quite nice even online

But it can happen that while audience looks at the

https://www.instagram.com/tyurinaart. But big

pastoral pictures in the gallries all the other world

artworks or three dimensional artworks need to be

outside the museum walls will burn in the fire of

seen in person. Otherwise the viewer will not get that

problems that noone wanted to notice.

strong impression that the artist wanted to give.

As an artist and an engineer, how do you consider

We have really appreciated the originality of your

the relationship between Art and Technology?

artistic production and before leaving this stimulating

Moreover, how do you consider the relationship

conversation we would like to thank you for chatting

between artistic research and scientific method?

with us and for sharing your thoughts, Daria. What projects are you currently working on, and what are

Daria Tyurina: I think that modern technologies

some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the

gives a lot of new opportunities for artists to

future?

express their thoughts.

Daria Tyurina: I am happy to share my thoughts and By using the technological progress it is possible to

art and very greatful for this opportunity.

make the things, that had never been made yet. For

Now I am finishing the series of “Water-Soil” works –

exampe I am thinking over to make tha series of

series of landscapes where I show the mutual

moving sculptures by using my knowlege in

attraction of earth and water, the deep connection of

automobile engineering.

their souls and the impossibility of them to be apart. After that I plan to return to the social and ecological

How do you consider the nature of your

theams in my artworks and continue the series of

relationship with your audience? Direct relationship

small sculptures, where the first work was “Salvation”

with the viewers in a physical context is definetely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work of Art. However, as the move of Art

An interview by

from traditional gallery spaces, to street and

and

, curator curator

especially to the online realm — as Instagram —

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Lives and works in Thassos, Greece

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Asia Djibirova

ART Habens

video, 2013

422 0

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Jordi Rosado

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Asia Djibirova An interview by and

, curator curator

Hello Asia and welcome to ART Habens. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit https://www.facebook.com/asie.djibiro va and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. Are there any experiences that did particularly influence your evolution as an artist? Asia Djibirova: Hello, Thank you for the opportunity to introduce readers of your wonderful magazine to my work., I am honored. Of course, there are... in fact, each experience of the artist affects his work and contributes to its development. There are experiences and stages in the life of each artist, which are like a springboard in the course of his development, and unfortunately some events are like a huge barrier to the growth of an artist. But the good thing is that such barriers are like the cork of a full bottle, and the moment this cork comes out, idea after idea is poured out, and so that I think everything affects the artist's work. One of my springboards was the moment I left ..... in fact, it is more accurate to say that I ran away from my parents in order to have my freedom to create.

Asia Djibirova

to do fine arts. I also went to Greece at the age of 26. My next significant moment in my life was when I became a mother and it completely changed my style, in fact I found what I was looking for... myself. And because my husband and I wanted to raise our children, to give myself completely to them, I didn't have time to paint, so I discovered my

My parents did not agree at all with me

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Asia Djibirova

handwriting, namely the Chaplin portrait, which is a very vivid example of my style. It is painted with a spatula and oil paints, fast, vigorous mixing of paints directly on the canvas, all borders and lines are blurred, background and image are blurred as if in one. Life directly affects or it is more correct to say that the artist's work is his very life. Marked out with such unique visual identity, the body of works that we have selected for this special edition of ART Habens —and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article — has at once captured our attention for the way you use your visual language to counter-balance subjectivity, offering an array of meanings. As you have remarked once, you see your work process as spiraling around different facets in order to widen your connection with materials and ideas: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how do you usually develop your initial idea for your artworks? Do you create your works gesturally, instinctively? In particular, how do you consider the role of chance and improvisation playing within your work as an artist? Asia Djibirova: My original idea was always to create something new, something that has not been done and has not been created before. Thus was

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Asia Djibirova

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Asia Djibirova

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Asia Djibirova

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born the idea to create a sculptor from canvases, each canvas being measured manually with the exact size for the exact place where it will be placed. My idea for this sculpture came from my desire to test the possibilities of the canvas and create a painting that does not hang hanging on the wall. I know that my inspiration for this work was given to me from Above, because no one has ever created anything. Ideas are just around us and we catch them whether it's an idea for a song, a poem, a book or a picture. I do not believe in coincidences, but in the fact that everything happens in a specific way at the right time. And the ideas appear as a flash and as a wave of energy that floods you and fills your whole body. This is the most wonderful moment in the whole process for me. Each stage has its own charm, but for me the illumination is the supreme moment, which fills the whole process with passion, energy and desire to see your idea realized. And improvisation is wonderful because it gives opportunities for options. As an artist, I always follow where the process takes me, and if it takes me away from the original idea, it doesn't bother me, so more and more ideas appear. So I even welcome improvisation, and the original idea can always come true it does not disappear.

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Asia Djibirova

You often alternate between landscape inspired painting, abstraction, and collage, and your works seem to unveil the bridge between the real and the

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imagined. Scottish painter Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic paintings are derived more from within the head than from what's out

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Asia Djibirova

there in front of us, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production?

ART Habens

Asia Djibirova: Imagination ...... Imagination ........ Imagination This is the artist, I agree with Peter

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Asia Djibirova

Doig, the work is ready in your head

artworks feature such unique harmony between colors, and we have particularly appreciated the way they create such dreamlike ambience. How

when you start creating it. When exploring edges or shapes, your

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Asia Djibirova

does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in your artworks and in particular, how do you develop your textures in order to achieve such unique results?

ART Habens

beautiful emotions and feelings then it is the combination I want and I use a lot of paint, thick layers of paint. I work mainly with oil paints because I like that they dry slowly so the paints seem to soak up more and more color and vibrant energy.

Asia Djibirova: I like to work with very bright colors, I follow my feelings when I choose a color to mix it with another, if a certain combination brings me

Although marked out with abstract style, your artworks are pervaded with effective narrative drive, and we really

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Asia Djibirova

appreciate the way Chaplin shows the connection between culture and your inner world: how does your everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research?

the smell of the paint, the open cans of paint in front of me , the splashed palette with all kinds of colors fills me with wonderful emotions. As an artist I do not like to limit myself to one style, I paint post-impressionist paintings, abstractions, surreal... I am a person of feelings and everything in me is subject to them. In my career so far always it was important to deliver pleasure and beauty to myself as an artist and it

Asia Djibirova: A wonderful question... I love the fine arts so much that despite my abstract thinking the relentless search for a new expression I always enjoy when I paint anything, even just

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Asia Djibirova

doesn't matter to me if my audience understands me, the important thing is whether they feel my paintings... and it continues to be so...

ART Habens

into your world everyone you touch with your work. With their unique multilayered visual quality, your artworks have several different strands but they are all connected to a core vision: how important is for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to discover the unity of your artistic production? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood?

And what a wonderful Is there a way to express your emotion and feelings from abstract expression? My daily experience in researching the appropriate expression for my emotions shows me every time that the more emotion you bring into your work, the more vivid it is and it does not stop talking and telling its story. Thus, through your work, you invite

Asia Djibirova: As I mentioned in my

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Asia Djibirova

previous answer, I do not want my works to be understood, but to feel and touch the soul of the audience. I do not tell or describe to my fans what the history of the work is, although it is interesting to acquaint the audience with the history of the work. But if my work does not bring feelings and emotion, if it does not touch the viewer deeply to experience it in his own way, then there is no point in telling him stories. And besides being an artist, I am also an energy healer and create healing energy pictures that their energy and the waves they emit speak more than the story itself. I think that when I tell what inspired my work, it's as if I'm directing the viewer to walk my path to the work, and when they come face to face with my work, a wave of their own emotions and feelings floods them, inspiring them to do things typical of them. Your landscapes reflect a sense of connection with the surroundings: how do the places you inhabit inspire your work as an artist? And how important are for you the memories of the places that you have had the chance to see? Asia Djibirova: I like to travel and get to know different cultures. Through their landscapes, which are in postImpressionist style, bright tones of vivid paintings take the viewer to the places I have visited. I love nature and therefore

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Asia Djibirova

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Asia Djibirova

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Asia Djibirova

to be inspired by a place it must be with a lot of living energy, flowers, sea, mountains picturesque pretty villages that keep their traditional look still., I like to have a lot of stones.

ART Habens

of the Gallery spaces We have really appreciated the originality of your artistic production and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Asia. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

You are an established artist, and your artworks are in private collections in the United States, England, Denmark, Greece, Romania, Serbia, Italy, Bulgaria, Hungary, Turkey: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? Direct relationship with the viewers in a physical context is definetely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

Asia Djibirova: i am happy to talk, but I especially want to thank you for the wonderful questions you ask me. I am working on my new project, with which I am exploring the possibilities of canvas. I have also studied fashion design and I would like to combine it with visual art. The canvas sculptor is just the beginning of these projects I am working on. Of course I am planning large-scale projects, but for now I will keep them a secret. I do not want to take away the surprise of the audience from the first meeting with my works.

Asia Djibirova: I believe that it is possible that the traditional way of displaying and exhibiting works of art can go hand in hand with online presentation. Of course, the artist's presentation in the online space is spreading like wildfire, but nothing can replace the visual contact with the work in a physical gallery. The energy that the work radiates when the viewer stands in front of it is comparable to Love at First Sight. In Bulgaria we like to say that every train has passengers, so I do not think that the online audience will attract viewers who remain faithful.

At the same time, I work as an energy healer and art therapist and work a lot with people. I also write fantasy novels, I have published a book "Love of Sleep" and I am working on the second book. An interview by and

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, curator curator

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ART Habens Art Review, Special Edition  

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