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FINE LIVING IN THE GREATER PASADENA AREA APRIL 2013

LEEZA:

SENIORS’ CAREGIVERS NEED CARE TOO

WALKING THE WALK Oldsters Hit the Road

MOURNING OR MENTAL ILLNESS? The Debate Over Troubles of the Elderly

MARK GERAGOS Defends the Defense

PLUS:

SUMMER CAMP GUIDE


arroyo VOLUME 9 | NUMBER 4 | APRIL 2013

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SAVVY AGING 13 WALK THIS WAY Walking brings seniors health, wealth and companionship. —By Brenda Rees

19 CARE FOR THE CAREGIVERS TV host Leeza Gibbons founded a center at Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center to help relatives helping seniors with disabilities. —By Rebecca Kuzins

24 GERAGOS FOR THE DEFENSE In a new book, celebrity attorney Mark Geragos argues that defense lawyers get no respect in this country. —By Bettijane Levine

51 A MENTAL DISORDER OR JUST REAL LIFE FOR THE ELDERLY? Aging specialists clash over newly designated mental disorders of the elderly in the new D.S.M.-5. —By Kathleen Kelleher

PHOTOS: Top, Courtesy of Runner’s Circle

DEPARTMENTS 11

FESTIVITIES Hillsides' Centennial Gala, The Law Offices of Donald P. Schweitzer's Monte Carlo Night

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ARROYO HOME SALES INDEX

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SUMMER CAMP PREVIEW

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KITCHEN CONFESSIONS Avoiding gluten, the latest bête noire of the bakery, has downsides.

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WINING AND DINING The Blind Donkey serves up an eclectic menu of 60 craft whiskeys.

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THE LIST The Marriage of Figaro updated, the 2013 Conference on Aging, Victorian Enchantment at Heritage Square and more

ABOUT THE COVER: Photo by Ron Derhacopian

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EDITOR’S NOTE

OKAY, EVERYBODY, APRIL 3 IS NATIONAL Walking Day, so get out of your cars and start moving. That’s good advice for people of every age, and it’s especially important for seniors, who can attain the benefits of aerobic exercise with minimal risk of injury. What’s the potential payoff? How about weight loss, heart health, even lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s? Brenda Rees put on her own walking shoes to keep pace with Pasadena’s peppy seniors, who told her about their health coups as they walked around the Rose Bowl, the Arroyo Seco and their own neighborhoods. In this issue, she offers advice on choosing shoes and getting started on a program. So no more excuses! Ways of managing health care for the elderly are still evolving. And as Kathleen Kelleher discovered, geriatric specialists are debating what constitutes mental illness and what are simply the inevitable burdens of old age. That’s one of the questions already brewing controversy in advance of the May release of the updated psychiatric bible, the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). But one thing is certain, Kelleher found — change is gonna come. Of course, the challenges of aging are not borne by the elderly alone. Their boomer caregivers often struggle with the job of tending to frail parents while maintaining their own lives. Their ranks include TV host Leeza Gibbons, who launched a support program for caregivers, dubbed Leeza’s Care Connection, at Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank. Rebecca Kuzins, who explored the facility for her story, knows the territory well —she’s one of 65 million Americans who’ve taken on this taxing but important role. On another front, Bettijane Levine talks to celebrity lawyer and La Cañada Flintridge resident Mark Geragos about his provocative new book with coauthor Pat Harris — Mistrial: An Inside Look at How the Justice System Works...And

Sometimes Doesn’t. Despite the media swarm around big trials, which often play out in your living room, his sometimes blistering critique may surprise you. —Irene Lacher

EDITOR IN CHIEF Irene Lacher ART DIRECTOR Kent Bancroft JUNIOR DESIGNER Carla Cortez PRODUCTION Richard Garcia, Rochelle Bassarear COPY EDITOR John Seeley CONTRIBUTORS Leslie Bilderback, Michael Cervin, Scarlet Cheng, Mandalit del Barco, Lynne Heffley, Noela Hueso, Carole Jacobs, Kathy Kelleher, Carl Kozlowski, Rebecca Kuzins, Bettijane Levine, Elizabeth McMillian, Brenda Rees, John Sollenberger,Nancy Spiller, Bradley Tuck

arroyo FINE LIVING IN THE GREATER PASADENA AREA

SOUTHLAND PUBLISHING V.P. OF FINANCE Michael Nagami V.P. OF OPERATIONS David Comden PRESIDENT Bruce Bolkin CONTACT US

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Dina Stegon

ADVERTISING dinas@pasadenaweekly.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Brenda Clarke, Joseluis Correa, Leslie Lamm

EDITORIAL editor@arroyomonthly.com

ADVERTORIAL CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Joanna Dehn Beresford

PHONE (626) 584-1500

ADVERTISING DESIGNERS Richard Garcia, Rochelle Bassarear

FAX (626) 795-0149

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER Andrea Baker

MAILING ADDRESS 50 S. De Lacey Ave., Ste. 200, Pasadena, CA 91105

PAYROLL Linda Lam

ArroyoMonthly.com

ACCOUNTING Alysia Chavez, Monica MacCree OFFICE ASSISTANT Ann Weathersbee PUBLISHER Jon Guynn 8 | ARROYO | 04.13

©2013 Southland Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.


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FESTIVITIES

Colleen Williams and Susan Pinsky

Donna and Henri Ford Dr. Drew and Susan Pinsky with Michael Catherwood and Bianca Kajlich

Hillsides CEO Joe Costa with Paul Rusnak

Greiman with her work

Elizabeth Rusnak Arizmendi and Marcus Allen

If Hillsides' Centennial Gala is any indication, the economy must be on the rebound, because the children's charity raised $655,000 that evening, far more than it had previously. Some 600 supporters celebrated Hillsides' 100th anniversary on Feb. 23 at an awards dinner with a winter wonderland theme at The Langham Huntington, Pasadena. Event chair Elizabeth Rusnak Arizmendi presided over the benefit, which honored TV personality and addiction specialist Dr. Drew Pinsky, NBC4 weatherman Fritz Coleman, actress Jean Smart, comedian George Lopez, football hall-of-famer Marcus Allen and Paul Rusnak, chairman/CEO of Rusnak Auto Group... The Law OfJean Smart with Hillsides CEO Joe Costa

fices of Donald P. Schweitzer also celebrated an anniversary -- the 10th for the Pasadena family law firm -- with a Monte Carlo Night fundraiser at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium that raised $6,000 for Foothill Unity Center's Mobile Dental Clinic, which treats more than 100 needy children in the San Gabriel Valley. Guests at the March 14 event included Mayor Bill Bogaard... Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California has announced the appointment of new board Chairman George Ball, CFO and executive VP at Parsons Corp. Joining Ball on the board are Luc Robitaille, L.A. Kings business exec; Trish McCarthy of The Coca-Cola Company;

PHOTOS: Raphael Maglonzo (Hillsides); Courtesy of The Law Offices of Donald P. Schweitzer; Mark Harmel (George Ball )

and Bill Gibbons of Davis Elen Advertising.

Mayor Bill Bogaard, Betty McWilliams and Donald P. Schweitzer

Fritz Coleman with Miss California USA 2013 Mabelyn Capeluj

Judge Victor Person, Donald Schweitzer and Frances Young Ruth Herrera, Rachel Bhagat, Keith Paul and Tina Paul

George Ball

Maria and Donald P. Schweitzer, Betty McWilliams and Kayla Horacek “Elvis� and Heidi Bitterman

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Walk This Way Whether competitive or social, walking brings seniors health, wealth and companionship. BY BRENDA REES

IT’S A COOL BRISK SATURDAY MORNING AND MAGGIE RITCHIE, 57, IS WARMING UP WITH THE PASADENA PACERS, A GROUP OF RUNNERS WHO MEET WEEKLY FOR TRAINING AND COMMUNAL RUNS IN AND AROUND THE ROSE BOWL AND NEARBY ARROYO. RITCHIE, HOWEVER, ISN’T JOINING THE MARATHON 10-MILE CHALLENGE OR OTHER FAST-MOVING GROUPS. SHE’S MAKING A FIVE-MILE JOURNEY INTO THE ARROYO SECO WITH THE WALKERS, A SMALL BAND OF PACERS WHO WANT THE OUTDOOR EXERCISE AND CAMARADERIE WITHOUT THE RUNNING. Ritchie started the exercise regime with her husband, Dave, in 2006 when he weighed 325 pounds. (“We tried to get him on The Biggest Loser, but that didn’t happen.”) Back then, she says, the Sunland couple routinely walked the Rose Bowl loop “every chance we could.” Dave eventually dropped the weight (diet played a big part) and then was bitten by the running bug. Today, he does Iron Man marathons, among other grueling races. Maggie, too, likes the thrill of competition but prefers to enroll in the walking categories now found alongside most 5Ks, 10Ks and even marathons. “I like walking. You get to see more, check out the scenery and I love moving outside,” she says as she hikes up a dirt path to a point with an overview of the creek bed where a few mallards splash. “I hate seeing seniors not moving. I want to keep doing this when I’m 90.” Ritchie may get her wish. More seniors are lacing up their walking shoes and hitting the sidewalks, pathways and trails around them. In doing so, they are reducing their risks of some diseases, increasing vitality and maybe even extending their lives. Walking, as a prime source of exercise for older folk, is on the rise. According to a CDC National Health Survey, which compared walkers in 2005 to those in 2010, the number of 45-to-64-year-old walkers increased from 55.6 to 62.2 –continued on page 14 04.13 | ARROYO | 13


–continued from page 13

percent. Among those 65 and older, walkers rose from 50 percent to 53.7 percent in the same time period. The survey also shows a steady upswing over the years of walkers with chronic conditions such as hypertension, arthritis and diabetes — symptoms of all these have

been found to be relieved by regular walking programs. And a recent study by professors at the University of Pittsburgh showed that walking may slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.” Walking is one of the best forms of exercise and is what your body was designed to do,” says Dr. Andrew Weil, an internationally known health expert in the field of integrative medicine. This month, Weil kicks off National Walking Day on April 3 with his 2013 Walkabout, a 28-day campaign to encourage walking each day for 30 minutes Mimi inney and (sign up at orthaheelusa.com/walkabout). Tom Mawh Walking for exercise is the ultimate no-brainer, continues Weil. “You can walk almost anywhere, any time and there is no special skill, training or equipment needed — all you need is the right footwear,” he says (see sidebar on selecting the right walking shoes). “Importantly for seniors, among all forms of aerobic exercise, walking carries the least risk of injury.” While walking can be done anywhere from neighborhood parks to indoor malls, the great outdoors seems to offer the most long-lasting inspiration. A recent study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity shows that older adults who engage in outdoor physical activity — including walking — exercised longer and more often than those working out indoors. Chalk up one more for Mother Nature. Walking benefits more than your muscles and cardiovascular system; it also helps your brain, according to Tom Strafaci, a physical therapist and personal trainer with offices in Arcadia and Pasadena, who presents physical fitness programs in conjunction with Huntington Hospital. “Yes, ears and feet work together — depth perception. The brain loves making those connections when we walk,” he says. “So many seniors are afraid to walk because of their balance, but it’s the best thing to do for balance.” In fact, says Strafaci, the act of walking — swinging arms, moving in a rhythm, breathing in and out — helps the brain create new pathways and connections. “When people say their mind feels clearer after a walk, there is a biological reason for it,” he says. Despite the near-miraculous claims for walking — and a recent Harvard Medical School study that indicates that lack of physical activity kills as many people as smoking in this coun-

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try — many seniors still have countless reasons for not embracing the exercise. “Inertia is a powerful force; we like to continue the way that we’ve been,” explains Weil, adding that mental and emotional factors often keep seniors on the couch. “If people are depressed, the last thing they feel like doing is moving, even though that activity is probably what would most benefit them. Perceived lack of time is another excuse that prevents people from walking.” “I think I’ve heard every excuse in the book,” agrees Dr. Alice Lacy, an Arcadia internist who treats primarily elderly patients. “ ‘The weather is too cold,’ ‘My back hurts,’ ‘I get plenty of other exercise,’ ‘I don’t want to fall down.’ You name it, I’ve heard it.” Lacy says she’s constantly proselytizing about the benefits of exercise to her senior patients — some eventually respond, some never do. The ones who’ve heeded her advice include a diabetic patient who lost 40 pounds after starting a walking program. “She was concerned for her blood pressure and her knees hurt her so bad,” she says. “We got walking poles to help give her a sense of balance and coordination. That was three years ago and she still walks — no poles anymore. And I have reduced her blood pressure medicine too. All because of her walking.” Lacy urges reluctant walkers to find a partner, so the activity is social as well as physical. “If someone comes and knocks on your door and says, ‘Hey, let’s go for our walk,’ you might get up off that chair,” she says. Motivation was a little trickier for Tom Mawhinney, 83, of Eagle Rock. After his left knee was replaced more than a decade ago, his doctor told him to start using it. “I don’t like walking,” he concedes, even though wife Jean, 80, has been a regular walker since 1983. “She makes me feel guilty if I don’t go with her.” Mawhinney finally discovered that walking in his quiet treelined Eagle Rock neighborhood certainly had unexpected payoffs — in feline form. Now known as “The Cat Man” in his ’hood, Mawhinney always goes on his 30-minute walk with a bag of cat treats. “I used to have five cats. Now I’m down to two. Maybe there’ll be more one day,” he says during a routine afternoon stroll. He stops by a house on the corner. Shaking his bag of treats, he hollers, “Mimi! Mimi!” and right on cue, out comes a handsome orange-and-white feline looking for a prize. Cat owners smile and wave at the couple. “I don’t mind walking so much now because of the cats,” says Mawhinney. “Walking wouldn’t be as much fun without them.” Is Walking Enough? For all the wonders of walking, there are things it just cannot help. “Walking is a great cardiovascular exercise that takes care of seniors’ endurance, but older adults need to strengthtrain muscles,” says Elaine Cress, a professor of kinesiology and a researcher at the University of Georgia Institute of Gerontology. Indeed, the CDC in 2008 recommended that seniors pick up weights or resistance bands at least three times a week. “Walking doesn’t work the front of the leg or the booty muscles,” says Cress, explaining that people lose muscle mass as they age. Strength, along with endurance and flexibility, are keys to keeping fit bodies — especially those of seniors — in top form. Cress has heard complaints from seniors when she tells them to add weights to their regimen, but she has an answer to that. “You have the time,” she says. “You just have to bite the bullet and find how to incorporate weights into your life. I think the greatest bargain, personally, is the YMCA.” However seniors add weight-training to their day, Cress stresses not to do it while walking. “I see walkers with ankle weights or weights strapped to arms or wrists and they are just terrible,” she says. “You can damage your knees, counter-balance yourself and wreck shoul–continued on page 16

PHOTOS,TOP: Courtesy of Runner’s Circle; BOTTOM: Brenda Rees

ave Ritchie g helped D in n n ru d n Walking a 25 pounds. a high of 3 shrink from


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ders. Don’t use them on walks. Never.” Personal trainer Strafaci recommends that seniors also avoid walking with Fido. Dogs could bolt or grapple with another dog, which could knock an older person off balance. “You also can’t walk effectively, moving your arms back and forth, when you are holding a leash,” he says. Finally, even though you burn extra calories walking, walking shouldn’t be viewed as a weight-loss tool alone, adds Strafaci. “People shouldn’t expect to melt off weight just by walking,” he says. When people “get into the exercise habit” he says, they naturally start eating better, which will ultimately help them drop the extra weight. But make no mistake, stresses Strafaci. The pluses of walking are tremendous — better coordination, energy and less pain. Back on the trail, Ritchie is nearing the end of her morning walk. She thinks about an upcoming race and then remembers the first time she walked in competition — she completed the Los Angeles Rock and Roll Marathon when she was 55 years old. On her birthday. “I love having something to look forward to, like a race. Gets me motivated to keep walking,” she says. “I can’t think of a day when I didn’t enjoy my walk.” ||||

PUTTING YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD When it comes to selecting the right walking shoes, don’t be a Frankenstein or Marie Antoinette. Newbies often think they need big heavy heels or an ultracushiony inside for their sidewalk forays. Big mistake. According to a study by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), 72 percent of Americans say that foot pain prevents them from exercising, says health expert Dr. Andrew Weil. “Without proper footwear, walking can be painful, making it difficult to maintain an active lifestyle,” he says. Good shoes can help reluctant walkers stand up and start moving. Finding the perfect shoe is all a matter of arches, explains Mike Gonzalez, manager of Run With Us, a Pasadena athletic shoe store that’s been around for 13 years. “The first thing we do is watch how a customer walks — that tells us how high or low their arches are,” he says. “People with flat feet can put extra stress on their knees, which can travel to their lower back if they aren’t wearing the right shoes.” Walking shoes need to be light and flexible — and that notion can go against the grain for some seniors who think they need sturdy, thick shoes. “Today’s shoes use materials that create a lighter shoe without losing the integrity of the structure. They reduce weight without sacrificing support.” Take a close look at the shoe you’re considering. Does it easily bend in the forefoot (not the middle)? Does it feel light but solid? Those are hallmarks of a 16 | ARROYO | 04.13

good walking shoe. “Most of our walkers choose running shoes because running shoes are created for so many foot types,” says Gonzalez. “They are light and help feet breathe.” Not only do feet “breathe,” they can also swell up when you’re out for a 30-minute jaunt. That’s why Gonzalez recommends folks “size it up” and buy a walking shoe that is one-half to a full size bigger than they usually wear. Socks are also important for walkers: Make sure they are synthetic, says Gonzalez. Cotton will hold moisture and who wants sticky, wet feet? In addition to a wide variety of synthetic socks, the store also sells loose-knit socks specifically designed for diabetics. All in all, expect to pay $95 to $150 for a good pair of walking shoes. Walking shoes, if used regularly, can last from six to eight months. Gonzalez says walkers will know when it’s time to get a new pair by paying attention to their bodies. “You’ll discover a new ache or a pain that you never had before. That’s a good indication your shoes aren’t supporting you,” he says. ||||


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Care

for the Caregivers TV host Leeza Gibbons founded centers for relatives helping seniors with disabilities after dealing with her own mother’s struggle with Alzheimer’s disease. BY REBECCA KUZINS

MY 88-YEAR-OLD MOTHER HAD BEEN IN DECLINING HEALTH FOR SEVERAL YEARS, SUFFERING FROM ARTHRITIS AND OTHER AGE-RELATED PROBLEMS, AND I HAD BEEN PROVIDING AS MUCH HELP AS I COULD WHILE WORKING FULL-TIME AND LIVING 30 MILES AWAY. BUT LAST YEAR, AFTER I LOST MY JOB, I MOVED IN WITH MY MOTHER. A FEW MONTHS LATER SHE experienced a serious bout of vertigo, which landed her in a rehabilitation center for two weeks. I assumed the responsibility of dealing with doctors and others at the center, and of overseeing her care when she returned home. Taking care of my mother had become my new job. She can no longer drive, and I initially had to drive her to what seemed like a never-ending round of appointments. I am responsible for the food shopping, laundry and other household tasks and have to juggle these duties with my freelance work. I quickly became overwhelmed, resentful that my life was being subsumed into my mother’s and unable to view her deteriorating condition with objectivity. At the same time, I genuinely wanted to help her, and I questioned whether I could adequately perform my caregiving role. –continued on page 21 04.13 | ARROYO | 19


Leeza Gibbons with Beverly Creighton and her son, Jim Cox. Creighton was a caregiver for her late husband Al, who had Alzheimer’s.

–continued from page 19

I am not the only caregiver struggling with these emotions. An estimated 65 million Americans — nearly 30 percent of the adult population — are caring for family members, according to the nonprofit National Alliance for Caregiving. Television host Leeza Gibbons and her family were caregivers for almost a decade after Gibbons’ mother, Gloria Jean Dyson Gibbons, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Gibbons created the Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation in 2002 to fulfill a promise she’d made to her mother to “tell her story and make it count.” Last July, the foundation opened Leeza’s Care Connection at Burbank’s Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, one of three hospital-based centers it has established to assist caregivers and their dependent loved ones (the others are at Olympia Medical Center in Los Angeles and Memorial Hospital Pembroke in South Florida). The foundation and Providence Saint Joseph sought this partnership because the hospital is also home to the Hycy and Howard Hill Neuroscience Institute, which treats patients with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other conditions that often require caregiving. Gibbons describes the center as “the womb room,” a “safe place where you can take a deep breath and gather yourself and then exhale, knowing you are not alone on your path to figure out where to go and what to do to adjust and adapt to your new normal. “Caregiving is not anyone’s idea of happily ever-after, yet there are 65 million people living this reality. We want those people to feel empowered and resourceful rather than burdened and victimized. Our job is to help connect them to each other and to the services, products, places and people that can help them stay sane.” Leeza’s Care Connection’s quarters at Providence resemble a living room, with a sofa, comfortable chairs and a television set, as well as an ample supply of coffee, cookies and

candy. Stefanie Elkins, the facility’s program and outreach director, said the décor is designed to make visitors feel that they are “a guest, not a patient or a client.” She added that for many of the visitors, “this is the first time they are asking someone for help. They know something needs to change… They feel burned out, isolated, alone and not understood. They want to take care of their loved ones, but they feel they are not doing enough.” The center provides numerous free services, in both English and Spanish, to help caregivers develop the skills that will enable them to become stronger, more resilient and accepting of the changes in their lives and the demands of caregiving. By coming to the center, caregivers can discover that they are not alone but are able to connect and communicate with others in a similar position, so they can reach out when overwhelmed or frustrated. Leeza’s Care Connection offers numerous support groups, which serve the recently bereaved and those caring for individuals with early memory loss, among other hurdles. Elkins said these groups offer a “continuum of care,” in which caregivers can discuss their loved ones’ diseases from the earliest diagnoses through the period after their deaths. Another support group there, Caregiver Life Lessons, enables participants to share their personal experiences and discuss the challenges. There are also support groups for adult children who are caregivers. Carol, a regular at a twice-monthly support group, said Leeza’s Care Connection helps relieve her stress and gives her the strength to care for her mother, an Alzheimer’s sufferer. “The community there is made up of people who are so wonderful that it is an endless resource of nourishment for me,” she said. “It nourishes me in such a way that … I feel connected. Otherwise I would be floundering around. I wouldn’t know where to begin.” –continued on page 23

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In addition to the support groups, Elkins said there are other “caregiverdriven” programs, such as a monthly book discussion and journaling group, in which participants discuss books about caregiving and share personal experiences written in their journals. Leeza’s Care Connection also offers support groups for patients — individuals who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other memory-loss diseases. In these sessions, Elkins said, participants discuss Workshops are held in an informal setting that resembles a living room, which makes caregivers feel they are in a comfortable, supportive environment. the issues they deem pertinent to their illness, including lifestyle challenges and medical research. Yoga classes are regularly offered as part of what Elkins described as the center’s “wellness approach,” which encourages caregivers to maintain their own physical and mental health so they can have the strength to assist others. One of the most popular activities is autobiographical scrapbooking, in which caregivers and their charges join together to preserve family memories through collections of photographs and other items. Scrapbooking, explained Elkins, enables caregivers to “engage with their loved ones, to reminisce.” In addition, the center is a clearinghouse for referrals to community resources, such as senior day programs, pro bono legal assistance, support groups and organizations such as the Alzheimer’s Association and the American Parkinson’s Disease Association. A media resource center provides books and other materials related to caregiving. The Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation established its first caregiver support center, called Leeza’s Place, in Sherman Oaks in 2003. “When we began, we were focused on people with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers,” said Gibbons. “While that is still the biggest part of our community, we came to realize Gibbons and her mother, Gloria that the caregiving experience is the same whether it’s for a mom with memory loss, a husband with cancer, a child with autism or a sometimes that comes not from your biological family but rather from your logical sister with MS [multiple sclerosis].” For this reason, the foundation expanded its services to family. Hold hands with that circle.” include caregivers coping with a broader range of patients. Since I began caring for my mother, I have learned to be less hard on myself and to In the decade since her foundation established its first care center, Gibbons said, she recognize that I am doing the best I can to help her. Although we initially argued about has learned “that sometimes courage just means trying it all over again one more time toeven the most trivial subjects, my mom and I have slowly forged a new relationship morrow; that there is no limit to forgiveness and that patience comes in an unending based on her acceptance of aging and my acceptance of her age-related limitations. And supply, but it often needs replenishing daily. I’ve learned that hope changes everything it’s good to know that there are places like Leeza’s Care Connection where I can find and a heart never forgets. These last 10 years have been a gift of epic proportions, allowcounsel, concern and camaraderie from others who are facing the same challenges. |||| ing me to grow my own faith enormously. I take a tremendous amount of pride in knowing my mother’s legacy is kept so lovingly in the hearts of our communities.” Gibbons advises caregivers to be “flexible and forgiving of yourself and others. RealFor information about Leeza’s Care Connection at Providence Saint Joseph Medical ize that there is strength in knowing your limits and that the best way to love the perCenter (501 S. Buena Vista St., South Tower, Burbank), visit son with disease is to first take care of yourself… It is essential to get support, but leezasplace.org/locLCC_Providence.html.

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PHOTO: Nathaniel Taylor


GERAGOS FOR THE DEFENSE In a new book, celebrity attorney Mark Geragos argues that defense lawyers get no respect in this country. BY BETTIJANE LEVINE

ARROYOLAND IS FILLED WITH FABULOUSLY SUCCESSFUL INDIVIDUALS WHOSE NAMES ARE NEVER PUBLICIZED AND WHO LIKE IT THAT WAY. POWERHOUSE ATTORNEY MARK GERAGOS IS NOT ONE OF THEM. TV WATCHERS AROUND THE GLOBE ARE FAMILIAR WITH GERAGOS’ NAME AND FACE BECAUSE HE HAS APPEARED ON THE TUBE SO MANY TIMES — EITHER AS DEFENSE ATTORNEY IN HIGH-PROFILE CRIMINAL CASES OR AS TALKING HEAD IN THOSE UBIQUITOUS POP-UP LAWYER PANELS TELEVISED DURING SENSATIONAL TRIALS. Geragos, a lifelong La Cañada Flintridge resident and pillar of the Armenian-American community, is internationally known as a celebrity lawyer who has represented Michael Jackson, Chris Brown, Winona Ryder, Mike Tyson, Sean “Diddy” Combs and Nicole Ritchie, among others. He has also defended such controversial clients as former congressman Gary Condit (who was questioned in the Chandra Levy murder scandal), and former unknowns such as salesman Scott Peterson, who became a household name for his conviction of murdering his pregnant wife. Geragos, 55, first earned his national reputation in the late ‘90s by winning an acquittal on embezzlement charges for Susan McDougal, who had been convicted in the Whitewater scandal involving Bill and Hillary Clinton. He went on to win groundbreaking decisions in criminal cases the public rarely heard about: dismissals in two unrelated murder trials after he proved flawed eyewitness identification (and a $1.7 million settlement for one of those clients from the City of Glendale in a lawsuit for false arrest); dismissal of felony kidnapping and torture charges for the exiled leader of China’s shadow government, Hung Bao Zhong; dismissals of murder charges against a USC student accused of killing her fetus, and for a father accused of murdering his child by throwing her off a cliff; dismissal of murder charges against a Japanese national accused of murdering his wife in what the foreign press dubbed “the Japanese O.J. case,” to list just a few. Geragos was also a lead lawyer in two groundbreaking federal class action lawsuits against New York Life Insurance and AXA Corporation for insurance policies issued in the early 20th century during the genocide of over 1.5 million Armenians by the Ottoman

Turk regime, settling the cases for more than $37.5 million. He is the only lawyer besides Johnny Cochran ever named “Lawyer of the Year” in both criminal and civil arenas by his peers in bar associations. Geragos smartly uses his celebrity to promote some of his own important causes, the most recent of which is a new book, out this month. Mistrial: An Inside Look at How the Criminal Justice System Works…and Sometimes Doesn’t (Gotham) is co-authored by Geragos and his longtime law partner, Pat Harris. It’s an eye-opening examination of the sometimes sleazy underbelly of our criminal justice system, which the authors contend has become politicized and now tilts perilously away from the defense and from basic ethics as well as time-honored concepts of justice for the accused. They claim that defense attorneys, who used to be society’s heroes in the days of Perry Mason, have become demonized in today’s era of Nancy Grace. Defense attorneys are now considered bad guys who will do anything to get a client “off,” they write, although they claim it’s more commonly the prosecution’s side that cuts corners and fudges the rules. The authors offer examples of unnamed prosecutors who play dirty tricks, prevent defense witnesses from testifying and ignore evidence; judges who rule based on public opinion and a desire for reelection; police who plant evidence, force confessions and lie on the witness stand to help win a case — and mounting numbers of potential jurors who believe that anyone accused must be guilty or he wouldn’t be in court in the first place. America has been brainwashed that we’re a nation “soft on crime,” the authors assert. –continued on page 26

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Mark Geragos and co-author Pat Harris

They say the exact opposite is true, citing a conviction rate that hovers around 90 percent. The book is a casual fun read, neither academic nor literary, and it’s also somewhat disturbing. If the authors are even partially correct, our criminal justice system is in as much chaos as is our economy. The lurid Jody Arias trial fortuitously occurred during the book’s pre-launch publicity offensive, and Geragos appeared on a spate of TV panels where he offered his wit and wisdom while promoting his book. . Arroyo Monthly interviewed Geragos the morning after he’d been on a CNN panel with Jeffrey Toobin and, surprisingly, Nancy Grace. Has Nancy Grace read your book? My guess is she won’t want to appear with me after she’s read it. That’s because on page 31 he likens Nancy Grace to a clown, and on page 33 he writes, “she broadcasts lies.” The authors also inform readers that when Grace was a Georgia prosecutor, the appellate courts found “she had committed prosecutorial misconduct three separate times in a nine-year career. To put that in perspective… most prosecutors in a 20- or 30-year career will not be admonished even once” for that offense. In the authors’ eyes, Grace represents a rising tide of faux hysterics with millions of loyal fans who consider themselves “victims’ advocates” and who “rant and rave about how the court system is stacked against the victim and for the defense.” This attitude has seeped into the mindset of young prosecutors, the authors say, leading some to belittle and demean defense attorneys, the judicial process and sometimes the evidence itself. Will Chris Dorner’s complaints against the police department get a fair re-examination? There’s not a chance that will happen. It’s done and buried just like he is.

26 | ARROYO | 04.13

Do you believe your former client, Scott Peterson, is innocent of murdering his wife, Laci Peterson? I thought that case was an outrage. I know most people think I’m delusional and I accept that. I don’t think they proved [Peterson] guilty and I don’t think he did it. I think there’s no question [the conviction] will be overturned on appeal. Is there a backlash after you lose such a high-profile case, where the defendant is so vilified? Absolutely. I was advised by virtually everybody not to take the case. But my father said, “This is what we [defense attorneys] do. How could you even think of not taking it?” Geragos’ father, Paul, was a highly respected Los Angeles attorney who started the family law firm of Geragos & Geragos 50 years ago. Now 86 and retired, he and his wife settled long ago in La Cañada Flintridge; son Mark and his family later bought a home just around the corner from them. Geragos says he learned law at his father’s knee but tried a few other ventures between graduating from Loyola Law School and joining the family firm. Now Geragos’ two sons are also at Loyola, one of them starting law school. Geragos says he “grew up in Saint Gregory’s Armenian church on Colorado in Pasadena.” Two years ago, to honor his parents, he donated funds for a church building named for them, The Paul and Betty Jane Geragos Hall. The book is partly a tribute to his beloved father, whom he calls “Pops.” In the introduction, Geragos writes that his father and their Armenian heritage dictated that he could become nothing other than a lawyer for the defense. And though the book may come across “as a diatribe about how the system is becoming unfairly weighted to the prosecution,” he hopes it also reflects the joy and fulfillment he finds in his work. “I love what I do, absolutely love it. It is not only my job; it is my only real hobby. Do I get frustrated? Absolutely. Would I want to do anything else? Absolutely not!” ||||

PHOTO: Brian Quisido

–continued from page 25


arroyo

SPONSORED BY

~HOME SALES INDEX~ HOME SALES

jan

feb

2013

2013

+3.9% ALTADENA HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. ARCADIA HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. EAGLE ROCK HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. GLENDALE HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. LA CANADA HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. PASADENA HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. SAN MARINO HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. SIERRA MADRE HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. SOUTH PASADENA HOMES SOLD MEDIAN PRICE MEDIAN SQ. FT. TOTAL HOMES SOLD AVG PRICE/SQ. FT.

JAN ‘13 34 $462,500 1340 JAN ‘13 20 $674,000 1669 JAN ‘13 10 $466,000 1356 JAN ‘13 72 $474,500 1448 JAN ‘13 10 $1,170,500 2211 JAN ‘13 104 $482,000 1323 JAN ‘13 9 $2,620,000 2852 JAN ‘13 6 $542,500 1377 JAN ‘13 16 $726,750 1372 JAN ‘13 278 $405

HOMES SOLD

278 346

AVG. PRICE/SQ. FT.

RECENT HOME CLOSINGS IN THE ARROYO FOOTPRINT

HOMES SOLD

+24.4%

HOME SALES ABOVE $750,000

FEB ‘13 43 $480,000 1397 FEB ‘13 21 $810,000 1791 FEB ‘13 15 $505,500 1570 FEB ‘13 98 $480,500 1474 FEB ‘13 14 $1,120,000 2759 FEB ‘13 120 $491,000 1323 FEB ‘13 10 $1,550,000 2499 FEB ‘13 15 $525,000 1514 FEB ‘13 10 $620,100 1510 FEB ‘13 346 $421

ADDRESS

CLOSE DATE PRICE

SOURCE: CalREsource

BDRMS. SQ. FT. YR. BUILT PREV. PRICE

PREV. SOLD

ALTADENA 1037 Wapello Street 2867 Windfall Avenue 1545 Braeburn Road 1605 Woodglen Lane 2397 Morslay Road

02/01/13 02/08/13 02/01/13 02/15/13 02/14/13

$785,000 $855,000 $1,045,000 $1,072,500 $1,100,000

4 2 7 5 6

1688 1397

1925 1950

$455,000 $830,000 $1,015,000 $1,050,000 $613,000

08/08/2003 12/27/2011 02/27/2008 01/06/2009 05/29/2012

ARCADIA 302 East Colorado Boulevard 1903 South 7th Avenue 1018 English Oaks Drive 1807 South 10th Avenue 1341 Mayflower Avenue 153 Ilene Drive 307 East Winnie Way 1038 Woodacre Lane 146 East Pamela Road 920 North Santa Anita Avenue 2662 South 10th Avenue 2500 Lee Avenue 2225 South 6th Avenue 1032 El Norte Avenue

02/21/13 02/22/13 02/12/13 01/31/13 02/01/13 02/01/13 02/22/13 02/15/13 01/31/13 02/21/13 02/27/13 02/20/13 02/05/13 02/15/13

$750,000 $773,000 $800,000 $810,000 $828,000 $848,000 $860,000 $920,000 $1,080,000 $1,310,000 $1,388,000 $1,520,000 $1,750,000 $2,018,000

4 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 8 3 4 2 2

2254 1564 2385 1316 2120 2333 1791 2202 2023 2917 4257 4265 1351 904

1951 1951 1980 1948 1950 1965 1958 1976 1957 1939 1941 1952 1952 1930

$235,000 $297,000 $405,000

08/31/2000 11/29/1994 08/01/2001

$530,000

11/22/1991

$1,088,000 $915,000 $97,500 $697,000 $701,000

09/30/2005 10/04/2005 06/30/1980 10/26/2009 05/17/2011

GLENDALE 1630 Valley View Road 926 Norton Avenue 1719 Cleveland Road 1725 Ridgeway Drive 1548 Hillcrest Avenue 1677 Arbor Drive 3255 Buckingham Road 325 East Randolph Street 1902 Rams Horn Court 957 Calle Amable 917 Calle La Primavera 928 Calle Simpatico 3070 Sparr Boulevard 1651 Santa Barbara Avenue 1431 Beaudry Boulevard

02/12/13 02/08/13 02/12/13 02/25/13 02/26/13 02/07/13 02/14/13 02/22/13 02/12/13 02/25/13 02/21/13 02/19/13 02/14/13 02/06/13 02/01/13

$756,000 $791,000 $940,000 $950,000 $1,000,000 $1,215,000 $998,000 $1,450,000 $1,470,000 $750,000 $778,000 $805,000 $850,000 $915,000 $940,000

2 6 5 4 5 8 3 5 5 4 3 4 4 5 8

2250 3641 2921 4486 3559

1976 1937 1927 2003 1926

2576 3844 5289 2615 2268 2528 2201 2670

2010 1919 1987 1989 1992 1990 1937 1929

$427,000 $210,000 $574,000 $180,000 $580,000 $1,180,000 $205,000

06/19/1998 06/15/1982 08/28/1998 04/17/2001 09/28/1994 05/17/2011 04/04/2005

$802,500 $810,000 $826,000 $850,000 $540,000 $279,000

06/08/2010 07/22/2008 09/14/2009 06/17/2011 09/09/1999 05/23/1984

LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE 176 Lamour Drive 5231 Bubbling Well Lane 3909 Starland Drive 5715 Summit Crest Drive 1037 Lavender Lane 750 Wendover Road 5210 Castle Road 5288 Gould Avenue 4928 Vineta Avenue 650 Foxwood Road

02/25/13 02/08/13 02/06/13 02/15/13 02/08/13 02/01/13 02/28/13 02/14/13 02/04/13 02/28/13

$1,047,000 $1,065,000 $1,075,000 $1,165,000 $1,425,000 $1,477,000 $1,500,000 $2,550,000 $2,646,000 $3,525,000

5 6 3 3 9 5 4 7 6 5

3008

1945

2510 2209

1957 1966

3509 3273 5016 4135 4272

1964 1953 2010 1951 1949

$1,200,000 $859,000 $1,473,000 $635,000 $2,650,000 $865,000 $2,000,000

12/13/2007 05/29/1998 08/10/2009 10/29/1999 04/07/2011 06/18/1993 05/12/2009

continued on page 29

The Arroyo Home Sales Index is calculated from residential home sales in Pasadena and the surrounding communities of South Pasadena, San Marino, La Canada Flintridge, Eagle Rock, Glendale (including Montrose), Altadena, Sierra Madre and Arcadia. Individual home sales data provided by CalREsource. Arroyo Home Sales Index © Arroyo 2013.

04.13 | ARROYO | 27


28 | ARROYO | 04.13


continued from page 27

HOME SALES ABOVE $750,000 RECENT HOME CLOSINGS IN THE ARROYO FOOTPRINT

SOURCE: CalREsource

PASADENA 217 South Marengo Ave #202

02/27/13

$1,250,000

1

550

2008

$310,000

09/30/2008

217 South Marengo Ave #203

02/27/13

$1,278,500

1

550

2008

$295,000

07/14/2009

1630 Pegfair Estates Drive

02/28/13

$1,100,000

4

2582

1964

2305 East Woodlyn Road

02/22/13

$815,000

3

1972

1947

$965,000

06/22/2007

1615 East Mountain Street

02/07/13

$1,052,000

4

2154

1915

$96,000

04/14/1978

$560,000

08/28/2012

1043 Atchison Street

02/05/13

$1,055,000

5

2685

1905

535 Glen Holly Drive

02/11/13

$835,000

2

1552

1936

566 West California Boulevard

02/06/13

$900,000

3

2036

1956

$337,500

03/14/1986

349 West Bellevue Drive

02/05/13

$960,000

2

1877

1978

$907,000

11/18/2008

379 West Bellevue Drive

02/21/13

$1,125,000

2

2480

1979

$605,000

10/16/1997

1121 Church Street

02/26/13

$1,311,000

5

3061

1961

678 West California Boulevard

02/26/13

$1,575,000

3

4368

1990

$760,000

04/18/1991

477 West California Boulevard

02/15/13

$1,850,000

4

3720

1976

$770,000

05/04/1988

1440 Brixton Road

02/28/13

$775,000

3

1974

1979

$500,000

06/27/2002

259 North Chester Avenue

02/01/13

$820,000

8

5488

1987

109 Harkness Avenue

02/13/13

$1,020,000

6

2906

1923

$1,080,000

12/20/2007

1532 Rose Villa Street

02/04/13

$1,325,000

3

1987

1925

$1,184,000

09/16/2011

1334 South Los Robles Avenue 02/20/13

$1,595,000

4

$525,000

06/30/1998

$1,370,000

02/13/2012

1405 South Oakland Avenue

02/15/13

$1,890,000

3

1100 South El Molino Avenue

02/25/13

$2,700,000

5

1438 Oakdale Street

02/27/13

$1,185,000

2

2325

2215

1937

$1,188,000

02/06/1995

1922

$785,000

10/05/2012

$340,000

08/01/2003

$525,000

03/18/2003

2225 Monte Vista Street

02/01/13

$781,500

3

2481

1947

3551 Yorkshire Road

02/20/13

$835,000

4

1872

1938

287 South Santa Anita Avenue 02/28/13

$840,000

4

2797

1930

2735 Morningside Street

02/07/13

$843,000

4

2208

1916

$600,000

11/13/2012

3545 Shadow Grove Road

02/26/13

$905,000

3

2395

1949

$265,000

04/24/1987

543 Woodward Boulevard

02/05/13

$941,500

3

1868

1949

2156 Las Lunas Street

02/12/13

$950,000

3

3086

1947

$980,000

04/11/2008

1460 Old House Road

02/14/13

$1,500,000

4

3292

1963

$350,500

09/24/1985

2925 Lindaloa Lane

02/20/13

$1,700,000

8

2480 Oswego Street

02/01/13

$2,750,000

4

1890

1914

$1,650,000

09/06/2005

965 El Campo Drive

02/01/13

$7,145,000

9

11932

1999

$3,500,000

11/21/2000

2835 Huntington Drive

02/12/13

$810,000

2

1427

1946

2845 Huntington Drive

02/20/13

$900,000

3

1274

1946

SAN MARINO

705 Plymouth Road

02/11/13

$1,375,000

3

2193

1939

$538,000

06/26/1991

720 Old Mill Road

02/25/13

$1,375,000

4

2368

1936

$612,000

08/27/1996

1781 Warwick Road

02/06/13

$1,500,000

3

2499

1950

$350,000

11/26/1980

2870 Lorain Road

02/21/13

$1,600,000

5

3073

1938

$1,040,000

10/03/2007

2195 Adair Street

02/26/13

$2,000,000

4

3071

1929

$840,000

07/02/2002

1424 Pasqualito Drive

02/04/13

$2,508,000

5

3118

1935

$1,125,000

02/28/2002

2395 Melville Drive

02/04/13

$2,790,000

4

4217

1938

$1,970,000

03/02/2006

843 San Marino Avenue

02/01/13

$4,000,000

9

$1,600,000

05/08/1998

1965 Vista Avenue

01/31/13

$831,000

3

1850

1953

$140,000

08/19/1980

314 North Sunnyside Avenue

02/20/13

$835,000

3

2106

1958

$439,000

02/12/1999

415 Auburn Lane

02/08/13

$865,000

4

1916

1929

$855,000

06/15/2005

58 West Carter Avenue

02/01/13

$1,195,000

4

2925

2003

$975,000

05/29/2003

258 Rancho Road

02/15/13

$1,200,000

2

2178

1958

610 Indiana Place

02/25/13

$879,000

3

2346

1978

$511,000

12/20/2002

1413 Lyndon Street

02/15/13

$930,000

3

1896

1952

1424 Oakcrest Avenue

02/04/13

$940,000

2

2490

1924

$321,500

05/25/1988

423 Magnolia Street

02/27/13

$1,035,000

4

2023

1900

$1,075,000

12/18/2007

SIERRA MADRE

SOUTH PASADENA

04.13 | ARROYO | 29


arroyo HOME & DESIGN SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

THE ADVENTURE OF A LIFETIME MAKING A SUCCESSFUL AND JOYFUL TRANSITION FROM FAMILY HOME TO SENIOR LIVING ENVIRONMENT BY JOANNA DEHN BERESFORD A FEW DAYS AGO MY TEENAGED DAUGHTER AND I HELPED AN ELDERLY WOMAN CLEAN HER HOUSE. IT’S AN OLD PLACE, LUXURIOUS, WITH GOOD BONES, AN ELEGANT FAÇADE,AND LOVELY, MATURE LANDSCAPING. BUT INSIDE IT WAS A MESS.WE WERE OVERWHELMED AT FIRST BY THE CLUTTER, THE DUST AND CAT HAIR, THE MOLDERING FOOD AROUND THE SINK, ON THE STOVE AND IN THE REFRIGERATOR, THE MOUNTAINOUS PILES OF BOOKS AND FURNITURE AND KNICKKNACKS AND PAPERS – IN GENERAL,THE TRASH AND TREASURE THAT HAS ACCUMULATED IN THE HOME OVER THE LAST FIFTY YEARS.AFTER WE HAD LABORED FOR ABOUT THREE HOURS WE FINALLY GLIMPSED SOME CLEAN SURFACES AND ORDER,AND MY DAUGHTER NOTED THAT THIS WAS VERY SATISFYING. OUR ELDERLY FRIEND, WHOM I WILL REFER TO AS MISS B, AGREED. SHE LOST HER LIFE PARTNER TO DISEASE AND THE GENERAL DECLINE OF AGE IN SEPTEMBER. SINCE THEN SHE HAS DONE LITTLE BESIDES CARE FOR HER CATS AND REREAD SOME OF HER FAVORITE MYSTERY NOVELS; AND EVEN BEFORE THE DEATH OF HER PARTNER, NEITHER OF THEM WANTED TO CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITY (OR REALITY) OF LEAVING THEIR BELOVED HOME. BUT NOW SHE’S MOVING OUT IN TWO WEEKS, AND SHE’S FEELING A BIT DESPERATE ABOUT HER TRANSITION. –continued on page 33 30 | ARROYO | 04.13


—ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT—

–continued from page 30 The truth is, Miss B’s situation is not uncommon, and although she faces a massive undertaking at this point, the transition from older, larger home to newer, smaller one need not be onerous or daunting or melancholy. What can transform the transition for anyone moving through this phase of life are three provisions: planning ahead; engaging the finest resources; and embracing a sense of adventure. Whatever it takes, for ourselves and for our loved ones, we ought to pursue these objectives when considering the endeavor often referred to as “downsizing for seniors.” PLANNING AHEAD “It’s important to know that this doesn’t have to be a stressful experience if you start thinking about the process early on and keep your mind open to different options,” says Jason Mak, of Golden Oaks Apartments, in South Pasadena. Golden Oaks is a family-owned establishment that offers a variety of contemporary lifestyle options for seniors, families and travelling professionals. Jason suggests that homeowners who foresee making a change in location “Start visiting local apartments, senior apartments, and assisted living facilities to learn what they have to offer.” At Golden Oaks, prospective residents are invited to join current tenants for breakfast or social activities.“We even allow people to live with us for a short term ‘trial period’ in one of our furnished apartments to make sure they are ultimately happy living here,” adds Jason. –continued on page 37

04.13 | ARROYO | 33


36 | ARROYO | 04.13


—ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT—

–continued from page 33 Dawneen Lorance of Villa Gardens in Pasadena also stresses the importance of investigating options early, allowing for ample to time make decisions .“Many of our residents tell us that they wish they had moved to Villa Gardens sooner,” says Dawneen.“The most important advice we offer is to plan ahead.” Like their counterparts at Golden Oaks, the staff at Villa Gardens encourages interested residents to visit the community more than once, share a meal, explore the location, amenities, services, space and financial options. Dawneen acknowledges that downsizing is a major decision, which deserves careful thought and preparation. “Plan ahead while you are still calling the shots,” urges Mikki Porretta, a Senior Real Estate Specialist (SRES) with Dilbeck Realty. Mikki has been facilitating such transitions in the San Gabriel Valley for decades, developing relationships with clients and truly becoming a part of their lives. In terms of downsizing and organizing a lifetime of belongings in particular, Mikki suggests that homeowners “Start with a drawer or two. Give the collections to someone that you know will enjoy them. Make a list to keep with your important papers and designate someone who has asked for or will appreciate your treasured items. Write a little bit of history to go along with each of the items.” All of which takes time, but allows seniors – and anyone launching a relocation – the opportunity to savor objects and relationships in a meaningful and reflective way. –continued on page 39

04.13 | ARROYO | 37


38 | ARROYO | 04.13


—ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT—

–continued from page 37 ENGAGING RESOURCES Resources abound for seniors who are planning to downsize, and first and foremost among them may be their own families and friends.“Enlist your children and grandchildren to help!” says Jason Mak.“Get them involved with this big decision and listen to their feedback.” Jason also suggests researching websites, like www.seniorhousingnet.com, and consulting with organizations like the local senior center in your community. Many senior living facilities provide residents with their own resources.“Villa Gardens offers advice and a list of professionals who can help with every aspect of the move,” says Dawneen Lorance. “We have helped our residents find services that will pack, move and unpack and place furniture…so that their new accommodations will feel like home when they arrive.They also get to choose the paint colors and other finishes of their choice. If you want it, we will help you make it happen.” A sentiment which is echoed by staff members at Golden Oaks. As a veteran SRES, Mikki Porretta provides her clients with a comprehensive array of services, starting with a consultation among the seniors themselves, family members and Mikki and her team.They discuss aspects of the sale of an existing home, including the possible need for cleaning and repairs; probable selling price based on recent sales and conditions; staging of the home; and the actual packing, moving process. “We discuss what we are going to do with the accumulation of a lot of years – donate, estate or garage sale?” Mikki explains.“How are we going to determine what they can take and what is going to be sold or given to others.” Mikki’s assistance includes “free handyman services, free notary services, arranging for packing and moving, floor plans of the new abode, charity pickup, free staging, consignment pickup, cleaning, garage sales and moving.” In other words, Mikki offers what she describes as one-stop shopping for her clients. THE ADVENTURE OF A LIFETIME Perhaps most important is that seniors and everyone else involved in their transition pursue the experience as a great adventure.“We understand that it can be difficult to think about moving,” says Villa Gardens’ Dawneen Lorance.“But while the task can seem daunting, choosing among your most precious possessions, then building a new environment around them can be thrilling.” For example, Dawneen describes the reflections of a current resident,Texas native Carrie Lovejoy, who viewed moving to Villa Gardens as a form of liberation from the traditional chores of homeownership and the enjoyment of a more peaceful and purpose –filled phase of her life. “Every morning I wake up to a view of the San Gabriel Mountains and a carefree lifestyle,” says Ms. Lovejoy.“Taking care of a house was a lot of responsibility and that was not something I wanted. I was unsure about leaving Texas but now some of my friends are jealous. I am having so many new adventures and meeting new friends… Every day there seems to be a new face at the dinner table and a new story to hear. It was one of the best decisions I ever made.” With proper planning, the use of valuable resources, the participation of family and friends, and a spirit of optimism, all of us, including my friend Miss B, may find such joy in reaching the next stage of our lives. AH&D 04.13 | ARROYO | 39


40 | ARROYO | 04.13


arroyo SUMMER CAMP PREVIEW SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

ALTADENA STABLES SUMMER CAMP

ART CLASSES OF PASADENA

FULL DAY, HALF DAY, SPORTS, ALL ABOUT HORSES We offer camps for boys and girls interested in learning all about horses. In addition to horseback riding skills, games and crafts they will learn to safely care for horses, and groom and bathe them. Camps are taught by skilled professionals with over thirty years of experience Ages: 5-18yrs. Date: June 17-21, July 8-12, August 12-16. Time: 8:30am-2:30pm and ツス day 8:30am-12pm Tuition: Full Day $525.00, ツス Day $325.00. Registration Deadline: enrollment open until filled. 3064 Ridgeview Drive Altadena, CA 91001 (626) 797-2012 altadenastables@yahoo.com www.altadenastables.com

ARTS Art Classes of Pasadena is open year round, 7 days a week, with classes in traditional drawing, watercolor, oil painting, cartooning and computer arts. These classes are available on a continuous open enrollment basis, so you can join any time! Expanded hours in summer. See website for details. Ages: 4 to Adults. Tuition: $20/hr base price (discount package available). Registration Deadline: join any time 3763 E. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91107 (626) 993-4021 jo@artclassesofpasadena.com www.artclassesofpasadena.com 窶田ontinued on page 43 04.13 | ARROYO | 41


42 | ARROYO | 04.13


—ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT—

–continued from page 41

BASKETBALL & LEADERSHIP SKILLS CAMP HALF DAY, SPORTS Join former Lakers star, AC Green, at this camp! Campers will be challenged on and off the court – practicing and improving their basketball skills, and participating in leadership and character development discussions. This camp is brought to you by AC Green’s Elite Skills Training, and the South Pasadena Educational Foundation. Girls and Boys ages 8-17. Date: July 29-August 2. Time: 9:00am-2:00pm. Tuition: $225, Based on space, Registration will be taken until Friday July 26 – to guarantee your place and souvenir camp tshirt, Registration Deadline before July 8, 2013. South Pasadena Middle School Gym, 1500 Fair Oaks Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030 (626) 441- 5810 x1163 info@spef4kids.org www.spef4kids.org

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF PASADENA FULL DAY, ARTS, SPORTS, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS The Club offers fun and educational games; activities to prevent summer learning loss; state-of-the-art computer centers; recreational swimming, swim lessons, and a free one-week intensive water safety course; field trips; sports and athletics; free breakfast and lunch, and much more! Ages: 6-18. Date: June 10-August 7. Time: Mon-Fri 8:00am-6:00pm. Tuition: $75.00 (tuition assistance available) for ages 6-12. Teenagers ages 13-18 are free Slavik Branch 3230 East Del Mar Blvd Pasadena, CA 91107 (626) 449-1953, Mackenzie-Scott Branch 2020 North Fair Oaks Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 798-3925, Administration (626) 449-9100 info@bgcpasadena.org www.bgcpasadena.org

CAMP ANIMAL PLANET Full Day, Half Day, Arts, Nature & Science, Sports, Enrichment and Academics, Day care available from 7am to 6pm Preschool (ages 2.5-4 years) and Kindergarten offers a nurturing environment that stimulates growth through a variety of activities. Weekly themes include academics and social and emotional skill development. First through Eighth Grades are offered morning academic classes and afternoon enrichments Monday through Thursday, with field trips on Fridays. Grade: Preschool to 8th grade. Date: June 24-July26, 2013. Time: 9:00am-3:30pm. Tuition: Preschool 3 half days is $95/week, 3 full days is $113/week, including day care 7-9AM and 3:30-6PM, 5 half days is $130/week, 5 full days is $150/week, Kindergarten; 5 half days is $650/week, 5 full days is $750/week, including day care 7-9AM and 3:30-6PM, First Grade through Eighth Grade: mornings only M-Th is $500 for 5 weeks, afternoons only M-Th is $500 for 5 weeks, full day, M-Th is $900 for 5 weeks, full day including Friday field trips & camp tshirt is $1125 for 5 weeks, Friday field trips only, including camp t-shirt is $325 for 5 weeks. 822 Bradbourne Avenue, Duarte, CA 91010 (626) 301-9809 info@foothilloaksacademy.org www.foothilloaksacademy.org

CLAIRBOURN SUMMER ADVANTAGE PROGRAM FULL DAY, HALF DAY, ARTS, NATURE & SCIENCE, SPORTS, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Now enrolling for summer learning! We offer Preschool, Kindergarten, and 1st-8th Grade Advantage Programs with over 45 academic, developmental, and creative workshops, where students can design their own adventure. Register by May 17. Give your child an advantage today! Ages: 3 to 13. Date: June 24 to July 26. Times: Preschool 9am-12pm Kindergarten 9am3pm Grades 1-8 attend classes anytime between 9-3pm. Tuition: Preschool & Kindergarten $750 for morning session & $1250 full day. Grades 1-8: each class ranges from $270 up to $340. Registration Deadline: May 27, 2013 Clairbourn School 8400 Huntington Drive, San Gabriel, CA 91775 (626) 286-3108 info@clairbourn.org www.clairbourn.org/summer/

DANCE FAMILY SUMMER HIP HOP CAMP HALF DAY, ARTS, SPORTS Top LA Choreographers lead a fun filled week where students learn newest hip hop moves they’ll perform at the camp’s culmination. Performances are optional on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, on the National Day of Dance, and Sizzling Salsa Nights. Get ready for Crazy Hair Day, Crazy Hat Day, and Crazy, fun teachers - the best time imaginable! Ages:7-17yrs (2 groups). Date: June 10-14, July 8-12, July 29-Aug 2. Time: 10am-3pm. Tuition: $395 (discounts available online). Registration Deadline: Max 30 students per camp 2700 E. Foothill Blvd., Suite 101, Pasadena, CA 91107 (626)568-3764 x2 info@TheDanceFamily.com www.TheDanceFamily.com

EMMAUS LUTHERAN SUMMER ACADEMY AND CAMP FULL DAY, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS, FIELD TRIPS Emmaus offers a morning academic program with regular classroom teachers who have a focus on mathematics, language arts, science and history. Every afternoon, –continued on page 45 04.13 | ARROYO | 43


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–continued from page 43 students enjoy camp fun and activities including enrichment courses, art, games, weekly field trip, and water activities. You may choose the weeks that you wish to attend. Ages: 6-13 (grades 1-8). Date: June 10- August 9, 2013. Time: 7:00am-6:30pm. Tuition: $155 per week, $135 for 2nd child, plus $65 reg. fee ($45 early reg. fee), May 17 for $45 early reg. fee discount Registration Deadline: Acceptance any time prior to June 17 840 S. Almansor Alhambra, Ca 91801 (626) 289-3664 x107 kit.hittinger@gmail.com www.emmauslutheranchurch.org

HANDS-ON SCIENCE CAMP AT THE CALIFORNIA SCIENCE CENTER FULL DAY, HALF DAY, NATURE & SCIENCE, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Exciting explorations, delightful discoveries and wild wonders await your family this summer at Hands-On Science Camp at the California Science Center. We offer more than 30 courses, including popular parent-and-child classes that give families a chance to investigate science together. The Hands-On Science Camp staff consists of education professionals and working professionals in science fields. Your child will have a unique, fun and engaging summer! Each camp session is a weeklong. It is best to register before the session you plan on attending. We strongly recommend registering early, because classes fill up quickly. Grade: Pre-K-8th. Date: June 10-August 5, 2013. Time: Full Day 9am-3pm, Half Day 911:30am and 12:30pm-3pm. Tuition: $140-$340 700 Exposition Park Drive Los Angeles, CA 90037 (213) 744-7444 summersciencecamp@cscmail.org www.californiasciencecenter.org/camp

HAPPY TRAILS FULL DAYS, ARTS, NATURE & SCIENCE, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Join in the summer fun as we play and explore THE 8 WONDERS OF CALIFORNIA with hands-on activities in our spacious play yards and cozy classrooms. There are many opportunities for discovery during our 9 week session. Each week will be filled with art, science, music and movement, dramatic play, literacy, math concepts and more! Weekly field trips such as to Summer Sounds at the Hollywood Bowl and weekly guest speakers like the traveling Cabrillo Marine Museum help connect the children’s learning experiences to the world around them. Our summer camp out and family picnic allow families to join in the fun, too! Ages: 2 months to Pre-K. Date: June 10 to August 8. Time: 7am-6pm. Tuition: $255-$300 per week for infants and toddler, $245 per week for preschoolers. Registration Deadline: ongoing until filled 791 E. Calaveras St., Altadena, CA 91001 (626) 797-6142 altaccc@aol.com www.accc-kids.org

INSTITUTE FOR GIRLS’ DEVELOPMENT FULL DAY, HALF DAY, ARTS, GIRLS ONLY Make friends! Be creative! Build skills! Get empowered! Have fun! • Mind, Body, Spirit, Friendship Adventures - grades 3-5; • Be R.E.A.L. friendship workshop - middle school girls. For teens and college women: • Push Back – Creating and maintaining your physical and verbal boundaries; • Mother and Daughter Self-Defense Class; • SoulCollage® Grade: 3rd grade through young adulthood. Date: June and July. Tuition: $80-$400 depending on the program. Registration Deadline: June 15 95 N. Marengo Ave, Suite 100, Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 585-8075 ext 108 shulan@InstituteForGirlsDevelopment.com www.InstituteForGirlsDevelopment.com

LAMA COLLEGE FOR MUSIC PROFESSIONAL SUMMER CAMP FULL DAY, ARTS Students write an original song, play in Ensemble Workshops, record, see instructors performing daily, and more. As with all programs at LAMA, our small, friendly environment and personal attention combined with daily playing/singing gives you the most focused style-specific musical training possible in one week. Sign up online at lama.edu! Ages: 9 –Adult. Date: June 22-26. Time: 9am–5pm Daily. Tuition: $995 (check out our facebook for a discount) Registration Deadline: June 7th, 2013 370 S. Fair Oaks Ave. Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 568-8850 info@lama.edu www.lama.edu

MAYFIELD JUNIOR SCHOOL SUMMER PROGRAM FULL DAY, HALF DAY, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Mayfield’s Summer Program offers an exciting array of camps and classes brimming with opportunities to learn, grow, and have fun. With over 100 classes and camps to choose from, Mayfield Junior School is a great place for your child to be challenged and engaged this summer. Ages: 3-14. Date: June 17-August 16. Time: Mon-Fri. 7:30am-6pm. Tuition: Session A classes: $210 Session B Classes: $225 Camps prices vary. Registration Deadline: June 8, 2013 405 South Euclid Avenue Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 229-2109 summer@mayfieldjs.or www.mayfieldjs.org/summer –continued on page 47 04.13 | ARROYO | 45


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PASADENA CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL’S BIG ADVENTURES FOR LITTLE EXPLORERS Full Day, Half Day, Arts, Nature & Science, Enrichment and Academics, Kindergarten Transition Program, Fun Themes, Water play, Gymnastics, Music Busy parents can trust our caring teachers to provide “Big Adventures” for their Little Explorers all summer long! Our theme-based camp features LOADS of water play, outdoor activities, games, crafts, Bible lessons, art, music, gymnastics, guest shows and much more! Also, our Kindergarten Transition Program is fantastic preparation for your rising kindergartener! Ages: 2-5yrs. Date: June 22-August 16, 2013. Time: Full Day 7:00am-6:00pm Half Day 8:30am-12:30pm. Registration Deadline: Ongoing enrollment based on availability 1485 N. Los Robles Ave; Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 791-1277 preschool@pasadenachristian.org www.pasadenachristian.org

PASADENA CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC SUMMER JAZZ WORKSHOP HALF DAY, ARTS, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS This two-week intensive course for students in 7th grade and up will develop foundations of jazz improvisation, theory, and history. Students will gain a comprehensive knowledge of jazz traditions; participate in daily master classes with professional musicians; learn to play pieces by masters; and perform in a public jazz concert. Grade: 7th grade and up. Date: Week one July 8-12, Week two July 15-19. Time: 3-7pm. Tuition: One week $275.00 both weeks $525.00. Registration Deadline: June 21 100 North Hill Avenue Pasadena (626) 683-3355 music@pasadenaconservatory.org pasadenaconservatory.org

PASSPORT TO ADVENTURE HALF DAY, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Our experienced and credentialed “tour guides” will lead an innovative and creative itinerary! In four weeks, our travelers will journey to three continents and beyond! We’ll virtually visit New York (6/24-6/28), Mars (7/1-7/3), Netherlands (7/8-7/12) and Zimbabwe (7/15-7/19). At each destination our tour guides will integrate differentiated instruction to develop math and reading proficiencies within the passengers’ weekly “travels.” Parents may choose two electives for their “traveler.” Math and reading will be offered at the fundamental and advanced levels. The traveler’s daily schedule will include math, reading plus two selected electives. Some of the available electives will be blogging, cooking, art, Spanish, drama, geography with an iPad, needlework (crocheting or knitting) and scrapbooking. Don’t wait, pack your bags and join us! Grade: Incoming 1st grade to Incoming 6th grade. Date: 6/24-7/19. Time: 9am-12pm. Tuition: 5 days week $125.00 or 3 days week $75.00. Registration Deadline: 6/12/2013. 1515 N. Los Robles Ave., Pasadena CA 91104 (626) 791-1214 sallen@pasadenachristian.org www.pasadenachristian.org

PCS SUMMER MUSIC ACADEMY ARTS Vision: “Praise God with Musical Instruments” All Students will receive private instruction, music theory, and group lesson from Dr. Chung, instrumental music director. Beginning violin, Intermediate violin, intermediate cello, beginning piano, and beginning guitar offered. Grade: 1st-8th grade. Date: July 9-July 31, 2013. Time: 7:55am-8:55am. Tuition: $75.00. Registration Deadline: June 7, 2013 1515 N. Los Robles Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 791-1214 gchung@pasadenachristian.org www.pasadenachristian.org

PROVIDENCE HIGH SCHOOL HUMANITIES CAMP HALF DAY, ARTS, NATURE & SCIENCE, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Humanities Camp combines science, math, literature and art into one fun-filled interdisciplinary learning activity. Centered around Space and Rocketry, students design, build and fly model rockets while exploring the literature of H.G. Wells; expressing their findings through art and writing. Math, measurement, CAD, painting, creative writing and model building are all elements of the curriculum. Grade: Rising 6th through 9th graders. Date: June 17-July 12. Time: M-F 8:00am-1:15pm. Tuition: $600.00. Registration Deadline: June 14 511 South Buena Vista Street, Burbank 91505 (818) 846-8141 ext 504 Reece.Talley@providencehigh.org www.providencehigh.org

ROLLING ROBOTS SUMMER CAMP FULL DAY, HALF DAY, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Our unique robot summer camps implement STEM concepts through the building of robots. Each camper takes home new skills that we hope will continue to motivate them long after they’ve left our store. We mask learning with fun with the goal that each child leaves with the kind of knowledge & passion that will inspire them, in whatever they do, for the rest of their lives. All registrants receive a t-shirt and a robot that their child builds on the last day. Age: 7-12 yrs. Date: June 24-August 19. Time: Mon-Fri 9am-12pm or 12pm-3pm (half day) 9am-3pm (full day). Tuition: Half day $250 Full day $450 757 Americana Way, Glendale, CA 91210 (818) 241-2308 alix@rollingrobots.com rollingrobots.com/summer-camp-2012 –continued on page 49 04.13 | ARROYO | 47


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SPARTAN ALLSTARS SPORTS DAY CAMP FULL DAY, HALF DAY, SPORTS 2nd annual Spartan Allstars is a coed summer camp located at La Canada High School. The staff consists of LCHS coaches, professionals, and college age counselors. Activities include: Soccer, basketball, volleyball, baseball, softball, football, track & field, wrestling, dance, martial arts, tennis, swimming, arts & crafts, and a Color War! Grade: K-8th grade. Date: June 17-28, July 8-19, July 29-Aug 2. Tuition: Half Day $300, Full Day $500, Registration Deadline: Until filled La Canada High School 4463 Oak Grove Drive La Canada 91011 (818) 445-8263 Spartan_allstars@hotmail.com spartanallstars.com

SUMMER CAMP FULL DAY, HALF DAY, ARTS, NATURE & SCIENCE, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS An ever popular summer program catering to ages 2-6. Loaded with fun activities like face painting, a visit by Mobile Marine Lab, pony rides, petting zoo, picnic in pajamas, tie & die, art & T-shirts, gardening, fruit smoothies, nature walks and much more. Ages: 2-6 yrs. Date: July 1st-August 30th. Time: 7am-6pm. Regular tuition rate plus $100 for materials (call for rates). Registration Deadline: Depending on availability 1739 Foothill Blvd La Canada, CA 91011 (818) 790-8844 montessorilacanada@yahoo.com www.flintridge-montessori.com

SUMMER FUNDAMENTALS HALF DAY, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Children learn best when all of their senses are engaged, so we use a multi-sensory teaching style that includes visual, auditory and kinesthetic approaches in our programs to maximize children’s acquisition and retention of skills. We offer three consecutive separate courses from 8am – 1pm, Monday through Friday that address decoding and spelling, comprehension and writing and executive functioning. Grade: 1st grade-6th grade. Date: July 8th-August 2nd. Time: 8am-1pm. Tuition: $3600. Registration Deadline: June 30, 2013 55 Auburn Avenue, Suite A, Sierra Madre, CA 91024 (626) 355-1729 justine@justineshermanslp.com www.justineshermanslp.com

SUMMER SCHOOL IN SOUTH PASADENA HALF DAY, ARTS, NATURE & SCIENCE, SPORTS, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS There are opportunities for everyone at South Pasadena’s popular K-12 Summer School. Classes include Robotics, Science, History, Languages, Writing, Sports, Art, Music, Dance, and Theater. Gain credits, advance in academics, while having fun! High School begins 6/20/2013. Elementary and Middle Schools begin 6/24/2013. Summer Camp daycare also available. Grade: K-12, Date: High School runs June 20 –July 24, 2013. Elementary and Middle Schools run June 24 –July 19, 2013. Time: 8:00am-2:25pm. Tuition: Classes from $140 (Resources and materials determine class fees), Registration begins April 29 for non-SPUSD and out of district students. South Pasadena Elementary, Middle and High Schools (626) 441- 5810 x1163 info@spef4kids.org www.spef4kids.org

THEATRE 360 PERFORMING ARTS THEATRE CAMP FULL DAY, HALF DAY, ARTS, NEW YORK CITY INTENSIVE Theatre 360’s unique program works with each student to inspire and educate helping them realize what it takes to be a part of the theatre. Our students spend the day singing, dancing, acting and rehearsing. Multiple sessions, a New York 2 week intensive July 27-August 10, plus year round programming. All levels are welcome. Ages: 3-19yrs. Date: June 10 to August 23, 2013. Time: 9am-3pm, aftercare available 3pm-6pm. Tuition: $265 to $775 per session. Registration Deadline: Open first come first serve 75 N. Marengo Ave. Pasadena CA 91101, (626) 577-5922 info@theatre360.org wwwtheatre360performingarts.com

TOTAL EDUCATION SOLUTIONS/DANNY’S FARM SUMMER ENRICHMENT EXPERIENCE FULL DAY, HALF DAY, ARTS, NATURE & SCIENCE, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS, SPECIAL NEEDS Ages: 5 to 22 years. Date: June through August.Time: 9am-5pm with early drop off and late pick up options available.Tuition: $600/week base (Regional center funding may be available) 5 & 6 Westmoreland Place, Pasadena, CA 91103 (213) 607-4432 dannysfarm@yahoo.com Find links at www.tesidea.com & www.dannysfarm.org

YOUNG MUSICIANS AT PASADENA CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC HALF DAY, ARTS, ENRICHMENT AND ACADEMICS Pasadena Conservatory of Music’s Young Musicians program encourages and nurtures each child’s musicality with age-specific classes that are creative and engaging. This eight-week program is a great introduction to PCM’s curriculum for infants and kids and a fun opportunity to explore group music-making. Classes include Folk Dance, Music Meets Drama, and Recorder Karate. Ages: Four months through 12 years. Date: June 24-August 12, 2013. Time: Varies. Tuition: $160. Registration Deadline: June 21, 2013 100 North Hill Avenue Pasadena, CA 91106 (626) 683-3355 music@pasadenaconservatory.org www.pasadenaconservatory.org ■

SUMMER GUIDE

There’s a lot to do in the San Gabriel Valley during the summer. That’s why Pasadena Weekly will focus on great things to do right here in your own Issue Date: May 9 backyard. Space Deadline: May 1 Call your sales rep today to reserve your space! 626.584.1500 04.13 | ARROYO | 49


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A Mental Disorder or Just Real Life for the Elderly? Aging specialists clash over new identifications of seniors’ mental disorders in the latest edition of the bible of psychiatry, known as the D.S.M.-5. BY KATHLEEN KELLEHER

THE FIFTH EDITION OF THE AMERICAN PSYCHIATRIC ASSOCIATION’S

DIAGNOSTIC AND STATISTICAL MANUAL OF MENTAL DISORDERS, A HANDBOOK OF PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSES, DEBUTS NEXT MONTH AMID A FIRESTORM OF CONTROVERSY. –continued on page 53

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To the eye, the D.S.M.-5’s most obvious change is the Arabic numerals that replace Roman ones. Mental disorders are renamed, removed or redefined; there are brand new disorders designated as such, and some new disorders that are duly noted but categorized as needing further study. Though most of us will never read the D.S.M.-5, many of us will be affected by it. Considered the bible of psychiatry, the manual can determine what disorders are covered by health insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, and influence the allocation of government resources and precious research dollars. Practically speaking, the manual is used by mental health professionals and primary care physicians to diagnose and treat patients — but it may also introduce its own set of problems. Two changes in the D.S.M.-5 could impact older people in significant ways. There is an expansion of cognitive disorders to include “mild neurocognitive disorder,” described by the APA as “changes that impact cognitive functioning.” The symptoms are described as going beyond normal signs of aging (e.g., misplacing your car keys and forgetting names). “Mild neurocognitive disorder” can be detected through objective testing and would typically be observed by the patient, or a close friend, spouse or colleague. Critics say the new categories of cognitive disorders will be misused among the vulnerable elderly population. “Forgetfulness in old age will be a ‘minor neurocognitive disorder,’ a label encompassing an enormous new patient population (only some of whom are at real risk of dementia) and incurring huge costs of unnecessary brain imaging when there is no effective treatment,” psychiatrist Allen Frances, professor emeritus at Duke University School of Medicine, writes in Bloomberg News. Frances, who was chairman of the task force that produced the D.S.M.-IV, has been a vocal critic of all things D.S.M.-5. But the APA contends that there is substantial clinical need to recognize people who need care for cognitive issues that go beyond normal aging. According to James Tyll, a spokesman for the APA, “Our hope is that by more accurately defining disorders, diagnosis and clinical care will be improved.” The idea is that early diagnosis of mild neurocognitive disorder will lead to early detection and treatment of cognitive decline before it progresses to major neurocognitive disorder, when it could be too late for treatment to arrest the decline. Identifying mild neurocognitive disorder early can make potential therapies like educational or brain stimulation more effective and may slow progression. And a diagnosis listed in the

D.S.M.-5 is also more likely to be covered by insurance. Still, some people with mild neurocognitive disorder or mild cognitive impairment never do develop more serious dementia, but there is no way to predict who will and won’t suffer that fate. Some geriatric specialists applaud the new disorder definition. “People with mild cognitive impairment should get treatment,” said Dr. Gary W. Small, director of the UCLA Longevity Center. “If I diagnose someone with mild cognitive impairment, if it is something more than normal aging, it helps me manage that patient better... Lots of evidence points to physical exercise, stress reduction, diet and memory techniques as a way to help compensate for memory decline,” said Small, co-author with wife GiGi Vorgan of The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program: Keep Your Brian Healthy for the Rest of Your Life (Workman Publishing; 2012). Other research indicates that patients given donepezil, a drug used to treat Alzheimer’s disease, slowed their rate of cognitive decline for the first year. But there was no difference after three years, Small said. Research in aging and dementia is focusing on identifying Alzheimer’s disease as early as possible, making the pre-dementia phase increasingly urgent. An even more controversial change to the D.S.M.-5 is the revised criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD). MDD no longer includes what is called the “bereavement exclusion.” The so-called “bereavement exclusion” in the D.S.M.-IV cautioned against diagnosing someone with MDD within two months following the death of a loved one, because grief and depression symptoms appear so similar. The D.S.M.-5 removes the bereavement exclusion from MDD, listing symptoms that, when persisting for a minimum two-week period, could trigger a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Exhibiting five or more on MDD’s list of symptoms — including feeling sad, crying, decreased appetite, insomnia, decreased interest in daily activities, fatigue, distraction and inability to function in daily life — meets the criteria for a diagnosis. Removing the bereavement exclusion is intended to prevent major depression from being overlooked in a grieving person, according to the APA’s Tyll. But the fear among geriatricians, social workers, bereavement counselors and other mental health practitioners is that this change will lead to overdiagnosis and overmedication for something that is per–continued on page 54 04.13 | ARROYO | 53


–continued from page 53

fectly natural and will get better with time and support from family and friends. “I do think we have to concern ourselves with creating a medicalizing of grief and then pharmacologically treating it,” said Dr. Eric Widera, a geriatrician at the University of California San Francisco, who wrote about the issue on GeriPals.org. “You know where most mental health disorders are treated? Primary care physicians. They rely on these DSM diagnoses and criteria and prescribe most of the antidepressants. Studies have never shown that treating grief after the loss of a loved one with medication has ever improved outcomes.” A minority of bereaved people (10 to 20 percent) experience what is called “complicated grief,” a detrimental life-disrupting variation that may call for treatment, says Widera. But people with complicated grief could still be diagnosed with MDD under the grief exclusion, Widera argues, just with a higher symptom threshold. The grief exclusion noted that a bereaved person should be diagnosed with MDD if they meet the five-symptom criteria of the disorder and demonstrate one or more of the following symptoms — an inability to function in daily life, suicidal thoughts, psychotic thinking, feelings of worthlessness or psychomotor retardation (marked slowing of thought and movement) — for more than two months. These guidelines were designed to ensure that the few people who develop truly depressive episodes after losing a loved one would not be overlooked by a clinician. “Uncomplicated grief may cause significant distress, but for the majority of bereaved, it is an adaptive and healthy reaction to the loss of a loved one,” Widera’s blog post reads. “Most bereaved individuals will adjust to a new life without their loved one, but this takes time — certainly longer than two weeks.” Adjusting and adapting to a new life following the death of a loved one is a painful, trying process for anyone, and it can be especially hard for older people. Rediscovering Hope, a bereavement support group, gathers weekly at the Pasadena Senior Center. Some participants are well along in the grief process, maybe even a year or two post-loss. But it is grief 54 | ARROYO | 04.13

that unites them. They come seeking the refuge, support and solace of others’ stories of loss, sadness and survival. “One of the things we do as clinicians that is so important is normalize the grief process,” said grief counselor Jody Casserly, L.C.S.W., who runs groups at the Pasadena Senior Center and at AIDS Project L.A. “I don’t want to be pathologizing something that is very normal — frequent crying, changes in sleep, eating and difficulty concentrating — after a major loss. The most beneficial aspect of support groups is people sharing their experiences with each other and feeling ‘I am not crazy’ or ‘I am not alone.’” Casserly, who is also in private practice, said that the D.S.M.-5 will surely increase what insurance and Medicare covers for bereaved people diagnosed with MDD, including the benefits of individual therapy, group therapy and psychopharmacological treatment. But she warns that the older people she sees in her bereavement groups would recoil at the idea of a diagnosis of a mental illness because the members have so normalized their experiences and feelings of loss. That would not stop Casserly, who is ever-watchful for the symptoms of potential major depression in those she counsels. She does not think she needs to consult the D.S.M.-5 on the matter, but she knows that primary care physicians will. The question is, will they know how to distinguish between clinical depression, which requires treatment, and uncomplicated grief, which is the normal response to the death of a loved one? What D.S.M.-5 critics and supporters agree on is that a great many people need a broad range of effective, pinpointed mental health support. What they cannot agree upon are the terms and language and whether a disorder deserves to be in the manual at all. It’s clear that the D.S.M.-5 will continue to be an embattled document. According to Tyll, the APA intends to use new technologies to incorporate timely, incremental updates to the manual based on “a preponderance of supportive research evidence.” That means that though many find the manual flawed, changes are ahead. ||||


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KITCHEN CONFESSIONS

Et tu, Gluten? Avoiding the latest bête noire of the bakery has some downsides you may not have considered. STORY AND PHOTO BY LESLIE BILDERBACK

THIS JUST IN — WHEAT IS KILLING US. WHAT WAS JUST ANOTHER ANNOYING TREND IN NUTRITIONISM IS

are likely gluten-based. (I always thought it was just excessive bean consumption.) Reports indicate that when some patients begin a gluten-free diet, they feel better almost immediately. As a result, doctors are now considering gluten avoidance as a remedy for

FAST JOINING CIGARETTES, SODA POP AND DRIVE-TIME TEXTING IN

several health problems, even without a diagnosis of celiac disease.

THE RANKS OF GLARE-WORTHY OFFENSES.

though, is harder to pin down. There is no real test, and no adequate definition. Is it a

Celiac disease is easily determined with a blood test and biopsy. Gluten sensitivity, case of celiac envy? How much of it is gluten, and how much of it is just our body

RECENT REPORTS FROM SEVERAL MEDIA OUTLETS, INCLUDING THE

NEW YORK TIMES, CNN AND THE HUFFINGTON POST, INDICATE AN INCREASE IN REPORTED CASES OF CELIAC DISEASE (AN AUTOIMMUNE

complaining about something else we put in it? (Our American bodies are hardly temples.) Or could there be something to the idea that gluten, which is in practically everything, is causing damage? As a result of recent findings, gluten-free products are flooding the market, as have, over the years, carb-free, oat-bran, sugar-free, fat-free and high-fiber products. They are

DISORDER OF THE SMALL INTESTINE), AS WELL AS THE NEWLY LEGIT-

trying, successfully, to draw us into the land of the gluten-free. But those of you toying with the idea of a gluten-free diet should do your homework: First, be aware that gluten,

IMIZED NON-CELIAC GLUTEN INTOLERANCE (NCGI). AS A RESULT, I HAVE DEVELOPED NON-CELIAC HYPOCHONDRIAC INTOLERANCE. I know people with serious celiac disease, and I have pooh-poohed anyone shun-

like high-fructose corn syrup and Ryan Seacrest, is everywhere. Check your condiments (for gluten, that is…not Ryan). And while you’re reading labels, check the gluten-free products. Most have extra fat and sweeteners to compensate for the lack of flavor (wheat tastes good), and additional non-gluten starches to simulate the structure nor-

ning wheat without a celiac calling card. Studies show that only 1 percent of Americans

mally provided by gluten. These other starches are much lower in fiber and nutrients

have celiac, according to the National Institutes of Health. But doctors now report up to

overall, which is problematic because fiber helps to stabilize blood sugar levels. Such

10 percent of us may have the related — and poorly understood — non-celiac gluten

loss of fiber often results in an increased pant size.

intolerance (also annoyingly referred to as “gluten sensitivity” — as if we are now con-

You might think that because I am a baker, this trend would be a setback. But peo-

cerned about the gluten’s feelings). Gluten intolerance is identified if patients’ health

ple are clamoring for cake, cookies, muffins and even pizza made without gluten —

improves when gluten is removed, and worsens when it is added. The state of “health” in

which we are providing. While the technology is improving (“technology” is code for

question is ill-defined and can manifest in several unpleasant conditions, including

my skill as a baker of gluten-free stuff), it all seems to be missing something. I under-

headaches, fatigue, acne and gastrointestinal issues. What they are describing is how I

stand that we have cravings. But I liken this to the Tofurkey vegans cook at Thanksgiv-

felt every Sunday morning in college. Was it gluten intolerance or too much beer pong?

ing. Why do you insist on replacing the thing you can’t have with a pale imitation?

In celiac disease, the culprit is gliadin, a protein in the endosperm of wheat, rye and

Gluten-free products are not that good. And gluten-free bread is the emperor’s new

barley. Bakers have long known about gliadin because it is one of the proteins that pro-

clothes of the bakery. Stop pretending that you are using bread to sandwich your

duce elasticity in our bread dough. Without it, bread dough wouldn’t rise, and your coun-

turkey breast. If it looks like cardboard and tastes like cardboard, it’s cardboard (or

try loaf would be an artisanal hockey puck. (See gluten-free bread.) Gliadin is comprised

gluten-free bread).

of a chain of several indigestible amino acids. No one can digest them, and a chosen

To throw a dinner party these days, you are expected to provide not only options for

few experience discomfort and illness. The intestines are gradually damaged, which pre-

the vegetarians (and vegans), guests with nut allergies, the religiously adherent and

vents the absorption of vitamins and minerals, which in turn results in deficiencies. The

now the gluten-sensitive. (Have you noticed lately that people spend way too much

onset of celiac disease can come at any age, and it is onsetting more and more, with

time telling others what they eat? I am pretty sure no one cares what I eat.) I was taught

diagnosed cases quadrupling over the past 50 years. Scientists speculate that the in-

that requesting food from my host is rude. I will enjoy whatever he creates for me and

crease is a result of the use of gluten in a huge number of processed foods (check your

eat as much or as little of it as I want to. In my day we ate whatever was served, then ex-

salad dressing bottle). As a baker, I’d like to think that it has nothing to do with the foodie-

cused ourselves to fart in the carport, like good Americans.

fueled trend of artisan breads, made with special high-gluten flours. After all, breads have

Why not learn to eat something else? There are fabulous grains that are naturally

been made this way since Hammurabi first thought about a code. That our species is just

gluten-free. Learn to cook with quinoa, brown rice, buckwheat, millet (a.k.a. bird seed),

now feeling its effects suggests the fault might rightly belong elsewhere — perhaps with

teff (used in Ethiopian injera bread), cornmeal and oats. Yes, it means you have to work

the mentality that brought us Hamburger Helper, TV dinners and SpaghettiOs.

a little harder to get your dinner. But it’s not as if you have to thresh the grain yourself. ||||

Gluten intolerance is actually a range of conditions, with celiac disease being the extreme case at the top of the spectrum, and your hippie food-trend–mongering neigh-

Leslie Bilderback, a certified master baker, chef and cookbook author, can be found in

bor at the other end. In between are a range of problems that appear to be gluten-

the kitchen of Heirloom Bakery in South Pasadena. She also teaches her techniques

related. Scientists now think that half the cases of irritable bowel syndrome in America

online at culinarymasterclass.com.

56 | ARROYO | 04.13


Quinoa Herb Salad Pronounced KEEN-wah, this tiny grain was first cultivated and cherished by the Incas and Aztecs. It is extremely high in protein and has a light, delicate, almost nutty flavor that pairs easily with all sorts of ingredients. When it cooks, the grain opens up slightly, producing a texture that is slightly crunchy, but not at all tough. METHOD 1. Bring water to a boil over high heat. Add quinoa, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 15 minutes, until tender. Drain and spread onto a baking sheet to cool and dry. 2. In a large bowl, mix together shallot, thyme, sage, lemon zest and juice, tarragon and oil. Add onion, tomato, cucumber and cooled quinoa. Stir thoroughly to coat, and chill at least 30 minutes. Toss in basil, parsley and almonds just before serving. VARIATIONS: Get creative! Add protein, like shrimp, grilled chicken or garbanzo beans, to this dish. Or put in more veggies, like roasted root vegetables, eggplant or artichoke hearts. Serve it warm, too, as a great side dish for roasted meats and fish.

PHOTO: James Fraloi

INGREDIENTS 4 cups water 1½ cups quinoa 1 large shallot, minced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme, minced 2 tablespoons fresh sage, minced 2 tablespoons fresh tarragon, minced Juice and zest of 1 lemon 3 tablespoons olive oil ½ small red onion 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved 1 cucumber, diced ¼ cup fresh basil leaves ¼ cup flat-leaf parsley leaves ½ cup sliced almonds

04.13 | ARROYO | 57


58 | ARROYO | 04.13


WINING & DINING

An Eye-Opening Whiskey Bar

The Blind Donkey 53 E. Union St., Pasadena (626) 792-1833 theblinddonkey.com Monday through Friday, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 2 a.m.

The Blind Donkey serves up familiar and esoteric brands from its menu of 60 craft whiskeys. BY BRADLEY TUCK

THE DAMP WIND CREPT UNDER MY COLLAR, AS INSTINCTIVELY I

Okay, I’m lying. The peat-laden air I’m actually inhaling emanates from the neck of a whiskey bottle at The Blind Donkey, a newish whiskey bar on Union Street, Old Pasadena,

HUNCHED OVER, THE BETTER TO KEEP WARM. I TURNED UP THE COL-

in the space that was once Dish Bistro. Dish was a lovely little spot, and its former patrons will note that the layout is pretty familiar. That’s because, as one of the bar’s four owners,

LAR OF MY WOOL COAT AND STARED ACROSS THE BAY SPREAD

John Bowers, tells me, he didn’t want to spend a fortune on the interior, opting instead to invest his budget in the products on the shelves. And what products they are. John is

OUT BEFORE ME, ITS GRAY WATERS LAPPING QUIETLY, LAZILY ONTO

guiding me on a sniffing tour of some of his favorites among the 60-odd bottles of the gold stuff from Ireland, Scotland and the Americas that line the back of the bar.

THE PEBBLED BEACH BENEATH MY FEET. THE DARK, HEAVY CLOUDS

Bowers’ partners are Brandon Bradford, Alen Aivazien and Ryan Sweeney, the man

PHOTO: Adam Torgerson

behind West Hollywood’s popular craft beer hangout, The Surly Goat. Bowers is a tall,

ABOVE NESTLED ATOP THE BOTTLE-GREEN HILLS AROUND THE BAY,

willowy chap, affable and self-deprecating. A former political publicist, it’s clear he’s at home behind the bar. He doesn’t just like whiskey. He loves whiskey. I ask him to show

BLURRING THE LINE BETWEEN LAND AND SKY AS I SUCKED IN THE

me a couple of his favorites, and it takes him no time at all to line up some very diverse spirits in beautifully designed bottles.

SOFT, PEAT-LADEN AIR.

–continued on page 60 04.13 | ARROYO | 59


WINING & DINING

Wine Weekending in Paso Robles

First up is Templeton Rye. I’m no whiskey expert, but I’ve heard of this one. A fact of which I was unaware, until Bowers enlightened me, is that Templeton was Al Capone’s favorite, and during Prohibition it was called “The Good Stuff.” Apparently, when Capone was shipped off to Alcatraz, a case was smuggled in for him. The brand, relaunched in 2006, is a popular rye, and I want to know about the esoteric stuff. Bowers points out that the menu is designed to allow patrons to try some of the more elusive and expensive drinks without having to sob into their wallets. Most bars pour a twoounce measure, and The Blind Donkey follows that standard, ranging in price from $8 to $59 for a 1975 Glenlivet Signatory. But its whiskeys are also available in a one-ounce shot, at a more approachable price of slightly more than half, so that it’s possible to explore the glories of some more unusual products. Take, for instance, FEW Rye Whiskey, hailing from Evanston, Illinois. Deriving its name, ironically, from a prominent member of the Temperance Movement, Frances Elizabeth Willard, it bears a very beautiful label one could easily imagine gracing the shelf of a speakeasy in the 1920s. A pop of the stopper reveals a lovely fruity aroma, with apple and pear notes. Then, quick as a flash, we’re on to the next, a whiskey described by Bowers as a “bit of a science experiment”: Brimstone, out of Waco, Texas, is a corn whiskey that is smoked in an effort to simulate a peated malt. The smoking is done over Texas sagebrush wood, and a whiff of the bottle reveals not just a mesquite campfire, but almost a desert post-thunderstorm smell. It’s a revelation. I could stay here all day and do this. Alas, two more sniffs, and it’s time to get going. The Blind Donkey has, in addition to an interesting cocktails list, a carefully curated selection of beer, as one might expect with Ryan Sweeney on board. There’s also a basic bar-food menu, including some triple-fried fries with ketchup ($5), and a dangerouslooking Cowboy Burger ($10), with bacon, cheddar and onion rings. Because let’s face it, you’re here for something other than food. But it would be dangerous to do all that exploring on an empty stomach. 60 | ARROYO | 04.13

||||

PRCC members at Windfall Farms

PHOTOS: Top: Adam Torgerson; Inset top: Chaz Roberts; Inset bottom: Linda Sanpei

–continued from page 59

We’re big fans of Paso Robles wines. As a region, it is producing some truly great cabernets and Bordeaux varietals and blends. What’s particularly great about it is that, for Southern Californians, it doesn’t involve the arduous trek that Napa does. With just a few hours of driving, you can be in the glorious Central Coast countryside with its oak-studded rolling hills, a patchwork vista clothed in grapevines. This month there’s a particularly good reason to go, as wine trade organization PRCC is holding its inaugural event,“Paso CABS of Distinction.” PRCC stands for Paso Robles Cabernet and Bordeaux Collective, and the event takes place the weekend of April 26 and 27.The aim is to showcase the quality and ageworthiness [description of a wine past its youth but not mature] of Paso’s Bordeaux blends and varietals, namely cabernets sauvignon and franc, merlot, petit verdot and malbec.The weekend includes winemaker dinners at key Paso restaurants, and a grand tasting afternoon with music performances and artisanal food purveyors at Windfall Farms on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Among the excellent wineries taking part are Justin Vineyards and Winery, Eberle Winery and HammerSky Vineyards and Inn. Paso has some very charming bed-and-breakfast accommodations, the recently refurbished Paso Robles Inn being a good choice for those who want to be in the middle of it all. HammerSky Inn offers a chance to stay at a very pretty vineyard property that’s over 100 years old. There are also a good number of VRBOs in the Paso area should you fancy gathering a group of friends for a fun weekend. Tickets to the event cost $95 and are available at pasoroblescab.com. — B.T.


04.13 | ARROYO | 61


THE LIST

A SELECTIVE PREVIEW OF UPCOMING EVENTS COMPILED BY JOHN SOLLENBERGER

THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO, 1980S-STYLE

ALL ABOUT AGING April 5 — The Pasadena Senior

April 12 — The Pacific

Center hosts the

Opera Project, known

2013 Conference on

for its innovative

Aging, offering practi-

takes on classic

cal information and

operas, presents a

wellness screenings to help seniors get

new production of

the most out of life. Dr. Eric Walsh of the

Mozart’s farce, The Marriage of Figaro. The

Pasadena Health Department will discuss

original 17th-century Spanish characters

“Secrets of Being a Healthy Senior.” Work-

are transported to the home of a Cuban

shops include information on a healthy

immigrant-turned-drug lord in Miami,

body and brain, financial and romantic

circa 1980. The production opens at 8

scams, finding the work you want after

p.m. today at Pasadena’s Porticos Art

age 50, disaster preparedness, Social Se-

Space and continues through the week-

curity and health care reform and ro-

end, with showtimes at 8 p.m. Saturday

mance after 50. The free event, at

and 4 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $30, $20

Pasadena’s First Church of the Nazarene

for students and seniors.

from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., includes lunch.

Porticos Art Space is located at 2033 E.

The First Church of the Nazarene is

Washington Blvd., Pasadena. Call (323)

located at 3700 E. Sierra Madre Blvd.,

739-6122 or visit pacificoperaproject.com.

Pasadena. RSVP by calling (877) 926-8300

PLAY EXPLORES MEGA-CHURCH’S MIXED BLESSINGS

or visiting aarp.cvent.com/2013pcoa.

THE BEAUX’ STRATAGEM OPENS AT A NOISE WITHIN

April 12 — The Sierra Madre Playhouse presents God’s Man

April 6 — A Noise Within stages

in Texas, the story of

Mission Play dance duet

George Farquhar’s

Houston’s Rock Bap-

comic classic The

Beaux’ Stratagem, opening at 8 p.m.

tist Church, whose

THE MISSION CONTINUES

congregation numbers in the thousands, with a host of commercial interests and ministries for everyone from singles to

and continuing through May 26. In this tale of an 18th-century buddy road trip,

April 5 — The San Gabriel Mission Playhouse revives The Mission Play through

overweight women. When the mega-

two penniless gentlemen travel the Eng-

April 7. Originally staged in 1912, John Steven McGroarty’s drama is a romanti-

church names a successor to its beloved

lish countryside in search of wealthy

cized recounting of Father Junipero Serra’s and other Spanish priests’ struggles

pastor, drama ensues. Showtimes through

women to seduce into marriage. The story

to establish early missions in California. The new production not only celebrates

May 18 are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays

was adapted by Thornton Wilder and Ken

the City of San Gabriel’s centennial but also adds a new chapter, from the per-

and 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets cost $25,

Ludwig. Julia Rodriguez-Elliott directs. Tick-

spectives of the original Tongva tribes and today’s San Gabriel citizens, in a

$22 for seniors 65 and older, $15 for youth

ets range from $40 to $52.

blend of history and fantasy. Showtimes are 8 p.m. today, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday

13 to 21 and $12 for children 12 and

A Noise Within is located at 3352 E. Foothill

and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets start at $25.

under.

Blvd., Pasadena. Call (626) 356-3100 or

The San Gabriel Mission Playhouse is located at 320 S. Mission Dr., San Gabriel.

The Sierra Madre Playhouse is located at

visit anoisewithin.org.

Visit missionplay.org.

87 W. Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre. Call (626) 355-4318 or visit sierramadreplay-

WALKING THE WALK FOR KIDS

house.org.

April 7 — The

The event starts at 7 a.m. with registration,

Mozart”, with Music Director and Conduc-

Pasadena Ronald

and the walk starts at 8 a.m.

tor Jeffrey Kahane conducting some

McDonald House

Exposition Park is located at 700 Exposition

works from the keyboard and taking the

April 13 —

hosts its annual Walk

Park Dr., Los Angeles. Call (626) 204-0400 or

podium for others. The concert starts at

Pasadena’s Cancer

for Kids in Exposition

visit walkforkids.org/pasadena to register.

8 p.m. at Glendale’s Alex Theatre, repeat-

Support Community

ing at 7 p.m. April 21 at UCLA’s Royce Hall.

chapter presents its 21st annual Angel

$120,000 for the home-away-from-home

CONVERSATION AND CONCERTOS IN GLENDALE

Tickets cost $25 to $110.

for families whose critically ill children are

April 20 — The Los Angeles Chamber Or-

Brand Blvd., Glendale. Call (213) 622-7001

being treated at nearby medical facilities.

chestra presents “Concertos: Handel and

or visit laco.org.

competitive 5K pledge event to raise

62 | ARROYO | 04.13

The Alex Theatre is located at 216 N.

Gala at 5:30 p.m. at Noor. This year’s event, dubbed “Studio 54,” –continued on page 64

PHOTO: Picasa (Mission Play dance duet)

Park. This is a non-

ANGELS DISCO TO THE RESCUE


04.13 | ARROYO | 63


THE LIST

Debra Prinzing

FLORAL FOCUS AT DESCANSO’S EARTH DAY April 20 — Descanso Gardens celebrates the good Earth at Descanso Gardens from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. with nature activities for children and samples of locally grown organic food for sale at Patina’s farmstand. Garden writer Debra Prinzing, author of

The 50 Mile Bouquet and Slow Flowers, conducts a floral design workshop at 10:30 a.m.The rock ensemble Mobile Homeboys performs from noon to 2 p.m. Prinzing returns for a lecture on creating bouquets with local flora at 1:30 p.m. All events are free with paid admission except for Prinzing’s 10:30 a.m. workshop, which costs $75 (includes supplies, lunch and a signed copy of Slow Flowers).

Descanso Gardens is located at 1418 Descanso Dr., La Cañada Flintridge. Call (818) 949-4200 or visit descansogardens.org.

features a reception, dinner, silent and live

produced clothing at Longfellow-Hastings

auctions and live dance music by the

Octagon House. Vintage clothing will also

disco and funk band The Funky Hippeez.

be on display at the Perry Mansion. Tickets

Tickets cost $225 per person. The organi-

cost $30, $22.50 for museum members,

zation provides free support and informa-

$15 for nonmember children 6 to 10 and

tion to cancer patients, caregivers and

$7.50 for member children; admission is

those who have lost a loved one to the

free for children under 6. Call (323) 225-

disease.

2700, ext. 223, for tickets.

Noor is located in the Paseo Colorado,

April 27 — “Soirées Mystique — An

280 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Call

Evening of Victorian Enchantment” fea-

(626) 796-1083 or visit cscpasadena.org.

tures Ian Élan as a 19th-century conjurer and clairvoyant, performing magic tricks,

HISTORY REVISITED AT HERITAGE SQUARE

much as wealthy patrons of the era hired

April 13 — Learn how clothing reflected

Audience members may participate in a

social status in a Victorian vintage fashion

séance authentic to the period. Perform-

show and tea, starting at 11 a.m. Both

ances are scheduled at 6 and 8 p.m. Tick-

men and women will model historically re64 | ARROYO | 04.13

performers to entertain at their homes.

–continued on page 66

PHOTO: Mary Grace Long photography (Debra Prinzing)

–continued from page 62


04.13 | ARROYO | 65


THE LIST

–continued from page 64 ets cost $60 for adults and children, $55 for

“Speaking Of” series explores the legacy

members. Visit victorianmagick.tick-

of local jazz treasure Bobby Bradford, a

etleap.com/perry-mansion for tickets.

trumpeter, bandleader, composer, educa-

Heritage Square Museum is located at

tor and Altadena resident. After growing

3800 Homer St., Los Angeles. Call (323)

up in the Mississippi Delta in the 1930s, he

225-2700 or visit heritagesquare.org.

settled in L.A. in 1964 and began to make his mark here as a major trumpet player,

EVANGELINE REMIXED RECALLS '60S STRAINS

borrowing from such early masters as Louis Armstrong and Charlie Parker. In the

April 17 — Evange-

1960s and ’70s, he became known for his

line REMIXED is

modern, post-bebop avant-garde sound

About Productions’

and performed with Ornette Coleman,

touring version of

Eric Dophy and John Carter. More

the show Evangeline,

recently, Bradford has headed up his

the Queen of Make-

ensemble, The Mo’tet. He has taught jazz

Believe, written by Louie Pérez of Los

history and improvisation for more than

Lobos and About's artistic director,

30 years at Pasadena City College and

Theresa Chavez, and Rose Portillo, who

Pomona College. The discussion starts at

also co-direct the production, staged at

2 p.m. at the library’s Allendale Branch.

7:30 p.m. at Pasadena’s First Congrega-

Admission is free and open to the public.

tional Church. It portrays a journey of

The Pasadena Public Library’s Allendale

self-discovery by a devoted East L.A.

Branch is located at 1130 S. Marengo

daughter by day and a Hollywood go-

Ave., Pasadena. Call (626) 744-7260 or

go dancer by night, set in 1968. Her

visit pasadenapubliclibrary.net.

traditional roots collide with the 1960s political scene in the midst of the East L.A student walkouts and fight for equal

GLORIOUS GARDENS TOUR HELPS HOSPITAL

education and civil rights. Pérez and Los

April 28 — Tour five

Lobos bandmate David Hidalgo perform

private gardens as

some of their Grammy Award--winning

the Spiritual Care

music. Tickets cost $10 and $15.

Guild of Children’s

First Congregational Church of Pasadena

Hospital of Los Ange-

is located at 464 E. Walnut St., Pasadena.

les presents the “Glo-

Visit aboutpd.org.

rious Gardens Tour” in the greater San Marino area. The gardens are open from

AUTISM SPEAKS WITH ITS FEET

10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with lunch served from

April 20 — Autism

11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., a gardener’s mar-

Speaks, America’s

ketplace from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and a

largest autism advo-

beer garden from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at

cacy organization,

a private estate's host garden. The Spiri-

hosts “Walk Now for

tual Care Guild raises funds for interfaith

Autism Speaks,” a

spiritual care services at Children's Hos-

fundraiser for research and America’s

pital 24 hours a day, seven days a week,

largest grassroots autism walk. Held at

aiding some 300,000 families whose chil-

the Rose Bowl Stadium, the event starts

dren are treated at the hospital. The tour

with 8 a.m. registration, followed by en-

honors its chaplain, Father John Sigler.

tertainment, stage programs and the

Single tour and luncheon passes cost

walk at 9 a.m. Walk starts continue on a

$100; sponsorship opportunities are

rolling basis every 10 minutes through

available for $250 to $10,000. Online sale

10:30 a.m.

of passes ends at midnight, April 24. A

Rose Bowl Stadium is located at 1001

limited number of passes are available

Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena. Visit walknow-

at the host garden the day of the event

forautismspeaks.org

for $140. Locations will be emailed to

SPEAKING OF: JAZZ

Visit scggloriousgardenstour2013.

April 27 — The Pasadena Public Library’s

eventbrite.com. ||||

ticketholders the week of the event.

66 | ARROYO | 04.13



Arroyo Monthly April 2013